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Sample records for cross flow filter

  1. Mechanical analysis of a cross flow filter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Attaar, M.H.; McNerney, K.R.

    1992-12-01

    Material properties have also been generated at the Argonne National Laboratories which detail the fracture toughness, Weibull modulus, and critical flaw size for a specifically fabricated lot of P-100A alumina/mullite cross flow filters.(Singh, 1990) The critical flaw size within the P-100A matrix was estimated to be {approximately}500 {mu},m which includes both large interconnected pores, as well as potentially debonded areas along the mid-rib or gas channel seams. Critical flaws are generally considered as potential failure initiation sites within the ceramic matrix. In addition maximum filter element stress levels induced by the process system have been estimated at ANL through the use of finite element computer analyses. These efforts project that the highest stresses result within the flange region of the cross flow filter. As a result of these projections, efforts at Coors Ceramics were directed to improving the overall strength of the alumina/mullite material which is used for cross flow filter fabrication. The results of the efforts at Coors Ceramics provide a significant improvement in the hot strength of the P-100A alumina/mullite filter matrix. Westinghouse assessed the existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques in terms of identifying methods for detecting critical flaws within the cross flow filter body. To date viable, cost effective methods for detecting critical flaws within the P-100A alumina/mullite matrix, or along the mid-rib bonds or gas channel seams in the full-scale, porous ceramic cross flow filter element are not readily available. As an alternate approach, Westinghouse focused its attention on developing NDE techniques as inspection methods for evaluating the extent of bonding along the mid-rib bonds and gas channel seams which results during the various fabrication stages of the cross flow filter element.

  2. Mechanical analysis of a cross flow filter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Attaar, M.H.; McNerney, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Material properties have also been generated at the Argonne National Laboratories which detail the fracture toughness, Weibull modulus, and critical flaw size for a specifically fabricated lot of P-100A alumina/mullite cross flow filters.(Singh, 1990) The critical flaw size within the P-100A matrix was estimated to be [approximately]500 [mu],m which includes both large interconnected pores, as well as potentially debonded areas along the mid-rib or gas channel seams. Critical flaws are generally considered as potential failure initiation sites within the ceramic matrix. In addition maximum filter element stress levels induced by the process system have been estimated at ANL through the use of finite element computer analyses. These efforts project that the highest stresses result within the flange region of the cross flow filter. As a result of these projections, efforts at Coors Ceramics were directed to improving the overall strength of the alumina/mullite material which is used for cross flow filter fabrication. The results of the efforts at Coors Ceramics provide a significant improvement in the hot strength of the P-100A alumina/mullite filter matrix. Westinghouse assessed the existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques in terms of identifying methods for detecting critical flaws within the cross flow filter body. To date viable, cost effective methods for detecting critical flaws within the P-100A alumina/mullite matrix, or along the mid-rib bonds or gas channel seams in the full-scale, porous ceramic cross flow filter element are not readily available. As an alternate approach, Westinghouse focused its attention on developing NDE techniques as inspection methods for evaluating the extent of bonding along the mid-rib bonds and gas channel seams which results during the various fabrication stages of the cross flow filter element.

  3. Hot gas cross flow filtering module

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, Thomas E.; Ciliberti, David F.

    1988-01-01

    A filter module for use in filtering particulates from a high temperature gas has a central gas duct and at least one horizontally extending support mount affixed to the duct. The support mount supports a filter element thereon and has a chamber therein, which communicates with an inner space of the duct through an opening in the wall of the duct, and which communicates with the clean gas face of the filter element. The filter element is secured to the support mount over an opening in the top wall of the support mount, with releasable securement provided to enable replacement of the filter element when desired. Ceramic springs may be used in connection with the filter module either to secure a filter element to a support mount or to prevent delamination of the filter element during blowback.

  4. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, D.A.; Bacchi, D.P.; Connors, T.F.; Collins, E.L. III

    1998-02-10

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by a novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken. 2 figs.

  5. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  6. Development of a monolithic ceramic cross flow filter

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    High-temperature, high-pressure particulate control is required to protect turbine equipment and to meet environmental stack emissions standards in coal-fueled power systems. Ceramic cross flow filters have high surface area per unit volume for removing particulates from these hot gas streams. A one-piece monolithic ceramic cross flow filter is needed. Mullite bonded, porous, permeable alumina ceramics were made on a lab scale with the Blasch injection forming process. Permeability and other initial targeted property requirements were achieved: >200 cd (<1 iwg/fpm), room temperature modulus of rupture >1000 psi, particle size 100/200 mesh, pore size 20 microns. It is concluded that it is feasible to use the proprietary Blasch process to form cross flow filters.

  7. Cross flow filter for AEPSC: TIDD slipstream HGCU project preliminary design package for Westinghouse cross flow filter system. Final submittal

    SciTech Connect

    Haldipur, G.B.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-06-16

    The Westinghouse ceramic cross-flow filter element is constructed of multiple layers of thin, porous ceramic plates that contain ribs to form gas flow channels. Consecutive layers of the ceramic plates are oriented such that the channels of alternating plates are at an angle of 90 degrees (``cross flow``) to each other. The current size of a ceramic cross flow filter element is 12 in. {times} 12 in. {times} 14 in. Both sides of the short channels (4 in.) are exposed to the particle-laden coal gas. One end of the long (12 in.) channels is sealed while the other end of the long channel is mounted to the clean gas plenum. The particle-laden coal gas flows through the ``roof and floor`` of the porous ceramic plates that comprise the short, ``dirty side`` channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, ``clean side`` channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, ``clean side`` channels and finally to the clean gas plenum. The dust cake on the ``dirty side`` channels is periodically removed by applying a high-pressure reverse pulse of dry, clean gas through the clean gas plenum. For the TIDD plant filter slipstream, air will be utilized for filter cleaning.

  8. Cross flow filter for AEPSC: TIDD slipstream HGCU project preliminary design package for Westinghouse cross flow filter system

    SciTech Connect

    Haldipur, G.B.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-06-16

    The Westinghouse ceramic cross-flow filter element is constructed of multiple layers of thin, porous ceramic plates that contain ribs to form gas flow channels. Consecutive layers of the ceramic plates are oriented such that the channels of alternating plates are at an angle of 90 degrees ( cross flow'') to each other. The current size of a ceramic cross flow filter element is 12 in. {times} 12 in. {times} 14 in. Both sides of the short channels (4 in.) are exposed to the particle-laden coal gas. One end of the long (12 in.) channels is sealed while the other end of the long channel is mounted to the clean gas plenum. The particle-laden coal gas flows through the roof and floor'' of the porous ceramic plates that comprise the short, dirty side'' channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, clean side'' channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, clean side'' channels and finally to the clean gas plenum. The dust cake on the dirty side'' channels is periodically removed by applying a high-pressure reverse pulse of dry, clean gas through the clean gas plenum. For the TIDD plant filter slipstream, air will be utilized for filter cleaning.

  9. Thermal/chemical stability of ceramic cross flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Bahovchin, D.M.; Lippert, T.E.; Tressler, R.E.; McNerney, K.B.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse has undertaken a two phase program to determine possible long-term, high temperature influence that advanced coal-based power system environments may have on the stability of the ceramic cross flow filter elements. During the past year, we have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. The alumina/mullite cross flow liter material that has consistently been used throughout the flow-through gas phase alkali testing segment of this program, consists of mullite rods or needles that are embedded within an amorphous phase which contains corundum (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and anorthite (CaAl[sub 2]Si[sub 2]O[sub 8]). Due to the rapid cooling rate that was used to produce the alumina/mullite filter disc material from high fire, the matrix consists of 59.6 wt% mullite, 30.5 wt% amorphous, 5.1 wt% anorthite, and 4.8 wt% alumina. The relatively low, as-fabricated, hot strength of this material (841[plus minus]259 psi at 870[degrees]C) is a direct result of the high amorphous content which softens at temperatures of 870[degrees]C. Load versus deflection curves as a function of temperature indicate that this material is relatively brittle up to temperatures of 600[degrees]C. Both a loss of strength, as well as plastic deformation of the matrix occurs at [approximately]700[degrees]C. If cross flow filters are manufactured from an alumina/mullite matrix that contains an [approximately]30.5 wt% amorphous content, we suspect that the plastic nature of the glass phase could potentially serve as a substrate for fines collection during initial filter operation at 700[degrees]C. Similarly the plastic nature could potentially cause deformation of the liter under load.

  10. Thermal/chemical stability of ceramic cross flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Bahovchin, D.M.; Lippert, T.E.; Tressler, R.E.; McNerney, K.B.

    1992-11-01

    Westinghouse has undertaken a two phase program to determine possible long-term, high temperature influence that advanced coal-based power system environments may have on the stability of the ceramic cross flow filter elements. During the past year, we have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. The alumina/mullite cross flow liter material that has consistently been used throughout the flow-through gas phase alkali testing segment of this program, consists of mullite rods or needles that are embedded within an amorphous phase which contains corundum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}). Due to the rapid cooling rate that was used to produce the alumina/mullite filter disc material from high fire, the matrix consists of 59.6 wt% mullite, 30.5 wt% amorphous, 5.1 wt% anorthite, and 4.8 wt% alumina. The relatively low, as-fabricated, hot strength of this material (841{plus_minus}259 psi at 870{degrees}C) is a direct result of the high amorphous content which softens at temperatures of 870{degrees}C. Load versus deflection curves as a function of temperature indicate that this material is relatively brittle up to temperatures of 600{degrees}C. Both a loss of strength, as well as plastic deformation of the matrix occurs at {approximately}700{degrees}C. If cross flow filters are manufactured from an alumina/mullite matrix that contains an {approximately}30.5 wt% amorphous content, we suspect that the plastic nature of the glass phase could potentially serve as a substrate for fines collection during initial filter operation at 700{degrees}C. Similarly the plastic nature could potentially cause deformation of the liter under load.

  11. Design and Initial Development of Monolithic Cross-Flow Ceramic Hot-Gas Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Barra, C.; Limaye, S.; Stinton, D.P.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1999-06-06

    Advanced, coal-fueled, power generation systems utilizing pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies are currently being developed for high-efficiency, low emissions, and low-cost power generation. In spite of the advantages of these promising technologies, the severe operating environment often leads to material degradation and loss of performance in the barrier filters used for particle entrapment. To address this problem, LoTEC Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are jointly designing and developing a monolithic cross-flow ceramic hot-gas filter. The filter concept involves a truly monolithic cross-flow design that is resistant to delamination, can be easily fabricated, and offers flexibility of geometry and material make-up. During Phase I of the program, a thermo-mechanical analysis was performed to determine how a cross-flow filter would respond both thermally and mechanically to a series of thermal and mechanical loads. The cross-flow filter mold was designed accordingly, and the materials selection was narrowed down to Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} (CS-50) and 2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3SiO{sub 2} (mullite). A fabrication process was developed using gelcasting technology and monolithic cross-flow filters were fabricated. The program focuses on obtaining optimum filter permeability and testing the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials.

  12. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K. , Inc., Cambridge, MA ); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. )

    1991-08-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  14. Enhancement of microfluidic particle separation using cross-flow filters with hydrodynamic focusing

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yun-Yen; Huang, Chen-Kang

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic chip is proposed to separate microparticles using cross-flow filtration enhanced with hydrodynamic focusing. By exploiting a buffer flow from the side, the microparticles in the sample flow are pushed on one side of the microchannels, lining up to pass through the filters. Meanwhile a larger pressure gradient in the filters is obtained to enhance separation efficiency. Compared with the traditional cross-flow filtration, our proposed mechanism has the buffer flow to create a moving virtual boundary for the sample flow to actively push all the particles to reach the filters for separation. It further allows higher flow rates. The device only requires soft lithograph fabrication to create microchannels and a novel pressurized bonding technique to make high-aspect-ratio filtration structures. A mixture of polystyrene microparticles with 2.7 μm and 10.6 μm diameters are successfully separated. 96.2 ± 2.8% of the large particle are recovered with a purity of 97.9 ± 0.5%, while 97.5 ± 0.4% of the small particle are depleted with a purity of 99.2 ± 0.4% at a sample throughput of 10 μl/min. The experiment is also conducted to show the feasibility of this mechanism to separate biological cells with the sample solutions of spiked PC3 cells in whole blood. By virtue of its high separation efficiency, our device offers a label-free separation technique and potential integration with other components, thereby serving as a promising tool for continuous cell filtration and analysis applications. PMID:26858812

  15. Enhancement of microfluidic particle separation using cross-flow filters with hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yun-Yen; Huang, Chen-Kang; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic chip is proposed to separate microparticles using cross-flow filtration enhanced with hydrodynamic focusing. By exploiting a buffer flow from the side, the microparticles in the sample flow are pushed on one side of the microchannels, lining up to pass through the filters. Meanwhile a larger pressure gradient in the filters is obtained to enhance separation efficiency. Compared with the traditional cross-flow filtration, our proposed mechanism has the buffer flow to create a moving virtual boundary for the sample flow to actively push all the particles to reach the filters for separation. It further allows higher flow rates. The device only requires soft lithograph fabrication to create microchannels and a novel pressurized bonding technique to make high-aspect-ratio filtration structures. A mixture of polystyrene microparticles with 2.7 μm and 10.6 μm diameters are successfully separated. 96.2 ± 2.8% of the large particle are recovered with a purity of 97.9 ± 0.5%, while 97.5 ± 0.4% of the small particle are depleted with a purity of 99.2 ± 0.4% at a sample throughput of 10 μl/min. The experiment is also conducted to show the feasibility of this mechanism to separate biological cells with the sample solutions of spiked PC3 cells in whole blood. By virtue of its high separation efficiency, our device offers a label-free separation technique and potential integration with other components, thereby serving as a promising tool for continuous cell filtration and analysis applications.

  16. Cross-flow, filter-sorbet catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: A cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  17. Long-term durability testing of ceramic cross-flow filter. Final report, September 29, 1987--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Long term durability testing of the cross flow filter is described. Two high temperature, high pressure test facilities were built and operated. The facilities were designed to simulate dirty gas environments typical of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification. Details of the design and operation of the test facilities and filter testing results are described.

  18. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This synopsis describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  19. Chemical cleaning of porous stainless steel cross-flow filter elements for nuclear waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-05-10

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) currently under construction for treatment of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site will rely on cross-flow ultrafiltration to provide solids-liquid separation as a core part of the treatment process. To optimize process throughput, periodic chemical cleaning of the porous stainless steel filter elements has been incorporated into the design of the plant. It is currently specified that chemical cleaning with nitric acid will occur after significant irreversible membrane fouling is observed. Irreversible fouling is defined as fouling that cannot be removed by backpulsing the filter. PNNL has investigated chemical cleaning processes as part of integrated tests with HLW simulants and with actual Hanford tank wastes. To quantify the effectiveness of chemical cleaning, the residual membrane resistance after cleaning was compared against the initial membrane resistance for each test in a series of long-term fouling tests. The impact of the small amount of residual resistance in these tests could not be separated from other parameters and the historical benchmark of >1 GPM/ft2 for clean water flux was determined to be an adequate metric for chemical cleaning. Using the results from these tests, a process optimization strategy is presented suggesting that for the simulant material under test, the value of chemical cleaning may be suspect. The period of enhanced filtration may not be enough to offset the down time required for chemical cleaning, without respect to the other associated costs.

  20. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. Sixth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  1. Subpilot scale gasifier evaluation of ceramic cross flow filter. Final report, February 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Meyer, J.H.

    1993-08-01

    The operating characteristics, performance and durability of a hot gas cross flow filter system were evaluated at the Texaco 15 tpd, entrained-bed gasifier pilot plant facility that is located at their Montebello Research Facilities (MRL) in California. A candle filter unit was also tested for comparative purposes. A wide range of operating test conditions were experienced. This report summarizes the results of eleven different test runs that occurred from April 1989 through August 1992. Differences between filter operation on the entrained gasifier and prior experience on fluid bed combustion are discussed.

  2. Hot gas cleanup using ceramic cross flow membrane filters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Keairns, D.L.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1983-12-01

    The single unresolved technical issue in the commercialization of pressurized fluid-bed combustion (PPBC) for electric power production is the hot gas cleaning problem. In this technology, high-temperature and -pressure (HTHP), dust-laden flue gases from the combustor must be cleaned enough to reduce expansion turbine blade erosion to an economically acceptable level. Additionally, the level of particulate emission must be compatible with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for environmental acceptability. The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a wide range of research and development programs directed at the solution of this problem. These programs were divided into two classifications, one dealing with more advanced concepts where testing was to be done at relatively large scale and a second group of less advanced, novel concepts where the testing was to be carried out at a bench scale. The cross-flow ceramic membrane filter program described in this report is a member of the small-scale, novel concept group.

  3. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Meyer, J.H.; Vidt, E.J.

    1989-09-01

    The ceramic cross-flow filter (CXF) system is a promising method to be used in advanced coal based power systems for high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) particle removal. Using a subpilot scale pressurized fluid-bed combustor (PFBC) at Argonne National Laboratory and various PFBC simulators, prior projects have indicated that CXF systems can be used in oxidizing environments at PFBC conditions. To extend the use of CXF systems, this project completed an economic analysis comparing the cost of various oxygen and air blown gasification systems with the CXF system incorporated, initiated the scaleup of the CXF element from development to commercial size, predicted the characteristics of gasifier dust cake, evaluated cleaning pulse characteristics in a large multielement simulation, upgraded pulse cleaning mathematical model, and completed additional testing of the CXF elements under gasification (reducing) and PFBC conditions. Coors Ceramic Company and GTE Products Corporation were integrally involved in this program through the development and fabrication of the CXF elements. 39 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  5. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K. , Inc., Cambridge, MA ); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. )

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work performed on a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particle filter, an SO {sub 2} sorbent, and a NO {sub x} reduction catalyst. One critical element of the R D program is the development of mixed metal oxide materials that serve as combined SO {sub 2} sorbents and NO {sub x} reduction catalysts. In this seventh quarterly progress report, we summarize the performance characteristics of three promising sorbent/catalyst materials tested in powder form.

  6. [Performance of cross flow trickling filter for H2S gas treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Li, Jian; Liu, Jia; Peng, Shu-Jing; Li, Chao; Chen, Ying; He, Hong

    2012-09-01

    A grading cross bio-trickling filter was designed for H2S removal. Mixed microorganisms domesticated from the former experiment were immobilized to start up the trickling filter. Removal performances during starting up period and different loadings were investigated. Results showed that the immobilization of the trickling filter was completed within 3 d. The removal efficiency was higher than 99% when the inlet concentration was in the range of 110 mg x m(-3) to 230 mg x m(-3) (EBRT 30 s). At low inlet loadings, the front part of the trickling filter played a major role in H2S degradation, accounting for about 85%. Microbial diversity and population of the front part were superior to the tail one. At higher loadings, microbial diversity and population of the tail part increased significantly, from 4.5 x 10(7) cells x g (-1) to 5.17 x 10(8) cells x g(-1), and the elimination capacity was also improved,from 0.04 g x h(-1) to 0.67 g x h(-1). Rod-shaped bacteria were the dominant microorganisms on the surface of ceramics in the steady state as observed by SEM. The surfaces of ceramics were covered by a lot of microbial metabolites at high loadings. Analysis of the metabolites indicated that the majority of H2S was oxidized to sulfur and only a small portion was converted to sulfate.

  7. Cross-flow, filter-sorbet catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: A cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  8. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. First quarterly technical progress report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This synopsis describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  9. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The objective of this program is to successfully carry out the experiment and design tasks described herein that will lead to the development a single-unit, cross flow filter-sorbent-catalyst. In the first stage of work we will investigate the SO{sub 2} removal and NO{sub x} reduction characteristics of different sorbent-catalyst compositions (in granular form), and we will conduct exploratory tests of cross-flow filters under conditions similar to those found in the combustion gases of small-scale combustors. In the second stage of the program, we will investigate the pollutant control characteristics of prototype filter-catalyst devices. The SO{sub 2} removal and NO{sub x} reduction efficiency of a unit-element' prototype will be investigated. This unit element' will be a slot reactor comprised of two flat porous walls, or slabs' of filter-sorbent-catalyst material separated by a 0.5 centimeter gap. The particulate collection efficiency and back-flushing requirements of a multi-element version of this device will be tested. A sorbent regeneration scheme will also be investigated. The sorbents under evaluation are: CuO, CeO{sub 2}, CuO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO-CeO{sub 2}, and CuO-CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Progress is described. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The device described in this report will simultaneously remove particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the combustion gases of coal combustors. The device is configured as a cross-flow filter. The gas flows from the inlet passages to orthogonally oriented discharge channels via thin, multilayered porous walls. Flue gas enters from both the front and back of the device. With the left wall of the filter sealed, gas discharges from the right side of the device. The key to combined physical (fly ash) and chemical (SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}) cleaning is to utilize chemical active sorbent-catalysts (e.g., metal oxides) in the layered walls of the filter. This quarter, the NO{sub x} reduction activity of three sorbent-catalyst materials was tested over a temperature range from 200 to 500{degree}C. We were primarily interested in the sorbent-catalyst NO{sub x} reduction performance at 400{degree}C because this appears to be a minimum temperature for acceptable sulfur capture with these sorbents. the tradeoff between sulfur capture and NO{sub x} reduction performance for these sorbent-catalysts is clear: sulfation improves with higher temperatures (e.g., 400--600{degree}C) while NO{sub x} reduction improves at lower temperatures (e.g., 200--300{degree}C). Sorbent-catalyst materials included: Cu-7Al-O; Cu-Ce-O; and CeO{sub 2}. 7 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. High flow ceramic pot filters.

    PubMed

    van Halem, D; van der Laan, H; Soppe, A I A; Heijman, S G J

    2017-07-20

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6-19 L h(-1)), but initial LRVs for E. coli of high flow filters was slightly lower than for regular ceramic pot filters. This disadvantage was, however, only temporarily as the clogging in high flow filters had a positive effect on the LRV for E. coli (from below 1 to 2-3 after clogging). Therefore, it can be carefully concluded that regular ceramic pot filters perform better initially, but after clogging, the high flow filters have a higher flow rate as well as a higher LRV for E. coli. To improve the initial performance of new high flow filters, it is recommended to further utilize residence time of the water in the receptacle, since additional E. coli inactivation was observed during overnight storage. Although a relationship was observed between flow rate and LRV of MS2 bacteriophages, both regular and high flow filters were unable to reach over 2 LRV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Particle flow superpositional GLMB filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucan, Augustin-Alexandru; Li, Yunpeng; Coates, Mark

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we propose a Superpositional Marginalized δ-GLMB (SMδ-GLMB) filter for multi-target tracking and we provide bootstrap and particle flow particle filter implementations. Particle filter implementations of the marginalized δ-GLMB filter are computationally demanding. As a first contribution we show that for the specific case of superpositional observation models, a reduced complexity update step can be achieved by employing a superpositional change of variables. The resulting SMδ-GLMB filter can be readily implemented using the unscented Kalman filter or particle filtering methods. As a second contribution, we employ particle flow to produce a measurement-driven importance distribution that serves as a proposal in the SMδ-GLMB particle filter. In high-dimensional state systems or for highly- informative observations the generic particle filter often suffers from weight degeneracy or otherwise requires a prohibitively large number of particles. Particle flow avoids particle weight degeneracy by guiding particles to regions where the posterior is significant. Numerical simulations showcase the reduced complexity and improved performance of the bootstrap SMδ-GLMB filter with respect to the bootstrap Mδ-GLMB filter. The particle flow SMδ-GLMB filter further improves the accuracy of track estimates for highly informative measurements.

  13. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. Seventh quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work performed on a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particle filter, an SO {sub 2} sorbent, and a NO {sub x} reduction catalyst. One critical element of the R&D program is the development of mixed metal oxide materials that serve as combined SO {sub 2} sorbents and NO {sub x} reduction catalysts. In this seventh quarterly progress report, we summarize the performance characteristics of three promising sorbent/catalyst materials tested in powder form.

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  15. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  16. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  17. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  18. Gaussian particle flow implementation of PHD filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lingling; Wang, Junjie; Li, Yunpeng; Coates, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Particle filter and Gaussian mixture implementations of random finite set filters have been proposed to tackle the issue of jointly estimating the number of targets and their states. The Gaussian mixture PHD (GM-PHD) filter has a closed-form expression for the PHD for linear and Gaussian target models, and extensions using the extended Kalman filter or unscented Kalman Filter have been developed to allow the GM-PHD filter to accommodate mildly nonlinear dynamics. Errors resulting from linearization or model mismatch are unavoidable. A particle filter implementation of the PHD filter (PF-PHD) is more suitable for nonlinear and non-Gaussian target models. The particle filter implementations are much more computationally expensive and performance can suffer when the proposal distribution is not a good match to the posterior. In this paper, we propose a novel implementation of the PHD filter named the Gaussian particle flow PHD filter (GPF-PHD). It employs a bank of particle flow filters to approximate the PHD; these play the same role as the Gaussian components in the GM-PHD filter but are better suited to non-linear dynamics and measurement equations. Using the particle flow filter allows the GPF-PHD filter to migrate particles to the dense regions of the posterior, which leads to higher efficiency than the PF-PHD. We explore the performance of the new algorithm through numerical simulations.

  19. Enzymatic oxidation of cephalosporin C using whole cells of the yeast Triginopsis variabilis within a "cross-flow filter-reactor".

    PubMed

    Vicenzi, J T; Hansen, G J

    1993-04-01

    An economical process for the enzymatic oxidation of cephalosporin C to glutaryl-7-ACA was developed at a pilot plant scale. The process utilized nonviable whole cells of the yeast Triginopsis variabilis containing high levels of D-amino acid oxidase. Prior to use, the whole cells were permeabilized with a 25% acetone/water solution which enhanced their apparent activity by 20- to 50-fold. After permeabilization, the whole cells were incubated at pH 11, which served to selectively deactivate catalase which was present in very large quantities. Deactivation of catalase was critical to achieving high reaction yields. The whole cells were utilized within a "cross-flow filter-reactor" which allowed easy and economical recycle of the cells for repeated use. The overall yield of glutaryl-7-ACA from cephalosporin C was 90-95%. The overall productivity of the yeast was 13 kg cephalosporin C oxidized per kilogram yeast (dry basis). The reaction was run at a concentration of 40 g cephalosporin CL-1 and the overall reactor productivity was 11 g glutaryl-7-ACA l-1 h-1. The process has been thoroughly demonstrated on a 35-l scale, and it should be directly scaleable to 10,000 l or more.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    SciTech Connect

    Raptis, A.C.

    1981-07-17

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow is disclosed. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  1. Granular flow in Dorfan Impingo filter for gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiau, S.S.; Smid, J.; Tsai, H.H.; Kuo, J.T.; Chou, C.S.

    1999-07-01

    Inside a two-dimensional model of the louvered Drofan Impingo panel with transparent front and rear walls, the velocity fields of filter granules without gas cross flow were observed. The PE beads with diameter of 6 mm were used as filter granules. The filter bed was filled with beads continuously and circulated until the granular flows inside the panel reached the steady state condition. In the moving granular bed, there is a central fast flowing core of filter granules surrounded by large quasi-stagnant zones located close to the louver walls. The existence of quasi-stagnant zones may result in the dust plugging problems. The velocity fields of filter granules are plotted for three different louver geometries.

  2. Angle only tracking with particle flow filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2011-09-01

    We show the results of numerical experiments for tracking ballistic missiles using only angle measurements. We compare the performance of an extended Kalman filter with a new nonlinear filter using particle flow to compute Bayes' rule. For certain difficult geometries, the particle flow filter is an order of magnitude more accurate than the EKF. Angle only tracking is of interest in several different sensors; for example, passive optics and radars in which range and Doppler data are spoiled by jamming.

  3. Velocity filtering applied to optical flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1990-01-01

    Optical flow is a method by which a stream of two-dimensional images obtained from a forward-looking passive sensor is used to map the three-dimensional volume in front of a moving vehicle. Passive ranging via optical flow is applied here to the helicopter obstacle-avoidance problem. Velocity filtering is used as a field-based method to determine range to all pixels in the initial image. The theoretical understanding and performance analysis of velocity filtering as applied to optical flow is expanded and experimental results are presented.

  4. Cross flow electrofilter and method

    DOEpatents

    Gidaspow, Dimitri; Lee, Chang H.; Wasan, Darsh T.

    1981-01-01

    A filter for clarifying carbonaceous liquids containing finely divided solid particles of, for instance, unreacted coal, ash and other solids discharged from a coal liquefaction process is presented. The filter includes two passageways separated by a porous filter medium. In one preferred embodiment the filter medium is of tubular shape to form the first passageway and is enclosed within an outer housing to form the second passageway within the annulus. An electrode disposed in the first passageway, for instance along the tube axis, is connected to a source of high voltage for establishing an electric field between the electrode and the filter medium. Slurry feed flows through the first passageway tangentially to the surfaces of the filter medium and the electrode. Particles from the feed slurry are attracted to the electrode within the first passageway to prevent plugging of the porous filter medium while carbonaceous liquid filters into the second passageway for withdrawal. Concentrated slurry is discharged from the first passageway at an end opposite to the feed slurry inlet. Means are also provided for the addition of diluent and a surfactant into the slurry to control relative permittivity and the electrophoretic mobility of the particles.

  5. A Filtering Method For Gravitationally Stratified Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti-Bono, Caroline; Colella, Phillip

    2005-04-25

    Gravity waves arise in gravitationally stratified compressible flows at low Mach and Froude numbers. These waves can have a negligible influence on the overall dynamics of the fluid but, for numerical methods where the acoustic waves are treated implicitly, they impose a significant restriction on the time step. A way to alleviate this restriction is to filter out the modes corresponding to the fastest gravity waves so that a larger time step can be used. This paper presents a filtering strategy of the fully compressible equations based on normal mode analysis that is used throughout the simulation to compute the fast dynamics and that is able to damp only fast gravity modes.

  6. Higher Order Crossings from a Parametric Family of Linear Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    HIGHER ORDER CROSSINGS FROM A PARAMETRIC FAMILY OF LINEAR FILTERS DTIC DTC Benjamin Kedem and Ta-hsin Li E! U 4C99 Department of MathematicsS4 9...NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Higher order crossings from a parametric family Technical Report of linear filters...corresponding family of zero-crossing counts. The resulting family of counts is referred to as higher order crossings or HOC. Thus, HOC are zero-crossing

  7. Spin selective filtering of polariton condensate flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, T.; Antón, C.; Martín, M. D.; Liew, T. C. H.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Viña, L.; Eldridge, P. S.; Savvidis, P. G.

    2015-07-06

    Spin-selective spatial filtering of propagating polariton condensates, using a controllable spin-dependent gating barrier, in a one-dimensional semiconductor microcavity ridge waveguide is reported. A nonresonant laser beam provides the source of propagating polaritons, while a second circularly polarized weak beam imprints a spin dependent potential barrier, which gates the polariton flow and generates polariton spin currents. A complete spin-based control over the blocked and transmitted polaritons is obtained by varying the gate polarization.

  8. Flow regions of granules in Dorfan Impingo filter for gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, J.T.; Smid, J.; Hsiau, S.S.; Tsai, S.S.; Chou, C.S.

    1999-07-01

    Inside a two-dimensional model of the louvered Dorfan Impingo panel with transparent front and rear walls the flow region of filter granules without gas cross flow were observed. The white PE beads were used as filter granules. Colored PE beads served as tracers. Filter granules were discharged and circulated to the bed. The flow rate of filter medium was controlled by the belt conveyor. The image processing system including a Frame Grabber and JVC videocamera was used to record the granular flow. Every image of motion was digitized and stored in a file. The flow patterns and the quasi-stagnant zones history in the moving granular bed were evaluated. The experiment showed fast central moving region (flowing core) of filter granules and quasi-stagnant zones close to louver walls.

  9. Effects of filter housing and ductwork configuration on air flow uniformity inside air cleaning filter housings

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    Each new HEPA filter installation presents a different physical configuration based on the system requirements the available space and designer preference. Each different configuration can result in variations of air flow uniformity inside the filter housing across the filter banks. This paper will present the results of air flow uniformity testing for six different filter housing/ductwork configurations and discuss if any of the variations in air flow uniformity is attributable to the difference in the physical arrangements for the six cases.

  10. Effects of filter housing and ductwork configuration on air flow uniformity inside air cleaning filter housings

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Each new HEPA filter installation presents a different physical configuration based on the system requirements the available space and designer preference. Each different configuration can result in variations of air flow uniformity inside the filter housing across the filter banks. This paper will present the results of air flow uniformity testing for six different filter housing/ductwork configurations and discuss if any of the variations in air flow uniformity is attributable to the difference in the physical arrangements for the six cases.

  11. Accounting for cross boundary flows.

    PubMed Central

    Brazier, J

    1987-01-01

    RAWP (Resource Allocation Working Party) allows for cross boundary flows by adjusting regional or district health authorities' (DHAs) targets at an average specialty cost. The previous paper in this series examined problems for an inner city district health authority arising from RAWP cross boundary flow adjustment. This paper examines the likely importance of these and other problems for the National Health Service as a whole. Cross charging has been proposed as an alternative method of funding flows. District health authorities would receive an allocation equivalent to their RAWP target and then all non-emergency flows would be agreed between the authorities where patients live and competing authorities offering treatment at previously negotiated charges based on local estimates of each type of case. The problem of cost estimation is usually cited as a difficulty with this proposed reform, but this paper also discusses other important issues that tend to be neglected. PMID:3119092

  12. A comparative study of pilot-scale bio-trickling filters with counter- and cross-current flow patterns in the treatment of emissions from chemical fibre wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuhui; Liu, Jia; Cao, Jingyang; Sheng, Dinghe; Cai, Tingjian; Li, Jian

    2017-11-01

    Two pilot-scale bio-trickling filters (BTFs) with counter-current and cross-current flow modes were constructed, and their performance tested, for purifying chemical fibre waste gas containing H2S, NH3 and VOCs with a maximum gas flow rate of 1008m(3)h(-1). The counter-current type of BTF presented with superior biodegradation results compared to the cross-current type: it could start up quickly, tolerated high transient shock loadings, and possessed an average contaminant removal efficiency higher than 90% with an empty bed residence time of 59s. The contaminant removal efficiency could be increased by 50% during winter due to the addition of pipeline insulation. The abundance and diversity from microorganism analysis showed that Dyella, Bacillus, Candidimonas, Pandoraea and Thiomonas were the main bacterial strains forming the community treating the pollutants. The counter-current type BTF functioned most effectively and is proposed for practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent-catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes work performed on a new concept for integrated pollutant control: An active filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particle filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x}, reduction catalyst. The focus of the research program documented in this final report is the development of the sorbent/catalyst materials that are the basis of such an emission control system. The device investigated in this program will simultaneously remove particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, from combustion exhaust gases. Sulfur dioxide capture and nitrogen oxide reduction are achieved with a reg le, mixed-metal oxide sorbent-catalyst. The device is a filter with layered walls: A small-pore layer is a barrier to particles, and a macroporus active layer is a SO{sub 2} sorbent and a catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The small-pore layer could be an inert ceramic that provides structural strength to the unit and protects the active (sorbent-catalyst) material from abrasion or contamination from fly ash particles. We have found that 95--100% removal efficiency of SO{sub 2} and 60--90% removal of NO{sub x}, is achievable with the use of mixed-metal oxide sorbent-catalysts in the device. The ceramic filters are barriers to particles and typically have removal efficiencies of 99.9%.

  14. Clutter filter design for ultrasound color flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Bjaerum, Steinar; Torp, Hans; Kristoffersen, Kjell

    2002-02-01

    For ultrasound color flow images with high quality, it is important to suppress the clutter signals originating from stationary and slowly moving tissue sufficiently. Without sufficient clutter rejection, low velocity blood flow cannot be measured, and estimates of higher velocities will have a large bias. The small number of samples available (8 to 16) makes clutter filtering in color flow imaging a challenging problem. In this paper, we review and analyze three classes of filters: finite impulse response (FIR), infinite impulse response (IIR), and regression filters. The quality of the filters was assessed based on the frequency response, as well as on the bias and variance of a mean blood velocity estimator using an autocorrelation technique. For FIR filters, the frequency response was improved by allowing a non-linear phase response. By estimating the mean blood flow velocity from two vectors filtered in the forward and backward direction, respectively, the standard deviation was significantly lower with a minimum phase filter than with a linear phase filter. For IIR filters applied to short signals, the transient part of the output signal is important. We analyzed zero, step, and projection initialization, and found that projection initialization gave the best filters. For regression filters, polynomial basis functions provide effective clutter suppression. The best filters from each of the three classes gave comparable bias and variance of the mean blood velocity estimates. However, polynomial regression filters and projection-initialized IIR filters had a slightly better frequency response than could be obtained with FIR filters.

  15. Computationally efficient angles-only tracking with particle flow filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Russell; Wettergren, Thomas A.

    2015-05-01

    Particle filters represent the current state of the art in nonlinear, non-Gaussian filtering. They are easy to implement and have been applied in numerous domains. That being said, particle filters can be impractical for problems with state dimensions greater than four, if some other problem specific efficiencies can't be identified. This "curse of dimensionality" makes particle filters a computationally burdensome approach, and the associated re-sampling makes parallel processing difficult. In the past several years an alternative to particle filters dubbed particle flows has emerged as a (potentially) much more efficient method to solving non-linear, non-Gaussian problems. Particle flow filtering (unlike particle filtering) is a deterministic approach, however, its implementation entails solving an under-determined system of partial differential equations which has infinitely many potential solutions. In this work we apply the filters to angles-only target motion analysis problems in order to quantify the (if any) computational gains over standard particle filtering approaches. In particular we focus on the simplest form of particle flow filter, known as the exact particle flow filter. This form assumes a Gaussian prior and likelihood function of the unknown target states and is then linearized as is standard practice for extended Kalman filters. We implement both particle filters and particle flows and perform numerous numerical experiments for comparison.

  16. Implementation and performance of FPGA-accelerated particle flow filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampidis, Dimitrios; Jilkov, Vesselin P.; Wu, Jiande

    2015-09-01

    The particle flow filters, proposed by Daum & Hwang, provide a powerful means for density-based nonlinear filtering but their computation is intense and may be prohibitive for real-time applications. This paper proposes a design for superfast implementation of the exact particle flow filter using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as a parallel environment to speedup computation. Simulation results from a nonlinear filtering example are presented to demonstrate that using FPGA can dramatically accelerate particle flow filters through parallelization at the expense of a tolerable loss in accuracy as compared to nonparallel implementation.

  17. Cross-flow Ultrafiltration Scaling Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M

    2006-04-10

    One legacy of the nuclear age is radioactive waste and it must be stabilized to be stored in a safe manner. An important part of the stabilization process is the separation of radioactive solids from the liquid wastes by cross-flow ultrafiltration. The performance of this technology with the wastes to be treated was unknown and, therefore, had to be obtained. However, before beginning a filter study the question of experimental scale had to be addressed. Of course, carrying out experiments using full-size equipment is always ideal, but rarely practical when dealing with plant size processes. Flow loops that will handle millions of liters of slurries, which are either highly caustic or acidic, with flow rates of 10,000 lpm make full-scale tests prohibitively expensive. Moreover, when the slurries happen to be radioactive such work is also very dangerous. All of these considerations lend themselves to investigations at smaller scales and in many situations can be treated with computational analyses. Unfortunately, as scale is reduced it becomes harder to provide prototypic results and the two and three phase multi-component mixtures challenge accurate computational results. To obtain accurate and representative filter results the use of two scales were chosen: (1) Small-scale--would allow the testing with actual radioactive waste samples and compare results with simulated wastes that were not radioactive. For this scale the feed tank held 6 liters of waste and it had a single cross-flow filter tube 0.61 m long. (2) Pilot-scale--would be restricted to use simulated non-radioactive wastes. At this larger scale the feed tank held 120 liters of waste and the filter unit was prototypic to the planned plant facility in pore size (0.1 micron), length (2.29 m), diameter (0.0127 m inside and 0.0159 m outside diameter), and being multi-tubed. The small-scale apparatus is convenient, easy to use, and can test both radioactive and non-radioactive wastes; therefore, there is a

  18. Modeling jets in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Various approaches to the modeling of jets in cross flow are reviewed. These are grouped into four classes, namely: empirical models, integral models, perturbation models, and numerical models. Empirical models depend largely on the correlation of experimental data and are mostly useful for first-order estimates of global properties such as jet trajectory and velocity and temperature decay rates. Integral models are based on some ordinary-differential form of the conservation laws, but require substantial empirical calibration. They allow more details of the flow field to be obtained; simpler versions have to assume similarity of velocity and temperature profiles, but more sophisticated ones can actually calculate these profiles. Perturbation models require little empirical input, but the need for small parameters to ensure convergent expansions limits their application to either the near-field or the far-field. Therefore, they are mostly useful for the study of flow physics. Numerical models are based on conservation laws in partial-differential form. They require little empirical input and have the widest range of applicability. They also require the most computational resources. Although many qualitative and quantitative features of jets in cross flow have been predicted with numerical models, many issues affecting accuracy such as grid resolution and turbulence model are not completely resolved.

  19. Modeling Flow Past a Tilted Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Wang, S L

    2009-06-29

    Inferior vena cava filters are medical devices used to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) from deep vein thrombosis. In particular, retrievable filters are well-suited for patients who are unresponsive to anticoagulation therapy and whose risk of PE decreased with time. The goal of this work is to use computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the flow past an unoccluded and partially occluded Celect inferior vena cava filter. In particular, the hemodynamic response to thrombus volume and filter tilt is examined, and the results are compared with flow conditions that are known to be thrombogenic. A computer model of the filter inside a model vena cava is constructed using high resolution digital photographs and methods of computer aided design. The models are parameterized using the Overture software framework, and a collection of overlapping grids is constructed to discretize the flow domain. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved, and the characteristics of the flow (i.e., velocity contours and wall shear stresses) are computed. The volume of stagnant and recirculating flow increases with thrombus volume. In addition, as the filter increases tilt, the cava wall adjacent to the tilted filter is subjected to low velocity flow that gives rise to regions of low wall shear stress. The results demonstrate the ease of IVC filter modeling with the Overture software framework. Flow conditions caused by the tilted Celect filter may elevate the risk of intrafilter thrombosis and facilitate vascular remodeling. This latter condition also increases the risk of penetration and potential incorporation of the hook of the filter into the vena caval wall, thereby complicating filter retrieval. Consequently, severe tilt at the time of filter deployment may warrant early clinical intervention.

  20. Numerical Analysis for the Air Flow of Cross Flow Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirokazu; Tokushge, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masatoshi; Ishihara, Takuya

    There are many factors for designing the cross flow fan. Therefore, the performance of cross flow fan is not clear yet. We can analyze the transient flow of a cross flow fan using sliding mesh approach. One of the tasks using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a way of modeling for analysis heat exchangers with cross flow fan. These tasks are very important for design. The paper has a modeling of heat exchangers and meshing the fan blades. The next tasks, we focus the ability of cross flow fan when we change the geometry of fan blades.

  1. Cross Flow Parameter Calculation for Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for determining a cross flow angle for a feature on a structure. A processor unit receives location information identifying a location of the feature on the structure, determines an angle of the feature, identifies flow information for the location, determines a flow angle using the flow information, and determines the cross flow angle for the feature using the flow angle and the angle of the feature. The flow information describes a flow of fluid across the structure. The flow angle comprises an angle of the flow of fluid across the structure for the location of the feature.

  2. High Order Filter Methods for Shock/Turbulence MHD Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    Low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous MHD flows has been constructed. Several variants of the filter approach that cater to different flow types are proposed. These filters provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field (del (raided dot) B) numerical error in the sense that no standard divergence cleaning is required. For certain 2-D MHD test problems, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields of these filter schemes has been achieved.

  3. Development of low optical cross talk filters for VIIRS (JPSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgai, Vijay; Hendry, Derek; Downing, Kevin; Carbone, David; Potter, John

    2016-09-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key sensor on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite launched on October 28, 2011 into a polar orbit of 824 km nominal altitude and the JPSS sensors currently being built and integrated. VIIRS collects radiometric and imagery data of the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and land surfaces in 22 spectral bands spanning the visible and infrared spectrum from 0.4 to 12.5 μm. Interference filters assembled in `butcher-block' arrays mounted adjacent to focal plane arrays provide spectral definition. Out-of-band signal and out-of-band optical cross-talk was observed for bands in the 0.4 to 1 μm range in testing of VIIRS for S-NPP. Optical cross-talk is in-band or out-of-band light incident on an adjacent filter or adjacent region of the same filter reaching the detector. Out-of-band optical cross-talk results in spectral and spatial `impurities' in the signal and consequent errors in the calculated environmental parameters such as ocean color that rely on combinations of signals from more than one band. This paper presents results of characterization, specification, and coating process improvements that enabled production of filters with significantly reduced out of band light for Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) J1 and subsequent sensors. Total transmission and scatter measurements at a wavelength within the pass band can successfully characterize filter performance prior to dicing and assembling filters into butcher block assemblies. Coating and process development demonstrated performance on test samples followed by production of filters for J1 and J2. Results for J1 and J2 filters are presented.

  4. Particle flow for nonlinear filters with log-homotopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2008-04-01

    We describe a new nonlinear filter that is vastly superior to the classic particle filter. In particular, the computational complexity of the new filter is many orders of magnitude less than the classic particle filter with optimal estimation accuracy for problems with dimension greater than 2 or 3. We consider nonlinear estimation problems with dimensions varying from 1 to 20 that are smooth and fully coupled (i.e. dense not sparse). The new filter implements Bayes' rule using particle flow rather than with a pointwise multiplication of two functions; this avoids one of the fundamental and well known problems in particle filters, namely "particle collapse" as a result of Bayes' rule. We use a log-homotopy to derive the ODE that describes particle flow. This paper was written for normal engineers, who do not have homotopy for breakfast.

  5. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC. - COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Coloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was demonstrated at the U.S Department of Energy's (DOE) Rock Flats Plant (RFP) as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund and Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. ...

  6. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC. - COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Coloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was demonstrated at the U.S Department of Energy's (DOE) Rock Flats Plant (RFP) as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund and Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. ...

  7. Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in a Buoyant Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    John William Strutt , the third Baron of Rayleigh , or more commonly known as Lord Rayleigh , was the first to offer a correct explanation of the...FILTERED RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN A BUOYANT FLOW FIELD         THESIS       Steven Michael Meents, Captain, USAF...AFIT/GAE/ENY/08-M22 FILTERED RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN A BUOYANT FLOW FIELD THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics

  8. Adaptive clutter filtering for ultrasound color flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yang Mo; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2003-09-01

    In this article, we present an adaptive clutter rejection method for selecting different clutter filters in ultrasound color flow imaging. A single clutter filter is typically used to reject the clutter. Because the clutter characteristics vary in both space and time, the single clutter filter approach has difficulty in providing optimum clutter rejection in ultrasound images. To achieve more accurate velocity estimation, we have developed a method to select a clutter filter adaptively at each location in an image from a set of predefined filters. Selection criteria have been developed based on the underlying clutter characteristics and the properties of various filters (e.g., minimum-phase finite impulse response, projection-initialized infinite impulse response and polynomial regression). We have incorporated our adaptive clutter rejection method in an ultrasound system. We have found that our adaptive method can reduce the mean absolute error between the estimated and true flow velocities significantly compared with the conventional methods, in which a single clutter filter is used throughout the entire image. With in vivo abdominal data, we obtained an average gain of 5.0 dB in signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR), compared with the conventional method. These preliminary results indicate that the proposed adaptive method could improve the accuracy of flow velocity estimation in ultrasound color flow imaging through the improvement in SCR and the reduction in bias.

  9. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-01-12

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed

  10. Mathematical modeling of flow field in ceramic candle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Taewon; Kim, Heuy-Dong; Choi, Joo-Hong; Chung, Jae Hwa

    1998-06-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is one of the candidates to achieve stringent environmental regulation among the clean coal technologies. Advancing the technology of the hot gas cleanup systems is the most critical component in the development of the IGCC. Thus the aim of this study is to understand the flow field in the ceramic filter and the influence of ceramic filter in removal of the particles contained in the hot gas flow. The numerical model based on the Reynolds stress turbulence model with the Darcy’s law in the porous region is adopted. It is found that the effect of the porosity in the flowfield is negligibly small while the effect of the filter length is significant. It is also found as the permeability decreases, the reattachment point due to the flow separation moves upstream. This is because the fluid is sucked into the filter region due to the pressure drop before the flow separation occurs. The particle follows well with the fluid stream and the particle is directly sucked into the filter due to the pressure drop even in the flow separation region.

  11. Cross-flow electrofilter and method

    DOEpatents

    Gidaspow, Dimitri; Lee, Chang H.; Wasan, Darsh T.

    1980-01-01

    A filter for clarifying carbonaceous liquids containing finely divided solid particles of, for instance, unreacted coal, ash and other solids discharged from a coal liquefaction process is presented. The filter includes two passageways separated by a porous filter medium. In one preferred embodiment the filter medium is of tubular shape to form the first passageway and is enclosed within an outer housing to form the second passageway within the annulus. An electrode disposed in the first passageway, for instance along the tube axis, is connected to a source of high voltage for establishing an electric field between the electrode and the filter medium. Slurry feed flows through the first passageway tangentially to the surfaces of the filter medium and the electrode. Particles from the feed slurry are attracted to the electrode within the first passageway to prevent plugging of the porous filter medium while carbonaceous liquid filters into the second passageway for withdrawal. Concentrated slurry is discharged from the first passageway at an end opposite to the feed slurry inlet. Means are also provided for the addition of diluent and a surfactant into the slurry to control relative permittivity and the electrophoretic mobility of the particles.

  12. Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2012-06-26

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes X zones. An electrical heater includes Y heater segments that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and proximate with the PM filter. A valve assembly includes Z sections that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. A control module adjusts flow through each of the Z sections during regeneration of the PM filter via control of the valve assembly. X, Y and Z are integers.

  13. Direction of fluid flow and the properties of fibrous filters

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, J.; Spurny, K.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of the fluid flow direction (downflow and upflow) on the filtration properties of filters that have a fibrous structure is investigated. It is concluded that selectivity of these filters (dependence of the filter efficiency on the particle size) in the case of upflow is changed - in comparison with the case of downflow - in three ways: the position of the minimum of this dependence is shifted to larger particle sizes, and the whole selectivity is decreased and simultaneously deformed. Corresponding equations for this shift and changes are derived and analyzed. Theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental data. In all cases qualitative agreement and in some cases quantitative agreement is found.

  14. Transverse high gradient magnetic filter cell with bounded flow field

    SciTech Connect

    Badescu, V.; Rotariu, O.; Murariu, V.; Rezlescu, N.

    1997-11-01

    The capture of fine paramagnetic particles from a fluid suspension in a magnetic filter element of a novel design is analyzed. Unlike the systems previously analyzed, in the model the flow is bounded by two by two parallel planar plates, and the ferromagnetic wires are installed outside these spaces, within planes parallel with the plates. The analysis is based on the study of particle trajectories, considering the laminar flow of carrier fluid. From these the authors establish the conditions for the maximum recovery of the particles in suspension. This study is useful in designing magnetic filter batteries with corrosion-protected ferromagnetic wires.

  15. Application of velocity filtering to optical-flow passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the velocity filtering method as applied to optical-flow passive ranging under real-world conditions is evaluated. The theory of the 3-D Fourier transform as applied to constant-speed moving points is reviewed, and the space-domain shift-and-add algorithm is derived from the general 3-D matched filtering formulation. The constant-speed algorithm is then modified to fit the actual speed encountered in the optical flow application, and the passband of that filter is found in terms of depth (sensor/object distance) so as to cover any given range of depths. Two algorithmic solutions for the problems associated with pixel interpolation and object expansion are developed, and experimental results are presented.

  16. Absorption Filter Based Optical Diagnostics in High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, Mo; Elliott, Gregory; Arnette, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    Two major regimes where laser light scattered by molecules or particles in a flow contains significant information about the flow are Mie scattering and Rayleigh scattering. Mie scattering is used to obtain only velocity information, while Rayleigh scattering can be used to measure both the velocity and the thermodynamic properties of the flow. Now, recently introduced (1990, 1991) absorption filter based diagnostic techniques have started a new era in flow visualization, simultaneous velocity and thermodynamic measurements, and planar velocity measurements. Using a filtered planar velocimetry (FPV) technique, we have modified the optically thick iodine filter profile of Miles, et al., and used it in the pressure-broaden regime which accommodates measurements in a wide range of velocity applications. Measuring velocity and thermodynamic properties simultaneously, using absorption filtered based Rayleigh scattering, involves not only the measurement of the Doppler shift, but also the spectral profile of the Rayleigh scattering signal. Using multiple observation angles, simultaneous measurement of one component velocity and thermodynamic properties in a supersonic jet were measured. Presently, the technique is being extended for simultaneous measurements of all three components of velocity and thermodynamic properties.

  17. An overland flow sampler for use in vegetative filters

    Treesearch

    D. Eisenhauer; M. Helmers; J. Brothers; M. Dosskey; T. Franti; A. Boldt; B. Strahm

    2002-01-01

    Vegetative filters (VF) are used to remove contaminants from agricultural runoff and improve surface water quality. Techniques are needed to quantify the performance of VF in realistic field settings. The goal of this project was to develop and test a relatively simple and low cost method for sampling overland flow in a VF. The 0.3 m wide sampler has the capacity to...

  18. Turbulent crossed fluxes in incompressible flows

    PubMed

    Sancho

    2000-02-01

    We show in the framework of the stochastic calculus the existence of turbulent crossed fluxes in incompressible flows. Physically, these fluxes are related to the dependence of the phenomenological coefficients on the temperature and concentration variables.

  19. Cross Flow Boiling in Tube Bundles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    subsequent corrosion induced failure of the heating tube , an understanding of the fluid motion and heat transfer behavior in confined spaces will be...1-1982A U Cross Flowing Boiling in Tube Bundles Annual Technical Report October 1982 LOD S.C. Yao Associate Professor Department of Mechanical...Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Annual Technical Report CROSS FLOW BOILING IN TUBE BUNDLES Aug. 1, 1981 to Aug. 1, 1982 - 6. PERFORMING ORG

  20. Cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells, cross-flow reactors, and use of cross-flow reactors for oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Udovich, Carl A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention discloses cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells containing oxygen permeable materials which have both electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity, cross-flow reactors, and electrochemical processes using cross-flow reactor cells having oxygen permeable monolithic cores to control and facilitate transport of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas stream to oxidation reactions of organic compounds in another gas stream. These cross-flow electrochemical reactors comprise a hollow ceramic blade positioned across a gas stream flow or a stack of crossed hollow ceramic blades containing a channel or channels for flow of gas streams. Each channel has at least one channel wall disposed between a channel and a portion of an outer surface of the ceramic blade, or a common wall with adjacent blades in a stack comprising a gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material of a perovskite structure having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. The invention includes reactors comprising first and second zones seprated by gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. Prefered gas-impervious materials comprise at least one mixed metal oxide having a perovskite structure or perovskite-like structure. The invention includes, also, oxidation processes controlled by using these electrochemical reactors, and these reactions do not require an external source of electrical potential or any external electric circuit for oxidation to proceed.

  1. Efficiency of subsurface flow constructed wetland with trickling filter.

    PubMed

    Vucinic, Aleksandra Anic; Hrenovic, Jasna; Tepes, Predrag

    2012-06-01

    Effective wastewater purification in subsurface flow constructed wetlands must include adequate pretreatment and ensure a sufficient amount of dissolved oxygen. In a pilot-scale operation, a subsurface flow constructed wetland (CW) consisted of a primary settlement tank, a trickling filter for pretreatment and two serially assembled basins. The trickling filter was added to ensure sufficient aeration, increase purification of the wastewater and shorten the wastewater purification time. The estimated nominal flow was 0.7 m3/d. The experiments were conducted using the wastewater from the municipal sewage canal of the city of Zagreb, with utilization of three different flows: 0.72 (A), 1.44 (B) and 2.88 (C) m3/d. The efficiency of the purification process was monitored over a period of three years (TSS, BOD5, COD, NH4-N, NO2-N, PO4-P, dissolved oxygen, temperature and pH). The experimental results showed an increase in the removal efficiency with a doubling of the nominal flow from 0.7 to 1.44 m3/d, which could be related to the implementation of the trickling filter where high removal rates were achieved.

  2. Information and Entropy Flow in the Kalman?Bucy Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitter, Sanjoy K.; Newton, Nigel J.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the information theoretic properties of Kalman-Bucy filters in continuous time, developing notions of information supply, storage and dissipation. Introducing a concept of energy, we develop a physical analogy in which the unobserved signal describes a statistical mechanical system interacting with a heat bath. The abstract `universe' comprising the signal and the heat bath obeys a non-increase law of entropy; however, with the introduction of partial observations, this law can be violated. The Kalman-Bucy filter behaves like a Maxwellian demon in this analogy, returning signal energy to the heat bath without causing entropy increase. This is made possible by the steady supply of new information. In a second analogy the signal and filter interact, setting up a stationary non-equilibrium state, in which energy flows between the heat bath, the signal and the filter without causing any overall entropy increase. We introduce a rate of interactive entropy flow that isolates the statistical mechanics of this flow from marginal effects. Both analogies provide quantitative examples of Landauer's Principle.

  3. Treatment of a synthetic waste water with a two-direction-flow anaerobic filter

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to improve the treatment efficiency of the anaerobic filter treatment of domestic and industrial waste waters. Two laboratory scale anaerobic filters were constructed. The filters were made of PVC pipe, six inches in diameter and six feet high. Activated charcoal was used as packing media. The first filter was operated as an upflow anaerobic filter. The second filter was operated as a two direction flow anaerobic filter. The substrate was fed into the bottom of the reactor, withdrawn after flowing upward approximately one foot, pumped to the top of the filter, and then flowed downward through the remainder of the filter. The treated effluent discharged opposite the port where the first section effluent was pumped to the top of the filter. The two filters were operated in parallel, using the same substrate, glucose, and the same hydraulic detention time of 32 hours. Three phases of operation were conducted: 1) pulsed operation, 2) continuous feed operation, and 3) continuous feed operation with twice the flow of number 2. The two direction flow filter produced better treatment than the up-flow filter because the hydrogen concentration in the methane phase of the filter was reduced, mixing was enhanced and a more uniform bacteria distribution occurred throughout the filter. All of these improvements over the upflow filter, and the resulting improved treatment efficiency, can be attributed to the two direction flow configuration.

  4. Delta wings with shock-free cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sritharan, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    In order to have a high level of maneuverability, supersonic delta wings should have a cross flow that is free of embedded shock waves. The conical cross flow sonic surface differs from that of plane transonic flow in many aspects. Well-known properties such as the monotone law are not true for conical cross flow sonic surfaces. By using a local analysis of the cross flow sonic line, relevant conditions for smooth cross flow are obtained. A technique to artificially construct a smooth sonic surface and an efficient numerical method to calculate the flow field are used to obtain cones with smooth cross flow.

  5. Ultrasonic Mastering of Filter Flow and Antifouling of Renewable Resources.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2016-04-04

    Inadequate access to pure water and sanitation requires new cost-effective, ergonomic methods with less consumption of energy and chemicals, leaving the environment cleaner and sustainable. Among such methods, ultrasound is a unique means to control the physics and chemistry of complex fluids (wastewater) with excellent performance regarding mass transfer, cleaning, and disinfection. In membrane filtration processes, it overcomes diffusion limits and can accelerate the fluid flow towards the filter preventing antifouling. Here, we outline the current state of knowledge and technological design, with a focus on physicochemical strategies of ultrasound for water cleaning. We highlight important parameters of ultrasound for the delivery of a fluid flow from a technical perspective employing principles of physics and chemistry. By introducing various ultrasonic methods, involving bubbles or cavitation in combination with external fields, we show advancements in flow acceleration and mass transportation to the filter. In most cases we emphasize the main role of streaming and the impact of cavitation with a perspective to prevent and remove fouling deposits during the flow. We also elaborate on the deficiencies of present technologies and on problems to be solved to achieve a wide-spread application.

  6. Vertical, Bubbly, Cross-Flow Characteristics over Tube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    2005-12-01

    Two-phase flow over tube bundles is commonly observed in shell and tube-type heat exchangers. However, only limited amount of data concerning flow pattern and void fraction exists due to the flow complexity and the difficulties in measurement. The detailed flow structure in tube bundles needs to be understood for reliable and effective design. Therefore, the objective of this study was to clarify the two-phase structure of cross-flow in tube bundles by PIV. Experiments were conducted using two types of models, namely in-line and staggered arrays with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. Each test section contains 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The experiment’s data were obtained under very low void fraction (α<0.02). Liquid and gas velocity data in the whole flow field were measured successfully by optical filtering and image processing. The structures of bubbly flow in the two different configurations of tube bundles were described in terms of the velocity vector field, turbulence intensity and void fraction.

  7. Adaptive probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter for unsaturated flow problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, J.; Li, W.; Zeng, L.; Wu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has gained popularity in hydrological data assimilation problems. As a Monte Carlo based method, a relatively large ensemble size is usually required to guarantee the accuracy. As an alternative approach, the probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter (PCKF) employs the Polynomial Chaos to approximate the original system. In this way, the sampling error can be reduced. However, PCKF suffers from the so called "cure of dimensionality". When the system nonlinearity is strong and number of parameters is large, PCKF is even more computationally expensive than EnKF. Motivated by recent developments in uncertainty quantification, we propose a restart adaptive probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter (RAPCKF) for data assimilation in unsaturated flow problem. During the implementation of RAPCKF, the important parameters are identified and active PCE basis functions are adaptively selected. The "restart" technology is used to alleviate the inconsistency between model parameters and states. The performance of RAPCKF is tested by unsaturated flow numerical cases. It is shown that RAPCKF is more efficient than EnKF with the same computational cost. Compared with the traditional PCKF, the RAPCKF is more applicable in strongly nonlinear and high dimensional problems.

  8. Filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann model for microchannel gas flows.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Congshan; Zhong, Chengwen

    2013-11-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method has been shown to be successful for microscale gas flows, and it has attracted significant research interest. In this paper, the recently proposed filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann (FMLB) model is first applied to study the microchannel gas flows, in which a Bosanquet-type effective viscosity is used to capture the flow behaviors in the transition regime. A kinetic boundary condition, the combined bounce-back and specular-reflection scheme with the second-order slip scheme, is also designed for the FMLB model. By analyzing a unidirectional flow, the slip velocity and the discrete effects related to the boundary condition are derived within the FMLB model, and a revised scheme is presented to overcome such effects, which have also been validated through numerical simulations. To gain an accurate simulation in a wide range of Knudsen numbers, covering the slip and the entire transition flow regimes, a set of slip coefficients with an introduced fitting function is adopted in the revised second-order slip boundary condition. The periodic and pressure-driven microchannel flows have been investigated by the present model in this study. The numerical results, including the velocity profile and the mass flow rate, as well as the nonlinear pressure distribution along the channel, agree fairly well with the solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation, the direct simulation Monte Carlo results, the experimental data, and the previous results of the multiple effective relaxation lattice Boltzmann model. Also, the present results of the velocity profile and the mass flow rate show that the present model with the fitting function can yield improved predictions for the microchannel gas flow with higher Knudsen numbers in the transition flow regime.

  9. Coupled continuum and molecular model of flow through fibrous filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shunliu; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    A coupled approach combining the continuum boundary singularity method (BSM) and the molecular direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is developed and validated using Taylor-Couette flow and the flow about a single fiber confined between two parallel walls. In the proposed approach, the DSMC is applied to an annular region enclosing the fiber and the BSM is employed in the entire flow domain. The parameters used in the DSMC and the coupling procedure, such as the number of simulated particles, the cell size, and the size of the coupling zone are determined by inspecting the accuracy of pressure drop obtained for the range of Knudsen numbers between zero and unity. The developed approach is used to study flowfield of fibrous filtration flows. It is observed that in the partial-slip flow regime, Kn ⩽ 0.25, the results obtained by the proposed coupled BSM-DSMC method match the solution by BSM combined with the heuristic partial-slip boundary conditions. For transition molecular-to-continuum Knudsen numbers, 0.25 < Kn ⩽ 1, the difference in pressure drop and velocity between these two approaches is significant. This difference increases with the Knudsen number that confirms the usefulness of coupled continuum and molecular methods in numerical modeling of transition low Reynolds number flows in fibrous filters.

  10. Coordinated Control of Cross-Flow Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, have several advantages over axial-flow turbines for a number of applications including urban wind power, high-density arrays, and marine or fluvial currents. By controlling the angular velocity applied to the turbine as a function of angular blade position, we have demonstrated a 79 percent increase in cross-flow turbine efficiency over constant-velocity control. This strategy uses the downhill simplex method to optimize control parameter profiles during operation of a model turbine in a recirculating water flume. This optimization method is extended to a set of two turbines, where the blade motions and position of the downstream turbine are optimized to beneficially interact with the coherent structures in the wake of the upstream turbine. This control scheme has the potential to enable high-density arrays of cross-flow turbines to operate at cost-effective efficiency. Turbine wake and force measurements are analyzed for insight into the effect of a coordinated control strategy.

  11. Modeling of two-dimensional overland flow in a vegetative filter

    Treesearch

    Matthew J. Helmers; Dean E. Eisenhauer; Thomas G. Franti; Michael G. Dosskey

    2002-01-01

    Water transports sediment and other pollutants through vegetative filters. It is often assumed that the overland flow is uniformly distributed across the vegetative filter, but this research indicates otherwise. The objective of this study was to model the two-dimensional overland water flow through a vegetative filter, accounting for variation in microtopography,...

  12. Nonlinear ultrasonic measurements based on cross-correlation filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Andrew; Stewart, Dylan; Bunget, Gheorghe; Kramer, Patrick; Farinholt, Kevin; Friedersdorf, Fritz; Pepi, Marc; Ghoshal, Anindya

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic loading of mechanical components promotes the formation of dislocation dipoles in metals, which can serve as precursors to crack nucleation and ultimately lead to failure. In the laboratory setting, an acoustic nonlinearity parameter has been assessed as an effective indicator for characterizing the progression of fatigue damage precursors. However, the need to use monochromatic waves of medium-to-high acoustic energy has presented a constraint, making it problematic for use in field applications. This paper presents a potential approach for field measurement of acoustic nonlinearity by using general purpose ultrasonic pulser-receivers. Nonlinear ultrasonic measurements during fatigue testing were analyzed by the using contact and immersion pulse-through method. A novel cross-correlation filtering technique was developed to extract the fundamental and higher harmonic waves from the signals. As in the case of the classic harmonic generation, the nonlinearity parameters of the second and third harmonics indicate a strong correlation with fatigue cycles. Consideration was given to potential nonlinearities in the measurement system, and tests have confirmed that measured second harmonic signals exhibit a linear dependence on the input signal strength, further affirming the conclusion that this parameter relates to damage precursor formation from cyclic loading.

  13. Flow Characteristics of Pulse Cleaning System in Ceramic Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongli, J.; Peng, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, M.

    2002-09-19

    The rigid ceramic filters have been recognized to be a most promising kind of equipment for the gas-solid separation and the cleaning of hot gases due to their unique properties and higher separation efficiency for larger than 5 {micro}m particles, which will well meet downstream system component protection and environmental standards. They have potential for increased efficiency in advanced coal-fired power generation systems like pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process, and petrochemical process such as fluid catalyst cracking (FCC) Process. In the commercial utilization of rigid ceramic filters, the performance of pulse cleaning systems has crucial effects on the long-term structural durability and reliability of the entire design. In order to get a clear insight into the nature of this cleaning process and provide a solid basis for the industrial applications, the transient flow characteristics of the rigid ceramic candle filter during the whole pulse cleaning process should be completely analyzed.

  14. Measurements of the flow and thermal characteristics of turbulet jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, S. A.

    An experimental investigation of the flow, turbulence, and thermal characteristics of heated, cooled, and isothermal turbulent jets in cross flow is reported. The experiments were carried out in a water channel facility of the recirculation type. Hot or cold water was injected verically upward from a circular pipe located near the channel bottom to the cross-flowing stream in the channel. Hot and cold-film anemometers along with appropriate linearizers, bridges, filters, and probes were used. A new signal analysis method was developed for resolving the complex three-dimensional structure of the mean turbulent flow field resulting from the interaction between the free stream and the jet. A rotatable probe technique was used to measure the size components for the Reynolds stress tensor in isothermal flows of any turbulence intensity. New experssions that correct for the temperature contamination of the velocity signals in nonisothermal flows were developed for both the linearized and unlinearized anemometer responses. Mean velocity and turbulence intensity data were obtained for the isothermal jet at jet-to-free stream velocity ratios of 2, 4, and 6 both in and outside the jet plane of symmetry.

  15. Replacement of fluid-filter elements without interruption of flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotler, R. A.; Ward, J. B.

    1969-01-01

    Gatling-type filter assembly, preloaded with several filter elements enables filter replacement without breaking into the operative fluid system. When the filter element becomes contaminated, a unit inner subassembly is rotated 60 degrees to position a clean filter in the line.

  16. Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration with a Shear-Thinning Organic Based Slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2001-01-10

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring the River Protection Project, which includes the design of a facility to stabilize liquid radioactive waste that is stored at the Hanford Site. Because of its experience with radioactive waste stabilization, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company was contracted to develop and test parts of the waste treatment process. One part of the process is the separation of highly radioactive solids from the liquid wastes by precipitation and cross-flow filtration. A cross-flow filter was tested with simulated wastes made to represent typical waste chemical and physical characteristics. This paper discusses the results of cross-flow filter operation in a pilot-scale facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids SRTC.

  17. Performance evaluation of eigendecomposition-based adaptive clutter filter for color flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Fuxian; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Xiufen

    2006-12-22

    In this paper, a newly developed eigendecomposition-based adaptive filter is applied in flow velocity estimation and its performance is evaluated and compared with the static polynomial regression filter. Results demonstrate that the eigendecomposition-based filter is the fully-adaptive and can not only suppress the clutter signals with minimal loss of low-flow signal, but also give less influence on the flow velocity estimation especially under the circumstance of high clutter velocity.

  18. Particle filter based on thermophoretic deposition from natural convection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sasse, A.G.B.M.; Nazaroff, W.W. ); Gadgil, A.J. )

    1994-04-01

    We present an analysis of particle migration in a natural convection flow between parallel plates and within the annulus of concentric tubes. The flow channel is vertically oriented with one surface maintained at a higher temperature than the other. Particle migration is dominated by advection in the vertical direction and thermophoresis in the horizontal direction. From scale analysis it is demonstrated that particles are completely removed from air flowing through the channel if its length exceeds L[sub c] = (b[sup 4]g/24K[nu][sup 2]), where b is the width of the channel, g is the acceleration of gravity, K is a thermophoretic coefficient of order 0.5, and [nu] is the kinematic viscosity of air. Precise predictions of particle removal efficiency as a function of system parameters are obtained by numerical solution of the governing equations. Based on the model results, it appears feasible to develop a practical filter for removing smoke particles from a smoldering cigarette in an ashtray by using natural convection in combination with thermophoresis. 22 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This drawing shows a cross-section view of the test cell at the heart of the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. The middle and lower drawings depict the volume of the silicone oil layer that served as the atmosphere as the steel ball rotated and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  20. Cavity flow control using a rod in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpotdar, Shekhar

    For a variety of aerodynamic conditions and geometric configurations fluid structure interactions give rise to a reverberant field. This phenomenon, referred to as resonant acoustics, has practical importance due to its undesirable effects such as noise, structural loading, and unsteady flow field. Several flow control technologies exist but they lose efficacy at off-design conditions. With the focus on expanding their operating envelope, the present work investigates the physics of the flow control using a combination of detailed experimental measurements and theoretical analysis. The model resonant acoustic flow problem that we chose for our study is cavity tones, i.e., the high intensity acoustic tones produced by high speed air moving over rectangular cavity. The flow control actuator is a rod in cross flow, i.e., a thin horizontal rod placed upstream of the cavity. In the present work, a detailed experimental study has been undertaken to characterize the acoustics, mean velocity field as well as the pressure perturbation field both inside and outside of the cavity. Control cases with contrasting suppression results are chosen to illustrate important aspects of the mean flow field. To investigate whether the cylinder, through its wake, changes the stability characteristics of the shear layer that develops over the cavity, stability analysis of the shear layer is undertaken. First, stability of artificial velocity profiles that are prototypical of the experimentally measured velocity profiles is investigated; in order to determine what parameters of the velocity profiles influence the stability of the shear layer the most. Next stability of experimentally measured velocity profiles is evaluated to calculate integrated growth rates along the length of the cavity. Mean velocity data is also used to elucidate the shear layer lift off mechanism of the rod. Both integrated growth range and shear layer lift off data are compared with the acoustic suppression results

  1. Improvement of hemodynamic performance using novel helical flow vena cava filter design

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Peng; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Xing, Yubin; Xing, Ning

    2017-01-01

    We propose a vena cava filter in which helical flow is created in the filter’s working zone to minimize filter blockage by trapped clots and facilitate the lysis of trapped clots. To validate this new design, we compared five helical flow inducers with different thread pitches in terms of blood flow patterns in the filter. The vena cava was reconstructed based on computed tomography images. Both the numerical simulation and in vitro experiment revealed that the helical flow inducer can effectively create a helical flow in the vessel, thereby subduing the filter structure’s adverse disruption to blood flow, and increasing flow-induced shear stress in the filter center. In addition, the smaller thread pitch helical flow inducer reduced the oscillating shear index and relative residence time on the vessel wall. Moreover, we observed that the helical flow inducer in the vena cava could induce flow rotation both in clockwise and counterclockwise directions. In conclusion, the new design of the filter with the smaller thread pitch inducer is advantageous over the traditional filter in terms of improving local hemodynamics, which may reduce thrombosis build-up after deployment. PMID:28112186

  2. The effect of flow on the filtration performance of paediatric breathing system filters.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, A R; Malan, C A; Hall, J E

    2008-01-01

    The effect of flow on the filtration performance of six different types of filter intended for use in paediatric anaesthesia was measured by challenging the filters with sodium chloride particles at five different flows: 6, 10, 15, 20 and 30 l x min(-1). Twenty-five unused samples of each filter type were evaluated. The pressure drop across each filter was measured at the same flows as those used to measure penetration. The pressure drop varied both between and within the types of filter. Mean pressure drop varied between 89 and 262 Pa at a flow of 15 l x min(-1) for the six different filters. Penetration of sodium chloride particles varied from 1.9 to 18% at 15 l x min(-1) for the six filters. Allowing for the variation in pressure drop, the penetration of particles increased fairly linearly as flow increased for all six filter types. The increase in penetration per unit increase in flow varied from 0.11 to 0.82% per litre per minute. Over the range of flows studied, the increase in penetration with flow is fairly predictable.

  3. A Graphical Filter/Flow Representation of Boolean Queries: A Prototype Implementation and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Degi; Shneiderman, Ben

    1993-01-01

    Literature showing the disadvantages of Boolean logic in online searching is reviewed, and research comparing the Filter/Flow visual interface (i.e., a graphical representation of Boolean operators) with a text-only interface is described. A significant difference in the total number of correct queries is reported that favored Filter/Flow. (16…

  4. Cross-Effects in Microgravity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyalka, Sudarshan K.; Tompson, R. V.; Ivchenko, I. N.; Ghosh, T. K.; Hamoodi, S. A.; Hickey, K. A.; Huang, C. M.; Tebbe, Patrick A.; Gabis, D. H.; Tekasakul, P.; hide

    1996-01-01

    Film growth by chemical/physical vapor deposition is a process of considerable interest in microgravity experiments. The absence of natural convection should allow better control of film growth processes but, in highly non-isothermal ampoules, thermal slip (creep) can become a matter of significant concern. The reported research is a theoretical and experimental investigation of the flow of gas/vapor mixtures under non-continuum conditions. The Boltzmann equation has been solved for a monatomic gas under non-condensing conditions and the various phenomenological coefficients have been computed. Computations for realistic potentials as well as for velocity and creep slip have been completed and the creep slip has been found to be dependent on the type of gas confirming the accuracy of previous variational results. The variational technique has been extended and planar flows calculated via the Burnett solutions. Velocity, diffusion and creep slips have been computed for gas mixtures and previously unknown dependencies of the creep slip on the mixture properties have been observed. Also for gas mixtures, an integral representation of the linearized Boltzmann operator has been developed for use in numerical and variational calculations for all intermolecular force laws. Two, two-bulb capillary systems have been designed, built and tested for the measurements of cross-flows; one of glass for isothermal measurements and one of stainless steel for non-isothermal measurements. Extensive data have been collected for Ar-He and N2-He mixtures at a variety of pressures and mole ratios. Viscosity, velocity slip coefficients and tangential momentum accommodation coefficients have been obtained from measurements with a spinning rotor gauge via a new theory that has been formulated for the spinning rotor gauge in the slip regime. The FIDAP fluid dynamics code has been applied to condensing flows in ampoules in the continuum regime and agreement obtained with the earlier work of

  5. New Evidence That Nonlinear Source-Filter Coupling Affects Harmonic Intensity and fo Stability During Instances of Harmonics Crossing Formants.

    PubMed

    Maxfield, Lynn; Palaparthi, Anil; Titze, Ingo

    2017-03-01

    The traditional source-filter theory of voice production describes a linear relationship between the source (glottal flow pulse) and the filter (vocal tract). Such a linear relationship does not allow for nor explain how changes in the filter may impact the stability and regularity of the source. The objective of this experiment was to examine what effect unpredictable changes to vocal tract dimensions could have on fo stability and individual harmonic intensities in situations in which low frequency harmonics cross formants in a fundamental frequency glide. To determine these effects, eight human subjects (five male, three female) were recorded producing fo glides while their vocal tracts were artificially lengthened by a section of vinyl tubing inserted into the mouth. It was hypothesized that if the source and filter operated as a purely linear system, harmonic intensities would increase and decrease at nearly the same rates as they passed through a formant bandwidth, resulting in a relatively symmetric peak on an intensity-time contour. Additionally, fo stability should not be predictably perturbed by formant/harmonic crossings in a linear system. Acoustic analysis of these recordings, however, revealed that harmonic intensity peaks were asymmetric in 76% of cases, and that 85% of fo instabilities aligned with a crossing of one of the first four harmonics with the first three formants. These results provide further evidence that nonlinear dynamics in the source-filter relationship can impact fo stability as well as harmonic intensities as harmonics cross through formant bandwidths. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transverse jet injection into a supersonic turbulent cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Z. A.; Thornber, B.; Drikakis, D.

    2011-04-01

    Jet injection into a supersonic cross-flow is a challenging fluid dynamics problem in the field of aerospace engineering which has applications as part of a rocket thrust vector control system for noise control in cavities and fuel injection in scramjet combustion chambers. Several experimental and theoretical/numerical works have been conducted to explore this flow; however, there is a dearth of literature detailing the instantaneous flow which is vital to improve the efficiency of the mixing of fluids. In this paper, a sonic jet in a Mach 1.6 free-stream is studied using a finite volume Godunov type implicit large eddy simulations technique, which employs fifth-order accurate MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) scheme with modified variable extrapolation and a three-stage second-order strong-stability-preserving Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal advancement. A digital filter based turbulent inflow data generation method is implemented in order to capture the physics of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer. This paper details the averaged and instantaneous flow features including vortex structures downstream of the jet injection, along with the jet penetration, jet mixing, pressure distributions, turbulent kinetic energy, and Reynolds stresses in the downstream flow. It demonstrates that Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities in the upper jet shear layer are primarily responsible for mixing of the two fluids. The results are compared to experimental data and recently performed classical large eddy simulations (LES) with the same initial conditions in order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical methods and utility of the inflow generation method. Results here show equivalent accuracy for 1/45th of the computational resources used in the classical LES study.

  7. Filter-based modeling of unsteady turbulent cavitating flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiongyang

    Cavitation plays an important role in the design and operation of fluid machinery and devices because it causes performance degradation, noise, vibration, and erosion. Cavitation involves complex phase-change dynamics, large density ratio between phases, and multiple time scales. Noticeable achievements have been made in employing homogeneous two-phase Navier-Stokes equations for cavitating computations in computational and modeling strategies. However, these issues pose challenges with respect to accuracy, stability, efficiency and robustness because of the complex unsteady interaction associated with cavitation dynamics and turbulence. The present study focuses on developing and assessing computational modeling techniques to provide better insight into unsteady turbulent cavitation dynamics. The ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, along with a volume fraction transport equation for cavitation and turbulence closure, are employed. To ensure stability and convergence with good efficiency and accuracy, the pressure-based Pressure Implicit Splitting of Operators (PISO) algorithm is adopted for time-dependent computations. The merits of recent transport equation-based cavitation models are first re-examined. To account for the liquid-vapor mixture compressibility, different numerical approximations of speed-of-sound are further investigated and generalized. To enhance the generality and capability of the recent interfacial dynamics-based cavitation model (IDM), we present an improved approximation for the interfacial velocity via phase transformation. In turbulence modeling, a filter-based model (FBM) derived from the k-epsilon two-equation model, an easily deployable conditional averaging method aimed at improving unsteady simulations, is introduced. The cavitation and turbulence models are assessed by unsteady simulations in various geometries including square cylinder, convergent-divergent nozzle, Clark-Y hydrofoil, and hollow-jet valve. The FBM reduces eddy

  8. Why do Cross-Flow Turbines Stall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, Robert; Strom, Benjamin; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Hydrokinetic turbines are prone to instability and stall near their peak operating points under torque control. Understanding the physics of turbine stall may help to mitigate this undesirable occurrence and improve the robustness of torque controllers. A laboratory-scale two-bladed cross-flow turbine operating at a chord-based Reynolds number ~ 3 ×104 is shown to stall at a critical tip-speed ratio. Experiments are conducting bringing the turbine to this critical speed in a recirculating current flume by increasing resistive torque and allowing the rotor to rapidly decelerate while monitoring inflow velocity, torque, and drag. The turbine stalls probabilistically with a distribution generated from hundreds of such events. A machine learning algorithm identifies stall events and indicates the effectiveness of available measurements or combinations of measurements as predictors. Bubble flow visualization and PIV are utilized to observe fluid conditions during stall events including the formation, separation, and advection of leading-edge vortices involved in the stall process.

  9. The matched-lag filter: detecting broadband multipath signals with auto- and cross-correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, J L

    2001-05-01

    Signal detection is considered for uncertain noise variance and a broadband source of unknown waveform and emission time. The signal travels to the receivers along paths with unknown delays. Using a new "matched-lag filter," the presence or absence of the signal is estimated from the auto- and cross-correlation functions of the receptions. Like a matched filter, correlation functions provide the first stage of gain in signal-to-noise ratio because the paths are assumed to be partially coherent. The second stage achieves additional gain by searching only over physically possible arrangements of signals in the auto- and cross-correlation functions while excluding forbidden arrangements. These stages enable the matched-lag filter to behave like a matched filter within a matched filter. In an ideal case, simulations of the matched-lag filter yield probabilities of detection that are, with one and two receivers, 4.1 and 366 times, respectively, that obtained from the conventional energy detector at a false-alarm probability of 0.001. The matched-lag filter has applications to wireless communications and the detection of acoustic signals from animals, vehicles, ships, and nuclear blasts. The matched-lag filter more completely describes signal structure than stochastic detection and communication theories whose specified auto-correlation function does not prohibit forbidden arrangements.

  10. Non-resonant parametric amplification in biomimetic hair flow sensors: Selective gain and tunable filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droogendijk, H.; Bruinink, C. M.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that the responsivity of flow sensors for harmonic flows can be improved significantly by non-resonant parametric amplification. Using electrostatic spring softening by AC-bias voltages, increased responsivity and sharp filtering are achieved in our biomimetic flow sensors. Tunable filtering is obtained for non-resonant electromechanical parametric amplification, applicable at a wide range of non-resonant frequencies while achieving highly selective gain of up to 20 dB.

  11. Hollywood log-homotopy: movies of particle flow for nonlinear filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we show five movies of particle flow to provide insight and intuition about this new algorithm. The particles flow solves the well known and important problem of particle degeneracy. Bayes' rule is implemented by particle flow rather than as a pointwise multiplication. This theory is roughly seven orders of magnitude faster than standard particle filters, and it often beats the extended Kalman filter by two orders of magnitude in accuracy for difficult nonlinear problems.

  12. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in the TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Henshaw, W D; Wang, S L

    2008-02-04

    To evaluate the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase vena cava filter using three dimensional computational fluid dynamics, including simulated thrombi of multiple shapes, sizes, and trapping positions. The study was performed to identify potential areas of recirculation and stagnation and areas in which trapped thrombi may influence intrafilter thrombosis. Computer models of the TrapEase filter, thrombi (volumes ranging from 0.25mL to 2mL, 3 different shapes), and a 23mm diameter cava were constructed. The hemodynamics of steady-state flow at Reynolds number 600 was examined for the unoccluded and partially occluded filter. Axial velocity contours and wall shear stresses were computed. Flow in the unoccluded TrapEase filter experienced minimal disruption, except near the superior and inferior tips where low velocity flow was observed. For spherical thrombi in the superior trapping position, stagnant and recirculating flow was observed downstream of the thrombus; the volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increased monotonically with thrombus volume. For inferiorly trapped spherical thrombi, marked disruption to the flow was observed along the cava wall ipsilateral to the thrombus and in the interior of the filter. Spherically shaped thrombus produced a lower peak wall shear stress than conically shaped thrombus and a larger peak stress than ellipsoidal thrombus. We have designed and constructed a computer model of the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase IVC filter with varying shapes, sizes, and positions of thrombi. The computer model offers several advantages over in vitro techniques including: improved resolution, ease of evaluating different thrombus sizes and shapes, and easy adaptation for new filter designs and flow parameters. Results from the model also support a previously reported finding from photochromic experiments that suggest the inferior trapping position of the TrapEase IVC filter leads to an intra-filter region of recirculating

  13. Adaptive Low Dissipative High Order Filter Methods for Multiscale MHD Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2004-01-01

    Adaptive low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous MHD flows has been constructed. Several variants of the filter approach that cater to different flow types are proposed. These filters provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field [divergence of B] numerical error in the sense that no standard divergence cleaning is required. For certain 2-D MHD test problems, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields of these filter schemes has been achieved.

  14. Divergence Free High Order Filter Methods for Multiscale Non-ideal MHD Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    Low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous MHD flows has been constructed. Several variants of the filter approach that cater to different flow types are proposed. These filters provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field (Delta . B) numerical error in the sense that no standard divergence cleaning is required. For certain 2-D MHD test problems, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields of these filter schemes has been achieved.

  15. Adaptive Low Dissipative High Order Filter Methods for Multiscale MHD Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2004-01-01

    Adaptive low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous MHD flows has been constructed. Several variants of the filter approach that cater to different flow types are proposed. These filters provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field [divergence of B] numerical error in the sense that no standard divergence cleaning is required. For certain 2-D MHD test problems, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields of these filter schemes has been achieved.

  16. Baleen Hydrodynamics and Morphology of Cross-Flow Filtration in Balaenid Whale Suspension Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Werth, Alexander J.; Potvin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The traditional view of mysticete feeding involves static baleen directly sieving particles from seawater using a simple, dead-end flow-through filtration mechanism. Flow tank experiments on bowhead (Balaena mysticetus) baleen indicate the long-standing model of dead-end filtration, at least in balaenid (bowhead and right) whales, is not merely simplistic but wrong. To recreate continuous intraoral flow, sections of baleen were tested in a flume through which water and buoyant particles circulated with variable flow velocity. Kinematic sequences were analyzed to investigate movement and capture of particles by baleen plates and fringes. Results indicate that very few particles flow directly through the baleen rack; instead much water flows anteroposteriorly along the interior (lingual) side of the rack, allowing items to be carried posteriorly and accumulate at the posterior of the mouth where they might readily be swallowed. Since water flows mainly parallel to rather than directly through the filter, the cross-flow mechanism significantly reduces entrapment and tangling of minute items in baleen fringes, obviating the need to clean the filter. The absence of copepods or other prey found trapped in the baleen of necropsied right and bowhead whales supports this hypothesis. Reduced through-baleen flow was observed with and without boundaries modeling the tongue and lips, indicating that baleen itself is the main if not sole agent of crossflow. Preliminary investigation of baleen from balaenopterid whales that use intermittent filter feeding suggests that although the biomechanics and hydrodynamics of oral flow differ, cross-flow filtration may occur to some degree in all mysticetes. PMID:26918630

  17. Baleen Hydrodynamics and Morphology of Cross-Flow Filtration in Balaenid Whale Suspension Feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Potvin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The traditional view of mysticete feeding involves static baleen directly sieving particles from seawater using a simple, dead-end flow-through filtration mechanism. Flow tank experiments on bowhead (Balaena mysticetus) baleen indicate the long-standing model of dead-end filtration, at least in balaenid (bowhead and right) whales, is not merely simplistic but wrong. To recreate continuous intraoral flow, sections of baleen were tested in a flume through which water and buoyant particles circulated with variable flow velocity. Kinematic sequences were analyzed to investigate movement and capture of particles by baleen plates and fringes. Results indicate that very few particles flow directly through the baleen rack; instead much water flows anteroposteriorly along the interior (lingual) side of the rack, allowing items to be carried posteriorly and accumulate at the posterior of the mouth where they might readily be swallowed. Since water flows mainly parallel to rather than directly through the filter, the cross-flow mechanism significantly reduces entrapment and tangling of minute items in baleen fringes, obviating the need to clean the filter. The absence of copepods or other prey found trapped in the baleen of necropsied right and bowhead whales supports this hypothesis. Reduced through-baleen flow was observed with and without boundaries modeling the tongue and lips, indicating that baleen itself is the main if not sole agent of crossflow. Preliminary investigation of baleen from balaenopterid whales that use intermittent filter feeding suggests that although the biomechanics and hydrodynamics of oral flow differ, cross-flow filtration may occur to some degree in all mysticetes.

  18. Pulsatile flow decreases gaseous micro-bubble filtering properties of oxygenators without integrated arterial filters during cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Aldo D.; Dodonov, Mikhail; Onorati, Francesco; Menon, Tiziano; Gottin, Leonardo; Malerba, Giovanni; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has a risk of embolic injury with an important role of gaseous micro-bubbles (GMBs), coming from CPB-circuit. Pulsatile perfusion (PP) can provide specific conditions for supplementary GMB-activity with respect to non-pulsatile (NP). We aimed to test GMB-filtering properties of three modern oxygenators under pulsatile and non-pulsatile conditions. METHODS Seventy-eight patients undergoing on-pump myocardial revascularization were randomized prospectively into three equal groups according to the oxygenator model used during CPB. Terumo Capiox-FX25, Sorin Synthesis or Maquet Quadrox-i-Adult membrane oxygenators were tested. Each group was divided equally to undergo PP or NP. GMBs were counted by means of a GAMPT-BCC200 bubble-counter with two probes placed at preoxygenator and arterial post-filter positions. Results were evaluated in terms of GMB-volume, GMB-number, amount of large over-ranged GMBs, a series of filtering indices and major neurological outcomes. RESULTS PP decreased GMB-filtering properties of the tested oxygenators. Those with integrated filters (CAPIOX-FX25 and SYNTHESIS) did not show significant differences between perfusion groups, while QUADROX-i oxygenator with external arterial filter showed significantly higher GMB-volume (P < 0.001), GMB-number (P < 0.001) and amount of over-ranged bubbles (P < 0.001) detected in arterial line during PP. Despite the differences in filtering capacity of all circuits with both types of perfusion, no important differences in clinical outcomes and major neurological events were observed. CONCLUSIONS Pulsatile flow decreases gaseous micro-bubble filtering properties of oxygenators without integrated arterial filters during CPB. PP requires specially designed circuit components to avoid the risk of additional GMB delivery. PMID:23842758

  19. Pulsatile flow decreases gaseous micro-bubble filtering properties of oxygenators without integrated arterial filters during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Milano, Aldo D; Dodonov, Mikhail; Onorati, Francesco; Menon, Tiziano; Gottin, Leonardo; Malerba, Giovanni; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has a risk of embolic injury with an important role of gaseous micro-bubbles (GMBs), coming from CPB-circuit. Pulsatile perfusion (PP) can provide specific conditions for supplementary GMB-activity with respect to non-pulsatile (NP). We aimed to test GMB-filtering properties of three modern oxygenators under pulsatile and non-pulsatile conditions. Seventy-eight patients undergoing on-pump myocardial revascularization were randomized prospectively into three equal groups according to the oxygenator model used during CPB. Terumo Capiox-FX25, Sorin Synthesis or Maquet Quadrox-i-Adult membrane oxygenators were tested. Each group was divided equally to undergo PP or NP. GMBs were counted by means of a GAMPT-BCC200 bubble-counter with two probes placed at preoxygenator and arterial post-filter positions. Results were evaluated in terms of GMB-volume, GMB-number, amount of large over-ranged GMBs, a series of filtering indices and major neurological outcomes. PP decreased GMB-filtering properties of the tested oxygenators. Those with integrated filters (CAPIOX-FX25 and SYNTHESIS) did not show significant differences between perfusion groups, while QUADROX-i oxygenator with external arterial filter showed significantly higher GMB-volume (P < 0.001), GMB-number (P < 0.001) and amount of over-ranged bubbles (P < 0.001) detected in arterial line during PP. Despite the differences in filtering capacity of all circuits with both types of perfusion, no important differences in clinical outcomes and major neurological events were observed. Pulsatile flow decreases gaseous micro-bubble filtering properties of oxygenators without integrated arterial filters during CPB. PP requires specially designed circuit components to avoid the risk of additional GMB delivery.

  20. Highly Inclined Jets in Cross Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, I. M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20deg and 45deg and yawed between Beta = 0deg and 90deg in increments of 15deg. The measurements were performed with two ×-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulent stresses. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x, normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, ? max, with the downstream distance is significantly less at higher Beta but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, ?xmax is about five times larger for Beta = 75deg compared to the levels at Beta = 0deg. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J. Distributions of turbulent stresses for various cases are documented. Peak normal stresses are found to occur within the core of the streamwise vortices. With yaw, at lower values of J, high turbulence is also observed in the boundary layer underneath the jet-vortex structure

  1. Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-06-27

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  2. Low frequency filtering of nasal pressure channel causes loss of flow limitation.

    PubMed

    Walter, Robert N; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this clinical vignette is to explore whether changes in low filter settings for respiratory waveforms have a clinically significant effect on patient management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This is a case report. We collected data from a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration polysomnogram (PSG) performed in our university based sleep laboratory. We reviewed the flow signal using low frequency filter settings of 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 Hz. We noted that a change in the low frequency filter for respiratory flow caused a change in the appearance of an otherwise flattened waveform indicating flow limitation to no longer appear flat. We noted that indiscriminate use of the low frequency filter for nasal pressure and flow estimate channels may lead to greater difficulty recognizing respiratory flow limitation.

  3. Modeling sediment trapping in a vegetative filter accounting for converging overland flow

    Treesearch

    M. J. Helmers; D. E. Eisenhauer; T. G. Franti; M. G. Dosskey

    2005-01-01

    Vegetative filters (VF) are used to remove sediment and other pollutants from overland flow. When modeling the hydrology of VF, it is often assumed that overland flow is planar, but our research indicated that it can be two-dimensional with converging and diverging pathways. Our hypothesis is that flow convergence will negatively influence the sediment trapping...

  4. An Evaluation of Mass Absorption Cross-Section for Optical Carbon Analysis on Teflon Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Presler-Jur, Paige; Doraiswamy, Prakash; Hammond, Oki; Rice, Joann

    2017-04-05

    Black carbon (BC) or elemental carbon (EC) is a by-product of incomplete fuel combustion, and contributes adversely to human health, visibility, and climate impacts. Previous studies have examined non-destructive techniques for particle light attenuation measurements on Teflon(®) filters to estimate BC. The incorporation of an inline Magee Scientific OT21 Transmissometer into the MTL AH-225 robotic weighing system provides the opportunity to perform optical transmission measurements on Teflon(®) filters at the same time as the gravimetric mass measurement. In this study, we characterize the performance of the inline OT21, and apply it to determine the mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of PM2.5 BC across the U.S. We analyzed 5393 archived Teflon(®) filters from the Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) collected during 2010-2011 and determined MAC by comparing light attenuation on Teflon(®) filters to corresponding thermal EC on quartz-fiber filters. Results demonstrated the importance of the initial transmission (I0) value used in light attenuation calculations. While light transmission varied greatly within filter lots, the average I0 of filter blanks during from the sampling period provided an estimate for archived filters. For newly collected samples, it is recommended that filter-specific I0 measurements be made (i.e., same filter before sample collection). The estimated MAC ranged from 6.9 to 9.4 m(2)/g that varied by region and season across the U.S., indicating that using a default value may lead to under- or over-estimated BC concentrations. An analysis of the chemical composition of these samples indicated good correlation with EC for samples with higher EC content as a fraction of total PM2.5 mass, while the presence of light scattering species such as crustal elements impacted the correlation affecting the MAC estimate. Overall, the method is demonstrated to be a quick, cost-effective approach to estimate BC from archived and newly sampled Teflon

  5. Eigen-based clutter filter design for ultrasound color flow imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Alfred; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-05-01

    Proper suppression of tissue clutter is a prerequisite for visualizing flow accurately in ultrasound color flow imaging. Among various clutter suppression methods, the eigen-based filter has shown potential because it can theoretically adapt its stopband to the actual clutter characteristics even when tissue motion is present. This paper presents a formative review on how eigen-based filters should be designed to improve their practical efficacy in adaptively suppressing clutter without affecting the blood flow echoes. Our review is centered around a comparative assessment of two eigen-filter design considerations: 1) eigen-component estimation approach (single-ensemble vs. multi-ensemble formulations), and 2) filter order selection mechanism (eigenvalue-based vs. frequencybased algorithms). To evaluate the practical efficacy of existing eigen-filter designs, we analyzed their clutter suppression level in two in vivo scenarios with substantial tissue motion (intra-operative coronary imaging and thyroid imaging). Our analysis shows that, as compared with polynomial regression filters (with or without instantaneous clutter downmixing), eigen-filters that use a frequency-based algorithm for filter order selection generally give Doppler power images with better contrast between blood and tissue regions. Results also suggest that both multi-ensemble and single-ensemble eigen-estimation approaches have their own advantages and weaknesses in different imaging scenarios. It may be beneficial to develop an algorithmic way of defining the eigen-filter formulation so that its performance advantages can be better realized.

  6. An evaluation of the filtration performance of paediatric breathing system filters at low flows.

    PubMed

    Malan, C A; Wilkes, A R; Hall, J E; Gildersleve, C

    2007-05-01

    The filtration performance of five different types of filter intended for use in paediatric anaesthesia was measured. A total of 120 unused filters (24 samples of each filter type) were evaluated. The pressure drop and filtration performance, using challenges of sodium chloride particles, were measured for each filter at 3 l min(-1) and 15 l min(-1). The pressure drop was less at the lower flow; there was a wide variation in the pressure drop across some filters. The filtration performance of all filter types showed an improvement at 3 l min(-1) compared to 15 l min(-1). Four filter types had filtration efficiencies greater than 95% at 15 l min(-1) and greater than 99% at 3 l min(-1). The remaining filter type had a filtration efficiency less than 90% at 15 l min(-1) and greater than 95% at 3 l min(-1). These levels of performance are comparable to that of breathing system filters intended for use in adult anaesthesia using flows representing mean inspiratory flow.

  7. Laminar boundary layers with uniform shear cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    Laminar boundary layers with fully developed uniform shear cross flows are considered. The first streamwise laminar flow is a Blasius boundary layer flow, the second is uniform shear flow over a semi-infinite plate, and the third is the flow induced by a power-law stretching surface. In the first two cases, the effect of streamwise plate motion is taken into account by the parameter λ. In each case, the similarity solutions reduce the governing boundary layer equations to a primary ordinary differential equation for the streamwise flow and a secondary linear equation coupled to the primary solution for the cross flow. It is found that an infinity of solutions exist in each problem and the unique solution in each case is found by applying the Glauert criterion. In some instances, a simple exact solution for the cross flow is presented. Results for the wall shear stresses and velocity profiles are given in graphical form.

  8. Immobilized cell cross-flow reactor. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chotani, G.K.; Constantinides, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cross-current flow reactor was operated using sodium alginate gel entrapped yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under growth conditions. Micron-sized silica, incorporated into the biocatalyst particles (1 mm mean diameter) improved mechanical strength and internal surface adhesion. The process showed decreased productivity and stability at 35/sup 0/C compared to the normal study done at 30/sup 0/C. The increased number of cross flows diminish the product inhibition effect. The residence time distribution shows that the cross-flow bioreactor system can be approximated to either a train of backmixed fermentors in series or a plug flow fermentor with moderate axial dispersion.

  9. The Effect of Cross Flow on Slat Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper continues the computational examination (AIAA Journal, Vol. 45, No. 9, 2007, pp. 2174-2186) of the unsteady flow within the slat cove region of a multi-element high-lift airfoil configuration. Two simulations have been performed to examine the effect of cross flow on the near-field fluctuations and far-field acoustics. The cross flow was imposed by changing the free-stream velocity vector and modifying the Reynolds number. The cross flow does appear to alter the dynamics in the cove region, but the impact on the noise seems to be more dependent on the flow conditions. However, separating out the true effects of the cross flow from those of the Mach and Reynolds number would require additional calculations to isolate those effects.

  10. Late wash cross-flow filter organic balance

    SciTech Connect

    Baich, M.A.

    1992-11-16

    A recent DOE-Savannah River review of the results and data from the Late Washing Crossflow Fitter assessment identified the fate of biphenyl as a concern in the Late Washing material balance. The concern arose because after the late washing operation only about 40% of the biphenyl remained in the irradiated precipitate and analyses of the spent wash water stream did not account for the missing biphenyl [2]. This document summarizes the results of subsequent filtration studies on the behavior and fate of all known organic precipitate feed components including biphenyl. The study employed a statistically designed material balance across a laboratory crossflow fitter. Data from two separate experiments are presented here. Results of the first study indicated no statistically significant loss of biphenyl, diphenylmercury, 0-terphenyl, diphenylamine, or aniline. Results did indicate minor losses of phenylboric acid, M-terphenyl, P-terphenyl, and a significant production of phenol, believed to be due to the way in which the experiment was performed. A second experiment demonstrated no statistically significant lose of any of the organic compounds.

  11. Cross flow characteristics in a three fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J. H.; Euh, D. J.; Park, C. K.; Youn, Y. J.; Kwon, T. S.

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the reactor thermal margin of APR+, reactor core flow distribution including both axial and lateral directional hydraulic resistances of fuel assemblies should be known. 3-Ch cross flow test facility has been constructed with three full-size fuel assemblies to investigate the cross flow characteristics. Performance tests have been performed. The axial and lateral directional hydraulic resistances of fuel assemblies have been measured. The test results have been compared to the CFD calculation. (authors)

  12. Analysis of nitrogen removal processes in a subsurface flow carbonate sand filter treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kløve, Bjørn; Søvik, Anne-Kristine; Holtan-Hartwig, Liv

    2005-01-01

    Controlled experiments were carried out in a mesoscale subsurface flow sand filter treating municipal wastewater from a single household. The system consisted of a 50 cm high vertical flow column (pre-filter) with unsaturated flow and a 3 m long horizontal subsurface flow unit (main filter) with saturated flow. Fluxes of nitrogen and carbon were analyzed in 4 different operating conditions (low and high loading, with and without the prefilter unit). Water samples were taken from the inlet, the outlet and within the sand filter at different depths and locations and analysed for water quality (Tot N, NO3-N, NH4-N, TOC, DOC, CODcr, BOD5, SS, pH, and EC) and dissolved gas content (N2O, CH4, and CO2). Emissions of N2O, CH4, and CO2 were measured with the closed-chamber technique adjacent to water quality sampling points. The results show that prefiltering in a vertical, unsaturated flow column changed the incoming ammonium to nitrate during low loading. During high loading part of the ammonium nitrified in the pre-filter was lost by denitrification. Within the horizontal main filter there were two pathways for the incoming nitrate: denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA).

  13. Effects of flow maldistribution on the thermal performance of cross-flow micro heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonino, C.; Savino, S.

    2016-09-01

    The combined effect of viscosity- and geometry-induced flow maldistribution on the thermal performance of cross-flow micro heat exchangers is investigated with reference to two microchannel cross-sectional geometries, three solid materials, three mass flow rates and three flow nonuniformity models. A FEM procedure, specifically developed for the analysis of the heat transfer between incompressible fluids in cross-flow micro heat exchangers, is used for the numerical simulations. The computed results indicate that flow maldistribution has limited effects on microchannel bulk temperatures, at least for the considered range of operating conditions.

  14. Flow in tubes of non-circular cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadir, Raushan Ara

    Laminar, viscous, incompressible flow in tubes of noncircular cross sections is investigated. The specific aims of the investigation are (1) to look at the problems of both developing flow and fully developed flow, (2) to consider noncircular cross sections in a more systematic manner than has been done in the past, and (3) to develop a relatively simple finite element technique for producing accurate numerical solutions of flow in tubes of fairly arbitrary cross sections. Fully developed flow in tubes is governed by a Poisson type equation for the mainstream velocity. Both analytical and numerical solutions are considered. The cross sections studied include elliptic and rectangular cross sections of different aspect ratios, some triangular cross sections, and a series of crescent-shaped cross sections. The physical characteristics of the flow are examined in a systematic manner in order to determine how these characteristics are affected by certain geometrical features of the cross section. Solutions fall into three basic categories depending on the shape of the cross section. In the first category, which includes circular and elliptic cross sections, solutions are possible in closed form. In the second, including rectangular and some triangular cross sections, solutions are in the form of infinite series. In the third, including cross sections of more complicated or irregular shapes, only numerical solutions are possible. Results of calculations of velocity profiles, flow rate, pumping power, and friction factor are presented in a way which can be useful for engineering applications. In numerical studies of both developing and fully developed flow finite element techniques are used. Results are obtained for tubes of rectangular and elliptic cross sections of different aspect ratios, for tubes of crescent-shaped cross sections, and a tube whose cross section is an oval of Cassini. For fully developed flow, results are compared with the corresponding exact

  15. Robust scale-up of dead end filtration: impact of filter fouling mechanisms and flow distribution.

    PubMed

    Laska, Michael E; Brooks, Ralph P; Gayton, Marshall; Pujar, Narahari S

    2005-11-05

    Robust design of a dead end filtration step and the resulting performance at manufacturing scale relies on laboratory data collected with small filter units. During process development it is important to characterize and understand the filter fouling mechanisms of the process streams so that an accurate assessment can be made of the filter area required at manufacturing scale. Successful scale-up also requires integration of the lab-scale filtration data with an understanding of flow characteristics in the full-scale filtration equipment. A case study is presented on the development and scale-up of a depth filtration step used in a 2nd generation polysaccharide vaccine manufacturing process. The effect of operating parameters on filter performance was experimentally characterized for a diverse set of process streams. Filter capacity was significantly reduced when operating at low fluxes, caused by both low filtration pressure and high stream viscosity. The effect of flux on filter capacity could be explained for a variety of diverse streams by a single mechanistic model of filter fouling. To complement the laboratory filtration data, the fluid flow and distribution characteristics in manufacturing-scale filtration equipment were carefully evaluated. This analysis identified the need for additional scale-up factors to account for non-uniform filter area usage in large-scale filter housings. This understanding proved critical to the final equipment design and depth filtration step definition, resulting in robust process performance at manufacturing scale. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Performance Evaluation of Axial Flow AG-1 FC and Prototype FM (High Strength) HEPA Filters - 13123

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Wilson, John A.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are routinely used in DOE nuclear containment activities. The Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook (NACH) stipulates that air cleaning devices and equipment used in DOE nuclear applications must meet the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) standard. This testing activity evaluates two different axial flow HEPA filters, those from AG-1 Sections FC and FM. Section FM is under development and has not yet been added to AG-1 due to a lack of qualification data available for these filters. Section FC filters are axial flow units that utilize a fibrous glass filtering medium. The section FM filters utilize a similar fibrous glass medium, but also have scrim backing. The scrim-backed filters have demonstrated the ability to endure pressure impulses capable of completely destroying FC filters. The testing activities presented herein will examine the total lifetime loading for both FC and FM filters under ambient conditions and at elevated conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Results will include loading curves, penetration curves, and testing condition parameters. These testing activities have been developed through collaborations with representatives from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), New Mexico State University, and Mississippi State University. (authors)

  17. Application of Micropore Filter Technology: Exploring the Blood Flow Path in Arterial-Line Filters and Its Effect on Bubble Trapping Functions

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Daniel P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Conventional arterial-line filters commonly use a large volume circular shaped housing, a wetted micropore screen, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove gas bubbles from extracorporeal blood flow. Focusing on the bubble trapping function, this work attempts to explore how the filter housing shape and its resulting blood flow path affect the clinical application of arterial-line filters in terms of gross air handling. A video camera was used in a wet-lab setting to record observations made during gross air-bolus injections in three different radially designed filters using a 30–70% glycerol–saline mixture flowing at 4.5 L/min. Two of the filters both had inlet ports attached near the filter-housing top with bottom oriented outlet ports at the bottom, whereas the third filter had its inlet and outlet ports both located at the bottom of the filter housing. The two filters with top-in bottom-out fluid paths were shown to direct the incoming flow downward as it passed through the filter, placing the forces of buoyancy and viscous drag in opposition to each other. This contrasted with the third filter's bottom-in bottom-out fluid path, which was shown to direct the incoming flow upward so that the forces of buoyancy and viscous drag work together. The direction of the blood flow path through a filter may be important to the application of arterial-line filter technology as it helps determine how the forces of buoyancy and flow are aligned with one another. PMID:28298665

  18. Application of Micropore Filter Technology: Exploring the Blood Flow Path in Arterial-Line Filters and Its Effect on Bubble Trapping Functions.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Daniel P

    2017-03-01

    Conventional arterial-line filters commonly use a large volume circular shaped housing, a wetted micropore screen, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove gas bubbles from extracorporeal blood flow. Focusing on the bubble trapping function, this work attempts to explore how the filter housing shape and its resulting blood flow path affect the clinical application of arterial-line filters in terms of gross air handling. A video camera was used in a wet-lab setting to record observations made during gross air-bolus injections in three different radially designed filters using a 30-70% glycerol-saline mixture flowing at 4.5 L/min. Two of the filters both had inlet ports attached near the filter-housing top with bottom oriented outlet ports at the bottom, whereas the third filter had its inlet and outlet ports both located at the bottom of the filter housing. The two filters with top-in bottom-out fluid paths were shown to direct the incoming flow downward as it passed through the filter, placing the forces of buoyancy and viscous drag in opposition to each other. This contrasted with the third filter's bottom-in bottom-out fluid path, which was shown to direct the incoming flow upward so that the forces of buoyancy and viscous drag work together. The direction of the blood flow path through a filter may be important to the application of arterial-line filter technology as it helps determine how the forces of buoyancy and flow are aligned with one another.

  19. Design of cross-coupled planar microstrip band-pass filters using a novel adjustment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkafaji, Muhammed S. S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper the design of a cross-coupled planar microwave band-pass filter using open-loop square microstrip resonators, with two symmetrically placed attenuation poles, is presented. The design starts from the following specifications: central frequency 3GHz, 150MHz bandwidth, 1dB ripple in the pass-band corresponding to return loss of 6.8dB.The adjustment method using additional ports placed on each resonator of the filter is used, allowing the interconnection of the filter structure with external lumped elements. Connecting a reactive element (capacitor) from such an additional port to ground allows a fine tuning of the resonator. Connecting a reactive element between two such additional ports allows a fine change in the coupling coefficient between these resonators. After adding four extra ports and connecting the external elements (capacitors), it is possible to use fast circuit simulation software to optimize the filter's response. Then all these capacitors have to be gradually eliminated, by compensating their effects through fine changes back in the layouts. If some specific issues are properly handled, this procedure improves considerably the quality of the final design of the filter. After a thorough optimization of the layout, the filter was fabricated and measured. The results of measurements are in good agreement with the specifications of the filter, showing this way the efficiency of the applied optimization method.

  20. Two interacting cylinders in cross flow.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Mahbub; Meyer, J P

    2011-11-01

    Cylindrical structures in a group are frequently seen on land and in the ocean. Mutual flow interaction between the structures makes the wake very excited or tranquil depending on the spacing between the structures. The excited wake-enhancing forces in some cases cause a catastrophic failure of the structures. This paper presents results of an experimental investigation of Strouhal number (St), time-mean, and fluctuating forces on, and flow structures around, two identical circular cylinders at stagger angle α = 0°-180° and gap-spacing ratio T/D=0.1-5, where T is the gap width between the cylinders, and D is the diameter of a cylinder. While forces were measured using a load cell, St was from spectral analysis of fluctuating pressures measured on the side surfaces of the cylinders. A flow visualization test was conducted to observe flow structures around the cylinders. Based on forces, St, and flow structures, 19 distinct flow categories in the ranges of α and T/D investigated are observed, including one quadristable flow, three kinds of tristable flows, and four kinds of bistable flows. The quadristable, tristable, and bistable flows ensue from instabilities of the gap flow, shear layers, vortices, separation bubbles, and wakes, engendering a strong jump or drop in forces and St of the cylinders. The two cylinders interact with each other in six different mechanisms, namely interaction between boundary layer and cylinder, shear layer or wake and cylinder, shear layer and shear layer, vortex and cylinder, vortex and shear layer, and vortex and vortex. While the interaction between vortex and cylinder results in a very high fluctuating drag, that between vortex and shear layer results in a high fluctuating lift. On the other hand, the interaction between shear layer or wake and cylinder weakens mean and fluctuating forces and flow unsteadiness. A mutual discussion of forces, St, and flow structures is presented in this paper.

  1. Two interacting cylinders in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Mahbub; Meyer, J. P.

    2011-11-01

    Cylindrical structures in a group are frequently seen on land and in the ocean. Mutual flow interaction between the structures makes the wake very excited or tranquil depending on the spacing between the structures. The excited wake-enhancing forces in some cases cause a catastrophic failure of the structures. This paper presents results of an experimental investigation of Strouhal number (St), time-mean, and fluctuating forces on, and flow structures around, two identical circular cylinders at stagger angle α = 0 °-180 ° and gap-spacing ratio T/D=0.1-5, where T is the gap width between the cylinders, and D is the diameter of a cylinder. While forces were measured using a load cell, St was from spectral analysis of fluctuating pressures measured on the side surfaces of the cylinders. A flow visualization test was conducted to observe flow structures around the cylinders. Based on forces, St, and flow structures, 19 distinct flow categories in the ranges of α and T/D investigated are observed, including one quadristable flow, three kinds of tristable flows, and four kinds of bistable flows. The quadristable, tristable, and bistable flows ensue from instabilities of the gap flow, shear layers, vortices, separation bubbles, and wakes, engendering a strong jump or drop in forces and St of the cylinders. The two cylinders interact with each other in six different mechanisms, namely interaction between boundary layer and cylinder, shear layer or wake and cylinder, shear layer and shear layer, vortex and cylinder, vortex and shear layer, and vortex and vortex. While the interaction between vortex and cylinder results in a very high fluctuating drag, that between vortex and shear layer results in a high fluctuating lift. On the other hand, the interaction between shear layer or wake and cylinder weakens mean and fluctuating forces and flow unsteadiness. A mutual discussion of forces, St, and flow structures is presented in this paper.

  2. Synthetic Jets in Cross-flow. Part 1; Round Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation on synthetic jets from round orifices with and without cross-flow are presented. Jet Reynolds number up to 46,000 with a fully turbulent approach boundary layer, and Stokes number up to 400. are covered. The threshold of stroke length for synthetic jet formation. in the absence of the cross-flow, is found to be Lo /D approximately 0.5. Above Lo /D is approximately 10, the profiles of normalized centerline mean velocity appear to become invariant. It is reasoned that the latter threshold may be related to the phenomenon of saturation of impulsively generated vortices. In the presence of the cross-flow, the penetration height of a synthetic jet is found to depend on the momentum- flux ratio . When this ratio is defined in terms of the maximum jet velocity and the cross-flow velocity. not only all data collapse but also the jet trajectory is predicted well by correlation equation available for steady jets-in-cross-flow. Distributions of mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as turbulence intensity for a synthetic jet in cross-flow are found to be similar to those of a steady jet-in-cross-flow. A pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, corresponding to the bound vortex pair of the steady case, is clearly observed. Mean velocity distribution exhibits a dome of low momentum fluid pulled up from the boundary layer, and the entire domain is characterized by high turbulence.

  3. Comparison of NOM removal and microbial properties in up-flow/down-flow BAC filter.

    PubMed

    Han, Lineng; Liu, Wenjun; Chen, Mo; Zhang, Minglu; Liu, Shuming; Sun, Ruilin; Fei, Xiangqin

    2013-09-15

    The removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in term of CODMn by up-flow biologically activated carbon filter (UBACF) and down-flow biologically activated carbon filter (DBACF) was investigated in a pilot-scale test. The impacts of the molecular weight distribution of NOM on its degradation by the UBACF and DBACF were evaluated. The relationship between biodegradation and the microbial properties in the UBACF and DBACF were approached as well. The feed water of the UBACF and DBACF were pumped from the effluent of the rapid sand filtration (RSF) of Chengnan Drinking Water Treatment Plant (CDWTP), Huaian, Jiangsu Province, China. When the adsorption was the dominant mechanism of NOM removal at the initial stage of operation, the CODMn removal efficiency by the UBACF was lower than the DBACF. However, with the microbes gradually accumulated and biofilm formed, the removal of CODMn by the UBACF increased correspondingly to 25.3%, at the steady-state operation and was approximately 10% higher than that by the DBACF. Heterotrophy plate count (HPC) in the finished water of the UBACF was observed 30% higher than that of the DBACF. The UBACF effluent had higher concentration of detached bacteria whereas the DBACF harbored more attached biomass. The highest attached biomass concentration of the UBACF was found in the middle of the GAC bed. On the contrary, the highest attached biomass concentration of the DBACF was found on the top of the GAC bed. Furthermore, a total of 9479 reads by pyrosequencing was obtained from samples of the UBACF and DBACF effluents. The UBACF effluent had a more diverse microbial community and more even distribution of species than the DBACF effluent did. Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in the finished water of the UBACF and DBACF. The higher organic matter removal by the UBACF was attributed to the presence of its higher biologically activity.

  4. N95 and p100 respirator filter efficiency under high constant and cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Eshbaugh, Jonathan P; Gardner, Paul D; Richardson, Aaron W; Hofacre, Kent C

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of high flow conditions on aerosol penetration and the relationship between penetration at constant and cyclic flow conditions. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved N95 and P100 filtering facepiece respirators and cartridges were challenged with inert solid and oil aerosols. A combination of monodisperse aerosol and size-specific aerosol measurement equipment allowed count-based penetration measurement of particles with nominal diameters ranging from 0.02 to 2.9 microm. Three constant flow conditions (85, 270, and 360 L/min) were selected to match the minute, inhalation mean, and inhalation peak flows of the four cyclic flow conditions (40, 85, 115, and 135 L/min) tested. As expected, penetration was found to increase under increased constant and cyclic flow conditions. The most penetrating particle size (MPPS) generally ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 microm for P100 filters and was approximately 0.05 microm for N95 filters. Although penetration increased at the high flow conditions, the MPPS was relatively unaffected by flow. Of the constant flows tested, the flows equivalent to cyclic inhalation mean and peak flows best approximated the penetration measurements of the corresponding cyclic flows.

  5. Molecular filter-based diagnostics in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Gregory S.; Samimy, MO; Arnette, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    The use of iodine molecular filters in nonintrusive planar velocimetry methods is examined. Detailed absorption profiles are obtained to highlight the effects that determine the profile shape. It is shown that pressure broadening induced by the presence of a nonabsorbing vapor can be utilized to significantly change the slopes bounding the absorbing region while remaining in the optically-thick regime.

  6. Parametric study on performance of cross-flow turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.B.; Seshadri, V.; Singh, S.N.

    1995-04-01

    In the present experimental study, the effect of blade number, nozzle entry arc, and head on the performance characteristics of a cross-flow turbine have been investigated. It has been observed that the efficiency of the turbine increases with increase in blade number, nozzle entry arc, and head. The present investigation has also shown that there is an optimum number of blades for a given nozzle entry arc beyond which the performance of the cross-flow turbine deteriorates. It has also been shown that cross-flow turbines at higher heads do not behave as pure impulse turbines.

  7. Effects of Purge-Flow Rate on Microbubble Capture in Radial Arterial-Line Filters.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    The process of microbubble filtration from blood is complex and highly dependent on the forces of flow and buoyancy. To protect the patient from air emboli, arterial-line filters commonly use a micropore screen, a large volume housing with purpose-built shape, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove circulating microbubbles. Although it has been proposed that an insufficient buoyancy force renders the purge port ineffective at removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm, this research attempts to investigate the purge flow of an arterial-line filter to better understand the microbubble removal function in a typical radial filter design. As its primary objective, the study aims to determine the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture using air bolus injections from a syringe pump with 22-gauge needle and Doppler ultrasound bubble detection. The measureable bubble size generated in the test circuit ranged between 30 and 500 μm, while purge flow was varied between .1 and .5 L/min for testing. Statistical analysis of the test data was handled using a repeated measures design with significance set at p < .05 level. Outcomes demonstrated that higher purge flows yielded higher bubble counts, but the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture decreased as bubble size increased. Results also showed that purge flow from the test filter was capable of capturing all bubble sizes being generated over the entire flow range tested, and confirms utility of the purge port in removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm. By analyzing bubble counts in the purge flow of a typical radial-filter design, this study demonstrates that currently available micropore filter technology is capable of removing the size range of bubbles that commonly pass through modern pump-oxygenator systems and should continue to be considered during extracorporeal circulation as a measure to improve patient safety.

  8. Effects of Purge-Flow Rate on Microbubble Capture in Radial Arterial-Line Filters

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The process of microbubble filtration from blood is complex and highly dependent on the forces of flow and buoyancy. To protect the patient from air emboli, arterial-line filters commonly use a micropore screen, a large volume housing with purpose-built shape, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove circulating microbubbles. Although it has been proposed that an insufficient buoyancy force renders the purge port ineffective at removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm, this research attempts to investigate the purge flow of an arterial-line filter to better understand the microbubble removal function in a typical radial filter design. As its primary objective, the study aims to determine the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture using air bolus injections from a syringe pump with 22-gauge needle and Doppler ultrasound bubble detection. The measureable bubble size generated in the test circuit ranged between 30 and 500 μm, while purge flow was varied between .1 and .5 L/min for testing. Statistical analysis of the test data was handled using a repeated measures design with significance set at p < .05 level. Outcomes demonstrated that higher purge flows yielded higher bubble counts, but the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture decreased as bubble size increased. Results also showed that purge flow from the test filter was capable of capturing all bubble sizes being generated over the entire flow range tested, and confirms utility of the purge port in removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm. By analyzing bubble counts in the purge flow of a typical radial-filter design, this study demonstrates that currently available micropore filter technology is capable of removing the size range of bubbles that commonly pass through modern pump-oxygenator systems and should continue to be considered during extracorporeal circulation as a measure to improve patient safety. PMID:27729703

  9. A baker's dozen of new particle flows for nonlinear filters, Bayesian decisions and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2015-05-01

    We describe a baker's dozen of new particle flows to compute Bayes' rule for nonlinear filters, Bayesian decisions and learning as well as transport. Several of these new flows were inspired by transport theory, but others were inspired by physics or statistics or Markov chain Monte Carlo methods.

  10. An explicit filtering method for large eddy simulation of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Joseph; Lechner, Richard; Foysi, Holger; Sesterhenn, Joern; Friedrich, Rainer

    2003-08-01

    A method for large eddy simulation (LES) is presented in which the sub-grid-scale modeling is achieved by filtering procedures alone. The procedure derives from a deconvolution model, and provides a mathematically consistent approximation of unresolved terms arising from any type of nonlinearity. The formal steps of primary filtering to obtain LES equations, approximate deconvolution to construct the subgrid model term and regularization are combined into an equivalent filter. This filter should be an almost perfect low pass filter below a cut-off wavenumber and then fall off smoothly. The procedure has been applied to a pressure-velocity-entropy formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flow to perform LES of two fully developed, turbulent, supersonic channel flows and has been assessed by comparison against direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Mach numbers are 1.5 and 3.0, and Reynolds numbers are 3000 and 6000, respectively. Effects of filter cut-off location, choice of differentiation scheme (a fifth-order compact upwind formula and a symmetric sixth-order compact formula were used), and grid refinement are examined. The effects are consistent with, and are readily understood by reference to, filtering characteristics of the differentiation and the LES filter. All simulations demonstrate a uniform convergence towards their respective DNS solutions.

  11. Adaptive clutter filtering based on sparse component analysis in ultrasound color flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Dalong; Bian, Zhengzhong

    2008-07-01

    An adaptive method based on the sparse component analysis is proposed for stronger clutter filtering in ultrasound color flow imaging (CFI). In the present method, the focal underdetermined system solver (FOCUSS) algorithm is employed, and the iteration of the algorithm is based on weighted norm minimization of the dependent variable with the weights being a function of the preceding iterative solutions. By finding the localized energy solution vector representing strong clutter components, the FOCUSS algorithm first extracts the clutter from the original signal. However, the different initialization of the basis function matrix has an impact on the filtering performance of FOCUSS algorithms. Thus, 2 FOCUSS clutter- filtering methods, the original and the modified, are obtained by initializing the basis function matrix using a predetermined set of monotone sinusoids and using the discrete Karhunen-Loeve transform (DKLT) and spatial averaging, respectively. Validation of 2 FOCUSS filtering methods has been performed through experimental tests, in which they were compared with several conventional clutter filters using simplistic simulated and gathered clinical data. The results demonstrate that 2 FOCUSS filtering methods can follow signal varying adaptively and perform clutter filtering effectively. Moreover, the modified method may obtain the further improved filtering performance and retain more blood flow information in regions close to vessel walls.

  12. Flow and fouling in membrane filters: Effects of membrane morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2015-11-01

    Membrane filters are widely-used in microfiltration applications. Many types of filter membranes are produced commercially, for different filtration applications, but broadly speaking the requirements are to achieve fine control of separation, with low power consumption. The answer to this problem might seem obvious: select the membrane with the largest pore size and void fraction consistent with the separation requirements. However, membrane fouling (an inevitable consequence of successful filtration) is a complicated process, which depends on many parameters other than membrane pore size and void fraction; and which itself greatly affects the filtration process and membrane functionality. In this work we formulate mathematical models that can (i) account for the membrane internal morphology (internal structure, pore size & shape, etc.); (ii) fouling of membranes with specific morphology; and (iii) make some predictions as to what type of membrane morphology might offer optimum filtration performance.

  13. Modeling Flow Past a TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Michael; Henshaw, William; Wang, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    This study uses three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the efficacy of the TrapEase inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Hemodynamics of the unoccluded and partially occluded filter are examined, and the clinical implications are assessed. The IVC, which is the primary vein that drains the legs, is modeled as a straight pipe, and a geometrically accurate model of the filter is constructed using computer aided design. Blood is modeled as a homogeneous, incompressible, Newtonian fluid, and the method of overset grids is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Results are corroborated with in-vitro studies. Flow around the unoccluded filter demonstrates minimal disruption, but spherical clots in the downstream trapping position lead to regions of stagnant and recirculating flow that may promote further clotting. The volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increase with clot volume. For clots trapped in the upstream trapping position, flow is disrupted along the cava wall downstream of the clot and within the filter. The shape and location of trapped clots also effect the peak wall shear stress and may impact the efficacy of the filter.

  14. Syringe Pump Performance Maintained with IV Filter Use During Low Flow Rate Delivery for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Chau, Destiny F; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Schoepf, Miriam; Zhang, Christina; Fahy, Brenda G

    2016-09-01

    Complex surgical and critically ill pediatric patients rely on syringe infusion pumps for precise delivery of IV medications. Low flow rates and in-line IV filter use may affect drug delivery. To determine the effects of an in-line filter to remove air and/or contaminants on syringe pump performance at low flow rates, we compared the measured rates with the programmed flow rates with and without in-line IV filters. Standardized IV infusion assemblies with and without IV filters (filter and control groups) attached to a 10-mL syringe were primed and then loaded onto a syringe pump and connected to a 16-gauge, 16-cm single-lumen catheter. The catheter was suspended in a normal saline fluid column to simulate the back pressure from central venous circulation. The delivered infusate was measured by gravimetric methods at predetermined time intervals, and flow rate was calculated. Experimental trials for initial programmed rates of 1.0, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mL/h were performed in control and filter groups. For each trial, the flow rate was changed to double the initial flow rate and was then returned to the initial flow rate to analyze pump performance for titration of rates often required during medication administration. These conditions (initial rate, doubling of initial rate, and return to initial rate) were analyzed separately for steady-state flow rate and time to steady state, whereas their average was used for percent deviation analysis. Differences between control and filter groups were assessed using Student t tests with adjustment for multiplicity (using n = 3 replications per group). Mean time from 0 to initial flow (startup delay) was <1 minute in both groups with no statistical difference between groups (P = 1.0). The average time to reach steady-state flow after infusion startup or rate changes was not statistically different between the groups (range, 0.8-5.5 minutes), for any flow rate or part of the trial (initial rate, doubling of initial rate, and

  15. Flow of Viscoelastic Polymer Solutions through Filter Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machač, Ivan; Surý, Alexander; Šiška, Bedřich

    2011-07-01

    In this contribution, the measurements are presented of the pressure drop in the creeping flow of viscoelastic solution of polyacrylamides through metal wire screens, differing in wire diameter, aperture dimension, and type of weaving. In this flow, a strong elastic pressure drop excess manifest itself. Analysing the extensive set of experimental data, it was verified that for engineering estimation of the pressure drop excess, a simple form of the corrective Deborah number function can be used.

  16. Construction of Low Dissipative High Order Well-Balanced Filter Schemes for Non-Equilibrium Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei; Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, Bjorn; Magin, Thierry; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to generalize the well-balanced approach for non-equilibrium flow studied by Wang et al. [26] to a class of low dissipative high order shock-capturing filter schemes and to explore more advantages of well-balanced schemes in reacting flows. The class of filter schemes developed by Yee et al. [30], Sjoegreen & Yee [24] and Yee & Sjoegreen [35] consist of two steps, a full time step of spatially high order non-dissipative base scheme and an adaptive nonlinear filter containing shock-capturing dissipation. A good property of the filter scheme is that the base scheme and the filter are stand alone modules in designing. Therefore, the idea of designing a well-balanced filter scheme is straightforward, i.e., choosing a well-balanced base scheme with a well-balanced filter (both with high order). A typical class of these schemes shown in this paper is the high order central difference schemes/predictor-corrector (PC) schemes with a high order well-balanced WENO filter. The new filter scheme with the well-balanced property will gather the features of both filter methods and well-balanced properties: it can preserve certain steady state solutions exactly; it is able to capture small perturbations, e.g., turbulence fluctuations; it adaptively controls numerical dissipation. Thus it shows high accuracy, efficiency and stability in shock/turbulence interactions. Numerical examples containing 1D and 2D smooth problems, 1D stationary contact discontinuity problem and 1D turbulence/shock interactions are included to verify the improved accuracy, in addition to the well-balanced behavior.

  17. Study on an undershot cross-flow water turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Omiya, Ryota; Fukutomi, Junichiro

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop a water turbine suitable for ultra-low heads in open channels, with the end goal being the effective utilization of unutilized hydroelectric energy in agricultural water channels. We performed tests by applying a cross-flow runner to an open channel as an undershot water turbine while attempting to simplify the structure and eliminate the casing. We experimentally investigated the flow fields and performance of water turbines in states where the flow rate was constant for the undershot cross-flow water turbine mentioned above. In addition, we compared existing undershot water turbines with our undershot cross-flow water turbine after attaching a bottom plate to the runner. From the results, we were able to clarify the following. Although the effective head for cross-flow runners with no bottom plate was lower than those found in existing runners equipped with a bottom plate, the power output is greater in the high rotational speed range because of the high turbine efficiency. Also, the runner with no bottom plate differed from runners that had a bottom plate in that no water was being wound up by the blades or retained between the blades, and the former received twice the flow due to the flow-through effect. As a result, the turbine efficiency was greater for runners with no bottom plate in the full rotational speed range compared with that found in runners that had a bottom plate.

  18. Plasmonic band-pass filter device using coupled asymmetric cross-shaped cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiao-Meng; Mi, Si-Chen; Wang, Tie-Jun; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel plasmonic band-pass filter by using the system consisting four waveguides and an asymmetric cross-shaped resonator is proposed. The plasmonic system is based on the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure which could overcome the diffraction limit and exhibit various promising applications. Here, we investigate the transmission spectra of the cross-shaped resonator by using finite-different-time-domain (FDTD) method and we find that the peak-wavelength on different ports show redshift or blueshift behaviors which are linearly changed with the length of cavity or the coupling distance. Moreover, the wavelength filter could be achieved and further applied in optical signal integrated circuits.

  19. Polarization tunable all-dielectric color filters based on cross-shaped Si nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Vashistha, Vishal; Vaidya, Gayatri; Gruszecki, Pawel; Serebryannikov, Andriy E; Krawczyk, Maciej

    2017-08-14

    Polarization sensitive and insensitive color filters have important applications in the area of nano-spectroscopy and CCD imaging applications. Metallic nanostructures provide an efficient way to design and engineer ultrathin color filters. These nanostructures have capability to split the white light into fundamental colors and enable color filters with ultrahigh resolution but their efficiency can be restricted due to high losses in metals especially at the visible wavelengths. In this work, we demonstrate all-dielectric color filters based on Si nanoantennas, which are sensitive to incident-wave polarization and, thus, tunable with the aid of polarization angle variation. Two different information can be encoded in two different polarization states in one nanostructure. The nanoantenna based pixels are highly efficient and can provide high quality of colors, in particular, due to low losses in Si at optical frequencies. We experimentally demonstrate that a variety of colors can be achieved by changing the physical size of the nonsymmetric cross-shaped nanoantennas. The proposed devices allow to cover an extended gamut of colors on CIE-1931 chromaticity diagram owing to the existence of high-quality resonances in Si nanoantennas. Significant tunability of the suggested color filters can be achieved by varying polarization angle in both transmission and reflection mode. Additional tunability can be obtained by switching between transmission and reflection modes.

  20. A scale-down cross-flow filtration technology for biopharmaceuticals and the associated theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuyin; Kiefer, Hans; Zhou, Dansheng; Guan, Yue Hugh; Wang, Shili; Wang, Hua; Lu, Ying; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-03-10

    Use of microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) in cross-flow mode has been intensifying in downstream processing for expensive biopharmaceuticals. A scale-down cross-flow module with ring channel was constructed for reducing costs and increasing throughput. Commensurate with its validation, a new scale down (or scale up) theoretical framework has been further developed to 3 operational parities: (1) ratio of initial sample volume to membrane area, (2) shear force adjacent to membrane surface, and (3) initial permeate flux. By keeping identical initial physicochemical properties, we show that these 3 operational parities are equivalent to 2 further time-dependent theoretical parities for flux and transmission respectively. Importantly, transmission sensitively reflects membrane conditions for partially transmissible molecules or particles. Computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to confirm nearly identical shear forces for the mini and its reference filters. Permeate fluxes in suspension containing Escherichia coli phage T7, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) or other proteins, and transmission (with phage T7) were measured. For application demonstration, diafiltration and concentration modes were applied to the MAb, and separation mode to a mixture of bovine serum albumin and lysozyme. In conclusion, the developed scale-down filter has been shown to behave identically or similarly to its reference filter.

  1. Turbulent combustion flow through variable cross section channel

    SciTech Connect

    Rogov, B.V.; Sokolova, I.A.

    1999-07-01

    The object of this study is to develop a new evolutionary numerical method for solving direct task of Laval nozzle, which provides non-iterative calculations of chemical reacting turbulent flows with detailed kinetic chemistry. The numerical scheme of fourth order along the normal coordinate and second order along the streamwise one is derived for calculation of difference-differential equations of the second order and the first order. Marching method provides the possibility of computing field flow in subsonic section of nozzle and near an expansion. Critical mass consumption is calculated with controlled accuracy. After critical cross section of nozzle a combined marching method with global iterations over axial pressure (only) makes it possible to overcome ill posedness of mixed supersonic flow and calculate the whole flow field near and after critical cross section. Numerical results are demonstrated on turbulent burning hydrogen-oxygen flow through Laval nozzle with curvature of wall K{sub w} = 0.5.

  2. File-Based Data Flow in the CMS Filter Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, J.M.; et al.

    2015-12-23

    During the LHC Long Shutdown 1, the CMS Data Acquisition system underwent a partial redesign to replace obsolete network equipment, use more homogeneous switching technologies, and prepare the ground for future upgrades of the detector front-ends. The software and hardware infrastructure to provide input, execute the High Level Trigger (HLT) algorithms and deal with output data transport and storage has also been redesigned to be completely file- based. This approach provides additional decoupling between the HLT algorithms and the input and output data flow. All the metadata needed for bookkeeping of the data flow and the HLT process lifetimes are also generated in the form of small “documents” using the JSON encoding, by either services in the flow of the HLT execution (for rates etc.) or watchdog processes. These “files” can remain memory-resident or be written to disk if they are to be used in another part of the system (e.g. for aggregation of output data). We discuss how this redesign improves the robustness and flexibility of the CMS DAQ and the performance of the system currently being commissioned for the LHC Run 2.

  3. Contribution of breathing frequency and inhalation flow rate on performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Bahloul, Ali; Haghighat, Fariborz; Ostiguy, Claude

    2014-03-01

    The investigation of particle penetration through filtering facepiece respirators under cyclic flows is very necessary because cyclic flows represent actual breathing flow patterns. This article reports the development of a procedure to investigate the individual impact of breathing frequency and flow rate on the performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators. Experiments were performed for two peak inhalation flows (PIFs; 135 and 360 l min(-1)) and two breathing frequencies [24 and 42 breaths per minute (BPM)] for a total of four cyclic flows (Flow A: 135 l min(-1) and 24 BPM; Flow B: 135 l min(-1) and 42 BPM; Flow C: 360 l min(-1) and 24 BPM; and Flow D: 360 l min(-1) and 42 BPM). Each experiment was performed using two different set-ups: the first set-up included both inhalations and exhalations through the filter media and test chamber, while with the second set-up, only inhalation flows were considered. The results showed that, for the most penetrating particle size range, an increase in both PIF and breathing frequency could potentially enhance the penetration with both set-ups; however, the effect of PIF was observed to be much more pronounced than that of frequency. The results indicated that with both set-ups, when the PIF was increased from 135 to 360 l min(-1) (for the given frequency: 24 or 42 BPM), an increase of up to 139-152% in penetration was observed. On the other hand, only a 10-16% increase in penetration occurred when the frequency was changed from 24 to 42 BPM (for a given PIF: 135 or 360 l min(-1)). This suggests that, from low to high respiratory efforts, a huge portion of penetration enhancement is due to PIF variations and only a small portion is contributed by frequency variations.

  4. CFD simulation of an internal spin-filter: evidence of lateral migration and exchange flow through the mesh.

    PubMed

    Figueredo-Cardero, Alvio; Chico, Ernesto; Castilho, Leda R; Medronho, Ricardo A

    2009-11-01

    In the present work Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to study the flow field and particle dynamics in an internal spin-filter (SF) bioreactor system. Evidence of a radial exchange flow through the filter mesh was detected, with a magnitude up to 130-fold higher than the perfusion flow, thus significantly contributing to radial drag. The exchange flow magnitude was significantly influenced by the filter rotation rate, but not by the perfusion flow, within the ranges evaluated. Previous reports had only given indirect evidences of this exchange flow phenomenon in spin-filters, but the current simulations were able to quantify and explain it. Flow pattern inside the spin-filter bioreactor resembled a typical Taylor-Couette flow, with vortices being formed in the annular gap and eventually penetrating the internal volume of the filter, thus being the probable reason for the significant exchange flow observed. The simulations also showed that cells become depleted in the vicinity of the mesh due to lateral particle migration. Cell concentration near the filter was approximately 50% of the bulk concentration, explaining why cell separation achieved in SFs is not solely due to size exclusion. The results presented indicate the power of CFD techniques to study and better understand spin-filter systems, aiming at the establishment of effective design, operation and scale-up criteria.

  5. Performance of Improved High-Order Filter Schemes for Turbulent Flows with Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotov, Dmitry Vladimirovich; Yee, Helen M C.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the filter scheme with improved dissipation control ? has been demonstrated for different flow types. The scheme with local ? is shown to obtain more accurate results than its counterparts with global or constant ?. At the same time no additional tuning is needed to achieve high accuracy of the method when using the local ? technique. However, further improvement of the method might be needed for even more complex and/or extreme flows.

  6. Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Air Flow on Fungal Growth Rate on Loaded Ventilation Filters.

    PubMed

    Tang, W; Kuehn, T H; Simcik, Matt F

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the fungal growth ratio on loaded ventilation filters under various temperature, relative humidity (RH), and air flow conditions in a controlled laboratory setting. A new full-size commercial building ventilation filter was loaded with malt extract nutrients and conidia of Cladosporium sphaerospermum in an ASHRAE Standard 52.2 filter test facility. Small sections cut from this filter were incubated under the following conditions: constant room temperature and a high RH of 97%; sinusoidal temperature (with an amplitude of 10°C, an average of 23°C, and a period of 24 hr) and a mean RH of 97%; room temperature and step changes between 97% and 75% RH, 97% and 43% RH, and 97% and 11% RH every 12 hr. The biomass on the filter sections was measured using both an elution-culture method and by ergosterol assay immediately after loading and every 2 days up to 10 days after loading. Fungal growth was detected earlier using ergosterol content than with the elution-culture method. A student's t-test indicated that Cladosporium sphaerospermum grew better at the constant room temperature condition than at the sinusoidal temperature condition. By part-time exposure to dry environments, the fungal growth was reduced (75% and 43% RH) or even inhibited (11% RH). Additional loaded filters were installed in the wind tunnel at room temperature and an RH greater than 95% under one of two air flow test conditions: continuous air flow or air flow only 9 hr/day with a flow rate of 0.7 m(3)/s (filter media velocity 0.15 m/s). Swab tests and a tease mount method were used to detect fungal growth on the filters at day 0, 5, and 10. Fungal growth was detected for both test conditions, which indicates that when temperature and relative humidity are optimum, controlling the air flow alone cannot prevent fungal growth. In real applications where nutrients are less sufficient than in this laboratory study, fungal growth rate may be reduced under the same operating conditions.

  7. Radial Flow Fludized Filter Finds Niche as a Pretreatment System for Surface Water in Small Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology called radial flow fluidized filter (R3f) has been developed as a low cost simplistic filtration technology for small communities of less than 10,000 people. Fouling is a major impediment to the sustainability of membrane technology particularly for small ...

  8. Radial Flow Fludized Filter Finds Niche as a Pretreatment System for Surface Water in Small Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology called radial flow fluidized filter (R3f) has been developed as a low cost simplistic filtration technology for small communities of less than 10,000 people. Fouling is a major impediment to the sustainability of membrane technology particularly for small ...

  9. Flow pathways and sediment trapping in a field-scale vegetative filter

    Treesearch

    M. J. Helmers; D. E. Eisenhauer; Mike G. Dosskey; T. G. Franti; J. M. Brothers; M. C. McCullough

    2005-01-01

    Vegetative filters (VF) are a best management practive installed in many areas to control sediment movement to water bodies. It is commonly assumed that runoff proceeds perpendicularly across a VF as sheet flow. However, there is little research information on natural pathways of water movement and performance of field-scale VF. The objectives of this study were: (1)...

  10. Formation of scalloped cross-bedding without unsteady flows.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Scalloped cross-bedding formed by fluctuating flow superficially resembles that formed by superimposed or intersecting bedforms, but, as illustrated in three-dimensional computer plots, the two kinds of structures commonly can be distinguished by directional properties of the bedding. Scallops deposited by alongslope-migrating, superimposed bedforms have cross-bed and bounding-surface dip patterns that lack bilateral symmetry and have cross-bed dips that are asymmetrically distributed relative to bounding-surface dips. Scallops with dip patterns that are bilaterally symmetrically distributed relative to the bounding-surface dips can be produced either by fluctuating flow or by downslope or upslope migration of superimposed bedforms. An example of nearshore-marine scalloped cross-bedding of Pleistocene age was examined in detail in a coastal terrace of Monterey Bay, California. -from Author

  11. A crossed hot-wire technique for complex turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a crossed hot-wire technique for the measurement of all components of mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, and triple products in a complex turbulent flow. The accuracy of various assumptions usually implicit in the use of crossed hot-wire anemometers is examined. It is shown that significant errors can result in flow with gradients in mean velocity or Reynolds stress, but that a first-order correction for these errors can be made using available data. It is also shown how corrections can be made for high turbulence levels using available data.

  12. Experimental study of cross-flow wet electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Pasic, H; Alam, K; Tiji, S A N; Mannella, N; Silva, T; Liu, T

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports development and testing of a novel cross-flow wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP), recently patented at Ohio University, that utilizes vertical columns of permeable material in the form of polypropylene ropes placed in a cross-flow configuration within a flue gas stream. The cross-flow design has large surface area, which provides scrubbing action; therefore, it has the potential for removing multiple pollutants, including particulates, gases, vapors, and mists. In this new method, the ropes are kept wet by the liquid (water) introduced from the top of the cells running downward on the ropes by capillary action, making the permeable materials act as the ground electrode for capturing particles from the flue gas. Preliminary testing has shown an efficiency of well above 80% using two cells and three sets of discharge electrodes. Since the material of construction is primarily corrosion-resistant polymeric material, both weight and cost reductions are expected from this new design. The newly invented cross-flow WESP exhibit particulate collection efficiency of well above 80% when introduced in particulate-laden exhaust flow. This value was obtained using a two cells and three discharge electrodes configuration. The electric field strength has a substantial effect on the collection efficiency. Also, the pressure drop test results indicate that there is a potential to increase the collection area, which, in turn, will increase the collection efficiency further.

  13. Demonstration and Analysis of Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Flow Field Diagnostic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forkey, Joseph N.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    Filtered Rayleigh Scattering (FRS) is a diagnostic technique which measures velocity, temperature, and pressure by determining Doppler shift, total intensity, and spectral line shape of laser induced Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering. In the work reported here, this is accomplished by using a narrow line width, injection seeded Nd-YAG laser sheet to induce Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering from a gas flow. This light is passed through an optical notch filter, and transmitted light is imaged onto an intensified charge coupled display (CCD) camera. By monitoring the grayscale value at a particular pixel while the laser frequency is tuned, the convolution between the Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profile and the filter transmission profile is attained. Since the filter profile can be independently measured, it can be deconvolved from the measuring signal, yielding the Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profile. From this profile, flow velocity, temperature, and pressure are determined. In this paper the construction and characterization of the optical notch filter and a newly developed frequency apparatus are discussed.

  14. Method and apparatus for affecting a recirculation zone in a cross flow

    DOEpatents

    Bathina, Mahesh [Andhra Pradesh, IN; Singh, Ramanand [Uttar Pradesh, IN

    2012-07-17

    Disclosed is a cross flow apparatus including a surface and at least one outlet located at the surface. The cross flow apparatus further includes at least one guide at the surface configured to direct an intersecting flow flowing across the surface and increase a velocity of a cross flow being expelled from the at least one outlet downstream from the at least one outlet.

  15. A particle filter to reconstruct a free-surface flow from a depth camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combés, Benoit; Heitz, Dominique; Guibert, Anthony; Mémin, Etienne

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the combined use of a kinect depth sensor and of a stochastic data assimilation (DA) method to recover free-surface flows. More specifically, we use a weighted ensemble Kalman filter method to reconstruct the complete state of free-surface flows from a sequence of depth images only. This particle filter accounts for model and observations errors. This DA scheme is enhanced with the use of two observations instead of one classically. We evaluate the developed approach on two numerical test cases: a collapse of a water column as a toy-example and a flow in an suddenly expanding flume as a more realistic flow. The robustness of the method to depth data errors and also to initial and inflow conditions is considered. We illustrate the interest of using two observations instead of one observation into the correction step, especially for unknown inflow boundary conditions. Then, the performance of the Kinect sensor in capturing the temporal sequences of depth observations is investigated. Finally, the efficiency of the algorithm is qualified for a wave in a real rectangular flat bottomed tank. It is shown that for basic initial conditions, the particle filter rapidly and remarkably reconstructs the velocity and height of the free surface flow based on noisy measurements of the elevation alone.

  16. Tricritical spiral vortex instability in cross-slot flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haward, Simon J.; Poole, Robert J.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Paulo J.; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Shen, Amy Q.

    2016-03-01

    We examine fluid flow through cross-slot devices with various depth to width ratios α . At low Reynolds number, Re, flow is symmetric and a sharp boundary exists between the two incoming fluid streams. Above an α -dependent critical value, R ec(α ) , a steady symmetry-breaking bifurcation occurs and a spiral vortex structure develops. Order parameters characterizing the instability grow according to a sixth-order Landau potential, and show a progression from second- to first-order transitions as α increases beyond a tricritical value of α ≈0.55 . Flow simulations indicate the instability is driven by vortex stretching at the stagnation point.

  17. Tricritical spiral vortex instability in cross-slot flow.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J; Poole, Robert J; Alves, Manuel A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Shen, Amy Q

    2016-03-01

    We examine fluid flow through cross-slot devices with various depth to width ratios α. At low Reynolds number, Re, flow is symmetric and a sharp boundary exists between the two incoming fluid streams. Above an α-dependent critical value, Re(c)(α), a steady symmetry-breaking bifurcation occurs and a spiral vortex structure develops. Order parameters characterizing the instability grow according to a sixth-order Landau potential, and show a progression from second- to first-order transitions as α increases beyond a tricritical value of α ≈ 0.55. Flow simulations indicate the instability is driven by vortex stretching at the stagnation point.

  18. A GPU-Parallelized Eigen-Based Clutter Filter Framework for Ultrasound Color Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chee, Adrian J Y; Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2017-01-01

    Eigen-filters with attenuation response adapted to clutter statistics in color flow imaging (CFI) have shown improved flow detection sensitivity in the presence of tissue motion. Nevertheless, its practical adoption in clinical use is not straightforward due to the high computational cost for solving eigendecompositions. Here, we provide a pedagogical description of how a real-time computing framework for eigen-based clutter filtering can be developed through a single-instruction, multiple data (SIMD) computing approach that can be implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU). Emphasis is placed on the single-ensemble-based eigen-filtering approach (Hankel singular value decomposition), since it is algorithmically compatible with GPU-based SIMD computing. The key algebraic principles and the corresponding SIMD algorithm are explained, and annotations on how such algorithm can be rationally implemented on the GPU are presented. Real-time efficacy of our framework was experimentally investigated on a single GPU device (GTX Titan X), and the computing throughput for varying scan depths and slow-time ensemble lengths was studied. Using our eigen-processing framework, real-time video-range throughput (24 frames/s) can be attained for CFI frames with full view in azimuth direction (128 scanlines), up to a scan depth of 5 cm ( λ pixel axial spacing) for slow-time ensemble length of 16 samples. The corresponding CFI image frames, with respect to the ones derived from non-adaptive polynomial regression clutter filtering, yielded enhanced flow detection sensitivity in vivo, as demonstrated in a carotid imaging case example. These findings indicate that the GPU-enabled eigen-based clutter filtering can improve CFI flow detection performance in real time.

  19. A GPU-Parallelized Eigen-Based Clutter Filter Framework for Ultrasound Color Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chee, Adrian; Yiu, Billy; Yu, Alfred

    2016-09-07

    Eigen-filters with attenuation response adapted to clutter statistics in color flow imaging (CFI) have shown improved flow detection sensitivity in the presence of tissue motion. Nevertheless, its practical adoption in clinical use is not straightforward due to the high computational cost for solving eigen-decompositions. Here, we provide a pedagogical description of how a real-time computing framework for eigen-based clutter filtering can be developed through a single-instruction, multiple data (SIMD) computing approach that can be implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU). Emphasis is placed on the single-ensemble-based eigen-filtering approach (Hankel-SVD) since it is algorithmically compatible with GPU-based SIMD computing. The key algebraic principles and the corresponding SIMD algorithm are explained, and annotations on how such algorithm can be rationally implemented on the GPU are presented. Real-time efficacy of our framework was experimentally investigated on a single GPU device (GTX Titan X), and the computing throughput for varying scan depths and slow-time ensemble lengths were studied. Using our eigenprocessing framework, real-time video-range throughput (24 fps) can be attained for CFI frames with full-view in azimuth direction (128 scanlines), up to a scan depth of 5 cm (λ pixel axial spacing) for slow-time ensemble length of 16 samples. The corresponding CFI image frames, with respect to the ones derived from non-adaptive polynomial regression clutter filtering, yielded enhanced flow detection sensitivity in vivo, as demonstrated in a carotid imaging case example. These findings indicate that GPU-enabled eigen-based clutter filtering can improve CFI flow detection performance in real time.

  20. On the structural limitations of recursive digital filters for base flow estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Costelloe, Justin F.; Peterson, Tim J.; Western, Andrew W.

    2016-06-01

    Recursive digital filters (RDFs) are widely used for estimating base flow from streamflow hydrographs, and various forms of RDFs have been developed based on different physical models. Numerical experiments have been used to objectively evaluate their performance, but they have not been sufficiently comprehensive to assess a wide range of RDFs. This paper extends these studies to understand the limitations of a generalized RDF method as a pathway for future field calibration. Two formalisms are presented to generalize most existing RDFs, allowing systematic tuning of their complexity. The RDFs with variable complexity are evaluated collectively in a synthetic setting, using modeled daily base flow produced by Li et al. (2014) from a range of synthetic catchments simulated with HydroGeoSphere. Our evaluation reveals that there are optimal RDF complexities in reproducing base flow simulations but shows that there is an inherent physical inconsistency within the RDF construction. Even under the idealized setting where true base flow data are available to calibrate the RDFs, there is persistent disagreement between true and estimated base flow over catchments with small base flow components, low saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil and larger surface runoff. The simplest explanation is that low base flow "signal" in the streamflow data is hard to distinguish, although more complex RDFs can improve upon the simpler Eckhardt filter at these catchments.

  1. The role of pressure drop and flow redistribution on modeling mercury control using sorbent injection in baghouse filters

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph R.V. Flora; Richard A. Hargis; William J. O'Dowd; Andrew Karash; Henry W. Pennline; Radisav D. Vidic

    2006-03-15

    A mathematical model based on simple cake filtration theory was coupled to a previously developed two-stage mathematical model for mercury (Hg) removal from coal combustion using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter. Values of the average permeability of the filter cake and the filter resistance extracted from the model were 4.4 x 10{sup -13}m{sup 2} and 2.5 x 10{sup -4}m{sup -1}, respectively. The flow is redistributed during partial cleaning of the filter, with flows higher across the newly cleaned filter section. The calculated average Hg removal efficiency from the baghouse is lower because of the high mass flux of Hg exiting the filter in the newly cleaned section. The model shows that calculated average Hg removal is affected by permeability, filter resistance, fraction of the baghouse cleaned, and cleaning interval. 17 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The role of pressure drop and flow redistribution on modeling mercury control using sorbent injection in baghouse filters.

    PubMed

    Flora, Joseph R V; Hargis, Richard A; O'Dowd, William J; Karash, Andrew; Pennline, Henry W; Vidic, Radisav D

    2006-03-01

    A mathematical model based on simple cake filtration theory was coupled to a previously developed two-stage mathematical model for mercury (Hg) removal using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter. Values of the average permeability of the filter cake and the filter resistance extracted from the model were 4.4 x 10(-13) m2 and 2.5 x 10(-4) m(-1), respectively. The flow is redistributed during partial cleaning of the filter, with flows higher across the newly cleaned filter section. The calculated average Hg removal efficiency from the baghouse is lower because of the high mass flux of Hg exiting the filter in the newly cleaned section. The model shows that calculated average Hg removal is affected by permeability, filter resistance, fraction of the baghouse cleaned, and cleaning interval.

  3. Intracycle angular velocity control of cross-flow turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven L.; Polagye, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, are attractive for power generation from wind and water currents. Some cross-flow turbine designs optimize unsteady fluid forces and maximize power output by controlling blade kinematics within one rotation. One established method is to dynamically pitch the blades. Here we introduce a mechanically simpler alternative: optimize the turbine rotation rate as a function of angular blade position. We demonstrate experimentally that this approach results in a 59% increase in power output over standard control methods. Analysis of fluid forcing and blade kinematics suggest that power increase is achieved through modification of the local flow conditions and alignment of fluid force and rotation rate extrema. The result is a low-speed, structurally robust turbine that achieves high efficiency and could enable a new generation of environmentally benign turbines for renewable power generation.

  4. Shell-crossing in quasi-one-dimensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampf, Cornelius; Frisch, Uriel

    2017-10-01

    Blow-up of solutions for the cosmological fluid equations, often dubbed shell-crossing or orbit crossing, denotes the breakdown of the single-stream regime of the cold-dark-matter fluid. At this instant, the velocity becomes multi-valued and the density singular. Shell-crossing is well understood in one dimension (1D), but not in higher dimensions. This paper is about quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) flow that depends on all three coordinates but differs only slightly from a strictly 1D flow, thereby allowing a perturbative treatment of shell-crossing using the Euler-Poisson equations written in Lagrangian coordinates. The signature of shell-crossing is then just the vanishing of the Jacobian of the Lagrangian map, a regular perturbation problem. In essence, the problem of the first shell-crossing, which is highly singular in Eulerian coordinates, has been desingularized by switching to Lagrangian coordinates, and can then be handled by perturbation theory. Here, all-order recursion relations are obtained for the time-Taylor coefficients of the displacement field, and it is shown that the Taylor series has an infinite radius of convergence. This allows the determination of the time and location of the first shell-crossing, which is generically shown to be taking place earlier than for the unperturbed 1D flow. The time variable used for these statements is not the cosmic time t but the linear growth time τ ∼ t2/3. For simplicity, calculations are restricted to an Einstein-de Sitter universe in the Newtonian approximation, and tailored initial data are used. However it is straightforward to relax these limitations, if needed.

  5. A novel pitch evaluation of one-dimensional gratings based on a cross-correlation filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Koenders, Ludger

    2014-04-01

    If one-dimensional (1D), p-period and arbitrarily structured grating position-related topographical signals coexist with noise, it is difficult to evaluate the pitch practically using the center-of-gravity (CG) method. The Fourier-transform-based (FT) method is the most precise to evaluate pitches; nevertheless, it cannot give the uniformity of pitches. If a cross-correlation filter—a half period of sinusoidal waveform sequence (pT period), cross-correlates with the signals, the noise can be eliminated if pT ≈ p. After cross-correlation filtering, the distance between any two adjacent waveform peaks along the direction perpendicular to 1D grating lines is one pitch value. The pitch evaluation based on the cross-correlation filtering together with the detection of the peak's position is described as the peak detection (PD) method in this paper. The pitch average and uniformity can be calculated by using the PD method. The computer simulation has indicated that the average of pitch deviations from the true pitch and the pitch variations are less than 0.2% and 0.2% for the sinusoidal and rectangular waveform signals with up to 50% uniform white noise, less than 0.1% and 1% for the sinusoidal and rectangular waveform signals and 0.6% and 2.5% for the triangular waveform signal if three waveform signals are mixed with Gaussian white, binomial and Bernoulli noise up to 50% in standard deviation, one probability and trial probability, respectively. As examples, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) with a 0.246 nm distance between second nearest neighbour atoms and a 1D grating with 3000 nm nominal pitch are measured by a ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV STM) and a metrological atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. After the position-related topographical signals are cross-correlation filtered, the 0.240 and 3004.11 nm pitches calculated by using the PD method are very close to the 0.240 and 3003.34 nm results evaluated by the FT

  6. Analysis of up-flow aerated biological activated carbon filter technology in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoming; Liu, Jincui; Li, Shaowen; Biney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Problems have been found in the traditional post-positioned down-flow biological activated carbon filter (DBACF), such as microorganism leakage and low biodegradability. A pilot test was carried out to place a BACF between the sediment tank and the sand filter; a new technology of dual media up-flow aerated biological activated carbon filter (UBACF) was developed. Results showed that in terms of the new process, the up-flow mode was better than the down-flow. Compared with the DBACF, the problem of microorganism leakage could be well resolved with the UBACF process by adding disinfectant before the sand filtration, and a similar adsorption effect could be obtained. For the tested raw water, the COD(Mn) and NH3-N removal rate was 54.6% and 85.0%, respectively, similar to the waterworks with the DBACF process. The UBACF greatly enhanced oxygen supply capability and mass transfer rate via aeration, and the NH3-N removal ability was significantly improved from 1.5 mg/L to more than 3 mg/L. Influent to the UBACF with higher turbidity could be coped with through the primary filtration of the ceramisite layer combined with fluid-bed technology, which gave the carbon bed a low-turbidity environment of less than 1.0 NTU. The backwashing parameters and carbon abrasion rate of the two processes were almost the same.

  7. Performance evaluation of a dual-flow recharge filter for improving groundwater quality.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Manoj P; Senthilvel, S; Mathew, Abraham C

    2014-07-01

    A dual-flow multimedia stormwater filter integrated with a groundwater recharge system was developed and tested for hydraulic efficiency and pollutant removal efficiency. The influent stormwater first flows horizontally through the circular layers of planted grass and biofibers. Subsequently, the flow direction changes to a vertical direction so that water moves through layers of pebbles and sand and finally gets recharged to the deep aquifers. The media in the sequence of vegetative medium:biofiber to pebble:sand were filled in nine proportions and tested for the best performing combination. Three grass species, viz., Typha (Typha angustifolia), Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), and St. Augustine grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum), were tested as the best performing vegetative medium. The adsorption behavior of Coconut (Cocos nucifera) fiber, which was filled in the middle layer, was determined by a series of column and batch studies.The dual-flow filter showed an increasing trend in hydraulic efficiency with an increase in flowrate. The chemical removal efficiency of the recharge dual-flow filter was found to be very high in case of K+ (81.6%) and Na+ (77.55%). The pH normalizing efficiency and electrical conductivity reduction efficiency were also recorded as high. The average removal percentage of Ca2+ was moderate, while that of Mg2+ was very low. The filter proportions of 1:1 to 1:2 (plant:fiber to pebble:sand) showed a superior performance compared to all other proportions. Based on the estimated annual costs and returns, all the financial viability criteria (internal rate of return, net present value, and benefit-cost ratio) were found to be favorable and affordable to farmers in terms of investing in the developed filtration system.

  8. Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

    2013-11-01

    A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

  9. Infrared species tomography of a transient flow field using Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Daun, Kyle J; Waslander, Steven L; Tulloch, Brandon B

    2011-02-20

    In infrared species tomography, the unknown concentration distribution of a species is inferred from the attenuation of multiple collimated light beams shone through the measurement field. The resulting set of linear equations is rank-deficient, so prior assumptions about the smoothness and nonnegativity of the distribution must be imposed to recover a solution. This paper describes how the Kalman filter can be used to incorporate additional information about the time evolution of the distribution into the reconstruction. Results show that, although performing a series of static reconstructions is more accurate at low levels of measurement noise, the Kalman filter becomes advantageous when the measurements are corrupted with high levels of noise. The Kalman filter also enables signal multiplexing, which can help achieve the high sampling rates needed to resolve turbulent flow phenomena.

  10. Adaptive Filtering Methods for Identifying Cross-Frequency Couplings in Human EEG

    PubMed Central

    Van Zaen, Jérôme; Murray, Micah M.; Meuli, Reto A.; Vesin, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations have been increasingly recognized as a core property of neural responses that contribute to spontaneous, induced, and evoked activities within and between individual neurons and neural ensembles. They are considered as a prominent mechanism for information processing within and communication between brain areas. More recently, it has been proposed that interactions between periodic components at different frequencies, known as cross-frequency couplings, may support the integration of neuronal oscillations at different temporal and spatial scales. The present study details methods based on an adaptive frequency tracking approach that improve the quantification and statistical analysis of oscillatory components and cross-frequency couplings. This approach allows for time-varying instantaneous frequency, which is particularly important when measuring phase interactions between components. We compared this adaptive approach to traditional band-pass filters in their measurement of phase-amplitude and phase-phase cross-frequency couplings. Evaluations were performed with synthetic signals and EEG data recorded from healthy humans performing an illusory contour discrimination task. First, the synthetic signals in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulations highlighted two desirable features of the proposed algorithm vs. classical filter-bank approaches: resilience to broad-band noise and oscillatory interference. Second, the analyses with real EEG signals revealed statistically more robust effects (i.e. improved sensitivity) when using an adaptive frequency tracking framework, particularly when identifying phase-amplitude couplings. This was further confirmed after generating surrogate signals from the real EEG data. Adaptive frequency tracking appears to improve the measurements of cross-frequency couplings through precise extraction of neuronal oscillations. PMID:23560098

  11. Adaptive filtering methods for identifying cross-frequency couplings in human EEG.

    PubMed

    Van Zaen, Jérôme; Murray, Micah M; Meuli, Reto A; Vesin, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations have been increasingly recognized as a core property of neural responses that contribute to spontaneous, induced, and evoked activities within and between individual neurons and neural ensembles. They are considered as a prominent mechanism for information processing within and communication between brain areas. More recently, it has been proposed that interactions between periodic components at different frequencies, known as cross-frequency couplings, may support the integration of neuronal oscillations at different temporal and spatial scales. The present study details methods based on an adaptive frequency tracking approach that improve the quantification and statistical analysis of oscillatory components and cross-frequency couplings. This approach allows for time-varying instantaneous frequency, which is particularly important when measuring phase interactions between components. We compared this adaptive approach to traditional band-pass filters in their measurement of phase-amplitude and phase-phase cross-frequency couplings. Evaluations were performed with synthetic signals and EEG data recorded from healthy humans performing an illusory contour discrimination task. First, the synthetic signals in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulations highlighted two desirable features of the proposed algorithm vs. classical filter-bank approaches: resilience to broad-band noise and oscillatory interference. Second, the analyses with real EEG signals revealed statistically more robust effects (i.e. improved sensitivity) when using an adaptive frequency tracking framework, particularly when identifying phase-amplitude couplings. This was further confirmed after generating surrogate signals from the real EEG data. Adaptive frequency tracking appears to improve the measurements of cross-frequency couplings through precise extraction of neuronal oscillations.

  12. A Fast Network Flow Model is used in conjunction with Measurements of Filter Permeability to calculate the Performance of Hot Gas Filters

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, J.G.; Chiang, T-K.

    2002-09-19

    Two different technologies that are being considered for generating electric power on a large scale by burning coal are Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems and Integrated Gasification and Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Particulate emission regulations that have been proposed for future systems may require that these systems be fitted with large scale Hot Gas Clean-Up (HGCU) filtration systems that would remove the fine particulate matter from the hot gas streams that are generated by PFBC and IGCC systems. These hot gas filtration systems are geometrically and aerodynamically complex. They typically are constructed with large arrays of ceramic candle filter elements (CFE). The successful design of these systems require an accurate assessment of the rate at which mechanical energy of the gas flow is dissipated as it passes through the filter containment vessel and the individual candle filter elements that make up the system. Because the filtration medium is typically made of a porous ceramic material having open pore sizes that are much smaller than the dimensions of the containment vessel, the filtration medium is usually considered to be a permeable medium that follows Darcy's law. The permeability constant that is measured in the lab is considered to be a function of the filtration medium only and is usually assumed to apply equally to all the filters in the vessel as if the flow were divided evenly among all the filter elements. In general, the flow of gas through each individual CFE will depend not only on the geometrical characteristics of the filtration medium, but also on the local mean flows in the filter containment vessel that a particular filter element sees. The flow inside the CFE core, through the system manifolds, and inside the containment vessel itself will be coupled to the flow in the filter medium by various Reynolds number effects. For any given filter containment vessel, since the mean flows are different in different locations

  13. Seeing induced cross-talks in filter-based velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, P.; Sridharan, R.; Sankarasubramanian, K.

    Narrow band imaging using Universal Birefringent Filter (UBF) can be used to measure velocity features on the Sun. Velocity maps, in filter-based observations, are created by taking the intensity differences between the blue and red wing images of a chosen spectral line. In the case of variable seeing, there is a large probability that one of the (red- or blue-) wing images can be affected more compared to the other. Such differential seeing leads to spurious velocity values which are contributed due to cross-talk from the intensity, and found to be more pronounced in umbra and penumbra of sunspots. Simulations are carried out to estimate and understand the sources of the cross-talk. Variable seeing conditions are created using the Adaptive Optics Performance Evaluator (AOPE) software. The point-spread-function (PSF) produced by the AOPE is used to generate the red- and blue-wing images. In this paper, we also discuss the advantages of using AO corrected images in such variable seeing scenario.

  14. Oxygen profile and clogging in vertical flow sand filters for on-site wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, A; Forquet, N; Boutin, C

    2016-04-01

    13 million people (about 20% of the population) use on-site wastewater treatment in France. Buried vertical sand filters are often built, especially when the soil permeability is not sufficient for septic tank effluent infiltration in undisturbed soil. Clogging is one of the main problems deteriorating the operation of vertical flow filters for wastewater treatment. The extent of clogging is not easily assessed, especially in buried vertical flow sand filters. We suggest examining two possible ways of detecting early clogging: (1) NH4-N/NO3-N outlet concentration ratio, and (2) oxygen measurement within the porous media. Two pilot-scale filters were equipped with probes for oxygen concentration measurements and samples were taken at different depths for pollutant characterization. Influent and effluent grab-samples were taken three times a week. The systems were operated using batch-feeding of septic tank effluent. Qualitative description of oxygen transfer processes under unclogged and clogged conditions is presented. NH4-N outlet concentration appears to be useless for early clogging detection. However, NO3-N outlet concentration and oxygen content allows us to diagnose the early clogging of the system.

  15. Final Report: Pilot-Scale Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration Test Using a Hanford Site Tank 241-AN-102 Waste Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2003-10-03

    Bechtel National l, Inc. (BNI) has been contracted to design a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to stabilize liquid radioactive waste that is stored at the Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project (RPP). Because of its experience with radioactive waste stabilization, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is working with BNI to help design and test certain parts of the waste treatment facility. One part of the process is the separation of radioactive solids from the liquid wastes by cross- flow ultrafiltration. This task tested a cross- flow filter, prototypic in porosity, length and diameter, with a simulated radioactive waste, made to prototypically represent the chemical and physical characteristics of a Hanford waste in tank 241-AN-102 (AN-102) and precipitated under prototypic conditions. This report discusses the results of cross- flow filter operation in a pilot-scale experimental facility. This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by Bechtel National, Inc. The waste treatment plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  16. Alternative filter media for phosphorous removal in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Vohla, Christina; Põldvere, Elar; Noorvee, Alar; Kuusemets, Valdo; Mander, Ulo

    2005-01-01

    During the study period from 1997 to 2002 the purification efficiency of phosphorus in the horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetland (CW) in Kodijärve, has been quite high (63-95%). However, slowly increasing trend in outlet P concentrations and decreasing annual P removal rate are obviously the indicators that show possible saturation processes in filter media. To search for potential filter media with high phosphorus sorption capacity, sorption characteristics and particle size distribution of several local sands, gravels, glauconite-sandstone, LWA, and calcareous waste products from oil-shale industry were investigated. The average P sorption capacity for best materials (crashed ash block, oil, shale fly ash and the sediment from oil shale ash plateau) was higher than 96% and estimated design capacity was around 4-5 g P kg(-1). According to results, sediment from oil shale ash plateau was considered as perspective filter media for P retention. In Summer 2002 experimental sedimentation filter, filled with the sediment from oil shale ash plateau, was installed in the outlet from the Kodijärve HSSF CW. According to preliminary results the average P removal in the sedimentation filter was 52%.

  17. Particle capture in axial magnetic filters with power law flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasov, T.; Herdem, S.; Köksal, M.

    1999-05-01

    A theory of capture of magnetic particle carried by laminar flow of viscous non-Newtonian (power law) fluid in axially ordered filters is presented. The velocity profile of the fluid flow is determined by the Kuwabara-Happel cell model. For the trajectory of the particle, the capture area and the filter performance simple analytical expressions are obtained. These expressions are valid for particle capture processes from both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For this reason the obtained theoretical results make it possible to widen the application of high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF) to other industrial areas. For Newtonian fluids the theoretical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental ones reported in the literature.

  18. Fibrous filter efficiency and pressure drop in the viscous-inertial transition flow regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Andres L.; Brockmann, John E.; Dellinger, Jennifer Gwynne; Lucero, Daniel A.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Servantes, Brandon Lee

    2011-10-01

    Fibrous filter pressure drop and aerosol collection efficiency were measured at low air pressures (0.2 to 0.8 atm) and high face velocities (5 to 20 meters per second) to give fiber Reynolds numbers in the viscous-inertial transition flow regime (1 to 16). In this regime, contemporary filtration theory based on Kuwabara's viscous flow through an ensemble of fibers under-predicts single fiber impaction by several orders of magnitude. Streamline curvature increases substantially as inertial forces become dominant. Dimensionless pressure drop measurements followed the viscous-inertial theory of Robinson and Franklin rather than Darcy's linear pressure-velocity relationship (1972). Sodium chloride and iron nano-agglomerate test aerosols were used to evaluate the effects of particle density and shape factor. Total filter efficiency collapsed when plotted against the particle Stokes and fiber Reynolds numbers. Efficiencies were then fitted with an impactor type equation where the cutpoint Stokes number and a steepness parameter described data well in the sharply increasing portion of the curve (20% to 80% efficiency). The cutpoint Stokes number was a linearly decreasing function of fiber Reynolds number. Single fiber efficiencies were calculated from total filter efficiencies and compared to contemporary viscous flow impaction theory (Stechkina et al. 1969), and numerical simulations from the literature. Existing theories under-predicted measured single fiber efficiencies although the assumption of uniform flow conditions for each successive layer of fibers is questionable; the common exponential relationship between single fiber efficiency and total filter efficiency may not be appropriate in this regime.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of tube arrays in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.

    1994-04-01

    Fluidelastic instability of loosely supported tube arrays was studied analytically and experimentally. This is one of the important practical problems of autonomous fluid-structure systems with many interesting motions. Both fluid-damping and fluid-stiffness controlled instabilities were investigated. Depending on the system parameter, the dynamic response of the tubes includes periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic motions. The analytical model is based on the unsteady flow theory, which can predict the nonlinear dynamics of tube arrays in cross flow. For fluid-damping controlled instability, analytical results and experimental data agree reasonably well. This study was applied to heat exchangers.

  20. Ambient wind energy harvesting using cross-flow fluttering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuguang; Yuan, Jianping; Lipson, Hod

    2011-01-01

    In this experimental study, we propose and test a bioinspired piezo-leaf architecture which converts wind energy into electrical energy by wind-induced fluttering motion. While conventional fluttering devices are arranged in parallel with the flow direction, here we explore a dangling cross-flow stalk arrangement. This architecture amplifies the vibration by an order of magnitude, making it appropriate for low-cost organic piezomaterials. We fabricated prototypes using flexible piezoelectric materials as stalks and polymer film as leaves. A series of experiments demonstrated a peak output power of approximately 600 μ W and maximum power density of approximately 2 mW/cm3 from a single leaf.

  1. Nonuniform air flow in inlets: the effect on filter deposits in the fiber sampling cassette.

    PubMed

    Baron, P A; Chen, C C; Hemenway, D R; O'Shaughnessy, P

    1994-08-01

    Smoke stream studies were combined with a new technique for visualizing a filter deposit from samples used to monitor asbestos or other fibers. Results clearly show the effect of secondary flow vortices within the sampler under anisoaxial sampling conditions. The vortices observed at low wind velocities occur when the inlet axis is situated at angles between 45 degrees and 180 degrees to the motion of the surrounding air. It is demonstrated that the vortices can create a complex nonuniform pattern in the filter deposit, especially when combined with particle settling or electrostatic interactions between the particles and the sampler. Inertial effects also may play a role in the deposit nonuniformity, as well as causing deposition on the cowl surfaces. Changes in the sampler, such as its placement, may reduce these biases. The effects noted are not likely to occur in all sampling situations, but may explain some reports of high variability on asbestos fiber filter samples. The flow patterns observed in this study are applicable to straight, thin-walled inlets. Although only compact particles were used, the air flow patterns and forces involved will have similar effects on fibers of the same aerodynamic diameter.

  2. Echo motion imaging with adaptive clutter filter for assessment of cardiac blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Visualization of the vortex blood flow in the cardiac chamber is a potential diagnostic tool for the evaluation of cardiac function. In the present study, a method for automatic selection of the desirable cutoff frequency of a moving target indicator filter, namely, a clutter filter, was proposed in order to visualize complex blood flows by the ultrahigh-frame-rate imaging of echoes from blood particles while suppressing clutter echoes. In this method, the cutoff frequency was adaptively changed as a function of the velocity of the heart wall (clutter source) in each frame. The feasibility of the proposed method was examined through the measurement of a healthy volunteer using parallel receive beamforming with a single transmission of a non-steered diverging beam. Using the moving target indicator filter as above with the cutoff frequency determined by the proposed method, the vortex-like blood flow in the cardiac chamber was visualized as movements of echoes from blood particles at a very high frame rate of 6024 Hz while suppressing clutter echoes.

  3. Enhanced Kalman Filtering for a 2D CFD NS Wind Farm Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doekemeijer, B. M.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Boersma, S.; Pao, L. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbines are often grouped together for financial reasons, but due to wake development this usually results in decreased turbine lifetimes and power capture, and thereby an increased levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Wind farm control aims to minimize this cost by operating turbines at their optimal control settings. Most state-of-the-art control algorithms are open-loop and rely on low fidelity, static flow models. Closed-loop control relying on a dynamic model and state observer has real potential to further decrease wind's LCOE, but is often too computationally expensive for practical use. In this paper two time-efficient Kalman filter (KF) variants are outlined incorporating the medium fidelity, dynamic flow model “WindFarmSimulator” (WFSim). This model relies on a discretized set of Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions to predict the flow in wind farms at low computational cost. The filters implemented are an Ensemble KF and an Approximate KF. Simulations in which a high fidelity simulation model represents the true wind farm show that these filters are 101 —102 times faster than a regular KF with comparable or better performance, correcting for wake dynamics that are not modeled in WFSim (noticeably, wake meandering and turbine hub effects). This is a first big step towards real-time closed-loop control for wind farms.

  4. Large particle penetration through N95 respirator filters and facepiece leaks with cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Shukla, Rakesh; Haruta, Hiroki; Sekar, Padmini; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate respirator filter and faceseal penetration of particles representing bacterial and fungal spore size ranges (0.7-4 mum). First, field experiments were conducted to determine workplace protection factors (WPFs) for a typical N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR). These data (average WPF = 515) were then used to position the FFR on a manikin to simulate realistic donning conditions for laboratory experiments. Filter penetration was also measured after the FFR was fully sealed on the manikin face. This value was deducted from the total penetration (obtained from tests with the partially sealed FFR) to determine the faceseal penetration. All manikin experiments were repeated using three sinusoidal breathing flow patterns corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates of 15, 30, and 85 l min(-1). The faceseal penetration varied from 0.1 to 1.1% and decreased with increasing particle size (P < 0.001) and breathing rate (P < 0.001). The fractions of aerosols penetrating through the faceseal leakage varied from 0.66 to 0.94. In conclusion, even for a well-fitting FFR respirator, most particle penetration occurs through faceseal leakage, which varies with breathing flow rate and particle size.

  5. A novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on matched filtering and gradient vector flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2013-10-01

    The microvasculature network of retina plays an important role in the study and diagnosis of retinal diseases (age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy for example). Although it is possible to noninvasively acquire high-resolution retinal images with modern retinal imaging technologies, non-uniform illumination, the low contrast of thin vessels and the background noises all make it difficult for diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce a novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on gradient vector flow and matched filtering to segment retinal vessels with different likelihood. Firstly, we use isotropic Gaussian kernel and adaptive histogram equalization to smooth and enhance the retinal images respectively. Secondly, a multi-scale matched filtering method is adopted to extract the retinal vessels. Then, the gradient vector flow algorithm is introduced to locate the edge of the retinal vessels. Finally, we combine the results of matched filtering method and gradient vector flow algorithm to extract the vessels at different likelihood levels. The experiments demonstrate that our algorithm is efficient and the intensities of vessel images exactly represent the likelihood of the vessels.

  6. Real-Time Flood Forecasting System Using Channel Flow Routing Model with Updating by Particle Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Chikamori, H.; Nagai, A.

    2008-12-01

    A real-time flood forecasting system using channel flow routing model was developed for runoff forecasting at water gauged and ungaged points along river channels. The system is based on a flood runoff model composed of upstream part models, tributary part models and downstream part models. The upstream part models and tributary part models are lumped rainfall-runoff models, and the downstream part models consist of a lumped rainfall-runoff model for hillslopes adjacent to a river channel and a kinematic flow routing model for a river channel. The flow forecast of this model is updated by Particle filtering of the downstream part model as well as by the extended Kalman filtering of the upstream part model and the tributary part models. The Particle filtering is a simple and powerful updating algorithm for non-linear and non-gaussian system, so that it can be easily applied to the downstream part model without complicated linearization. The presented flood runoff model has an advantage in simlecity of updating procedure to the grid-based distributed models, which is because of less number of state variables. This system was applied to the Gono-kawa River Basin in Japan, and flood forecasting accuracy of the system with both Particle filtering and extended Kalman filtering and that of the system with only extended Kalman filtering were compared. In this study, water gauging stations in the objective basin were divided into two types of stations, that is, reference stations and verification stations. Reference stations ware regarded as ordinary water gauging stations and observed data at these stations are used for calibration and updating of the model. Verification stations ware considered as ungaged or arbitrary points and observed data at these stations are used not for calibration nor updating but for only evaluation of forecasting accuracy. The result confirms that Particle filtering of the downstream part model improves forecasting accuracy of runoff at

  7. Models of hydrodynamic flow in the bowhead whale filter feeding apparatus.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J

    2004-09-01

    Anatomical and behavioral analyses suggest that the filtration mechanism of bowhead and right whales (Balaenidae) is driven by hydrodynamic as well as ram hydraulic pressures. Complementary models were devised to investigate biomechanical aspects of water flow in the buccal cavity of the bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus during continuous filter feeding. A mathematical model was created to test and quantify water flow predictions with steady state hydromechanical equations; a physical model of the bowhead mouth (approximately 1/15 scale) was constructed to visualize flow processes. Both models rely on morphometric data obtained from whales harvested by Inupiat Eskimos for subsistence purposes along with information on foraging ecology (locomotor velocity, gape, etc.). Results indicate that unique features of balaenid oral construction and function (e.g. subrostral gap, orolabial sulcus, curvature of baleen, extensive mandibular rotation and lingual mobility) not only permit steady, unidirectional flow of water through the mouth, but also establish Bernoulli and Venturi effects during feeding. These hydrodynamic conditions allow balaenids to improve filtering efficiency and avoid creation of an anterior compressive wave (by increasing flow velocity and thereby reducing pressure) so that they may capture elusive prey even at slow swimming speeds.

  8. Robust optical flow using adaptive Lorentzian filter for image reconstruction under noisy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesrarat, Darun; Patanavijit, Vorapoj

    2017-02-01

    In optical flow for motion allocation, the efficient result in Motion Vector (MV) is an important issue. Several noisy conditions may cause the unreliable result in optical flow algorithms. We discover that many classical optical flows algorithms perform better result under noisy condition when combined with modern optimized model. This paper introduces effective robust models of optical flow by using Robust high reliability spatial based optical flow algorithms using the adaptive Lorentzian norm influence function in computation on simple spatial temporal optical flows algorithm. Experiment on our proposed models confirm better noise tolerance in optical flow's MV under noisy condition when they are applied over simple spatial temporal optical flow algorithms as a filtering model in simple frame-to-frame correlation technique. We illustrate the performance of our models by performing an experiment on several typical sequences with differences in movement speed of foreground and background where the experiment sequences are contaminated by the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) at different noise decibels (dB). This paper shows very high effectiveness of noise tolerance models that they are indicated by peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR).

  9. Effect of inner guide on performances of cross flow turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokubu, K.; Yamasaki, K.; Honda, H.; Kanemoto, T.

    2012-11-01

    To get the sustainable society, the hydropower with not only the large but also the mini/micro capacity has been paid attention to the power generation. The cross-flow turbines can work efficiently at the comparatively low head and/or low discharge in the onshore and the offshore, and the runner and the casing profiles have been optimizing. In this paper, the turbine composed of the optimal profiles has prepared to provide for the mini/micro hydropower, and the performances have been investigated at the low head. The hydraulic efficiency is maximal at the normal guide vane opening and deteriorates at the lower and the higher discharge than the normal discharge. Such deteriorations are brought from the unacceptable flow conditions crossing in the runner, that is, the flow direction does not meet the setting angle of the blade at the inner radius. To improve dramatically the performances, the inner guide, which guards the shaft from the water jet and adjusts the flow direction, was installed in the runner.

  10. Investigation of non-symmetric jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fan-Ming

    1987-05-01

    Non-symmetric jets in crossflow were studied with various jet geometries, jet orientations, jet characteristics, and jet to crossflow velocity ratios. Four different cross-section geometry jets were studied and compared with a circular jet with identical jet port cross-sectional area. Standard dye and laser induced fluorescent flow visualization techniques were used to identify the existence of various vortices in the flow field. Among the many forms of secondary vortices produced, three major vortex systems were identified: main jet vortices, wake vortices, and spinoff vortices. A reconstruction of the asymmetric flow field based on observations and its evolution and relationships with established symmetric jets in the crossflow were made. The large scale rolled-up vortex structure which was found at low jet to crossflow velocity ratio is very similar to the hair-pin vortex structure. This observation provides a potential research tool on the study of the structure of turbulent boundary layers. Unsteady jets created by pulsation of the jet flow at low pulsation frequencies give the increase of the depth of penetration. However, the introducing of swirl into jets by passive methods reduces the depth of penetration.

  11. Numerical simulation of a cross flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Taylor; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    In the search for alternative sources of energy, the kinetic energy of water currents in oceans, rivers and estuaries is being explored as predictable and environmentally benign. We are investigating the flow past a cross flow turbine in which a helical blade under hydrodynamic forces turns around a shaft perpendicular to the free stream. This type of turbine, while very different from the classical horizontal axis turbine commonly used in the wind energy field, presents advantages for stacking in very narrow constricted channels where the water currents are consistently high and therefore turbine installation may be economically feasible. We use a model of a helical four-bladed turbine in cross flow to investigate the efficiency of the energy capture and the dynamics of the turbulent wake. Scale model experiments in a flume are used to validate the numerical results on a stationary configuration as an initial step towards creating an accurate numerical model of the turbine. The simulation of the rotating turbine provides a full perspective on the effect of angular position on flow detachment and vortex shedding from the blade, as well as on the fluctuations of the shaft torque produced (a problematic feature of this type of turbine). The results are analyzed in terms of hydrodynamic optimization of the blade and its structural loading. Supported by DOE through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center.

  12. Flow instability in a curved duct of rectangular cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belaidi, A.; Johnson, M. W.; Humphrey, J. A. C.

    1992-12-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out in a curved duct of rectangular cross section in order to study the development of flow instability in such geometries. Hot wire anemometry was used to obtain detailed measurements of velocity on the symmetry plane of the duct for different curvature ratios. As the duct Dean number is increased, a centrifugal instability develops and the Dean vortices are seen to oscillate along the inner wall. To understand the contribution of these vortices to the laminar-turbulent transition, time histories and spectra of the flow were taken on the symmetry plane of the duct for different Reynolds numbers. These data reveal a time-periodic motion along the inner wall where the secondary flows originating from the side wall boundary layers collide. The bend angle where this instability develops depends on the Reynolds number while the frequency of the instability depends on the curvature ratio of the bend.

  13. A reduced order model based on Kalman filtering for sequential data assimilation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldi, M.; Poux, A.

    2017-10-01

    A Kalman filter based sequential estimator is presented in this work. The estimator is integrated in the structure of segregated solvers for the analysis of incompressible flows. This technique provides an augmented flow state integrating available observation in the CFD model, naturally preserving a zero-divergence condition for the velocity field. Because of the prohibitive costs associated with a complete Kalman Filter application, two model reduction strategies have been proposed and assessed. These strategies dramatically reduce the increase in computational costs of the model, which can be quantified in an augmentation of 10%- 15% with respect to the classical numerical simulation. In addition, an extended analysis of the behavior of the numerical model covariance Q has been performed. Optimized values are strongly linked to the truncation error of the discretization procedure. The estimator has been applied to the analysis of a number of test cases exhibiting increasing complexity, including turbulent flow configurations. The results show that the augmented flow successfully improves the prediction of the physical quantities investigated, even when the observation is provided in a limited region of the physical domain. In addition, the present work suggests that these Data Assimilation techniques, which are at an embryonic stage of development in CFD, may have the potential to be pushed even further using the augmented prediction as a powerful tool for the optimization of the free parameters in the numerical simulation.

  14. Development of an implantable oxygenator with cross-flow pump.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yuichi; Funakubo, Akio; Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Taga, Ichiro; Higami, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Thrombogenicity, a problem with long-term artificial lungs, is caused by blood-biomaterial interactions and is made worse by nonuniform flow, which also causes decreased gas exchange. To overcome these obstacles, we changed the inlet and added a uniform flow pump to our previous oxygenator design. Conventional membrane oxygenators have a (1/2)-inch port for the inlet of blood. These port structures make it difficult for the blood to flow uniformly in the oxygenator. In addition, the complex blood flow patterns that occur in the oxygenator, including turbulence and stagnation, lead to thrombogenicity. A cross-flow pump (CFP) can result in uniform blood flow to the inlet side of an oxygenator. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of an integrated oxygenator with a fiber bundle porosity of 0.6 and a membrane surface area of 1.3 m2. The inlet part of the oxygenator is improved and better fits the outlet of the CFP. Each of the three models of the improved oxygenator has a different inlet taper angle. The computational fluid dynamics analysis showed that, compared with the original design, uniform flow of the integrated oxygenator improved by 88.8% at the hollow fiber membrane. With the integrated oxygenator, O2 transfer increased by an average of 20.8%, and CO2 transfer increased by an average of 35.5%. The results of our experiments suggest that the CFP, which produces a wide, uniform flow to the oxygenator, is effective in attaining high gas exchange performance.

  15. Data assimilation for unsaturated flow models with restart adaptive probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Jun; Li, Weixuan; Zeng, Lingzao; Wu, Laosheng

    2016-06-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has gained popularity in hydrological data assimilation problems. As a Monte Carlo based method, a relatively large ensemble size is usually required to guarantee the accuracy. As an alternative approach, the probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter (PCKF) employs the polynomial chaos to approximate the original system. In this way, the sampling error can be reduced. However, PCKF suffers from the so-called "curse of dimensionality". When the system nonlinearity is strong and number of parameters is large, PCKF could be even more computationally expensive than EnKF. Motivated by most recent developments in uncertainty quantification, we propose a restart adaptive probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter (RAPCKF) for data assimilation in unsaturated flow problems. During the implementation of RAPCKF, the important parameters are identified and active PCE basis functions are adaptively selected. The "restart" technology is used to eliminate the inconsistency between model parameters and states. The performance of RAPCKF is tested with numerical cases of unsaturated flow models. It is shown that RAPCKF is more efficient than EnKF with the same computational cost. Compared with the traditional PCKF, the RAPCKF is more applicable in strongly nonlinear and high dimensional problems.

  16. Data assimilation for unsaturated flow models with restart adaptive probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Jun; Li, Weixuan; Zeng, Lingzao; Wu, Laosheng

    2016-06-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has gained popularity in hydrological data assimilation problems. As a Monte Carlo based method, a sufficiently large ensemble size is usually required to guarantee the accuracy. As an alternative approach, the probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter (PCKF) employs the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) to represent and propagate the uncertainties in parameters and states. However, PCKF suffers from the so-called "curse of dimensionality". Its computational cost increases drastically with the increasing number of parameters and system nonlinearity. Furthermore, PCKF may fail to provide accurate estimations due to the joint updating scheme for strongly nonlinear models. Motivated by recent developments in uncertainty quantification and EnKF, we propose a restart adaptive probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter (RAPCKF) for data assimilation in unsaturated flow problems. During the implementation of RAPCKF, the important parameters are identified and active PCE basis functions are adaptively selected at each assimilation step; the "restart" scheme is utilized to eliminate the inconsistency between updated model parameters and states variables. The performance of RAPCKF is systematically tested with numerical cases of unsaturated flow models. It is shown that the adaptive approach and restart scheme can significantly improve the performance of PCKF. Moreover, RAPCKF has been demonstrated to be more efficient than EnKF with the same computational cost.

  17. Vibration effect on cross-flow and co-flow focusing mechanism for droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Microbubbles are widely used in many industries such as water treatment, drug coating, and ultrasonic contrast agents. Cross-flow focusing and co-flow focusing are considered basic mechanisms used for microbubble generation. Typically, to achieve micron-sized droplets requires structure dimensions in the same order of magnitude of the desired droplet sizes. In this paper we report a method of applying an external vibration to a cross-flow and co-flow focusing structure, which allows for smaller droplets to be generated. The junction dimension was 700×400 μm, and the channel width was 800 μm. The two assumed fluids are selected in a way that the Capillary number is high (Ca>10) to make use of necking effect occurred in the downstream. Linear vibration was exerted on the microchannel structure in the direction of central flow. A 2D structure was simulated using finite element software, and the numerical approach was then verified by comparing the experimental data of a typical cross-flow focusing structure taken from our previous study with the corresponding simulation assuming the same parameters. The results show that although the droplet generation regime depends on flow ratio (Qa/Qw) and vibration parameter (ampl×freq), Capillary number also has a significant effect on the regime. Briefly, applying a low-cost linear vibration to the conventional flow focusing structures can be used as an accurate controlling technique for increasing the chance of droplet generation. In fact, vibration motion can change the flow regime and breakup mechanism. It can also change the breakup point at which the droplets are formed.

  18. Rotational echo double resonance detection of cross-links formed in mussel byssus under high-flow stress.

    PubMed

    McDowell, L M; Burzio, L A; Waite, J H; Schaefer, J

    1999-07-16

    13C2H rotational echo double resonance NMR has been used to provide the first evidence for the formation of quinone-derived cross-links in mussel byssal plaques. Labeling of byssus was achieved by allowing mussels to filter feed from seawater containing L-[phenol-4-13C]tyrosine and L-[ring-d4]tyrosine for 2 days. Plaques and threads were harvested from two groups of mussels over a period of 28 days. One group was maintained in stationary water while the other was exposed to turbulent flow at 20 cm/s. The flow-stressed byssal plaques exhibited significantly enhanced levels of 5, 5'-di-dihydroxyphenylalanine cross-links. The average concentration of di-dihydroxyphenylalanine cross-links in byssal plaques is 1 per 1800 total protein amino acid residues.

  19. A new way to apply ultrasound in cross-flow ultrafiltration: application to colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Hengl, N; Jin, Y; Pignon, F; Baup, S; Mollard, R; Gondrexon, N; Magnin, A; Michot, L; Paineau, E

    2014-05-01

    A new coupling of ultrasound device with membrane process has been developed in order to enhance cross-flow ultrafiltration of colloidal suspensions usually involved in several industrial applications included bio and agro industries, water and sludge treatment. In order to reduce mass transfer resistances induced by fouling and concentration polarization, which both are main limitations in membrane separation process continuous ultrasound is applied with the help of a vibrating blade (20 kHz) located in the feed channel all over the membrane surface (8mm between membrane surface and the blade). Hydrodynamic aspects were also taking into account by the control of the rectangular geometry of the feed channel. Three colloidal suspensions with different kinds of colloidal interaction (attractive, repulsive) were chosen to evaluate the effect of their physico-chemical properties on the filtration. For a 90 W power (20.5 W cm(-2)) and a continuous flow rate, permeation fluxes are increased for each studied colloidal suspension, without damaging the membrane. The results show that the flux increase depends on the initial structural properties of filtered dispersion in terms of colloidal interaction and spatial organizations. For instance, a Montmorillonite Wyoming-Na clay suspension was filtered at 1.5 × 10(5)Pa transmembrane pressure. Its permeation flux is increased by a factor 7.1, from 13.6 L m(-2)h(-1) without ultrasound to 97 L m(-2)h(-1) with ultrasound.

  20. Results from Evaluation of Representative ASME AG-1 Section FK Radial Flow Dimple Pleated HEPA Filters Under Elevated Conditions - 12002

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rickert, Jaime G.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-07-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has recently added Section FK establishing requirements for radial flow HEPA filters to the Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1). Section FK filters are expected to be a major element in the HEPA filtration systems across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Radial flow filters have been used in Europe for some time, however a limited amount of performance evaluation data exists with respect to these new AG-1 Section FK units. In consultation with a technical working group, the Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University (MSU)has evaluated a series of representative AG-1 Section FK dimple pleated radial flow HEPA filters. The effects of elevated relative humidity and temperature conditions on these filters are particularly concerning. Results from the evaluation of Section FK filters under ambient conditions have been presented at the 2011 waste management conference. Additions to the previous test stand to enable high temperature and high humidity testing, a review of the equipment used, the steps taken to characterize the new additions, and the filter test results are presented in this study. Test filters were evaluated at a volumetric flow rate of 56.6 m{sup 3}/min (2000 cfm) and were challenged under ambient conditions with Alumina, Al(OH){sub 3}, until reaching a differential pressure of 1 kPa (4 in. w.c.), at which time the filters were tested, unchallenged with aerosol, at 54 deg. C (130 deg. F) for approximately 1 hour. At the end of that hour water was sprayed near the heat source to maximize vaporization exposing the filter to an elevated relative humidity up to 95%. Collected data include differential pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and volumetric flow rate versus time. (authors)

  1. Three-dimensional computations of cross-flow injection and combustion in a supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    A low-storage version of the SPARK3D code which is based on the temporally second-order accurate MacCormack (1969) explicit scheme is used to solve the governing equations for three-dimensional chemically reacting flows with finite-rate chemistry. The code includes a fourth-order compact spatial scheme capable of providing higher order spatial accuracy, and it is used to study two-dimensional linear advection, two-dimensional Euler flow, and three-dimensional viscous flow. Also considered are the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen in a supersonic cross stream.

  2. Adaptive clutter filter in 2-D color flow imaging based on in vivo I/Q signal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Zhang, Congyao; Liu, Dong C

    2014-01-01

    Color flow imaging has been well applied in clinical diagnosis. For the high quality color flow images, clutter filter is important to separate the Doppler signals from blood and tissue. Traditional clutter filters, such as finite impulse response, infinite impulse response and regression filters, were applied, which are based on the hypothesis that the clutter signal is stationary or tissue moves slowly. However, in realistic clinic color flow imaging, the signals are non-stationary signals because of accelerated moving tissue. For most related papers, simulated RF signals are widely used without in vivo I/Q signal. Hence, in this paper, adaptive polynomial regression filter, which is down mixing with instantaneous clutter frequency, was proposed based on in vivo carotid I/Q signal in realistic color flow imaging. To get the best performance, the optimal polynomial order of polynomial regression filter and the optimal polynomial order for estimation of instantaneous clutter frequency respectively were confirmed. Finally, compared with the mean blood velocity and quality of 2-D color flow image, the experiment results show that adaptive polynomial regression filter, which is down mixing with instantaneous clutter frequency, can significantly enhance the mean blood velocity and get high quality 2-D color flow image.

  3. Fast simultaneous determination of niobium and tantalum by Kalman Filter analysis with flow injection chemiluminescence method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Li, Junfeng; Chen, Zhengxia; Liu, Mingyang; Wang, Hongyan

    2005-09-01

    A fast and highly efficient Kalman Filter analysis-flow injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method was developed to simultaneously determine trace amounts of niobium and tantalum in geological samples. The method, without the boring process of separation and dear instruments, is suitable for field scene analysis. The mixed chemiluminescence kinetic curve was analyzed by a Kalman Filter (KF) in this method to realize the simultaneous determination of niobium and tantalum. Possible interference elements in the determination were investigated. Under the selected conditions, the detection limits (3sigma, n = 11) of niobium(V) and tantalum(V) were 2.1 x 10(-3) microg g(-1) and 4.0 x 10(-3) microg g(-1), respectively, and the relative standard deviations were 4.9% and 3.3% (n = 9). The method was applied to the determination of niobium and tantalum in geological samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Unsteady Simulation of an ASME Venturi Flow in a Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Jeremy; Rahai, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    Unsteady numerical simulations of an ASME venturi flow into a cross flow were performed. The velocity ratios between the venturi flow and the free stream were 25, 50, and 75%. Two cases of the venturi with and without a tube extension have been investigated. The tube extension length was approximately 4D (here D is the inner diameter of the venturi's outlet), connecting the venturi to the bottom surface of the numerical wind tunnel. A finite volume approach with the Wilcox K-φ turbulence model were used. Results that include contours of the mean velocity, velocity vector, turbulent kinetic energy, pressure and vortices within the venturi as well as downstream in the interaction region indicate that when the venturi is flushed with the surface, there is evidence of flow separation within the venturi, near the outlet. However, when the tube extension was added, the pressure recovery was sustained and flow separation within the venturi was not present and the characteristics of the flow in the interaction region were similar to the corresponding characteristics of a pipe jet in a cross flow.

  5. Effect of Post-Reconstruction Gaussian Filtering on Image Quality and Myocardial Blood Flow Measurement with N-13 Ammonia PET

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon Sik; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Ju Han; Kwon, Seong Young; Lee, Byeong-il; Bom, Hee-Seung

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): In order to evaluate the effect of post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering on image quality and myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurement by dynamic N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography (PET), we compared various reconstruction and filtering methods with image characteristics. Methods: Dynamic PET images of three patients with coronary artery disease (male-female ratio of 2:1; age: 57, 53, and 76 years) were reconstructed, using filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) methods. OSEM reconstruction consisted of OSEM_2I, OSEM_4I, and OSEM_6I with 2, 4, and 6 iterations, respectively. The images, reconstructed and filtered by Gaussian filters of 5, 10, and 15 mm, were obtained, as well as non-filtered images. Visual analysis of image quality (IQ) was performed using a 3-grade scoring system by 2 independent readers, blinded to the reconstruction and filtering methods of stress images. Then, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated by noise and contrast recovery (CR). Stress and rest MBF and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were obtained for each method. IQ scores, stress and rest MBF, and CFR were compared between the methods, using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: In the visual analysis, IQ was significantly higher by 10 mm Gaussian filtering, compared to other sizes of filter (P<0.001 for both readers). However, no significant difference of IQ was found between FBP and various numbers of iteration in OSEM (P=0.923 and 0.855 for readers 1 and 2, respectively). SNR was significantly higher in 10 mm Gaussian filter. There was a significant difference in stress and rest MBF between several vascular territories. However CFR was not significantly different according to various filtering methods. Conclusion: Post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering with a filter size of 10 mm significantly enhances the IQ of N-13 ammonia PET-CT, without changing the results of CFR calculation. PMID:27408866

  6. Numerical simulations of flue gas flow in a first stage filter with top inlet - Modifications of the inlet chamber inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Martin; Matas, Richard; Sedláček, Jan

    2017-09-01

    This paper is focused on flue gas flow simulations in a first stage filter with top inlet that is used in a cogeneration power plant. CFD simulations were done with emphasize on the influence of inlet chamber on the flue gas distribution and filtering process. The flow has to be turned at right direction in a quite small space. To achieve this change, distribution walls with flaps and duct inserts are used in the inlet chamber. The results showed that the main influence on the velocity distribution inside the filter have the inserts in the chamber.

  7. Taylor-Couette flow control by amplitude variation of the inner cylinder cross-section oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oualli, Hamid; Mekadem, Mahmoud; Lebbi, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Ahcene

    2015-07-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of a viscous fluid flow evolving in an annular space between a rotating inner cylinder with a periodically variable radius and an outer fixed cylinder is considered. The basic flow is axis-symmetric with two counter-rotating vortices each wavelength along the whole filled system length. The numerical simulations are implemented on the commercial Fluent software package, a finite-volume CFD code. It is aimed to make investigation of the early flow transition with assessment of the flow response to radial pulsatile motion superimposed to the inner cylinder cross-section as an extension of a previous developed work in Oualli et al. [H. Oualli, A. Lalaoua, S. Hanchi, A. Bouabdallah, Eur. Phys. J. Appl. Phys. 61, 11102 (2013)] where a comparative controlling strategy is applied to the outer cylinder. The same basic system is considered with similar calculating parameters and procedure. In Oualli et al. [H. Oualli, A. Lalaoua, S. Hanchi, A. Bouabdallah, Eur. Phys. J. Appl. Phys. 61, 11102 (2013)], it is concluded that for the actuated outer cylinder and relatively to the non-controlled case, the critical Taylor number, Tac1, characterizing the first instability onset illustrated by the piled Taylor vortices along the gap, increases substantially to reach a growing rate of 70% when the deforming amplitude is ɛ = 15%. Interestingly, when this controlling strategy is applied to the inner cylinder cross-section with a slight modification of the actuating law, this tendency completely inverts and the critical Taylor number decreases sharply from Tac1 = 41.33 to Tac1 = 17.66 for ɛ = 5%, corresponding to a reduction rate of 57%. Fundamentally, this result is interesting and can be interpreted by prematurely triggering instabilities resulting in rapid development of flow turbulence. Practically, important applicative aspects can be met in several industry areas where substantial intensification of transport phenomena (mass, momentum and heat) is

  8. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  9. Fluidic low pass filter for hydrodynamic flow stabilization in microfluidic environments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jun; Yang, Sung

    2012-04-24

    Fluctuations in flow rate invariably occur in microfluidic devices. This fluidic instability results in a deteriorating performance and the suspension of their unique functions occasionally. In this study, a fluidic-LPF (low pass filter), which is composed of an ACU (air compliance unit) and a FCSP (fluidic channel with high fluidic resistance for sufficient preload), has been proposed for providing the stabilization of hydrodynamic flow in microfluidic devices. To investigate the characteristics of various fluidic networks including our fluidic-LPF, we used a parametric identification method to estimate the time constants via a transient response that was based on a discrete parameter model. In addition, we propose the use of a pulsation index (PI) to quantify the fluctuations in flow rate. We verified the formula for PI derived herein by varying individually both the periods and the air compliance volumes in the ACU, both theoretically and experimentally. We found that the PI depended strongly on either the time constants or the periods of the flow rates at the inlet. Additionally, the normalized differences between the experimental results and the theoretical estimations were less than 6%, which shows that the proposed formula for PI can provide an accurate quantification of the fluctuations in flow, and estimate the parametric effects. Finally, we have successfully demonstrated that our fluidic-LPF can regulate fluctuations in the flow at extremely low flow rates (~ 10 μL h(-1)) and can also control severe fluidic fluctuations (PI = 0.67) with excessively long periods (100 s) via a microfluidic viscometer. We therefore believe that the stabilization of hydrodynamic flow using a fluidic-LPF could be used easily and extensively with a range of microfluidic platforms that require constant flow rates.

  10. Lagrangian filtered density function for LES-based stochastic modelling of turbulent particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Alessio; Marchioli, Cristian; Chibbaro, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach based on Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is one of the most promising and viable numerical tools to study particle-laden turbulent flows, when the computational cost of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) becomes too expensive. The applicability of this approach is however limited if the effects of the Sub-Grid Scales (SGSs) of the flow on particle dynamics are neglected. In this paper, we propose to take these effects into account by means of a Lagrangian stochastic SGS model for the equations of particle motion. The model extends to particle-laden flows the velocity-filtered density function method originally developed for reactive flows. The underlying filtered density function is simulated through a Lagrangian Monte Carlo procedure that solves a set of Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) along individual particle trajectories. The resulting model is tested for the reference case of turbulent channel flow, using a hybrid algorithm in which the fluid velocity field is provided by LES and then used to advance the SDEs in time. The model consistency is assessed in the limit of particles with zero inertia, when "duplicate fields" are available from both the Eulerian LES and the Lagrangian tracking. Tests with inertial particles were performed to examine the capability of the model to capture the particle preferential concentration and near-wall segregation. Upon comparison with DNS-based statistics, our results show improved accuracy and considerably reduced errors with respect to the case in which no SGS model is used in the equations of particle motion.

  11. Optimized cross-slot flow geometry for microfluidic extensional rheometry.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J; Oliveira, Mónica S N; Alves, Manuel A; McKinley, Gareth H

    2012-09-21

    A precision-machined cross-slot flow geometry with a shape that has been optimized by numerical simulation of the fluid kinematics is fabricated and used to measure the extensional viscosity of a dilute polymer solution. Full-field birefringence microscopy is used to monitor the evolution and growth of macromolecular anisotropy along the stagnation point streamline, and we observe the formation of a strong and uniform birefringent strand when the dimensionless flow strength exceeds a critical Weissenberg number Wi(crit) ≈ 0.5. Birefringence and bulk pressure drop measurements provide self-consistent estimates of the planar extensional viscosity of the fluid over a wide range of deformation rates (26 s(-1) ≤ ε ≤ 435 s(-1)) and are also in close agreement with numerical simulations performed by using a finitely extensible nonlinear elastic dumbbell model.

  12. Two-, three-, and four-poster jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukits, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    In connection with the problems of the ingestion of hot exhaust gases in engines of V/STOL and STOVL aircraft in ground effect, a series of studies have been undertaken. Ground impinging, two- and three-poster jets operating in the presence of cross flow were studied. The current paper is divided into two parts. The first part is a comparison of the low speed, two-, three-, and four-poster jet cases, with respect to the flowfield in the region of interaction between the forward and the jet flows. These include cases with mass balanced inlet suction. An analysis of the inlet entry plane of the low speed two- and three-poster jet cases is also given. In the second part, high speed results for a two jet configuration without inlet suction are given. The results are based on quantitative, marker concentration distributions obtained by digitizing video images.

  13. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals in response to said first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  14. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-05-14

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  15. Analysis of multiple jets in a cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaac, K. M.; Schetz, J. A.

    1982-12-01

    The analysis of Campbell and Schetz (1973) is extended to the study of multiple jets in a cross flow, where the interaction of two jets is taken into account by a modification of the drag coefficient that is sensed by each jet. Results show that the rear jet trajectory is significantly modified by the presence of the front one even when the jets are spaced far apart. The analysis is applicable to such phenomena as the exhaust of chimney stack smoke into a wind and the lift jets of a V/STOL aircraft during takeoff or landing in strong winds.

  16. Cross Flow Effects on Glaze Ice Roughness Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2004-01-01

    The present study examines the impact of large-scale cross flow on the creation of ice roughness elements on the leading edge of a swept wing under glaze icing conditions. A three-dimensional triple-deck structure is developed to describe the local interaction of a 3 D air boundary layer with ice sheets and liquid films. A linear stability analysis is presented here. It is found that, as the sweep angle increases, the local icing instabilities enhance and the most linearly unstable modes are strictly three dimensional.

  17. Recovery Act - Refinement of Cross Flow Turbine Airfoils

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2013-08-30

    Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (ORPC) is a global leader in hydrokinetic technology and project development. ORPC develops hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of oceans and rivers to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC’s technology consists of a family of modular hydrokinetic power systems: the TidGen® Power System, for use at shallow to medium-depth tidal sites; the RivGen™ Power System, for use at river and estuary sites; and the OCGen® Power System, presently under development, for use at deep tidal and offshore ocean current sites. These power systems convert kinetic energy in moving water into clean, renewable, grid-compatible electric power. The core technology component for all ORPC power systems is its patented turbine generator unit (TGU). The TGU uses proprietary advanced design cross flow (ADCF) turbines to drive an underwater permanent magnet generator mounted at the TGU’s center. It is a gearless, direct-drive system that has the potential for high reliability, requires no lubricants and releases no toxins that could contaminate the surrounding water. The hydrokinetic industry shows tremendous promise as a means of helping reduce the U.S.’s use of fossil fuels and dependence on foreign oil. To exploit this market opportunity, cross-flow hydrokinetic devices need to advance beyond the pre-commercial state and more systematic data about the structure and function of cross-flow hydrokinetic devices is required. This DOE STTR project, “Recovery Act - Refinement of Cross Flow Turbine Airfoils,” refined the cross-flow turbine design process to improve efficiency and performance and developed turbine manufacturing processes appropriate for volume production. The project proposed (1) to overcome the lack of data by extensively studying the properties of cross flow turbines, a particularly competitive design approach for extracting hydrokinetic energy and (2) to help ORPC mature its pre

  18. Flow-through SIP - A novel stable isotope probing approach limiting cross-feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooshammer, Maria; Kitzinger, Katharina; Schintlmeister, Arno; Kjedal, Henrik; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per; Wagner, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a widely applied tool to link specific microbial populations to metabolic processes in the environment without the prerequisite of cultivation, which has greatly advanced our understanding of the role of microorganisms in biogeochemical cycling. SIP relies on tracing specific isotopically labeled substrates (e.g., 13C, 15N, 18O) into cellular biomarkers, such as DNA, RNA or phospholipid fatty acids, and is considered to be a robust technique to identify microbial populations that assimilate the labeled substrate. However, cross-feeding can occur when labeled metabolites are released from a primary consumer and then used by other microorganisms. This leads to erroneous identification of organisms that are not directly responsible for the process of interest, but are rather connected to primary consumers via a microbial food web. Here, we introduce a new approach that has the potential to eliminate the effect of cross-feeding in SIP studies and can thus also be used to distinguish primary consumers from other members of microbial food webs. In this approach, a monolayer of microbial cells are placed on a filter membrane, and labeled substrates are supplied by a continuous flow. By means of flow-through, labeled metabolites and degradation products are constantly removed, preventing secondary consumption of the substrate. We present results from a proof-of-concept experiment using nitrifiers from activated sludge as model system, in which we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for identification of nitrifiers in combination with nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) for visualization of isotope incorporation at the single-cell level. Our results show that flow-through SIP is a promising approach to significantly reduce cross-feeding and secondary substrate consumption in SIP experiments.

  19. Using the developed cross-flow filtration chip for collecting blood plasma under high flow rate condition and applying the immunoglobulin E detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hung, Chia-Wei; Wu, Chun-Han; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a cross-flow filtration chip for separating blood cells (white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets) and obtaining blood plasma from human blood. Our strategy is to flow the sample solution in parallel to the membrane, which can generate a parallel shear stress to remove the clogging microparticles on the membrane, so the pure sample solution is obtained in the reservoir. The cross-flow filtration chip includes a cross-flow layer, a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane, and a reservoir layer. The three layers are packaged in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) frame to create the cross-flow filtration chip. Various dilutions of the blood sample (original, 2 × , 3 × , 5 × , and 10×), pore sizes with different diameters (1 µm, 2 µm, 4 µm, 7 µm, and 10 µm), and different flow rates (1 mL/min, 3 mL/min, 5 mL/min, 7 mL/min, and 10 mL/min) are tested to determine their effects on filtration percentage. The best filtration percentage is 96.2% when the dilution of the blood sample is 10 × , the diameter of pore size of a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane is 2 µm, and the flow rate is 10 mL/min. Finally, for the clinical tests of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentration, the cross-flow filtration chip is used to filter the blood of the allergy patients to obtain the blood plasma. This filtered blood plasma is compared with that obtained using the conventional centrifugation based on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results reveal that these two blood separation methods have similar detection trends. The proposed filtration chip has the advantages of low cost, short filtration time, and easy operation and thus can be applied to the separation of microparticles, cells, bacteria, and blood.

  20. Computational studies of flow through cross flow fans - effect of blade geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, M.; Sampat, D. Lakshmana

    2005-09-01

    This present paper describes three dimensional computational analysis of complex internal flow in a cross flow fan. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software code CFX was used for the computation. RNG k-ɛ two equation turbulence model was used to simulate the model with unstructured mesh. Sliding mesh interface was used at the interface between the rotating and stationary domains to capture the unsteady interactions. An accurate assessment of the present investigation is made by comparing various parameters with the available experimental data. Three impeller geometries with different blade angles and radius ratio are used in the present study. Maximum energy transfer through the impeller takes place in the region where the flow follows the blade curvature. Radial velocity is not uniform through blade channels. Some blades work in turbine mode at very low flow coefficients. Static pressure is always negative in and around the impeller region.

  1. Single-ensemble-based eigen-processing methods for color flow imaging--Part I. The Hankel-SVD filter.

    PubMed

    Yu, Alfred C H; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2008-03-01

    Because of their adaptability to the slow-time signal contents, eigen-based filters have shown potential in improving the flow detection performance of color flow images. This paper proposes a new eigen-based filter called the Hankel-SVD filter that is intended to process each slowtime ensemble individually. The new filter is derived using the notion of principal Hankel component analysis, and it achieves clutter suppression by retaining only the principal components whose order is greater than the clutter eigen-space dimension estimated from a frequency based analysis algorithm. To assess its efficacy, the Hankel-SVD filter was first applied to synthetic slow-time data (ensemble size: 10) simulated from two different sets of flow parameters that model: 1) arterial imaging (blood velocity: 0 to 38.5 cm/s, tissue motion: up to 2 mm/s, transmit frequency: 5 MHz, pulse repetition period: 0.4 ms) and 2) deep vessel imaging (blood velocity: 0 to 19.2 cm/s, tissue motion: up to 2 cm/s, transmit frequency: 2 MHz, pulse repetition period: 2.0 ms). In the simulation analysis, the post-filter clutter-to- blood signal ratio (CBR) was computed as a function of blood velocity. Results show that for the same effective stopband size (50 Hz), the Hankel-SVD filter has a narrower transition region in the post-filter CBR curve than that of another type of adaptive filter called the clutter-downmixing filter. The practical efficacy of the proposed filter was tested by application to in vivo color flow data obtained from the human carotid arteries (transmit frequency: 4 MHz, pulse repetition period: 0.333 ms, ensemble size: 10). The resulting power images show that the Hankel-SVD filter can better distinguish between blood and moving-tissue regions (about 9 dB separation in power) than the clutter-downmixing filter and a fixed-rank multi ensemble-based eigen-filter (which showed a 2 to 3 dB separation).

  2. Can a numerically stable subgrid-scale model for turbulent flow computation be ideally accurate?: a preliminary theoretical study for the Gaussian filtered Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2003-09-01

    This paper introduces a candidate for the origin of the numerical instabilities in large eddy simulation repeatedly observed in academic and practical industrial flow computations. Without resorting to any subgrid-scale modeling, but based on a simple assumption regarding the streamwise component of flow velocity, it is shown theoretically that in a channel-flow computation, the application of the Gaussian filtering to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations yields a numerically unstable term, a cross-derivative term, which is similar to one appearing in the Gaussian filtered Vlasov equation derived by Klimas [J. Comput. Phys. 68, 202 (1987)] and also to one derived recently by Kobayashi and Shimomura [Phys. Fluids 15, L29 (2003)] from the tensor-diffusivity subgrid-scale term in a dynamic mixed model. The present result predicts that not only the numerical methods and the subgrid-scale models employed but also only the applied filtering process can be a seed of this numerical instability. An investigation concerning the relationship between the turbulent energy scattering and the unstable term shows that the instability of the term does not necessarily represent the backscatter of kinetic energy which has been considered a possible origin of numerical instabilities in large eddy simulation. The present findings raise the question whether a numerically stable subgrid-scale model can be ideally accurate.

  3. Methods to improve pressure, temperature and velocity accuracies of filtered Rayleigh scattering measurements in gaseous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Ulrich; Burow, Eike; Stockhausen, Guido; Willert, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Frequency scanning filtered Rayleigh scattering is able to simultaneously provide time-averaged measurements of pressure, temperature and velocity in gaseous flows. By extending the underlying mathematical model, a robust alternative to existing approaches is introduced. Present and proposed model functions are then characterized during a detailed uncertainty analysis. Deviations between the analytical solution of a jet flow experiment and measured results could be related to laser-induced background radiation as well as the Rayleigh scattering’s spectral distribution. In applying a background correction method and by replacing the standard lineshape model by an empirical formulation, detrimental effects on pressure, temperature and velocity accuracies could be reduced below 15 hPa, 2.5 K and 2.7 m s-1.

  4. Fast reconstruction and prediction of frozen flow turbulence based on structured Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Fraanje, Rufus; Rice, Justin; Verhaegen, Michel; Doelman, Niek

    2010-11-01

    Efficient and optimal prediction of frozen flow turbulence using the complete observation history of the wavefront sensor is an important issue in adaptive optics for large ground-based telescopes. At least for the sake of error budgeting and algorithm performance, the evaluation of an accurate estimate of the optimal performance of a particular adaptive optics configuration is important. However, due to the large number of grid points, high sampling rates, and the non-rationality of the turbulence power spectral density, the computational complexity of the optimal predictor is huge. This paper shows how a structure in the frozen flow propagation can be exploited to obtain a state-space innovation model with a particular sparsity structure. This sparsity structure enables one to efficiently compute a structured Kalman filter. By simulation it is shown that the performance can be improved and the computational complexity can be reduced in comparison with auto-regressive predictors of low order.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  7. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part II. Experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Emma; Håkansson, Andreas; Janiak, John; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    In this study we investigate the effect of programmed cross-flows on the error in the hydrodynamic radii (r(h)) determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF). Three different standard polystyrene particles (nominal radii of 30 and 40 and 50 nm) are fractionated with exponentially and linearly decaying cross-flows with different decay rates. Hydrodynamic radii are calculated according to retention theory including steric effects. Rapid decay is expected to give rise to systematic deviations in r(h) determination. The error in r(h) was found to be small when decay rates with half-lives longer than 6 min were used, whereas steeper decays could give rise to errors as high as 16% of the particle size. The error is often explained in terms of secondary relaxation. However, comparisons show that experimental errors are significantly larger than what would be expected due to secondary relaxation, suggesting that other factors also have to be considered in order to fully understand deviations for rapidly decaying cross-flow.

  8. Construction of low dissipative high-order well-balanced filter schemes for non-equilibrium flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Yee, H.C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Magin, Thierry; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2011-05-20

    The goal of this paper is to generalize the well-balanced approach for non-equilibrium flow studied by Wang et al. (2009) to a class of low dissipative high-order shock-capturing filter schemes and to explore more advantages of well-balanced schemes in reacting flows. More general 1D and 2D reacting flow models and new examples of shock turbulence interactions are provided to demonstrate the advantage of well-balanced schemes. The class of filter schemes developed by Yee et al. (1999) , Sjoegreen and Yee (2004) and Yee and Sjoegreen (2007) consist of two steps, a full time step of spatially high-order non-dissipative base scheme and an adaptive non-linear filter containing shock-capturing dissipation. A good property of the filter scheme is that the base scheme and the filter are stand-alone modules in designing. Therefore, the idea of designing a well-balanced filter scheme is straightforward, i.e. choosing a well-balanced base scheme with a well-balanced filter (both with high-order accuracy). A typical class of these schemes shown in this paper is the high-order central difference schemes/predictor-corrector (PC) schemes with a high-order well-balanced WENO filter. The new filter scheme with the well-balanced property will gather the features of both filter methods and well-balanced properties: it can preserve certain steady-state solutions exactly; it is able to capture small perturbations, e.g. turbulence fluctuations; and it adaptively controls numerical dissipation. Thus it shows high accuracy, efficiency and stability in shock/turbulence interactions. Numerical examples containing 1D and 2D smooth problems, 1D stationary contact discontinuity problem and 1D turbulence/shock interactions are included to verify the improved accuracy, in addition to the well-balanced behavior.

  9. Approximate solutions of the filtered radiative transfer equation in large eddy simulations of turbulent reactive flows

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.J.

    2009-05-15

    An analysis of the relevance of turbulence-radiation interaction in the numerical simulation of turbulent reactive flows is presented. A semi-causal stochastic model was used to generate a time-series of turbulent scalar fluctuations along optical paths of Sandia flame D, a widely studied piloted turbulent jet nonpremixed flame. The radiative transfer equation was integrated along these paths for every realization using a grid resolution typical of a direct numerical simulation. The correlated k-distribution method was employed to compute the radiative properties of the medium. The results were used to determine the ensemble average, as well as the extreme values, of quantities that indicate the importance of the turbulence-radiation interaction. Several approximate methods are then proposed to solve the filtered radiative transfer equation in the framework of large eddy simulations. The proposed methods are applicable along with combustion models that either assume the filtered probability density function of a conserved scalar or solve a transport equation for a joint scalar or joint scalar/velocity filtered density function. It is concluded that the errors resulting from neglecting the turbulence-radiation interaction in large eddy simulations are much lower than those found in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculations. The optically thin fluctuation approximation may be extended to large eddy simulations yielding predictions in excellent agreement with the reference solution. If the turbulence-radiation interaction is accounted for using this approximation, the average relative error of the filtered total radiation intensity is generally below 0.3% for the studied flame. (author)

  10. Detection of cortisol in saliva with a flow-filtered, portable surface plasmon resonance biosensor system.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Richard C; Soelberg, Scott D; Near, Steve; Furlong, Clement E

    2008-09-01

    Saliva provides a useful and noninvasive alternative to blood for many biomedical diagnostic assays. The level of the hormone cortisol in blood and saliva is related to the level of stress. We present here the development of a portable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor system for detection of cortisol in saliva. Cortisol-specific monoclonal antibodies were used to develop a competition assay with a six-channel portable SPR biosensor designed in our laboratory. The detection limit of cortisol in laboratory buffers was 0.36 ng/mL (1.0 nM). An in-line filter based on diffusion through a hollow fiber hydrophilic membrane served to separate small molecules from the complex macromolecular matrix of saliva prior to introduction to the sensor surface. The filtering flow cell provided in-line separation of small molecules from salivary mucins and other large molecules with only a 29% reduction of signal compared with direct flow of the same concentration of analyte over the sensor surface. A standard curve for detection of cortisol in saliva was generated with a detection limit of 1.0 ng/mL (3.6 nM), sufficiently sensitive for clinical use. The system will also be useful for a wide range of applications where small molecular weight analytes are found in complex matrixes.

  11. Coupling of stochastic moment equations and Ensemble Kalman Filter for groundwater flow data assimilation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnini, A.; Panzeri, M.; Riva, M.; Neuman, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    We embed stochastic groundwater flow moment equations (MEs) in the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) in a way that obviates the need for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The MEs yield approximate conditional ensemble means and covariances of hydraulic heads and fluxes in randomly heterogeneous media. Embedding these in EnKF allows updating of conductivity and head predictors as new data become available without the need for MC. The approach is well suited for cases in which real-time measurements allow sequential (as opposed to simultaneous) updating of flow parameters. We discuss and compare the accuracies and computational efficiencies of our newly proposed ME-based EnKF approach and the traditional MC-based EnKF approach for the case of a pumping well in a two-dimensional randomly heterogeneous aquifer. We analyze a number of settings and investigate the impact on parameters estimates of (a) the number of head measurements assimilated, (b) the error variance associated with head and log conductivity measurements and (c) the initial hydraulic head field. We demonstrate the computational feasibility and accuracy of our methodology and show that hydraulic conductivity estimates are more sensitive to early than to later head values, improving with increased assimilation frequency at early time. Our approach mitigates issues of filter inbreeding and spurious covariances often plaguing standard EnKF.

  12. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  13. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  14. Constraining a compositional flow model with flow-chemical data using an ensemble-based Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharamti, M. E.; Kadoura, A.; Valstar, J.; Sun, S.; Hoteit, I.

    2014-03-01

    Isothermal compositional flow models require coupling transient compressible flows and advective transport systems of various chemical species in subsurface porous media. Building such numerical models is quite challenging and may be subject to many sources of uncertainties because of possible incomplete representation of some geological parameters that characterize the system's processes. Advanced data assimilation methods, such as the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), can be used to calibrate these models by incorporating available data. In this work, we consider the problem of estimating reservoir permeability using information about phase pressure as well as the chemical properties of fluid components. We carry out state-parameter estimation experiments using joint and dual updating schemes in the context of the EnKF with a two-dimensional single-phase compositional flow model (CFM). Quantitative and statistical analyses are performed to evaluate and compare the performance of the assimilation schemes. Our results indicate that including chemical composition data significantly enhances the accuracy of the permeability estimates. In addition, composition data provide more information to estimate system states and parameters than do standard pressure data. The dual state-parameter estimation scheme provides about 10% more accurate permeability estimates on average than the joint scheme when implemented with the same ensemble members, at the cost of twice more forward model integrations. At similar computational cost, the dual approach becomes only beneficial after using large enough ensembles.

  15. Cross correlation and length scales in turbulent flows near surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.; Moin, P.; Lee, M.; Moser, R. D.; Spalart, P.; Mansour, N. N.; Kaimal, J. C.; Gaynor, E.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of length scales are used in turbulent flows; 'functional length scales' such as mixing length, dissipation length L(sub epsilon), etc., and 'flow-field length scales' derived from cross correlations of velocity, pressure, etc. in the flow. Some connection between these scales are derived here. We first consider the cross correlation R(sub vv)(y,y(sub 1)) of the normal components u at two heights y, y(sub 1) above a rigid surface, normalized by the velocity y(sub 1) (greater than y). For shear-free boundary layers it is found theoretically, and in field and numerical experiments that R(sub vv) approximately equals y/y(sub 1). For shear layers it is also found that R(sub vv) approximately equals f(y/y(sub 1)) less than or equal to y,y(sub 1). This function f differs slightly between low Reynolds number numerical simulations and field experiments. The lateral structure defined by R(sub vv)(y,r(sub 3); y(sub 1),0) is also self similar and shows that the eddies centered at about y(sub 1) appear to have constant lateral width a(sub 3) above and below y(sub 1), where a(sub 3, sup +) approximately equals 7+1/(1.4dU(sup +)/dy(sup +)), when normalized on u(sub *) and v, where U is the mean velocity. Results for L(sub epsilon, sup -1) from direct numerical simulation are found to compare well with the formula L(sub epsilon, sup -1) = A(sub B)/y + A(sub S)dU/dy/v, for unidirectional and reversing turbulent boundary layers and channel flow, except near where dU/dy approximately equals 0. The conclusion is that the large-scale eddy structure and length scales in these flows are determined by a combination of shear and blocking, and that the vertical component of turbulence has a self-similar structure in both kinds of boundary layer.

  16. Cross-flow versus counter-current flow packed-bed scrubbers: a mathematical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, V.M.

    1996-02-01

    Little is known about the mass transfer properties of packing media exposed to a crossflow of gas and liquid, whereas there is abundant information related to counter-current scrubbers. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of mass transfer and hydrodynamics in cross- flow packed bed scrubbers and compares those with information available for counter current towers, so that the first can be evaluated and/or designed based on data derived for the second. Mathematical models of mass transfer in cross-flow and counter- current packed bed scrubbers are presented. From those, one can predict the removal effectiveness of a crossflow scrubber from the number of transfer units (NTU) calculated for a similar counterflow operation; alternatively, when the removal effectiveness in counterflow is known, one can predict the corresponding NTU in crossflow.

  17. Finding Leading Indicators for Disease Outbreaks: Filtering, Cross-correlation, and Caveats

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Ronald M.; Buckeridge, David L.; Cheng, Karen E.

    2007-01-01

    Bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases such as influenza have spurred research into rapid outbreak detection. One primary thrust of this research has been to identify data sources that provide early indication of a disease outbreak by being leading indicators relative to other established data sources. Researchers tend to rely on the sample cross-correlation function (CCF) to quantify the association between two data sources. There has been, however, little consideration by medical informatics researchers of the influence of methodological choices on the ability of the CCF to identify a lead–lag relationship between time series. We draw on experience from the econometric and environmental health communities, and we use simulation to demonstrate that the sample CCF is highly prone to bias. Specifically, long-scale phenomena tend to overwhelm the CCF, obscuring phenomena at shorter wave lengths. Researchers seeking lead–lag relationships in surveillance data must therefore stipulate the scale length of the features of interest (e.g., short-scale spikes versus long-scale seasonal fluctuations) and then filter the data appropriately—to diminish the influence of other features, which may mask the features of interest. Otherwise, conclusions drawn from the sample CCF of bi-variate time-series data will inevitably be ambiguous and often altogether misleading. PMID:17068353

  18. Effect of filter media size, mass flow rate and filtration stage number in a moving-bed granular filter on the yield and properties of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Paenpong, Chaturong; Inthidech, Sudsakorn; Pattiya, Adisak

    2013-07-01

    Fast pyrolysis of cassava rhizome was performed in a bench-scale fluidised-bed reactor unit incorporated with a cross-flow moving-bed granular filter. The objective of this research was to examine several process parameters including the granular size (425-1160 μm) and mass flow rate (0-12 g/min) as well as the number of the filtration stages (1-2 stages) on yields and properties of bio-oil. The results showed that the bio-oil yield decreased from 57.7 wt.% to 42.0-49.2 wt.% when increasing the filter media size, the mass flow rate and the filtration stage number. The effect of the process parameters on various properties of bio-oil is thoroughly discussed. In general, the bio-oil quality in terms of the solids content, ash content, initial viscosity, viscosity change and ageing rate could be enhanced by the hot vapour granular filtration. Therefore, bio-oil of high stability could be produced by the pyrolysis reactor configuration designed in this work.

  19. Chebyshev-like generalized Shapiro filters for high-accuracy flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falissard, F.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents Chebyshev-like generalized Shapiro (CS) filters with improved spectral-like resolution compared to existing generalized Shapiro filters. These new filters combine the advantages of Shapiro filters, i.e. arbitrary accuracy order, no-dispersion, full damping of 2Δ-waves, and the advantages of Chebyshev filters, i.e. purely dissipative response function with equal ripples satisfying an arbitrary Chebyshev criterion in passband. Thanks to the formalism of generalized Shapiro filters, general formulas are derived for arbitrary accuracy orders and arbitrary Chebyshev criterion. A python script is provided in appendix to compute CS filter coefficients. Computations based on the Euler equations assess the benefit of CS filters compared to the standard Shapiro filters. Since CS filters differ from Shapiro filters only by their coefficients, they can easily and advantageously be implemented in computational solvers already making use of generalized Shapiro filters.

  20. Infiltration capacity of roadside filter strips with non-uniform overland flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Serrana, María; Gulliver, John S.; Nieber, John L.

    2017-02-01

    The side slope to a roadside swale (drainage ditch) constitutes a filter strip that has potential for infiltration of road runoff, thereby serving as a stormwater quantity and quality control mechanism. A total of thirty-two tests were performed during three seasons in four different highways located in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area, MN to analyze the infiltration performance of roadside filter strips and the effect of fractional coverage of water on infiltration. Three different application rates were used in the experiments. All the tests showed that water flow on the lateral slope of a roadside swale is concentrated in fingers, instead of sheet flow, at the typical road runoff intensities for which infiltration practices are utilized to improve surface water quality. A linear relationship between flux of water from the road and fraction of wetted surface was observed, for the intensities tested. The average percentage infiltration of the medium road runoff rate (1.55 × 10-4 m2/s, without direct rainfall) experiments performed in fall was 85% and in spring 70%. For the high road runoff rate (3.1 × 10-4 m2/s, without direct rainfall) tests the average amount of water infiltrated was 47% and for the low road runoff rate (7.76 × 10-5 m2/s, without direct rainfall) tests it was 69%, both set of tests performed in spring and summer. The saturated hydraulic conductivity of swale soil was high, relative to the values typical of laboratory permeameter measurements for these types of soils. This is believed to be due to the macropores generated by vegetation roots, activity of macrofauna (e.g. earthworms), and construction/maintenance procedures. The trend was to have more infiltration when the saturated hydraulic conductivity was higher and for a greater side slope length, as expected. The vegetation, type of soil and length of the side slope are important to consider for constructing and maintaining roadside swales that will be efficient as stormwater

  1. Improved radiocarbon dating for contaminated archaeological bone collagen, silk, wool and hair samples via cross-flow nanofiltrated amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boudin, Mathieu; Boeckx, Pascal; Vandenabeele, Peter; Van Strydonck, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Radiocarbon dating and stable isotope analyses of bone collagen, wool, hair and silk contaminated with extraneous carbon (e.g. humic substances) does not yield reliable results if these materials are pre-treated using conventional methods. A cross-flow nanofiltration method was developed that can be applied to various protein materials like collagen, hair, silk, wool and leather, and should be able to remove low-molecular and high-molecular weight contaminants. To avoid extraneous carbon contamination via the filter a ceramic filter (molecular weight cut-off of 200 Da) was used. The amino acids, released by hot acid hydrolysis of the protein material, were collected in the permeate and contaminants in the retentate (>200 Da). (14)C-dating results for various contaminated archaeological samples were compared for bulk material (pre-treated with the conventional methods) and for cross-flow nanofiltrated amino acids (permeate) originating from the same samples. Contamination and quality control of (14)C dates of bulk and permeate samples were obtained by measuring C:N ratios, fluorescence spectra, and δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of the samples. Cross-flow nanofiltration decreases the C:N ratio which means that contaminants have been removed. Cross-flow nanofiltration clearly improved sample quality and (14)C results. It is a quick and non-labor-intensive technique and can easily be implemented in any (14)C and stable isotope laboratory for routine sample pre-treatment analyses. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Multiscale Simulations of ALD in Cross Flow Reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2014-08-13

    In this study, we have developed a multiscale simulation code that allows us to study the impact of surface chemistry on the coating of large area substrates with high surface area/high aspect-ratio features. Our code, based on open-source libraries, takes advantage of the ALD surface chemistry to achieve an extremely efficient two-way coupling between reactor and feature length scales, and it can provide simulated quartz crystal microbalance and mass spectrometry data at any point of the reactor. By combining experimental surface characterization with simple analysis of growth profiles in a tubular cross flow reactor, we are able to extract amore » minimal set of reactions to effectively model the surface chemistry, including the presence of spurious CVD, to evaluate the impact of surface chemistry on the coating of large, high surface area substrates.« less

  3. Multiscale Simulations of ALD in Cross Flow Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2014-08-13

    In this study, we have developed a multiscale simulation code that allows us to study the impact of surface chemistry on the coating of large area substrates with high surface area/high aspect-ratio features. Our code, based on open-source libraries, takes advantage of the ALD surface chemistry to achieve an extremely efficient two-way coupling between reactor and feature length scales, and it can provide simulated quartz crystal microbalance and mass spectrometry data at any point of the reactor. By combining experimental surface characterization with simple analysis of growth profiles in a tubular cross flow reactor, we are able to extract a minimal set of reactions to effectively model the surface chemistry, including the presence of spurious CVD, to evaluate the impact of surface chemistry on the coating of large, high surface area substrates.

  4. "Stolen" blood flow: effect of an open arterial filter purge line in a simulated neonatal CPB model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Miller, Akemi; Myers, John L; Undar, Akif

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different flow rates and pressures on the degree of shunting of blood flow by the arterial filter purge line in a simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. The circuit was primed with heparinized bovine blood (hematocrit 24%) and postfilter pressure was varied from 60-180 mm Hg (20 mm Hg increments) using a Hoffman clamp. Trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 200-600 ml/min (100 ml/min increments). During trials conducted at a postfilter pressure of 60 mm Hg, 42.6% of blood flow was shunted through the purge line at a flow rate of 200 ml/min, whereas only 12.8% of flow was diverted at a flow rate 600 ml/min. During trials conducted at a postfilter pressure of 180 mm Hg, 82.8% of blood flow at 200 ml/min and 25.9% of blood flow at 600 ml/min was diverted through the open arterial purge line. The results of this study confirm that a significant amount of flow is diverted away from the patient when the arterial purge line is open. Shunting of blood flow through the arterial purge line could result in less effective tissue perfusion, particularly at low flow rates and high postfilter pressures. To minimize hypoperfusion injury, a flow probe (distal to the arterial filter) may be used to monitor real-time arterial flow in the setting of an open arterial filter purge line.

  5. Spiral vortex formation in cross-slot flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haward, Simon; Burshtein, Noa; Poole, Robert; Oliveira, Paulo; Alves, Manuel; Shen, Amy

    2016-11-01

    Fluid flow through bisecting channels (cross-slots) results in the formation of a steady spiral vortex as the Reynolds number (Re) is increased above a modest critical value (Rec) . The value of Rec is strongly dependent on the channel aspect ratio, α = d / w , where d and w are the depth and width of the channel, respectively. Quasistatic experiments and numerical simulations over a range of Re show that for low α this symmetry-breaking bifurcation is supercritical, however subcritical behavior develops as α is increased. The system can be described by a Landau-type 6th-order polynomial potential and we identify a value of α 0 . 55 for which a tricritical point can be found. Dynamic experiments and simulations conducted across the transition indicate a plausible mechanism for the onset of the instability. Our analysis suggests that the transition results from the growth of center-point vorticity induced by random imbalances between two pairs of Dean vortices that form in the channel cross-section. Vorticity growth is governed by two distinct time scales. At short times, viscous diffusion dominates and vorticity grows slowly. Once the vorticity is sufficiently high, vortex stretching dominates and the vorticity grows rapidly until steady state is reached.

  6. Use of cross-flow membrane filtration in a recirculating hydroponic system to suppress root disease in pepper caused by Pythium myriotylum.

    PubMed

    Schuerger, Andrew C; Hammer, William

    2009-05-01

    Zoosporic pathogens in the genera Pythium and Phytophthora cause extensive root disease epiphytotics in recirculating hydroponic vegetable-production greenhouses. Zoospore cysts of Pythium myriotylum Drechsler were used to evaluate the effectiveness of cross-flow membrane filters to control pythiaceous pathogens in recirculating hydroponic systems. Four membrane filter brands (Honeycomb, Polypure, Polymate, and Absolife) were tested alone or in combination to determine which filters would effectively remove infective propagules of P. myriotylum from solutions and reduce disease incidence and severity. Zoospore cysts of P. myriotylum generally measured 8 to 10 microm, and it was hypothesized that filters with pore-sizes<5 microm would be effective at removing 100% of the infective propagules and protect pepper plants from root infection. Single-filter assays with Honeycomb and Polypure brands removed 85 to 95% of zoospore cysts when pore sizes were rated at 1, 5, 10, 20, or 30 microm. Single-filter assays of Polymate and Absolife brands were more effective, exhibiting apparently 100% removal of zoospore cysts from nutrient solutions on filters rated at 1 to 10 microm. However, plant bioassays with Honeycomb and Polymate single filters failed to give long-term protection of pepper plants. Double-filter assays with 1- and 0.5-microm Polymate filters significantly increased the protection of pepper plants grown in nutrient film technique systems but, eventually, root disease and plant wilt could be observed. Insect transmissions by shore flies were not factors in disease development. Scanning electron microscopy images of zoospore cysts entrapped on Polymate filters revealed zoospore cysts that were either fully encysted, partially encysted, or of unusually small size (3 microm in diameter). It was concluded that either the atypically small or pliable pleomorphic zoospore cysts were able to penetrate filter membranes that theoretically should have captured them.

  7. Study on performance and flow field of an undershot cross-flow water turbine comprising different number of blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Hatano, Kentaro; Inagaki, Terumi

    2017-10-01

    Recently, small hydroelectric generators have gained attention as a further development in water turbine technology for ultra low head drops in open channels. The authors have evaluated the application of cross-flow water turbines in open channels as an undershot type after removing the casings and guide vanes to substantially simplify these water turbines. However, because undershot cross-flow water turbines are designed on the basis of cross-flow water turbine runners used in typical pipelines, it remains unclear whether the number of blades has an effect on the performance or flow fields. Thus, in this research, experiments and numerical analyses are employed to study the performance and flow fields of undershot cross-flow water turbines with varying number of blades. The findings show that the turbine output and torque are lower, the fluctuation is significantly higher, and the turbine efficiency is higher for runners with 8 blades as opposed to those with 24 blades.

  8. Data Assimilation for Vadose Zone Flow Modeling Using the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Schaap, M. G.; Zha, Y.; Xue, L.

    2015-12-01

    The natural system is open and complex and the hydraulic parameters needed for describing flow and transport in the vadose zone are often poorly known, making it prone to multiple interpretations, mathematical descriptions and uncertainty. Quite often a reasonable "handle" on a sites flow characteristics can be gained only through direct observation of the flow processes itself, determination of the spatial- and probability distributions of material properties combined with computationally expensive inversions of the Richards equation. In groundwater systems, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has proven to be an effective alternative to model inversions by assimilating observations directly into an ensemble of groundwater models from which time and/or space-variable variable probabilistic quantities of the flow process can be derived. Application of EnKF to Richards equation-type unsaturated flow problems, however, is more challenging than in groundwater systems because the relation of state and model parameters is strongly nonlinear. In addition, the type of functional dependence of moisture content and hydraulic conductivity on matric potential leads to high-dimensional (in the parameter space) problems even under conditions where closed-form expressions of these models such as van Genuchten-Mualem formulations are used. In this study, we updated soil water retention parameters and hydraulic conductivity together and used Restart EnKF, which rerun the nonlinear model from the initial time to obtain the updated state variables, in synthetic cases to explore the factors that may influence estimation results, including the initial estimate, the ensemble size, the observation error, and the assimilation interval. We embedded the EnKF into the Bayesian model averaging framework to enhance the model reliability and reduce predictive uncertainties. This approach is evaluated from a 15 m deep semi-arid highly heterogeneous and anisotropic vadose zone site at the

  9. Isothermal and Reactive Turbulent Jets in Cross-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Bush, Scott; Ibrahim, Irene

    2004-11-01

    Jets in cross flow have numerous applications including vertical/short takeoff/landing (V/STOL) aircraft, cooling jets for gas turbine blades and combustion air supply inlets in gas turbine engine. The properties exhibited by these jets are dictated by complex three dimensional turbulence structures which form due to the interaction of the jet with the freestream. The isothermal tests are conducted in a wind tunnel measuring the characteristics of air jets injected perpendicular into an otherwise undisturbed air stream. Different nozzle exit geometries of the air jets were tested including circular, triangular and elongated configurations. Jets are injected in single and paired combinations with other jets to measure the effect of mutual interaction on the parameters mentioned. Quantitative velocity fields are obtained using PIV. The data obtained allows the extraction of flow parameters such as jet structure, penetration and mixing. The reacting tests include separate and combined jets of fuel/air mixture utilized to explore the stabilization of combustion at various operating conditions. Different geometrical configurations of transverse jets are tested to determine the shape and combination of jets that will optimize the jets ability to successfully stabilize a flame.

  10. Pitched and Yawed Circular Jets in Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20 degrees and 45 degrees and yawed between beta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees in increments of 15 degrees. The measurements were performed with two X-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulence intensity. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, with the downstream distance is significantly lessened at higher alpha but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, omega(sub xmax) is about five times larger for beta = 0 degrees compared to the levels at beta = 0 degrees. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J.

  11. Baleen wear reveals intraoral water flow patterns of mysticete filter feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Straley, Janice M; Shadwick, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    A survey of macroscopic and microscopic wear patterns in the baleen of eight whale species (Cetacea: Mysticeti) discloses structural, functional, and life history properties of this neomorphic keratinous tissue, including evidence of intraoral water flow patterns involved in filter feeding. All baleen demonstrates wear, particularly on its medial and ventral edges, as flat outer layers of cortical keratin erode to reveal horn tubes, also of keratin, which emerge as hair-like fringes. This study quantified five additional categories of specific wear: pitting of plates, scratching of plates, scuffing of fringes, shortening of fringes, and reorientation of fringes (including fringes directed between plates to the exterior of the mouth). Blue whale baleen showed the most pitting and sei whale baleen the most scratching; gray whale baleen had the most fringe wear. The location of worn baleen within the mouth suggests that direct contact with the tongue is not responsible for most wear, and that flowing water as well as abrasive prey or sediment carried by the flowing water likely causes pitting and scratching of plates as well as fringe fraying, scuffing, shortening, and reorientation. Baleen also has elevated vertical and horizontal ridges that are unrelated to wear; these are probably related to growth and may allow for age determination.

  12. Filter feeders and plankton increase particle encounter rates through flow regime control

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Collisions between particles or between particles and other objects are fundamental to many processes that we take for granted. They drive the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, the onset of rain and snow precipitation, and the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, powders and crystals. Here, I show that the traditional assumption that viscosity dominates these situations leads to consistent and large-scale underestimation of encounter rates between particles and of deposition rates on surfaces. Numerical simulations reveal that the encounter rate is Reynolds number dependent and that encounter efficiencies are consistent with the sparse experimental data. This extension of aerosol theory has great implications for understanding of selection pressure on the physiology and ecology of organisms, for example filter feeders able to gather food at rates up to 5 times higher than expected. I provide evidence that filter feeders have been strongly selected to take advantage of this flow regime and show that both the predicted peak concentration and the steady-state concentrations of plankton during blooms are ≈33% of that predicted by the current models of particle encounter. Many ecological and industrial processes may be operating at substantially greater rates than currently assumed. PMID:19416879

  13. Filter-feeding, near-field flows, and the morphologies of colonial choanoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkegaard, Julius B.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-11-01

    Efficient uptake of prey and nutrients from the environment is an important component in the fitness of all microorganisms, and its dependence on size may reveal clues to the origins of evolutionary transitions to multicellularity. Because potential benefits in uptake rates must be viewed in the context of other costs and benefits of size, such as varying predation rates and the increased metabolic costs associated with larger and more complex body plans, the uptake rate itself is not necessarily that which is optimized by evolution. Uptake rates can be strongly dependent on local organism geometry and its swimming speed, providing selective pressure for particular arrangements. Here we examine these issues for choanoflagellates, filter-feeding microorganisms that are the closest relatives of the animals. We explore the different morphological variations of the choanoflagellate Salpingoeca rosetta, which can exist as a swimming cell, as a sessile thecate cell, and as colonies of cells in various shapes. In the absence of other requirements and in a homogeneously nutritious environment, we find that the optimal strategy to maximize filter-feeding by the collar of microvilli is to swim fast, which favors swimming unicells. In large external flows, the sessile thecate cell becomes advantageous. Effects of prey diffusion are discussed and also found to be to the advantage of the swimming unicell.

  14. Filter feeders and plankton increase particle encounter rates through flow regime control.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Stuart

    2009-05-12

    Collisions between particles or between particles and other objects are fundamental to many processes that we take for granted. They drive the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, the onset of rain and snow precipitation, and the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, powders and crystals. Here, I show that the traditional assumption that viscosity dominates these situations leads to consistent and large-scale underestimation of encounter rates between particles and of deposition rates on surfaces. Numerical simulations reveal that the encounter rate is Reynolds number dependent and that encounter efficiencies are consistent with the sparse experimental data. This extension of aerosol theory has great implications for understanding of selection pressure on the physiology and ecology of organisms, for example filter feeders able to gather food at rates up to 5 times higher than expected. I provide evidence that filter feeders have been strongly selected to take advantage of this flow regime and show that both the predicted peak concentration and the steady-state concentrations of plankton during blooms are approximately 33% of that predicted by the current models of particle encounter. Many ecological and industrial processes may be operating at substantially greater rates than currently assumed.

  15. Fuzzy State Transition and Kalman Filter Applied in Short-Term Traffic Flow Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming-jun; Qu, Shi-ru

    2015-01-01

    Traffic flow is widely recognized as an important parameter for road traffic state forecasting. Fuzzy state transform and Kalman filter (KF) have been applied in this field separately. But the studies show that the former method has good performance on the trend forecasting of traffic state variation but always involves several numerical errors. The latter model is good at numerical forecasting but is deficient in the expression of time hysteretically. This paper proposed an approach that combining fuzzy state transform and KF forecasting model. In considering the advantage of the two models, a weight combination model is proposed. The minimum of the sum forecasting error squared is regarded as a goal in optimizing the combined weight dynamically. Real detection data are used to test the efficiency. Results indicate that the method has a good performance in terms of short-term traffic forecasting.

  16. Treatment of landfill leachate using an up-flow anaerobic sludge semi-fixed filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, J.; Bai, S. Y.; Li, Z. Y.; Zhou, H. C.

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, an up-flow anaerobic sludge semi-fixed filter (UASSF) was developed for landfill leachate treatment by packing the soft polyurethane belt as the supporting carrier. The performance of the hybrid reactor was evaluated in terms of COD removal and carbon flux distribution, also, the biomass effectiveness was investigated by restarting the reactor without the supporting carrier. The COD removal increased with the stepwise increment of the organic loading rate (OLR), while the sulfate removal decreased slowly. When the reactor was operated at design load (9 kgCOD/m3·d), COD and sulfate removal remained around 81% and 90%, respectively. The results indicate that this kind of semi-fixed carrier is capable to form the active biofilm in the anaerobic process, and the UASSF system can perform well in the leachate treatment.

  17. Real-time groundwater flow modeling with the Ensemble Kalman Filter: Joint estimation of states and parameters and the filter inbreeding problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Kinzelbach, W.

    2008-09-01

    Real-time groundwater flow modeling with filter methods is interesting for dynamical groundwater flow systems, for which measurement data in real-time are available. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) approach is used here to update states together with parameters by adopting an augmented state vector approach. The performance of EnKF is investigated in a synthetic study with a two-dimensional transient groundwater flow model where (1) only the recharge rate is spatiotemporally variable, (2) only transmissivity is spatially variable with σlnT2 = 1.0 or (3) with σlnT2 = 2.7, and (4) both recharge rate and transmissivity are uncertain (a combination of (1) and (3)). The performance of EnKF for simultaneous state and parameter estimation in saturated groundwater flow problems is investigated in dependence of the number of stochastic realizations, the updating frequency and updating intensity of log-transmissivity, the amount of measurements in space and time, and the method (iterative versus noniterative EnKF), among others. Satisfactory results were also obtained if both transmissivity and recharge rate were uncertain. However, it was found that filter inbreeding is much more severe if hydraulic heads and transmissivities are jointly updated than if only hydraulic heads are updated. The filter inbreeding problem was investigated in more detail and could be strongly reduced with help of a damping parameter, which limits the intensity of the perturbation of the log-transmissivity field. An additional reduction of filter inbreeding could be achieved by combining two measures: (1) inflating the elements of the predicted state covariance matrix on the basis of a comparison between the model uncertainty and the observed errors at the measurement points and (2) starting the flow simulations with a very large number of realizations and then sampling the desired number of realizations after one simulation time step by minimizing the differences between the local cpdfs (and

  18. Ensemble Kalman Filter vs Particle Filter in a Physically Based Coupled Model of Surface-Subsurface Flow (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putti, M.; Camporese, M.; Pasetto, D.

    2010-12-01

    Data assimilation (DA) has recently received growing interest by the hydrological modeling community due to its capability to merge observations into model prediction. Among the many DA methods available, the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) and the Particle Filter (PF) are suitable alternatives for applications to detailed physically-based hydrological models. For each assimilation period, both methods use a Monte Carlo approach to approximate the state probability distribution (in terms of mean and covariance matrix) by a finite number of independent model trajectories, also called particles or realizations. The two approaches differ in the way the filtering distribution is evaluated. EnKF implements the classical Kalman filter, optimal only for linear dynamics and Gaussian error statistics. Particle filters, instead, use directly the recursive formula of the sequential Bayesian framework and approximate the posterior probability distributions by means of appropriate weights associated to each realization. We use the Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) technique, which retains only the most probable particles, in practice the trajectories closest in a statistical sense to the observations, and duplicates them when needed. In contrast to EnKF, particle filters make no assumptions on the form of the prior distribution of the model state, and convergence to the true state is ensured for large enough ensemble size. In this study EnKF and PF have been implemented in a physically based catchment simulator that couples a three-dimensional finite element Richards equation solver with a finite difference diffusion wave approximation based on a digital elevation data for surface water dynamics. We report on the retrieval performance of the two schemes using a three-dimensional tilted v-catchment synthetic test case in which multi-source observations are assimilated (pressure head, soil moisture, and streamflow data). The comparison between the results of the two approaches

  19. Comparison of Flow Impairment during Carotid Artery Stenting Using Two Types of Eccentric Filter Embolic Protection Devices

    PubMed Central

    NII, Kouhei; TSUTSUMI, Masanori; MAEDA, Hitoshi; AIKAWA, Hiroshi; INOUE, Ritsuro; ETO, Ayumu; SAKAMOTO, Kimiya; MITSUTAKE, Takafumi; HANADA, Hayatsura; KAZEKAWA, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the angiographic findings and the clinical outcomes after carotid artery stenting (CAS) using two different, eccentric filter embolic protection devices (EPDs). Between July 2010 and August 2015, 175 CAS procedures were performed using a self-expandable closed-cell stent and a simple eccentric filter EPD (FilterWire EZ in 86 and Spider FX in 89 procedures). The angiographic findings (i.e., flow impairment and vasospasm) at the level of EPDs, neurologic events, and post-operative imaging results were compared between the FilterWire EZ and the Spider FX groups. The CAS was angiographically successful in all 175 procedures. However, the angiographs were obtained immediately after CAS-detected flow impairment in the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) in 11 (6.3%) and ICA spasms at the level of the EPD in 40 cases (22.9%). The incidence of these complications was higher with FilterWire EZ than Spider FX (ICA flow impairment of 10.5% vs. 2.2%, P = 0.03; vasospasm 30.2% vs. 15.7%, P = 0.03). There were nine neurologic events (5.1%); five patients were presented with transient ischemic attacks, three had minor strokes, and one had a major stroke. New MRI lesions were seen in 25 (29.1%) FilterWire-group and in 36 (40.4%) Spider-group patients. The neurologic events and new MRI lesions were not associated with the type of EPD used. Although the ICA flow impairment may result in neurologic events, there was no significant association between the FilterWire EZ and the Spider FX CAS with respect to the incidence of neurologic events by the prompt treatment such as catheter aspiration. PMID:27319302

  20. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water filter generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in the water flow system. Silver ions serve as effective bactericide/deodorizers. Ray Ward requested and received from NASA a technical information package on the Shuttle filter, and used it as basis for his own initial development, a home use filter.

  1. Loki--A Lava Lake in Rarefied Circumplanetary Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.

    2011-05-01

    The interaction between Io's largest hot spot, Loki, and Io's circumplanetary winds is simulated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Our three-dimensional simulation models the rarefied pressure-driven boundary layer flow over a ``hot'' disk in the presence of a weak gravitational field. The pressure gradient which forces winds away from the subsolar point toward the nightside is caused by the variation in insolation over the surface. The rarefaction varies strongly with time of day due to the exponential dependence of the vapor pressure on the surrounding surface frost temperature (KnHS~1×10-4 to 0.5 where KnHS = λ/R, λ is the mean free path, and R is Loki's effective radius). The spread of heat from the hot spot, the equilibration of pressure over the hot spot, and separation of the boundary layer are examined. The spread of heat away from the hot spot is approximately controlled by δ = tRADU/R (tRAD is the radiation time scale and U is the mean wind speed). For cross flow speed considered here, δ~0.5 and therefore the gas warmed by the hot spot cools by e-1~0.5R downstream of the hot spot edge. For the cases without plasma heating, the boundary layer flow separates near the hot spot because the spot creates a significant adverse pressure gradient. Despite the near surface pressure over the hot spot being lower than over surrounding regions, the increased scale height due to the 332 K surface temperature results in higher pressures above the hot spot than the surrounding sublimation atmosphere at high altitudes (>10 km). When plasma heating from above is included the atmosphere is significantly inflated leading to a higher pressure gradient at all altitudes and therefore higher flow speeds. The elevated pressure at high altitudes also decreases the relative size of the adverse pressure gradient created by the hot spot; therefore the boundary layer remains attached. The pressure over the hot spot does not equilibrate with the surrounding

  2. Experiments on confined turbulent jets in cross flow. [longitudinal and transverse distributions of velocity and temperature for jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.; Greber, I.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of experiments on the effects of an opposite wall on the characteristics of turbulent jets injected into a cross flow, for unheated and heated jets. Longitudinal and transverse distributions of velocity and temperature are presented for single and multiple circular jets, and trajectories are presented for two-dimensional jets. The opposite wall has relatively little effect on a single jet unless the ratio of jet to cross flow momentum flux is large enough for the jet to impinge on the opposite wall. For a row of jets aligned perpendicularly to the cross flow, the opposite wall exerts progressively larger influence as the spacing between jets decreases. Much of the effect of jet and wall proximity can be understood by considering the interaction of the vortex flow which is the major feature of the structure of a single jet in a cross flow. Smoke photographs are shown to elucidate some of the interaction patterns.

  3. The Effect of Body Geometry on the Flow Noise of Cylinders in Cross Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEachern, James F.

    This is an experimental thesis that examines the effects of body geometry on the flow noise of cylindrical inertial pressure gradient hydrophones in cross flow. Flow noise is characterized as a fluctuating force on the surface of the body. Variable geometry inertial hydrophones have been fabricated, calibrated and towed in water in an acoustically quiet facility. Flow noise expressed as equivalent sound pressure level is presented for a blunt ended cylinder with a length to diameter ratio of 0.5. The results of the acoustic tow testing show some agreement with existing models for noise generated by pressure fluctuations in the turbulent boundary layer. The fluctuating force is measured at Reynolds numbers from 4 cdot 10^3 to 1.8 cdot 10^4 on cylindrical bodies with length to diameter ratios ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and end cap shapes ranging from flat to hemispherical. Results are expressed in terms of dimensionless spectra. The experimental results show that increased end cap radius and body aspect ratio can attenuate the fluctuating force level.

  4. Simplified groundwater flow modeling: an application of Kalman filter based identification

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, K.D.; Candy, J.V.; Azevedo, S.G.; Doerr, T.A.

    1980-05-01

    The need exists for methods to simplify groundwater contaminant transport models. Reduced-order models are needed in risk assessments for licensing and regulating long-term nuclear waste repositories. Such models will be used in Monte Carlo simulations to generate probabilities of nuclear waste migration in aquifers at candidate repository sites in the United States. In this feasibility study we focused on groundwater flow rather than contaminant transport because the flow problem is more simple. A pump-drawdown test is modeled with a reduced-order set of ordinary differential equations obtained by differencing the partial differential equation. We determined the accuracy of the reduced model by comparing it with the analytic solution for the drawdown test. We established an accuracy requirement of 2% error at the single observation well and found that a model with only 21 states satisfied that criterion. That model was used in an extended Kalman filter with synthesized measurement data from one observation well to identify transmissivity within 1% error and storage coefficient within 10% error. We used several statistical tests to assess the performance of the estimator/identifier and found it to be satisfactory for this application.

  5. Dripping to jetting transition for cross-flowing liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrandias, A.; Duval, H.; Casalinho, J.; Giorgi, M. L.

    2017-04-01

    We experimentally study drops formed from a nozzle into an immiscible, cross-flowing phase. Depending on the operating conditions, drops are generated either in dripping or jetting mode. We investigate the impact of the continuous and dispersed phase velocities, dispersed phase viscosity, and interfacial tension on the drop generation mode and size. We find that a dripping to jetting transition (DJT) takes place at a critical inner Weber number, a function of the outer capillary and Ohnesorge numbers. Two jetting regimes occur depending on the phase velocity ratio. When the continuous phase velocity is significantly greater (respectively lower) than the dispersed phase velocity, jet narrowing (respectively widening) occurs. In jet widening, the critical inner Weber number depends little on the outer capillary number whereas in jet narrowing, it sharply decreases as the outer capillary number increases. We propose a comprehensive model to describe the DJT based on the attached drop equation of motion. The model satisfactorily predicts the DJT and the effect of the outer capillary number on the critical inner Weber number. It also well accounts for the drop diameter in jet narrowing.

  6. Impact of ENSO on Western Pacific Cross-equatorial Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Kim, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Western Pacific cross-equatorial flows (CEFs) show evident interannual variability in boreal summer. Results from Principle Component Analysis indicate that El Niño/Southern Oscillation modulates the interannual variability of Western Pacific CEFs. Both Matsuno-Gill mechanism and Lindzen-Nigam mechanism are introduced and applied in order to better explain the development of CEFs. Using the Mixed Layer Model by Stevens (2002) and methods stated by Back and Bretherton (2009), the low-level CEFs are decomposed into two pressure gradient contributions: free-atmosphere and boundary layer; and further found mainly contributed by the latter one. The intensity of boundary layer pressure gradient is highly coincide with the distribution of sea surface temperature (SST) gradient on Western Pacific, which is intensified by El Niño in boreal summer. These results show that the Lindzen-Nigam mechanism plays a major role on CEFs' interannual change. An atmosphere general circulation model is included to support the influence of SST forcing on low-level CEFs. North American Multi-Model Ensemble is further adopted to understand the seasonal predictability of CEFs.

  7. Ensemble Kalman Filter Data Assimilation with the ParFlow Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. L., III

    2015-12-01

    Hydrometeorological research has shown that simulations of atmospheric processes benefit from sophisticated land surface formulations. Moisture and energy fluxes between the land surface and lower atmosphere are influenced strongly not only by atmospheric conditions, but by terrestrial hydrologic processes, soil moisture distribution in particular. By improving the representation of hydrologic processes, better predictive skill can be achieved in a fully-coupled weather forcasting model. Further improvements in the model can be realized by incorporating observed data values into the hydrologic model. This work applies the Ensemble Kalman Filter functionality included in the Data Assimilation Assimilation Research Testbed (DART), a collection of data assimilation tools maintained at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, to the ParFlow hydrologic model—the hydrologic component of the TerrSysMP fully coupled hydrologic - land surface - atmospheric model system. This generalized data assimilation tool allows observations of variables in the hydrologic component of the system to be incorporated into the overall error covariance matrix thus guiding the development of quantities that define the model state. Single dimension column tests, and a three-dimensional idealized catchment drainage and dry-out test were performed with the ParFlow-DART system to evaluate the effects of assimilating pressure head, soil moisture, and outflow observations on the development of the model through time. The data assimilation system was then applied to the hydrologic portion a fully-coupled (subsurface, land surface, and atmosphere) simulation over the North Rhine-Westphalia region in western Germany to demonstrate the utility of this system in a non-idealized and realistic forecasting situation. The success of these tests will allow the ParFlow-DART system to be developed into a complete data assimilation package for the TerrSysMP fully-coupled modeling system.

  8. Ensemble Kalman Filter Data Assimilation for the ParFlow Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John

    2014-05-01

    Research in hydrometeorology has demonstrated repeatedly that atmospheric models benefit from detailed formulations of the land surface, and that energy and moisture fluxes between the land surface and atmosphere are coupled strongly not only with atmospheric conditions, but also with subsurface hydrology—particularly soil moisture distribution. Improving the representation of hydrologic processes should lead to better predictive skill in a fully-coupled weather forecasting model, and the hydrologic model itself can be improved by incorporating observed data values. For this work, we apply the Ensemble Kalman Filter functionality included in the Data Assimilation Assimilation Research Testbed (DART), a collection of data assimilation tools maintained at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, to the ParFlow hydrologic model—the hydrologic component of the TerrSysMP fully coupled hydrologic - land surface - atmospheric model system. This generalized data assimilation tool allows observations of variables in the hydrologic component of the system to be incorporated into the overall error covariance matrix thus guiding the development of quantities that define the model state. Single dimension column tests, two-dimensional hillslope tests, and a three-dimensional drainage and dry-out test were performed with the ParFlow-DART system to evaluate the effects of assimilating pressure head, soil moisture, and outflow observations on the development of the model through time. The success of these tests will allow the ParFlow-DART system to be developed into a complete data assimilation package for the TerrSysMP fully-coupled modeling system.

  9. Application of Nonlinear Filtering in the Real Time Forecasting of River Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, Carlos E.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1987-04-01

    The practical use of nonlinear filters on conceptual stochastic watershed models is investigated. Results obtained on a case study emphasize the importance of the assumed noise components of the watershed model. Depending on such noises, runoff predictions could range from excellent to unacceptable. The simpler of the nonlinear filters considered, the extended Kaiman filter, was found to be, when effective, as good as other, more complicated filters. Although smoothing algorithms lead to improvements, their computational burden may be unacceptable.

  10. Analysis of the cross flow in a radial inflow turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    Equations of motion were derived, and a computational procedure is presented, for determining the nonviscous flow characteristics in the cross-sectional planes of a curved channel due to continuous mass discharge or mass addition. An analysis was applied to the radial inflow turbine scroll to study the effects of scroll geometry and the through flow velocity profile on the flow behavior. The computed flow velocity component in the scroll cross-sectional plane, together with the through flow velocity profile which can be determined in a separate analysis, provide a complete description of the three dimensional flow in the scroll.

  11. Illustration of cross flow of polystyrene melts through a coathanger die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöppner, V.; Henke, B.

    2015-05-01

    To design an optimal coathanger die with a uniform flow rate distribution and low pressure drop, it is essential to understand the flow conditions in the die. This is important because the quality of the product is influenced by the flow velocity and the flow rate distribution. In extrusion dies, cross flows also occur in addition to the main flow, which flow perpendicular to the main flow. This results in pressure gradients in the extrusion direction, which have an influence on flow distribution and pressure drop in the die. In recent decades, quantitative representation and analysis of physical flow processes have made considerable progress in predicting the weather, developing drive technologies and designing aircraft using simulation methods and lab trials. Using the flow-line method, the flow is analyzed in flat film extrusion dies with a rectangular cross-section, in particular cross flows. The simplest method to visualize the flow is based on the measurement of obstacle orientation in the flow field by adding individual particles. A near-surface flow field can be visualized by using wool or textile yarns. By sticking thin, frayed at the ends of strands of wool surface that is to be examined cross flows, near-wall profiles of the flow and vortex and separation regions can be visualized. A further possibility is to add glass fibers and analyze the fiber orientation by microscopy and x-ray analysis. In this paper the influence of process parameters (e.g. melt temperatures and throughput) on cross flow and fiber orientation is described.

  12. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    DOE PAGES

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Ruiz, Anthony M.; Lacaze, Guilhem

    2015-04-03

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of [Su and Mungal JFM 2004]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensivemore » characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.« less

  13. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Ruiz, Anthony M.; Lacaze, Guilhem

    2015-04-03

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of [Su and Mungal JFM 2004]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensive characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.

  14. Air flow resistance of three heat and moisture exchanging filter designs under wet conditions: implications for patient safety.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Hughes, N J; Mills, G H; Northwood, D

    2001-08-01

    Heat and moisture exchanging filters (HMEFs) can be blocked by secretions. We have studied HMEF performance under wet conditions to see which particular design features predispose to this complication. Dar Hygrobac-S (composite felt filter and cellulose exchanger), Dar Hygroster (composite pleated ceramic membrane and cellulose exchanger) and Pall BB22-15 (pleated ceramic membrane) HMEFs were tested. Saline retention, saline concealment, and changes in air flow resistance when wet were assessed. The cellulose exchanger in the composite Hygrobac-S and Hygroster retained saline, producing a 'tampon' effect, associated with bi-directional air flow resistances in excess of the international standard of a 5 cm H(2)O pressure drop at 60 litre min(-1) air flow. Furthermore, high air flow resistances occurred before free saline was apparent within the transparent filter housing. The pleat only BB22-15 showed a significant increase in expiratory air flow resistance, but only after the presence of saline was apparent. These data imply that composite HMEFs with cellulose exchangers are more likely to block or cause excessive work of breathing as a result of occult accumulation of patient secretions than pleat only HMEFs.

  15. Blood Cell Separation Device Using Serially Connected Membrane Filters for Adapting to Blood Flow Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Kato, Daiki; Koga, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Kenichi; Fukuda, Makoto; Kinoshita, Yoshiharu; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Konishi, Satoshi

    This paper proposes a cooperative operation of serially connected membrane filters toward adaptive blood cell separation system in order to overcome a restriction of a single membrane filter. Serially connected membrane filters allow that downstream filters extract blood plasma from residual blood at upstream filters. Consequently, it becomes possible to adapt filtering characteristics to changing properties of blood. We focus on trans-membrane pressure difference in order to prevent hemolysis. Our strategy can be realized as a miniaturized PDMS fluidic chip. Our laboratory experiment using a prototype shows that plasma extraction efficiency is improved from 34% to 75%. Toward an integrated system, this paper also demonstrates multiple filters are successfully integrated into a PDMS fluidic chip.

  16. Westinghouse filter update

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    Hot gas filters have been implemented and operated in four different test facilities: Subpilot scale entrained gasifier, located at the Texaco Montebello Research facilities in California, Foster Wheeler Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion pilot plant facilities, located in Livingston, New Jersey, Slipstream of the American Electric Power (AEP) 70 MW (electric) Tidd-PFBC, located in Brilliant, Ohio, and in the Ahlstrom 10 MW (thermal) Circulating PFBC facility, located in Karhula, Finland. Candle filter testing has occurred at all four facilities; cross flow filter testing has occurred at the Texaco and Foster Wheeler facilities. Table 1 identifies and summarizes the key operating characteristics of these facilities and the type and scale of filter unit tested. A brief description of each project is given.

  17. Viscous Flow through Pipes of Various Cross-Sections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2007-01-01

    An interesting variety of pipe cross-sectional shapes can be generated, for which the Navier-Stokes equations can be solved exactly. The simplest cases include the known solutions for elliptical and equilateral triangle cross-sections. Students can find pipe cross-sections from solutions of Laplace's equation in two dimensions, and then plot the…

  18. [Effect of grass barrier-combined filter strips on the reduction of nitrogen and phosphorus concentration under concentrated flow of varying densities].

    PubMed

    Du, Qin; Wang, Jin-ye; Li, Hai-fang

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative barrier-combined filter strips are defined as grass barriers set up before filter strips. They could make concentrated water flow disperse, which exerts the function of grass barriers (i.e., existence of grass barriers improves the performance of filter strips in the purification of pollutants). In this regards, grass barriers are generally considered to be effective in the purification of pollutants when the density of concentrated flow is low, whereas little was known about this effect with an increasing density of concentrated flow. In this study, we constructed Miscanthus floridulus barrier before Vitex negundo filter strip with three densities of concentrated flow (low: one concentrated flow channel; middle: three channels; high: five channels). The aim of work was to identify the effect of M. floridulus combined V. negundo filter strips in reducing nitrogen and phosphorus concentration under three concentrated water flow levels. Our results showed that the combined filter strips had a higher performance in the reduction in the total N, NH(4+)-N, NO(3-)-N and total P compared to those in the V. negundo (P < 0.05), regardless of the water flow level. There was no significant difference in the reduction of total N, NH(4+)-N, NO(3-)-N and total P among three water flow levels (P > 0.05). We concluded that M. floridulus combined V. negundo filter strips could improve the reduction of nutrients, which couldn' t be influenced by varying density of concentrated flow level.

  19. Effect of the spatial filtering and alignment error of hot-wire probes in a wall-bounded turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, A.; Cimarelli, A.; Rüedi, J.-D.; De Angelis, E.; Talamelli, A.

    2011-10-01

    The effort to describe velocity fluctuation distributions in wall-bounded turbulent flows has raised different questions concerning the accuracy of hot-wire measurement techniques close to the wall and more specifically the effect of spatial averaging resulting from the finite size of the wire. Here, an analytical model which describes the effect of the spatial filtering and misalignment of hot-wire probes on the main statistical moments in turbulent wall-bounded flows is presented. The model, which is based on the two-point velocity correlation function, shows that the filtering is directly related to the transverse Taylor micro-scale. By means of turbulent channel flow DNS data, the capacity of the model to accurately describe the probe response is established. At the same time, the filtering effect is appraised for different wire lengths and for a range of misalignment angles which can be expected from good experimental practice. Effects of the second-order terms in the model equations are also taken into account and discussed. In order to use the model in a practical situation, the Taylor micro-scale distribution at least should be provided. A simple scaling law based on classic turbulence theory is therefore introduced and finally employed to estimate the filtering effect for different wire lengths.

  20. Optical flow based Kalman filter for body joint prediction and tracking using HOG-LBP matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Binu M.; Kendricks, Kimberley D.; Asari, Vijayan K.; Tuttle, Ronald F.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a real-time novel framework for tracking specific joints in the human body on low resolution imagery using optical flow based Kalman tracker without the need of a depth sensor. Body joint tracking is necessary for a variety of surveillance based applications such as recognizing gait signatures of individuals, identifying the motion patterns associated with a particular action and the corresponding interactions with objects in the scene to classify a certain activity. The proposed framework consists of two stages; the initialization stage and the tracking stage. In the initialization stage, the joints to be tracked are either manually marked or automatically obtained from other joint detection algorithms in the first few frames within a window of interest and appropriate image descriptions of each joint are computed. We employ the use of a well-known image coding scheme known as the Local Binary Patterns (LBP) to represent the joint local region where this image coding removes the variance to non-uniform lighting conditions as well as enhances the underlying edges and corner. The image descriptions of the joint region would then include a histogram computed from the LBP-coded ROI and a HOG (Histogram of Oriented Gradients) descriptor to represent the edge information. Next the tracking stage can be divided into two phases: Optical flow based detection of joints in corresponding frames of the sequence and prediction /correction phases of Kalman tracker with respect to the joint coordinates. Lucas Kanade optical flow is used to locate the individual joints in consecutive frames of the video based on their location in the previous frame. But more often, mismatches can occur due to the rotation of the joint region and the rotation variance of the optical flow matching technique. The mismatch is then determined by comparing the joint region descriptors using Chi-squared metric between a pair of frames and depending on this statistic, either the prediction

  1. Penetration of fiber versus spherical particles through filter media and faceseal leakage of N95 filtering facepiece respirators with cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Turkevich, Leonid; Miller, Matthew; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Ha, KwonChul; Reponen, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in penetration between fibers and spherical particles through faceseal leakage of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator. Three cyclic breathing flows were generated corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates (MIF) of 15, 30, and 85 L/min. Fibers had a mean diameter of 1 μm and a median length of 4.9 μm (calculated aerodynamic diameter, d(ae) = 1.73 μm). Monodisperse polystyrene spheres with a mean physical diameter of 1.01 μm (PSI) and 1.54 μm (PSII) were used for comparison (calculated d(ae) = 1.05 and 1.58 μm, respectively). Two optical particle counters simultaneously determined concentrations inside and outside the respirator. Geometric means (GMs) for filter penetration of the fibers were 0.06, 0.09, and 0.08% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.07, 0.12, and 0.12%. GMs for faceseal penetration of fibers were 0.40, 0.14, and 0.09% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.96, 0.41, and 0.17%. Faceseal penetration decreased with increased breathing rate for both types of particles (p ≤ 0.001). GMs of filter and faceseal penetration of PSII at an MIF of 30 L/min were 0.14% and 0.36%, respectively. Filter penetration and faceseal penetration of fibers were significantly lower than those of PSI (p < 0.001) and PSII (p < 0.003). This confirmed that higher penetration of PSI was not due to slightly smaller aerodynamic diameter, indicating that the shape of fibers rather than their calculated mean aerodynamic diameter is a prevailing factor on deposition mechanisms through the tested respirator. In conclusion, faceseal penetration of fibers and spherical particles decreased with increasing breathing rate, which can be explained by increased capture by impaction. Spherical particles had 2.0-2.8 times higher penetration through faceseal leaks and 1.1-1.5 higher penetration through filter media than fibers, which can be attributed to

  2. Penetration of Fiber Versus Spherical Particles Through Filter Media and Faceseal Leakage of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators with Cyclic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Turkevich, Leonid; Miller, Matthew; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Ha, KwonChul; Reponen, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated differences in penetration between fibers and spherical particles through faceseal leakage of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator. Three cyclic breathing flows were generated corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates (MIF) of 15, 30, and 85 L/min. Fibers had a mean diameter of 1 μm and a median length of 4.9 μm (calculated aerodynamic diameter, dae = 1.73 μm). Monodisperse polystyrene spheres with a mean physical diameter of 1.01 μm (PSI) and 1.54 μm (PSII) were used for comparison (calculated dae = 1.05 and 1.58 μm, respectively). Two optical particle counters simultaneously determined concentrations inside and outside the respirator. Geometric means (GMs) for filter penetration of the fibers were 0.06, 0.09, and 0.08% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.07, 0.12, and 0.12%. GMs for faceseal penetration of fibers were 0.40, 0.14, and 0.09% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.96, 0.41, and 0.17%. Faceseal penetration decreased with increased breathing rate for both types of particles (p ≤ 0.001). GMs of filter and faceseal penetration of PSII at an MIF of 30 L/min were 0.14% and 0.36%, respectively. Filter penetration and faceseal penetration of fibers were significantly lower than those of PSI (p < 0.001) and PSII (p < 0.003). This confirmed that higher penetration of PSI was not due to slightly smaller aerodynamic diameter, indicating that the shape of fibers rather than their calculated mean aerodynamic diameter is a prevailing factor on deposition mechanisms through the tested respirator. In conclusion, faceseal penetration of fibers and spherical particles decreased with increasing breathing rate, which can be explained by increased capture by impaction. Spherical particles had 2.0–2.8 times higher penetration through faceseal leaks and 1.1–1.5 higher penetration through filter media than fibers, which can be attributed to

  3. Grid-Independent Large-Eddy Simulation in Turbulent Channel Flow using Three-Dimensional Explicit Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gullbrand, Jessica

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, turbulence-closure models are evaluated using the 'true' LES approach in turbulent channel flow. The study is an extension of the work presented by Gullbrand (2001), where fourth-order commutative filter functions are applied in three dimensions in a fourth-order finite-difference code. The true LES solution is the grid-independent solution to the filtered governing equations. The solution is obtained by keeping the filter width constant while the computational grid is refined. As the grid is refined, the solution converges towards the true LES solution. The true LES solution will depend on the filter width used, but will be independent of the grid resolution. In traditional LES, because the filter is implicit and directly connected to the grid spacing, the solution converges towards a direct numerical simulation (DNS) as the grid is refined, and not towards the solution of the filtered Navier-Stokes equations. The effect of turbulence-closure models is therefore difficult to determine in traditional LES because, as the grid is refined, more turbulence length scales are resolved and less influence from the models is expected. In contrast, in the true LES formulation, the explicit filter eliminates all scales that are smaller than the filter cutoff, regardless of the grid resolution. This ensures that the resolved length-scales do not vary as the grid resolution is changed. In true LES, the cell size must be smaller than or equal to the cutoff length scale of the filter function. The turbulence-closure models investigated are the dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM), the dynamic mixed model (DMM), and the dynamic reconstruction model (DRM). These turbulence models were previously studied using two-dimensional explicit filtering in turbulent channel flow by Gullbrand & Chow (2002). The DSM by Germano et al. (1991) is used as the USFS model in all the simulations. This enables evaluation of different reconstruction models for the RSFS stresses. The DMM

  4. Use of a high-frequency linear transducer and MTI filtered color flow mapping in the assessment of fetal heart anatomy at the routine 11 to 13 + 6-week scan: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Votino, C; Kacem, Y; Dobrescu, O; Dessy, H; Cos, T; Foulon, W; Jani, J

    2012-02-01

    To prospectively assess the contribution of a high-frequency linear transducer and of moving target indicator (MTI) filtered color flow mapping in the visualization of cardiac fetal anatomy at the routine 11 to 13 + 6-week scan. This was a cross-sectional prospective study, including 300 singleton fetuses at 11 to 13 + 6 weeks' gestation. Patients were randomized into four groups and a detailed fetal cardiac examination was conducted transabdominally using either a conventional curvilinear transducer, a conventional curvilinear transducer and MTI filtered color flow mapping, a high-frequency linear transducer or a high-frequency linear transducer and MTI filtered color flow mapping. Regression analysis was used to investigate the effect on the ability to visualize different cardiac structures of the following parameters: gestational age at ultrasound examination; fetal crown-rump length (CRL); maternal body mass index (BMI); transducer-heart distance; the technique used at ultrasound; and the position of the placenta. The four-chamber view was visualized in 89.0% of fetuses and regression analysis showed this rate was correlated with CRL and the use of MTI filtered color flow mapping during ultrasonography, and inversely correlated with BMI and transducer-heart distance. Use of a conventional curvilinear transducer and MTI filtered color flow mapping allowed visualization of the four-chamber view in 97.3% of fetuses, while this was only possible in 84.0% of fetuses using a high-frequency linear transducer. The left and right outflow tracts were visualized in 62.3 and 57.7% of fetuses, respectively. Regression analysis showed that the ability to visualize the left or the right outflow tract was correlated with the use of MTI filtered color flow mapping during scanning and was inversely correlated with transducer-heart distance. The use of a conventional curvilinear transducer and MTI filtered color flow mapping allowed visualization of the left and right outflow

  5. Matched filter optimization of kSZ measurements with a reconstructed cosmological flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Angulo, R. E.; White, S. D. M.; Jasche, J.

    2014-09-01

    We develop and test a new statistical method to measure the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect. A sample of independently detected clusters is combined with the cosmic flow field predicted from a galaxy redshift survey in order to derive a matched filter that optimally weights the kSZ signal for the sample as a whole given the noise involved in the problem. We apply this formalism to realistic mock microwave skies based on cosmological N-body simulations, and demonstrate its robustness and performance. In particular, we carefully assess the various sources of uncertainty, cosmic microwave background primary fluctuations, instrumental noise, uncertainties in the determination of the velocity field, and effects introduced by miscentring of clusters and by uncertainties of the mass-observable relation (normalization and scatter). We show that available data (Planck maps and the MaxBCG catalogue) should deliver a 7.7σ detection of the kSZ. A similar cluster catalogue with broader sky coverage should increase the detection significance to ˜13σ. We point out that such measurements could be binned in order to study the properties of the cosmic gas and velocity fields, or combined into a single measurement to constrain cosmological parameters or deviations of the law of gravity from General Relativity.

  6. Detailed flow and force measurements in a rotated triangular tube bundle subjected to two-phase cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Zhang, C.; Mureithi, N. W.; Pamfil, D.

    2005-05-01

    Two-phase cross-flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers. A detailed knowledge of the characteristics of two-phase cross-flow in tube bundles is required to understand and formulate flow-induced vibration parameters such as damping, fluidelastic instability, and random excitation due to turbulence. An experimental program was undertaken with a rotated-triangular array of cylinders subjected to air/water flow to simulate two-phase mixtures. The array is made of relatively large diameter cylinders (38 mm) to allow for detailed two-phase flow measurements between cylinders. Fiber-optic probes were developed to measure local void fraction. Local flow velocities and bubble diameters or characteristic lengths of the two-phase mixture are obtained by using double probes. Both the dynamic lift and drag forces were measured with a strain gauge instrumented cylinder.

  7. Measurements of the flow and turbulence characteristics of round jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, S. A.; Pletcher, R. H.

    1986-05-01

    Measurements of the velocity and turbulence characteristics of a round turbulent jet in cross flow are reported. The experiments were conducted in a water channel, 8.53 m long, 0.61 m wide, and 1.067 m deep, of the recirculation type. Water was injected vertically upward from a circular pipe located near the channel bottom to simulate the turbulent jet. Normal and 45 deg-slanted fiber-film probes along with appropriate anemometers and bridges were operated in the constant temperature mode to measure mean velocities, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stresses, structural parameters, correlation coefficients, and the turbulent kinetic energy. The measurements were carried out in the jet and its wake both in and outside the jet plane of symmetry.

  8. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; ...

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connectingmore » the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.« less

  9. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; Jae, Moosung; Park, Goon -Cherl

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connecting the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.

  10. Single- and Two-Phase Diversion Cross-Flows Between Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle Subchannels - Data on Flow Resistance and Interfacial Friction Coefficients for the Cross-Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuya Higuchi; Akimaro Kawahara; Michio Sadatomi; Hiroyuki Kudo

    2006-07-01

    Single- and two-phase diversion cross-flows arising from the pressure difference between tight lattice subchannels are our concern in this study. In order to obtain a correlation of the diversion cross-flow, we conducted adiabatic experiments using a vertical multiple-channel with two subchannels simplifying the triangle tight lattice rod bundle for air-water flows at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In the experiments, data were obtained on the axial variations in the pressure difference between the subchannels, the ratio of flow rate in one subchannel to the whole channel, the void fraction in each subchannel for slug-churn and annular flows in two-phase flow case. These data were analyzed by use of a lateral momentum equation based on a two-fluid model to determine both the cross-flow resistance coefficient between liquid phase and channel wall and the gas-liquid interfacial friction coefficient. The resulting coefficients have been correlated in a way similar to that developed for square lattice subchannel case by Kano et al. (2002); the cross-flow resistance coefficient data can be well correlated with a ratio of the lateral velocity due to the cross-flow to the axial one irrespective of single- and two-phase flows; the interfacial friction coefficient data were well correlated with a Reynolds number, which is based on the relative velocity between gas and liquid cross-flows as the characteristic velocity. (authors)

  11. Modeling the Air Flow in the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack System

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2013-01-23

    Additional ventilation capacity has been designed for the 3410 Building filtered exhaust stack system. The updated system will increase the number of fans from two to three and will include ductwork to incorporate the new fan into the existing stack. Stack operations will involve running various two-fan combinations at any given time. The air monitoring system of the existing two-fan stack was previously found to be in compliance with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, however it is not known if the modified (three-fan) system will comply. Subsequently, a full-scale three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the modified stack system has been created to examine the sampling location for compliance with the standard. The CFD modeling results show good agreement with testing data collected from the existing 3410 Building stack and suggest that velocity uniformity and flow angles will remain well within acceptance criteria when the third fan and associated ductwork is installed. This includes two-fan flow rates up to 31,840 cfm for any of the two-fan combinations. For simulation cases in which tracer gas and particles are introduced in the main duct, the model predicts that both particle and tracer gas coefficients of variance (COVs) may be larger than the acceptable 20 percent criterion of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard for each of the two-fan, 31,840 cfm combinations. Simulations in which the tracers are introduced near the fans result in improved, though marginally acceptable, COV values for the tracers. Due to the remaining uncertainty that the stack will qualify with the addition of the third fan and high flow rates, a stationary air blender from Blender Products, Inc. is considered for inclusion in the stack system. A model of the air blender has been developed and incorporated into the CFD model. Simulation results from the CFD model that includes the air blender show striking improvements in tracer gas mixing and tracer particle

  12. Improved design and optimization of subsurface flow constructed wetlands and sand filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Carranza-Díaz, O.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2010-05-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands and sand filters are engineered systems capable of eliminating a wide range of pollutants from wastewater. These devices are easy to operate, flexible and have low maintenance costs. For these reasons, they are particularly suitable for small settlements and isolated farms and their use has substantially increased in the last 15 years. Furthermore, they are also becoming used as a tertiary - polishing - step in traditional treatment plants. Recent work observed that research is however still necessary to understand better the biogeochemical processes occurring in the porous substrate, their mutual interactions and feedbacks, and ultimately to identify the optimal conditions to degrade or remove from the wastewater both traditional and anthropogenic recalcitrant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons, pharmaceuticals, personal care products. Optimal pollutant elimination is achieved if the contact time between microbial biomass and the contaminated water is sufficiently long. The contact time depends on the hydraulic residence time distribution (HRTD) and is controlled by the hydrodynamic properties of the system. Previous reports noted that poor hydrodynamic behaviour is frequent, with water flowing mainly through preferential paths resulting in a broad HRTD. In such systems the flow rate must be decreased to allow a sufficient proportion of the wastewater to experience the minimum residence time. The pollutant removal efficiency can therefore be significantly reduced, potentially leading to the failure of the system. The aim of this work was to analyse the effect of the heterogeneous distribution of the hydraulic properties of the porous substrate on the HRTD and treatment efficiency, and to develop an improved design methodology to reduce the risk of system failure and to optimize existing systems showing poor hydrodynamics. Numerical modelling was used to evaluate the effect of substrate heterogeneity on the breakthrough curves of

  13. Cross-flow vortex structure and transition measurements using multi-element hot films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Naval K.; Mangalam, Siva M.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Collier, Fayette S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment on a 45-degree swept wing was conducted to study three-dimensional boundary-layer characteristics using surface-mounted, micro-thin, multi-element hot-film sensors. Cross-flow vortex structure and boundary-layer transition were measured from the simultaneously acquired signals of the hot films. Spanwise variation of the root-mean-square (RMS) hot-film signal show a local minima and maxima. The distance between two minima corresponds to the stationary cross-flow vortex wavelength and agrees with naphthalene flow-visualization results. The chordwise and spanwise variation of amplified traveling (nonstationary) cross-flow disturbance characteristics were measured as Reynolds number was varied. The frequency of the most amplified cross-flow disturbances agrees with linear stability theory.

  14. Cross-flow vortex structure and transition measurements using multi-element hot films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Naval K.; Mangalam, Siva M.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Collier, Fayette S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment on a 45-degree swept wing was conducted to study three-dimensional boundary-layer characteristics using surface-mounted, micro-thin, multi-element hot-film sensors. Cross-flow vortex structure and boundary-layer transition were measured from the simultaneously acquired signals of the hot films. Spanwise variation of the root-mean-square (RMS) hot-film signal show a local minima and maxima. The distance between two minima corresponds to the stationary cross-flow vortex wavelength and agrees with naphthalene flow-visualization results. The chordwise and spanwise variation of amplified traveling (nonstationary) cross-flow disturbance characteristics were measured as Reynolds number was varied. The frequency of the most amplified cross-flow disturbances agrees with linear stability theory.

  15. Accelerated Singular Value-Based Ultrasound Blood Flow Clutter Filtering With Randomized Singular Value Decomposition and Randomized Spatial Downsampling.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Trzasko, Joshua D; Manduca, Armando; Qiang, Bo; Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Kallmes, David F; Chen, Shigao

    2017-04-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD)-based ultrasound blood flow clutter filters have recently demonstrated substantial improvement in clutter rejection for ultrafast plane wave microvessel imaging, and have become the commonly used clutter filtering method for many novel ultrafast imaging applications such as functional ultrasound and super-resolution imaging. At present, however, the computational burden of SVD remains as a major hurdle for practical implementation and clinical translation of this method. To address this challenge, in the study we present two blood flow clutter filtering methods based on randomized SVD (rSVD) and randomized spatial downsampling to accelerate SVD clutter filtering with minimal compromise to the clutter filter performance. rSVD accelerates SVD computation by approximating the k largest singular values, while random downsampling accelerates both full SVD and rSVD by decomposing the original large data matrix into small matrices that can be processed in parallel. An in vitro blood flow phantom study with the presence of heavy tissue clutter showed significantly improved computational performance using the proposed methods with minimal deterioration to the clutter filter performance (less than 3-dB reduction in blood to clutter ratio, less than 0.2-cm(2)/s(2) increase in flow mean squared error, less than 0.1-cm/s increase in the standard deviation of the vessel blood flow signal, and less than 0.3-cm/s increase in tissue clutter velocity for both full SVD and rSVD when the downsampling factor was less than 20× ). The maximum acceleration was about threefold from randomized spatial downsampling, and approximately another threefold from rSVD. An in vivo rabbit kidney perfusion study showed that rSVD provided comparable performance to full SVD in clutter rejection in vivo (maximum difference of blood to clutter ratio was less than 0.6 dB), and random downsampling provided artifact-free perfusion imaging results when combined with both

  16. Filtered sub-grid constitutive models for fluidized gas-particle flows constructed from 3-D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Avik; Milioli, Fernando E.; Ozarkar, Shailesh; Li, Tingwen; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2016-10-01

    The accuracy of fluidized-bed CFD predictions using the two-fluid model can be improved significantly, even when using coarse grids, by replacing the microscopic kinetic-theory-based closures with coarse-grained constitutive models. These coarse-grained constitutive relationships, called filtered models, account for the unresolved gas-particle structures (clusters and bubbles) via sub-grid corrections. Following the previous 2-D approaches of Igci et al. [AIChE J., 54(6), 1431-1448, 2008] and Milioli et al. [AIChE J., 59(9), 3265-3275, 2013], new filtered models are constructed from highly-resolved 3-D simulations of gas-particle flows. Although qualitatively similar to the older 2-D models, the new 3-D relationships exhibit noticeable quantitative and functional differences. In particular, the filtered stresses are strongly dependent on the gas-particle slip velocity. Closures for the filtered inter-phase drag, gas- and solids-phase pressures and viscosities are reported. A new model for solids stress anisotropy is also presented. These new filtered 3-D constitutive relationships are better suited to practical coarse-grid 3-D simulations of large, commercial-scale devices.

  17. Wind tunnel experiments on chaotic dynamics of a flexible tube row in a cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Muntean, G.; Moon, F.C.

    1994-12-31

    Flow visualization and dynamics measurements of flexible cylindrical tubes in a cross-flow are described. Five tubes mounted on flexible supports were subjected to cross flow in a low turbulence wind tunnel. Dynamic measurements of the tube motion are presented. The data suggests that a low dimensional attractor exists for tube flutter under impact constraints using fractal dimension calculations. There is also qualitative evidence for single tube flutter in-line with the flow. In another set of experiments, a flow visualization technique is used to examine the flow behind the vibrating cylinders. Four different configurations of the jet flow behind the cylinders are observed. Coupling of the jet dynamics and tube motion seems apparent from the video data. These experiments are being used to try and construct a low order nonlinear model for the tube-flow dynamics.

  18. Ultrafiltration and nanofiltration in the pulp and paper industry using cross-rotational (CR) filters.

    PubMed

    Mänttäri, M; Nyström, M

    2004-01-01

    Ultra- and nanofiltration with high shear CR-filters have been utilized for cleaning of clear filtrates and effluents from the pulp and paper industry. The aim was to find out how different nanofiltration membranes operate at high shear conditions. The filtration efficiency of the membranes was evaluated by measuring flux, retention and fouling at various recovery and pH conditions. High fluxes (approximately 100 L/(m2h)) for nanofiltration membranes were measured when circulation waters from the paper machine were filtered at neutral conditions. In the filtration of discharge of external activated sludge treatment plants we measured fluxes around 150 L/(m2h) even at a concentration factor of 12. The best NF membranes removed over 80% of the organic carbon and of the conductivity and almost completely eliminated the color. With acidic waters fluxes and retentions were significantly lower. The NF270 membrane from Dow and the Desal-5 membranes from Osmonics had the highest flux and retention properties. However, the Desal-5 membrane lost its retention properties slowly, which restricts its use in the high shear CR-filter. CR-nanofiltration can be used in the pulp and paper industry without feed pre-treatment by ultrafiltration. This increases the attractiveness of high shear CR-nanofiltration.

  19. Kalman/Map filtering-aided fast normalized cross correlation-based Wi-Fi fingerprinting location sensing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongliang; Xu, Yubin; Li, Cheng; Ma, Lin

    2013-11-13

    A Kalman/map filtering (KMF)-aided fast normalized cross correlation (FNCC)-based Wi-Fi fingerprinting location sensing system is proposed in this paper. Compared with conventional neighbor selection algorithms that calculate localization results with received signal strength (RSS) mean samples, the proposed FNCC algorithm makes use of all the on-line RSS samples and reference point RSS variations to achieve higher fingerprinting accuracy. The FNCC computes efficiently while maintaining the same accuracy as the basic normalized cross correlation. Additionally, a KMF is also proposed to process fingerprinting localization results. It employs a new map matching algorithm to nonlinearize the linear location prediction process of Kalman filtering (KF) that takes advantage of spatial proximities of consecutive localization results. With a calibration model integrated into an indoor map, the map matching algorithm corrects unreasonable prediction locations of the KF according to the building interior structure. Thus, more accurate prediction locations are obtained. Using these locations, the KMF considerably improves fingerprinting algorithm performance. Experimental results demonstrate that the FNCC algorithm with reduced computational complexity outperforms other neighbor selection algorithms and the KMF effectively improves location sensing accuracy by using indoor map information and spatial proximities of consecutive localization results.

  20. Calculation of linearized supersonic flow over slender cones of arbitrary cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascitti, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    Supersonic linearized conical-flow theory is used to determine the flow over slender pointed cones having horizontal and vertical planes of symmetry. The geometry of the cone cross sections and surface velocities are expanded in Fourier series. The symmetry condition permits the uncoupling of lifting and nonlifting solutions. The present method reduces to Ward's theory for flow over a cone of elliptic cross section. Results are also presented for other shapes. Results by this method diverge for cross-sectional shapes where the maximum thickness is large compared with the minimum thickness. However, even for these slender-body shapes, lower order solutions are good approximations to the complete solution.

  1. An analysis of pressure driven cross-flow through a long slot connecting two parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Cross-flow between two parallel channels that were connected by a long narrow slot has been measured. The data was presented primarily in terms of transverse resistance coefficients. This data has been analyzed with momentum balances applied to both the axial and transverse components of the slot flow. The importance of wall friction to the slot flow and the necessity of calculating the axial component of the slot flow is demonstrated.

  2. Investigation of flow and transport processes at the MADE site using ensemble Kalman filter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Gaisheng; Chen, Y.; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2008-01-01

    In this work the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is applied to investigate the flow and transport processes at the macro-dispersion experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, MS. The EnKF is a sequential data assimilation approach that adjusts the unknown model parameter values based on the observed data with time. The classic advection-dispersion (AD) and the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) models are employed to analyze the tritium plume during the second MADE tracer experiment. The hydraulic conductivity (K), longitudinal dispersivity in the AD model, and mass transfer rate coefficient and mobile porosity ratio in the DDMT model, are estimated in this investigation. Because of its sequential feature, the EnKF allows for the temporal scaling of transport parameters during the tritium concentration analysis. Inverse simulation results indicate that for the AD model to reproduce the extensive spatial spreading of the tritium observed in the field, the K in the downgradient area needs to be increased significantly. The estimated K in the AD model becomes an order of magnitude higher than the in situ flowmeter measurements over a large portion of media. On the other hand, the DDMT model gives an estimation of K that is much more comparable with the flowmeter values. In addition, the simulated concentrations by the DDMT model show a better agreement with the observed values. The root mean square (RMS) between the observed and simulated tritium plumes is 0.77 for the AD model and 0.45 for the DDMT model at 328 days. Unlike the AD model, which gives inconsistent K estimates at different times, the DDMT model is able to invert the K values that consistently reproduce the observed tritium concentrations through all times. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurements of Neutron Capture Cross-Section for Tantalum at the Neutron Filtered Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritzay, Olena; Libman, Volodymyr

    2009-08-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of tantalum have been measured for the neutron energies 2 and 59 keV using the WWR-M Kyiv Research Reactor (KRR) of the Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Science of Ukraine. The cross sections of 181Ta (n, γ) 182Ta reaction were obtained by the activation method using a gamma-spectrometer with Ge(Li)-detector. The obtained neutron capture cross sections were compared with the known experimental data from database EXFOR/CSISRS and the ENDF libraries.

  4. Flow-through rates and evaluation of solids separation of compost filter socks versus silt fence in sediment control applications.

    PubMed

    Keener, Harold M; Faucette, Britt; Klingman, Michael H

    2007-01-01

    Soil loss rates from construction sites can be 1000 times the average of natural soil erosion rates and 20 times that from agricultural lands. Silt fence (SF) is the current industry standard used to control sediment originating from construction activities. Silt fences are designed to act as miniature detention ponds. Research has indicated that SF sediment filtering efficiency is related to its ability to detain and pond water, not necessarily the filtration ability of the fabric. Design capacity and spacing is based on flow-through rate and design height. In addition, increased detention of runoff and pressure from ponding may increase the likelihood of overtopping or failure of SF in field application. Testing was conducted on compost silt socks (SS) and SF to determine sediment filtering efficiency, flow-through rate, ponding depth, overtopping point, design height, and design capacity. Results indicate flow-through rate changes with time, as does ponding depth, due to the accumulation of solids on/in the sediment filters. Changes in depth with time were a linear function of flow rate after 10 min of flow, up to the time the sediment filter is overtopped. Predicting the capacity of SF and SS to handle runoff without the filter being overtopped requires consideration of both runoff rate and length of runoff time. Data show SS half the heights of SF were less likely to overtop than SF when sediment-laden runoff water flow rates are less than 1.03 L(-1) s(-1) m(-1) (5 gpm/ft, gal per minute per lineal foot). Ponded depth behind a 61.0-cm (24 in) SF increased more rapidly than behind a 30.5-cm diam. (12 in) SS, and at the end of the thirty minutes, the depth behind the SF was 75% greater than that behind the SS. Removal of solids by the SF and the SS were not shown to be statistically different. Results were used to create a Microsoft Excel-based interactive design tool to assist engineers and erosion and sediment control planners on how to specify compost SS

  5. Temporally and spectrally resolved observation of a crossed-flow DBD plasma jet using pure helium and argon/acetone mixed gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Sands, Brian L.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Sakai, Osamu

    2012-06-01

    A crossed gas flow dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet using vertical pure helium and tilted argon/acetone mixed gases is investigated in this study, mainly by an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. We have observed ionization-front propagation and transient glow discharge formation following the rise of the applied voltage pulse. A secondary discharge with a reverse polarity was ignited during the falling slope of the applied voltage pulse. In order to analyze excited-species distribution inside the discharge, optical interference filters were placed in front of the ICCD camera with the center wavelengths set at the excited species' transition. The imaging results revealed detailed discharge structures around the crossing point of the two gas flows including bridging emission between the two flows that changed position with time. We also discuss the ignition mechanisms of the secondary discharge considering effects of accumulated charge during the primary discharge and changes in the channel conductivity following the primary discharge.

  6. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part I. A theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Andreas; Magnusson, Emma; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    Direct determination of hydrodynamic radius from retention time is an advantage of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, this is not always completely straight forward since non-idealities exist and assumptions have been made in deriving the retention equations. In this study we investigate the effect on accuracy from two factors: (1) level of sophistication of the equations used to determine channel height from a calibration experiment and (2) the influence of secondary relaxation on the accuracy of hydrodynamic radius determination. A new improved technique for estimating the channel height from calibration experiments is suggested. It is concluded that severe systematic error can arise if the most common channel height equations are used and an alternative more rigorous approach is described. For secondary relaxation it is concluded that this effect increases with the cross-flow decay rate. The secondary relaxation effect is quantified for different conditions. This is part one of two. In the second part the determination of hydrodynamic radius are evaluated experimentally under similar conditions.

  7. Averaged indicators of secondary flow in repeated acoustic Doppler current profiler crossings of bends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Cross-stream velocity was measured in a large river bend at high spatial resolution over three separate survey episodes. A suite of methods for resolving cross-stream velocity distributions was tested on data collected using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the sand-bedded Sacramento River, California. The bend was surveyed with repeated ADCP crossings at eight cross sections during a rising limb of high discharge in February 2004 and twice on recession in March 2004. By translating and interpolating repeated ADCP crossings to planar grids, velocity ensembles at similar positions along irregular boat paths could be averaged. The averaging minimized turbulent fluctuations in streamwise velocities over 1 m/s, enabling the resolution of weaker cross-stream velocities (???15-30 cm/s). Secondary-flow influence on suspended sediment was inferred from a lateral region of acoustic backscatter intensity aligned with outward flow over the point bar. A near-bed decrease in backscatter intensity across the pool corresponded with inward cross-stream flow. These suspension indicators were used to orient averaged velocity grids for unambiguously defining the cross-stream velocity magnitudes. Additional field investigations could test whether the correlation between cross-stream velocity and backscatter intensity patterns results from helical recirculation of suspended sediment to the inside of the bend. These river measurements, consistent with classic and recent laboratory studies, show that ADCP surveys can provide refined views of secondary flow and sediment movement in large rivers.

  8. Dilution jets in accelerated cross flows. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, A.; Greber, I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments and measurements of the temperature field produced by a single jet and a row of dilution jets issued into a reverse flow combustor are presented. The flow in such combustors is typified by transverse and longitudinal acceleration during the passage through its bending section. The flow visualization experiments are designed to examine the separate effects of longitudinal and transverse acceleration on the jet trajectory and spreading rate. A model describing a dense single jet in a lighter accelerating cross flow is developed. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flows. It uses a modified entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The flow visualization results are compared with the model calculations in terms of trajectories and spreading rates. Each experiment is typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, density ratio and the densimetric Froude number.

  9. Analysis of KrF excimer laser beam modification resulting from ablation under closed thick film flowing filtered water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, Colin; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    The application of a closed thick film flowing filtered water to immerse the ablation etching mechanism of an excimer laser poses interesting possibilities concerning debris control, modification of machined feature topography and modification of the ablation rate. Furthermore, these parameters have been shown to be dependent on flow velocity; hence, offering further user control of machining characteristics. However, the impact of this technique requires investigation. This contribution offers comparison of the calculated ablation pressure and the effect on feature surface characteristics given for laser ablation of bisphenol A polycarbonate using KrF excimer laser radiation in ambient air against laser ablation of the same substrate under closed thick film flowing filtered water immersion. Also, an impact of such immersion equipment on the optical performance of the micromachining centre used is quantified and reviewed. The pressure is calculated to have risen by a magnitude of 48, when using the liquid immersed ablation technique. This increase in pressure is proposed to have an increased surface roughness, promoting the number of asperities with a surface area lower than 16 μm 2; resulting in a diffuse reflection of light and an apparent darkening of features. The focal length of the optical system was accurately predicted to increase by 2.958 mm, when using the closed flowing liquid immersion equipment. This equipment is predicted to have increased the optical depth of focus via reduction in the angle of convergence of the two defining image rays; yet the perceived focus, measured discretely by mean feature wall angle, was found to be 25% smaller when using the closed thick film flowing filtered water immersion technique instead of similar laser ablation in ambient air. A compressed plume interaction is proposed as a contributing factor in this change.

  10. Computer program for the analysis of the cross flow in a radial inflow turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program was used to solve the governing of the potential flow in the cross sectional planes of a radial inflow turbine scroll. A list of the main program, the subroutines, and typical output example are included.

  11. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: A CROSS-FLOW PERVAPORATION SYSTEM FOR REMOVAL OF VOCS FROM CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation is a process for removing volatile organic compounds (VOC) from contaminated water. The performance of the cross-flow pervaporation system increases with temperature, with an equipment limitation of 35 degrees Celsius. Permeable membranes that preferentially adsor...

  12. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: A CROSS-FLOW PERVAPORATION SYSTEM FOR REMOVAL OF VOCS FROM CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation is a process for removing volatile organic compounds (VOC) from contaminated water. The performance of the cross-flow pervaporation system increases with temperature, with an equipment limitation of 35 degrees Celsius. Permeable membranes that preferentially adsor...

  13. Volatile organic compounds absorption in a cross-flow rotating packed bed.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Shao; Hsu, Yi-Chun; Lin, Chia-Chang; Tai, Clifford Yi-Der; Liu, Hwai-Shen

    2008-04-01

    A cross-flow rotating packed bed (RPB) process was evaluated for its absorption of some volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into water, including isopropyl alcohol, acetone, and ethyl acetate. The experimental results showed that the mass transfer coefficient (KGa) increased with increasing rotational speed, liquid rate, and gas rate, and thus an empirical correlation of KGa was proposed for the cross-flow RPB for the first time. It was found thatthis correlation could reasonably estimate our experimental KGa data as well as those reported in literatures. Although the mass transfer coefficient was lower than that in a countercurrent-flow RPB, a cross-flow RPB is believed to be capable of handling a higher gas rate because of its flow pattern.

  14. CFD simulations of the flow control performance applied for inlet of low drag high-bypass turbofan engine at cross flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursakov, I. A.; Kazhan, E. V.; Lysenkov, A. V.; Savelyev, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Paper describes the optimization procedure for low cruise drag inlet of high-bypass ratio turbofan engine (HBRE). The critical cross-flow velocity when the flow separation on the lee side of the inlet channel occurs is determined. The effciency of different flow control devices used to improve the flow parameters at inlet section cross flow regime is analyzed. Boundary layer suction, bypass slot and vortex generators are considered. It is shown that flow control devices enlarge the stability range of inlet performance at cross flow regimes.

  15. Intensity transform and Wiener filter in measurement of blood flow in arteriography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Polyana F.; Franco, Marcelo L. N.; Filho, João. B. D.; Patrocínio, Ana C.

    2015-03-01

    Using the arteriography examination, it is possible to check anomalies in blood vessels and diseases such as stroke, stenosis, bleeding and especially in the diagnosis of Encephalic Death in comatose individuals. Encephalic death can be diagnosed only when there is complete interruption of all brain functions, and hence the blood stream. During the examination, there may be some interference on the sensors, such as environmental factors, poor maintenance of equipment, patient movement, among other interference, which can directly affect the noise produced in angiography images. Then, we need to use digital image processing techniques to minimize this noise and improve the pixel count. Therefore, this paper proposes to use median filter and enhancement techniques for transformation of intensity using the sigmoid function together with the Wiener filter so you can get less noisy images. It's been realized two filtering techniques to remove the noise of images, one with the median filter and the other with the Wiener filter along the sigmoid function. For 14 tests quantified, including 7 Encephalic Death and 7 other cases, the technique that achieved a most satisfactory number of pixels quantified, also presenting a lesser amount of noise, is the Wiener filter sigmoid function, and in this case used with 0.03 cuttof.

  16. A cantilevered flexible cylinder in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jessica; Smits, Alexander; Stone, Howard

    2011-11-01

    Biological fluid-structure interactions of high aspect ratio bluff bodies are commonplace: flow around tall plants; flow through arrays of sensory vibrissae, antennae, and hairs. In this study, we seek insight to this class of problems by generalizing the flow configuration to uniform flow past a flexible cantilevered cylinder. Experiments were conducted for ReD = 100-500. Cylinders deflected with the flow and demonstrated multimodal oscillations in both the streamwise and transverse directions. Oscillation frequencies were correlated with vortex shedding frequencies, but low oscillation frequencies (sub-1 Hz), which were not apparently vortex- induced, were also present. Two ReD regimes were noted in which the vortex shedding frequency remained relatively constant with ReD , while the two regimes were separated by an intermediate transition region. This feature results in an apparently linear relationship between St and ReD in each regime. Hydrogen bubble visualization showed strong three-dimensionality in the wake, as well as a diversity of wake structures varying with ReD . NSF-GRFP

  17. Thermography-based blood flow imaging in human skin of the hands and feet: a spectral filtering approach.

    PubMed

    Sagaidachnyi, A A; Fomin, A V; Usanov, D A; Skripal, A V

    2017-02-01

    The determination of the relationship between skin blood flow and skin temperature dynamics is the main problem in thermography-based blood flow imaging. Oscillations in skin blood flow are the source of thermal waves propagating from micro-vessels toward the skin's surface, as assumed in this study. This hypothesis allows us to use equations for the attenuation and dispersion of thermal waves for converting the temperature signal into the blood flow signal, and vice versa. We developed a spectral filtering approach (SFA), which is a new technique for thermography-based blood flow imaging. In contrast to other processing techniques, the SFA implies calculations in the spectral domain rather than in the time domain. Therefore, it eliminates the need to solve differential equations. The developed technique was verified within 0.005-0.1 Hz, including the endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic frequency bands of blood flow oscillations. The algorithm for an inverse conversion of the blood flow signal into the skin temperature signal is addressed. The examples of blood flow imaging of hands during cuff occlusion and feet during heating of the back are illustrated. The processing of infrared (IR) thermograms using the SFA allowed us to restore the blood flow signals and achieve correlations of about 0.8 with a waveform of a photoplethysmographic signal. The prospective applications of the thermography-based blood flow imaging technique include non-contact monitoring of the blood supply during engraftment of skin flaps and burns healing, as well the use of contact temperature sensors to monitor low-frequency oscillations of peripheral blood flow.

  18. Influence of flow concentration on parameter importance and prediction uncertainty of pesticide trapping by vegetative filter strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Garey A.; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Sabbagh, George J.

    2010-04-01

    SummaryFlow concentration is a key hydrologic factor limiting the effectiveness of vegetated filter strips (VFS) in removing pesticides from surface runoff. Numerical models, such as VFSMOD-W, offer a mechanistic approach for evaluating VFS effectiveness under various hydrological conditions including concentrated flow. This research hypothesizes that the presence of concentrated flow drastically alters the importance of various hydrological, sedimentological, and pesticide input factors and the prediction uncertainty of pesticide reduction. Using data from a VFS experimental field study investigating chlorpyrifos and atrazine transport, a two-step global sensitivity and uncertainty analysis framework was used with VFSMOD-W based on (1) a screening method (Morris) and (2) a variance-based method (extended Fourier Analysis Sensitivity Test, FAST). The vertical, saturated hydraulic conductivity was consistently the most important input factor for predicting infiltration, explaining 49% of total output variance for uniform sheet flow, but only 8% for concentrated flow. Sedimentation was governed by both hydrologic (vertical, saturated hydraulic conductivity and initial and saturated water content) and sediment characteristics (average particle diameter). The vertical, saturated hydraulic conductivity was the most important input factor for atrazine or chlorpyrifos trapping under uniform sheet flow (explained more than 46% of the total output variance) and concentrated flow (although only explained 8% of the total variance in this case). The 95% confidence intervals for atrazine and chlorpyrifos reduction ranged between 43% and 78% for uniform sheet flow and decreased to between 1% and 16% under concentrated flow. Concentrated flow increased interactions among the system components, enhancing the relative importance of processes that were latent under shallow flow conditions. This complex behavior warrants the need for process-based modeling to be able to predict the

  19. Transport and survival of bacterial and viral tracers through submerged-flow constructed wetland and sand-filter system.

    PubMed

    Vega, Everardo; Lesikar, Bruce; Pillai, Suresh D

    2003-08-01

    Untreated or improperly treated wastewater has often been cited as the primary contamination source of groundwater. The use of decentralized wastewater treatment systems has applicability around the world since it obviates the need for extensive infrastructure development and expenditures. The use of a submerged flow constructed wetland (CW) and a sand filter to remove bacterial and viral pathogens from wastewater streams was evaluated in this study Salmonella sp. and a bacteriophages tracer were used in conjunction with the conservative bromide tracer to understand the fate and transport of these organisms in these treatment systems. Viral breakthrough numbers in the sand filter and CW were similar with a Spearman Rank correlation of 0.8 (P<0.05). In the CW, the virus exhibited almost a 3-log reduction, while in the sand filter, the viruses exhibited a 2-log reduction. The bacterial tracers, however, did not exhibit similar reductions. Low numbers of bacteria and viruses were still detectable in the effluent streams suggesting that disinfection of the effluent is critical. The survival of the tracer bacteria and viruses was as expected dependent on the biotic and abiotic conditions existing within the wastewater. The results suggest that the microbial removal characteristics of decentralized wastewater treatment systems can vary and depend on factors such as adsorption, desorption and inactivation which in turn depend on the design specifics such as filter media characteristics and local climatic conditions.

  20. Spin-filtered and spatially distinguishable crossed Andreev reflection in a silicene-superconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kangkang; Zhang, Yan-Yang

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the quantum transport in a junction between a superconductor and a silicene nanoribbon, under the effect of a magnetic exchange field. We find that for a narrow nanoribbon of silicene, remarkable crossed Andreev reflection (with a fraction >50 % ) can be induced in the energy window of the elastic cotunneling, by destroying some symmetries of the system. Since the energy responses of electrons to the exchange field are opposite for opposite spins, these transport channels can be well spin polarized. Moreover, due to the helicity conservation of the topological edge states, the Andreev reflection, the crossed Andreev reflection, and the elastic cotunneling are spatially separated in three different locations of the device, making them experimentally distinguishable. This crossed Andreev reflection is a nonlocal quantum interference between opposite edges through evanescent modes. If two superconducting leads with different phases are connected to two edges of the silicene nanoribbon, the crossed Andreev reflection can present Josephson type oscillations, with a maximal fraction ˜100 % .

  1. Air sampling by pumping through a filter: effects of air flow rate, concentration, and decay of airborne substances.

    PubMed

    Šoštarić, Marko; Petrinec, Branko; Babić, Dinko

    2016-12-01

    This paper tackles the issue of interpreting the number of airborne particles adsorbed on a filter through which a certain volume of sampled air has been pumped. This number is equal to the product of the pumped volume and particle concentration in air, but only if the concentration is constant over time and if there is no substance decomposition on the filter during sampling. If this is not the case, one must take into account the inconstancy of the concentration and the decay law for a given substance, which is complicated even further if the flow rate through the filter is not constant. In this paper, we develop a formalism which considers all of these factors, resulting in a single, compact expression of general applicability. The use of this expression is exemplified by addressing a case of sampling airborne radioactive matter, where the decay law is already well known. This law is combined with three experimentally observed time dependence of the flow rate and two models for the time dependence of the particle concentration. We also discuss the implications of these calculations for certain other situations of interest to environmental studies.

  2. Groundwater flow inverse modeling in non-MultiGaussian media: performance assessment of the normal-score Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Zhou, H.; Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Gómez-Hernández, J. J.

    2012-02-01

    The normal-score ensemble Kalman filter (NS-EnKF) is tested on a synthetic aquifer characterized by the presence of channels with a bimodal distribution of its hydraulic conductivities. This is a clear example of an aquifer that cannot be characterized by a multiGaussian distribution. Fourteen scenarios are analyzed which differ among them in one or various of the following aspects: the prior random function model, the boundary conditions of the flow problem, the number of piezometers used in the assimilation process, or the use of covariance localization in the implementation of the Kalman filter. The performance of the NS-EnKF is evaluated through the ensemble mean and variance maps, the connectivity patterns of the individual conductivity realizations and the degree of reproduction of the piezometric heads. The results show that (i) the localized NS-EnKF can characterize the non-multiGaussian underlying hydraulic distribution even when an erroneous prior random function model is used, (ii) localization plays an important role to prevent filter inbreeding and results in a better logconductivity characterization, and (iii) the NS-EnKF works equally well under very different flow configurations.

  3. Groundwater flow inverse modeling in non-MultiGaussian media: performance assessment of the normal-score Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Zhou, H.; Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Gómez-Hernández, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    The normal-score ensemble Kalman filter (NS-EnKF) is tested on a synthetic aquifer characterized by the presence of channels with a bimodal distribution of its hydraulic conductivities. Fourteen scenarios are analyzed which differ among them in one or various of the following aspects: the prior random function model, the boundary conditions of the flow problem, the number of piezometers used in the assimilation process, or the use of covariance localization in the implementation of the Kalman filter. The performance of the NS-EnKF is evaluated through the ensemble mean and variance maps, the connectivity patterns of the individual conductivity realizations and the degree of reproduction of the piezometric heads. The results show that (i) the localized NS-EnKF can identify correctly the channels when a large number of conditioning piezometers are used even when an erroneous prior random function model is used, (ii) localization plays an important role to prevent filter inbreeding and results in a better logconductivity characterization, and (iii) the NS-EnKF works equally well under very different flow configurations.

  4. Stabilization of Mass Absorption Cross Section of Elemental Carbon for Filter-Based Absorption Photometer by Heated Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.; Sahu, L.; Takegawa, N.; Miyazaki, Y.; Han, S.; Moteki, N.; Hu, M.; Kim Oanh, N.; Kim, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate measurements of elemental carbon (EC) or black carbon on a long-term basis are important for the studies of impacts of EC on climate and human health. In principle, mass concentrations of EC (MEC) can be estimated by the measurement of light absorption coefficient by EC. Filter-based methods, which quantify the absorption coefficient (kabs) from the change in transmission through a filter loaded with particles, have been widely used to measure MEC because of the ease of the operation. However, in practice, reliable determination of MEC has been very difficult because of the large variability in the mass absorption cross sections (Cabs), which is a conversion factor from kabs to MEC. Coating of EC by volatile compounds and co-existence of light-scattering particles greatly contributes to the variability of Cabs. In order to overcome this difficulty, volatile aerosol components were removed before collection of EC particles on filters by heating an inlet section to 400°C. The heated inlet vaporized almost completely sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and organics without any detectable loss of EC. Simultaneous measurements of kabs by two types photometers (Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and Continuous Soot Monitoring System (COSMOS)) together with MEC by the EC-OC analyzer were made to determine Cabs at 6 different locations in Asia (Japan, Korea, China, and Thailand) in different seasons. The Cabs was stable to be 10.5±0.7 m2 g-1 at the wavelength of 565 nm for EC strongly impacted by emissions from vehicles and biomass burning. The stability of the Cabs for different EC sources and under the different physical and chemical conditions provides a firm basis for its use in estimating MEC in fine mode with an accuracy of about 10%.

  5. Dynamics of the ion flow in a discharge with crossed E and H fields

    SciTech Connect

    Movsesyants, Yu. B. Tyuryukanov, P. M.

    2011-12-15

    The experimental and theoretical results of the investigation of an ion flow in a low-pressure discharge in crossed E and H fields are presented. It is shown that two quasi-stationary current states can be realized in a transonic collisionless flow of ions in a cold plasma.

  6. Vibration of Tube Bundles in Cross Water Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikarev, I. M.; Loshkareva, E. A.; Kartuesova, A. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    Results of vibration testing of an experimental tube bundle of 72 tubes of diameter 0.012 m in the case of cooling-water flow across the tubes with different versions of installation of baffles are described. The influence of the displacement of the baffles on the parameters of vibration of the tube bundle is determined.

  7. Scheduling and Separating Departures Crossing Arrival Flows in Shared Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalley, Eric; Parke, Bonny K.; Lee, Paul; Omar, Faisal; Lee, Hwasoo; Beinert, Nancy; Kraut, Joshua M.; Palmer, Everett

    2013-01-01

    Flight efficiency and reduction of flight delays are among the primary goals of NextGen. In this paper, we propose a concept of shared airspace where departures fly across arrival flows, provided gaps are available in these flows. We have explored solutions to separate departures temporally from arrival traffic and pre-arranged procedures to support controllers' decisions. We conducted a Human-in-the-Loop simulation and assessed the efficiency and safety of 96 departures from the San Jose airport (SJC) climbing across the arrival airspace of the Oakland and San Francisco arrival flows. In our simulation, the SJC tower had a tool to schedule departures to fly across predicted gaps in the arrival flow. When departures were mistimed and separation could not be ensured, a safe but less efficient route was provided to the departures to fly under the arrival flows. A coordination using a point-out procedure allowed the arrival controller to control the SJC departures right after takeoff. We manipulated the accuracy of departure time (accurate vs. inaccurate) as well as which sector took control of the departures after takeoff (departure vs. arrival sector) in a 2x2 full factorial plan. Results show that coordination time decreased and climb efficiency increased when the arrival sector controlled the aircraft right after takeoff. Also, climb efficiency increased when the departure times were more accurate. Coordination was shown to be a critical component of tactical operations in shared airspace. Although workload, coordination, and safety were judged by controllers as acceptable in the simulation, it appears that in the field, controllers would need improved tools and coordination procedures to support this procedure.

  8. A computational model for three-dimensional incompressible wall jets with large cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, W. D.; Shankar, V.; Malmuth, N. D.

    1979-01-01

    A computational model for the flow field of three dimensional incompressible wall jets prototypic of thrust augmenting ejectors with large cross flow is presented. The formulation employs boundary layer equations in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. Simulation of laminar as well as turbulen wall jets is reported. Quantification of jet spreading, jet growth, nominal separation, and jet shrink effects due to corss flow are discussed.

  9. Nonstationary flow in a channel with variable cross section under conditions of periodic pulsed energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2007-04-01

    The effect of a periodic pulsed supply of energy, equal to that of hydrogen combustion in air, on the structure of a supersonic flow in a channel of variable cross section modeling a ramjet tract has been studied. The flow has been numerically simulated based on two-dimensional gasdynamic equations. Various flow regimes are obtained depending on the configuration of energy supply zones and the excess air ratio in the channel.

  10. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  11. Gas flow and particle deposition in the hot gas filter vessel at Wilsonville

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Goodarz; Zhang, Haifeng

    1999-11-01

    Particle transport and deposition in the Wilsonville hot gas filter vessel is studied. The filter vessel contains a total of 72 filters which are arranged in two tiers. These are modeled by six upper and one lower cylindrical effective filters. An unstructured grid of 296,781 cells generated by GAMBIT is used in the simulations. The Reynolds stress model of FLUENT (version 5.0) code is used for evaluating the gas mean velocity and root mean-square fluctuation velocities in the vessel. The particle equation of motion includes the drag, the gravitational and the lift forces. The turbulent instantaneous fluctuation velocity is simulated by a filtered Gaussian white-noise model provided by the FLUENT code. The particle deposition patterns are evaluated, and the effect of particle size is studied. In addition, the effect of turbulence dispersion, the lift force and the gravitional force are analyzed. The results show that the deposition pattern depends on particle size, and turbulence dispersion plays an important role in transport and deposition of particles in the vessel. The gravitational force affects the motion of larege particles, but has no effect on the transport and deposition of small particles.

  12. Traffic flow of a roundabout crossing with an open boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ke-Zhao; Tan, Hui-Li; Kong, Ling-Jiang; Liu, Mu-Ren

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a cellular automaton traffic flow model with an open boundary condition to describe the traffic flow at a roundabout crossing with an inner roundabout lane and an outer roundabout lane. The simulation results show that the boundary condition, bottlenecks and the self-organization affect the traffic flow at the roundabout crossing. Because of the effect of bottlenecks, jams easily appear on the inner roundabout lane. To improve the capacity of the roundabout system, proper values of the enter probability α and the out probability β can be chosen.

  13. Global aerodynamic instability of twin cylinders in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Mahbub; Meyer, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    This paper comprises an in-depth physical discussion of the flow-induced vibration of two circular cylinders in view of the time-mean lift force on stationary cylinders and interaction mechanisms. The gap-spacing ratio T/D is varied from 0.1 to 5 and the attack angle α from 0° to 180° where T is the gap width between the cylinders and D is the diameter of a cylinder. Mechanisms of interaction between two cylinders are discussed based on time-mean lift, fluctuating lift, flow structures and flow-induced responses. The whole regime is classified into seven interaction regimes, i.e., no interaction regime; boundary layer and cylinder interaction regime; shear-layer/wake and cylinder interaction regime; shear-layer and shear-layer interaction regime; vortex and cylinder interaction regime; vortex and shear-layer interaction regime; and vortex and vortex interaction regime. Though a single non-interfering circular cylinder does not correspond to a galloping following quasi-steady galloping theory, two circular cylinders experience violent galloping vibration due to shear-layer/wake and cylinder interaction as well as boundary layer and cylinder interaction. A larger magnitude of fluctuating lift communicates to a larger amplitude vortex excitation.

  14. The calibration and operation of a constant-temperature crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernando, E. M.; Donovan, J. F.; Smits, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration and operation of a constant-temperature crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow is considered. Crossed-wire probes offer considerable advantages over single, inclined wires: the kinematic shear stress can be derived from a single point measurement; the rms quantities can be derived from the same measurement, and the instantaneous quantities can be obtained as a continuous function of time. However, using a crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow is subject to the following practical difficulties: the problem of flow interference, where the shock waves from one wire and its supports interfere with the flow over the other wire; the necessity for high frequency response to resolve the spectral content, and the sensitivity of the results to small changes in the calibration constants. In the present contribution, each of these problems is addressed. Practical solutions are suggested, and some encouraging results are presented.

  15. On the Nonlinear Evolution of a Stationary Cross-Flow Vortex in a Fully Three-Dimensional Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear stability of a fully three-dimensional boundary layer flow in an incompressible fluid and derive an equation governing the nonlinear development of a stationary cross-flow vortex. The amplitude equation is a novel integro-differential equation which has spatial derivatives of the amplitude occurring in the kernal function. It is shown that the evolution of the cross-flow vortex is strongly coupled to the properties of an unsteady wall layer which is in fact driven by an unknown slip velocity, proportional to the amplitude of the cross-flow vortex. The work is extended to obtain the corresponding equation for rotating disk flow. A number of special cases are examined and the numerical solution for one of cases, and further analysis, demonstrates the existence of finite-distance as well as focussing type singularities. The numerical solutions also indicate the presence of a new type of nonlinear wave solution for a certain set of parameter values.

  16. Improving Efficiency of a Counter-Current Flow Moving Bed Granular Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Colver, G.M.; Brown, R.C.; Shi, H.; Soo, D.S-C.

    2002-09-18

    The goal of this research is to improve the performance of moving bed granular filters for gas cleaning at high temperatures and pressures. A second goal of the research is to optimize the performances of both solids and gas filtering processes through appropriate use of granular bed materials, particle sizes, feed rates etc. in a factorial study. These goals are directed toward applications of advanced coal-fired power cycles under development by the U.S. Department of Energy including pressurized fluidized bed combustion and integrated gasification/combined cycles based on gas turbines and fuel cells. Only results for particulate gas cleaning are reported here.

  17. Assessment of reduced-order unscented Kalman filter for parameter identification in 1-dimensional blood flow models using experimental data.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, A; Caforio, Federica; Montecinos, Gino; Muller, Lucas O; Blanco, Pablo J; Toro, Eluterio F

    2016-10-25

    This work presents a detailed investigation of a parameter estimation approach on the basis of the reduced-order unscented Kalman filter (ROUKF) in the context of 1-dimensional blood flow models. In particular, the main aims of this study are (1) to investigate the effects of using real measurements versus synthetic data for the estimation procedure (i.e., numerical results of the same in silico model, perturbed with noise) and (2) to identify potential difficulties and limitations of the approach in clinically realistic applications to assess the applicability of the filter to such setups. For these purposes, the present numerical study is based on a recently published in vitro model of the arterial network, for which experimental flow and pressure measurements are available at few selected locations. To mimic clinically relevant situations, we focus on the estimation of terminal resistances and arterial wall parameters related to vessel mechanics (Young's modulus and wall thickness) using few experimental observations (at most a single pressure or flow measurement per vessel). In all cases, we first perform a theoretical identifiability analysis on the basis of the generalized sensitivity function, comparing then the results owith the ROUKF, using either synthetic or experimental data, to results obtained using reference parameters and to available measurements.

  18. Influence of furnace cross section on the flow and velocity distribution in tangential firing furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainudin, A. F.; Hasini, H.; Fadhil, S. S. A.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the influence of different furnace cross sectional configurations on the flow and velocity distribution in a small-scale tangential firing furnace. The flow and combustion of natural gas in three furnaces of different cross section are simulated numerically using CFD. The results show that velocity distribution is non-uniform along the width and depth of the furnace in rectangular furnace while square cross section gives uniform distribution. The effect of furnace cross section on the tangential velocity is more obvious when the length difference of the width and depth of the furnace is larger. The axial velocity is found to be highly influenced by the furnace cross section.

  19. Cellular automata (CA) simulation of the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on urban low-grade uncontrolled roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    This paper discusses the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on uncontrolled low-grade roads or branch roads without separating barriers in cities where pedestrians may cross randomly from any location on both sides of the road. The rules governing pedestrian street crossings are analyzed, and a cellular automata (CA) model to simulate the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings is proposed. The influence of the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on the volume and travel time of the vehicle flow and the average wait time for pedestrians to cross is investigated through simulations. The main results of the simulation are as follows: (1) The vehicle flow volume decreases because of interruption from pedestrian crossings, but a small number of pedestrian crossings do not cause a significant delay to vehicles. (2) If there are many pedestrian crossings, slow vehicles will have little chance to accelerate, causing travel time to increase and the vehicle flow volume to decrease. (3) The average wait time for pedestrians to cross generally decreases with a decrease in vehicle flow volume and also decreases with an increase in the number of pedestrian crossings. (4) Temporal and spatial characteristics of vehicle flows and pedestrian flows and some interesting phenomena such as "crossing belt" and "vehicle belt" are found through the simulations.

  20. Cross flow induced vibrations in staggered arrays of cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Marn, J.

    1991-12-31

    Flow induced vibrations cause by instability is the subject of this investigation. The bulk of the work performed is theoretical in nature, the comparison with some of existing experimental data is given for each of four models described. First model encompasses the effects of prescribed motion on the cylinder. Such circumstances occur in the case of vortex shedding initiated instability. The reduced velocity within the cylinder array is low and there is no coupling between the adjacent cylinders. Second model assumes certain form of vibration and corresponding behavior of the perturbed velocity field in temporal and one of spatial coordinates thus transforming partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations and takes into account the motion of the neighboring cylinder. This corresponds to fluid elastic controlled instabilities. The resulting equations are solved analytically. The model is used for better understanding of the equations of cylinder motion as well as for quick estimates of threshold of instability. Third model relaxes an assumption about the form of vibration in spatial direction and uses the vorticity formulation of equation of fluid motion to account for fluid-solid interaction. This model analysis is of two phase (air-water mixture) flow. The void fraction distribution is found to be the single most decisive factor to determine the onset of instability for such a domain. In conclusion, two distinct mechanism were found to be responsible for flow induced vibration caused instabilities, (1) outside source controlled periodic excitation (such as vortex shedding) -- described by the first model and (2) fluid elastic forces -- described by second, third and fourth models. For the values of reduced velocity below 0.7 first model is proposed, for the values above 0.7, the rest.

  1. Crossing turbulent boundaries: interfacial flux in environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Grant, Stanley B; Marusic, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the visualization and prediction of turbulence are shedding new light on mass transfer in the turbulent boundary layer. These discoveries have important implications for many topics in environmental science and engineering, from the transport of earth-warming CO2 across the sea-air interface, to nutrient processing and sediment erosion in rivers, lakes, and the ocean, to pollutant removal in water and wastewater treatment systems. In this article we outline current understanding of turbulent boundary layer flows, with particular focus on coherent turbulence and its impact on mass transport across the sediment-water interface in marine and freshwater systems.

  2. The Cross-Flow Plate-Type Intercooler

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-04-01

    MoGraw-HillBook Coe , 15c., 1933, 4. Norris,R. H ., and Streid ,D. D.: Lamlnar-Flow Coefficientsfor Duets. A.S.M.M.Trans.,vol. Aug. 1940,pp. 525-533...typefite~coolerhavingspacesof “O.025 fichbetween adjacentplatesand ka7iw a len@ h of 2.30 inchesla the dlrecticm of cooling-airflm and 4.30 tickesIn...2s/d) platethickness,feet (or inches wheredesignated) I .... 3 %1 w N v % f w n ‘f la Ax A= h % u density of plateI’Jmterlal,pouudsper Intercodler

  3. Treatment of petrochemical secondary effluent by an up-flow biological aerated filter (BAF).

    PubMed

    Fu, L Y; Wu, C Y; Zhou, Y X; Zuo, J E; Ding, Y

    2016-01-01

    In this study, petrochemical secondary effluent was treated by a 55 cm diameter pilot-scale biological aerated filter (BAF) with a media depth of 220 cm. Volcanic rock grains were filled as the BAF media. Median removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) was 29.35 and 57.98%, respectively. Moreover, the removal profile of the COD, NH3-N, total nitrogen and total organic carbon demonstrated that the filter height of 140 cm made up to 90% of the total removal efficiency of the final effluent. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, removal efficiencies of 2-chloromethyl-1,3-dioxolane, and benzonitrile, indene and naphthalene were obtained, ranging from 30.12 to 63.01%. The biomass and microbial activity of the microorganisms on the filter media were in general reduced with increasing filter height, which is consistent with the removal profile of the contaminants. The detected genera Defluviicoccus, Betaproteobacteria_unclassified and the Blastocatella constituted 1.86-6.75% of the identified gene, enhancing the COD and nitrogen removal in BAF for treating petrochemical secondary effluent.

  4. Uncertainty Evaluation of Coliform Bacteria Removal from Vegetated Filter Strip under Overland Flow Condition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vegetated filter strips (VFS) have become an important component of water quality improvement by reducing sediment and nutrients transport to surface water. This management practice is also beneficial for controlling manure-borne pathogen transport to surface water. The objective of this work was to...

  5. Vertical flow soil filter for the elimination of micro pollutants from storm and waste water.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Niklas; Banzhaf, Stefan; Scheytt, Traugott; Bester, Kai

    2009-11-01

    A technical scale activated soil filter has been used to study the elimination rates of diverse environmentally relevant micro pollutants from storm and waste water. The filter was made of layers of peat, sand and gravel. The upper (organic) layer was planted with reed (phragmites australis) to prevent clogging and was spiked with activated sludge to enhance microbial biomass and biodegradation potential. Compounds used as UV filters, antioxidants or plasticizers, namely 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBBS), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone (2,6-DTB-1,4-BQ), 1,1-biphenyl-3,3-dimethyl (1,1-BP-3,3-DM) and dibenzyl (DB) have been included in this study. The chemical characteristics of these compounds ranged from the hydrophilic (pK(OW) 2.6) to the lipophilic (pK(OW) 5) properties. For the elimination studies, synthetic waste water spiked to 3000 ng L(-1) with the selected compounds was used. Elimination rates with low hydraulic load (61 L m(-2)d(-1), water retention time: 2d) were higher than 96%. During a storm water simulation experiment (hydraulic load: 255 L m(-2), water retention time: <1h), the elimination rates of the most analytes decreased to 79-96%. The elimination performance of the hydrophilic compound NBBS declined to 21%. Balancing studies including the soil of the filter system revealed that degradation or transformation were both relevant elimination mechanism.

  6. Optical investigation of the heat transfer from a rotating cylinder in a cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, M. A.

    . The heat transfer from a rotating cylinder in an air-cross flow was investigated by purely optical measuring techniques. Flow velocities were measured by a two-dimensional LDV both in the vicinity of the cylinder and in the boundary layer. A new optical device based on light-deflection in a temperature field was developed to examine local temperature gradients in the boundary layer of the rotating cylinder. Finally, a Michelson-interferometer was installed to produce real-time pictures of isothermal lines around the heated cylinder. The impact of rotation on flow patterns, boundary layer behaviour and heat transfer could be clearly identified. It appears that the velocity-ratio Ω acts like an independent parameter, in that flow patterns correspond to this dimensionless number. Furthermore, it seems that rotation dominates over cross flow, both fluid-dynamically and thermally above Ω = 2.

  7. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  8. Preconditioning an ensemble Kalman filter for groundwater flow using environmental-tracer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdal, Daniel; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2017-02-01

    Groundwater resources management requires operational, regional-scale groundwater models accounting for dominant spatial variability of aquifer properties and spatiotemporal variability of groundwater recharge. We test the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to estimate transient hydraulic heads and groundwater recharge, as well as the hydraulic conductivity and specific-yield distributions of a virtual phreatic aquifer. To speed up computation time, we use a coarsened spatial grid in the filter simulations, and reconstruct head measurements at observation points by a local model in the vicinity of the piezometer as part of the observation operator. We show that the EnKF can adequately estimate both the mean and spatial patterns of hydraulic conductivity when assimilating daily values of hydraulic heads from a highly variable initial sample. The filter can also estimate temporally variable recharge to a satisfactory level, as long as the ensemble size is large enough. Constraining the parameters on concentrations of groundwater-age tracers (here: tritium) and transient hydraulic-head observations cannot reasonably be done by the EnKF because the concentrations depend on the recharge history over longer times while the head observations have much shorter temporal support. We thus use a different method, the Kalman Ensemble Generator (KEG), to precondition the initial ensemble of the EnKF on the groundwater-age tracer data and time-averaged hydraulic-head values. The preconditioned initial ensemble exhibits a smaller spread as well as improved means and spatial patterns. The preconditioning improves the EnKF particularly for smaller ensemble sizes, allowing operational data assimilation with reduced computational effort. In a validation scenario of delineating groundwater protection zones, the preconditioned filter performs clearly better than the filter using the original initial ensemble.

  9. Dynamic analysis of pedestrian crossing behaviors on traffic flow at unsignalized mid-block crosswalks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; He, Jing; Luo, Zhiyong; Yang, Wunian; Zhang, Xiping

    2015-05-01

    It is important to study the effects of pedestrian crossing behaviors on traffic flow for solving the urban traffic jam problem. Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) traffic cellular automata (TCA) model, a new one-dimensional TCA model is proposed considering the uncertainty conflict behaviors between pedestrians and vehicles at unsignalized mid-block crosswalks and defining the parallel updating rules of motion states of pedestrians and vehicles. The traffic flow is simulated for different vehicle densities and behavior trigger probabilities. The fundamental diagrams show that no matter what the values of vehicle braking probability, pedestrian acceleration crossing probability, pedestrian backing probability and pedestrian generation probability, the system flow shows the "increasing-saturating-decreasing" trend with the increase of vehicle density; when the vehicle braking probability is lower, it is easy to cause an emergency brake of vehicle and result in great fluctuation of saturated flow; the saturated flow decreases slightly with the increase of the pedestrian acceleration crossing probability; when the pedestrian backing probability lies between 0.4 and 0.6, the saturated flow is unstable, which shows the hesitant behavior of pedestrians when making the decision of backing; the maximum flow is sensitive to the pedestrian generation probability and rapidly decreases with increasing the pedestrian generation probability, the maximum flow is approximately equal to zero when the probability is more than 0.5. The simulations prove that the influence of frequent crossing behavior upon vehicle flow is immense; the vehicle flow decreases and gets into serious congestion state rapidly with the increase of the pedestrian generation probability.

  10. A circular cylinder undergoing large-amplitude transverse oscillations in a slow uniform cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. M.; Liu, P.

    2013-05-01

    This study explores the vortex patterns formed by a circular cylinder undergoing lateral cylinder oscillations with large amplitudes and in the presence of a slow uniform cross flow. It is an extension of our previous study (Lam et al., 2010b) in which formation of the 2S, 2P and P+S vortex modes were discussed from the viewpoint of interaction of a uniform cross-flow with the vortex street patterns of a cylinder oscillating in an otherwise quiescent fluid at Keulegan-Carpenter numbers up to KC=8.9. The present paper reports three additional experimental sets in which the amplitudes of cylinder oscillations have even larger values, at A/D>2.5, and lie beyond the vortex mode map usually quoted from Williamson and Roshko (1988). It is found that the slow uniform cross-flow at λ/D≈3 and Reynolds number based on cross-flow velocity at 232 acts to convect the corresponding vortex patterns in the absence of cross-flow downstream across the line of cylinder oscillation. Vortex-vortex interaction and vortex-cylinder interaction are observed to affect the subsequent development of vortices. The P+S vortex mode is found to occur up to KC=16. At KC between 16 and 24, a new vortex mode is observed in which only one vortex pair can be convected downstream every cylinder oscillation cycle. Another new vortex mode with two vortex pairs and two stationary vortices are found at KC>24.

  11. Performance characterization of a cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine in sheared inflow

    SciTech Connect

    Forbush, Dominic; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Donegan, James; McEntee, Jarlath

    2016-12-01

    A method for constructing a non-dimensional performance curve for a cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine in sheared flow is developed for a natural river site. The river flow characteristics are quasi-steady, with negligible vertical shear, persistent lateral shear, and synoptic changes dominated by long time scales (days to weeks). Performance curves developed from inflow velocities measured at individual points (randomly sampled) yield inconclusive turbine performance characteristics because of the spatial variation in mean flow. Performance curves using temporally- and spatially-averaged inflow velocities are more conclusive. The implications of sheared inflow are considered in terms of resource assessment and turbine control.

  12. Electro-osmotic flow through a two-dimensional screen-pump filter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Hong; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chang, Chien C; Wang, Chang-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The electro-osmotic flow driven by a screen pump, composed of a line array of evenly spaced identical rectangular solid blocks, is investigated under the Debye-Hückel approximation. The geometry of the screen pump is determined by the spacing and aspect ratio of the solid blocks. A constant surface zeta potential is assumed on the block surface. The method of eigenfunction series expansion is applied to solve analytically for the applied electric field, electric charge potential in the fluid, and flow field. Because of the low Reynolds number, Stokes equations are applied for the flow. The analytic result is first confirmed by comparing with the exact solution of the electro-osmotic flow in an infinite channel. Then different geometries of the screen pump and the effect of the electrokinetic width are computed for their influence on the flow rate. Recirculating eddies and reversing flow are found even though the applied electric driving field is unidirectional.

  13. Remediation of groundwater contaminated with MTBE and benzene: the potential of vertical-flow soil filter systems.

    PubMed

    van Afferden, Manfred; Rahman, Khaja Z; Mosig, Peter; De Biase, Cecilia; Thullner, Martin; Oswald, Sascha E; Müller, Roland A

    2011-10-15

    Field investigations on the treatment of MTBE and benzene from contaminated groundwater in pilot or full-scale constructed wetlands are lacking hugely. The aim of this study was to develop a biological treatment technology that can be operated in an economic, reliable and robust mode over a long period of time. Two pilot-scale vertical-flow soil filter eco-technologies, a roughing filter (RF) and a polishing filter (PF) with plants (willows), were operated independently in a single-stage configuration and coupled together in a multi-stage (RF+PF) configuration to investigate the MTBE and benzene removal performances. Both filters were loaded with groundwater from a refinery site contaminated with MTBE and benzene as the main contaminants, with a mean concentration of 2970±816 and 13,966±1998 μg L(-1), respectively. Four different hydraulic loading rates (HLRs) with a stepwise increment of 60, 120, 240 and 480 L m(-2) d(-1) were applied over a period of 388 days in the single-stage operation. At the highest HLR of 480 L m(-2) d(-1), the mean concentrations of MTBE and benzene were found to be 550±133 and 65±123 μg L(-1) in the effluent of the RF. In the effluent of the PF system, respective mean MTBE and benzene concentrations of 49±77 and 0.5±0.2 μg L(-1) were obtained, which were well below the relevant MTBE and benzene limit values of 200 and 1 μg L(-1) for drinking water quality. But a dynamic fluctuation in the effluent MTBE concentration showed a lack of stability in regards to the increase in the measured values by nearly 10%, which were higher than the limit value. Therefore, both (RF+PF) filters were combined in a multi-stage configuration and the combined system proved to be more stable and effective with a highly efficient reduction of the MTBE and benzene concentrations in the effluent. Nearly 70% of MTBE and 98% of benzene were eliminated from the influent groundwater by the first vertical filter (RF) and the remaining amount was almost

  14. Characterizing a Co-Flow Nozzle for use in a Filtered Rayleigh Scattering System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Figure 15- Velocity profile at the exit plane of the nozzle at an outer annulus flow rate of 500 SLPM. The air intake tube is situated opposite the...annulus of the coflow nozzle used in this experiment, the internal flow structure of the outer annulus and intake pipe were studied using Fluent based...15- Velocity profile at the exit plane of the nozzle at an outer annulus flow rate of 500 SLPM. The air intake tube is situated opposite the side of

  15. Ensemble kalman filtering to perform data assimilation with soil water content probes and pedotransfer functions in modeling water flow in variably saturated soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Data from modern soil water contents probes can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling, i.e. continual correction of the flow model performance based on observations. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. The method requires estimates of the unce...

  16. Purely-Elastic Flow Instabilities in a 3D Six Arms Cross-Slot Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, A.; Alves, M. A.; Pinho, F. T.

    2008-07-01

    A numerical study of the creeping flow of an UCM fluid is carried out in a three-dimensional cross-slot geometry with inlets and outlets in all three orthogonal directions. Using two different inlet flow rate configurations, Io = 4:2 and 2:4, representing uniaxial extension and biaxial extension, respectively, it was possible to assess the importance of different types of extensional flow near the stagnation point. Two different methods of calculation of the polymer stress were used, the standard approach and the log-conformation approach. The uniaxial extension flow configuration is prone to the onset of steady flow asymmetries, at a rather small Deborah number (Decrit = 0.21) and regardless of the stress computation method. However, for the biaxial extension flow configuration a perfectly symmetric flow has so far been observed up to De = 0.5 using the log-conformation approach. The use of these two configurations allowed the variation of the amount of stretch and compression near the stagnation point, providing new insights into the viscoelastic flow instability mechanisms in cross-slot flows.

  17. Saturated and unsaturated flow through sloped compost filter beds of different particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Petrell, R J; Gumulia, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the hydraulics of sloped compost beds having active free and non-flowing zones, and used for runoff erosion and volume control, and heavy metal removal. Water sorption tests on yard waste compost indicated that water transfer between the two zones would be slow (6 hr for a 0.04 m rise). The free flowing zone in ≈1 m long sloped (15°) beds increased in depth (0.01-0.08 m) with decreasing particle size and increasing flow. Particle size and flow (0.08-0.3 L/s/m) affected bed stability. Drainage volume increased with flow while drainage time remained fairly constant. Saturated flow occurred depending on the particle size above 0.02-0.165 L/s/m. Data indicate that sheet runoff from low intensity storms would most likely create unsaturated but stable bed conditions. Concentrated flows as from downspouts would likely create saturated conditions and have to be managed to prevent washout. A model based on porous media theory indicated that flow regime under saturated flow is turbulent. Results can be used to design compost beds for various runoff rates and to develop a heavy metal sorption model.

  18. Understanding the Influence of Flow Velocity, Wall Motion Filter, Pulse Repetition Frequency, and Aliasing on Power Doppler Image Quantification.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maricy R; Martins, Wellington P; Soares, Carlos A M; Miyague, Andre H; Kudla, Marek J; Pavan, Theo Z

    2017-07-24

    Although power Doppler imaging has been used to quantify tissue and organ vascularity, many studies showed that limitations in defining adequate ultrasound machine settings and attenuation make such measurements complex to be achieved. However, most of these studies were conducted by using the output of proprietary software, such as Virtual Organ computer-aided analysis (GE Healthcare, Kretz, Zipf, Austria); therefore, many conclusions may not be generalizable because of unknown settings and parameters used by the software. To overcome this limitation, our goal was to evaluate the impact of the flow velocity, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and wall motion filter (WMF) on power Doppler image quantification using beam-formed ultrasonic radiofrequency data. The setup consisted of a blood-mimicking fluid flowing through a phantom. Radiofrequency signals were collected using PRFs ranging from 0.6 to 10 kHz for 6 different flow velocities (5-40 cm/s). Wall motion filter cutoff frequencies were varied between 50 and 250 Hz. The power Doppler magnitude was deeply influenced by the WMF cutoff frequency. The effect of using different WMF values varied with the PRF; therefore, the power Doppler signal intensity was dependent on the PRF. Finally, we verified that power Doppler quantification can be affected by the aliasing effect, especially when using a PRF lower than 1.3 kHz. The WMF and PRF greatly influenced power Doppler quantification, mainly when flow velocities lower than 20 cm/s were used. Although the experiments were conducted in a nonclinical environment, the evaluated parameters are equivalent to those used in clinical practice, which makes them valuable for aiding the interpretation of related data in future research. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Respirator Filter Efficiency Testing Against Particulate and Biological Aerosols Under Moderate to High Flow Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    mainly of charge- neutralized dioctyl phthalate (DOP), sodium chloride (NaCl), corn oil, or polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres. The aerosol concentrations...function of particle size for several filtering facepieces and DM, DFM, and HEPA respirator cartridges using corn oil particles over a size range of...globigii, M luteus, and P. alcaligenes, monodisperse urea aerosols (1.5, 3, 5, 7, and 9 um), and a NaCl aerosol (0.6 Vtm MMAD, 2.3 GSD). Bacterial

  20. Does Kutta lift exist on a vortex ring in a uniform cross flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, T. T.; Lua, K. B.; Thet, K.

    2008-05-01

    Past works [Y. K. Chang and A. D. Vakili, Phys. Fluids 7, 1583 (1995); R. Sau and K. Mahesh, AIAA Paper No. 2007-1316] show that a vortex ring ejected normal to a cross flow tilts and deforms as it propagates downstream, and they attribute this phenomenon to the Kutta lift or Magnus effect. Here, we show through a controlled experiment that there is no physical evidence of the existence of a Kutta lift when a fully developed vortex ring is exposed to a uniform cross flow. The observed phenomenon could be attributed to the modification of vorticity distribution of the vortex core due to the combined effect of the cross flow itself and the entrainment of boundary layer material during the formation of vortex ring.

  1. TOMOGRAPHY OF PLASMA FLOWS IN THE UPPER SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE USING TIME-DISTANCE INVERSION COMBINING RIDGE AND PHASE-SPEED FILTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Svanda, Michal

    2013-09-20

    The consistency of time-distance inversions for horizontal components of the plasma flow on supergranular scales in the upper solar convection zone is checked by comparing the results derived using two k-{omega} filtering procedures-ridge filtering and phase-speed filtering-commonly used in time-distance helioseismology. I show that both approaches result in similar flow estimates when finite-frequency sensitivity kernels are used. I further demonstrate that the performance of the inversion improves (in terms of a simultaneously better averaging kernel and a lower noise level) when the two approaches are combined together in one inversion. Using the combined inversion, I invert for horizontal flows in the upper 10 Mm of the solar convection zone. The flows connected with supergranulation seem to be coherent only for the top {approx}5 Mm; deeper down there is a hint of change of the convection scales toward structures larger than supergranules.

  2. Flow Style Investigation and Noise Reduction of a Cross-Flow Fan with Varied Rotor-Skew-Angle Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Go-Long; Tu, Tsung-Hsien; Li, Tung-Chen; Wang, Kuang-Hsieng

    The purpose of this study was investigating the noise emission, flow-style, fan’s performance regarding to cross-fan with three different rotor-skew angle (RSA) rotors. The special flow visualization setups for both vertical and parallel investigation of smoke slice were used to overcome the blind sight of a Laser-Doppler or a particle-tracking velocimeter, and the three-dimensional flow differences were confirmed with streamline images. The experimental results indicated that RSA-5, which is a rotor with a nearly a pitch skew within blade’s two end shrouds, has a lower sound emission and little pressure drops relative to that of no skew angle case, RSA-0. RSA-10, two pitches twisting case, also has a better acoustics quietness than that of RSA-0, but it excited undesired noise in a high frequency components around 2-4kHz. In this work, for a compromise between flow and acoustics performances, RSA-5 shows the most suitable design for cross-flow fan rotor.

  3. The role of loading rate, backwashing, water and air velocities in an up-flow nitrifying tertiary filter.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Emmanuelle; Choubert, Jean-Marc; Canler, Jean-Pierre; Heduit, Alain; Sørensen, Kim Helleshøj; Lessard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The vertical distribution of nitrification performances in an up-flow biological aerated filter operated at tertiary nitrification stage is evaluated in this paper. Experimental data were collected from a semi-industrial pilot-plant under various operating conditions. The actual and the maximum nitrification rates were measured at different levels inside the up-flow biofilter. A nitrogen loading rate higher than 1.0 kg NH4-Nm(-3)_mediad(-1) is necessary to obtain nitrification activity over all the height of the biofilter. The increase in water and air velocities from 6 to 10 m h(-1) and 10 to 20 m h(-1) has increased the nitrification rate by 80% and 20% respectively. Backwashing decreases the maximum nitrification rate in the media by only 3-14%. The nitrification rate measured at a level of 0.5 m above the bottom of the filter is four times higher than the applied daily average volumetric nitrogen loading rate up to 1.5 kg NH4-N m(-3)_mediad(-1). Finally, it is shown that 58% of the available nitrification activity is mobilized in steady-state conditions while up to 100% is used under inflow-rate increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Progress Toward Affordable High Fidelity Combustion Simulations Using Filtered Density Functions for Hypersonic Flows in Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Pisciuneri, Patrick H.; Yilmaz, S. Levent

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the development of subgrid scale (SGS) closures based on a filtered density function (FDF) for large eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent reacting flows. The FDF is the counterpart of the probability density function (PDF) method, which has proven effective in Reynolds averaged simulations (RAS). However, while systematic progress is being made advancing the FDF models for relatively simple flows and lab-scale flames, the application of these methods in complex geometries and high speed, wall-bounded flows with shocks remains a challenge. The key difficulties are the significant computational cost associated with solving the FDF transport equation and numerically stiff finite rate chemistry. For LES/FDF methods to make a more significant impact in practical applications a pragmatic approach must be taken that significantly reduces the computational cost while maintaining high modeling fidelity. An example of one such ongoing effort is at the NASA Langley Research Center, where the first generation FDF models, namely the scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) are being implemented into VULCAN, a production-quality RAS and LES solver widely used for design of high speed propulsion flowpaths. This effort leverages internal and external collaborations to reduce the overall computational cost of high fidelity simulations in VULCAN by: implementing high order methods that allow reduction in the total number of computational cells without loss in accuracy; implementing first generation of high fidelity scalar PDF/FDF models applicable to high-speed compressible flows; coupling RAS/PDF and LES/FDF into a hybrid framework to efficiently and accurately model the effects of combustion in the vicinity of the walls; developing efficient Lagrangian particle tracking algorithms to support robust solutions of the FDF equations for high speed flows; and utilizing finite rate chemistry parametrization, such as flamelet models, to reduce

  5. Thin-film flow in helically wound shallow channels of arbitrary cross-sectional shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D. J.; Stokes, Y. M.; Green, J. E. F.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the steady, gravity-driven flow of a thin film of viscous fluid down a helically wound shallow channel of arbitrary cross-sectional shape with arbitrary torsion and curvature. This extends our previous work [D. J. Arnold et al., "Thin-film flow in helically-wound rectangular channels of arbitrary torsion and curvature," J. Fluid Mech. 764, 76-94 (2015)] on channels of rectangular cross section. The Navier-Stokes equations are expressed in a novel, non-orthogonal coordinate system fitted to the channel bottom. By assuming that the channel depth is small compared to its width and that the fluid depth in the vertical direction is also small compared to its typical horizontal extent, we are able to solve for the velocity components and pressure analytically. Using these results, a differential equation for the free surface shape is obtained, which must in general be solved numerically. Motivated by the aim of understanding flows in static spiral particle separators used in mineral processing, we investigate the effect of cross-sectional shape on the secondary flow in the channel cross section. We show that the competition between gravity and inertia in non-rectangular channels is qualitatively similar to that in rectangular channels, but that the cross-sectional shape has a strong influence on the breakup of the secondary flow into multiple clockwise-rotating cells. This may be triggered by small changes to the channel geometry, such as one or more bumps in the channel bottom that are small relative to the fluid depth. In contrast to the secondary flow which is quite sensitive to small bumps in the channel bottom, the free-surface profile is relatively insensitive to these. The sensitivity of the flow to the channel geometry may have important implications for the design of efficient spiral particle separators.

  6. Physics of the cigarette filter: fluid flow through structures with randomly-placed obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Andrade, José S.

    2001-06-01

    This talk briefly reviews the subject of fluid flow through disordered media. In particular, we focus on the sorts of considerations that may be necessary to move statistical physics from the description of idealized flows in the limit of zero Reynolds number to more realistic flows of real fluids moving at a nonzero velocity, where inertia effects mean that dangling ends are explored and the backbone is not entirely explored by the fluid. We discuss several intriguing features, such as the surprisingly sharp change in behavior from a localized to delocalized flow structure (distribution of flow velocities) that seems to occur at a critical value of Re which is orders of magnitude smaller than the critical value of Re where turbulence sets in.

  7. Analysis of the injection of a heated turbulent jet into a cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Schetz, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a theoretical model is investigated of the incompressible jet injection process. The discharge of a turbulent jet into a cross flow was mathematically modeled by using an integral method which accounts for natural fluid mechanisms such as turbulence, entrainment, buoyancy, and heat transfer. The analytical results are supported by experimental data and demonstrate the usefulness of the theory for estimating the trajectory and flow properties of the jet for a variety of injection conditions. The capability of predicting jet flow properties, as well as two- and three-dimensional jet paths, was enhanced by obtaining the jet cross-sectional area during the solution of the conservation equations. Realistic estimates of temperature in the jet fluid were acquired by accounting for heat losses in the jet flow due to forced convection and to entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet.

  8. Investigation of rarefied gas flow in microchannels of non-uniform cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemadri, Vadiraj; Varade, Vijay V.; Agrawal, Amit; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2016-02-01

    Study of rarefied gas flow in converging and diverging cross sections is crucial to the development of micro-nozzles and micro-thrusters. In other practical cases too, a microchannel may not always be straight and may include diverging and converging sections in the flow path. In this context, isothermal rarefied gas flow in microchannels of longitudinally varying cross section is studied experimentally in this work. The primary objective is to investigate the existence of Knudsen minimum in microchannels of varying cross sections. The effect of geometrical cross section and fluid properties on the Knudsen minimum are also investigated by performing experiments on three divergence angles (4°, 8°, and 12°) and three different gases (argon, nitrogen, and oxygen) to prove the robustness of the result. The Knudsen minimum, which is one of the characteristic features of rarefied flows, is experimentally observed for the first time in a microchannel of varying cross section. The position of the Knudsen minimum (at Kn ≈ 1) is seen to depend only weakly on the divergence angle and fluid properties.

  9. The CA model for traffic-flow at the grade roundabout crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui-Xiong; Bai, Ke-Zhao; Liu, Mu-Ren

    2006-07-01

    The cellular automaton model is suggested to describe the traffic-flow at the grade roundabout crossing. After the simulation with computer, the fundamental properties of this model have been revealed. Analysing this kind of road structure, this paper transforms the grade roundabout crossing with inner-roundabout-lane and outer-roundabout-lane into a configuration with many bottlenecks. Because of the self-organization, the traffic flow remains unblocked under a certain vehicle density. Some results of the simulation are close to the actual design parameter.

  10. Thermal design of multi-fluid mixed-mixed cross-flow heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roetzel, W.; Luo, X.

    2010-11-01

    A fast analytical calculation method is developed for the thermal design and rating of multi-fluid mixed-mixed cross-flow heat exchangers. Temperature dependent heat capacities and heat transfer coefficients can iteratively be taken into account. They are determined at one or two special reference temperatures. Examples are given for the application of the method to the rating of special multi-fluid multi-pass shell-and-tube heat exchangers and multi-fluid cross-flow plate-fin heat exchangers. The accuracy of the method is tested against numerical calculations with good results.

  11. Numerical study of cross flow fan performance in an indoor air conditioning unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yet, New Mei; Raghavan, Vijay R.; Chinc, W. M.

    2012-06-01

    The cross flow fan is a unique type of turbo machinery where the air stream flows transversely across the impeller, passing the blades twice. Due to its complex geometry, and highly turbulent and unsteady air-flow, a numerical method is used in this work to conduct the characterization study on the performance of a cross flow fan. A 2D cross-sectional model of a typical indoor air conditioning unit has been chosen for the simulation instead of a three dimensional 3D model due to the highly complex geometry of the fan. The simplified 2D model has been validated with experiments where it is found that the RMS error between the simulation and experimental results is less than 7%. The important parameters that affect the cross flow fan performance, i.e. the internal and external blade angles, the blade thickness, and the casing design, are analyzed in this study. The formation of an eccentric vortex is observed within the impeller.

  12. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  13. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  14. Flame Structure of Vitiated Fuel-Rich Inverse Diffusion Flames in a Cross-Flow (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified David Blunck 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include Area Code) N/A Standard Form 298...subscripts j and cf represent jet and cross-flow. The blowing ratio was determined from the mass flow rate and the exit area to avoid the added complexity...nm output from the Continuum dye laser was passed through a BBO crystal within an Inrad Autotracker III unit and then through a Pellin Broca prism

  15. Investigation on entrance length for electroosmotic flow in circular and noncircular cross section nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaakub, Tuan Norjihan Tuan; Yunas, Jumril; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2017-09-01

    Characteristics of bulk electroosmotic flow in nanochannel are different to microchannel because the electric double layer (EDL) becomes comparable to the channel height. This work presents a numerical investigation on the entrance length of pure electroosmotic flow inside 3D rectangular, cylinder and triangular nanochannel with same channel length. The electric field is fixed at 250 kV/cm for all models. A finite element analysis has been performed to solve the governing equation for laminar flow under the influenced of an electric field. The entry length estimation for fully developed electroosmotic laminar flow in a circular and noncircular cross sections are compared by evaluating the electroosmotic velocity magnitude and flow profiles at the centre line cut plane inside the nanochannel. The entrance length in nanochannel is found shorter in a smaller depth flow in rectangular, cylinder and triangular channels. While the triangular nanochannel has the shortest entry length for fully developed laminar flow compare to other cross section shape models. The effect of a step change in ζ-potential on the channel wall surface to the electroosmotic flow entrance length is also presented.

  16. Bubble Formation from Wall Orifice in Liquid Cross-Flow Under Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Two-phase flows present a wide variety of applications for spacecraft thermal control systems design. Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two phase flow science. The objective of the present work is to experimentally investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate, and orifice diameter on bubble formation in a wall-bubble injection configuration. Data were taken mainly under reduced gravity conditions but some data were taken in normal gravity for comparison. The reduced gravity experiment was conducted aboard the NASA DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The results show that the process of bubble formation and detachment depends on gravity, the orifice diameter, the gas flow rate, and the liquid cross-flow velocity. The data are analyzed based on a force balance, and two different detachment mechanisms are identified. When the gas momentum is large, the bubble detaches from the injection orifice as the gas momentum overcomes the attaching effects of liquid drag and inertia. The surface tension force is much reduced because a large part of the bubble pinning edge at the orifice is lost as the bubble axis is tilted by the liquid flow. When the gas momentum is small, the force balance in the liquid flow direction is important, and the bubble detaches when the bubble axis inclination exceeds a certain angle.

  17. In-vessel fluid flow measurements using thermocouples cross-correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    NguyenLe, Q.

    1998-05-08

    Fluid flow rate in high temperature and pressure vessels can be difficult to measure due to the associated harsh environment, inaccessible locations and pressure boundary integrity concerns. However, by using quick response miniature thermocouples to measure the naturally occurring temperature variations within the flow, the fluid velocity can be inferred from the transit time analysis. This flow measurement technique has other advantages such as the flow profile is not significantly disturbed, no additional flow restrictions introduced and the system fiction factor is not increased. Furthermore, since the measured flow rate is generally unaffected by the global system dynamics, such as heat increases or losses, as well as changes in the flow regimes, the location of the thermocouple pairs is extremely flexible. Due to the mentioned advantages, the thermocouple cross-correlation flow measurement method has been developed for use at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). Currently, thermocouple cross-correlation technique is used to measure the Reactor Pressure Vessel downcomer fluid velocity and the suppression pool in-vessel natural circulation velocity.

  18. Electric Discharge Flow Interaction in Parallel and Cross-Flow Electric Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    was measured by a pitot-static probe (connected to a mercury manometer ) inserted in the exhaust opening of the test section. The probe was removed...fan was employed, blowing in the reverse direction from the normal flow, at an air flow speed too small to be measured by the pitot tube and mercury ... manometer . Results summarized on Figure 21 indicate an increase in power with increased electrode spacing. This is a fundamental improvement over the

  19. Applications of moving granular-bed filters to advanced systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.W.; Haas, J.C.; Eshelman, M.B.

    1993-09-01

    The contract is arranged as a base contract with three options. The objective of the base contract is to develop conceptual design(s) of moving granular bed filter and ceramic candle filter technology for control of particles from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBC), and direct coal fueled turbine (DCFT) environments. The conceptual design(s) of these filter technologies are compared, primarily from an economic perspective. The granular bed filter was developed through low pressure, high temperature (1600{degree}F) testing in the late 1970`s and early 1980`s. Collection efficiencies over 99% were obtained. In 1988, high pressure, high temperature testing was completed at New York University, Westbury, N.Y., utilizing a two advanced power generating plants were chosen for developing conceptual designs and cost estimates of the commercial sized filters. One is the 450 MWe, second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plant defined by Foster Wheeler. This plant originally included cross-flow filters for hot gas cleanup. The other plant under study is a 100 MWe, KRW air blown gasifier. A cross-flow filter was utilized for gas stream cleanup in this study also. Granular bed and ceramic candle filters were substituted for the cross-flow filters in both these plants, and the resulting costs were compared.

  20. UV filters analyzed by isotope diluted TurboFlow-LC-MS/MS in urine from Danish children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Nielsen, Ole; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Juul, Anders; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2017-03-01

    Experimental studies indicate that some chemicals with UV blocking properties (known as UV filters) can act as endocrine disruptors. UV filters are used in sunscreens and other cosmetic- and personal care products, as well as in other consumer products such as food packaging, clothing and furniture textiles to protect the products against UV radiation. Here we present the urinary excretion of suspected endocrine active UV filters in Danish children and adolescents recruited from the general population. The content of benzophenone (BP), benzophenone-1 (BP-1), benzophenone-2 (BP-2), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), 5-chloro-2- hydroxybenzophenone (BP-7), 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4-HBP), 4-methyl-benzophenone (4-MBP), 3-(4- methylbenzylidene)-camphor (4-MBC) and 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC) were monitored in 24h urine and two consecutive first morning samples from 129 healthy Danish children and adolescents (6-21 yrs). All 387 samples were collected during the autumn (Nov. 2007) and were analyzed by a new on-line TurboFlow-LC-MS/MS method developed for simultaneous biomonitoring of these nine UV filters in urine. BP-3 and BP-1 were detected in more than 80% of the 24h samples and were significantly correlated (R(2)=0.815). BP, 4-HBP and BP-2 were found in 43, 15 and 5% of the samples, respectively. The median (range) concentrations of the UV-filters in 24-h urine were as follows: BP-3, 0.92 (LOD-115); BP-1, 0.54 (LOD-44.6); BP,filters; BP-7, 4-MBP, 4-MBC or 3-BC were detected in urine. A highly significant correlation between first morning and 24h urine levels of BP-3, BP-1 and 4-HBP from the same day was observed. Our project on UV filters analyzed by a new robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS method in Danish children and

  1. Cross-omics comparison of stress responses in mesothelial cells exposed to heat- versus filter-sterilized peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed

    Kratochwill, Klaus; Bender, Thorsten O; Lichtenauer, Anton M; Herzog, Rebecca; Tarantino, Silvia; Bialas, Katarzyna; Jörres, Achim; Aufricht, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that cytoprotective responses, such as expression of heat-shock proteins, might be inadequately induced in mesothelial cells by heat-sterilized peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids. This study compares transcriptome data and multiple protein expression profiles for providing new insight into regulatory mechanisms. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) based proteomics and topic defined gene expression microarray-based transcriptomics techniques were used to evaluate stress responses in human omental peritoneal mesothelial cells in response to heat- or filter-sterilized PD fluids. Data from selected heat-shock proteins were validated by 2D western-blot analysis. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data discriminated differentially regulated protein abundance into groups depending on correlating or noncorrelating transcripts. Inadequate abundance of several heat-shock proteins following exposure to heat-sterilized PD fluids is not reflected on the mRNA level indicating interference beyond transcriptional regulation. For the first time, this study describes evidence for posttranscriptional inadequacy of heat-shock protein expression by heat-sterilized PD fluids as a novel cytotoxic property. Cross-omics technologies introduce a novel way of understanding PDF bioincompatibility and searching for new interventions to reestablish adequate cytoprotective responses.

  2. Cross-Omics Comparison of Stress Responses in Mesothelial Cells Exposed to Heat- versus Filter-Sterilized Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Kratochwill, Klaus; Bender, Thorsten O.; Lichtenauer, Anton M.; Herzog, Rebecca; Tarantino, Silvia; Bialas, Katarzyna; Jörres, Achim; Aufricht, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that cytoprotective responses, such as expression of heat-shock proteins, might be inadequately induced in mesothelial cells by heat-sterilized peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids. This study compares transcriptome data and multiple protein expression profiles for providing new insight into regulatory mechanisms. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) based proteomics and topic defined gene expression microarray-based transcriptomics techniques were used to evaluate stress responses in human omental peritoneal mesothelial cells in response to heat- or filter-sterilized PD fluids. Data from selected heat-shock proteins were validated by 2D western-blot analysis. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data discriminated differentially regulated protein abundance into groups depending on correlating or noncorrelating transcripts. Inadequate abundance of several heat-shock proteins following exposure to heat-sterilized PD fluids is not reflected on the mRNA level indicating interference beyond transcriptional regulation. For the first time, this study describes evidence for posttranscriptional inadequacy of heat-shock protein expression by heat-sterilized PD fluids as a novel cytotoxic property. Cross-omics technologies introduce a novel way of understanding PDF bioincompatibility and searching for new interventions to reestablish adequate cytoprotective responses. PMID:26495307

  3. Vortex shedding and galloping of open semi-circular and parabolic cylinders in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D. S.; Veljkovic, I.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel study was undertaken to investigate the flow-induced vibration behaviour of open semi-circular and parabolic cylinders in cross-flow. The motivation for the research was to investigate the cause of the fatigue failures of a number of parabolic section rotary mixing blades in a large mixing vessel. Results are presented for force coefficients as a function of angle of incidence of the flow, Strouhal number and amplitude response. It is shown that the parabolic cylinder is subject to large amplitude vortex shedding resonance and, when the elastic axis is sufficiently downstream of the section's centre of gravity, galloping instability.

  4. The flow of red cells through spleen-like filtering slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    It is widely understood that the spleen is the principal site in the body for removal of old red blood cells. As they age during their approximately 120 day lifetimes, red blood cells have increasingly slow relaxation times. This mechanical change is potentially the identifying characteristic for filtering in the spleen, which is thought to occur in particularly narrows slit-like passages (< 1 μ m × ~ 7 μ m). The mechanism of the filtering, however, is unclear. Most simply, increasing cell viscosity with age would slow, rather than stop, cell passage. Similarly, `testing' the cells via significant strains during each passage through the spleen might be expected to accelerate aging through fatigue-like mechanisms. Our detailed simulations of red cells passing trough a model slit geometry suggest that increasing cell viscosity can fundamentally change its passage. The results are suggestive of a bifurcation, such as in the onset of instability, with increasing cell interior viscosity. Higher viscosities (or elastic capillary numbers) are seen in cases to lead to a fingering-like instability, which might be expected to severely damage aged cells, leading to their removal, while leaving younger low viscosity cells relatively unstressed.

  5. Analysis on Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modeling of Incompressible Flow Through Ceramic Foam Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, Shahin; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Kennedy, Mark William; Aune, Ragnhild Elizabeth; Jönsson, Pӓr Göran

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents experimental results of pressure drop measurements on 30, 50, and 80 pores per inch (PPI) commercial alumina ceramic foam filters (CFF) and compares the obtained pressure drop profiles to numerically modeled values. In addition, it is aimed at investigating the adequacy of the mathematical correlations used in the analytical and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. It is shown that the widely used correlations for predicting pressure drop in porous media continuously under-predict the experimentally obtained pressure drop profiles. For analytical predictions, the negative deviations from the experimentally obtained pressure drop using the unmodified Ergun and Dietrich equations could be as high as 95 and 74 pct, respectively. For the CFD predictions, the deviation to experimental results is in the range of 84.3 to 88.5 pct depending on filter PPI. Better results can be achieved by applying the Forchheimer second-order drag term instead of the Brinkman-Forchheimer drag term. Thus, the final deviation of the CFD model estimates lie in the range of 0.3 to 5.5 pct compared to the measured values.

  6. Effect of oscillatory flow on the performance of a novel cross-flow affinity membrane device

    SciTech Connect

    Najarian, S.; Bellhouse, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the effect of oscillatory flow in a membrane-based affinity contactor. This device was designed to accommodate a tubular affinity membrane, and the flow direction of working fluid was tangential to the surface of the membrane. Cibacron Blue F3G-A was utilized as the capturing ligand and bovine serum albumin as the target molecule. The dye molecules were immobilized covalently via spaced molecules (polyethylenimine) onto the pores of a microfiltration membrane with a pore size rating of 0.45{mu}m. Bovine serum albumin was pumped through the annular space between the concentric screw-threaded insert and the tubular membrane in oscillatory flow with a mean flow component. The effects of pulsation frequency and stroke length were investigated. It was found that, as a result of the pulsatile flow, the protein recovery was increased by a factor of 2. To make the interpretation of the results easier, various dimensionless groups were defined specifically for this system and the experimental data were reported in terms of these groups. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Influence of Cross-Andes Flow on the South American Low-Level Jet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Fu, Rong

    2004-03-01

    By analyzing the 15-yr (1979 93) reanalysis data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), it has been found that the seasonal and synoptic time-scale variations of the South American low-level jets (LLJs) are largely controlled by an upper-level trough and associated low-level zonal flow, rather than by horizontal temperature gradients along the slope of the Andes. The northerly LLJs are maintained by strong zonal pressure gradients caused by the upstream trough and westerly flow crossing the Andes through lee cyclogenesis. The process involves both baroclinic development of the upper-level trough and mechanical deflection of the westerly flow by the Andes. When an anticyclonic circulation replaces the trough and westerly flow over the eastern South Pacific, the northerly LLJs tend to diminish or reverse into southerly LLJs. The dependence of the LLJs upon the upstream wind pattern helps to explain how the seasonal variation of the South American LLJs is related to the seasonal changes of the large-scale circulation pattern over the eastern South Pacific. On synoptic time scales, the relation between LLJs and cross-Andes zonal flow is strong in austral winter, spring, and fall. This relation weakens somewhat in summer, when Amazon convection is strongest. The analysis also demonstrated strong connections of the LLJs with South American precipitation, intensity of the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ), and low-level cross-equatorial flow. A method for up to 5-day forecasts of the LLJs based on 700-hPa zonal winds over the subtropical eastern South Pacific was also introduced. A cross validation indicates a certain degree of predictability for South American LLJs. The results further suggest that the upstream flow pattern over the South Pacific should be closely monitored to determine the variability of the South American LLJs.

  8. Removal of Salmonella enteritidis from unpasteurized liquid egg white using a cross flow microfiltration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liquid egg white (LEW) is typically pasteurized to prevent common foodborne illnesses such as salmonellosis; however, heat pasteurization does not eliminate all pathogenic or spoilage microbes. In this study, a novel intervention technology based on cross-flow microfiltration (MF) was evaluated for ...

  9. Numerical Study on Influence of Cross Flow on Rewetting of AHWR Fuel Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mithilesh; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Ghosh, A. K.; Kumar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Numerical study on AHWR fuel bundle has been carried out to assess influence of circumferential and cross flow rewetting on the conduction heat transfer. The AHWR fuel bundle quenching under accident condition is designed primarily with radial jets at several axial locations. A 3D (r, θ, z) transient conduction fuel pin model has been developed to carry out the study with a finite difference method (FDM) technique with alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme. The single pin has been considered to study effect of circumferential conduction and multipins have been considered to study the influence of cross flow. Both analyses are carried out with the same fluid temperature and heat transfer coefficients as boundary conditions. It has been found from the analyses that, for radial jet, the circumferential conduction is significant and due to influence of overall cross flow the reductions in fuel temperature in the same quench plane in different rings are different with same initial surface temperature. Influence of cross flow on rewetting is found to be very significant. Outer fuel pins rewetting time is higher than inner. PMID:24672341

  10. Mixing characteristics of pulsed air-assist liquid jet into an internal subsonic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inchul; Kang, Youngsu; Koo, Jaye

    2010-04-01

    Penetration depth, spray dispersion angle, droplet sizes in breakup processes and atomization processes are very important parameters in combustor of air-breathing engine. These processes will enhance air/fuel mixing inside the combustor. Experimental results from the pulsed air-assist liquid jet injected into a cross-flow are investigated. And experiments were conducted to a range of cross-flow velocities from 42˜136 m/s. Air is injected with 0˜300kPa, with air-assist pulsation frequency of 0˜20Hz. Pulsation frequency was modulated by solenoid valve. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer(PDPA) was utilized to quantitatively measuring droplet characteristics. High-speed CCD camera was used to obtain injected spray structure. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will offer rapid mixing and good liquid jet penetration. Air-assist makes a very fine droplet which generated mist-like spray. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will introduce additional supplementary turbulent mixing and control of penetration depth into a cross-flow field. The results show that pulsation frequency has an effect on penetration, transverse velocities and droplet sizes. The experimental data generated in these studies are used for a development of active control strategies to optimize the liquid jet penetration in subsonic cross-flow conditions and predict combustion low frequency instability.

  11. Generation of two-dimensional vortices in a cross-flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samaniego, Jean-Michel

    1993-01-01

    The present report is concerned with an experimental study on the generation of plane two-dimensional vortices in a cross-flow. The purpose of this work is to address the problem of the feasibility of a two-dimensional experiment of flame-vortex interactions.

  12. On the trajectory scaling of tandem twin jets in cross-flow in close proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New, T. H.; Zang, B.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on tandem twin jets in cross-flow (JICF) in close proximity to investigate the relationships between their trajectories, separation distances and velocity ratios. Results show that the front and rear jets, each with initially distinct jet trajectory, merge into a single trajectory shortly after they exhaust into the cross-flow. Furthermore, the merged tandem JICF attains deeper cross-flow penetration than that of a single JICF at the same velocity ratio. The front jet is also observed to provide `shielding' for the rear jet such that the latter penetrates relatively deeper into the cross-flow, which corroborates observations made by earlier studies. In particular, the present study demonstrates that it is possible to collapse the tandem JICF merged trajectories by ` rD'-scaling, where A and B coefficients show slight reductions and increments, respectively, with increasing separation distance. Collapsing the merged trajectories by using single JICF A and B coefficients leads to the notion of effective velocity ratio for tandem JICF, which enable the authors to propose a modification in the ` rD'-scaling law for tandem JICF. Lastly, the modified ` rD'-scaling law is applied to trajectory data from an earlier tandem JICF study, and its validity is demonstrated by the resulting good collapse.

  13. Effect of real-time information upon traffic flows on crossing roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Minoru; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Yokoya, Yasushi; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    The effect of real-time information on the traffic flows of the crossing roads is studied by simulations based on a cellular automaton model. At the intersection, drivers have to enter a road of a shorter trip-time, by making a turn if necessary, as indicated on the information board. Dynamics of the traffic are expressed as a return map in the density-flow space. The traffic flow is classified into six phases, as a function of the car density. It is found that such a behavior of drivers induces too much concentration of cars on one road and, as a result, causes oscillation of the flow and the density of cars on both roads. The oscillation usually results in a reduced total flow, except for the cases of high car density.

  14. Data Assimilation in a Solar Dynamo Model Using Ensemble Kalman Filters: Sensitivity and Robustness in Reconstruction of Meridional Flow Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2016-09-01

    We implement an Ensemble Kalman Filter procedure using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed for assimilating “synthetic” meridional flow-speed data in a Babcock-Leighton-type flux-transport solar dynamo model. By performing several “observing system simulation experiments,” we reconstruct time variation in meridional flow speed and analyze sensitivity and robustness of reconstruction. Using 192 ensemble members including 10 observations, each with 4% error, we find that flow speed is reconstructed best if observations of near-surface poloidal fields from low latitudes and tachocline toroidal fields from midlatitudes are assimilated. If observations include a mixture of poloidal and toroidal fields from different latitude locations, reconstruction is reasonably good for ≤slant 40 % error in low-latitude data, even if observational error in polar region data becomes 200%, but deteriorates when observational error increases in low- and midlatitude data. Solar polar region observations are known to contain larger errors than those in low latitudes; our forward operator (a flux-transport dynamo model here) can sustain larger errors in polar region data, but is more sensitive to errors in low-latitude data. An optimal reconstruction is obtained if an assimilation interval of 15 days is used; 10- and 20-day assimilation intervals also give reasonably good results. Assimilation intervals \\lt 5 days do not produce faithful reconstructions of flow speed, because the system requires a minimum time to develop dynamics to respond to flow variations. Reconstruction also deteriorates if an assimilation interval \\gt 45 days is used, because the system’s inherent memory interferes with its short-term dynamics during a substantially long run without updating.

  15. Cellular automata model for urban road traffic flow considering pedestrian crossing street

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Han-Tao; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Xiao-Xu

    2016-11-01

    In order to analyze the effect of pedestrians' crossing street on vehicle flows, we investigated traffic characteristics of vehicles and pedestrians. Based on that, rules of lane changing, acceleration, deceleration, randomization and update are modified. Then we established two urban two-lane cellular automata models of traffic flow, one of which is about sections with non-signalized crosswalk and the other is on uncontrolled sections with pedestrians crossing street at random. MATLAB is used for numerical simulation of the different traffic conditions; meanwhile space-time diagram and relational graphs of traffic flow parameters are generated and then comparatively analyzed. Simulation results indicate that when vehicle density is lower than around 25 vehs/(km lane), pedestrians have modest impact on traffic flow, whereas when vehicle density is higher than about 60 vehs/(km lane), traffic speed and volume will decrease significantly especially on sections with non-signal-controlled crosswalk. The results illustrate that the proposed models reconstruct the traffic flow's characteristic with the situation where there are pedestrians crossing and can provide some practical reference for urban traffic management.

  16. Production of monodisperse silica gel microspheres for bioencapsulation by extrusion into an oil cross-flow.

    PubMed

    Benson, Joey J; Wackett, Lawrence P; Aksan, Alptekin

    2016-06-29

    Silica gel microspheres are ideal materials for bioencapsulation due to their mechanical properties, biocompatibility, and stability. Encapsulated cells are isolated from the environment and protected from predators, changes in pH, and osmotic stress. However methods for the production of silica gel microspheres suitable for bioencapsulation are not well established. This paper describes a method for the production of monodisperse silicon alkoxide cross-linked silica nanoparticle (SNP) gel microspheres for bioencapsulation in which silica gel precursor is extruded from a needle into a cross-flowing stream of mineral oil. Microspheres produced ranged from 1.3 to 2.9 mm in diameter with coefficients of variation ranging from 2 to 6%. Microsphere size was mainly controlled by the flowrate of the cross-flowing oil and smaller microspheres generally had larger coefficients of variation. The method described in this paper can be optimised to produce silica gel microspheres with a diverse range of compositions and properties.

  17. Divergence-free filtering and pressure determination from 3D velocimetry: applications to flows of industrial and biomedical relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavazzi, Daniele; Coletti, Filippo; Bodart, Julien; Eaton, John K.

    2013-11-01

    Methodologies to acquire three-dimensional velocity fields are becoming increasingly available. However unavoidable experimental errors limit the possibility of exploiting the data to extract further information. We recently introduced a noise reduction algorithm which eliminates spurious divergence in incompressible flow measurements, removing about fifty percent of the Gaussian noise. Here we apply the algorithm to the mean velocity field in an inclined jet in crossflow measured by Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry. The de-noised field is used to calculate the mean pressure distribution by integrating the Reynolds-averaged momentum equation. A simple eddy-viscosity model is used for the estimation of the Reynolds stresses. The results are compared with a highly resolved Large Eddy Simulation of the same configuration. It is argued that filtering of the spurious noise can be critical to obtain a correct evaluation of the pressure field. Applications to biomedical flows are also discussed. Results are presented for in vivo cardiac flow measurements as well as in vitro velocimetry in a model of human airways.

  18. Modelling aerobic biodegradation in vertical flow sand filters: impact of operational considerations on oxygen transfer and bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, A; Forquet, N; Wanko, A; Laurent, J; Molle, P; Mosé, R; Sadowski, A

    2012-05-01

    Oxygen renewal, as a prominent phenomenon for aerobic bacterial activity, deeply impacts Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland (VFCW) treatment efficiency. We introduce a multiphase model able to simulate multi-component transfer in VFCWs. It is based on a two-phase flow module, and a transport module. The flow module can quantify both water and air velocities throughout the filter during operation. The reactive transport module follows dissolved and gaseous oxygen concentrations, and the transport of solutes such as ammonium and readily biodegradable COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand). The consumption of components is governed by Monod-type kinetics. Heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria, which are responsible for COD and ammonium degradation respectively, are part of the model components. The kinetics are based on the Constructed Wetlands Model 1. The results from the simulation tool were compared with existing experimental data, and two kinds of operation with VFCWs were investigated. The authors show strong interplay between oxygen renewal and bacterial consumption in case of sequential batch feeding with transient flooding of surface. Oxygen renewal is essentially convection mediated in such operation, while convection is not significant in non-flooding operation. Simulated bacterial patterns are impacted by the operation, both quantitatively and spatially. From a modelling point of view, the authors highlight some limitations of the biological model: the description of bacterial lysis processes needs to be enhanced, as well as ammonium adsorption to organic matter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-Reacting and Combusting Flow Investigation of Bluff Bodies in Cross Flow (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Karman Street vortex shed behind the cylinder. According to Panton (1984), as the Reynolds number increases the boundary layer of the cylinder separates...number decreases. Panton concludes the flow behind the cylinder is not “turbulent” until the Reynolds number approaches 30,000. The v-gutter data does

  20. Cross-Diffusion Systems with Excluded-Volume Effects and Asymptotic Gradient Flow Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruna, Maria; Burger, Martin; Ranetbauer, Helene; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the analysis of a cross-diffusion PDE system for a mixture of hard spheres, which was derived in Bruna and Chapman (J Chem Phys 137:204116-1-204116-16, 2012a) from a stochastic system of interacting Brownian particles using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The resulting cross-diffusion system is valid in the limit of small volume fraction of particles. While the system has a gradient flow structure in the symmetric case of all particles having the same size and diffusivity, this is not valid in general. We discuss local stability and global existence for the symmetric case using the gradient flow structure and entropy variable techniques. For the general case, we introduce the concept of an asymptotic gradient flow structure and show how it can be used to study the behavior close to equilibrium. Finally, we illustrate the behavior of the model with various numerical simulations.

  1. Performance of system consisting of vertical flow trickling filter and horizontal flow multi-soil-layering reactor for treatment of rural wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Yan; Yang, Chunping; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve nitrogen removal for rural wastewater, a novel two-stage hybrid system, consisting of a vertical flow trickling filter (VFTF) and a horizontal flow multi-soil-layering (HFMSL) bioreactor was developed. The performance of the apparatus was observed under various carbon-nitrogen ratios and water spraying frequencies separately. The maximum removal efficiency of total nitrogen (TN) for the hybrid system was 92.8% while the removal rates of CODCr, ammonium (NH4(+)-N), and total phosphorus (TP) were 94.1%, 96.1%, 92.0% respectively, and the corresponding effluent concentrations were 3.61, 21.20, 1.91, and 0.33 mg L(-1). The horizontal flow mode for MSL led the system to denitrifying satisfactorily as it ensured relatively long hydraulic retention time (HRT), ideal anoxic condition and adequate organic substrates supply. Also, higher water spraying frequency benefited intermittent feeding system for pollutants removal. Shock loading test indicated that the hybrid system could operate well even at hydraulic shock loadings.

  2. A diode laser-based velocimeter providing point measurements in unseeded flows using modulated filtered Rayleigh scattering (MFRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagodzinski, Jeremy James

    2007-12-01

    The development to date of a diode-laser based velocimeter providing point-velocity-measurements in unseeded flows using molecular Rayleigh scattering is discussed. The velocimeter is based on modulated filtered Rayleigh scattering (MFRS), a novel variation of filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS), utilizing modulated absorption spectroscopy techniques to detect a strong absorption of a relatively weak Rayleigh scattered signal. A rubidium (Rb) vapor filter is used to provide the relatively strong absorption; alkali metal vapors have a high optical depth at modest vapor pressures, and their narrow linewidth is ideally suited for high-resolution velocimetry. Semiconductor diode lasers are used to generate the relatively weak Rayleigh scattered signal; due to their compact, rugged construction diode lasers are ideally suited for the environmental extremes encountered in many experiments. The MFRS technique utilizes the frequency-tuning capability of diode lasers to implement a homodyne detection scheme using lock-in amplifiers. The optical frequency of the diode-based laser system used to interrogate the flow is rapidly modulated about a reference frequency in the D2-line of Rb. The frequency modulation is imposed on the Rayleigh scattered light that is collected from the probe volume in the flow under investigation. The collected frequency modulating Rayleigh scattered light is transmitted through a Rb vapor filter before being detected. The detected modulated absorption signal is fed to two lock-in amplifers synchronized with the modulation frequency of the source laser. High levels of background rejection are attained since the lock-ins are both frequency and phase selective. The two lock-in amplifiers extract different Fourier components of the detected modulated absorption signal, which are ratioed to provide an intensity normalized frequency dependent signal from a single detector. A Doppler frequency shift in the collected Rayleigh scattered light due to a change

  3. Simulation of underresolved turbulent flows by adaptive filtering using the high order discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flad, David; Beck, Andrea; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Scale-resolving simulations of turbulent flows in complex domains demand accurate and efficient numerical schemes, as well as geometrical flexibility. For underresolved situations, the avoidance of aliasing errors is a strong demand for stability. For continuous and discontinuous Galerkin schemes, an effective way to prevent aliasing errors is to increase the quadrature precision of the projection operator to account for the non-linearity of the operands (polynomial dealiasing, overintegration). But this increases the computational costs extensively. In this work, we present a novel spatially and temporally adaptive dealiasing strategy by projection filtering. We show this to be more efficient for underresolved turbulence than the classical overintegration strategy. For this novel approach, we discuss the implementation strategy and the indicator details, show its accuracy and efficiency for a decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the transitional Taylor-Green vortex and compare it to the original overintegration approach and a state of the art variational multi-scale eddy viscosity formulation.

  4. Filter type rotor for multistation photometer

    DOEpatents

    Shumate, II, Starling E.

    1977-07-12

    A filter type rotor for a multistation photometer is provided. The rotor design combines the principle of cross-flow filtration with centrifugal sedimentation so that these occur simultaneously as a first stage of processing for suspension type fluids in an analytical type instrument. The rotor is particularly useful in whole-blood analysis.

  5. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields--An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach.

    PubMed

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion.

  6. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields—An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion. PMID:26308839

  7. A critical evaluation of various methods for the analysis of flow-solid interaction in a nest of thin cylinders subjected to cross flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1987-01-01

    Various experimental, analytical, and numerical analysis methods for flow-solid interaction of a nest of cylinders subjected to cross flows are reviewed. A nest of cylinders subjected to cross flows can be found in numerous engineering applications including the Space Shuttle Maine Engine-Main Injector Assembly (SSME-MIA) and nuclear reactor heat exchangers. Despite its extreme importance in engineering applications, understanding of the flow-solid interaction process is quite limited and design of the tube banks are mostly dependent on experiments and/or experimental correlation equations. For future development of major numerical analysis methods for the flow-solid interaction of a nest of cylinders subjected to cross flow, various turbulence models, nonlinear structural dynamics, and existing laminar flow-solid interaction analysis methods are included.

  8. Evaluation of alkanolamine solutions for carbon dioxide removal in cross-flow rotating packed beds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Chang; Lin, Yu-Hong; Tan, Chung-Sung

    2010-03-15

    The removal of CO(2) from a 10 vol% CO(2) gas by chemical absorption with 30 wt% alkanolamine solutions containing monoethanolamine (MEA), piperazine (PZ), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) in the cross-flow rotating packed bed (RPB) was investigated. The CO(2) removal efficiency increased with rotor speed, liquid flow rate and inlet liquid temperature. However, the CO(2) removal efficiency decreased with gas flow rate. Also, the CO(2) removal efficiency was independent of inlet gas temperature. The 30 wt% alkanolamine solutions containing PZ with MEA were the appropriate absorbents compared with the single alkanolamine (MEA, AMP) and the mixed alkanolamine solutions containing AMP with MEA. A higher portion of PZ in alkanolamine solutions was more favorable to CO(2) removal. Owing to less contact time in the cross-flow RPB, alkanolamines having high reaction rates with CO(2) are suggested to be used. For the mixed alkanolamine solution containing 12 wt% PZ and 18 wt% MEA, the highest gas flow rate allowed to achieve the CO(2) removal efficiency more than 90% at a liquid flow rate of 0.54 L/min was of 29 L/min. The corresponding height of a transfer unit (HTU) was found to be less than 5.0 cm, lower than that in the conventional packed bed. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oscillating flow and heat transfer in a channel with sudden cross section change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Hashim, Waqar

    1993-01-01

    We have computationally examined oscillating flow (zero mean) between two parallel plates with a sudden change in cross section. The flow was assumed to be laminar incompressible with the inflow velocity uniform over the channel cross section but varying sinusoidally with time. The cases studied cover wide ranges of Re(sub max) (from 187.5 to 2000), Va (from 1 to 10.66), the expansion ratio (1:2 and 1:4) and A(sub r) (2 and 4). Also, three different geometric cases were discussed: (1) asymmetric expansion/contraction; (2) symmetric expansion/contraction; and (3) symmetric blunt body. For these oscillating flow conditions, the fluid undergoes sudden expansion in one-half of the cycle and sudden contraction inthe other half. The instantaneous friction factor, for some ranges of Re(sub max) and Va, deviated substantially from the steady-state friction factor for the same flow parameters. A region has been identified below which the flow is laminar quasi-steady. A videotape showing computer simulations of the oscillating flow demonstrates the usefulness of the current analyses in providing information on the transient hydraulic phenomena.

  10. Vibration of a tube bundle in two-phase Freon cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pettigrew, M.J.; Taylor, C.E.; Jong, J.H.; Currie, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    Two-phase cross-flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers. The U-bend region of nuclear steam generators is a prime example. Testing in two-phase flow simulated by air-water provides useful results inexpensively. However, two-phase flow parameters, in particular surface tension and density ratio, are considerably different in air-water than in steam-water. A reasonable compromise is testing in liquid-vapor Freon, which is much closer to steam-water while much simpler experimentally. This paper presents the first results of a series of tests on the vibration behavior of tube bundles subjected to two-phase Freon cross-flow. A rotated triangular tube bundle of tube-to-diameter ratio of 1.5 was tested over a broad range of void fractions and mass fluxes. Fluidelastic instability, random turbulence excitation, and damping were investigated. Well-defined fluidelastic instabilities were observed in continuous two-phase flow regimes. However, intermittent two-phase flow regimes had a dramatic effect on fluidelastic instability. Generally, random turbulence excitation forces are much lower in Freon than in air-water. Damping is very dependent on void fraction, as expected.

  11. Reducing cross-sectional data using a genetic algorithm method and effects on cross-section geometry and steady-flow profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reduced cross-sectional data points on steady-flow profiles were also determined. Thirty-five cross sections of the original steady-flow model of the Kootenai River were used. These two methods were tested for all cross sections with each cross section resolution reduced to 10, 20 and 30 data points, that is, six tests were completed for each of the thirty-five cross sections. Generally, differences from the original water-surface elevation were smaller as the number of data points in reduced cross sections increased, but this was not always the case, especially in the braided reach. Differences were smaller for reduced cross sections developed by the genetic algorithm method than the standard algorithm method.

  12. Peclet number analysis of cross-flow in porous gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC).

    PubMed

    Suresh, P V; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2016-10-01

    Adoption of hydrogen economy by means of using hydrogen fuel cells is one possible solution for energy crisis and climate change issues. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is an important type of fuel cells, suffers from the problem of water management. Cross-flow is induced in some flow field designs to enhance the water removal. The presence of cross-flow in the serpentine and interdigitated flow fields makes them more effective in proper distribution of the reactants on the reaction layer and evacuation of water from the reaction layer than diffusion-based conventional parallel flow fields. However, too much of cross-flow leads to flow maldistribution in the channels, higher pressure drop, and membrane dehydration. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the amount of cross-flow required for effective distribution of reactants and removal of water in the gas diffusion layer. Unit cells containing two adjacent channels with gas diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layer at the bottom have been considered for the parallel, interdigitated, and serpentine flow patterns. Computational fluid dynamics-based simulations are carried out to study the reactant transport in under-the-rib area with cross-flow in the GDL. A new criterion based on the Peclet number is presented as a quantitative measure of cross-flow in the GDL. The study shows that a cross-flow Peclet number of the order of 2 is required for effective removal of water from the GDL. Estimates show that this much of cross-flow is not usually produced in the U-bends of Serpentine flow fields, making these areas prone to flooding.

  13. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  14. Laccase-initiated cross-linking of lignocellulose fibres using a ultra-filtered lignin isolated from kraft black liquor.

    PubMed

    Elegir, G; Bussini, D; Antonsson, S; Lindström, M E; Zoia, L

    2007-12-01

    In this work, the effect of Trametes pubescens laccase (TpL) used in combination with a low-molecular-weight ultra-filtered lignin (UFL) to improve mechanical properties of kraft liner pulp and chemi-thermo-mechanical pulp was studied. UFL was isolated by ultra-filtration from the kraft cooking black liquor obtained from softwood pulping. This by-product from the pulp industry contains an oligomeric lignin with almost twice the amount of free phenolic moieties than residual kraft pulp lignin. The reactivity of TpL on UFL and kraft pulp was studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. Laccase was shown to polymerise UFL and residual kraft pulp lignin in the fibres, seen by the increase in their average molecular weight and in the case of UFL as a decrease in the amount of phenolic hydroxyls. The laccase initiated cross-linking of lignin, mediated by UFL, which gives rise to more than a twofold increase in wet strength of kraft liner pulp handsheets without loosing other critical mechanical properties. Hence, this could be an interesting path to decrease mechano-sorptive creep that has been reported to lessen in extent as wet strength is given to papers. The laccase/2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) mediator system showed a greater increase in wet tensile strength of the resulting pulp sheets than the laccase/UFL system. However, other mechanical properties such as dry tensile strength, compression strength and Scott Bond internal strength were negatively affected by the laccase/ABTS system.

  15. Cross-flow turbines: progress report on physical and numerical model studies at large laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, Martin; Bachant, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) applications. A research focus is on accurately predicting device performance and wake evolution to improve turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction. Experiments were carried with large laboratory-scale cross-flow turbines D O (1 m) using a turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. Several turbines of varying solidity were employed, including the UNH Reference Vertical Axis Turbine (RVAT) and a 1:6 scale model of the DOE-Sandia Reference Model 2 (RM2) turbine. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of cross-flow turbines and compared with experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Supported by NSF-CBET Grant 1150797, Sandia National Laboratories.

  16. Numerical Simulations of a Reacting Sonic Jet in a Supersonic Cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2014-11-01

    Interaction of a jet with a background cross-flow is a situation common to many engineering systems, including combustors in SCRAMJETS, gas turbines etc. Such an interaction enhances fuel-air mixing through the distortion of coherent structures into counter-rotating vortex pairs that are tilted, stretched and then sundered by the velocity gradient in the cross-flow, eventually leading to turbulent mixing. The ignition process and flame characteristics depend sensitively on the extent and efficiency of this turbulent mixing process. We describe results from detailed 3D numerical simulations of a sonic circular jet of diameter (D = 0.5 cm) issuing a mixture of H2 (Fuel) diluted with 50% N2 at 300 K into a turbulent, Mach 2 cross-flow of air at 1200 K. The simulations were performed in a computational domain of 20 × 16 × 16 jet diameters using the compressible flow code FLASH, with modifications to handle detailed (H2-O2) chemistry and temperature-dependent material properties. We discuss the role of shock driven mixing, ignition and flame anchoring on the combustion efficiency of the system.

  17. Ammonium removal using a novel unsaturated flow biological filter with passive aeration.

    PubMed

    Lahav, O; Artzi, E; Tarre, S; Green, M

    2001-02-01

    A novel vertical bed process for the removal of ammonium from secondary effluents, using a "passive air pump", has been developed. The process is based on convective aeration caused by a fill and draw operational sequence, and combines the advantages of the vertical wetlands concept with the high loading rates typically associated with trickling filters. Experiments were carried out in a 500-l reactor using simulative effluents and actual municipal secondary effluents. A maximal ammonium removal rate of 1100 g N/m2 reactor/d was achieved using simulative effluents and an effective gravel size of 0.96 mm. At all hydraulic loads applied, the nitrification rate was found to be limited by the oxygen transfer rate. The small-size medium used with simulative effluents clogged when using actual municipal secondary effluents. Two other media (2.46 mm and 4.31 mm) did not clog during the entire experimental period and a maximum removal load of 300 g N/m2 reactor/d was achieved. This value is still much higher than typical rates reported for conventional vertical beds.

  18. Scale-adaptive simulation of a hot jet in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, B. M.; Menter, F. R.; Hansen, T.; Esteve, M.-J.

    2011-12-01

    The simulation of a hot jet in cross flow is of crucial interest for the aircraft industry as it directly impacts aircraft safety and global performance. Due to the highly transient and turbulent character of this flow, simulation strategies are necessary that resolve at least a part of the turbulence spectrum. The high Reynolds numbers for realistic aircraft applications do not permit the use of pure Large Eddy Simulations as the spatial and temporal resolution requirements for wall bounded flows are prohibitive in an industrial design process. For this reason, the hybrid approach of the Scale-Adaptive Simulation is employed, which retains attached boundary layers in well-established RANS regime and allows the resolution of turbulent fluctuations in areas with sufficient flow instabilities and grid refinement. To evaluate the influence of the underlying numerical grid, three meshing strategies are investigated and the results are validated against experimental data.

  19. Experimental and numerical analyses of finned cross flow heat exchangers efficiency under non-uniform gas inlet flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Tomasz; Składzień, Jan; Widziewicz, Katarzyna

    2010-10-01

    The work deals with experimental and numerical thermodynamic analyses of cross-flow finned tube heat exchangers of the gas-liquid type. The aim of the work is to determine an impact of the gas non-uniform inlet on the heat exchangers performance. The measurements have been carried out on a special testing rig and own numerical code has been used for numerical simulations. Analysis of the experimental and numerical results has shown that the range of the non-uniform air inlet to the considered heat exchangers may be significant and it can significantly affect the heat exchanger efficiency.

  20. Sound propagation in slowly varying lined flow ducts of arbitrary cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rienstra, S. W.

    2003-11-01

    Sound transmission through ducts of constant cross-section with a uniform inviscid mean flow and a constant acoustic lining (impedance wall) is classically described by a modal expansion, where the modes are eigenfunctions of the corresponding Laplace eigenvalue problem along a duct cross-section. A natural extension for ducts with cross-section and wall impedance that are varying slowly (compared to a typical acoustic wavelength and a typical duct radius) in the axial direction is a multiple-scales solution. This has been done for the simpler problem of circular ducts with homentropic irrotational flow. In the present paper, this solution is generalized to the problem of ducts of arbitrary cross-section. It is shown that the multiple-scales problem allows an exact solution, given the cross-sectional Laplace eigensolutions. The formulation includes both hollow and annular geometries. In addition, the turning point analysis is given for a single hard-wall cut-on, cut-off transition. This appears to yield the same reflection and transmission coefficients as in the circular duct problem.

  1. Cross-flow turbines: physical and numerical model studies towards improved array simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cross-flow, or vertical-axis turbines, show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow turbines. Numerical simulations are generally better suited to explore the turbine array design parameter space, as physical model studies of large arrays at large model scale would be expensive. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries, the turbines' interaction with the energy resource needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Most models in use today, e.g. actuator disk, are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. Experiments were carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier--Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An

  2. The Next Step in Ice Flow Measurement from Optical Imagery: Comprehensive Mapping Of Ice Sheet Flow in Landsat 8 Imagery Using Spatial Frequency Filtering, Enabled by High Radiometric Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, M. A.; Scambos, T. A.; Klinger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of large area satellite coverage in the visible spectrum enabled satellite-based tracking of ice sheet flow just over twenty years ago. Following this, rapid development of techniques for imaging radar data enabled the wide-area mapping and time series coverage that SAR has brought to the documentation of changing ice discharge. We report on the maturation of feature tracking in visible-band satellite imagery of the ice sheets enabled by the high radiometric resolution and accurate geolocation delivered by Landsat 8, and apply this to mapping ice flow in the interiors of Antarctica and Greenland. The high radiometric resolution of Landsat 8 enables one to track subtle patterns on the surface of the ice sheet, unique at spatial scales of a few hundred meters, between images separated by multiple orbit cycles. In areas with significant dynamic topography generated by ice flow, this requires use of simple spatial filtering techniques first applied by Scambos et al. 1992. The result is densely sampled maps of surface motion that begin to rival the coverage available from SAR speckle tracking and interferometry. Displacement accuracy can approach one tenth of a pixel for reasonable chip sizes using conventional normalized cross-correlation; this can exceed the geolocation accuracy of the scenes involved, but coverage is sufficient to allow correction strategies based on very slow moving ice. The advance in radiometry, geo-location, and tracking tools is augmented by an increased rate of acquisition by Landsat 8. This helps mitigate the issue of cloud cover, as much of every 16-day orbit cycle over ice is acquired, maximizing the acquisition of clear-sky scenes. Using the correlation techniques common to IMCORR and later software, modern libraries, and single-cpu hardware, we are able to process full Landsat 8 scene pairs in a few minutes, allowing comprehensive analysis of ~1K available ice sheet image pairs in a few days.

  3. MHD Oldroyd-B fluid flow across a melting surface with cross diffusion and double stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, N.; Gnaneswara Reddy, M.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we analyzed the Oldroyd-B flow across a horizontal melting surface with cross-diffusion and double stratification (thermal and solutal) effects. We reconstructed the controlling equations as a group of nonlinear ODEs and solved by employing the RK-based shooting technique. The influence of important specifications on the three common profiles (velocity, temperature and concentration) is discussed through the plots. Tables are utilized to discuss the heat and mass transfer rates. We verified that the thermal stratification improves the heat transfer rate. Cross diffusion regulates the concentration and thermal fields.

  4. Inference of nonlinear state-space models for sandwich-type lateral flow immunoassay using extended Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Nianyin; Wang, Zidong; Li, Yurong; Du, Min; Liu, Xiaohui

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for sandwich-type lateral flow immunoassay is developed via short available time series. A nonlinear dynamic stochastic model is considered that consists of the biochemical reaction system equations and the observation equation. After specifying the model structure, we apply the extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm for identifying both the states and parameters of the nonlinear state-space model. It is shown that the EKF algorithm can accurately identify the parameters and also predict the system states in the nonlinear dynamic stochastic model through an iterative procedure by using a small number of observations. The identified mathematical model provides a powerful tool for testing the system hypotheses and also for inspecting the effects from various design parameters in both rapid and inexpensive way. Furthermore, by means of the established model, the dynamic changes in the concentration of antigens and antibodies can be predicted, thereby making it possible for us to analyze, optimize, and design the properties of lateral flow immunoassay devices.

  5. The influence of tripwires on the stability of tube bundles subjected to cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Romberg, O.; Popp, K.

    1996-12-01

    In heat exchanger tube arrays subjected to cross flow fluidelastic instability is a dangerous excitation mechanism. This paper reports on experimental investigations concerning the influence of disturbed flow on the stability behavior of normal and rotated triangular tube arrays of different pitch-to-diameter ratios as well as to in-line square arrays. The excitation is due to air cross flow in a wind tunnel. The experimental apparatus allows to measure the stability boundaries of fully flexible bundles as well as single flexibly mounted tubes with variable equilibrium position in otherwise fixed arrays as a function of the mass-damping parameter {delta}{sub r} and the reduced gap velocity V{sub r}. A disturbance of the flow channels between the tubes is achieved by application of thin Prandtl-tripwires with a diameter of 1/80 of tube diameter on the top and the bottom of each tube. This leads in most of the cases to a shift of the stability boundaries often to higher reduced gap velocities or even to stability in the entire parameter region, depending on the bundle configuration and equilibrium position. To understand these effects a simultaneous flow visualization based on the laser-light-sheet procedure has been carried out.

  6. Influence of cross-flow on nonlinear Tollmien-Schlichting/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. A. R.; Smith, F. T.

    1994-01-01

    The transition of an incompressible three-dimensional boundary layer with strong cross-flow is considered theoretically and computationally in the context of vortex/wave interactions. Specifically the work centers on two lower-branch Tollmien-Schlichting waves which mutually interact nonlinearly to induce a longitudinal vortex flow. The vortex motion in turn gives rise to significant wave modulation via wall-shear forcing. The characteristic Reynolds number is large and, as a consequence, the waves' and the vortex motion are governed primarily by triple deck theory. The nonlinear interaction is captured by a viscous partial-differential system for the vortex coupled with a pair of amplitude equations for each wave pressure. Following analysis and computation over a wide range of parameters, three distinct responses are found to emerge in the nonlinear behavior of the flow solution downstream: an algebraic finite-distance singularity, far-downstream saturation or far-downstream wave decay leaving pure vortex flow. These depend on the input conditions, the wave angles and the size of the cross flow.

  7. Effect of Oscillating Tabs on a Jet-in-Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2003-01-01

    A novel technique for active control of a jet-in-cross-flow is explored in this study. Two triangular tabs are placed at the 90 degree and 270 degree edges of the jet orifice, relative to the direction of the cross-flow. A slight asymmetry in the placement of the two tabs is reversed periodically. This causes a profound oscillation of the flow field that persists as far downstream as the measurements were permitted by the facility (100 orifice diameters). Parametric dependence of the unsteadiness and its impact on the flowfield has been investigated preliminarily. It is found that the effect becomes increasingly pronounced with increasing value of the momentum flux ratio (J). However, there is little or no effect at low values of J in the range, J less than 15. The effective frequencies of oscillation are low - more than an order of magnitude lower than that found with oscillatory blowing technique in previous studies. The flow mechanism apparently involves a direct perturbation of the counter-rotating streamwise vortex pair of the flow.

  8. Influence of cross-flow on nonlinear Tollmien-Schlichting/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. A. R.; Smith, F. T.

    1994-01-01

    The transition of an incompressible three-dimensional boundary layer with strong cross-flow is considered theoretically and computationally in the context of vortex/wave interactions. Specifically the work centers on two lower-branch Tollmien-Schlichting waves which mutually interact nonlinearly to induce a longitudinal vortex flow. The vortex motion in turn gives rise to significant wave modulation via wall-shear forcing. The characteristic Reynolds number is large and, as a consequence, the waves' and the vortex motion are governed primarily by triple deck theory. The nonlinear interaction is captured by a viscous partial-differential system for the vortex coupled with a pair of amplitude equations for each wave pressure. Following analysis and computation over a wide range of parameters, three distinct responses are found to emerge in the nonlinear behavior of the flow solution downstream: an algebraic finite-distance singularity, far-downstream saturation or far-downstream wave decay leaving pure vortex flow. These depend on the input conditions, the wave angles and the size of the cross flow.

  9. Studying the flow dynamics in an aortic endograft with crossed-limbs.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Xenakis, Antonios; Manopoulos, Christos; Georgiadis, George S; Argyriou, Christos; Tsangaris, Sokrates; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the flow phenomena within an aortic endograft with crossed-limbs, comparing to an endograft with the ordinary limb bifurcation. An endograft model with crossed-limbs was computationally reconstructed based on Computed Tomography patient-specific data, using commercially available software. Accordingly, its analogue model was reconstructed in the ordinary fashion (ordinary bifurcation). Computational fluid dynamics analysis was performed to determine and compare the flow fields, velocity profiles, pressure and shear stress distribution throughout the different parts of both endograft configurations, in different phases of the cardiac cycle. The flow patterns between the "Ballerina" and the classic endograft were similar, with flow disturbance near the inlet zone at late diastole and smooth flow patterns during the systolic phase. Both configurations presented similar pressure distribution patterns throughout the cardiac cycle. The highest and lowest pressures were demonstrated in the inlet-main body area and the iliac limbs, respectively. Marked differences were observed in the velocity profiles of the proximal limb segments between the two configurations, mostly in the peak- and end-systolic phase. The regions of lower velocities correlated well to low shear values. Differences in the shear stress distribution were noted between the two configurations in the systolic and, predominantly, in the diastolic phase. There are differences in the velocity profiles and shear distribution between the limbs of the two endograft configurations. The pathophysiologic implication of our findings and their possible association with clinical events, such as thrombus apposition, deserves further investigation.

  10. PIV measurement of the vertical cross-flow structure over tube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    Shell and tube heat exchangers are among the most commonly used types of heat exchangers. Shell-side cross-flow in tube bundles has received considerable attention and has been investigated extensively. However, the microscopic flow structure including velocity distribution, wake, and turbulent structure in the tube bundles needs to be determined for more effective designs. Therefore, in this study, in order to clarify the detailed structure of cross-flow in tube bundles with particle image velocimetry (PIV), experiments were conducted using two types of model; in-line and staggered bundles with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5, containing 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The velocity data in the whole flow field were measured successfully by adjusting the refractive index of the working fluid to that of the tube material. The flow features were characterized in different tube bundles with regards to the velocity vector field, vortex structure, and turbulent intensity.

  11. Dynamics of traffic flows on crossing roads induced by real-time information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Minoru; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Traffic flows on crossing roads with an information board installed at the intersection have been simulated by a cellular automaton model. In the model, drivers have to enter the road with a shorter trip-time indicated on the information board, by making a turn at the intersection if necessary. The movement of drivers induces various traffic states, which are classified into six phases as a function of the car density. The dynamics of the traffic is expressed as the return map in the density-flow space, and analyzed on the basis of the car configuration on the roads.

  12. A Numerical Simulation of a Normal Sonic Jet into a Hypersonic Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, Damon K.; Krishnamurthy, Ramesh; Chandra, Suresh

    1997-01-01

    This study involves numerical modeling of a normal sonic jet injection into a hypersonic cross-flow. The numerical code used for simulation is GASP (General Aerodynamic Simulation Program.) First the numerical predictions are compared with well established solutions for compressible laminar flow. Then comparisons are made with non-injection test case measurements of surface pressure distributions. Good agreement with the measurements is observed. Currently comparisons are underway with the injection case. All the experimental data were generated at the Southampton University Light Piston Isentropic Compression Tube.

  13. Cross-flow deep fat frying and its effect on fry quality distribution and mobility.

    PubMed

    van Koerten, K N; Schutyser, M A I; Somsen, D; Boom, R M

    2016-04-01

    Conventional industrial frying systems are not optimised towards homogeneous product quality, which is partly related to poor oil distribution across the packed bed of fries. In this study we investigate an alternative frying system with an oil cross-flow from bottom to top through a packed bed of fries. Fluidization of rectangular fries during frying was characterised with a modified Ergun equation. Mixing was visualized by using two coloured layers of fries and quantified in terms of mixing entropy. Smaller fries mixed quickly during frying, while longer fries exhibited much less mixing, which was attributed to the higher minimum fluidization velocity and slower dehydration for longer fries. The cross-flow velocity was found an important parameter for the homogeneity of the moisture content of fries. Increased oil velocities positively affected moisture distribution due to a higher oil refresh rate. However, inducing fluidization caused the moisture distribution to become unpredictable due to bed instabilities.

  14. Numerical study of streamwise and cross flow in the presence of heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan-ul-Haq; Soomro, Feroz Ahmed; Khan, Z. H.; Al-Mdallal, Qasem M.

    2017-05-01

    The present model is devoted to investigate the streamwise and cross flow of a viscous fluid over a heated moving surface. Viscous dissipation effects are also considered with heat and mass transfer effects and these effects with cross flow have not been explored yet in the literature. Governing boundary layer equations consist in the form of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). Compatible transformations are applied to change such equations into ordinary differential equations which are further solved using the Runge-Kutta technique and shooting method. Linear stability analysis is also performed over the obtained solutions to validate the results and to determine the smallest eigenvalues. Three different kinds of fluids namely: acetone, water and ethaline glycol are investigated to analyse the heat transfer rate. The problem contains important physical parameters namely: Prandtl number, Eckert numbers and Lewis number. The obtained solutions are discussed in detail against each physical parameter using graphs and tables.

  15. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  16. Hydrologic filtering of fish life history strategies across the United States: implications for stream flow alteration.

    PubMed

    McManamay, Ryan A; Frimpong, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Lotic fish have developed life history strategies adapted to the natural variation in stream flow regimes. The natural timing, duration, and magnitude of flow events has contributed to the diversity, production, and composition of fish assemblages over time. Studies evaluating the role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages have been more common at the local or regional scale with very few studies conducted at the continental scale. Furthermore, quantitative linkages between natural hydrologic patterns and fish assemblages are rarely used to make predictions of ecological consequences of hydrologic alterations. We ask two questions: (1) what is the relative role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at large scales? and (2) can relationships between fish assemblages and natural hydrology be utilized to predict fish assemblage responses to hydrologic disturbance? We developed models to relate fish life histories and reproductive strategies to landscape and hydrologic variables separately and then combined. Models were then used to predict the ecological consequences of altered hydrology due to dam regulation. Although hydrology plays a considerable role in structuring fish assemblages; the performance of models using only hydrologic variables was lower than that of models constructed using landscape variables. Isolating the relative importance of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at the continental scale is difficult since hydrology is interrelated to many landscape factors. By applying models to dam-regulated hydrologic data, we observed some consistent predicted responses in fish life history strategies and modes of reproduction. In agreement with existing literature, equilibrium strategists are predicted to increase following dam regulation, whereas opportunistic and periodic species are predicted to decrease. In addition, dam regulation favors the selection of reproductive strategies with extended spawning seasons and preference for stable

  17. Hydrologic filtering of fish life history strategies across the United States: implications for stream flow alteration

    DOE PAGES

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lotic fish have developed life history strategies adapted to the natural variation in stream flow regimes. The natural timing, duration, and magnitude of flow events has contributed to the diversity, production, and composition of fish assemblages over time. Studies evaluating the role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages have been more common at the local or regional scale with very few studies conducted at the continental scale. Furthermore, quantitative linkages between natural hydrologic patterns and fish assemblages are rarely used to make predictions of ecological consequences of hydrologic alterations. We ask two questions: (1) what is the relative role ofmore » hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at large scales? and (2) can relationships between fish assemblages and natural hydrology be utilized to predict fish assemblage responses to hydrologic disturbance? We developed models to relate fish life histories and reproductive strategies to landscape and hydrologic variables separately and then combined. Models were then used to predict the ecological consequences of altered hydrology due to dam regulation. Although hydrology plays a considerable role in structuring fish assemblages, the performance of models using only hydrologic variables was lower than that of models constructed using landscape variables. Isolating the relative importance of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at the continental scale is difficult since hydrology is interrelated to many landscape factors. By applying models to dam-regulated hydrologic data, we observed some consistent predicted responses in fish life history strategies and modes of reproduction. In agreement with existing literature, equilibrium strategists are predicted to increase following dam regulation, whereas opportunistic and periodic species are predicted to decrease. In addition, dam regulation favors the selection of reproductive strategies with extended spawning seasons and preference for

  18. Hydrologic filtering of fish life history strategies across the United States: implications for stream flow alteration

    SciTech Connect

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lotic fish have developed life history strategies adapted to the natural variation in stream flow regimes. The natural timing, duration, and magnitude of flow events has contributed to the diversity, production, and composition of fish assemblages over time. Studies evaluating the role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages have been more common at the local or regional scale with very few studies conducted at the continental scale. Furthermore, quantitative linkages between natural hydrologic patterns and fish assemblages are rarely used to make predictions of ecological consequences of hydrologic alterations. We ask two questions: (1) what is the relative role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at large scales? and (2) can relationships between fish assemblages and natural hydrology be utilized to predict fish assemblage responses to hydrologic disturbance? We developed models to relate fish life histories and reproductive strategies to landscape and hydrologic variables separately and then combined. Models were then used to predict the ecological consequences of altered hydrology due to dam regulation. Although hydrology plays a considerable role in structuring fish assemblages, the performance of models using only hydrologic variables was lower than that of models constructed using landscape variables. Isolating the relative importance of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at the continental scale is difficult since hydrology is interrelated to many landscape factors. By applying models to dam-regulated hydrologic data, we observed some consistent predicted responses in fish life history strategies and modes of reproduction. In agreement with existing literature, equilibrium strategists are predicted to increase following dam regulation, whereas opportunistic and periodic species are predicted to decrease. In addition, dam regulation favors the selection of reproductive strategies with extended spawning seasons and preference for stable

  19. Shape optimization of multi-chamber cross-flow mufflers by SA optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Min-Chie; Chang, Ying-Chun

    2008-05-01

    It is essential when searching for an efficient acoustical mechanism to have an optimally shaped muffler designed specially for the constrained space found in today's plants. Because the research work of optimally shaped straight silencers in conjunction with multi-chamber cross-flow perforated ducts is rarely addressed, this paper will not only analyze the sound transmission loss (STL) of three kinds of cross-flow perforated mufflers but also will analyze the optimal design shape within a limited space. In this paper, the four-pole system matrix used in evaluating acoustic performance is derived by using the decoupled numerical method. Moreover, a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, a robust scheme in searching for the global optimum by imitating the softening process of metal, has been adopted during shape optimization. To reassure SA's correctness, the STL's maximization of three kinds of muffles with respect to one-tone and dual-tone noise is exemplified. Furthermore, the optimization of mufflers with respect to an octave-band fan noise by the simulated algorithm has been introduced and fully discussed. Before the SA operation can be carried out, an accuracy check of the mathematical model with respect to cross-flow perforated mufflers has to be performed by Munjal's analytical data and experimental data. The optimal result in eliminating broadband noise reveals that the cross-flow perforated muffler with more chambers is far superior at noise reduction than a muffler with fewer chambers. Consequently, the approach used for the optimal design of noise elimination proposed in this study is certainly easy and efficient.

  20. Cross flow filtration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, V.L.; Hewitt, J.D.

    1989-12-01

    A new method for disposal of Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level radioactive waste is being developed as an alternative to hydrofracture. The acceptability of the final waste form rests in part on the presence or absence of transuranic (TRU) isotopes. Inertial cross flow filtration was used in this study to determine the potential of this method for separation of the TRU isotopes from the bulk liquid stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks. 7 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Development of Improved Design and 3D Printing Manufacture of Cross-Flow Fan Rotor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    done studies at NPS examining the applicability of CFFs for the propulsion of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) [5]–[7]. The studies...rotor UAV powered by two electric motors [5]. Figure 2 shows Jones’ UAV. Figure 2. UAV built by Jones. Source: [5]. This UAV proved that cross-flow...recorded. The batteries used to power the motor, shown in Figure 27, were lithium -polymer and rated for 5,000 mAh. 25 Figure 27. Clamp ammeter

  2. Viability of Cross-Flow Fan for Vertical Take-Off and Landing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    the Propulsive Wing at a high angle of attack. From [7] ....3  Figure 4.  SOLIDWORKS model of 16-blade rotor...there has been a recent resurgence in interest to find an alternate method of propulsion that is simpler than today’s VTOL fixed-wing aircraft and...safer than rotary-wing aircraft. A propulsion system designed around a cross-flow fan (CFF) is an ideal candidate for the VTOL vehicle of the future

  3. Determination of filter-cake thicknesses from on-line flow measurements and gas/particle transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Powell, V.; Ibrahim, E.; Ferer, M.; Ahmadi, G.

    1996-12-31

    The use of cylindrical candle filters to remove fine ({approx}0.005 mm) particles from hot ({approx}500- 900{degrees}C) gas streams currently is being developed for applications in advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies. Successfully deployed with hot-gas filtration, PFBC and IGCC technologies will allow the conversion of coal to electrical energy by direct passage of the filtered gases into non-ruggedized turbines and thus provide substantially greater conversion efficiencies with reduced environmental impacts. In the usual approach, one or more clusters of candle filters are suspended from a tubesheet in a pressurized (P {approx_lt}1 MPa) vessel into which hot gases and suspended particles enter, the gases pass through the walls of the cylindrical filters, and the filtered particles form a cake on the outside of each filter. The cake is then removed periodically by a backpulse of compressed air from inside the filter, which passes through the filter wall and filter cake. In various development or demonstration systems the thickness of the filter cake has proved to be an important, but unknown, process parameter. This paper describes a physical model for cake and pressure buildups between cleaning backpulses, and for longer term buildups of the ``baseline`` pressure drop, as caused by incomplete filter cleaning and/or re-entrainment. When combined with operating data and laboratory measurements of the cake porosity, the model may be used to calculate the (average) filter permeability, the filter-cake thickness and permeability, and the fraction of filter-cake left on the filter by the cleaning backpulse or re-entrained after the backpulse. When used for a variety of operating conditions (e.g., different coals, sorbents, temperatures, etc.), the model eventually may provide useful information on how the filter-cake properties depend on the various operating parameters.

  4. High transmission and low color cross-talk plasmonic color filters using triangular-lattice hole arrays in aluminum films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Cumming, David R S

    2010-06-21

    Three primary color (red, green and blue) filters consisting of subwavelength triangular-lattice hole arrays in an aluminum film on glass were simulated and fabricated. A silicon dioxide cap layer, deposited on the patterned aluminum film, was found to almost double the transmission efficiency for all the filters. The measured peak transmittance for each color filter was above 30%, exhibiting a wavelength spectrum with a full-width at half-maximum of approximately 100 nm. Simulation results of various structures with different cap layers revealed the enhanced coupling between surface plasmon resonances at both sides of the metal film in a symmetrical configuration. It was found that gratings with as few as three periods were sufficient to demonstrate filtering. The effect of metal thickness and hole size was investigated in detail.

  5. The Far Field Structure of a Jet in Cross-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanitis, Nicolas; Dawson, James

    2014-11-01

    Stereoscopic PIV measurements were performed in the far field of a cross-flow jet. Measurements were taken in a water channel in the spanwise-wall normal plane (y-z) containing the Counter-Rotating vortex pair (CVP). The jet's Reynolds number was Rejet = 2 ×104 and had an exit diameter of dj = 4 mm. Measurements were taken for a jet to cross-flow velocity ratio of Vr = 10 at three downstream positions of x /dj = 30 , 55 , 85 and for a Vr = 15 , 20 at x /dj = 85 . Two point spatial correlations hint at the presence of arch shaped structures titled in the streamwise x-direction on the windward side of the CVP as well as straight vortex tubes extending into the wake. The arched shaped structure is compounded by PDFs of the location of streamwise vorticity peaks (vortex tubes) in the instantaneous field indicating the presence of a vortex structure aligned in the spanwise direction. This information together with the use of High Speed Stereoscopic PIV and Taylor's Hypothesis, which allowed for the extraction of 3D structures, led to the development of an eddy model comprised of hairpin, roller and wake structures to predict turbulence statistics of a jet in cross-flow.

  6. Air-bubbling, hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration.

    PubMed

    Nishii, K; Sode, K; Karube, I

    1990-05-01

    Continuous asymmetric reduction of dyhydrooxoisophorone (DOIP) to 4-hydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylcyclo-hexanone (4-HTMCH) was achieved by a thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NK86-0151. Three reactors were used: an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration, an air-lift reactor, and a CSTR with PAA immobilized cells. The maximum cell concentration of 11.1 g dry wt L(-1) was obtained in an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor, while in the other reactors the cell densities were between 3.5 and 4.1 g dry wt L(-1) The optimum bleed ratio was 0.1 at the dilution rate 0.3 h(-1) in the hollow-fiber reactor. The highest viable cell concentration was maintained in the dilution range of 0.4-0.7 h(-1) by a combination of proper cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration. The maximum volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH reached 826 mg L(-1) h(-1) at the dilution rate 0.54 h(-1). This value was 4 and 2 times higher than those in the air-lift reactor and CSTR, respectively. The increasing viable cell concentration increased the volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH. A cell free product solution was continuously obtained by cross-flow filtration.

  7. The role of Ekman flow and planetary waves in the oceanic cross-equatorial heat transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopf, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical model is used to mechanistically simulate the oceans' seasonal cross-equatorial heat transport. The basic process of Ekman pumping and drift is able to account for a large amount of the cross-equatorial flux. Increased easterly wind stress in the winter hemisphere causes Ekman surface drift poleward, while decreased easterly stress allows a reduction in the poleward drift in the summer hemisphere. The addition of planetary and gravity waves to this model does not alter the net cross-equatorial flow, although the planetary waves are clearly seen. On comparison with Oort and Vonder Haar (1976), this adiabatic advective redistribution of heat is seen to be plausible up to 10-20 deg N, beyond which other dynamics and thermodynamics are indicated.

  8. Optimal hydraulic design of earth dam cross section using saturated-unsaturated seepage flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.-Q.; Unami, K.; Kawachi, T.

    An optimal hydraulic design problem regarding an earth dam cross section is formulated as an inverse problem for the steady model of saturated-unsaturated seepage flows in porous media. In the problem formulation, the choice of soil material to be used in each point of the dam cross sectional domain is considered as the control variable to be identified. The performance index used to evaluate the appropriateness of the design is defined as the sum of two square integral norms, which represent reducing the saturated zone and minimizing material costs. It is also shown that the first norm bounds the total seepage discharge through the earth dam. Since the governing variational boundary value problem as well as the adjoint problem is well-posed, a deterministic approach is taken. A numerical scheme including pseudo-unsteady terms is developed to calculate the optimal solution in an ideal earth dam cross section to be designed utilizing two different types of soil material. The results show that an inclined clay core of less hydraulic conductivity should be located on the upstream side of the cross section. The unsaturated zone turns out to play an important role in the flow field and the optimal design.

  9. Kinetics of gravity-driven slug flow in partially wettable capillaries of varying cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissan, Alon; Wang, Qiuling; Wallach, Rony

    2016-11-01

    A mathematical model for slug (finite liquid volume) motion in not-fully-wettable capillary tubes with sinusoidally varying cross-sectional areas was developed. The model, based on the Navier-Stokes equation, accounts for the full viscous terms due to nonuniform geometry, the inertial term, the slug's front and rear meniscus hysteresis effect, and dependence of contact angle on flow velocity (dynamic contact angle). The model includes a velocity-dependent film that is left behind the advancing slug, reducing its mass. The model was successfully verified experimentally by recording slug movement in uniform and sinusoidal capillary tubes with a gray-scale high-speed camera. Simulation showed that tube nonuniformity has a substantial effect on slug flow pattern: in a uniform tube it is monotonic and depends mainly on the slug's momentary mass/length; an undulating tube radius results in nonmonotonic flow characteristics. The static nonzero contact angle varies locally in nonuniform tubes owing to the additional effect of wall slope. Moreover, the nonuniform cross-sectional area induces slug acceleration, deceleration, blockage, and metastable-equilibrium locations. Increasing contact angle further amplifies the geometry effect on slug propagation. The developed model provides a modified means of emulating slug flow in differently wettable porous media for intermittent inlet water supply (e.g., raindrops on the soil surface).

  10. Low-flow hydraulic conductivity tests at wells that cross the water table.

    PubMed

    Aragon-Jose, Alejandra T; Robbins, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    Wells with screens and sand packs that cross the water table represent a challenging problem for determining hydraulic conductivity by slug testing due to sand pack drainage and resaturation. Sand pack drainage results in a multisegmented recovery curve. One must then subjectively pick a portion of the curve to analyze. Sand pack drainage also results in a change in the effective radius of the well which requires a guess at the porosity or specific yield in analyzing the test. In the study of Robbins et al. (2009), a method was introduced to obtain hydraulic conductivity in monitoring wells using the steady-state drawdown and flow rate obtained during low-flow sampling. The method was tested in this study in wells whose screens cross the water table and shown to avoid sand pack drainage problems that complicate analyzing slug tests. In applying the method to low-flow sampling, only a single pair of steady-state flow rate and drawdown are needed; hence, to derive meaningful results, an accurate determination of these parameters is required. Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  11. Influence of cross-flow on the entrainment of bending plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedland, Graham; Mastin, Larry; Steven, Solovitz; Cal, Raul

    2016-11-01

    Volcanic eruption columns inject high concentrations of ash into the atmosphere. Some of this ash is carried downwind forming ash clouds in the atmosphere that are hazardous for private and commercial aviation. Current models rely on inputs such as plume height, duration, eruption rate, and meteorological wind fields. Eruption rate is estimated from plume height using relations that depend on the rate of air entrainment into the plume, which is not well quantified. A wind tunnel experiment has been designed to investigate these models by injecting a vertical air jet into a cross-flow. The ratio of the cross-flow and jet velocities is varied to simulate a weak plume, and flow response is measured using particle image velocimetry. The plumes are characterized and profile data is examined to measure the growth of weak plumes and the entrainment velocity along its trajectory. This allows for the study of the flow field, mean, and second order moments, and obtain information to improve models of volcanic ash concentrations in the atmosphere.

  12. Blockage effects on the hydrodynamic performance of a marine cross-flow turbine.

    PubMed

    Consul, Claudio A; Willden, Richard H J; McIntosh, Simon C

    2013-02-28

    This paper explores the influence of blockage and free-surface deformation on the hydrodynamic performance of a generic marine cross-flow turbine. Flows through a three-bladed turbine with solidity 0.125 are simulated at field-test blade Reynolds numbers, O(10(5)-10(6)), for three different cross-stream blockages: 12.5, 25 and 50 per cent. Two representations of the free-surface boundary are considered: rigid lid and deformable free surface. Increasing the blockage is observed to lead to substantial increases in the power coefficient; the highest power coefficient computed is 1.23. Only small differences are observed between the two free-surface representations, with the deforming free-surface turbine out-performing the rigid lid turbine by 6.7 per cent in power at the highest blockage considered. This difference is attributed to the increase in effective blockage owing to the deformation of the free surface. Hydrodynamic efficiency, the ratio of useful power generated to overall power removed from the flow, is found to increase with blockage, which is consistent with the presence of a higher flow velocity through the core of the turbine at higher blockage ratios. Froude number is found to have little effect on thrust and power coefficients, but significant influence on surface elevation drop across the turbine.

  13. Investigation of Blade Angle of an Open Cross-Flow Runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Iio, Shouichiro; Veerapun, Salisa; Uchiyama, Tomomi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a nano-hydraulic turbine utilizing drop structure in irrigation channels or industrial waterways. This study was focused on an open-type cross-flow turbine without any attached equipment for cost reduction and easy maintenance. In this study, the authors used an artificial indoor waterfall as lab model. Test runner which is a simple structure of 20 circular arc-shaped blades sandwiched by two circular plates was used The optimum inlet blade angle and the relationship between the power performance and the flow rate approaching theoretically and experimentally were investigated. As a result, the optimum inlet blade angle due to the flow rate was changed. Additionally, allocation rate of power output in 1st stage and 2nd stage is changed by the blade inlet angle.

  14. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  15. 2D-simulation of stationary MHD flows in the ducts of rectangular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Ilgisonis, Victor

    2005-10-01

    The numerical code for a calculation of 2D stationary MHD flows of incompressible conducting viscous fluids (liquid metals) in straight and circular ducts of rectangular cross-section is developed. The flows are driven by the electrical current perpendicular both to the duct axis and to the external magnetic field. The code generalizes the well-known iterative Gauss-Seidel method for the case of systems of elliptic equations. The algorithm developed allows us to carry out the calculations of stationary flows in a wide range of Hartmann (Ha=110^3) and Reynolds (Re=110^6) numbers. The numerical results are presented for the experimental device, which is under construction in Russia.

  16. Experiments on the ground vortex formed by an impinging jet in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, William B.; Stewart, Vearl R.

    1993-01-01

    An inclined jet impinging on the ground creates a wall flow that spreads radially from the point of impingement. If a cross-flow is introduced, the upstream component of the wall flow will separate from the ground and create what has been termed the 'ground vortex.' The ground vortex has been shown to have a significant impact on aircraft aerodynamics and is one of the major contributors to hot gas ingestion. The paper discusses a recent study which included a generic wing-body configuration for assessing the impact of the ground vortex on configuration aerodynamics. Wind tunnel tests using fixed ground boards, moving ground belts, and moving model tests are discussed. The emphasis of the data is macroscopic, i.e. forward location of the vortex, effects of ground height, etc.

  17. Air filtration in the free molecular flow regime: a review of high-efficiency particulate air filters based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Chunya; Zhang, Yingying; Wei, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Air filtration in the free molecular flow (FMF) regime is important and challenging because a higher filtration efficiency and lower pressure drop are obtained when the fiber diameter is smaller than the gas mean free path in the FMF regime. In previous studies, FMF conditions have been obtained by increasing the gas mean free path through reducing the pressure and increasing the temperature. In the case of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with nanoscale diameters, it is possible to filtrate in the FMF regime under normal conditions. This paper reviews recent progress in theoretical and experimental studies of air filtration in the FMF regime. Typical structure models of high-efficiency particulate (HEPA) air filters based on CNTs are introduced. The pressure drop in air filters operated in the FMF regime is less than that predicted by the conventional air filtration theory. The thinnest HEPA filters fabricated from single-walled CNT films have an extremely low pressure drop. CNT air filters with a gradient nanostructure are shown to give a much better filtration performance in dynamic filtration. CNT air filters with a hierarchical structure and an agglomerated CNT fluidized bed air filter are also introduced. Finally, the challenges and opportunities for the application of CNTs in air filtration are discussed.

  18. Investigation of the flow-field in the upper respiratory system when wearing N95 filtering facepiece respirator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotie; Li, Hui; Shen, Shengnan; Cai, Mang

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a reverse modeling of the headform when wearing a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation based on the modeling. The whole model containing the upper respiratory airway, headform, and FFR was directly recorded by computed tomography (CT) scanning, and a medical contrast medium was used to make the FFR "visible." The FFR was normally worn by the subject during CT scanning so that the actual deformation of both the FFR and the face muscles during contact can be objectively conserved. The reverse modeling approach was introduced to rebuild the geometric model and convert it into a CFD solvable model. In this model, we conducted a transient numerical simulation of air flow containing carbon dioxide, thermal dynamics, and pressure and wall shear stress distribution in the respiratory system taking into consideration an individual wearing a FFR. The breathing cycle was described as a time-dependent profile of the air velocity through the respiratory airway. The result shows that wearing the N95 FFR results in CO2 accumulation, an increase in temperature and pressure elevation inside the FFR cavity. The volume fraction of CO2 reaches 1.2% after 7 breathing cycles and then is maintained at 3.04% on average. The wearers re-inhale excessive CO2 in every breathing cycle from the FFR cavity. The air temperature in the FFR cavity increases rapidly at first and then stays close to the exhaled temperature. Compared to not wearing an FFR, wearers have to increase approximately 90 Pa more pressure to keep the same breathing flow rate of 30.54 L/min after wearing an FFR. The nasal vestibule bears more wall shear stress than any other area in the airway.

  19. A coordinated flowing afterglow and crossed beam study of electron attachment to CCl3Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanel, P.; Smith, D.; Matejcik, S.; Kiendler, A.; Mark, T. D.

    1997-11-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to CCl3Br has been studied using a flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) and a crossed beam technique. In the FALP experiment the overall attachment rate coefficients and the branching ratio into the Cl- and the Br- product channels, R = Cl-/(Cl- + Br-), were measured as a function of the gas temperature, Tg, in the range of 300-540K and the electron temperatures, Te, from Tg to 4000K indicating that R approached the statistical value of 0.75 at the highest Tg. At Tg = 540K both Cl2-1 and ClBr- molecular ions were observed at about the 2% level. An apparent activation energy of 55 meV for the overall attachment reaction was derived using a model developed previously to describe the dependence of dissociative electron attachment rates on Tg and Te. The crossed beam experiment provided relative attachment cross-sections for the production of Cl- and Br- as a function of electron energy, E, from near zero up to ~2 eV at several Tg within the range 311-423 K. The absolute cross-sections at Tg = 311K were obtained from the FALP value using a calibration procedure. At low E the overall attachment cross-section varies as E-1 in accordance with s-wave capture theory. In accordance with the FALP data R increases from 0.2 at low E and the lowest Tg to the statistical value of 0.75 at high E and high Tg. A peak observed in the cross-section at an E of about 0.7 eV is tentatively attributed to p-wave electron attachment. The rapid decrease of this peak cross-section with Tg is ascribed to autodetachment.

  20. Bacterial community involved in the nitrogen cycle in a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating UASB effluent.

    PubMed

    Mac Conell, E F A; Almeida, P G S; Martins, K E L; Araújo, J C; Chernicharo, C A L

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) effluent was investigated by pyrosequencing. Bacterial community composition considerably changed along the reactor and over the operational period. The dominant phyla detected were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes. The abundance of denitrifiers decreased from the top to the bottom and it was consistent with the organic matter concentration gradients. At lower loadings (organic and nitrogen loading rates), the abundance of anammox bacteria was higher than that of the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the upper portion of the reactor, suggesting that aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation occurred. Nitrification occurred in all the compartments, while anammox bacteria prominently appeared even in the presence of high organic carbon to ammonia ratios (around 1.0-2.0 gCOD gN(-1)). The results suggest that denitrifiers, nitrifiers, and anammox bacteria coexisted in the reactor; thus, different metabolic pathways were involved in ammonium removal in the post-UASB reactor sponge-based.

  1. Field-scale application of Ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of transient groundwater flow data via stochastic moment equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeri, Marco; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2014-05-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) enables one to assimilate newly available data in transient groundwater and other temporal earth system models through real-time Bayesian updating of system states (e.g., hydraulic heads) and parameters (e.g., hydraulic conductivities). It has become common to treat spatially varying hydraulic conductivities as autocorrelated random fields conditioned on measured conductivities and/or heads. Doing so renders the corresponding groundwater flow equations stochastic. Assimilating data in such equations via traditional EnKF entails computationally intensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. We have previously illustrated a methodology to circumvent the need for MC. Our methodology is grounded on (1) an approximate direct solution of nonlocal (integrodifferential) equations that govern the space-time evolution of conditional ensemble means (statistical expectations) and covariances of hydraulic heads and fluxes and (2) the embedding of these moments in EnKF. This provides sequential updates of conductivity and head estimates throughout the space-time domain of interest, does not suffer from inbreeding issues and, as an additional benefit, obviates the need for computationally intensive batch inverse solution of the moment equations as we have been doing previously. We compare the performance of our new EnKF approach based on stochastic moment equation and of the traditional Monte Carlo approach. We do so for a field scale scenario involving a sequence of pumping tests performed in a heterogeneous alluvial test site located near the city of Tuebingen, Germany.

  2. Enhanced azo dye removal in a continuously operated up-flow anaerobic filter packed with henna plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingang; Wu, Mengke; Chen, Jianjun; Liu, Xiuyan; Chen, Tingting; Wen, Yue; Tang, Junhong; Xie, Zhengmiao

    2015-12-15

    Effects of henna plant biomass (stem) packed in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) on an azo dye (AO7) removal were investigated. AO7 removal, sulfanilic acid (SA) formation, and pseudo first-order kinetic constants for these reactions (kAO7 and kSA) were higher in the henna-added UAF (R2) than in the control UAF without henna (R1). The maximum kAO7 in R1 and R2 were 0.0345 and 0.2024 cm(-1), respectively, on day 18; the corresponding molar ratios of SA formation to AO7 removal were 0.582 and 0.990. Adsorption and endogenous bio-reduction were the main AO7 removal pathways in R1, while in R2 bio-reduction was the dominant. Organics in henna could be released and fermented to volatile fatty acids, acting as effective electron donors for AO7 reduction, which was accelerated by soluble and/or fixed lawsone. Afterwards, the removal process weakened over time, indicating the demand of electron donation and lawsone-releasing during the long-term operation of UAF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of Bayesian Maximum Entropy Filter in parameter calibration of groundwater flow model in PingTung Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Shao-Yong; Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Due to the limited hydrogeological observation data and high levels of uncertainty within, parameter estimation of the groundwater model has been an important issue. There are many methods of parameter estimation, for example, Kalman filter provides a real-time calibration of parameters through measurement of groundwater monitoring wells, related methods such as Extended Kalman Filter and Ensemble Kalman Filter are widely applied in groundwater research. However, Kalman Filter method is limited to linearity. This study propose a novel method, Bayesian Maximum Entropy Filtering, which provides a method that can considers the uncertainty of data in parameter estimation. With this two methods, we can estimate parameter by given hard data (certain) and soft data (uncertain) in the same time. In this study, we use Python and QGIS in groundwater model (MODFLOW) and development of Extended Kalman Filter and Bayesian Maximum Entropy Filtering in Python in parameter estimation. This method may provide a conventional filtering method and also consider the uncertainty of data. This study was conducted through numerical model experiment to explore, combine Bayesian maximum entropy filter and a hypothesis for the architecture of MODFLOW groundwater model numerical estimation. Through the virtual observation wells to simulate and observe the groundwater model periodically. The result showed that considering the uncertainty of data, the Bayesian maximum entropy filter will provide an ideal result of real-time parameters estimation.

  4. The Effect of Vortex Generators on a Jet in a Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Foss, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of vortex generators in the form of tabs on the penetration and spreading of a jet in a cross-flow has been studied experimentally. It is found that the tab has very little effect when placed on the leeward side, i.e., on the downstream edge of the jet nozzle relative to the free-stream flow. A study of the static pressure distribution reveals significantly lower pressures on the leeward side. Thus, when placed on that side the tab does not produce a "pressure hill" of sufficient magnitude that is the primary source of streamwise vorticity in the flow field over the tab. This qualitatively explains the ineffectiveness. In comparison, there is a significant effect on the flow field when the tab is placed on the windward side, The sense of vorticity generated by the tab in the latter configuration is opposite to that of the bound vortex pair that otherwise characterizes the flow. Thus, the strength of the bound vortex pair is diminished and the jet penetration is reduced.

  5. Experimental evaluation of sound produced by two cylinders in a cross flow in various configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilka, Michael; Kerrian, Peter; Morris, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Cylinders in a cross flow is a canonical test case that is considered representative of industrial fluid flow problems, such as heat exchangers and aircraft landing gear. The general configurations are cylinders in tandem, parallel or staggered, which lead to several interesting flow phenomena such as wake cavity/wake interaction effects (tandem), symmetric/asymmetric wake behavior (parallel) or wake interaction/coanda effects (staggered), depending on relative location of the cylinders. In many cases, it is important to not only understand the flow interaction between the cylinders but also the acoustic consequence of such configurations. However, information on the acoustical behavior based on these configurations is relatively small compared to that of the steady aerodynamic and flow interaction behavior. The present work investigates the acoustic spectral properties of these configurations in order to characterize the sound produced by cylinder proximity and wake effects. The spectra are measured using an acoustic beam-forming technique to identify the sources and remove spurious content from the spectra.

  6. Performance improvement of a cross-flow hydro turbine by air layer effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. D.; Yoon, H. Y.; Inagaki, M.; Ooike, S.; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, Y. H.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is not only to investigate the effects of air layer in the turbine chamber on the performance and internal flow of the cross-flow turbine, but also to suggest a newly developed air supply method. Field test is performed in order to measure the output power of the turbine by a new air supply method. CFD analysis on the performance and internal flow of the turbine is conducted by an unsteady state calculation using a two-phase flow model in order to embody the air layer effect on the turbine performance effectively.The result shows that air layer effect on the performance of the turbine is considerable. The air layer located in the turbine runner passage plays the role of preventing a shock loss at the runner axis and suppressing a recirculation flow in the runner. The location of air suction hole on the chamber wall is very important factor for the performance improvement. Moreover, the ratio between air from suction pipe and water from turbine inlet is also significant factor of the turbine performance.

  7. Constraints of nonresponding flows based on cross layers in the networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Chao; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Dong

    2016-02-01

    In the active queue management (AQM) scheme, core routers cannot manage and constrain user datagram protocol (UDP) data flows by the sliding window control mechanism in the transport layer due to the nonresponsive nature of such traffic flows. However, the UDP traffics occupy a large part of the network service nowadays which brings a great challenge to the stability of the more and more complex networks. To solve the uncontrollable problem, this paper proposes a cross layers random early detection (CLRED) scheme, which can control the nonresponding UDP-like flows rate effectively when congestion occurs in the access point (AP). The CLRED makes use of the MAC frame acknowledgement (ACK) transmitting congestion information to the sources nodes and utilizes the back-off windows of the MAC layer throttling data rate. Consequently, the UDP-like flows data rate can be restrained timely by the sources nodes in order to alleviate congestion in the complex networks. The proposed CLRED can constrain the nonresponsive flows availably and make the communication expedite, so that the network can sustain stable. The simulation results of network simulator-2 (NS2) verify the proposed CLRED scheme.

  8. Jet mixing into a heated cross flow in a cylindrical duct - Influence of geometry and flow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, M. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelson, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the mixing characteristics of jets in an axi-symmetric can geometry, temperature measurements were obtained downstream of a row of cold jets injected into a heated cross stream. Parametric, non-reacting experiments were conducted to determine the influence of geometry and flow variations on mixing patterns in a cylindrical configuration. Results show that jet to mainstream momentum flux ratio and orifice geometry significantly impact the mixing characteristics of jets in a can geometry. For a fixed number of orifices, the coupling between momentum flux ratio and injector determines (1) the degree of jet penetration at the injection plane, and (2) the extent of circumferential mixing downstream of the injection plane. The results also show that, at a fixed momentum flux ratio, jet penetration decreases with (1) an increase in slanted slot aspect ratio, and (2) an increase in the angle of the slots with respect to the mainstream direction.

  9. Jet mixing into a heated cross flow in a cylindrical duct: Influence of geometry and flow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, M. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the mixing characteristics of jets in an axi-symmetric can geometry, temperature measurements were obtained downstream of a row of cold jets injected into a heated cross stream. Parametric, non-reacting experiments were conducted to determine the influence of geometry and flow variations on mixing patterns in a cylindrical configuration. Results show that jet to mainstream momentum flux ratio and orifice geometry significantly impact the mixing characteristics of jets in a can geometry. For a fixed number of orifices, the coupling between momentum flux ratio and injector determines (1) the degree of jet penetration at the injection plane, and (2) the extent of circumferential mixing downstream of the injection plane. The results also show that, at a fixed momentum flux ratio, jet penetration decreases with (1) an increase in slanted slot aspect ratio, and (2) an increase in the angle of the slots with respect to the mainstream direction.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Cross-Flow Axis Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines, Including Effects of Waves and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2011-12-01

    A new test bed for Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy at the University of New Hampshire (UNH-CORE) was used to evaluate the performance of different cross-flow axis hydrokinetic turbines, and investigate the effects of waves and turbulence on these devices. The test bed was designed and built to operate in the UNH tow and wave tank, which has a cross section of 3.67m (width) x 2.44m (depth). In the present configuration, tow speeds of up to 3 m/s can be achieved for smaller turbine models, and up to 1.5 m/s for large turbine models with low gear ratio. It features a flap style wave maker at one end that is capable of producing waves with 1-5 s periods up to 0.4 m wave height. Turbine thrust (drag) and mechanical power output (torque, angular velocity) were measured at tow speeds of 0.6-1.5 m/s for two cross-flow axis MHK turbines: a Gorlov Helical Turbine (GHT) and a Lucid spherical turbine (LST). Both were provided by Lucid Energy Technologies, LLP, and have frontal areas of 1.3 (GHT) and 1.0 (LST) square meters, respectively. GHT performance was also measured in progressive waves of various periods, grid turbulence, and in the wake of a cylinder, installed upstream at various cross-stream locations. Overall, the GHT performs with higher power and thrust (drag) coefficients than the LST. A 2nd law efficiency, or kinetic exergy efficiency, was defined to calculate what fraction of the kinetic energy removed from the flow is converted to usable shaft work by each turbine. The exergy efficiency varies with tip speed ratio but approaches 90% for the optimum operating conditions for each turbine. The fraction of kinetic energy removed from the fluid that is not converted to shaft work is redistributed into turbulent kinetic energy in the wake. Quantifying the kinetic energy flowing out of the turbine is important for modeling of environmental transport processes and for predicting performance when turbines are used in arrays

  11. Experimental Investigation of the Discharge Coefficient and Impingement Heat Transfer Characteristics of a Single Jet in Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Brian

    This experimentation investigates the local heat transfer characteristics of an impinging jet with the effects of cross flow. The jet is formed by a single round hole with a diameter of 0.25 inches, sharp edges and a length to diameter ratio of 4. For one combination of impingement plate spacing and cross flow to jet flow mass velocity ratio, detailed photographs of a sheet of liquid crystal were taken. These photographs were then used to create a Nusselt number contour plot. Observations are made regarding the comparison of the Nusselt number contour plots with and without cross flow. Comparisons are also made to data in open literature citing the degradation of the average Nusselt number with cross flow to that without cross flow. While the main focus of this study was the heat transfer of an impinging jet, a large amount of discharge coefficient data was also gathered for a single, sharp edged, round hole in the presence of cross flow. It compared very well to other investigator's data and a correlation relating the discharge coefficient to the mass velocity ratio is reported.

  12. Mechanisms of Flame Stabilization and Blowout in a Reacting Turbulent Hydrogen Jet in Cross-Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kolla, H.; Grout, R. W.; Gruber, A.; Chen, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanisms contributing to flame stabilization and blowout in a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen transverse jet in a turbulent boundary layer cross-flow (JICF) are investigated using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed chemistry. Non-reacting JICF DNS were performed to understand the relative magnitude and physical location of low velocity regions on the leeward side of the fuel jet where a flame can potentially anchor. As the injection angle is reduced from 90{sup o} to 70{sup o}, the low velocity region was found to diminish significantly, both in terms of physical extent and magnitude, and hence, its ability to provide favorable conditions for flame anchoring and stabilization are greatly reduced. In the reacting JICF DNS a stable flame is observed for 90{sup o} injection angle and, on average, the flame root is in the vicinity of low velocity magnitude and stoichiometric mixture. When the injection angle is smoothly transitioned to 75{sup o} a transient flame blowout is observed. Ensemble averaged quantities on the flame base reveal two phases of the blowout characterized by a kinematic imbalance between flame propagation speed and flow normal velocity. In the first phase dominant flow structures repeatedly draw the flame base closer to the jet centerline resulting in richer-than-stoichiometric mixtures and high velocity magnitudes. In the second phase, in spite of low velocity magnitudes and a return to stoichiometry, due to jet bending and flame alignment normal to the cross-flow, the flow velocity normal to the flame base increases dramatically perpetuating the blowout.

  13. Vadose zone flow model parameterisation using cross-borehole radar and resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, Andrew; Cassiani, Giorgio; Middleton, Roy; Winship, Peter

    2002-10-01

    Cross-borehole geoelectrical imaging, in particular electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and transmission radar tomography, can provide high-resolution images of hydrogeological structures and, in some cases, detailed assessment of dynamic processes in the subsurface environment. Through appropriate petrophysical relationships, these tools offer data suitable for parameterising and constraining models of groundwater flow. This is demonstrated using cross-borehole radar and resistivity measurements collected during a controlled vadose zone tracer test, performed at a field site in the UK Sherwood Sandstone. Both methods show clearly the vertical migration of the tracer over a 200 h monitoring period. By comparing first and second spatial moments of changes in moisture content predicted from a numerical simulation of vadose zone flow with equivalent statistics from two- and three-dimensional ERT and cross-borehole radar profiles the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated to be approximately 0.4 m/d. Such a value is comparable to field estimates from borehole hydraulic tests carried out in the saturated zone at the field site and provides valuable information that may be utilised to parameterise pollutant transport models of the site.

  14. Vadose Zone Flow Model Parameterisation Using Cross-Borehole Radar and Resistivity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A.; Cassiani, G.; Middleton, R.; Winship, P.

    2001-12-01

    Cross-borehole geoelectrical imaging, in particular electrical resistivity tomography and transmission radar tomography, can provide high resolution images of hydrogeological structures and, in some cases, detailed assessment of dynamic processes in the subsurface environment. Through appropriate petrophysical relationships, these tools offer data suitable for parameterizing and constraining models of groundwater flow. This is demonstrated using cross-borehole radar and resistivity measurements collected during a controlled vadose zone tracer test, performed at a field site in the UK Sherwood Sandstone. Both methods show clearly the vertical migration of the tracer over a 200 hour monitoring period. By comparing first and second spatial moments of changes in moisture content predicted from a numerical simulation of vadose zone flow with equivalent statistics from 2- and 3-D electrical resistivity tomography and cross-borehole radar profiles the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated to be approximately 0.4 m d-1. Such a value is comparable to field estimates from borehole hydraulic tests carried out in the saturated zone at the field site and provides valuable information that may be utilized to parameterise pollutant transport models of the site.

  15. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-06-27

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recen