Science.gov

Sample records for cross talk blocks

  1. Control analysis of systems with reaction blocks that 'cross-talk'.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, E K; Brand, M D

    1998-09-01

    Practical application of metabolic control analysis has been facilitated by use of the top-down approach, which divides a metabolic system into a small number of reaction blocks, linked by a few key intermediates. Previous papers have stressed that communication between blocks should be only through the explicit intermediates, 'cross-talk' between reaction blocks invalidated the approach. Here we show how the restriction is a result of the use of inhibitors of the blocks, and can be overcome if other system modulations are used. We also show a way to treat the related problem of enzymes that appear in more than one block such as the analysis of glycolytic substrate cycles into ATP consuming and net flux activities.

  2. Tick Talk: Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Tick Talk Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease When warm weather arrives, you might get the ... mainly in the mid-Atlantic and southern states. Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness. It’s ...

  3. Cross-talk between tumors can affect responses to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Devaud, Christel; John, Liza B; Westwood, Jennifer A; Yong, Carmen SM; Beavis, Paul A; Schwendener, Reto A; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Advanced stages of cancer often involve multiple tumors in different locations in the body. These tumors are associated with a microenvironment that can influence tumor responses to immunotherapy. Whether tumors and their disparate microenvironment can interact together at distance in a multiple tumor setting, through a form of cross-talk, and affect their responses to immunotherapy has never been described. Our study investigated the cross-talk between two tumors with disparate microenvironments in a mouse model. We demonstrated that immunosuppressive visceral tumors could influence distant subcutaneous (SC) tumors to render them resistant to immunotherapy. We observed distinct modifications in the SC tumor microenvironment following cross-talk with kidney tumors that exhibit a type-2 macrophage-related immunosuppressive microenvironment. Indeed, when a concomitant kidney tumor was present in the mouse, the SC tumors were highly infiltrated with M2 macrophages and had a reduced T cell and NK cell effector immune profile. Finally, blocking the M2-associated chemokine CCL2 or depleting macrophages, significantly improved the effect of immunotherapy on growth of SC tumors in the presence of concomitant kidney tumors. This work emphasizes the potential negative influence that a tumor, with a strong immunosuppressive microenvironment, can exert on distant tumors that would normally be treatment-responsive. This report may lead to a new vision of the prioritization in the treatment of advanced metastatic cancer. PMID:26140251

  4. Intercellular Cross-talk in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Egashira, Yusuke; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating cerebrovascular disorder with high mortality and morbidity. Currently, there are few treatment strategies for ICH-induced brain injury. A recent increase in interest in the pathophysiology of ICH, has led to elucidation of the pathways underlying ICH-induced brain injury, pathways where intercellular and hematoma to cell signaling play important roles. In this review, we summarize recent advances in ICH research focusing on intercellular and hematoma:cell cross-talk related to brain injury and recovery after ICH. PMID:25863131

  5. Cross-talk in abscisic acid signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2002-01-01

    "Cross-talk" in hormone signaling reflects an organism's ability to integrate different inputs and respond appropriately, a crucial function at the heart of signaling network operation. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone involved in bud and seed dormancy, growth regulation, leaf senescence and abscission, stomatal opening, and a variety of plant stress responses. This review summarizes what is known about ABA signaling in the control of stomatal opening and seed dormancy and provides an overview of emerging knowledge about connections between ABA, ethylene, sugar, and auxin synthesis and signaling.

  6. Cross Talk Pathways Between Coagulation and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H; Conway, Edward M

    2016-04-29

    Anatomic pathology studies performed over 150 years ago revealed that excessive activation of coagulation occurs in the setting of inflammation. However, it has taken over a century since these seminal observations were made to delineate the molecular mechanisms by which these systems interact and the extent to which they participate in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases. There is, in fact, extensive cross talk between coagulation and inflammation, whereby activation of one system may amplify activation of the other, a situation that, if unopposed, may result in tissue damage or even multiorgan failure. Characterizing the common triggers and pathways are key for the strategic design of effective therapeutic interventions. In this review, we highlight some of the key molecular interactions, some of which are already showing promise as therapeutic targets for inflammatory and thrombotic disorders. PMID:27126649

  7. National CrossTalk. Volume 19, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "National CrossTalk" is a publication of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The National Center promotes public policies that enhance opportunities for quality education and training beyond high school. The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues.…

  8. National CrossTalk. Volume 18, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "National CrossTalk" is a publication of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The National Center promotes public policies that enhance opportunities for quality education and training beyond high school. The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues.…

  9. National CrossTalk. Volume 18, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "National CrossTalk" is a publication of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The National Center promotes public policies that enhance opportunities for quality education and training beyond high school. The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues.…

  10. National CrossTalk. Volume 12, Number 1, Winter 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "National CrossTalk" is a publication of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The National Center promotes public policies that enhance opportunities for quality education and training beyond high school. The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues.…

  11. National CrossTalk. Volume 17, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "National CrossTalk" is a publication of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The National Center promotes public policies that enhance opportunities for quality education and training beyond high school. The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues.…

  12. Endogenous cross-talk of fungal metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Kevin J.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Doyle, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide (NRP) synthesis in fungi requires a ready supply of proteogenic and non-proteogenic amino acids which are subsequently incorporated into the nascent NRP via a thiotemplate mechanism catalyzed by NRP synthetases. Substrate amino acids can be modified prior to or during incorporation into the NRP, or following incorporation into an early stage amino acid-containing biosynthetic intermediate. These post-incorporation modifications involve a range of additional enzymatic activities including but not exclusively, monooxygenases, methyltransferases, epimerases, oxidoreductases, and glutathione S-transferases which are essential to effect biosynthesis of the final NRP. Likewise, polyketide biosynthesis is directly by polyketide synthase megaenzymes and cluster-encoded ancillary decorating enzymes. Additionally, a suite of additional primary metabolites, for example: coenzyme A (CoA), acetyl CoA, S-adenosylmethionine, glutathione (GSH), NADPH, malonyl CoA, and molecular oxygen, amongst others are required for NRP and polyketide synthesis (PKS). Clearly these processes must involve exquisite orchestration to facilitate the simultaneous biosynthesis of different types of NRPs, polyketides, and related metabolites requiring identical or similar biosynthetic precursors or co-factors. Moreover, the near identical structures of many natural products within a given family (e.g., ergot alkaloids), along with localization to similar regions within fungi (e.g., conidia) suggests that cross-talk may exist, in terms of biosynthesis and functionality. Finally, we speculate if certain biosynthetic steps involved in NRP and PKS play a role in cellular protection or environmental adaptation, and wonder if these enzymatic reactions are of equivalent importance to the actual biosynthesis of the final metabolite. PMID:25601857

  13. Cross Talk Inhibition Nullified by a Receiver Domain Missense Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Lin, Hsia-Yin; Noriega, Chris E.; Lin, Alice V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In two-component signal transduction, a sensor protein transmitter module controls cognate receiver domain phosphorylation. Most receiver domain sequences contain a small residue (Gly or Ala) at position T + 1 just distal to the essential Thr or Ser residue that forms part of the active site. However, some members of the NarL receiver subfamily have a large hydrophobic residue at position T + 1. Our laboratory previously isolated a NarL mutant in which the T + 1 residue Val-88 was replaced with an orthodox small Ala. This NarL V88A mutant confers a striking phenotype in which high-level target operon expression is both signal (nitrate) and sensor (NarX and NarQ) independent. This suggests that the NarL V88A protein is phosphorylated by cross talk from noncognate sources. Although cross talk was enhanced in ackA null strains that accumulate acetyl phosphate, it persisted in pta ackA double null strains that cannot synthesize this compound and was observed also in narL+ strains. This indicates that acetate metabolism has complex roles in mediating NarL cross talk. Contrariwise, cross talk was sharply diminished in an arcB barA double null strain, suggesting that the encoded sensors contribute substantially to NarL V88A cross talk. Separately, the V88A substitution altered the in vitro rates of NarL autodephosphorylation and transmitter-stimulated dephosphorylation and decreased affinity for the cognate sensor, NarX. Together, these experiments show that the residue at position T + 1 can strongly influence two distinct aspects of receiver domain function, the autodephosphorylation rate and cross talk inhibition. IMPORTANCE Many bacterial species contain a dozen or more discrete sensor-response regulator two-component systems that convert a specific input into a distinct output pattern. Cross talk, the unwanted transfer of signals between circuits, occurs when a response regulator is phosphorylated inappropriately from a noncognate source. Cross talk is

  14. Cross-talk theory of memory capacity in neural networks.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, R J; Gerstein, G L

    1991-01-01

    The present paper presents a theory for the mechanics of cross-talk among constituent neurons in networks in which multiple memory traces have been embedded, and develops criteria for memory capacity based on the disruptive influences of this cross-talk. The theory is based on interconnection patterns defined by the sequential configuration model of dynamic firing patterns. The theory accurately predicts the memory capacities observed in computer simulated nets, and predicts that cortical-like modules should be able to store up to about 300-900 selectively retrievable memory traces before disruption by cross-talk is likely. It also predicts that the cortex may has designed itself for modules of 30,000 neurons to at least in part to optimize memory capacity.

  15. Cross talk analysis in multicore optical fibers by supermode theory.

    PubMed

    Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Napierala, Marek; Ziolowicz, Anna; Pytel, Anna; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Nasilowski, Tomasz

    2016-08-15

    We discuss the theoretical aspects of core-to-core power transfer in multicore fibers relying on supermode theory. Based on a dual core fiber model, we investigate the consequences of this approach, such as the influence of initial excitation conditions on cross talk. Supermode interpretation of power coupling proves to be intuitive and thus may lead to new concepts of multicore fiber-based devices. As a conclusion, we propose a definition of a uniform cross talk parameter that describes multicore fiber design.

  16. Cross talk analysis in multicore optical fibers by supermode theory.

    PubMed

    Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Napierala, Marek; Ziolowicz, Anna; Pytel, Anna; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Nasilowski, Tomasz

    2016-08-15

    We discuss the theoretical aspects of core-to-core power transfer in multicore fibers relying on supermode theory. Based on a dual core fiber model, we investigate the consequences of this approach, such as the influence of initial excitation conditions on cross talk. Supermode interpretation of power coupling proves to be intuitive and thus may lead to new concepts of multicore fiber-based devices. As a conclusion, we propose a definition of a uniform cross talk parameter that describes multicore fiber design. PMID:27519082

  17. National CrossTalk. Volume 16, Number 1, Fall 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) The Credit Crisis Goes to College: Upheaval in the Student-Loan Business Leaves Students and Parents Scrambling (Susan C. Thomson); (2) The Engaged University: Northern Kentucky…

  18. National CrossTalk. Volume 15, Number 1, Winter 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) The Celtic Tiger: Ireland Invests Heavily in Higher Education, and Benefits Mightily (Jon Marcus); (2) Western Classic: Nevada's James Rogers Is a Non-Traditional Chancellor with a…

  19. National CrossTalk. Volume 14, Number 1, Winter 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National Cross Talk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This publication contains the following articles: (1) The Plagiarism Plague: In the Internet Era, Cheating Has Become an Epidemic on College Campuses (Don Campbell); (2) Dillard's Dire Straits: Historically Black College…

  20. National CrossTalk. Volume 17, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Florida's Unnatural Disaster: The State's Economic Bubble Has Burst, Leaving Higher Education in a Double Bind (Jon Marcus); (2) Saudi King's Modern University: Partnerships Are…

  1. National CrossTalk. Volume 12, Number 4, Fall 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Code of Conduct: Air Force Academy Adopts Changes in Response to 2003 Sexual Assault Scandal (Kathy Witkowsky); (2) Political Football: Partisan Politics Could Determine Management…

  2. National CrossTalk. Volume 13, Number 2, Spring 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) CUNY [City University of New York] Sheds Reputation as "Tutor U": The Nation's Largest Urban University Raises Standards, and Grapples with Remediation (Jon Marcus); (2) Scholarship…

  3. Cross-talk compensation in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Onal, Cagdas D; Sümer, Bilsay; Sitti, Metin

    2008-10-01

    In this work, calibration and correction of cross-talk in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. Several reasons and effects of this inherent problem on experimental results are discussed. We propose a general procedure that can be used on most AFM systems to compensate for cross-talk on the cantilever bending and twisting signals. The method utilizes two initial experiments on a flat surface to achieve an affine transformation between the measured signals and the actual signals. Using this transformation directly on the voltage signals allows us to remove the detrimental effects of cross-talk on AFM-based force measurement experiments. The achieved transformation matrix can be turned into a simple circuit and applied online, by users who have access to the raw signals in the AFM head. As a case study, a lateral deflection based mechanical characterization test for a poly(methyl methacrylate) microfiber that is suspended on a trench is investigated in terms of the effectiveness of the cross-talk compensation.

  4. Cross-talk compensation in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Cagdas D.; Suemer, Bilsay; Sitti, Metin

    2008-10-15

    In this work, calibration and correction of cross-talk in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. Several reasons and effects of this inherent problem on experimental results are discussed. We propose a general procedure that can be used on most AFM systems to compensate for cross-talk on the cantilever bending and twisting signals. The method utilizes two initial experiments on a flat surface to achieve an affine transformation between the measured signals and the actual signals. Using this transformation directly on the voltage signals allows us to remove the detrimental effects of cross-talk on AFM-based force measurement experiments. The achieved transformation matrix can be turned into a simple circuit and applied online, by users who have access to the raw signals in the AFM head. As a case study, a lateral deflection based mechanical characterization test for a poly(methyl methacrylate) microfiber that is suspended on a trench is investigated in terms of the effectiveness of the cross-talk compensation.

  5. National CrossTalk. Volume 14, Number 2, Spring 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) "Effectiveness and Efficiency": The University System of Maryland's Campaign to Control Costs and Increase Student Aid (Kay Mills); (2) Remote Access: Western Governors University…

  6. National CrossTalk. Volume 12, Number 3, Summer 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) U.K. Adopts "Top-Up" Tuition Fees: British Universities Prepare to Compete in a More "American" System (Jon Marcus); (2) "Plain Living": Berea College Makes a Commitment to the…

  7. National CrossTalk. Volume 13, Number 3, Summer 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Virginia Tries Restructuring: Financial Stress Leads to New Arrangements between State and Campuses (Robert A. Jones); (2) Georgia's Odd Couple: Can Two Foundations Share a…

  8. National CrossTalk. Volume 13, Number 1, Winter 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) A Legacy to Overcome: The University of Georgia Hopes to Become a More Desirable Destination for Black Students (Don Campbell); (2) Oklahoma's Brain Gain: A Comprehensive Drive to…

  9. National CrossTalk. Volume 13, Number 4, Fall 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This publication contains the following articles: (1) "Truth in Tuition" (Susan C. Thomson); (2) In Katrina's Wake (Kathy Witkowsky); (3) News from the Center: New Center Associates; (4) Colorado On the Edge (Robert A. Jones); (5)…

  10. National CrossTalk. Volume 14, Number 3, Summer 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombley, William, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of "National CrossTalk" is to stimulate informed discussion and debate of higher education issues. This issue contains the following articles: (1) The M Word: "Marketing" Has Changed from a Dirty Word to a Buzzword in Higher Education (Jon Marcus); (2) A Contrarian View of the Testing Industry: FairTest Argues that Standardized…

  11. Cross-talk between bone morphogenetic proteins and inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    van der Kraan, Peter M; Davidson, Esmeralda N Blaney

    2015-11-23

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines and bone morphogenetic proteins are generally studied separately and considered to be elements of different worlds, immunology and developmental biology. Varas and colleagues report that these factors show cross-talk in rheumatoid arthritis synoviocytes. They show that pro-inflammatory cytokines not only stimulate the production of bone morphogenetic proteins but that these endogenously produced bone morphogenetic proteins interfere with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on synoviocytes.

  12. Specificity, cross-talk and adaptation in Interferon signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilman, Anton

    Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I Interferons - which are also used therapeutically in the treatment of a number of diseases, such as Hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. Puzzlingly, different Interferons act through the same cell surface receptor but have different effects on the target cells. They also exhibit a strange pattern of temporal cross-talk resulting in a serious clinical problem - loss of response to Interferon therapy. We combined mathematical modeling with quantitative experiments to develop a quantitative model of specificity and adaptation in the Interferon signaling pathway. The model resolves several outstanding experimental puzzles and directly affects the clinical use of Type I Interferons in treatment of viral hepatitis and other diseases.

  13. Cross-talk between probiotic lactobacilli and host immune system.

    PubMed

    Kemgang, T S; Kapila, S; Shanmugam, V P; Kapila, R

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism by which probiotic lactobacilli affect the immune system is strain specific. As the immune system is a multicompartmental system, each strain has its way to interact with it and induce a visible and quantifiable effect. This review summarizes the interplay existing between the host immune system and probiotic lactobacilli, that is, with emphasis on lactobacilli as a prototype probiotic genus. Several aspects including the bacterial-host cross-talk with the mucosal and systemic immune system are presented, as well as short sections on the competing effect towards pathogenic bacteria and their uses as delivery vehicle for antigens.

  14. Plant hormone cross-talk: the pivot of root growth.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Elena; Polverari, Laura; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2015-02-01

    Root indeterminate growth and its outstanding ability to produce new tissues continuously make this organ a highly dynamic structure able to respond promptly to external environmental stimuli. Developmental processes therefore need to be finely tuned, and hormonal cross-talk plays a pivotal role in the regulation of root growth. In contrast to what happens in animals, plant development is a post-embryonic process. A pool of stem cells, placed in a niche at the apex of the meristem, is a source of self-renewing cells that provides cells for tissue formation. During the first days post-germination, the meristem reaches its final size as a result of a balance between cell division and cell differentiation. A complex network of interactions between hormonal pathways co-ordinates such developmental inputs. In recent years, by means of molecular and computational approaches, many efforts have been made aiming to define the molecular components of these networks. In this review, we focus our attention on the molecular mechanisms at the basis of hormone cross-talk during root meristem size determination.

  15. Proteomics of the bacterial cross-talk by quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Calasso, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Words such as language and behavior are frequently used to depict "quorum sensing" (QS) in the literature. Simplifying the concept, language and cross-talk between bacteria, and between bacteria and animal or plants hosts determine the behavior (e.g., beneficial or pathogenic effects). Genomics and transcriptomics were the principal approaches used to study the multiple mechanisms of QS. Nevertheless, sequencing of genomes paved the way for another approach which consists on comparative and functional proteomics. This review aims at describing how the proteomic dictionary translates: (i) the languages (N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones, AHL; autoinducing peptide, AIP; autoinducer-2, AI-2) used by bacteria to communicate; (ii) signals of QS which induce various phenotypes (e.g., virulence, biofilm maturation); (iii) cross-talk between lactic acid bacteria within various food ecosystems (e.g. sourdough and fermented milk); (iv) probiotic messages at intra- and inter-species and interkingdom levels; and (v) words for quorum quenching (QQ). Proteomics is an indispensible discipline to elucidate the mechanisms of regulation of the multitude of language signals which diffuse through different microbial communities.

  16. The cross-talk between enterocytes and intraepithelial lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Serena; Picascia, Stefania; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2016-12-01

    The gut mucosa is continuously exposed to food and microbial antigens. Both enterocytes and intraepithelial lymphocytes have a pivotal role in maintaining the integrity of intestinal mucosa, as these cells guarantee a first line of defense against pathogens and toxic molecules. Enterocytes maintain a physical barrier against microbes and directly contribute to the gut homeostasis by sampling the luminal agents through several pattern recognition receptors or presenting antigen to mucosa T cells. Similarly, due to a close physical contact with the intestinal epithelial cells, the intraepithelial lymphocytes represent an important part of the gut lymphoid tissue, contrasting the entry and spread of pathogens. An alteration of the cross-talk between intestinal epithelial cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes might actively contribute to the development of intestinal immune disorders, as occurring in patients with celiac disease. In genetically predisposed individuals, the gluten exposure results in a massive production of interleukin-15, activation of intraepithelial lymphocytes, and modification of small intestinal mucosa architecture and function. We will review the recent studies on the pathophysiology of cross-talk between enterocytes and intraepithelial T cells, and how this interaction is crucial for intestinal integrity and homeostasis. PMID:27251606

  17. Systematic Characterization and Prediction of Post-Translational Modification Cross-Talk*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanhua; Xu, Bosen; Zhou, Xueya; Li, Ying; Lu, Ming; Jiang, Rui; Li, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM)1 plays an important role in regulating the functions of proteins. PTMs of multiple residues on one protein may work together to determine a functional outcome, which is known as PTM cross-talk. Identification of PTM cross-talks is an emerging theme in proteomics and has elicited great interest, but their properties remain to be systematically characterized. To this end, we collected 193 PTM cross-talk pairs in 77 human proteins from the literature and then tested location preference and co-evolution at the residue and modification levels. We found that cross-talk events preferentially occurred among nearby PTM sites, especially in disordered protein regions, and cross-talk pairs tended to co-evolve. Given the properties of PTM cross-talk pairs, a naïve Bayes classifier integrating different features was built to predict cross-talks for pairwise combination of PTM sites. By using a 10-fold cross-validation, the integrated prediction model showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.833, superior to using any individual feature alone. The prediction performance was also demonstrated to be robust to the biases in the collected PTM cross-talk pairs. The integrated approach has the potential for large-scale prioritization of PTM cross-talk candidates for functional validation and was implemented as a web server available at http://bioinfo.bjmu.edu.cn/ptm-x/. PMID:25605461

  18. Systematic characterization and prediction of post-translational modification cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanhua; Xu, Bosen; Zhou, Xueya; Li, Ying; Lu, Ming; Jiang, Rui; Li, Tingting

    2015-03-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM)(1) plays an important role in regulating the functions of proteins. PTMs of multiple residues on one protein may work together to determine a functional outcome, which is known as PTM cross-talk. Identification of PTM cross-talks is an emerging theme in proteomics and has elicited great interest, but their properties remain to be systematically characterized. To this end, we collected 193 PTM cross-talk pairs in 77 human proteins from the literature and then tested location preference and co-evolution at the residue and modification levels. We found that cross-talk events preferentially occurred among nearby PTM sites, especially in disordered protein regions, and cross-talk pairs tended to co-evolve. Given the properties of PTM cross-talk pairs, a naïve Bayes classifier integrating different features was built to predict cross-talks for pairwise combination of PTM sites. By using a 10-fold cross-validation, the integrated prediction model showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.833, superior to using any individual feature alone. The prediction performance was also demonstrated to be robust to the biases in the collected PTM cross-talk pairs. The integrated approach has the potential for large-scale prioritization of PTM cross-talk candidates for functional validation and was implemented as a web server available at http://bioinfo.bjmu.edu.cn/ptm-x/.

  19. Phosphoinositide kinase signaling controls ER-PM cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Omnus, Deike J.; Manford, Andrew G.; Bader, Jakob M.; Emr, Scott D.; Stefan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipid dynamics must be precisely regulated for normal cellular function, and disruptions in lipid homeostasis are linked to the progression of several diseases. However, little is known about the sensory mechanisms for detecting membrane composition and how lipid metabolism is regulated in response to membrane stress. We find that phosphoinositide (PI) kinase signaling controls a conserved PDK-TORC2-Akt signaling cascade as part of a homeostasis network that allows the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to modulate essential responses, including Ca2+-regulated lipid biogenesis, upon plasma membrane (PM) stress. Furthermore, loss of ER-PM junctions impairs this protective response, leading to PM integrity defects upon heat stress. Thus PI kinase–mediated ER-PM cross-talk comprises a regulatory system that ensures cellular integrity under membrane stress conditions. PMID:26864629

  20. Ethylene and Hormonal Cross Talk in Vegetative Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Van de Poel, Bram; Smet, Dajo; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is a gaseous plant hormone that most likely became a functional hormone during the evolution of charophyte green algae, prior to land colonization. From this ancient origin, ethylene evolved into an important growth regulator that is essential for myriad plant developmental processes. In vegetative growth, ethylene appears to have a dual role, stimulating and inhibiting growth, depending on the species, tissue, and cell type, developmental stage, hormonal status, and environmental conditions. Moreover, ethylene signaling and response are part of an intricate network in cross talk with internal and external cues. Besides being a crucial factor in the growth control of roots and shoots, ethylene can promote flowering, fruit ripening and abscission, as well as leaf and petal senescence and abscission and, hence, plays a role in virtually every phase of plant life. Last but not least, together with jasmonates, salicylate, and abscisic acid, ethylene is important in steering stress responses.

  1. SOI CMOS Imager with Suppression of Cross-Talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Zheng, Xingyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sun, Chao

    2009-01-01

    A monolithic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image-detecting integrated circuit of the active-pixel-sensor type, now undergoing development, is designed to operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and to offer a combination of high quantum efficiency and low diffusion and capacitive cross-talk among pixels. The imager is designed to be especially suitable for astronomical and astrophysical applications. The imager design could also readily be adapted to general scientific, biological, medical, and spectroscopic applications. One of the conditions needed to ensure both high quantum efficiency and low diffusion cross-talk is a relatively high reverse bias potential (between about 20 and about 50 V) on the photodiode in each pixel. Heretofore, a major obstacle to realization of this condition in a monolithic integrated circuit has been posed by the fact that the required high reverse bias on the photodiode is incompatible with metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) in the CMOS pixel readout circuitry. In the imager now being developed, the SOI structure is utilized to overcome this obstacle: The handle wafer is retained and the photodiode is formed in the handle wafer. The MOSFETs are formed on the SOI layer, which is separated from the handle wafer by a buried oxide layer. The electrical isolation provided by the buried oxide layer makes it possible to bias the MOSFETs at CMOS-compatible potentials (between 0 and 3 V), while biasing the photodiode at the required higher potential, and enables independent optimization of the sensory and readout portions of the imager.

  2. Integrating multi-omics for uncovering the architecture of cross-talking pathways in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xiao, Yun; Ping, Yanyan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongying; Li, Feng; Hu, Jing; Zhang, Hongyi; Deng, Yulan; Tian, Jiawei; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Cross-talk among abnormal pathways widely occurs in human cancer and generally leads to insensitivity to cancer treatment. Moreover, alterations in the abnormal pathways are not limited to single molecular level. Therefore, we proposed a strategy that integrates a large number of biological sources at multiple levels for systematic identification of cross-talk among risk pathways in cancer by random walk on protein interaction network. We applied the method to multi-Omics breast cancer data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), including somatic mutation, DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression profiles. We identified close cross-talk among many known cancer-related pathways with complex change patterns. Furthermore, we identified key genes (linkers) bridging these cross-talks and showed that these genes carried out consistent biological functions with the linked cross-talking pathways. Through identification of leader genes in each pathway, the architecture of cross-talking pathways was built. Notably, we observed that linkers cooperated with leaders to form the fundamentation of cross-talk of pathways which play core roles in deterioration of breast cancer. As an example, we observed that KRAS showed a direct connection to numerous cancer-related pathways, such as MAPK signaling pathway, suggesting that it may be a central communication hub. In summary, we offer an effective way to characterize complex cross-talk among disease pathways, which can be applied to other diseases and provide useful information for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Photodiode arrays having minimized cross-talk between diodes

    DOEpatents

    Guckel, Henry; McNamara, Shamus P.

    2000-10-17

    Photodiode arrays are formed with close diode-to-diode spacing and minimized cross-talk between diodes in the array by isolating the diodes from one another with trenches that are formed between the photodiodes in the array. The photodiodes are formed of spaced regions in a base layer, each spaced region having an impurity type opposite to that of the base layer to define a p-n junction between the spaced regions and the base layer. The base layer meets a substrate at a boundary, with the substrate being much more heavily doped than the base layer with the same impurity type. The trenches extend through the base layer and preferably into the substrate. Minority carriers generated by absorption of light photons in the base layer can only migrate to an adjacent photodiode through the substrate. The lifetime and the corresponding diffusion length of the minority carriers in the substrate is very short so that all minority carriers recombine in the substrate before reaching an adjacent photodiode.

  4. Hierarchical beamformer and cross-talk reduction in electroneurography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvetti, Daniela; Wodlinger, Brian; Durand, Dominique M.; Somersalo, Erkki

    2011-10-01

    Electroneurography (ENG) is a method of recording neural activity within nerves. Using nerve electrodes with multiple contacts the activation patterns of individual neuronal fascicles can be estimated by measuring the surface voltages induced by the intraneural activity. The information about neuronal activation can be used for functional electric stimulation (FES) of patients suffering from spinal chord injury, or to control a robotic prosthetic limb of an amputee. However, the ENG signal estimation is a severely ill-posed inverse problem due to uncertainties in the model, low resolution due to limitations of the data, geometric constraints and the difficulty in separating the signal from biological and exogenous noise. In this paper, a reduced computational model for the forward problem is proposed, and the ENG problem is addressed by using beamformer techniques. Furthermore, we show that using a hierarchical statistical model, it is possible to develop an adaptive beamformer algorithm that estimates directly the source variances rather than the voltage source itself. The advantage of this new algorithm, e.g., over a traditional adaptive beamformer algorithm, is that it allows a very stable noise reduction by averaging over a time window. In addition, a new projection technique for separating sources and reducing cross-talk between different fascicle signals is proposed. The algorithms are tested on a computer model of realistic nerve geometry and time series signals.

  5. Dyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2010-06-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated with the majority of de novo cholesterol synthesis occurring in the liver and intestine. 3 Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a major enzyme involved in cholesterol synthesis, is raised in both liver and intestine in diabetic animals. Niemann PickC1-like1 protein regulates cholesterol absorption in the intestine and facilitates cholesterol transport through the liver. There is evidence to suggest that the effect of inhibition of Niemann PickC1-like1 lowers cholesterol through its effect not only in the intestine but also in the liver. ATP binding cassette proteins G5/G8 regulate cholesterol re-excretion in the intestine and in the liver, cholesterol excretion into the bile. Diabetes is associated with reduced ATP binding cassette protein G5/G8 expression in both the liver and intestine in animal models. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is central to the formation of the chylomicron in the intestine and VLDL in the liver. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein mRNA is increased in diabetes in both the intestine and liver. Cross-talk between the intestine and liver is poorly documented in humans due to the difficulty in obtaining liver biopsies but animal studies are fairly consistent in showing relationships that explain in part mechanisms involved in cholesterol homeostasis.

  6. Cross-talk between KLF4 and STAT3 regulates axon regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Song; Zou, Yuhua; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2013-10-01

    Cytokine-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) promotes the regrowth of damaged axons in the adult central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that KLF4 physically interacts with STAT3 upon cytokine-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine 705 (Y705) on STAT3. This interaction suppresses STAT3-dependent gene expression by blocking its DNA-binding activity. The deletion of KLF4 in vivo induces axon regeneration of adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) via Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT3 signalling. This regeneration can be greatly enhanced by exogenous cytokine treatment, or removal of an endogenous JAK-STAT3 pathway inhibitor called suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3). These findings reveal an unexpected cross-talk between KLF4 and activated STAT3 in the regulation of axon regeneration that might have therapeutic implications in promoting repair of injured adult CNS.

  7. Transient gain and cross talk in erbium-doped fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Giles, C R; Desurvire, E; Simpson, J R

    1989-08-15

    Transient gain saturation and recovery with 110-340-microsec time constants were observed in erbium-doped fiber amplifiers. This slow response reduces the effects of saturation-induced cross talk and intermodulation distortion associated with multichannel signal amplification. In a two-channel amplification experiment, negligible saturation-induced cross talk was measured at signal modulation frequencies >5 kHz. Increased suppression of saturation-induced cross talk was achieved through feed-forward compensation to reduce low-frequency gain fluctuations. PMID:19752999

  8. Talking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Connie; Rosen, Harold

    1974-01-01

    Excepts from THE LANGUAGE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN (Penguin, 1973), which evolved from a project initiated by the English Committee of the Schools Council of England and conducted under the direction of Mrs. Connie Rosen; focuses on the talk of primary school children in the presence of a teacher. (Author/JM)

  9. Information content and cross-talk in biological signal transduction: An information theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ashok; Lyons, Samanthe

    2014-03-01

    Biological cells respond to chemical cues provided by extra-cellular chemical signals, but many of these chemical signals and the pathways they activate interfere and overlap with one another. How well cells can distinguish between interfering extra-cellular signals is thus an important question in cellular signal transduction. Here we use information theory with stochastic simulations of networks to address the question of what happens to total information content when signals interfere. We find that both total information transmitted by the biological pathway, as well as its theoretical capacity to discriminate between overlapping signals, are relatively insensitive to cross-talk between the extracellular signals, until significantly high levels of cross-talk have been reached. This robustness of information content against cross-talk requires that the average amplitude of the signals are large. We predict that smaller systems, as exemplified by simple phosphorylation relays (two-component systems) in bacteria, should be significantly much less robust against cross-talk. Our results suggest that mammalian signal transduction can tolerate a high amount of cross-talk without degrading information content, while smaller bacterial systems cannot.

  10. Cross talk between cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts: from multiscale investigative approaches to mechanisms and functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, P.; Su, J.

    2012-01-01

    The heart is comprised of a syncytium of cardiac myocytes (CM) and surrounding nonmyocytes, the majority of which are cardiac fibroblasts (CF). CM and CF are highly interspersed in the myocardium with one CM being surrounded by one or more CF. Bidirectional cross talk between CM and CF plays important roles in determining cardiac mechanical and electrical function in both normal and diseased hearts. Genetically engineered animal models and in vitro studies have provided evidence that CM and CF can regulate each other's function. Their cross talk contributes to structural and electrical remodeling in both atria and ventricles and appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of various heart diseases that lead to heart failure and arrhythmia disorders. Mechanisms of CM-CF cross talk, which are not yet fully understood, include release of paracrine factors, direct cell-cell interactions via gap junctions and potentially adherens junctions and nanotubes, and cell interactions with the extracellular matrix. In this article, we provide an overview of the existing multiscale experimental and computational approaches for the investigation of cross talk between CM and CF and review recent progress in our understanding of the functional consequences and underlying mechanisms. Targeting cross talk between CM and CF could potentially be used therapeutically for the modulation of the cardiac remodeling response in the diseased heart and may lead to new strategies for the treatment of heart failure or rhythm disturbances. PMID:23064834

  11. Nitric oxide metabolism and indole acetic acid biosynthesis cross-talk in Azospirillum brasilense SM.

    PubMed

    Koul, Vatsala; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-04-01

    Production of nitric oxide (NO) and the presence of NO metabolism genes, nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ), nitrous oxide reductase regulator (nosR) and nitric oxide reductase (norB) were identified in the plant-associated bacterium (PAB) Azospirillum brasilense SM. NO presence was confirmed in all overexpressing strains, while improvement in the plant growth response of these strains was mediated by increased NO and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the strains. Electron microscopy showed random distribution to biofilm, with surface colonization of pleiomorphic Azospirilla. Quantitative IAA estimation highlighted a crucial role of nosR and norBC in regulating IAA biosynthesis. The NO quencher and donor reduced/blocked IAA biosynthesis by all strains, indicating their common regulatory role in IAA biosynthesis. Tryptophan (Trp) and l-Arginine (Arg) showed higher expression of NO genes tested, while in the case of ipdC, only Trp and IAA increased expression, while Arg had no significant effect. The highest nosR expression in SMnosR in the presence of IAA and Trp, along with its 2-fold IAA level, confirmed the relationship of nosR overexpression with Trp in increasing IAA. These results indicate a strong correlation between IAA and NO in A. brasilense SM and suggest the existence of cross-talk or shared signaling mechanisms in these two growth regulators.

  12. Cross-talk induces bifurcations in nonlinear models of synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Terry

    2012-02-01

    Linear models of synaptic plasticity provide a useful starting-point for examining the dynamics of neuronal development and learning, but their inherent problems are well known. Models of synaptic plasticity that embrace the demands of biological realism are therefore typically nonlinear. Viewed from a more abstract perspective, nonlinear models of synaptic plasticity are a subset of nonlinear dynamical systems. As such, they may therefore exhibit bifurcations under the variation of control parameters, including noise and errors in synaptic updates. One source of noise or error is the cross-talk that occurs during otherwise Hebbian plasticity. Under cross-talk, stimulation of a set of synapses can induce or modify plasticity in adjacent, unstimulated synapses. Here, we analyze two nonlinear models of developmental synaptic plasticity and a model of independent component analysis in the presence of a simple model of cross-talk. We show that cross-talk does indeed induce bifurcations in these models, entirely destroying their ability to acquire either developmentally or learning-related patterns of fixed points. Importantly, the critical level of cross-talk required to induce bifurcations in these models is very sensitive to the statistics of the afferents' activities and the number of afferents synapsing on a postsynaptic cell. In particular, the critical level can be made arbitrarily small. Because bifurcations are inevitable in nonlinear models, our results likely apply to many nonlinear models of synaptic plasticity, although the precise details vary by model. Hence, many nonlinear models of synaptic plasticity are potentially fatally compromised by the toxic influence of cross-talk and other sources of noise and errors more generally. We conclude by arguing that biologically realistic models of synaptic plasticity must be robust against noise-induced bifurcations and that biological systems may have evolved strategies to circumvent their possible dangers.

  13. Parabens and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligand Cross-Talk in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shawn; Yuan, Chaoshen; Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Rudel, Ruthann A.; Ackerman, Janet M.; Yaswen, Paul; Vulpe, Chris D.; Leitman, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xenoestrogens are synthetic compounds that mimic endogenous estrogens by binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Exposure to estrogens and to some xenoestrogens has been associated with cell proliferation and an increased risk of breast cancer. Despite evidence of estrogenicity, parabens are among the most widely used xenoestrogens in cosmetics and personal-care products and are generally considered safe. However, previous cell-based studies with parabens do not take into account the signaling cross-talk between estrogen receptor α (ERα) and the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family. Objectives: We investigated the hypothesis that the potency of parabens can be increased with HER ligands, such as heregulin (HRG). Methods: The effects of HER ligands on paraben activation of c-Myc expression and cell proliferation were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blots, flow cytometry, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in ERα- and HER2-positive human BT-474 breast cancer cells. Results: Butylparaben (BP) and HRG produced a synergistic increase in c-Myc mRNA and protein levels in BT-474 cells. Estrogen receptor antagonists blocked the synergistic increase in c-Myc protein levels. The combination of BP and HRG also stimulated proliferation of BT-474 cells compared with the effects of BP alone. HRG decreased the dose required for BP-mediated stimulation of c-Myc mRNA expression and cell proliferation. HRG caused the phosphorylation of serine 167 in ERα. BP and HRG produced a synergistic increase in ERα recruitment to the c-Myc gene. Conclusion: Our results show that HER ligands enhanced the potency of BP to stimulate oncogene expression and breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro via ERα, suggesting that parabens might be active at exposure levels not previously considered toxicologically relevant from studies testing their effects in isolation. Citation: Pan S, Yuan C, Tagmount A, Rudel RA, Ackerman JM

  14. Simulation of cross-talk between thermal track positioning control and thermal flying height controla)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Shen, Shengnan; Cui, Fuhao; Huang, Jie; Wu, Shijing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, a coupling analysis of thermal-structural simulation and air-bearing simulation has been performed to investigate the cross-talk effects between thermal track positioning control (TPC) and thermal flying height control (TFC) on the static flying attitude of a TPC-TFC slider. Simulation results show that the TPC heating induced head protrusion towards disk is comparable to the head actuation stroke along the cross-track direction. By optimizing the distance of TPC heater to air bearing surface, and the distance of TPC heater to the slider center line, it can obtain a large TPC actuation stroke and a small head protrusion towards disk. Moreover, it is found that the TPC heating will cause large protrusion of the side edge of trailing pad and change the flying characteristics significantly. A trade-off performance between cross-talk effects and TPC actuation stroke along cross-track direction is needed.

  15. Cross-Talk: The Role of Homophily and Elite Bias in Civic Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weare, Christopher; Musso, Juliet; Jun, Kyu-Nahm

    2009-01-01

    We examine the manner in which voluntary associations expose individuals to differing perspectives, or "cross-talk." Specifically we develop hypotheses based on the interactive roles of elite bias and homophily in structuring networks of democratic participation and test them on social network data of Los Angeles neighborhood councils. We find…

  16. Illuminating the Gap: Neuronal Cross-Talk within Sensory Ganglia and Persistent Pain.

    PubMed

    Seal, Rebecca P

    2016-09-01

    How primary sensory neurons contribute to persistent pain remains unclear. A novel imaging technique introduced here by Kim et al. (2016) in this issue of Neuron to view the activities of large numbers of ganglion neurons simultaneously analyzes the importance of neuronal cross-talk in pain transmission. PMID:27608756

  17. Cross-talk between signaling and metabolism in the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Uebelhoer, Melanie; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2016-08-01

    The link between signaling and metabolism was first recognized with insulin signal transduction. Efficient glucose uptake by the endothelium requires insulin receptor activation to deliver GLUT receptors to the cell surface. More recently however, additional evidence has emerged for a broader crosstalk as signaling events have been shown to regulate a large number of metabolic enzymes. Changes in the metabolic status of endothelial and smooth muscle cells are observed at times of increased proliferative activity and these coincide with activation of cell surface receptors. Intriguingly, a rise in glycolysis appears to be associated with remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton during migration and angiogenesis. Overall, understanding how do signaling and metabolic pathways intersect and cross-regulate each other has become an important question and an emerging cornerstone in vascular biology. PMID:27291139

  18. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  19. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Bialowas, Sonja; Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  20. Metabolic cross-talk between pathways of terpenoid backbone biosynthesis in spike lavender.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Arrillaga, Isabel

    2015-10-01

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in developing spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia Med) was analyzed using specific inhibitors and on the basis of (13)C-labeling experiments. The presence of mevinolin (MEV), an inhibitor of the MVA pathway, at concentrations higher than 0.5 μM significantly reduced plant development, but not the synthesis of chlorophylls and carotenoids. On the other hand, fosmidomycin (FSM), an inhibitor of the MEP pathway, at concentrations higher than 20 μM blocked the synthesis of chlorophyll, carotenoids and essential oils, and significantly reduced stem development. Notably, 1.2 mM MVA could recover the phenotype of MEV-treated plants, including the normal growth and development of roots, and could partially restore the biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments and, to a lesser extent, of the essential oils in plantlets treated with FSM. Spike lavender shoot apices were also used in (13)C-labeling experiments, where the plantlets were grown in the presence of [U-(13)C6]glucose. GC-MS-analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. However, on the basis of the isotopologue profiles, a minor contribution of the MVA pathway was evident that was increased in transgenic spike lavender plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first enzyme of the MVA pathway. Together, these findings provide evidence for a transport of MVA-derived precursors from the cytosol to the plastids in leaves of spike lavender. PMID:26254184

  1. Kv4.2 is a locus for PKC and ERK/MAPK cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Laura A.; Ren, Yajun; Cheng, Feng; Bui, Dui; Sweatt, J. David; Anderson, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    Transient outward K+ currents are particularly important for the regulation of membrane excitability of neurons and repolarization of action potentials in cardiac myocytes. These currents are modulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activation, and the K+ channel subunit, Kv4.2, is a major contributor to these currents. Furthermore, the current recorded from Kv4.2 channels expressed in oocytes is reduced by PKC activation. The mechanism underlying PKC regulation of Kv4.2 currents is unknown. In this study, we determined that PKC directly phosphorylates the Kv4.2 channel protein. In vitro phosphorylation of the intracellular amino (N)- and carboxyl (C)-termini of Kv4.2 glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein revealed that the Kv4.2 C-terminal was phosphorylated by PKC, while the N-terminal was not. Amino acid mapping and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the phosphorylated residues on the Kv4.2 C-terminal were Serine (Ser) 447 and Ser537. A phospho-site specific antibody showed that phosphorylation at the Ser537 site increased in the hippocampus in response to PKC activation. Surface biotinylation experiments revealed that alanine mutation to block phosphorylation at both of the PKC sites increased surface expression compared to wildtype Kv4.2. Electrophysiological recordings of the wildtype and both the alanine and aspartate mutant Kv4.2 channels expressed with KChIP3 revealed no significant difference in the half activation or inactivation voltage of the channel. Interestingly, the Ser537 site lies within a possible extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) recognition (docking) domain in the Kv4.2 C-terminal sequence. We found that phosphorylation of Kv4.2 by PKC enhanced ERK phosphorylation of the channel in vitro. These findings suggest the possibility that Kv4.2 is a locus for PKC and ERK cross-talk. PMID:18795890

  2. Decoupling indirect topographic cross-talk in band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sang Mo; Mazet, Lucie; Okatan, M. Baris; Jesse, Stephen; Niu, Gang; Schroeder, Thomas; Schamm-Chardon, Sylvie; Dubourdieu, Catherine; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-06-01

    All scanning probe microscopies are subjected to topographic cross-talk, meaning the topography-related contrast in functional images. Here, we investigate the signatures of indirect topographic cross-talk in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging and spectroscopy and its decoupling using band excitation (BE) method in ferroelectric BaTiO3 deposited on the Si substrates with free standing nanopillars of diameter 50 nm. Comparison between the single-frequency PFM and BE-PFM results shows that the measured signal can be significantly distorted by topography-induced shifts in the contact resonance frequency and cantilever transfer function. However, with proper correction, such shifts do not affect PFM imaging and hysteresis loop measurements. This suggests the necessity of an advanced approach, such as BE-PFM, for detection of intrinsic sample piezoresponse on the topographically non-uniform surfaces.

  3. Cross-talk among structural domains of human DBP upon binding 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arjun; Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is structurally very similar to serum albumin (ALB); both have three distinct structural domains and high cysteine-content. Yet, functionally they are very different. DBP possesses high affinity for vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, but ALB does not. It has been suggested that there may be cross-talk among the domains so that binding of one ligand may influence the binding of others. In this study we have employed 2-p-toluidinyl-6-sulphonate (TNS), a reporter molecule that fluoresces upon binding to hydrophobic pockets of DBP. We observed that recombinant domain III possesses strong binding for TNS, which is not influenced by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3), yet TNS-fluorescence of the whole protein is quenched by 25-OH-D3. These results provide a direct evidence of cross-talk among the structural domains of DBP. PMID:18035050

  4. Non-cross talk multi-channel photomultiplier using guided electron multipliers

    DOEpatents

    Gomez, J.; Majewski, S.; Weisenberger, A.G.

    1995-09-26

    An improved multi-channel electron multiplier is provided that exhibits zero cross-talk and high rate operation. Resistive material input and output masks are employed to control divergence of electrons. Electron multiplication takes place in closed channels. Several embodiments are provided for these channels including a continuous resistive emissive multiplier and a discrete resistive multiplier with discrete dynode chains interspaced with resistive layers-masks. Both basic embodiments provide high gain multiplication of electrons without accumulating surface charges while containing electrons to their proper channels to eliminate cross-talk. The invention can be for example applied to improve the performance of ion mass spectrometers, positron emission tomography devices, in DNA sequencing and other beta radiography applications and in many applications in particle physics. 28 figs.

  5. Non cross talk multi-channel photomultiplier using guided electron multipliers

    DOEpatents

    Gomez, Javier; Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    1995-01-01

    An improved multi-channel electron multiplier is provided that exhibits zero cross-talk and high rate operation. Resistive material input and output masks are employed to control divergence of electrons. Electron multiplication takes place in closed channels. Several embodiments are provided for these channels including a continuous resistive emissive multiplier and a discrete resistive multiplier with discrete dynode chains interspaced with resistive layers-masks. Both basic embodiments provide high gain multiplication of electrons without accumulating surface charges while containing electrons to their proper channels to eliminate cross-talk. The invention can be for example applied to improve the performance of ion mass spectrometers, positron emission tomography devices, in DNA sequencing and other beta radiography applications and in many applications in particle physics.

  6. Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton mediates receptor cross talk: An emerging concept in tuning receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Pieta K.; Batista, Facundo D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton in the control of receptor signaling. This may be of particular importance in the context of immune receptors, such as the B cell receptor, where dysregulated signaling can result in autoimmunity and malignancy. Here, we discuss the role of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling receptor compartmentalization, dynamics, and clustering as a means to regulate receptor signaling through controlling the interactions with protein partners. We propose that the actin cytoskeleton is a point of integration for receptor cross talk through modulation of protein dynamics and clustering. We discuss the implication of this cross talk via the cytoskeleton for both ligand-induced and low-level constitutive (tonic) signaling necessary for immune cell survival. PMID:26833785

  7. Decoupling indirect topographic cross-talk in band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Mazet, Lucie; Jesse, Stephen; Niu, Gang; Schroeder, Thomas; Schamm-Chardon, Sylvie; Dubourdieu, Catherine; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Yang, Sang Mo; Okatan, M. Baris

    2016-06-20

    Here, all scanning probe microscopies are subjected to topographic cross-talk, meaning the topography-related contrast in functional images. Here, we investigate the signatures of indirect topographic cross-talk in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging and spectroscopy and its decoupling using band excitation (BE) method in ferroelectric BaTiO3 deposited on the Si substrates with free standing nanopillars of diameter 50 nm. Comparison between the single-frequency PFM and BE-PFM results shows that the measured signal can be significantly distorted by topography-induced shifts in the contact resonance frequency and cantilever transfer function. However, with proper correction, such shifts do not affect PFM imaging and hysteresismore » loop measurements. This suggests the necessity of an advanced approach, such as BE-PFM, for detection of intrinsic sample piezoresponse on the topographically non-uniform surfaces.« less

  8. Cross-talk between apoptosis and cytokines in the regulation of parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    DosReis, George A; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia L; Guillermo, Landi V C; Lopes, Marcela F

    2007-01-01

    Parasitic diseases have worldwide medical and economical impact. Host T lymphocytes and the cytokines they produce determine the outcome of parasitic infections. Programmed cell death by apoptosis is induced in the course of parasitic infections, and affects cytokine production by removing activated effector T and B cells. In addition, engulfment of apoptotic cells promotes the secretion of cytokines that regulate intracellular replication of protozoan parasites. In this review, we discuss how the cross-talk between apoptosis and cytokines regulates parasitic infection.

  9. Glomerular endothelial cell injury and cross talk in diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jia; Lee, Kyung; Chuang, Peter Y.; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains a leading cause of new-onset end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and yet, at present, the treatment is still very limited. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD is therefore necessary to develop more effective therapies. Increasing evidence suggests that glomerular endothelial cell (GEC) injury plays a major role in the development and progression of DKD. Alteration of the glomerular endothelial cell surface layer, including its major component, glycocalyx, is a leading cause of microalbuminuria observed in early DKD. Many studies suggest a presence of cross talk between glomerular cells, such as between GEC and mesangial cells or GEC and podocytes. PDGFB/PDGFRβ is a major mediator for GEC and mesangial cell cross talk, while vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietins, and endothelin-1 are the major mediators for GEC and podocyte communication. In DKD, GEC injury may lead to podocyte damage, while podocyte loss further exacerbates GEC injury, forming a vicious cycle. Therefore, GEC injury may predispose to albuminuria in diabetes either directly or indirectly by communication with neighboring podocytes and mesangial cells via secreted mediators. Identification of novel mediators of glomerular cell cross talk, such as microRNAs, will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD. Targeting these mediators may be a novel approach to develop more effective therapy for DKD. PMID:25411387

  10. Fast method of cross-talk effect reduction in biomedical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Maciej; Kolenderska, Sylwia M.; Borycki, Dawid; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of biological samples or living tissue structures requires light delivery to a region of interest and then collection of scattered light or fluorescent light in order to reconstruct an image of the object. When the coherent illumination light enters bulky biological object, each of scattering center (single molecule, group of molecules or other sample feature) acts as a secondary light source. As a result, scattered spherical waves from these secondary sources interact with each other, generating cross-talk noise between optical channels (eigenmodes). The cross-talk effect have serious impact on the performance of the imaging systems. In particular it reduces an ability of optical system to transfer high spatial frequencies thereby reducing its resolution. In this work we present a fast method to eliminate all unwanted waves combination, that overlap at image plane, suppressing recovery of high spatial frequencies by using the spatio-temporal optical coherence manipulation (STOC, [1]). In this method a number of phase mask is introduced to illuminating beam by spatial light modulator in a time of single image acquisition. We use a digital mirror device (DMD) in order to rapid cross-talk noise reduction (up to 22kHz modulation frequency) when imaging living biological cells in vivo by using full-field microscopy setup with double pass arrangement. This, to our best knowledge, has never been shown before. [1] D. Borycki, M. Nowakowski, and M. Wojtkowski, Opt. Lett. 38, 4817 (2013).

  11. Different cross-talk sites between the renin-angiotensin and the kallikrein-kinin systems.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2014-12-01

    Targeting the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) constitutes a major advance in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Evidence indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin AT1 receptor blockers act on both the RAS and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). In addition to the interaction between the RAS and KKS at the level of angiotensin-converting enzyme catalyzing both angiotensin II generation and bradykinin degradation, the RAS and KKS also interact at other levels: 1) prolylcarboxypeptidase, an angiotensin II inactivating enzyme and a prekallikrein activator; 2) kallikrein, a kinin-generating and prorenin-activating enzyme; 3) angiotensin-(1-7) exerts kininlike effects and potentiates the effects of bradykinin; and 4) the angiotensin AT1 receptor forms heterodimers with the bradykinin B2 receptor. Moreover, angiotensin II enhances B1 and B2 receptor expression via transcriptional mechanisms. These cross-talks explain why both the RAS and KKS are up-regulated in some circumstances, whereas in other circumstances both systems change in the opposite manner, expressed as an activated RAS and a depressed KKS. As the cross-talks between the RAS and the KKS play an important role in response to different stimuli, taking these cross-talks between the two systems into account may help in the development of drugs targeting the two systems. PMID:23386283

  12. Tubular cross talk in acute kidney injury: a story of sense and sensibility.

    PubMed

    El-Achkar, Tarek M; Dagher, Pierre C

    2015-06-15

    The mammalian kidney is an organ composed of numerous functional units or nephrons. Beyond the filtering glomerulus of each nephron, various tubular segments with distinct populations of epithelial cells sequentially span the kidney from cortex to medulla. The highly organized folding of the tubules results in a spatial distribution that allows intimate contact between various tubular subsegments. This unique arrangement can promote a newly recognized type of horizontal epithelial-to-epithelial cross talk. In this review, we discuss the importance of this tubular cross talk in shaping the response of the kidney to acute injury in a sense and sensibility model. We propose that injury-resistant tubules such as S1 proximal segments and thick ascending limbs (TAL) can act as "sensors" and thus modulate the responsiveness or "sensibility" of the S2-S3 proximal segments to injury. We also discuss new findings that highlight the importance of tubular cross talk in regulating homeostasis and inflammation not only in the kidney, but also systemically.

  13. Oligodendrocyte-microglia cross-talk in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Peferoen, Laura; Kipp, Markus; van der Valk, Paul; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) is exemplified by cross-talk between glia and neurons shown to be essential for maintaining homeostasis. While microglia are actively modulated by neurons in the healthy brain, little is known about the cross-talk between oligodendrocytes and microglia. Oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells in the CNS, are essential for the propagation of action potentials along axons, and additionally serve to support neurons by producing neurotrophic factors. In demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, oligodendrocytes are thought to be the victims. Here, we review evidence that oligodendrocytes also have strong immune functions, express a wide variety of innate immune receptors, and produce and respond to chemokines and cytokines that modulate immune responses in the CNS. We also review evidence that during stress events in the brain, oligodendrocytes can trigger a cascade of protective and regenerative responses, in addition to responses that elicit progressive neurodegeneration. Knowledge of the cross-talk between microglia and oligodendrocytes may continue to uncover novel pathways of immune regulation in the brain that could be further exploited to control neuroinflammation and degeneration.

  14. Improving spinning disk confocal microscopy by preventing pinhole cross-talk for intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimozawa, Togo; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kondo, Takefumi; Hayashi, Shigeo; Shitamukai, Atsunori; Konno, Daijiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Takayama, Jun; Onami, Shuichi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujita, Katsumasa; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    A recent key requirement in life sciences is the observation of biological processes in their natural in vivo context. However, imaging techniques that allow fast imaging with higher resolution in 3D thick specimens are still limited. Spinning disk confocal microscopy using a Yokogawa Confocal Scanner Unit, which offers high-speed multipoint confocal live imaging, has been found to have wide utility among cell biologists. A conventional Confocal Scanner Unit configuration, however, is not optimized for thick specimens, for which the background noise attributed to “pinhole cross-talk,” which is unintended pinhole transmission of out-of-focus light, limits overall performance in focal discrimination and reduces confocal capability. Here, we improve spinning disk confocal microscopy by eliminating pinhole cross-talk. First, the amount of pinhole cross-talk is reduced by increasing the interpinhole distance. Second, the generation of out-of-focus light is prevented by two-photon excitation that achieves selective-plane illumination. We evaluate the effect of these modifications and test the applicability to the live imaging of green fluorescent protein-expressing model animals. As demonstrated by visualizing the fine details of the 3D cell shape and submicron-size cytoskeletal structures inside animals, these strategies dramatically improve higher-resolution intravital imaging. PMID:23401517

  15. Remifentanil-induced preconditioning has cross-talk with A1 and A2B adenosine receptors in ischemic-reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Cheol; Jung, Jiyoon; Park, Sang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a cross-talk between opioid receptors (OPRs) and adenosine receptors (ADRs) in remifentanil preconditioning (R-Pre) and, if so, to investigate the types of ADRs involved in the cross-talk. Isolated rat hearts received 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 2 hr of reperfusion. OPR and ADR antagonists were perfused from 10 min before R-Pre until the end of R-Pre. The heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP),velocity of contraction (+dP/dtmax), and coronary flow (CF) were recorded. The area at risk and area of necrosis were measured. After reperfusion, the LVDP, +dP/dtmax,and CF showed a significant increase in the R-Pre group compared with the control group (no intervention before or after regional ischemia). These increases in the R-Pre group were blocked by naloxone, a nonspecific ADR antagonist, an A1 ADR antagonist, and an A2B ADR antagonist. The infarct size was reduced significantly in the R-Pre group compared with the control group. The infarct-reducing effect in the R-Pre group was blocked by naloxone, the nonspecific ADR antagonist, the A1 ADR antagonist, and the A2B ADR antagonist. The results of this study demonstrate that there is cross-talk between ADRs and OPRs in R-Pre and that A1 ADR and A2B ADR appear to be involved in the cross-talk. PMID:26773185

  16. Elevated cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage in osteoarthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jun; Wang, Bin; Li, Wen; Zhou, Xiaozhou; Scherr, Thomas; Yang, Yunyi; Price, Christopher; Wang, Liyun

    2012-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and one of the leading causes of disability in the United States and across the world. As a disease of the whole joint, OA exhibits a complicated etiology with risk factors including, but not limited to, ageing, altered joint loading, and injury. Subchondral bone is hypothesized to be involved in OA development. However, direct evidence supporting this is lacking. We previously detected measurable transport of solute across the mineralized calcified cartilage in normal joints, suggesting a potential cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage. Whether this cross-talk exists in OA has not been established yet. Using two models that induced OA by either ageing or surgery (destabilization of medial meniscus, DMM), we tested the hypothesis that increased cross-talk occurs in OA. We quantified the diffusivity of sodium fluorescein (mol. wt. 376Da), a marker of small-sized signaling molecules, within calcified joint matrix using our newly developed fluorescence loss induced by photobleaching (FLIP) method. Tracer diffusivity was found to be 0.30±0.17 and 0.33±0.20μm(2)/s within the calcified cartilage and 0.12±0.04 and 0.07±0.03μm(2)/s across the osteochondral interface in the aged (20-24-month-old, n=4) and DMM OA joints (5-month-old, n=5), respectively, which were comparable to the control values for the contralateral non-operated joints in the DMM mice (0.48±0.13 and 0.12±0.06μm(2)/s). Although we did not detect significant changes in tissue matrix permeability in OA joints, we found i) an increased number of vessels invading the calcified cartilage (and sometimes approaching the tidemark) in the aged (+100%) and DMM (+50%) joints relative to the normal age controls; and ii) a 60% thinning of the subchondral bone and calcified cartilage layers in the aged joints (with no significant changes detected in the DMM joints). These results suggested that the capacity for cross-talk between subchondral bone

  17. Propagation dynamics of controlled cross-talk via interplay between {chi}{sup (1)} and {chi}{sup (3)} processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Paul S.; Welch, George R.; Gord, James R.; Patnaik, Anil K.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the propagation dynamics of a nonlinear cross-talk effect between two probe channels in a double-ladder system and show that an interplay between {chi}{sup (1)} and {chi}{sup (3)} processes leads to the control of cross-talk. We derive analytical solutions to describe the propagation dynamics of the probe fields with the cross-talk effect built in. From the analytical results we identify and examine the regimes of interest where contributions of either {chi}{sup (1)} or {chi}{sup (3)} or both are significant. The control of cross-talk is demonstrated experimentally, and good quantitative agreement is found between the analytical solutions and the experiment.

  18. Staphylococcus epidermidis agr quorum-sensing system: signal identification, cross talk, and importance in colonization.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael E; Todd, Daniel A; Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Paharik, Alexandra E; Van Dyke, Michael J; Büttner, Henning; Dunman, Paul M; Rohde, Holger; Cech, Nadja B; Fey, Paul D; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic pathogen that is one of the leading causes of medical device infections. Global regulators like the agr quorum-sensing system in this pathogen have received a limited amount of attention, leaving important questions unanswered. There are three agr types in S. epidermidis strains, but only one of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) signals has been identified (AIP-I), and cross talk between agr systems has not been tested. We structurally characterized all three AIP types using mass spectrometry and discovered that the AIP-II and AIP-III signals are 12 residues in length, making them the largest staphylococcal AIPs identified to date. S. epidermidis agr reporter strains were developed for each system, and we determined that cross-inhibitory interactions occur between the agr type I and II systems and between the agr type I and III systems. In contrast, no cross talk was observed between the type II and III systems. To further understand the outputs of the S. epidermidis agr system, an RNAIII mutant was constructed, and microarray studies revealed that exoenzymes (Ecp protease and Geh lipase) and low-molecular-weight toxins were downregulated in the mutant. Follow-up analysis of Ecp confirmed the RNAIII is required to induce protease activity and that agr cross talk modulates Ecp activity in a manner that mirrors the agr reporter results. Finally, we demonstrated that the agr system enhances skin colonization by S. epidermidis using a porcine model. This work expands our knowledge of S. epidermidis agr system function and will aid future studies on cell-cell communication in this important opportunistic pathogen.

  19. Staphylococcus epidermidis agr Quorum-Sensing System: Signal Identification, Cross Talk, and Importance in Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Michael E.; Todd, Daniel A.; Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Paharik, Alexandra E.; Van Dyke, Michael J.; Büttner, Henning; Dunman, Paul M.; Rohde, Holger; Cech, Nadja B.; Fey, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic pathogen that is one of the leading causes of medical device infections. Global regulators like the agr quorum-sensing system in this pathogen have received a limited amount of attention, leaving important questions unanswered. There are three agr types in S. epidermidis strains, but only one of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) signals has been identified (AIP-I), and cross talk between agr systems has not been tested. We structurally characterized all three AIP types using mass spectrometry and discovered that the AIP-II and AIP-III signals are 12 residues in length, making them the largest staphylococcal AIPs identified to date. S. epidermidis agr reporter strains were developed for each system, and we determined that cross-inhibitory interactions occur between the agr type I and II systems and between the agr type I and III systems. In contrast, no cross talk was observed between the type II and III systems. To further understand the outputs of the S. epidermidis agr system, an RNAIII mutant was constructed, and microarray studies revealed that exoenzymes (Ecp protease and Geh lipase) and low-molecular-weight toxins were downregulated in the mutant. Follow-up analysis of Ecp confirmed the RNAIII is required to induce protease activity and that agr cross talk modulates Ecp activity in a manner that mirrors the agr reporter results. Finally, we demonstrated that the agr system enhances skin colonization by S. epidermidis using a porcine model. This work expands our knowledge of S. epidermidis agr system function and will aid future studies on cell-cell communication in this important opportunistic pathogen. PMID:25070736

  20. Functional Consequences of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Cross-talk and Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Wismann, Pernille; Iversen, Helle; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Knudsen, Sanne Moeller; Waldhoer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The signaling capacity of seven-transmembrane/G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) can be regulated through ligand-mediated receptor trafficking. Classically, the recycling of internalized receptors is associated with resensitization, whereas receptor degradation terminates signaling. We have shown previously that the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) internalizes fast and is primarily resensitized through recycling back to the cell surface. GLP-1R is expressed in pancreatic islets together with the closely related glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) and glucagon (GCGR) receptors. The interaction and cross-talk between coexpressed receptors is a wide phenomenon of the 7TM/GPCR superfamily. Numerous reports show functional consequences for signaling and trafficking of the involved receptors. On the basis of the high structural similarity and tissue coexpression, we here investigated the potential cross-talk between GLP-1R and GIPR or GCGR in both trafficking and signaling pathways. Using a real-time time-resolved FRET-based internalization assay, we show that GLP-1R, GIPR, and GCGR internalize with differential properties. Remarkably, upon coexpression of the internalizing GLP-1R and the non-internalizing GIPR, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R internalization was impaired in a GIPR concentration-dependent manner. As a functional consequence of such impaired internalization capability, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R signaling was abrogated. A similar compromised signaling was found when GLP-1R internalization was abrogated by a dominant-negative version of dynamin (dynamin-1 K44E), which provides a mechanistic link between GLP-1R trafficking and signaling. This study highlights the importance of receptor internalization for full functionality of GLP-1R. Moreover, cross-talk between the two incretin receptors GLP-1R and GIPR is shown to alter receptor trafficking with functional consequences for GLP-1R signaling. PMID:25451942

  1. PCB 126 toxicity is modulated by cross-talk between caveolae and Nrf2 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Petriello, Michael C.; Han, Sung Gu; Newsome, Bradley J.; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    Environmental toxicants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been implicated in the promotion of multiple inflammatory disorders including cardiovascular disease, but information regarding mechanisms of toxicity and cross-talk between relevant cell signaling pathways is lacking. To examine the hypothesis that cross-talk between membrane domains called caveolae and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) pathways alters PCB-induced inflammation, caveolin-1 was silenced in vascular endothelial cells, resulting in a decreased PCB-induced inflammatory response. Cav-1 silencing (siRNA treatment) also increased levels of Nrf2-ARE transcriptional binding, resulting in higher mRNA levels of the antioxidant genes glutathione s-transferase and NADPH dehydrogenase quinone-1 in both vehicle and PCB-treated systems. Along with this upregulated antioxidant response, Cav-1 siRNA treated cells exhibited decreased mRNA levels of the Nrf2 inhibitory protein Keap1 in both vehicle and PCB-treated samples. Silencing Cav-1 also decreased protein levels of Nrf2 inhibitory proteins Keap1 and Fyn kinase, especially in PCB-treated cells. Further, endothelial cells from wildtype and Cav-1 −/− mice were isolated and treated with PCB to better elucidate the role of functional caveolae in PCB-induced endothelial inflammation. Cav-1 −/− endothelial cells were protected from PCB-induced cellular dysfunction as evidenced by decreased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) protein induction. Compared to wildtype cells, Cav-1 −/− endothelial cells also allowed for a more effective antioxidant response, as observed by higher levels of the antioxidant genes. These data demonstrate novel cross-talk mechanisms between Cav-1 and Nrf2 and implicate the reduction of Cav-1 as a protective mechanism for PCB-induced cellular dysfunction and inflammation. - Highlights: • Reduction of caveolin-1 protein protects against polychlorinated biphenyl toxicity. • Decreasing

  2. A new multiple-drug applicator with minimal drug cross-talk, leakage, and consumption.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yosuke; Shimomura, Takeshi; Hosoguchi, Masafumi; Kano, Masanobu; Fukurotani, Kenkichi; Tabata, Toshihide

    2010-04-01

    The relative effects of multiple drugs give an important clue to dissect a neuronal mechanism and to seek for a candidate neurotherapeutical agent. Here we have devised a "flute" applicator which can deliver several drugs to a neural cell preparation. The applicator stands by, cleaning itself with bath perfusate and delivers drugs only during test applications. This minimizes drug cross-talk in and leakage from the applicator and drug consumption. Using the applicator, we successfully compared the relative effects of widely different doses of an agonist in single neurons. The flute applicator would be a useful tool for pharmacological analyses.

  3. A new multiple-drug applicator with minimal drug cross-talk, leakage, and consumption.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yosuke; Shimomura, Takeshi; Hosoguchi, Masafumi; Kano, Masanobu; Fukurotani, Kenkichi; Tabata, Toshihide

    2010-04-01

    The relative effects of multiple drugs give an important clue to dissect a neuronal mechanism and to seek for a candidate neurotherapeutical agent. Here we have devised a "flute" applicator which can deliver several drugs to a neural cell preparation. The applicator stands by, cleaning itself with bath perfusate and delivers drugs only during test applications. This minimizes drug cross-talk in and leakage from the applicator and drug consumption. Using the applicator, we successfully compared the relative effects of widely different doses of an agonist in single neurons. The flute applicator would be a useful tool for pharmacological analyses. PMID:20060427

  4. Investigation of in vivo cross-talk between key two-component systems of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Daniël T; Arents, Jos C; Postma, Pieter W; Crielaard, Wim; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2002-01-01

    Intracellular signal transfer in bacteria is dominated by phosphoryl transfer between conserved transmitter and receiver domains in regulatory proteins of so-called two-component systems. Escherichia coli contains 30 such systems, which allow it to modulate gene expression, enzyme activity and the direction of flagellar rotation. The authors have investigated whether, and to what extent, these separate systems form (an) interacting network(s) in vivo, focussing on interactions between four major systems, involved in the responses to the availability of phosphorylated sugars (Uhp), phosphate (Pho), nitrogen (Ntr) and oxygen (Arc). Significant cross-talk was not detectable in wild-type cells. Decreasing expression levels of succinate dehydrogenase (reporting Arc activation), upon activation of the Pho system, appeared to be independent of signalling through PhoR. Cross-talk towards NtrC did occur, however, in a ntrB deletion strain, upon joint activation of Pho, Ntr and Uhp. UhpT expression was demonstrated when cells were grown on pyruvate, through non-cognate phosphorylation of UhpA by acetyl phosphate.

  5. Reverse Engineering: A Key Component of Systems Biology to Unravel Global Abiotic Stress Cross-Talk

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, Swetlana; Usadel, Björn; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the global abiotic stress response is an important stepping stone for the development of universal stress tolerance in plants in the era of climate change. Although co-occurrence of several stress factors (abiotic and biotic) in nature is found to be frequent, current attempts are poor to understand the complex physiological processes impacting plant growth under combinatory factors. In this review article, we discuss the recent advances of reverse engineering approaches that led to seminal discoveries of key candidate regulatory genes involved in cross-talk of abiotic stress responses and summarized the available tools of reverse engineering and its relevant application. Among the universally induced regulators involved in various abiotic stress responses, we highlight the importance of (i) abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) hormonal cross-talks and (ii) the central role of WRKY transcription factors (TF), potentially mediating both abiotic and biotic stress responses. Such interactome networks help not only to derive hypotheses but also play a vital role in identifying key regulatory targets and interconnected hormonal responses. To explore the full potential of gene network inference in the area of abiotic stress tolerance, we need to validate hypotheses by implementing time-dependent gene expression data from genetically engineered plants with modulated expression of target genes. We further propose to combine information on gene-by-gene interactions with data from physical interaction platforms such as protein–protein or TF-gene networks. PMID:23293646

  6. Pathway Analysis Based on Attractor and Cross Talk in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third and second most common cancer form in men and women worldwide. It is generally accepted that colon cancer mainly results from diet. The aim of this study was to identify core pathways which elucidated the molecular mechanisms in colon cancer. The microarray data of E-GEOD-44861 was downloaded from ArrayExpress database. All human pathways were obtained from Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. In total, 135 differential expressed genes (DEG) were identified using Linear Models for Microarray Data package. Differential pathways were identified with the method of attractor after overlapping with DEG. Pathway cross talk network (PCN) was constructed by combining protein-protein interactions and differential pathways. Cross talks of all pathways were obtained in PCN. There were 65 pathways with RankProd (RP) values < 0.05 and 16 pathways with Impact Factors (IF) values > 100. Five pathways were satisfied with P value < 0.05, RP values < 0.05, and IF values > 100, which were considered to be the most important pathways in colon cancer. In conclusion, the five pathways were identified in the center status of colon cancer, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism and development of colon cancer. PMID:27746583

  7. Cross Talk between Insulin and Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Systems in Brown Adipogenesis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbin; Schulz, Tim J.; Espinoza, Daniel O.; Huang, Tian Lian; Emanuelli, Brice; Kristiansen, Karsten; Tseng, Yu-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Both insulin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling systems are important for adipocyte differentiation. Analysis of gene expression in BMP7-treated fibroblasts revealed a coordinated change in insulin signaling components by BMP7. To further investigate the cross talk between insulin and BMP signaling systems in brown adipogenesis, we examined the effect of BMP7 in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1)-deficient brown preadipocytes, which exhibit a severe defect in differentiation. Treatment of these cells with BMP7 for 3 days prior to adipogenic induction restored differentiation and expression of brown adipogenic markers. The high level of adipogenic inhibitor preadipocyte factor 1 (Pref-1) in IRS-1-null cells was markedly reduced by 3 days of BMP7 treatment, and analysis of the 1.3-kb pref-1 promoter revealed 9 putative Smad binding elements (SBEs), suggesting that BMP7 could directly suppress Pref-1 expression, thereby allowing the initiation of the adipogenic program. Using a series of sequential deletion mutants of the pref-1 promoter linked to the luciferase gene and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that the promoter-proximal SBE (−192/−184) was critical in mediating BMP7's suppressive effect on pref-1 transcription. Together, these data suggest cross talk between the insulin and BMP signaling systems by which BMP7 can rescue brown adipogenesis in cells with insulin resistance. PMID:20584981

  8. Cross Talk between Cancer and Mesenchymal Stem Cells through Extracellular Vesicles Carrying Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lopatina, Tatiana; Gai, Chiara; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are considered to be a novel complex mechanism of cell communication within the tumor microenvironment. EVs may act as vehicles for transcription factors and nucleic acids inducing epigenetic changes in recipient cells. Since tumor EVs may be present in patient biological fluids, it is important to investigate their function and molecular mechanisms of action. It has been shown that tumor cells release EVs, which are capable of regulating cell apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition, as well as to suppress activity of immune cells, to enhance angiogenesis, and to prepare a favorable microenvironment for metastasis. On the other hand, EVs derived from stromal cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), may influence the phenotype of tumor cells through reciprocal cross talk greatly influenced by the transcription factors and nucleic acids they carry. In particular, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs and long ncRNAs, have recently been identified as the main candidates for the phenotypic changes induced in the recipient cells by EVs. ncRNAs, which are important regulators of mRNA and protein expression, can function either as tumor suppressors or as oncogenes, depending on their targets. Herein, we have attempted to revise actual evidence reported in the literature on the role of EVs in tumor biology with particular regard to the cross talk of ncRNAs between cancer cells and MSCs. PMID:27242964

  9. Astroglia-Microglia Cross Talk during Neurodegeneration in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Batlle, Montserrat; Ferri, Lorenzo; Andrade, Carmen; Ortega, Francisco-Javier; Vidal-Taboada, Jose M.; Pugliese, Marco; Mahy, Nicole; Rodríguez, Manuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury triggers a progressive inflammatory response supported by a dynamic astroglia-microglia interplay. We investigated the progressive chronic features of the astroglia-microglia cross talk in the perspective of neuronal effects in a rat model of hippocampal excitotoxic injury. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) injection triggered a process characterized within 38 days by atrophy, neuronal loss, and fast astroglia-mediated S100B increase. Microglia reaction varied with the lesion progression. It presented a peak of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) secretion at one day after the lesion, and a transient YM1 secretion within the first three days. Microglial glucocorticoid receptor expression increased up to day 5, before returning progressively to sham values. To further investigate the astroglia role in the microglia reaction, we performed concomitant transient astroglia ablation with L-α-aminoadipate and NMDA-induced lesion. We observed a striking maintenance of neuronal death associated with enhanced microglial reaction and proliferation, increased YM1 concentration, and decreased TNF-α secretion and glucocorticoid receptor expression. S100B reactivity only increased after astroglia recovery. Our results argue for an initial neuroprotective microglial reaction, with a direct astroglial control of the microglial cytotoxic response. We propose the recovery of the astroglia-microglia cross talk as a tissue priority conducted to ensure a proper cellular coordination that retails brain damage. PMID:25977914

  10. Review: Post-translational cross-talk between brassinosteroid and sucrose signaling.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Christina

    2016-07-01

    A direct link has been elucidated between brassinosteroid function and perception, and sucrose partitioning and transport. Sucrose regulation and brassinosteroid signaling cross-talk at various levels, including the well-described regulation of transcriptional gene expression: BZR-like transcription factors link the signaling pathways. Since brassinosteroid responses depend on light quality and quantity, a light-dependent alternative pathway was postulated. Here, the focus is on post-translational events. Recent identification of sucrose transporter-interacting partners raises the question whether brassinosteroid and sugars jointly affect plant innate immunity and plant symbiotic interactions. Membrane permeability and sensitivity depends on the number of cell surface receptors and transporters. More than one endocytic route has been assigned to specific components, including brassinosteroid-receptors. The number of such proteins at the plasma membrane relies on endocytic recycling, internalization and/or degradation. Therefore, vesicular membrane trafficking is gaining considerable attention with regard to plant immunity. The organization of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), other receptors or transporters in membrane microdomains participate in endocytosis and the formation of specific intracellular compartments, potentially impacting biotic interactions. This minireview focuses on post-translational events affecting the subcellular compartmentation of membrane proteins involved in signaling, transport, and defense, and on the cross-talk between brassinosteroid signals and sugar availability. PMID:27181949

  11. Neurovascular cross talk in diabetic retinopathy: Pathophysiological roles and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Moran, Elizabeth P; Wang, Zhongxiao; Chen, Jing; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Smith, Lois E H; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population in developed countries, and its prevalence will increase as the global incidence of diabetes grows exponentially. DR begins with an early nonproliferative stage in which retinal blood vessels and neurons degenerate as a consequence of chronic hyperglycemia, resulting in vasoregression and persistent retinal ischemia, metabolic disequilibrium, and inflammation. This is conducive to overcompensatory pathological neovascularization associated with advanced proliferative DR. Although DR is considered a microvascular complication, the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia; neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, and dysregulation of neurovascular cross talk are responsible in part for vascular abnormalities in both early nonproliferative DR and advanced proliferative DR. Neuronal activity directly regulates microvascular dilation and blood flow in the process of neurovascular coupling. Retinal neurons also secrete guidance cues in response to injury, ischemia, or metabolic stress that may either promote or suppress vascular outgrowth, either alleviating or exacerbating DR, contingent on the stage of disease and retinal microenvironment. Neurodegeneration, impaired neurovascular coupling, and dysregulation of neuronal guidance cues are key events in the pathogenesis of DR, and correcting these events may prevent or delay development of advanced DR. The review discusses the mechanisms of neurovascular cross talk and its dysregulation in DR, and their potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27473938

  12. Cross-talk between the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Greene, Geoffrey L; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M; Yang, Sichun

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a hormone-responsive transcription factor that contains several discrete functional domains, including a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a DNA-binding domain (DBD). Despite a wealth of knowledge about the behaviors of individual domains, the molecular mechanisms of cross-talk between LBD and DBD during signal transduction from hormone to DNA-binding of ERα remain elusive. Here, we apply a multiscale approach combining coarse-grained (CG) and atomistically detailed simulations to characterize this cross-talk mechanism via an investigation of the ERα conformational landscape. First, a CG model of ERα is built based on crystal structures of individual LBDs and DBDs, with more emphasis on their interdomain interactions. Second, molecular dynamics simulations are implemented and enhanced sampling is achieved via the "push-pull-release" strategy in the search for different LBD-DBD orientations. Third, multiple energetically stable ERα conformations are identified on the landscape. A key finding is that estradiol-bound LBDs utilize the well-described activation helix H12 to pack and stabilize LBD-DBD interactions. Our results suggest that the estradiol-bound LBDs can serve as a scaffold to position and stabilize the DBD-DNA complex, consistent with experimental observations of enhanced DNA binding with the LBD. Final assessment using atomic-level simulations shows that these CG-predicted models are significantly stable within a 15-ns simulation window and that specific pairs of lysine residues in close proximity at the domain interfaces could serve as candidate sites for chemical cross-linking studies. Together, these simulation results provide a molecular view of the role of ERα domain interactions in response to hormone binding.

  13. Cross-talk reduction by correcting the subpixel position in a multiview autostereoscopic three-dimensional display based on a lenticular sheet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong-Hua; Li, Xiao-Fang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Ai-Hong; Li, Da-Hai

    2011-03-01

    A method is proposed to alleviate the cross talk in multiview autostereoscopic three-dimensional displays based on a lenticular sheet. We analyze the positional relationship between subpixels on the image panel and the lenticular sheet. According to this relationship, optimal synthetic images are synthesized to minimize cross talk by correcting the positions of subpixels on the image panel. Experimental results show that the proposed method significantly reduces the cross talk of view images and improves the quality of stereoscopic images. PMID:21364705

  14. Optimal design of loudspeaker arrays for robust cross-talk cancellation using the Taguchi method and the genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Tung, Chih-Wei; Lee, Chih-Chung

    2005-05-01

    An optimal design technique of loudspeaker arrays for cross-talk cancellation with application in three-dimensional audio is presented. An array focusing scheme is presented on the basis of the inverse propagation that relates the transducers to a set of chosen control points. Tikhonov regularization is employed in designing the inverse cancellation filters. An extensive analysis is conducted to explore the cancellation performance and robustness issues. To best compromise the performance and robustness of the cross-talk cancellation system, optimal configurations are obtained with the aid of the Taguchi method and the genetic algorithm (GA). The proposed systems are further justified by physical as well as subjective experiments. The results reveal that large number of loudspeakers, closely spaced configuration, and optimal control point design all contribute to the robustness of cross-talk cancellation systems (CCS) against head misalignment.

  15. Cross-talk characterization of dense single-photon avalanche diode arrays in CMOS 150-nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hesong; Pancheri, Lucio; C. Braga, Leo H.; Betta, Gian-Franco Dalla; Stoppa, David

    2016-06-01

    Cross-talk characterization results of high-fill-factor single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays in CMOS 150-nm technology are reported and discussed. Three different SPAD structures were designed with two different sizes (15.6 and 25.6 μm pitch) and three guard ring widths (0.6, 1.1, and 1.6 μm). Each SPAD was implemented in an array, composed of 25 (5×5) devices, which can be separately activated. Measurement results show that the average cross-talk probability is well below 1% for the shallow-junction SPAD structure with 15.6 μm pitch and 39.9% fill factor, and 1.45% for the structure with 25.6 μm pitch and 60.6% fill factor. An increase of cross-talk probability with the excess bias voltage is observed.

  16. PKCε and allopregnanolone: functional cross-talk at the GABAA receptor level

    PubMed Central

    Puia, Giulia; Ravazzini, Federica; Castelnovo, Luca Franco; Magnaghi, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Changes in GABAergic inhibition occur during physiological processes, during response to drugs and in various pathologies. These changes can be achieved through direct allosteric modifications at the γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptor protein level, or by altering the synthesis, trafficking and stability of the receptor. Neurosteroids (NSs) and protein kinase C (PKC) are potent modulators of GABAA receptors and their effects are presumably intermingled, even though evidence for this hypothesis is only partially explored. However, several PKC isoforms are able to phosphorylate the GABAA receptor, producing different functional effects. We focused on the ε isoform, that has been correlated to the sensitivity of the GABAA receptor to allosteric modulators and whose expression may be regulated in peripheral sensory neurons by NSs. The cross-talk between PKC-ε and NSs, leading to changes in GABAA receptor functionality, is considered and discussed in this perspective. PMID:25852476

  17. Cross-talk between calcium signalling and protein phosphorylation at the thylakoid

    PubMed Central

    Stael, Simon; Rocha, Agostinho G.; Wimberger, Terje; Anrather, Dorothea; Vothknecht, Ute C.; Teige, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The role of protein phosphorylation for adjusting chloroplast functions to changing environmental needs is well established, whereas calcium signalling in the chloroplast is only recently becoming appreciated. The work presented here explores the potential cross-talk between calcium signalling and protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts and provides the first evidence for targets of calcium-dependent protein phosphorylation at the thylakoid membrane. Thylakoid proteins were screened for calcium-dependent phosphorylation by 2D gel electrophoresis combined with phospho-specific labelling and PsaN, CAS, and VAR1, among other proteins, were identified repeatedly by mass spectrometry. Subsequently their calcium-dependent phosphorylation was confirmed in kinase assays using the purified proteins and chloroplast extracts. This is the first report on the protein targets of calcium-dependent phosphorylation of thylakoid proteins and provides ground for further studies in this direction. PMID:22197893

  18. Chemical Reporter for Visualizing Metabolic Cross-Talk between Carbohydrate Metabolism and Protein Modification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells. PMID:25062036

  19. Chemical reporter for visualizing metabolic cross-talk between carbohydrate metabolism and protein modification.

    PubMed

    Zaro, Balyn W; Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-09-19

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells.

  20. Dissecting molecular cross-talk between Nrf2 and NF-κB response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wardyn, Joanna D.; Ponsford, Amy H.; Sanderson, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    In most tissues, cells are exposed to frequent changes in levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) are the two key transcription factors that regulate cellular responses to oxidative stress and inflammation respectively. Pharmacological and genetic studies suggest that there is functional cross-talk between these two important pathways. The absence of Nrf2 can exacerbate NF-κB activity leading to increased cytokine production, whereas NF-κB can modulate Nrf2 transcription and activity, having both positive and negative effects on the target gene expression. This review focuses on the potentially complex molecular mechanisms that link the Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways and the importance of designing more effective therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat a broad range of neurological disorders. PMID:26551702

  1. Oncogenic transformation tunes the cross-talk between mesenchymal stem cells and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Nilda; Miranda, Alex; Funes, Juan M; Hevia, Giselle; Pérez, Rolando; de León, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells from mesenchymal origin (MSC) exert a plethora of immunomodulatory effects. We created a neoplastic model based on in vitro step-wise transformation to assess whether oncogenic pathways have the capacity to mould the cross-talk of MSC and lymphocytes. Neoplastic MSC exhibit an increased inhibitory effect on T cell proliferation, either directly or mediated by myeloid derived suppressor cells. Additionally, transformation of MSC enhances T cell apoptosis without reducing either the percentage of CD25 expressing cells or the level of this protein expression. Malignant transformation drives MSC to lose dependency on nitric oxide for immunosuppression whilst increasing the constitutive production of PGE2. Our results indicate that oncogenesis tunes the interplay between MSC and immune cells, favoring cancer immune evasion. PMID:24841856

  2. Heterogeneous glioblastoma cell cross-talk promotes phenotype alterations and enhanced drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Motaln, Helena; Koren, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Ramšak, Živa; Schichor, Christian; Lah, Tamara T

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most lethal of brain cancer, and it comprises a heterogeneous mixture of functionally distinct cancer cells that affect tumor progression. We examined the U87, U251, and U373 malignant cell lines as in vitro models to determine the impact of cellular cross-talk on their phenotypic alterations in co-cultures. These cells were also studied at the transcriptome level, to define the mechanisms of their observed mutually affected genomic stability, proliferation, invasion and resistance to temozolomide. This is the first direct demonstration of the neural and mesenchymal molecular fingerprints of U87 and U373 cells, respectively. U87-cell conditioned medium lowered the genomic stability of U373 (U251) cells, without affecting cell proliferation. In contrast, upon exposure of U87 cells to U373 (U251) conditioned medium, U87 cells showed increased genomic stability, decreased proliferation rates and increased invasion, due to a plethora of produced cytokines identified in the co-culture media. This cross talk altered the expression 264 genes in U87 cells that are associated with proliferation, inflammation, migration, and adhesion, and 221 genes in U373 cells that are associated with apoptosis, the cell cycle, cell differentiation and migration. Indirect and direct co-culturing of U87 and U373 cells showed mutually opposite effects on temozolomide resistance. In conclusion, definition of transcriptional alterations of distinct glioblastoma cells upon co-culturing provides better understanding of the mechanisms of glioblastoma heterogeneity, which will provide the basis for more informed glioma treatment in the future. PMID:26517510

  3. Opposite Cross-Talk by Oleate and Palmitate on Insulin Signaling in Hepatocytes through Macrophage Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Guijas, Carlos; Balsinde, Jesús; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation in adipose tissue during obesity is associated with an impairment of the insulin signaling cascade. In this study, we have evaluated the impact of palmitate or oleate overload of macrophage/Kupffer cells in triggering stress-mediated signaling pathways, in lipoapoptosis, and in the cross-talk with insulin signaling in hepatocytes. RAW 264.7 macrophages or Kupffer cells were stimulated with oleate or palmitate, and levels of M1/M2 polarization markers and the lipidomic profile of eicosanoids were analyzed. Whereas proinflammatory cytokines and total eicosanoids were elevated in macrophages/Kupffer cells stimulated with palmitate, enhanced arginase 1 and lower leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels were detected in macrophages stimulated with oleate. When hepatocytes were pretreated with conditioned medium (CM) from RAW 264.7 or Kupffer cells loaded with palmitate (CM-P), phosphorylation of stress kinases and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling was increased, insulin signaling was impaired, and lipoapoptosis was detected. Conversely, enhanced insulin receptor-mediated signaling and reduced levels of the phosphatases protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were found in hepatocytes treated with CM from macrophages stimulated with oleate (CM-O). Supplementation of CM-O with LTB4 suppressed insulin sensitization and increased PTP1B and PTEN. Furthermore, LTB4 decreased insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in hepatocytes, activated the NFκB pathway, and up-regulated PTP1B and PTEN, these effects being mediated by LTB4 receptor BTL1. In conclusion, oleate and palmitate elicit an opposite cross-talk between macrophages/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes. Whereas CM-P interferes at the early steps of insulin signaling, CM-O increases insulin sensitization, possibly by reducing LTB4. PMID:25792746

  4. Heterogeneous glioblastoma cell cross-talk promotes phenotype alterations and enhanced drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Motaln, Helena; Koren, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Ramšak, Živa; Schichor, Christian; Lah, Tamara T.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most lethal of brain cancer, and it comprises a heterogeneous mixture of functionally distinct cancer cells that affect tumor progression. We examined the U87, U251, and U373 malignant cell lines as in vitro models to determine the impact of cellular cross-talk on their phenotypic alterations in co-cultures. These cells were also studied at the transcriptome level, to define the mechanisms of their observed mutually affected genomic stability, proliferation, invasion and resistance to temozolomide. This is the first direct demonstration of the neural and mesenchymal molecular fingerprints of U87 and U373 cells, respectively. U87-cell conditioned medium lowered the genomic stability of U373 (U251) cells, without affecting cell proliferation. In contrast, upon exposure of U87 cells to U373 (U251) conditioned medium, U87 cells showed increased genomic stability, decreased proliferation rates and increased invasion, due to a plethora of produced cytokines identified in the co-culture media. This cross talk altered the expression 264 genes in U87 cells that are associated with proliferation, inflammation, migration, and adhesion, and 221 genes in U373 cells that are associated with apoptosis, the cell cycle, cell differentiation and migration. Indirect and direct co-culturing of U87 and U373 cells showed mutually opposite effects on temozolomide resistance. In conclusion, definition of transcriptional alterations of distinct glioblastoma cells upon co-culturing provides better understanding of the mechanisms of glioblastoma heterogeneity, which will provide the basis for more informed glioma treatment in the future. PMID:26517510

  5. Procedure for systematically tuning up cross-talk in the cross-resonance gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Sarah; Magesan, Easwar; Chow, Jerry M.; Gambetta, Jay M.

    2016-06-01

    We present improvements in both theoretical understanding and experimental implementation of the cross resonance (CR) gate that have led to shorter two-qubit gate times and interleaved randomized benchmarking fidelities exceeding 99%. The CR gate is an all-microwave two-qubit gate that does not require tunability and is therefore well suited to quantum computing architectures based on two-dimensional superconducting qubits. The performance of the gate has previously been hindered by long gate times and fidelities averaging 94-96%. We have developed a calibration procedure that accurately measures the full CR Hamiltonian. The resulting measurements agree with theoretical analysis of the gate and also elucidate the error terms that have previously limited gate fidelity. The increase in fidelity that we have achieved was accomplished by introducing a second microwave drive tone on the target qubit to cancel unwanted components of the CR Hamiltonian.

  6. Cross-talk in host-parasite associations: What do past and recent proteomics approaches tell us?

    PubMed

    Chetouhi, Chérif; Panek, Johan; Bonhomme, Ludovic; ElAlaoui, Hicham; Texier, Catherine; Langin, Thierry; de Bekker, Charissa; Urbach, Serge; Demettre, Edith; Missé, Dorothée; Holzmuller, Philippe; Hughes, David P; Zanzoni, Andreas; Brun, Christine; Biron, David G

    2015-07-01

    A cross-talk in host-parasite associations begins when a host encounters a parasite. For many host-parasite relationships, this cross-talk has been taking place for hundreds of millions of years. The co-evolution of hosts and parasites, the familiar 'arms race' results in fascinating adaptations. Over the years, host-parasite interactions have been studied extensively from both the host and parasitic point of view. Proteomics studies have led to new insights into host-parasite cross-talk and suggest that the molecular strategies used by parasites attacking animals and plants share many similarities. Likewise, animals and plants use several common molecular tactics to counter parasite attacks. Based on proteomics surveys undertaken since the post-genomic era, a synthesis is presented on the molecular strategies used by intra- and extracellular parasites to invade and create the needed habitat for growth inside the host, as well as strategies used by hosts to counter these parasite attacks. Pitfalls in deciphering host-parasite cross-talk are also discussed. To conclude, helpful advice is given with regard to new directions that are needed to discover the generic and specific molecular strategies used by the host against parasite invasion as well as by the parasite to invade, survive, and grow inside their hosts, and to finally discover parasitic molecular signatures associated with their development.

  7. Atypical Cross Talk Between Mentalizing and Mirror Neuron Networks in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Inna; Keown, Christopher L.; Lincoln, Alan J.; Pineda, Jaime A.; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Converging evidence indicates that brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involve atypical network connectivity, but it is unclear whether altered connectivity is especially prominent in brain networks that participate in social cognition. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether adolescents with ASD show altered functional connectivity in 2 brain networks putatively impaired in ASD and involved in social processing, theory of mind (ToM) and mirror neuron system (MNS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional study using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging involving 25 adolescents with ASD between the ages of 11 and 18 years and 25 typically developing adolescents matched for age, handedness, and nonverbal IQ. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Statistical parametric maps testing the degree of whole-brain functional connectivity and social functioning measures. RESULTS Relative to typically developing controls, participants with ASD showed a mixed pattern of both over- and underconnectivity in the ToM network, which was associated with greater social impairment. Increased connectivity in the ASD group was detected primarily between the regions of the MNS and ToM, and was correlated with sociocommunicative measures, suggesting that excessive ToM-MNS cross talk might be associated with social impairment. In a secondary analysis comparing a subset of the 15 participants with ASD with the most severe symptomology and a tightly matched subset of 15 typically developing controls, participants with ASD showed exclusive overconnectivity effects in both ToM and MNS networks, which were also associated with greater social dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Adolescents with ASD showed atypically increased functional connectivity involving the mentalizing and mirror neuron systems, largely reflecting greater cross talk between the 2. This finding is consistent with emerging evidence of reduced network segregation in ASD and challenges the

  8. The cross talk between long, non-coding RNAs and microRNAs in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaiyuan; Wang, Hao; Guo, Xiaoqiang; Xia, Jiazeng

    2016-02-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although great effort has been made during the past decades to facilitate the early detection and treatment of gastric cancer, the prognosis is not yet satisfactory and the underlying molecular mechanisms of gastric cancer pathogenesis are not fully understood. Meanwhile, non-coding RNAs have been established as key players in regulating various biological and pathological processes, such as cell-cycle progression, chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, and posttranscriptional processing. Furthermore, numerous studies have also revealed a complicated interplay among different species of non-coding RNAs; therefore, the cross-regulation between long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) has begun to emerge. This lncRNA-miRNA cross talk, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, is involved in a great number of human diseases including gastric cancer. In this review, we summarize the latest research progress of the interactions between lncRNAs and miRNAs, highlighting their influences on the development and progression of gastric cancer to provide novel approaches for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Cannabinoid-hypocretin cross-talk in the central nervous system: what we know so far

    PubMed Central

    Flores, África; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Emerging findings suggest the existence of a cross-talk between hypocretinergic and endocannabinoid systems. Although few studies have examined this relationship, the apparent overlap observed in the neuroanatomical distribution of both systems as well as their putative functions strongly point to the existence of such cross-modulation. In agreement, biochemical and functional studies have revealed the existence of heterodimers between CB1 cannabinoid receptor and hypocretin receptor-1, which modulates the cellular localization and downstream signaling of both receptors. Moreover, the activation of hypocretin receptor-1 stimulates the synthesis of 2-arachidonoyl glycerol culminating in the retrograde inhibition of neighboring cells and suggesting that endocannabinoids could contribute to some hypocretin effects. Pharmacological data indicate that endocannabinoids and hypocretins might have common physiological functions in the regulation of appetite, reward and analgesia. In contrast, these neuromodulatory systems seem to play antagonistic roles in the regulation of sleep/wake cycle and anxiety-like responses. The present review attempts to piece together what is known about this interesting interaction and describes its potential therapeutic implications. PMID:24391536

  10. Distraction and Pedestrian Safety: How Talking on the Phone, Texting, and Listening to Music Impact Crossing the Street

    PubMed Central

    Schwebel, David C.; Stavrinos, Despina; Byington, Katherine W.; Davis, Tiffany; O’Neal, Elizabeth E.; de Jong, Desiree

    2011-01-01

    As use of handheld multimedia devices has exploded globally, safety experts have begun to consider the impact of distraction while talking, text-messaging, or listening to music on traffic safety. This study was designed to test how talking on the phone, texting, and listening to music may influence pedestrian safety. 138 college students crossed an interactive, semi-immersive virtual pedestrian street. They were randomly assigned to one of four groups: crossing while talking on the phone, crossing while texting, crossing while listening to a personal music device, or crossing while undistracted. Participants distracted by music or texting were more likely to be hit by a vehicle in the virtual pedestrian environment than were undistracted participants. Participants in all three distracted groups were more likely to look away from the street environment (and look toward other places, such as their telephone or music device) than were undistracted participants. Findings were maintained after controlling for demographics, walking frequency, and media use frequency. Distraction from multimedia devices has a small but meaningful impact on college students’ pedestrian safety. Future research should consider the cognitive demands of pedestrian safety, and how those processes may be impacted by distraction. Policymakers might consider ways to protect distracted pedestrians from harm and to reduce the number of individuals crossing streets while distracted. PMID:22269509

  11. Cross-Talk between Adiponectin and IGF-IR in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Loredana; Naimo, Giuseppina Daniela; Ricchio, Emilia; Panno, Maria Luisa; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic and multifactorial disorder that is reaching epidemic proportions. It is characterized by an enlarged mass of adipose tissue caused by a combination of size increase of preexisting adipocytes (hypertrophy) and de novo adipocyte differentiation (hyperplasia). Obesity is related to many metabolic disorders like hypertension, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease, and it is associated with an increased risk of cancer development in different tissues including breast. Adipose tissue is now regarded as not just a storage reservoir for excess energy, but rather as an endocrine organ, secreting a large number of bioactive molecules called adipokines. Among these, adiponectin represents the most abundant adipose tissue-excreted protein, which exhibits insulin sensitizing, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties. The serum concentrations of adiponectin are inversely correlated with body mass index. Recently, low levels of plasma adiponectin have been associated with an increased risk for obesity-related cancers and development of more aggressive phenotype, concomitantly with alterations in the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the cross-talk between adiponectin/AdipoR1 and IGF-I/IGF-IR in breast cancer. PMID:26236690

  12. Cross-talk between phosphorylation and lysine acetylation in a genome-reduced bacterium

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, Vera; Seebacher, Jan; Bader, Samuel; Mohammed, Shabaz; Vonkova, Ivana; Betts, Matthew J; Kühner, Sebastian; Kumar, Runjun; Maier, Tobias; O'Flaherty, Martina; Rybin, Vladimir; Schmeisky, Arne; Yus, Eva; Stülke, Jörg; Serrano, Luis; Russell, Robert B; Heck, Albert JR; Bork, Peer; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) represent important regulatory states that when combined have been hypothesized to act as molecular codes and to generate a functional diversity beyond genome and transcriptome. We systematically investigate the interplay of protein phosphorylation with other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in the genome-reduced bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Systematic perturbations by deletion of its only two protein kinases and its unique protein phosphatase identified not only the protein-specific effect on the phosphorylation network, but also a modulation of proteome abundance and lysine acetylation patterns, mostly in the absence of transcriptional changes. Reciprocally, deletion of the two putative N-acetyltransferases affects protein phosphorylation, confirming cross-talk between the two PTMs. The measured M. pneumoniae phosphoproteome and lysine acetylome revealed that both PTMs are very common, that (as in Eukaryotes) they often co-occur within the same protein and that they are frequently observed at interaction interfaces and in multifunctional proteins. The results imply previously unreported hidden layers of post-transcriptional regulation intertwining phosphorylation with lysine acetylation and other mechanisms that define the functional state of a cell. PMID:22373819

  13. Histidine kinases in plants: cross talk between hormone and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Nongpiur, Ramsong; Soni, Praveen; Karan, Ratna; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2012-10-01

    Two-component signaling pathways involve sensory histidine kinases (HK), histidine phosphotransfer proteins (HpT) and response regulators (RR). Recent advancements in genome sequencing projects for a number of plant species have established the TCS family to be multigenic one. In plants, HKs operate through the His-Asp phosphorelay and control many physiological and developmental processes throughout the lifecycle of plants. Despite the huge diversity reported for the structural features of the HKs, their functional redundancy has also been reported via mutant approach. Several sensory HKs having a CHASE domain, transmembrane domain(s), transmitter domain and receiver domain have been reported to be involved in cytokinin and ethylene signaling. On the other hand, there are also increasing evidences for some of the sensory HKs to be performing their role as osmosensor, clearly indicating toward a possible cross-talk between hormone and stress responsive cascades. In this review, we bring out the latest knowledge about the structure and functions of histidine kinases in cytokinin and ethylene signaling and their role(s) in development and the regulation of environmental stress responses.

  14. Metagenomic cross-talk: the regulatory interplay between immunogenomics and the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Levy, Maayan; Thaiss, Christoph A; Elinav, Eran

    2015-11-20

    The human microbiome, often referred to as the 'second genome', encompasses up to 100-fold more genes than the host genome. In contrast to the human genome, the microbial genome is flexible and amenable to change during the host's lifetime. As the composition of the microbial metagenome has been associated with the development of human disease, the mechanisms controlling the composition and function of the metagenome are of considerable interest and therapeutic potential. In the past few years, studies have revealed how the host immune system is involved in determining the microbial metagenome, and, in turn, how the microbiota regulates gene expression in the immune system. This species-specific bidirectional interaction is required for homeostatic health, whereas aberrations in the tightly controlled regulatory circuits that link the host immunogenome and the microbial metagenome drive susceptibility to common human diseases. Here, we summarize some of the major principles orchestrating this cross-talk between microbial and host genomes, with a special focus on the interaction between the intestinal immune system and the gut microbiome. Understanding the reciprocal genetic and epigenetic control between host and microbiota will be an important step towards the development of novel therapies against microbiome-driven diseases.

  15. Dse1 may control cross talk between the pheromone and filamentation pathways in yeast.

    PubMed

    Draper, Edward; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Bar, Eli E; Stone, David E

    2009-12-01

    The filamentous/invasive growth pathway is activated by nutrient limitation in the haploid form of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas exposure to mating-pheromone causes cells to differentiate into gametes. Although these two pathways respond to very different stimuli and generate very different responses, they utilize many of the same signaling components. This implies the need for robust mechanisms to maintain signal fidelity. Dse1 was identified in an allele-specific suppressor screen for proteins that interact with the pheromone-responsive Gbetagamma, and found to bind both to a Gbetagamma-affinity column, and to the shared MEKK, Ste11. Although overexpression of Dse1 stimulated invasive growth and transcription of both filamentation and mating-specific transcriptional reporters, deletion of DSE1 had no effect on these outputs. In contrast, pheromone hyper-induced transcription of the filamentation reporter in cells lacking Dse1 and in cells expressing a mutant form of Gbeta that exhibits diminished interaction with Dse1. Thus, the interaction of Dse1 with both Gbeta and Ste11 may be designed to control cross talk between the pheromone and filamentation pathways. PMID:19820940

  16. A Glutathione-Nrf2-Thioredoxin Cross-Talk Ensures Keratinocyte Survival and Efficient Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Telorack, Michèle; Meyer, Michael; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Bloch, Wilhelm; Werner, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is the most abundant cellular antioxidant with high medical relevance, and it is also required as a co-factor for various enzymes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and toxic compounds. However, its cell-type specific functions and its interaction with other cytoprotective molecules are largely unknown. Using a combination of mouse genetics, functional cell biology and pharmacology, we unraveled the function of glutathione in keratinocytes and its cross-talk with other antioxidant defense systems. Mice with keratinocyte-specific deficiency in glutamate cysteine ligase, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glutathione biosynthesis, showed a strong reduction in keratinocyte viability in vitro and in the skin in vivo. The cells died predominantly by apoptosis, but also showed features of ferroptosis and necroptosis. The increased cell death was associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which caused DNA and mitochondrial damage. However, epidermal architecture, and even healing of excisional skin wounds were only mildly affected in the mutant mice. The cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2 was strongly activated in glutathione-deficient keratinocytes, but additional loss of Nrf2 did not aggravate the phenotype, demonstrating that the cytoprotective effect of Nrf2 is glutathione dependent. However, we show that deficiency in glutathione biosynthesis is efficiently compensated in keratinocytes by the cysteine/cystine and thioredoxin systems. Therefore, our study highlights a remarkable antioxidant capacity of the epidermis that ensures skin integrity and efficient wound healing. PMID:26808544

  17. Cross-talk between reproduction and energy homeostasis: central impact of estrogens, leptin and kisspeptin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Casey C; Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system receives hormonal cues (e.g., estrogens and leptin, among others) that influence reproduction and energy homeostasis. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion via classical steroid signaling and rapid non-classical membrane-initiated signaling. Because GnRH neurons are void of leptin receptors, the actions of leptin on these neurons must be indirect. Although it is clear that the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus is the primary site of overlap between these two systems, it is still unclear which neural network(s) participate in the cross-talk of E2 and leptin, two hormones essential for reproductive function and metabolism. Herein we review the progress made in understanding the interactions between reproduction and energy homeostasis by focusing on the advances made to understand the cellular signaling of E2 and leptin on three neural networks: kisspeptin, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Although critical in mediating the actions of E2 and leptin, considerable work still remains to uncover how these neural networks interact in vivo. PMID:25372735

  18. Medical education in India: Time to encourage cross-talk between different streams

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Kishor

    2013-01-01

    Currently, India recognizes five different healthcare systems, collectively known as AYUSH (Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha, Homeopathy), along with the conventional biomedicine. These systems have their own institutionalized structure for monitoring medical education and practice. However, because of the ‘parallel’ kind of policy model that is followed in India, there is no formal provision for any cross-talk between the professionals belonging to these different streams. This situation has not only given rise to mutual misgivings among these professionals regarding the strengths and weaknesses of each other, but also has led to a poor appreciation of the historical and socio-cultural connections these streams share with the community at large. To tackle these issues and to promote adequate participation of biomedicine experts in AYUSH-related research projects, ‘introduction of an AYUSH module in the current curriculum of MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) program’ has been proposed in this communication along with a possible roadmap for its implementation. It is also suggested that the experts in biomedicine be engaged for training AYUSH graduates in their respective specialties so that quality AYUSH education may be ensured. PMID:23741164

  19. Lung-Kidney Cross-Talk in the Critically Ill Patient.

    PubMed

    Husain-Syed, Faeq; Slutsky, Arthur S; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-08-15

    Discoveries have emerged highlighting the complex nature of the interorgan cross-talk between the kidney and the lung. Vascular rigidity, neurohormonal activation, tissue hypoxia, and abnormal immune cell signaling have been identified as common pathways leading to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. However, our understanding of the causal relationships between lung injury and kidney injury is not precise. This review discusses a number of features and mechanisms of renal dysfunction in pulmonary disorders in relation to respiratory acidosis, impaired gas exchange, systemic congestion, respiratory support/replacement therapies, and other issues relevant to the clinical care of these patients. Biotrauma due to injurious ventilatory strategies can lead to the release of mediators into the lung, which may then translocate into the systemic circulation and cause end-organ dysfunction, including renal dysfunction. Right ventricular dysfunction and congestive states may contribute to alterations of renal perfusion and oxygenation, leading to diuretic resistance and recurrent hospitalization. In patients with concomitant respiratory failure, noninvasive ventilation represents a promising treatment option for the correction of impaired renal microcirculation and endothelial dysfunction. In patients requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, short- and long-term monitoring of kidney function is warranted, as they are at highest risk of developing acute kidney injury and fluid overload. PMID:27337068

  20. Disruption of astrocyte-neuron cholesterol cross talk affects neuronal function in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, M; Marullo, M; Di Paolo, E; Cesana, E; Zuccato, C; Biella, G; Cattaneo, E

    2015-01-01

    In the adult brain, neurons require local cholesterol production, which is supplied by astrocytes through apoE-containing lipoproteins. In Huntington's disease (HD), such cholesterol biosynthesis in the brain is severely reduced. Here we show that this defect, occurring in astrocytes, is detrimental for HD neurons. Astrocytes bearing the huntingtin protein containing increasing CAG repeats secreted less apoE-lipoprotein-bound cholesterol in the medium. Conditioned media from HD astrocytes and lipoprotein-depleted conditioned media from wild-type (wt) astrocytes were equally detrimental in a neurite outgrowth assay and did not support synaptic activity in HD neurons, compared with conditions of cholesterol supplementation or conditioned media from wt astrocytes. Molecular perturbation of cholesterol biosynthesis and efflux in astrocytes caused similarly altered astrocyte–neuron cross talk, whereas enhancement of glial SREBP2 and ABCA1 function reversed the aspects of neuronal dysfunction in HD. These findings indicate that astrocyte-mediated cholesterol homeostasis could be a potential therapeutic target to ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:25301063

  1. Cross talk between NDR kinase pathways coordinates cytokinesis with cell separation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sneha; Govindaraghavan, Meera; McCollum, Dannel

    2014-08-01

    NDR (nuclear Dbf-2-related) kinases constitute key regulatory nodes in signaling networks that control multiple biological processes such as growth, proliferation, mitotic exit, morphogenesis, and apoptosis. Two NDR pathways called the septation initiation network (SIN) and the morphogenesis Orb6 network (MOR) exist in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The SIN promotes cytokinesis, and the MOR drives cell separation at the end of cytokinesis and polarized growth during interphase. We showed previously that cross talk exists between these two pathways, with the SIN inhibiting the MOR during cytokinesis through phosphorylation of the MOR component Nak1 by the SIN Sid2 kinase. The reason for this inhibition remained uncertain. We show here that failure to inhibit MOR signaling during cytokinesis results in cell lysis at the site of septum formation. Time-lapse analysis revealed that MOR signaling during cytokinesis causes cells to prematurely initiate septum degradation/cell separation. The cell lysis phenotype is due to premature initiation of cell separation because it can be rescued by mutations in genes required for cell separation/septum degradation. We also shed further light on how the SIN inhibits the MOR. Sid2 phosphorylation of the MOR proteins Sog2 and Nak1 is required to prevent cell lysis during cytokinesis. Together, these results show that SIN inhibition of the MOR enforces proper temporal ordering of cytokinetic events.

  2. Medical education in India: Time to encourage cross-talk between different streams.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Kishor

    2013-01-01

    Currently, India recognizes five different healthcare systems, collectively known as AYUSH (Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha, Homeopathy), along with the conventional biomedicine. These systems have their own institutionalized structure for monitoring medical education and practice. However, because of the 'parallel' kind of policy model that is followed in India, there is no formal provision for any cross-talk between the professionals belonging to these different streams. This situation has not only given rise to mutual misgivings among these professionals regarding the strengths and weaknesses of each other, but also has led to a poor appreciation of the historical and socio-cultural connections these streams share with the community at large. To tackle these issues and to promote adequate participation of biomedicine experts in AYUSH-related research projects, 'introduction of an AYUSH module in the current curriculum of MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) program' has been proposed in this communication along with a possible roadmap for its implementation. It is also suggested that the experts in biomedicine be engaged for training AYUSH graduates in their respective specialties so that quality AYUSH education may be ensured.

  3. Protective environments and health status: cross-talk between human and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Singer, Burton; Friedman, Elliot; Seeman, Teresa; Fava, Giovanni A; Ryff, Carol D

    2005-12-01

    Although aging populations tend to have increased prevalence of a diversity of diseases and disabilities, there are substantial numbers of people who, nevertheless, maintain good health into old age. Human studies frequently demonstrate associations between environmental factors, particularly supportive social environments, and positive states of health. Identifying the pathways from protective social environments to reduced disease risk necessitates the use of animal models as a basis of explanation and a source of suggestions for further human research. We present two examples of this kind of cross-talk: (i) the possibility that the success of well-being therapy following pharmacological treatment for depression as a means of preventing recurrent depressive episodes is based on the stimulation of enrichment of dendritic networks in the hippocampus and spine retraction in the basolateral amygdala; (ii) the possibility that the release of intracerebral oxytocin is a mediating factor between persistently supportive social environments and reduced disease in later life, as exemplified by low levels of allostatic load. PMID:16213626

  4. A Glutathione-Nrf2-Thioredoxin Cross-Talk Ensures Keratinocyte Survival and Efficient Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Telorack, Michèle; Meyer, Michael; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Bloch, Wilhelm; Werner, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is the most abundant cellular antioxidant with high medical relevance, and it is also required as a co-factor for various enzymes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and toxic compounds. However, its cell-type specific functions and its interaction with other cytoprotective molecules are largely unknown. Using a combination of mouse genetics, functional cell biology and pharmacology, we unraveled the function of glutathione in keratinocytes and its cross-talk with other antioxidant defense systems. Mice with keratinocyte-specific deficiency in glutamate cysteine ligase, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glutathione biosynthesis, showed a strong reduction in keratinocyte viability in vitro and in the skin in vivo. The cells died predominantly by apoptosis, but also showed features of ferroptosis and necroptosis. The increased cell death was associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which caused DNA and mitochondrial damage. However, epidermal architecture, and even healing of excisional skin wounds were only mildly affected in the mutant mice. The cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2 was strongly activated in glutathione-deficient keratinocytes, but additional loss of Nrf2 did not aggravate the phenotype, demonstrating that the cytoprotective effect of Nrf2 is glutathione dependent. However, we show that deficiency in glutathione biosynthesis is efficiently compensated in keratinocytes by the cysteine/cystine and thioredoxin systems. Therefore, our study highlights a remarkable antioxidant capacity of the epidermis that ensures skin integrity and efficient wound healing. PMID:26808544

  5. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ~16-89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (~64-89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (~16-51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction.

  6. Imbalance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk in isocyanate mediated pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Hariom; Jain, Deepika; Khan, Saba; Pathak, Neelam; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Bhargava, Arpit; Banerjee, Smita; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic investigations coupled with epidemiology, case-control, cohort and observational studies have increasingly linked isocyanate exposure (both chronic and acute) with pulmonary morbidity and mortality. Though ascribed for impairment in endothelial cell function, molecular mechanisms of these significant adverse pulmonary outcomes remains poorly understood. As preliminary studies conducted in past have failed to demonstrate a cause-effect relationship between isocyanate toxicity and compromised pulmonary endothelial cell function, we hypothesized that direct exposure to isocyanate may disrupt endothelial structural lining, resulting in cellular damage. Based on this premise, we comprehensively evaluated the molecular repercussions of methyl isocyanate (MIC) exposure on human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAE-26). We examined MIC-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine response, oxidative DNA damage response and apoptotic index. Our results demonstrate that exposure to MIC, augment mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, depletion in antioxidant defense enzymes, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine response and induced endothelial cell apoptosis via affecting the balance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk. We herein delineate the first and direct molecular cascade of isocyanate-induced pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. The results of our study might portray a connective link between associated respiratory morbidities with isocyanate exposure, and indeed facilitate to discern the exposure-phenotype relationship in observed deficits of pulmonary endothelial cell function. Further, understanding of inter- and intra-cellular signaling pathways involved in isocyanate-induced endothelial damage would not only aid in biomarker identification but also provide potential new avenues to target specific therapeutic interventions.

  7. Cross Talk of Proteostasis and Mitostasis in Cellular Homeodynamics, Ageing, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gumeni, Sentiljana; Trougakos, Ioannis P.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that provide essential metabolic functions and represent the major bioenergetic hub of eukaryotic cell. Therefore, maintenance of mitochondria activity is necessary for the proper cellular function and survival. To this end, several mechanisms that act at different levels and time points have been developed to ensure mitochondria quality control. An interconnected highly integrated system of mitochondrial and cytosolic chaperones and proteases along with the fission/fusion machinery represents the surveillance scaffold of mitostasis. Moreover, nonreversible mitochondrial damage targets the organelle to a specific autophagic removal, namely, mitophagy. Beyond the organelle dynamics, the constant interaction with the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) has become an emerging aspect of healthy mitochondria. Dysfunction of mitochondria and UPS increases with age and correlates with many age-related diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. In this review, we discuss the functional cross talk of proteostasis and mitostasis in cellular homeodynamics and the impairment of mitochondrial quality control during ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration. PMID:26977249

  8. Do androgen deprivation drugs affect the immune cross-talk between mononuclear and prostate cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Salman, Hertzel; Bergman, Michael; Blumberger, Naava; Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of androgen deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide on the immune cross-talk between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cells from PC-3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer lines. PBMC, PC-3 and LNCaP were separately incubated without and with two androgen-deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide, and the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10 was examined. In addition, the effect of both drugs on the production of those cytokines was carried out after 24 hours incubation of PBMC with both types of cancer cells. Leuprolide or bicalutamide did not affect the production of the cytokines by PBMC or by the prostate cancer cells from the two lines. Incubation of PBMC with PC-3 or LNCaP cells caused increased production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 as compared with PBMC incubated without malignant cells. While 10(-7) M and 10(-8) M of leuprolide caused a decreased secretion of IL-1β by PBMC previously incubated with prostate cancer cells without the drug, bicalutamide did not affect this PBMC activity at any drug concentration. This observation suggests the existence of an additional mechanism explaining the effect of androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  9. Cross talk between miR-214 and PTEN attenuates glomerular hypertrophy under diabetic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Shen, E.; Wang, Yanzhe; Li, Junhui; Cheng, Dongsheng; Chen, Yuqiang; Gui, Dingkun; Wang, Niansong

    2016-01-01

    Glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) hypertrophy is one of the earliest pathological abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy (DN), which correlates with eventual glomerulosclerosis. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic role of miRNA in diabetic glomerular MCs hypertrophy and synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM). Microarray analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of miR-214 in the renal cortex of diabetic db/db mice, which was confirmed by real-time PCR of isolated glomeruli and primary cultured human MCs. In vitro studies showed that inhibition of miR-214 significantly reduced expression of α-SMA, SM22 and collagen IV, and partially restored phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein level in high glucose-stimulated human MCs. Furthermore, we identified PTEN as the target of miR-214 by a luciferase assay in HEK293 cells. Moreover, overexpression of PTEN ameliorated miR-214-mediated diabetic MC hypertrophy while knockdown of PTEN mimicked the MC hypertrophy. In vivo study further confirmed that inhibition of miR-214 significantly decreased the expression of SM22, α-SMA and collagen IV, partially restored PTEN level, and attenuated albuminuria and mesangial expansion in db/db mice. In conclusion, cross talk between miR-214 and PTEN attenuated glomerular hypertrophy under diabetic conditions in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, miR-214 may represent a novel therapeutic target for DN. PMID:27549568

  10. A regulatory cross-talk between Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocytes and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Ludovic; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Dietrich, Gilles; Bourin, Philippe; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Poupot, Rémy

    2009-03-01

    The physiological functions of human TCRVgamma9Vdelta2(+) gammadelta lymphocytes reactive to non-peptide phosphoantigens contribute to cancer immunosurveillance and immunotherapy. However, their regulation by mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), multipotent and immunomodulatory progenitor cells able to infiltrate tumors, has not been investigated so far. By analyzing freshly isolated TCRVgamma9Vdelta2(+) lymphocytes and primary cell lines stimulated with synthetic phosphoantigen or B-cell lymphoma cell lines in the presence of MSC, we demonstrated that MSC were potent suppressors of gammadelta-cell proliferation, cytokine production and cytolytic responses in vitro. This inhibition was mediated by the COX-2-dependent production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) and by MSC through EP2 and EP4 inhibitory receptors expressed by Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocytes. COX-2 expression and PGE(2) production by MSC were not constitutive, but were induced by IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha secreted by activated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells. This regulatory cross-talk between MSC and Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocytes involving PGE(2) could be of importance for the antitumor and antimicrobial activities of gammadelta T cells.

  11. Regulatory Cross-Talks and Cascades in Rice Hormone Biosynthesis Pathways Contribute to Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Grewal, Rumdeep K; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus, independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each others production directly. Thus, multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones.

  12. Natural variation in cross-talk between glucosinolates and onset of flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lea M.; Jepsen, Henriette S. K.; Halkier, Barbara A.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Burow, Meike

    2015-01-01

    Naturally variable regulatory networks control different biological processes including reproduction and defense. This variation within regulatory networks enables plants to optimize defense and reproduction in different environments. In this study we investigate the ability of two enzyme-encoding genes in the glucosinolate pathway, AOP2 and AOP3, to affect glucosinolate accumulation and flowering time. We have introduced the two highly similar enzymes into two different AOPnull accessions, Col-0 and Cph-0, and found that the genes differ in their ability to affect glucosinolate levels and flowering time across the accessions. This indicated that the different glucosinolates produced by AOP2 and AOP3 serve specific regulatory roles in controlling these phenotypes. While the changes in glucosinolate levels were similar in both accessions, the effect on flowering time was dependent on the genetic background pointing to natural variation in cross-talk between defense chemistry and onset of flowering. This variation likely reflects an adaptation to survival in different environments. PMID:26442014

  13. Regulatory Cross-Talks and Cascades in Rice Hormone Biosynthesis Pathways Contribute to Stress Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Grewal, Rumdeep K.; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus, independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each others production directly. Thus, multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones. PMID:27617021

  14. Cross talk between miR-214 and PTEN attenuates glomerular hypertrophy under diabetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Shen, E; Wang, Yanzhe; Li, Junhui; Cheng, Dongsheng; Chen, Yuqiang; Gui, Dingkun; Wang, Niansong

    2016-01-01

    Glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) hypertrophy is one of the earliest pathological abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy (DN), which correlates with eventual glomerulosclerosis. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic role of miRNA in diabetic glomerular MCs hypertrophy and synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM). Microarray analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of miR-214 in the renal cortex of diabetic db/db mice, which was confirmed by real-time PCR of isolated glomeruli and primary cultured human MCs. In vitro studies showed that inhibition of miR-214 significantly reduced expression of α-SMA, SM22 and collagen IV, and partially restored phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein level in high glucose-stimulated human MCs. Furthermore, we identified PTEN as the target of miR-214 by a luciferase assay in HEK293 cells. Moreover, overexpression of PTEN ameliorated miR-214-mediated diabetic MC hypertrophy while knockdown of PTEN mimicked the MC hypertrophy. In vivo study further confirmed that inhibition of miR-214 significantly decreased the expression of SM22, α-SMA and collagen IV, partially restored PTEN level, and attenuated albuminuria and mesangial expansion in db/db mice. In conclusion, cross talk between miR-214 and PTEN attenuated glomerular hypertrophy under diabetic conditions in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, miR-214 may represent a novel therapeutic target for DN. PMID:27549568

  15. Network Modeling Reveals Cross Talk of MAP Kinases during Adaptation to Caspofungin Stress in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Baldin, Clara; Weber, Jakob; Guthke, Reinhard; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Brakhage, Axel A.; Linde, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are highly conserved in eukaryotic organisms. In pathogenic fungi, their activities were assigned to different physiological functions including drug adaptation and resistance. Aspergillus fumigatus is a human pathogenic fungus, which causes life-threatening invasive infections. Therapeutic options against invasive mycoses are still limited. One of the clinically used drugs is caspofungin, which specifically targets the fungal cell wall biosynthesis. A systems biology approach, based on comprehensive transcriptome data sets and mathematical modeling, was employed to infer a regulatory network and identify key interactions during adaptation to caspofungin stress in A. fumigatus. Mathematical modeling and experimental validations confirmed an intimate cross talk occurring between the cell wall-integrity and the high osmolarity-glycerol signaling pathways. Specifically, increased concentrations of caspofungin promoted activation of these signalings. Moreover, caspofungin affected the intracellular transport, which caused an additional osmotic stress that is independent of glucan inhibition. High concentrations of caspofungin reduced this osmotic stress, and thus decreased its toxic activity. Our results demonstrated that MAPK signaling pathways play a key role during caspofungin adaptation and are contributing to the paradoxical effect exerted by this drug. PMID:26356475

  16. The cell pole: the site of cross talk between the DNA uptake and genetic recombination machinery.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Dawit; Ayora, Silvia; Sweasy, Joann B; Graumann, Peter L; Alonso, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    Natural transformation is a programmed mechanism characterized by binding of free double-stranded (ds) DNA from the environment to the cell pole in rod-shaped bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis some competence proteins, which process the dsDNA and translocate single-stranded (ss) DNA into the cytosol, recruit a set of recombination proteins mainly to one of the cell poles. A subset of single-stranded binding proteins, working as "guardians", protects ssDNA from degradation and limit the RecA recombinase loading. Then, the "mediators" overcome the inhibitory role of guardians, and recruit RecA onto ssDNA. A RecA·ssDNA filament searches for homology on the chromosome and, in a process that is controlled by "modulators", catalyzes strand invasion with the generation of a displacement loop (D-loop). A D-loop resolvase or "resolver" cleaves this intermediate, limited DNA replication restores missing information and a DNA ligase seals the DNA ends. However, if any step fails, the "rescuers" will repair the broken end to rescue chromosomal transformation. If the ssDNA does not share homology with resident DNA, but it contains information for autonomous replication, guardian and mediator proteins catalyze plasmid establishment after inhibition of RecA. DNA replication and ligation reconstitute the molecule (plasmid transformation). In this review, the interacting network that leads to a cross talk between proteins of the uptake and genetic recombination machinery will be placed into prospective.

  17. A proteomic approach towards understanding the cross talk between Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium longum in coculture.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, David; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez, Noelia; Cuesta, Isabel; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of the interactions among intestinal microbes is needed to decipher the complex cross talk that takes place within the human gut. Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium genera are among the most relevant intestinal bacteria, and it has been previously reported that coculturing of these 2 microorganisms affects their survival. Therefore, coculturing of Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bacteroides fragilis DSMZ2151 was performed with the aim of unravelling the mechanisms involved in their interaction. To this end, we applied proteomic (2D-DIGE) analyses, and by chromatographic techniques we quantified the bacterial metabolites produced during coincubation. Coculture stimulated the growth of B. longum, retarding that of B. fragilis, with concomitant changes in the production of some proteins and metabolites of both bacteria. The combined culture promoted upregulation of the bifidobacterial pyruvate kinase and downregulation of the Bacteroides phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase - 2 enzymes involved in the catabolism of carbohydrates. Moreover, B. fragilis FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a protein with chaperone-like activity, was found to be overproduced in coculture, suggesting the induction of a stress response in this microorganism. This study provides mechanistic data to deepen our understanding of the interaction between Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium intestinal populations.

  18. Regulatory Cross-Talks and Cascades in Rice Hormone Biosynthesis Pathways Contribute to Stress Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Grewal, Rumdeep K.; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus, independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each others production directly. Thus, multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones.

  19. Cross-talk between Ras and Rho signalling pathways in transformation favours proliferation and increased motility.

    PubMed

    Sahai, E; Olson, M F; Marshall, C J

    2001-02-15

    Transformation by oncogenic Ras requires the function of the Rho family GTPases. We find that Ras-transformed cells have elevated levels of RhoA-GTP, which functions to inhibit the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21/Waf1. These high levels of Rho-GTP are not a direct consequence of Ras signalling but are selected for in response to sustained ERK-MAP kinase signalling. While the elevated levels of Rho-GTP control the level of p21/Waf, they no longer regulate the formation of actin stress fibres in transformed cells. We show that the sustained ERK-MAP kinase signalling resulting from transformation by oncogenic Ras down-regulates ROCK1 and Rho-kinase, two Rho effectors required for actin stress fibre formation. The repression of Rho- dependent stress fibre formation by ERK-MAP kinase signalling contributes to the increased motility of Ras-transformed fibroblasts. Overexpression of the ROCK target LIM kinase restores actin stress fibres and inhibits the motility of Ras-transformed fibroblasts. We propose a model in which Ras and Rho signalling pathways cross-talk to promote signalling pathways favouring transformation.

  20. Vitamin B6 Modifies the Immune Cross-Talk between Mononuclear and Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bessler, H; Djaldetti, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of vitamin B6 as a key component in a number of biological events has been well established. Based on the relationship between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis on the one hand, and the interaction between immune and cancer cells expressed by modulated cytokine production on the other hand, the aim of the present work was to examine the possibility that vitamin B6 affects cancer development by an interference in the cross-talk between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and those from two colon carcinoma cell lines. Both non-stimulated PBMC and mononuclear cells induced for cytokine production by HT-29 and RKO cells from human colon carcinoma lines were incubated without and with 4, 20 and 100 μg/ml of pyridoxal hydrochloride (vitamin B6) and secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-1ra was examined. Vit B6 caused a dose-dependent decrease in production of all cytokines examined, except for that of IL-1ra. The results indicate that vitamin B6 exerts an immunomodulatory effect on human PBMC. The finding that production of inflammatory cytokines is more pronounced when PBMC are in contact with malignant cells and markedly inhibited by the vitamin suggests an additional way by which vitamin B6 may exert its carcinopreventive effect. PMID:27085010

  1. Regulatory Cross-Talks and Cascades in Rice Hormone Biosynthesis Pathways Contribute to Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Grewal, Rumdeep K; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus, independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each others production directly. Thus, multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones. PMID:27617021

  2. Dynamin-Actin Cross Talk Contributes to Phagosome Formation and Closure.

    PubMed

    Marie-Anaïs, Florence; Mazzolini, Julie; Herit, Floriane; Niedergang, Florence

    2016-05-01

    Phagocytosis is a mechanism used by macrophages to internalize and eliminate microorganisms or cellular debris. It relies on profound rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton that is the driving force allowing plasma membrane extension around the particle. The closure step of phagocytosis, however, remains poorly defined. We used a dedicated experimental setup with Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) to monitor phagosome formation and closure in three dimensions in living cells. We show that dynamin-2, which mediates the scission of endocytic vesicles, was recruited early and concomitantly with actin during phagosome formation. Dynamin-2 accumulated at the site of phagosome closure in living macrophages. Inhibition of its activity with dominant negative mutants or drugs demonstrated that dynamin-2 is implicated in actin dynamics and pseudopod extension. Depolymerization of actin led to impaired dynamin-2 recruitment or activity. Finally, we show that dynamin-2 plays a critical role in the effective scission of the phagosome from the plasma membrane. Thus, we establish that a cross talk between actin and dynamin takes place for phagosome formation and closure before dynamin functions for scission. PMID:26847957

  3. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ˜16-89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (˜64-89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (˜16-51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction.

  4. Cross-talk between the fat body and brain regulates insect developmental arrest

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Lu, Yu-Xuan; Denlinger, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Developmental arrest, a critical component of the life cycle in animals as diverse as nematodes (dauer state), insects (diapause), and vertebrates (hibernation), results in dramatic depression of the metabolic rate and a profound extension in longevity. Although many details of the hormonal systems controlling developmental arrest are well-known, we know little about the interactions between metabolic events and the hormones controlling the arrested state. Here, we show that diapause is regulated by an interplay between blood-borne metabolites and regulatory centers within the brain. Gene expression in the fat body, the insect equivalent of the liver, is strongly suppressed during diapause, resulting in low levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates circulating within the blood, and at diapause termination, the fat body becomes activated, releasing an abundance of TCA intermediates that act on the brain to stimulate synthesis of regulatory peptides that prompt production of the insect growth hormone ecdysone. This model is supported by our success in breaking diapause by injecting a mixture of TCA intermediates and upstream metabolites. The results underscore the importance of cross-talk between the brain and fat body as a regulator of diapause and suggest that the TCA cycle may be a checkpoint for regulating different forms of animal dormancy. PMID:22912402

  5. Genetic-and-Epigenetic Interspecies Networks for Cross-Talk Mechanisms in Human Macrophages and Dendritic Cells during MTB Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Yun-Lin; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Mtb is one of the oldest human pathogens, and evolves mechanisms implied in human evolution. The lungs are the first organ exposed to aerosol-transmitted Mtb during gaseous exchange. Therefore, the guards of the immune system in the lungs, such as macrophages (Mϕs) and dendritic cells (DCs), are the most important defense against Mtb infection. There have been several studies discussing the functions of Mϕs and DCs during Mtb infection, but the genome-wide pathways and networks are still incomplete. Furthermore, the immune response induced by Mϕs and DCs varies. Therefore, we analyzed the cross-talk genome-wide genetic-and-epigenetic interspecies networks (GWGEINs) between Mϕs vs. Mtb and DCs vs. Mtb to determine the varying mechanisms of both the host and pathogen as it relates to Mϕs and DCs during early Mtb infection. First, we performed database mining to construct candidate cross-talk GWGEIN between human cells and Mtb. Then we constructed dynamic models to characterize the molecular mechanisms, including intraspecies gene/microRNA (miRNA) regulation networks (GRNs), intraspecies protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs), and the interspecies PPIN of the cross-talk GWGEIN. We applied a system identification method and a system order detection scheme to dynamic models to identify the real cross-talk GWGEINs using the microarray data of Mϕs, DCs and Mtb. After identifying the real cross-talk GWGEINs, the principal network projection (PNP) method was employed to construct host-pathogen core networks (HPCNs) between Mϕs vs. Mtb and DCs vs. Mtb during infection process. Thus, we investigated the underlying cross-talk mechanisms between the host and the pathogen to determine how the pathogen counteracts host defense mechanisms in Mϕs and DCs during Mtb H37Rv early infection. Based on our findings, we propose Rv1675c as a potential drug target because of its important defensive role in

  6. CMOS Imager Has Better Cross-Talk and Full-Well Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image detector now undergoing development is designed to exhibit less cross-talk and greater full-well capacity than do prior CMOS image detectors of the same type. Imagers of the type in question are designed to operate from low-voltage power supplies and are fabricated by processes that yield device features having dimensions in the deep submicron range. Because of the use of low supply potentials, maximum internal electric fields and depletion widths are correspondingly limited. In turn, these limitations are responsible for increases in cross-talk and decreases in charge-handling capacities. Moreover, for small pixels, lateral depletion cannot be extended. These adverse effects are even more accentuated in a back-illuminated CMOS imager, in which photogenerated charge carriers must travel across the entire thickness of the device. The figure shows a partial cross section of the structure in the device layer of the present developmental CMOS imager. (In a practical imager, the device layer would sit atop either a heavily doped silicon substrate or a thin silicon oxide layer on a silicon substrate, not shown here.) The imager chip is divided into two areas: area C, which contains readout circuits and other electronic circuits; and area I, which contains the imaging (photodetector and photogenerated-charge-collecting) pixel structures. Areas C and I are electrically isolated from each other by means of a trench filled with silicon oxide. The electrical isolation between areas C and I makes it possible to apply different supply potentials to these areas, thereby enabling optimization of the supply potential and associated design features for each area. More specifically, metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) that are typically included in CMOS imagers now reside in area C and can remain unchanged from established designs and operated at supply potentials prescribed for those designs, while the

  7. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) as a systemic disease: whole body autoregulation and inter-organ cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Carmine; Tripepi, Giovanni; Dounousi, Evangelia; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The inter-organ cross-talk and the functional integration of organ systems is an exceedingly complex process which until now has been investigated with a reductionist approach. CKD perturbs the inter-organ cross-talk and demands central resetting of autonomic (nervous) control of organ systems. Due to limitations inherent to the reductionist approach, we currently identify CKD-related pseudo-syndromes and largely fail at describing the complex systemic inter-relationships set into motion by renal damage and renal dysfunction. A mature technology for a system-analysis approach to physiology and pathophysiology of CKD now exists. System biology will allow in depth understanding of complex diseases like CKD and will set the stage for predictive, preventive and personalized medicine, a long-standing dream of doctors and patients alike. PMID:25117758

  8. New topical treatment of vulvodynia based on the pathogenetic role of cross talk between nociceptors, immunocompetent cells, and epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, J M; Kopsky, D J; Sajben, N

    2016-01-01

    Topical treatments of localized neuropathic pain syndromes in general are mostly neglected, mainly due to the fact that most pain physicians expect that a topical formulation needs to result in a transdermal delivery of the active compounds. On the basis of the practical experience, this study brings forth a new, somewhat neglected element of the vulvodynia pathogenesis: the cross talk between the nerve endings of nociceptors, the adjacent immunocompetent cells, and vaginal epithelial cells. Insight into this cross talk during a pathogenic condition supports the treatment of vulvodynia with topical (compounded) creams. Vulvodynia was successfully treated with an analgesic cream consisting of baclofen 5% together with the autacoid palmitoylethanolamide 1%, an endogenous anti-inflammatory compound. In this review, data is presented to substantiate the rationale behind developing and prescribing topical products for localized pain states such as vulvodynia. Most chronic inflammatory disorders are based on a network pathogenesis, and monotherapeutic inroads into the treatment of such disorders are obsolete. PMID:27757050

  9. Elimination of motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts using blade sequences in lumbar spine MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Lavdas, Eleftherios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Kostopoulos, Spiros; Glotsos, Dimitrios; Roka, Violeta; Koutsiaris, Aristotle G; Batsikas, Georgios; Sakkas, Georgios K; Tsagkalis, Antonios; Notaras, Ioannis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Vassiou, Katerina

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of T2 turbo spin echo (TSE) axial and sagittal BLADE sequences in reducing or even eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts in lumbar spine MRI examinations. Forty four patients, who had routinely undergone a lumbar spine examination, participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: a) T2 TSE Sagittal (SAG) in thirty two cases, and b) T2 TSE Axial (AX) also in thirty two cases. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed based on measurements in different normal anatomical structures and examination of seven characteristics, respectively. The qualitative analysis was performed by experienced radiologists. Also, the presence of image motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts was evaluated. Based on the results of the qualitative analysis for the different sequences and anatomical structures, the BLADE sequences were found to be significantly superior to the conventional ones in all the cases. The BLADE sequences eliminated the motion artifacts in all the cases. In our results, it was found that in the examined sequences (sagittal and axial) the differences between the BLADE and conventional sequences regarding the elimination of motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts were statistically significant. In all the comparisons, the T2 TSE BLADE sequences were significantly superior to the corresponding conventional sequences regarding the classification of their image quality. In conclusion, this technique appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts in lumbar spine MR images and producing high quality images in collaborative and non-collaborative patients.

  10. Cross-talk between lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and tropomyosin receptor kinase A promotes lung epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nan, Ling; Wei, Jianxin; Jacko, Anastasia M; Culley, Miranda K; Zhao, Jing; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Ma, Haichun; Zhao, Yutong

    2016-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid, which plays a crucial role in the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. LPA exerts its biological effects mainly through binding to cell-surface LPA receptors (LPA1-6), which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and GPCRs modulates GPCRs-mediated signaling. Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) is a RTK, which mediates nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced biological functions including cell migration in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we show LPA1 transactivation of TrkA in murine lung epithelial cells (MLE12). LPA induced tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkA in both time- and dose-dependent manners. Down-regulation of LPA1 by siRNA transfection attenuated LPA-induced phosphorylation of TrkA, suggesting a cross-talk between LPA1 and TrkA. To investigate the molecular regulation of the cross-talk, we focused on the interaction between LPA1 and TrkA. We found that LPA induced interaction between LPA1 and TrkA. The LPA1/TrkA complex was localized on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. The C-terminus of LPA1 was identified as the binding site for TrkA. Inhibition of TrkA attenuated LPA-induced phosphorylation of TrkA and LPA1 internalization, as well as lung epithelial cell migration. These studies provide a molecular mechanism for the transactivation of TrkA by LPA, and suggest that the cross-talk between LPA1 and TrkA regulates LPA-induced receptor internalization and lung epithelial cell migration. PMID:26597701

  11. HilD-mediated transcriptional cross-talk between SPI-1 and SPI-2.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Víctor H; Martínez, Luary C; Santana, Francisco J; Knodler, Leigh A; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Puente, José L

    2008-09-23

    The acquisition of new genetic traits by horizontal gene transfer and their incorporation into preexisting regulatory networks have been essential events in the evolution of bacterial pathogens. An example of successful assimilation of virulence traits is Salmonella enterica, which acquired, at distinct evolutionary times, Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), required for efficient invasion of the intestinal epithelium and intestinal disease, and SPI-2, essential for Salmonella replication and survival within macrophages and the progression of a systemic infection. A positive regulatory cascade mainly composed of HilD, HilA, and InvF, encoded in SPI-1, controls the expression of SPI-1 genes, whereas the two-component regulatory system SsrA/B, encoded in SPI-2, controls expression of SPI-2 genes. In this study, we report a previously undescribed transcriptional cross-talk between SPI-1 and SPI-2, where the SPI-1-encoded regulator HilD is essential for the activation of both the SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulons but at different times during the stationary phase of growth in Luria-Bertani medium. Our data indicate that HilD counteracts the H-NS-mediated repression exerted on the OmpR-dependent activation of the ssrAB operon by specifically interacting with its regulatory region. In contrast, HilD is not required for SPI-2 regulon expression under the in vitro growth conditions that are thought to resemble the intracellular environment. Our results suggest that two independent SPI-2 activation pathways evolved to take advantage of the SPI-2-encoded information at different niches and, in consequence, in response to different growth conditions.

  12. The cell pole: The site of cross talk between the DNA uptake and genetic recombination machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Dawit; Ayora, Silvia; Sweasy, Joann; Graumann, Peter L.; Alonso, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Natural transformation is a programmed mechanism characterized by binding of free double-stranded (ds) DNA from the environment to the cell pole in rod-shaped bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis some competence proteins, which process the dsDNA and translocate single-stranded (ss) DNA into the cytosol, recruit a set of recombination proteins mainly to one of the cell poles. A subset of single-stranded binding proteins, working as “guardians”, protect ssDNA from degradation and limit the RecA recombinase loading. Then, the “mediators” overcome the inhibitory role of guardians, and recruit RecA onto ssDNA. A RecA·ssDNA filament searches for homology on the chromosome and, in a process that is controlled by “modulators”, catalyzes strand invasion with the generation of a displacement loop (D-loop). A D-loop resolvase or “resolver” cleaves this intermediate, limited DNA replication restores missing information and a DNA ligase seals the DNA ends. However, if any step fails, the “rescuers” will repair the broken end to rescue chromosomal transformation. If the ssDNA does not share homology with resident DNA, but it contains information for autonomous replication, guardian and mediator proteins catalyze plasmid establishment after inhibition of RecA. DNA replication and ligation reconstitute the molecule (plasmid transformation). In this review, the interacting network that leads to a cross talk between proteins of the uptake and genetic recombination machinery will be placed into prospective. PMID:23046409

  13. Functional cross-talk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and -adrenal axes.

    PubMed

    Viau, V

    2002-06-01

    Under normal conditions, the adrenal glucocorticoids, the endproduct of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, provide a frontline of defence against threats to homeostasis (i.e. stress). On the other hand, chronic HPA drive and glucocorticoid hypersecretion have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several forms of systemic, neurodegenerative and affective disorders. The HPA axis is subject to gonadal influence, indicated by sex differences in basal and stress HPA function and neuropathologies associated with HPA dysfunction. Functional cross-talk between the gonadal and adrenal axes is due in large part to the interactive effects of sex steroids and glucocorticoids, explaining perhaps why several disease states linked to stress are sex-dependent. Realizing the interactive nature by which the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and HPA systems operate, however, has made it difficult to model how these hormones act in the brain. Manipulation of one endocrine system is not without effects on the other. Simultaneous manipulation and assessment of both endocrine systems can overcome this problem. This dual approach in the male rat reveals that testosterone can act and interact on different aspects of basal and stress HPA function. Basal adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release is regulated by testosterone-dependent effects on arginine vasopressin synthesis, and corticosterone-dependent effects on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) synthesis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. In contrast, testosterone and corticosterone interact on stress-induced ACTH release and drive to the PVN motor neurones. Candidate structures mediating this interaction include several testosterone-sensitive afferents to the HPA axis, including the medial preoptic area, central and medial amygdala and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis. All of these relay homeostatic information and integrate reproductive and social behaviour. Because these modalities are affected

  14. Salt stress and senescence: identification of cross-talk regulatory components.

    PubMed

    Allu, Annapurna Devi; Soja, Aleksandra Maria; Wu, Anhui; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Balazadeh, Salma

    2014-07-01

    Leaf senescence is an active process with a pivotal impact on plant productivity. It results from extensive signalling cross-talk coordinating environmental factors with intrinsic age-related mechanisms. Although many studies have shown that leaf senescence is affected by a range of external parameters, knowledge about the regulatory systems that govern the interplay between developmental programmes and environmental stress is still vague. Salinity is one of the most important environmental stresses that promote leaf senescence and thus affect crop yield. Improving salt tolerance by avoiding or delaying senescence under stress will therefore play an important role in maintaining high agricultural productivity. Experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) functions as a common signalling molecule in both developmental and salt-induced leaf senescence. In this study, microarray-based gene expression profiling on Arabidopsis thaliana plants subjected to long-term salinity stress to induce leaf senescence was performed, together with co-expression network analysis for H2O2-responsive genes that are mutually up-regulated by salt induced- and developmental leaf senescence. Promoter analysis of tightly co-expressed genes led to the identification of seven cis-regulatory motifs, three of which were known previously, namely CACGTGT and AAGTCAA, which are associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive genes, and CCGCGT, described as a stress-responsive regulatory motif, while the others, namely ACGCGGT, AGCMGNC, GMCACGT, and TCSTYGACG were not characterized previously. These motifs are proposed to be novel elements involved in the H2O2-mediated control of gene expression during salinity stress-triggered and developmental senescence, acting through upstream transcription factors that bind to these sites.

  15. Cross-talk between the complement and the kinin system in vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Fleur; Peerschke, Ellinor I; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Tedesco, Francesco

    2011-10-30

    The endothelium is a continuous physical barrier that regulates coagulation and selective passage of soluble molecules and circulating cells through the vessel wall into the tissue. Due to its anatomic localization, the endothelium may establish contact with components of the complement, the kinin and the coagulation systems which are the main, though not exclusive, inducers of vascular leakage. Although the complement and the kinin systems may act independently, increasing evidence suggest that there is a crosstalk that involve different components of both systems. Activation is required for the function of the two systems which are involved in pathological conditions such as hereditary and acquired angioedema (AE) and vasculitidis. The aim of this review is to discuss the contribution of complement and kinin systems to vascular leakage and the cross-talk between the two systems in the development of AE. This clinical condition is characterized by episodic and recurrent local edema of subcutaneous and submucosal tissues and is due to inherited or acquired C1-INH deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of the swelling in patients with AE was originally thought to be mediated by C2, ample evidence indicate bradykinin (BK) as the most effective mediator even though the possibility that both the complement and the kinin-forming systems may contribute to the edema has not been completely excluded. BK induces endothelial leakage interacting with B2 receptors but other molecules may be involved in the onset and maintenance of AE. In this review we shall discuss the role of B1 receptors and gC1qR/p33 in addition to that of B2 receptors in the onset of AE attacks and the importance of these receptors as new possible molecular targets for therapy.

  16. EMMPRIN/CD147 deficiency disturbs ameloblast-odontoblast cross-talk and delays enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Huet, Eric; Vallée, Benoît; Bensidhoum, Morad; Le Denmat, Dominique; Filatova, Anna; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Ribes, Sandy; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Rochefort, Gael Y; Kiesow, Andreas; Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Poliard, Anne; Petzold, Matthias; Gabison, Eric E; Menashi, Suzanne; Chaussain, Catherine

    2014-09-01

    Tooth development is regulated by a series of reciprocal inductive signaling between the dental epithelium and mesenchyme, which culminates with the formation of dentin and enamel. EMMPRIN/CD147 is an Extracellular Matrix MetalloPRoteinase (MMP) INducer that mediates epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in cancer and other pathological processes and is expressed in developing teeth. Here we used EMMPRIN knockout (KO) mice to determine the functional role of EMMPRIN on dental tissue formation. We report a delay in enamel deposition and formation that is clearly distinguishable in the growing incisor and associated with a significant reduction of MMP-3 and MMP-20 expression in tooth germs of KO mice. Insufficient basement membrane degradation is evidenced by a persistent laminin immunostaining, resulting in a delay of both odontoblast and ameloblast differentiation. Consequently, enamel volume and thickness are decreased in adult mutant teeth but enamel maturation and tooth morphology are normal, as shown by micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT), nanoindentation, and scanning electron microscope analyses. In addition, the dentino-enamel junction appears as a rough calcified layer of approximately 10±5μm thick (mean±SD) in both molars and growing incisors of KO adult mice. These results indicate that EMMPRIN is involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk during tooth development by regulating the expression of MMPs. The mild tooth phenotype observed in EMMPRIN KO mice suggests that the direct effect of EMMPRIN may be limited to a short time window, comprised between basement membrane degradation allowing direct cell contact and calcified matrix deposition.

  17. Cross-talk between the NR3B and NR4A families of orphan nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lammi, Johanna; Rajalin, Ann-Marie; Huppunen, Johanna; Aarnisalo, Piia . E-mail: piia.aarnisalo@helsinki.fi

    2007-07-27

    Estrogen-related receptors (NR3B family) and Nurr1, NGFI-B, and Nor1 (NR4A family) are orphan nuclear receptors lacking identified natural ligands. The mechanisms regulating their transcriptional activities have remained elusive. We have previously observed that the members of NR3B and NR4A families are coexpressed in certain cell types such as osteoblasts and that the ability of Nurr1 to transactivate the osteopontin promoter is repressed by ERRs. We have now studied the cross-talk between NR3B and NR4A receptors. We show that NR3B and NR4A receptors mutually repress each others' transcriptional activity. The repression involves intact DNA-binding domains and dimerization interfaces but does not result from competition for DNA binding or from heterodimerization. The activation functions of NR3B and NR4A receptors are dispensable for the cross-talk. In conclusion, we report that cross-talk between NR3B and NR4A receptors is a mechanism modulating the transcriptional activities of these orphan nuclear receptors.

  18. Cross Talk between Gibberellin and Cytokinin: The Arabidopsis GA Response Inhibitor SPINDLY Plays a Positive Role in Cytokinin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Greenboim-Wainberg, Yaarit; Maymon, Inbar; Borochov, Roy; Alvarez, John; Olszewski, Neil; Ori, Naomi; Eshed, Yuval; Weiss, David

    2005-01-01

    SPINDLY (SPY) is a negative regulator of gibberellin (GA) responses; however, spy mutants exhibit various phenotypic alterations not found in GA-treated plants. Assaying for additional roles for SPY revealed that spy mutants are resistant to exogenously applied cytokinin. GA also repressed the effects of cytokinin, suggesting that there is cross talk between the two hormone-response pathways, which may involve SPY function. Two spy alleles showing severe (spy-4) and mild (spy-3) GA-associated phenotypes exhibited similar resistance to cytokinin, suggesting that SPY enhances cytokinin responses and inhibits GA signaling through distinct mechanisms. GA and spy repressed numerous cytokinin responses, from seedling development to senescence, indicating that cross talk occurs early in the cytokinin-signaling pathway. Because GA3 and spy-4 inhibited induction of the cytokinin primary-response gene, type-A Arabidopsis response regulator 5, SPY may interact with and modify elements from the phosphorelay cascade of the cytokinin signal transduction pathway. Cytokinin, on the other hand, had no effect on GA biosynthesis or responses. Our results demonstrate that SPY acts as both a repressor of GA responses and a positive regulator of cytokinin signaling. Hence, SPY may play a central role in the regulation of GA/cytokinin cross talk during plant development. PMID:15608330

  19. Mode-coupling analysis and trench design for large-mode-area low-cross-talk multicore fiber.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Siwen; Ren, Guobin; Lin, Zhen; Jian, Shuisheng

    2013-07-01

    The complete analytical solutions of the mode-coupling dynamics for seven-core multicore fibers (MCFs) with identical cores is proposed. All the coupling coefficients C(mn) of adjacent cores and nonadjacent cores as a function of the structural parameters are investigated. It is shown that the coupling coefficients can decrease by adjusting the structural parameters. In addition, the trench-assisted structure could be used for suppressing cross talk in MCF, and the effective area A(eff) can be enlarged without degrading the crosstalk properties. Simulations suggest that low cross talk and/or large A(eff) could be achieved by adjusting the trench parameters. Large mode area could be obtained by utilizing small trench (small trench width c, small refractive index difference Δ(trench)) in the trench-assisted MCF (TA-MCF), whereas low cross talk could be achieved by utilizing larger trench (large trench width c, large Δ(trench)) in the TA-MCF.

  20. HIF-1α inhibition blocks the cross talk between multiple myeloma plasma cells and tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Borsi, Enrica; Perrone, Giulia; Terragna, Carolina; Martello, Marina; Zamagni, Elena; Tacchetti, Paola; Pantani, Lucia; Brioli, Annamaria; Dico, Angela Flores; Zannetti, Beatrice Anna; Rocchi, Serena; Cavo, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder of post-germinal center B cells, characterized by the clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells (PCs) within the bone marrow (BM). The reciprocal and complex interactions that take place between the different compartments of BM and the MM cells result in tumor growth, angiogenesis, bone disease, and drug resistance. Given the importance of the BM microenvironment in MM pathogenesis, we investigated the possible involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible transcription Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in the PCs-bone marrow stromal cells interplay. To test this hypothesis, we used EZN-2968, a 3rd generation antisense oligonucleotide against HIF-1α, to inhibit HIF-1α functions. Herein, we provide evidence that the interaction between MM cells and BM stromal cells is drastically reduced upon HIF-1α down-modulation. Notably, we showed that upon exposure to HIF-1α inhibitor, neither the incubation with IL-6 nor the co-culture with BM stromal cells were able to revert the anti-proliferative effect induced by EZN-2968. Moreover, we observed a down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades and a reduction of MM cells adhesion capability to the extracellular matrix proteins in EZN-2968-treated samples. Taken together, these results strongly support the concept that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the interactions between bone BM cells and PCs in Multiple Myeloma. - Highlights: • HIF-1α inhibition induces a mild apoptotic cell death. • Down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades upon HIF-1α inhibition. • Reduced interaction between MM cells and BMSCs upon HIF-1α down-modulation. • Reduced PCs adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein induced by EZN-2968. • HIF-1α inhibition may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for Multiple Myeloma.

  1. Our Paths Might Cross: the Role of the Fungal Cell Wall Integrity Pathway in Stress Response and Cross Talk with Other Stress Response Pathways▿

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2009-01-01

    Fungi occupy diverse environments and are subjected to many extreme conditions. Among the stressful conditions faced by fungi are pH changes, osmotic changes, thermal changes, oxide radicals, nutrient deprivation, and exposure to chemicals. These adversities can be found either in the environment or in animal and human hosts. The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway provides a means to fortify and repair damages to the cell wall in order to withstand stressful environments. The CWI pathway in comprised of cell wall stress sensors that lead to activation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Signaling through the MAPK cascade leads to expression of transcription factors that facilitate biosynthesis of cell wall components and actin organization. Given the relatively limited number of components of the CWI pathway and the very diverse stimuli, there must be a means of expanding the pathway. To manage the diverse stress conditions, the CWI pathway cross talks with other pathways or proteins, and these cross talk events enhance the signaling capabilities of the CWI pathway. Lateral influences that facilitate maintaining the cell wall under stress conditions are TOR signaling, calcineurin signaling, the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, the cyclic AMP-protein kinase A pathway, and additional proteins. In this article, we highlight several of the cross talk events that have been described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and several other fungi. PMID:19717745

  2. Cross-talk between interferon-gamma and interleukin-18 in melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Ling, Jingjing; Wang, Yong; Shang, Jing; Ping, Fengfeng

    2016-10-01

    Skin is the largest organ in our body and strategically placed to provide a metabolically active biological barrier against a range of noxious stressors. A lot of inflammatory cytokines, which are increased after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation produced by keratinocytes or other immunocytes, are closely related to pigmentary changes, including interleukin-18 (IL-18) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In this study, the effect of cross-talk between IL-18 and IFN-γ on melanogenesis was investigated. Treatment with IL-18 resulted in a dose-dependent increase of melanogenesis, while IFN-γ made an opposite effect. This influence of IL-18 and IFN-γ was mediated by regulations of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its downstream enzymatic cascade expressions. Furthermore, IFN-γ inhibited basal and IL-18-induced melanogenesis. IFN-γ increased signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) phosphorylation to play its position in regulating melanin pigmentation, and its inhibitory effect could be prevented by Janus Kinase 1 (JAK 1) inhibitor. IFN-γ could inhibit melanogenesis by decreasing melanocyte dendrite formation. In addition, IFN-γ inhibited the expressions of Rab Pases to suppress the mature and transport of melanosomes. IL-18 could rapidly induce Akt and PTEN phosphorylation and p65 expression in B16F10 cells. When treatment with IL-18 and IFN-γ together, the phosphorylation level of Protein Kinase B (Akt) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and expression of p65 NF-κB were inhibited, compared with treated with IL-18 only. Our studies indicated that IFN-γ could directly induce B16F10 cells apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IFN-γ markedly up-regulated IL-18 binding protein (BP) production in normal human foreskin-derived epidermal keratinocytes in dose-dependent manner. UVB irradiation induced protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) expression in NHEK, IFN-γ could inhibit this

  3. Cross-talk between interferon-gamma and interleukin-18 in melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Ling, Jingjing; Wang, Yong; Shang, Jing; Ping, Fengfeng

    2016-10-01

    Skin is the largest organ in our body and strategically placed to provide a metabolically active biological barrier against a range of noxious stressors. A lot of inflammatory cytokines, which are increased after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation produced by keratinocytes or other immunocytes, are closely related to pigmentary changes, including interleukin-18 (IL-18) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In this study, the effect of cross-talk between IL-18 and IFN-γ on melanogenesis was investigated. Treatment with IL-18 resulted in a dose-dependent increase of melanogenesis, while IFN-γ made an opposite effect. This influence of IL-18 and IFN-γ was mediated by regulations of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its downstream enzymatic cascade expressions. Furthermore, IFN-γ inhibited basal and IL-18-induced melanogenesis. IFN-γ increased signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) phosphorylation to play its position in regulating melanin pigmentation, and its inhibitory effect could be prevented by Janus Kinase 1 (JAK 1) inhibitor. IFN-γ could inhibit melanogenesis by decreasing melanocyte dendrite formation. In addition, IFN-γ inhibited the expressions of Rab Pases to suppress the mature and transport of melanosomes. IL-18 could rapidly induce Akt and PTEN phosphorylation and p65 expression in B16F10 cells. When treatment with IL-18 and IFN-γ together, the phosphorylation level of Protein Kinase B (Akt) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and expression of p65 NF-κB were inhibited, compared with treated with IL-18 only. Our studies indicated that IFN-γ could directly induce B16F10 cells apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IFN-γ markedly up-regulated IL-18 binding protein (BP) production in normal human foreskin-derived epidermal keratinocytes in dose-dependent manner. UVB irradiation induced protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) expression in NHEK, IFN-γ could inhibit this

  4. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer

    PubMed Central

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H.; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S. White, Matthew.; S. Sariciftci, Niyazi.; Scharber, Markus C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium–tin–oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor–acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  5. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer.

    PubMed

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S White, Matthew; S Sariciftci, Niyazi; Scharber, Markus C

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium-tin-oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor-acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  6. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer.

    PubMed

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S White, Matthew; S Sariciftci, Niyazi; Scharber, Markus C

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium-tin-oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor-acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process.

  7. Indica and Japonica Crosses Resulting in Linkage Block and Recombination Suppression on Rice Chromosome 12

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yulin; Jia, Melissa H.; Wang, Xueyan; Liu, Guangjie

    2012-01-01

    Understanding linkage block size and molecular mechanisms of recombination suppression is important for plant breeding. Previously large linkage blocks ranging from 14 megabases to 27 megabases were observed around the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in rice cultivars and backcross progeny involving an indica and japonica cross. In the present study, the same linkage block was further examined in 456 random recombinant individuals of rice involving 5 crosses ranging from F2 to F10 generation, with and without Pi-ta containing genomic indica regions with both indica and japonica germplasm. Simple sequence repeat markers spanning the entire chromosome 12 were used to detect recombination break points and to delimit physical size of linkage blocks. Large linkage blocks ranging from 4.1 megabases to 10 megabases were predicted from recombinant individuals involving genomic regions of indica and japonica. However, a significantly reduced block from less than 800 kb to 2.1megabases was identified from crosses of indica with indica rice regardless of the existence of Pi-ta. These findings suggest that crosses of indica and japonica rice have significant recombination suppression near the centromere on chromosome 12. PMID:22912788

  8. Cross-talk and co-trafficking between rho1/GABA receptors and ATP-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Boué-Grabot, Eric; Emerit, Michel B; Toulmé, Estelle; Séguéla, Philippe; Garret, Maurice

    2004-02-20

    Gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) and ATP ionotropic receptors represent two structurally and functionally different classes of neurotransmitter-gated channels involved in fast synaptic transmission. We demonstrate here that, when the inhibitory rho1/GABA and the excitatory P2X2 receptor channels are co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, activation of one channel reduces the currents mediated by the other one. This reciprocal inhibitory cross-talk is a receptor-mediated phenomenon independent of agonist cross-modulation, membrane potential, direction of ionic flux, or channel densities. Functional interaction is disrupted when the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of P2X2 is deleted or in competition experiments with minigenes coding for the C-terminal domain of P2X2 or the main intracellular loop of rho1 subunits. We also show a physical interaction between P2X2 and rho1 receptors expressed in oocytes and the co-clustering of these receptors in transfected hippocampal neurons. Co-expression with P2X2 induces retargeting and recruitment of mainly intracellular rho1/GABA receptors to surface clusters. Therefore, molecular and functional cross-talk between inhibitory and excitatory ligand-gated channels may regulate synaptic strength both by activity-dependent current occlusion and synaptic receptors co-trafficking.

  9. Dendritic Cell-Lymphocyte Cross Talk Downregulates Host Restriction Factor SAMHD1 and Stimulates HIV-1 Replication in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biedma, Marina Elizabeth; Lederle, Alexandre; Peressin, Maryse; Lambotin, Mélanie; Proust, Alizé; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in dendritic cells (DCs) is restricted by SAMHD1. This factor is counteracted by the viral protein Vpx; Vpx is found in HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from sooty mangabeys (SIVsm) or from macaques (SIVmac) but is absent from HIV-1. We previously observed that HIV-1 replication in immature DCs is stimulated by cocultivation with primary T and B lymphocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 restriction in DCs may be overcome under coculture conditions. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism of SAMHD1-mediated restriction in DC-lymphocyte coculture. We found that coculture with lymphocytes downregulated SAMHD1 expression and was associated with increased HIV-1 replication in DCs. Moreover, in infected DC-T lymphocyte cocultures, DCs acquired maturation status and secreted type 1 interferon (alpha interferon [IFN-α]). The blockade of DC-lymphocyte cross talk by anti-ICAM-1 antibody markedly inhibited the stimulation of HIV-1 replication and prevented the downregulation of SAMHD1 expression in cocultured DCs. These results demonstrate that, in contrast to purified DCs, cross talk with lymphocytes downregulates SAMHD1 expression in DCs, triggering HIV-1 replication and an antiviral immune response. Therefore, HIV-1 replication and immune sensing by DCs should be investigated in more physiologically relevant models of DC/lymphocyte coculture. IMPORTANCE SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we demonstrate that, in a coculture model of DCs and lymphocytes mimicking early mucosal HIV-1 infection, stimulation of HIV-1 replication in DCs is associated with downregulation of SAMHD1 expression and activation of innate immune sensing by DCs. We propose that DC-lymphocyte cross talk occurring in vivo modulates host restriction factor SAMHD1, promoting HIV-1 replication in cellular reservoirs and stimulating immune sensing. PMID:24574390

  10. A microarray approach to identify genes involved in seed-pericarp cross-talk and development in peach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Field observations and a few physiological studies have demonstrated that peach embryogenesis and fruit development are tightly coupled. In fact, attempts to stimulate parthenocarpic fruit development by means of external tools have failed. Moreover, physiological disturbances during early embryo development lead to seed abortion and fruitlet abscission. Later in embryo development, the interactions between seed and fruit development become less strict. As there is limited genetic and molecular information about seed-pericarp cross-talk and development in peach, a massive gene approach based on the use of the μPEACH 1.0 array platform and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to study this process. Results A comparative analysis of the transcription profiles conducted in seed and mesocarp (cv Fantasia) throughout different developmental stages (S1, S2, S3 and S4) evidenced that 455 genes are differentially expressed in seed and fruit. Among differentially expressed genes some were validated as markers in two subsequent years and in three different genotypes. Seed markers were a LTP1 (lipid transfer protein), a PR (pathogenesis-related) protein, a prunin and LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) protein, for S1, S2, S3 and S4, respectively. Mesocarp markers were a RD22-like protein, a serin-carboxypeptidase, a senescence related protein and an Aux/IAA, for S1, S2, S3 and S4, respectively. The microarray data, analyzed by using the HORMONOMETER platform, allowed the identification of hormone-responsive genes, some of them putatively involved in seed-pericarp crosstalk. Results indicated that auxin, cytokinins, and gibberellins are good candidates, acting either directly (auxin) or indirectly as signals during early development, when the cross-talk is more active and vital for fruit set, whereas abscisic acid and ethylene may be involved later on. Conclusions In this research, genes were identified marking different phases of seed and mesocarp

  11. Cross-talk between HIF and p53 as mediators of molecular responses to physiological and genotoxic stresses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal rates of growth together with metastatic potential and lack of susceptibility to cellular signals leading to apoptosis are widely investigated characteristics of tumors that develop via genetic or epigenetic mechanisms. Moreover, in the growing tumor, cells are exposed to insufficient nutrient supply, low oxygen availability (hypoxia) and/or reactive oxygen species. These physiological stresses force them to switch into more adaptable and aggressive phenotypes. This paper summarizes the role of two key mediators of cellular stress responses, namely p53 and HIF, which significantly affect cancer progression and compromise treatment outcomes. Furthermore, it describes cross-talk between these factors. PMID:23945296

  12. Transcriptome dynamics and molecular cross-talk between bovine oocyte and its companion cumulus cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    carbohydrate metabolism (ACO1, 2), molecular transport (GAPDH, GFPT1) and nucleic acid metabolism (CBS, NOS2), those over expressed in CCs + OO are involved in cellular growth and proliferation (FOS, GADD45A), cell cycle (HAS2, VEGFA), cellular development (AMD1, AURKA, DPP4) and gene expression (FOSB, TGFB2). Conclusion In conclusion, this study has generated large scale gene expression data from different oocyte and CCs samples that would provide insights into gene functions and interactions within and across different pathways that are involved in the maturation of bovine oocytes. Moreover, the presence or absence of oocyte and CC factors during bovine oocyte maturation can have a profound effect on transcript abundance of each cell types, thereby showing the prevailing molecular cross-talk between oocytes and their corresponding CCs. PMID:21261964

  13. A novel unidirectional cross-talk from the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor to leptin receptor in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Tuba; Nahta, Rita

    2008-06-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for the development and progression of breast cancer. Increased circulating levels of the obesity-associated hormones leptin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and overexpression of the leptin receptor (Ob-R) and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) have been detected in a majority of breast cancer cases and during obesity. Due to correlations between increased leptin, Ob-R, IGF-I, and IGF-IR in breast cancer, we hypothesized that molecular interactions may exist between these two signaling pathways. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunoblotting showed that IGF-IR and Ob-R interact in the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MCF7, BT474, and SKBR3. Stimulation of cells with IGF-I promoted Ob-R phosphorylation, which was blocked by IGF-IR kinase inhibition. In addition, IGF-I activated downstream signaling molecules in the leptin receptor and IGF-IR pathways. In contrast to IGF-I, leptin did not induce phosphorylation of IGF-IR, indicating that receptor cross-signaling is unidirectional, occurring from IGF-IR to Ob-R. Our results show, for the first time, a novel interaction and cross-talk between the IGF-I and leptin receptors in human breast cancer cells.

  14. Adjacent effect and cross talk of land surfaces on coastal water in the Aster VNIR and SWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Tsutomu; Masuda, Kazuhiko; Sato, Isao; Tsuchida, Satoshi

    2002-12-01

    The adjacency effect is discussed at coastal areas of main land and peninsula using VNIR and SWIR on ASTER sensor, although the cross-talk phenomenon is apparently noted on some SWIR. The purpose of the analysis is to derive optical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol. The aerosol model is in accordance to the dust-like model. This model is adopted to ASTER and MISR on Terra satellite. Data is the Atsumi Peninsula near Nagoya (34° 40'N, 134° 00'E) GMT1.55 on July 10,2000. The ASTER SWIR(1.65μm-2.395μm) cross-talk phenomenon is noted in the data. This is known as a result of a structure of ASTER sensor. It is relatively large (5-6 DN counts and 100 lines or 3km length). On the other hands, when ASTER observe heterogeneous surface of coastal water, the adjacency effect due to the scattering by atmosphere might partly be contaminated to the above effect. In the SWIR region of spectrum, molecular scattering is practically neglected. However, some aerosol model indicates strong scattering effect at SWIR wavelengths. The main results are (1) The Japan Main land indicates 6~20 times more effect than the peninsula on adjacent radiance from ocean water. (2) SWIR & VNIR exhibit similar adjacent effect which might indicate aerosol or large particles.

  15. Bimanual cross-talk during reaching movements is primarily related to response selection, not the specification of motor parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazeltine, Eliot; Diedrichsen, Joern; Kennerley, Steven W.; Ivry, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    Simultaneous reaching movements made with the two hands can show a considerable increase in reaction time (RT) when they differ in terms of direction or extent, compared to when the movements involve the same direction and extent. This cost has been attributed to cross-talk in the specification of the motor parameters for the two hands. However, a recent study [Diedrichsen, Hazeltine, Kennerley, & Ivry, (2001). Psychological Science, 12, 493-498] indicates that when reaching movements are cued by the onset of the target endpoint, no compatibility effects are observed. To determine why directly cued movements are immune from interference, we varied the stimulus onset asynchrony for the two movements and used different combinations of directly cued and symbolically cued movements. In two experiments, compatibility effects were only observed when both movements were symbolically cued. No difference was found between compatible and incompatible movements when both movements were directly cued or when one was directly cued and the other was symbolically cued. These results indicate that interference is not related to the specification of movement parameters but instead emerges from processes associated with response selection. Moreover, the data suggest that cross-talk, when present, primarily shortens the RT of the second movement on compatible trials rather than lengthening this RT on incompatible trials.

  16. After-pulsing, cross-talk, dark-count, and gain of MPPC under 7-T static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    Multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs) have been used instead of photomultiplier tubes for positron emission tomography combined with magnetic resonance (PET-MR). However, the effects of the magnetic field (MF) on the intrinsic properties-gain, cross-talk, after-pulsing, and dark-count-have not been sufficiently investigated. Therefore, we measured these properties for two types of MPPCs-S10931-50P and S12572-50P-in a static 7-T MF. These properties were measured with a pulse-shape analysis using pulse data acquired by a digital oscilloscope in the presence of the MF (w/MF) and the absence of the MF (w/o MF) by changing the supplied over-voltages (from 0.95 to 2.1 V for S10931 and from 2.1 to 3.3 V for S12572). No significant differences between the w/MF and w/o MF cases were observed for either MPPC, suggesting that the gain, cross-talk, after-pulsing, and dark-count are insensitive to a 7-T MF. The present work shows that constant MPPC performance is expected under a strong MF and demonstrates positive results for PET-MR. PMID:27188511

  17. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhen; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Ruixin; Jiao, Na; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs.

  18. Novel detector design for reducing intercell x-ray cross-talk in the variable resolution x-ray CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi, Hosein; Asl, Ali Reza Kamali; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The variable resolution x-ray (VRX) CT scanner provides substantial improvement in the spatial resolution by matching the scanner's field of view (FOV) to the size of the object being imaged. Intercell x-ray cross-talk is one of the most important factors limiting the spatial resolution of the VRX detector. In this work, a new cell arrangement in the VRX detector is suggested to decrease the intercell x-ray cross-talk. The idea is to orient the detector cells toward the opening end of the detector. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used for performance assessment of the oriented cell detector design. Previously published design parameters and simulation results of x-ray cross-talk for the VRX detector were used for model validation using the GATE Monte Carlo package. In the first step, the intercell x-ray cross-talk of the actual VRX detector model was calculated as a function of the FOV. The obtained results indicated an optimum cell orientation angle of 28 deg. to minimize the x-ray cross-talk in the VRX detector. Thereafter, the intercell x-ray cross-talk in the oriented cell detector was modeled and quantified. Results: The intercell x-ray cross-talk in the actual detector model was considerably high, reaching up to 12% at FOVs from 24 to 38 cm. The x-ray cross-talk in the oriented cell detector was less than 5% for all possible FOVs, except 40 cm (maximum FOV). The oriented cell detector could provide considerable decrease in the intercell x-ray cross-talk for the VRX detector, thus leading to significant improvement in the spatial resolution and reduction in the spatial resolution nonuniformity across the detector length. Conclusions: The proposed oriented cell detector is the first dedicated detector design for the VRX CT scanners. Application of this concept to multislice and flat-panel VRX detectors would also result in higher spatial resolution.

  19. Cross-linked block copolymer templated assembly of nanoparticle arrays with high density and position selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhicheng; Chang, Tongxin; Huang, Haiying; Bai, Lu

    2016-10-01

    Patterning ordered nanoparticle arrays is crucial for the fascinating collective properties of nanoparticles. Block copolymer template provides us a platform for the simple and efficient assembly of nanoparticle arrays. In this work, cylinder-forming poly(styrene-block-2-vinylpyridine) thin film was firstly plasma-etched to expose poly(2-vinylpyridine) cylinders. Then the templates were cross-linked by small molecules so as to access gold nanoparticle arrays with both high density and excellent position selectivity. The cross-linking process significantly restrains the unfavorable surface reconstruction of the thin film. It is demonstrated that the quality of the nanoparticle array was affected by the degree of the cross-linking and the immersion time in nanoparticle solution. The highly ordered gold nanoparticle arrays are promising in several fields such as optics and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

  20. Walking & Talking: Dual-Task Effects on Street Crossing Behavior in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Neider, Mark B.; Gaspar, John G.; McCarley, Jason S.; Crowell, James A.; Kaczmarski, Henry; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to perform multiple tasks simultaneously has become increasingly important as technologies such as cell phones and portable music players have become more common. In the current study, we examined dual-task costs in older and younger adults using a simulated street crossing task constructed in an immersive virtual environment with an integrated treadmill so that participants could walk as they would in the real world. Participants were asked to cross simulated streets of varying difficulty while either undistracted, listening to music, or conversing on a cell phone. Older adults were more vulnerable to dual-task impairments than younger adults when the crossing task was difficult; dual-task costs were largely absent in the younger adult group. Performance costs in older adults were primarily reflected in timeout rates. When conversing on a cell phone older adults were less likely to complete their crossing compared to when listening to music or undistracted. Analysis of time spent next to the street prior to each crossing, where participants were presumably analyzing traffic patterns and making decisions regarding when to cross, revealed that older adults took longer than younger adults to initiate their crossing, and that this difference was exacerbated during cell phone conversation, suggesting impairments in cognitive planning processes. Our data suggest that multi-tasking costs may be particularly dangerous for older adults even during everyday activities such as crossing the street. PMID:21401262

  1. First Step of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) Biosynthesis Cross-talks with Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Ras Signaling in Candida albicans*

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Bhatnagar, Shilpi; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Jain, Priyanka; Pratyusha, Vavilala A.; Kumar, Pravin; Komath, Sneha Sudha

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading cause of fungal infections worldwide. It has several glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored virulence factors. Inhibiting GPI biosynthesis attenuates its virulence. Building on our previous work, we explore the interaction of GPI biosynthesis in C. albicans with ergosterol biosynthesis and hyphal morphogenesis. This study is also the first report of transcriptional co-regulation existing between two subunits of the multisubunit enzyme complex, GPI-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GPI-GnT), involved in the first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Using mutational analysis, we show that the accessory subunits, GPI2 and GPI19, of GPI-GnT exhibit opposite effects on ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling (which determines hyphal morphogenesis). This is because the two subunits negatively regulate one another; GPI19 mutants show up-regulation of GPI2, whereas GPI2 mutants show up-regulation of GPI19. Two different models were examined as follows. First, the two GPI-GnT subunits independently interact with ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling. Second, the two subunits mutually regulate one another and thereby regulate sterol levels and Ras signaling. Analysis of double mutants of these subunits indicates that GPI19 controls ergosterol biosynthesis through ERG11 levels, whereas GPI2 determines the filamentation by cross-talk with Ras1 signaling. Taken together, this suggests that the first step of GPI biosynthesis talks to and regulates two very important pathways in C. albicans. This could have implications for designing new antifungal strategies. PMID:24356967

  2. Amphiphilic peptides and their cross-disciplinary role as building blocks for nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Silvia; Albericio, Fernando; Kros, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are particularly attractive as molecular building blocks in the bottom-up fabrication of supramolecular structures based on self-assembly and have potential in many important applications in the fields of biotechnology and bioengineering. In the first part of this critical review the main categories of peptide-based amphiphiles will be discussed by showing some relevant examples, which demonstrate the importance of amphiphilic peptides as molecular building blocks for nanostructures. In the second part of this review we will review the cross-disciplinary role of peptide-based supramolecular nanoarchitectures ranging from chemistry to biology, medicine, materials science, and engineering through discussing several examples of applied nanomaterials (216 references).

  3. Stereoscopic three-dimensional display based on polarization-switching device with low cross talk and high contrast ratio.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hun Ki; Lee, Joong Ha; Jin, Hye-Jung; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Jae Chang

    2010-07-01

    We present a polarization-switching device with dual-frequency liquid crystal material for a stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) display. This device shows good properties, such as low 3D cross talk and high brightness, due to a fast dynamic response time. Without optical compensation, however, this device has an asymmetric contrast ratio on the left- and right-hand sides of 3D glasses, because the viewing principles on both sides are different from each other. To solve this problem, we design an optical structure with two half-wave plate films using the Jones matrix method. As the results of simulation and experiment show, excellent dark states and high brightness are realized over the entire range of visible wavelengths on both sides.

  4. Dynamic Modeling and Analysis of the Cross-Talk between Insulin/AKT and MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Arkun, Yaman

    2016-01-01

    Feedback loops play a key role in the regulation of the complex interactions in signal transduction networks. By studying the network of interactions among the biomolecules present in signaling pathways at the systems level, it is possible to understand how the biological functions are regulated and how the diseases emerge from their deregulations. This paper identifies the key feedback loops involved in the cross-talk among the insulin-AKT and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways. We developed a mathematical model that can be used to study the steady-state and dynamic behavior of the interactions among these two important signaling pathways. Modeling analysis and simulation case studies identify the key interaction parameters and the feedback loops that determine the normal and disease phenotypes. PMID:26930065

  5. Molecular Heterogeneities of Adipose Depots - Potential Effects on Adipose-Muscle Cross-Talk in Humans, Mice and Farm Animals

    PubMed Central

    Komolka, Katrin; Albrecht, Elke; Wimmers, Klaus; Michal, Jennifer J.; Maak, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is considered as a major endocrine organ that secretes numerous proteins called adipokines. The heterogeneous nature of adipose tissue in different parts of the body suggests respective heterogeneity of proteomes and secretomes. This review consolidates knowledge from recent studies targeting the diversity of different adipose depots affecting the pattern of secreted adipokines and discusses potential consequences for the cross-talk between adipose and skeletal muscle in humans, rodent models and farm animals. Special attention is paid to muscle-associated fat depots like inter- and intramuscular fat that become focus of attention in the context of the rather new notion of skeletal muscle as a major endocrine organ. Understanding the complexity of communication between adipocytes and skeletal muscle cells will allow developing strategies for improvement of human health and for sustainable production of high quality meat. PMID:25057322

  6. Dynamic Modeling and Analysis of the Cross-Talk between Insulin/AKT and MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Arkun, Yaman

    2016-01-01

    Feedback loops play a key role in the regulation of the complex interactions in signal transduction networks. By studying the network of interactions among the biomolecules present in signaling pathways at the systems level, it is possible to understand how the biological functions are regulated and how the diseases emerge from their deregulations. This paper identifies the key feedback loops involved in the cross-talk among the insulin-AKT and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways. We developed a mathematical model that can be used to study the steady-state and dynamic behavior of the interactions among these two important signaling pathways. Modeling analysis and simulation case studies identify the key interaction parameters and the feedback loops that determine the normal and disease phenotypes. PMID:26930065

  7. Role of Ethylene and Its Cross Talk with Other Signaling Molecules in Plant Responses to Heavy Metal Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Thu, Nguyen Binh Anh; Hoang, Xuan Lan Thi; Asgher, Mohd; Khan, Nafees A.; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Excessive heavy metals (HMs) in agricultural lands cause toxicities to plants, resulting in declines in crop productivity. Recent advances in ethylene biology research have established that ethylene is not only responsible for many important physiological activities in plants but also plays a pivotal role in HM stress tolerance. The manipulation of ethylene in plants to cope with HM stress through various approaches targeting either ethylene biosynthesis or the ethylene signaling pathway has brought promising outcomes. This review covers ethylene production and signal transduction in plant responses to HM stress, cross talk between ethylene and other signaling molecules under adverse HM stress conditions, and approaches to modify ethylene action to improve HM tolerance. From our current understanding about ethylene and its regulatory activities, it is believed that the optimization of endogenous ethylene levels in plants under HM stress would pave the way for developing transgenic crops with improved HM tolerance. PMID:26246451

  8. Role of Ethylene and Its Cross Talk with Other Signaling Molecules in Plant Responses to Heavy Metal Stress.

    PubMed

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Khan, M Iqbal R; Thu, Nguyen Binh Anh; Hoang, Xuan Lan Thi; Asgher, Mohd; Khan, Nafees A; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-09-01

    Excessive heavy metals (HMs) in agricultural lands cause toxicities to plants, resulting in declines in crop productivity. Recent advances in ethylene biology research have established that ethylene is not only responsible for many important physiological activities in plants but also plays a pivotal role in HM stress tolerance. The manipulation of ethylene in plants to cope with HM stress through various approaches targeting either ethylene biosynthesis or the ethylene signaling pathway has brought promising outcomes. This review covers ethylene production and signal transduction in plant responses to HM stress, cross talk between ethylene and other signaling molecules under adverse HM stress conditions, and approaches to modify ethylene action to improve HM tolerance. From our current understanding about ethylene and its regulatory activities, it is believed that the optimization of endogenous ethylene levels in plants under HM stress would pave the way for developing transgenic crops with improved HM tolerance.

  9. Stereoscopic three-dimensional display based on polarization-switching device with low cross talk and high contrast ratio.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hun Ki; Lee, Joong Ha; Jin, Hye-Jung; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Jae Chang

    2010-07-01

    We present a polarization-switching device with dual-frequency liquid crystal material for a stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) display. This device shows good properties, such as low 3D cross talk and high brightness, due to a fast dynamic response time. Without optical compensation, however, this device has an asymmetric contrast ratio on the left- and right-hand sides of 3D glasses, because the viewing principles on both sides are different from each other. To solve this problem, we design an optical structure with two half-wave plate films using the Jones matrix method. As the results of simulation and experiment show, excellent dark states and high brightness are realized over the entire range of visible wavelengths on both sides. PMID:20596202

  10. Use of information visualization methods eliminating cross talk in multiple sensing units investigated for a light-addressable potentiometric sensor.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José R; Maki, Rafael M; Paulovich, Fernando V; Werner, Carl F; Poghossian, Arshak; de Oliveira, Maria C F; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Schöning, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The integration of nanostructured films containing biomolecules and silicon-based technologies is a promising direction for reaching miniaturized biosensors that exhibit high sensitivity and selectivity. A challenge, however, is to avoid cross talk among sensing units in an array with multiple sensors located on a small area. In this letter, we describe an array of 16 sensing units of a light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS), which was made with layer-by-layer (LbL) films of a poly(amidomine) dendrimer (PAMAM) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), coated with a layer of the enzyme penicillinase. A visual inspection of the data from constant-current measurements with liquid samples containing distinct concentrations of penicillin, glucose, or a buffer indicated a possible cross talk between units that contained penicillinase and those that did not. With the use of multidimensional data projection techniques, normally employed in information visualization methods, we managed to distinguish the results from the modified LAPS, even in cases where the units were adjacent to each other. Furthermore, the plots generated with the interactive document map (IDMAP) projection technique enabled the distinction of the different concentrations of penicillin, from 5 mmol L(-1) down to 0.5 mmol L(-1). Data visualization also confirmed the enhanced performance of the sensing units containing carbon nanotubes, consistent with the analysis of results for LAPS sensors. The use of visual analytics, as with projection methods, may be essential to handle a large amount of data generated in multiple sensor arrays to achieve high performance in miniaturized systems.

  11. Cross-talk between EGF and BMP9 signalling pathways regulates the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Qin, Jiaqiang; Luo, Qing; Bi, Yang; Zhu, Gaohui; Jiang, Wei; Kim, Stephanie H; Li, Mi; Su, Yuxi; Nan, Guoxin; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Wenwen; Li, Ruidong; Chen, Xiang; Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Jiye; Wang, Jinhua; Rogers, Mary Rose; Zhang, Hongyu; Shui, Wei; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Liang, Xi; Wu, Ningning; He, Yunfeng; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Shi, Lewis L; Li, Tingyu; He, Tong-Chuan; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitors, which give rise to several lineages, including bone, cartilage and fat. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. EGF acts by binding with high affinity to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the cell surface and stimulating the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity of its receptor, which initiates a signal transduction cascade causing a variety of biochemical changes within the cell and regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. We have identified BMP9 as one of the most osteogenic BMPs in MSCs. In this study, we investigate if EGF signalling cross-talks with BMP9 and regulates BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation. We find that EGF potentiates BMP9-induced early and late osteogenic markers of MSCs in vitro, which can be effectively blunted by EGFR inhibitors Gefitinib and Erlotinib or receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors AG-1478 and AG-494 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EGF significantly augments BMP9-induced bone formation in the cultured mouse foetal limb explants. In vivo stem cell implantation experiment reveals that exogenous expression of EGF in MSCs can effectively potentiate BMP9-induced ectopic bone formation, yielding larger and more mature bone masses. Interestingly, we find that, while EGF can induce BMP9 expression in MSCs, EGFR expression is directly up-regulated by BMP9 through Smad1/5/8 signalling pathway. Thus, the cross-talk between EGF and BMP9 signalling pathways in MSCs may underline their important roles in regulating osteogenic differentiation. Harnessing the synergy between BMP9 and EGF should be beneficial for enhancing osteogenesis in regenerative medicine. PMID:23844832

  12. IRF-8 Controls Melanoma Progression by Regulating the Cross Talk between Cancer and Immune Cells within the Tumor Microenvironment12

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Fabrizio; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Sestili, Paola; Spadaro, Francesca; Fragale, Alessandra; Sistigu, Antonella; Lucarini, Valeria; Spada, Massimo; Sanchez, Massimo; Scala, Stefania; Battistini, Angela; Belardelli, Filippo; Gabriele, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8) is crucial for myeloid cell development and immune response and also acts as a tumor suppressor gene. Here, we analyzed the role of IRF-8 in the cross talk between melanoma cells and tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. B16-F10 melanoma cells transplanted into IRF-8-deficient (IRF-8-/-) mice grow more rapidly, leading to higher numbers of lung metastasis, with respect to control animals. These events correlated with reduced dendritic cell and T cell infiltration, accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and a chemokine/chemokine receptor expression profile within the tumor microenvironment supporting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Noticeably, primary tumors developing in IRF-8-/- mice displayed a clear-cut inhibition of IRF-8 expression in melanoma cells. Injection of the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine into melanoma-bearing IRF-8-/- animals induced intratumoral IRF-8 expression and resulted in the re-establishment of a chemokine/ chemokine receptor pattern favoring leukocyte infiltration and melanoma growth arrest. Importantly, intrinsic IRF-8 expression was progressively down-modulated during melanoma growth in mice and in human metastatic melanoma cells with respect to primary tumors. Lastly, IRF-8 expression in melanoma cells was directly modulated by soluble factors, among which interleukin-27 (IL-27), released by immune cells from tumor-bearing mice. Collectively, these results underscore a key role of IRF-8 in the cross talk between melanoma and immune cells, thus revealing its critical function within the tumor microenvironment in regulating melanoma progression and invasiveness. PMID:23308054

  13. IRF-8 controls melanoma progression by regulating the cross talk between cancer and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Fabrizio; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Sestili, Paola; Spadaro, Francesca; Fragale, Alessandra; Sistigu, Antonella; Lucarini, Valeria; Spada, Massimo; Sanchez, Massimo; Scala, Stefania; Battistini, Angela; Belardelli, Filippo; Gabriele, Lucia

    2012-12-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8) is crucial for myeloid cell development and immune response and also acts as a tumor suppressor gene. Here, we analyzed the role of IRF-8 in the cross talk between melanoma cells and tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. B16-F10 melanoma cells transplanted into IRF-8-deficient (IRF-8(-/-)) mice grow more rapidly, leading to higher numbers of lung metastasis, with respect to control animals. These events correlated with reduced dendritic cell and T cell infiltration, accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and a chemokine/chemokine receptor expression profile within the tumor microenvironment supporting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Noticeably, primary tumors developing in IRF-8(-/-) mice displayed a clear-cut inhibition of IRF-8 expression in melanoma cells. Injection of the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine into melanoma-bearing IRF-8(-/-) animals induced intratumoral IRF-8 expression and resulted in the re-establishment of a chemokine/ chemokine receptor pattern favoring leukocyte infiltration and melanoma growth arrest. Importantly, intrinsic IRF-8 expression was progressively down-modulated during melanoma growth in mice and in human metastatic melanoma cells with respect to primary tumors. Lastly, IRF-8 expression in melanoma cells was directly modulated by soluble factors, among which interleukin-27 (IL-27), released by immune cells from tumor-bearing mice. Collectively, these results underscore a key role of IRF-8 in the cross talk between melanoma and immune cells, thus revealing its critical function within the tumor microenvironment in regulating melanoma progression and invasiveness. PMID:23308054

  14. Cross Talk between the Calcium-Sensing Receptor and the Vitamin D System in Prevention of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Kállay, Enikö

    2016-01-01

    There is epidemiological evidence for the cancer preventive effect of dietary calcium (Ca2+) and vitamin D. This effect is strongest in colorectal cancer (CRC). The active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3), bound to its receptor, the vitamin D receptor (VDR) regulates the expression of hundreds of different genes in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. While Ca2+ acts through multiple mechanisms and pathways, some of its effects are mediated by the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). The joint action of Ca2+ and 1,25D3 is due to the fact that both regulate some of the main processes involved in the development of various cancers, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and inflammation. Moreover, 1,25D3, bound to VDR can induce translation of the CaSR, while the amount and activity of the CaSR affects 1,25D3 signaling. However, the complexity of the cross-talk between the CaSR and the vitamin D system goes beyond regulating similar pathways and affecting each other's expression. Our aim was to review some of the mechanisms that drive the cross-talk between the vitamin D system and the CaSR with a special focus on the interaction in CRC cells. We evaluated the molecular evidence that supports the epidemiological observation that both vitamin D and calcium are needed for protection against malignant transformation of the colon and that their effect is modulated by the presence of a functional CaSR. PMID:27803671

  15. Inhibition of tau aggregation by a rosamine derivative that blocks tau intermolecular disulfide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Mamunul; Kim, Dohee; Yu, Young Hyun; Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Dong Jin; Chang, Young-Tae; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal tau aggregates are presumed to be neurotoxic and are an important therapeutic target for multiple neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Growing evidence has shown that tau intermolecular disulfide cross-linking is critical in generating tau oligomers that serve as a building block for higher-order aggregates. Here we report that a small molecule inhibitor prevents tau aggregation by blocking the generation of disulfide cross-linked tau oligomers. Among the compounds tested, a rosamine derivative bearing mild thiol reactivity selectively labeled tau and effectively inhibited oligomerization and fibrillization processes in vitro. Our data suggest that controlling tau oxidation status could be a new therapeutic strategy for prevention of abnormal tau aggregation. PMID:24919397

  16. A study on a method to reduce the effect of the cross-talk artifact in a simultaneous, multiple-slice, plane, oblique MRI scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun-Yeob; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Moo-Seong; Park, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Eng-Chan; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Shin, Jae-Woo; Kim, Young-Jae; Cho, Young-Kuk

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the effect of cross-talk artifacts on the region of interest (ROI) and to improve the diagnostic value of an image by conducting an examination using the linear (series) method, rather than the interleave method, based on the time concept, which is a basic principle of MRI, with a focus on the T1-weighted image, which has a strong effect on the cross-talk artifact. A water phantom was placed in the center of a brain coil before using the interleave method and the linear method to obtain cross-sectional images. A sagittal oblique scan was conducted to ensure that the slice groups intersected one another. A reference image was also acquired at TR (time of repetition) = 500 msec. Subsequently, the TR was changed to 600 and 700 msec to conduct scans. The analysis method was to use the interleave method and the linear method to compare the effects of the cross-talk artifacts and the TR. As scanned images were suggested, the SNR (signal to noise ratio) for the ROI was measured. According to the study results, the effects of cross-talk artifacts were reduced more significantly in the image scanned using the linear method than in that using the interleave method. When the SNRs of the images scanned in the interleave method and the linear method were compared, the image scanned in the linear method showed higher SNRs for the anterior and the posterior parts at TR = 500, 600, and 700 msec. On the other hand, the image scanned in the interleave method showed an increase in the SNR for the middle part, where the cross-talk artifacts did not appear. This means that the cross-talk artifacts were reduced in the image scanned using the linear method, which resulted in an increase in the SNR. Overall, the SNRs of each image for the interleave method and the linear method were highest at TR = 700 msec. In conclusion, the linear method is selected to reduce the effects of cross-talk artifacts in a simultaneous and multiple slice plane oblique scan

  17. Cross-talk between PRMT1-mediated methylation and ubiquitylation on RBM15 controls RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Tran, Ngoc-Tung; Su, Hairui; Wang, Rui; Lu, Yuheng; Tang, Haiping; Aoyagi, Sayura; Guo, Ailan; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Zhou, Dewang; Qian, Kun; Hricik, Todd; Côté, Jocelyn; Han, Xiaosi; Zhou, Wenping; Laha, Suparna; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Levine, Ross L; Raffel, Glen; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Dongquan; Li, Haitao; Townes, Tim; Wang, Hengbin; Deng, Haiteng; Zheng, Y George; Leslie, Christina; Luo, Minkui; Zhao, Xinyang

    2015-11-17

    RBM15, an RNA binding protein, determines cell-fate specification of many tissues including blood. We demonstrate that RBM15 is methylated by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) at residue R578, leading to its degradation via ubiquitylation by an E3 ligase (CNOT4). Overexpression of PRMT1 in acute megakaryocytic leukemia cell lines blocks megakaryocyte terminal differentiation by downregulation of RBM15 protein level. Restoring RBM15 protein level rescues megakaryocyte terminal differentiation blocked by PRMT1 overexpression. At the molecular level, RBM15 binds to pre-messenger RNA intronic regions of genes important for megakaryopoiesis such as GATA1, RUNX1, TAL1 and c-MPL. Furthermore, preferential binding of RBM15 to specific intronic regions recruits the splicing factor SF3B1 to the same sites for alternative splicing. Therefore, PRMT1 regulates alternative RNA splicing via reducing RBM15 protein concentration. Targeting PRMT1 may be a curative therapy to restore megakaryocyte differentiation for acute megakaryocytic leukemia.

  18. Cross-talk between PRMT1-mediated methylation and ubiquitylation on RBM15 controls RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Tran, Ngoc-Tung; Su, Hairui; Wang, Rui; Lu, Yuheng; Tang, Haiping; Aoyagi, Sayura; Guo, Ailan; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Zhou, Dewang; Qian, Kun; Hricik, Todd; Côté, Jocelyn; Han, Xiaosi; Zhou, Wenping; Laha, Suparna; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Levine, Ross L; Raffel, Glen; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Dongquan; Li, Haitao; Townes, Tim; Wang, Hengbin; Deng, Haiteng; Zheng, Y George; Leslie, Christina; Luo, Minkui; Zhao, Xinyang

    2015-01-01

    RBM15, an RNA binding protein, determines cell-fate specification of many tissues including blood. We demonstrate that RBM15 is methylated by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) at residue R578, leading to its degradation via ubiquitylation by an E3 ligase (CNOT4). Overexpression of PRMT1 in acute megakaryocytic leukemia cell lines blocks megakaryocyte terminal differentiation by downregulation of RBM15 protein level. Restoring RBM15 protein level rescues megakaryocyte terminal differentiation blocked by PRMT1 overexpression. At the molecular level, RBM15 binds to pre-messenger RNA intronic regions of genes important for megakaryopoiesis such as GATA1, RUNX1, TAL1 and c-MPL. Furthermore, preferential binding of RBM15 to specific intronic regions recruits the splicing factor SF3B1 to the same sites for alternative splicing. Therefore, PRMT1 regulates alternative RNA splicing via reducing RBM15 protein concentration. Targeting PRMT1 may be a curative therapy to restore megakaryocyte differentiation for acute megakaryocytic leukemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07938.001 PMID:26575292

  19. Hierarchically porous polymers from hyper-cross-linked block polymer precursors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Myungeun; Kim, Soobin; Oh, Jaehoon; Kim, Sun-Jung; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2015-01-21

    We report synthesis of hierarchically porous polymers (HPPs) consisting of micropores and well-defined 3D continuous mesopores by combination of hyper-cross-linking and block polymer self-assembly. Copolymerization of 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (VBzCl) with divinylbenzene (DVB) in the presence of polylactide (PLA) macro-chain-transfer agent produced a cross-linked block polymer precursor PLA-b-P(VBzCl-co-DVB) via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. A nanoscopic bicontinuous morphology containing PLA and P(VBzCl-co-DVB) microdomains was obtained as a result of polymerization-induced microphase separation. While a basic treatment of the precursor selectively removed PLA to yield a reticulated mesoporous polymer, hyper-cross-linking of the precursor by FeCl3 generated micropores in the P(VBzCl-co-DVB) microdomain via Friedel-Crafts alkylation and simultaneously degraded PLA to produce the HPP containing micropores in the mesoporous framework. The mesopore size of the HPP could be precisely controlled from 6 to 15 nm by controlling the molar mass of PLA. We demonstrate acceleration in adsorption rate in the HPP compared to a hyper-cross-linked microporous polymer. PMID:25551291

  20. A new dual-isotope convolution cross-talk correction method: a Tl-201/Tc-99m SPECT cardiac phantom study.

    PubMed

    Knesaurek, K

    1994-10-01

    Simultaneous dual-isotope SPECT imaging provides a clear advantage in situations where two concurrent metabolic, anatomic, or background measurements are desired. It obviates the need for two separate imaging sessions, reduces patient motion problems, and provides exact image registration between images. However, a potential limitation of dual-isotope SPECT imaging is contribution of scattered and primary photons from one radionuclide into the second radionuclide's photopeak energy window, referred to here as cross-talk. Cross-talk in both photopeak energy windows can significantly degrade image quality, resolution, and quantitation to an unacceptable level. Simple cross-talk correction method used in dual-radionuclide in vitro counting, even applied on a pixel-by-pixel basis, does not account for the differences in spatial distribution of the photopeak and cross-talk photons. Here a new convolution cross-talk correction method is presented. The convolution filters are derived from point response functions (PRFs) for Tc-99m and Tl-201 point sources. Three separate acquisitions were performed, each with two 20% wide energy windows, one centered at 140 keV and another at 70 keV. The first acquisition was done with Tc-99m solution only, the second with Tl-201 solution only, and the third with a mixture of Tc-99m and Tl-201. The nonuniform RH-2 thorax-heart phantom was used to test a new correction technique. The main difficulty and limitation of the convolution correction approach is caused by the variation in PRF as a function of depth. Thus, average PRF should be used in the creation of an approximative filter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7869989

  1. An examination of the assumptions in the POLCAL cross-talk removal algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, M.; Freeman, A.

    1992-01-01

    The POLCAL crosstalk removal algorithm is based on the statistical properties of the image background and does not need any corner reflector or active radar calibrator deployed in the scene. The advantage of being able to remove the crosstalk contamination without using external calibration targets gives rise to the consideration of algorithms based on clutter statistics in polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images in more detail. The basic assumption of the POLCAL procedure is the decorrelation of copolarized and cross-polarized backscatter, which is valid for natural targets with azimuthal symmetry. This assumption and others regarding the properties of the imaged surface are examined. An improved version called POLCALII is presented, and its performance is compared with POLCAL.

  2. Modulator-induced interference in functional cross talk between the substrate and the ATP sites of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Maki, Nazli; Moitra, Karobi; Silver, Cara; Ghosh, Pratiti; Chattopadhyay, Apurba; Dey, Saibal

    2006-02-28

    The human P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) is an ATP-dependent efflux pump for structurally unrelated hydrophobic compounds, conferring simultaneous resistance to and restricting bioavailability of several anticancer and antimicrobial agents. Drug transport by Pgp requires a coordinated communication between its substrate binding/translocating pathway (substrate site) and the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs or ATP sites). In this study, we demonstrate that certain thioxanthene-based Pgp modulators, such as cis-(Z)-flupentixol and its closely related analogues, effectively disrupt molecular cross talk between the substrate, and the ATP, sites without affecting the basic functional aspects of the two domains, such as substrate recognition, binding, and hydrolysis of ATP and dissociation of ADP following ATP hydrolysis. The allosteric modulator cis-(Z)-flupentixol has no effect on [alpha-(32)P]-8-azido-ATP binding to Pgp under nonhydrolytic conditions or on the K(m) for ATP during ATP hydrolysis. Both hydrolysis of ATP and vanadate-induced [alpha-(32)P]-8-azido-ADP trapping (following [alpha-(32)P]-8-azido-ATP breakdown) by Pgp are stimulated by the modulator. However, the ability of Pgp substrates (such as prazosin) to stimulate ATP hydrolysis and facilitate vanadate-induced trapping of [alpha-(32)P]-8-azido-ADP is substantially affected in the presence of cis-(Z)-flupentixol. Substrate recognition by Pgp as determined by [(125)I]iodoarylazidoprazosin ([(125)I]IAAP) binding both in the presence and in the absence of ATP is facilitated by the modulator, whereas substrate dissociation in response to vanadate trapping is considerably affected in its presence. In the Pgp F983A mutant, which is impaired in modulation by cis-(Z)-flupentixol, the modulator has a minimal effect on substrate-stimulated ATP hydrolysis as well as on substrate dissociation coupled to vanadate trapping. Finally, cis-(Z)-flupentixol has no effect on dissociation of [alpha-(32)P]-8-azido-ADP (or ADP

  3. Role of p53–fibrinolytic system cross-talk in the regulation of quartz-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandary, Yashodhar P.; Shetty, Shwetha K.; Marudamuthu, Amarnath S.; Fu, Jian; Pinson, Barbara M.; Levin, Jeffrey; Shetty, Sreerama

    2015-03-01

    Silica is the major component of airborne dust generated by wind, manufacturing and/or demolition. Chronic occupational inhalation of silica dust containing crystalline quartz is by far the predominant form of silicosis in humans. Silicosis is a progressive lung disease that typically arises after a very long latency and is a major occupational concern with no known effective treatment. The mechanism of silicosis is not clearly understood. However, silicosis is associated with increased cell death, expression of redox enzymes and pro-fibrotic cytokines and chemokines. Since alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) death and disruption of alveolar fibrinolysis is often associated with both acute and chronic lung injuries, we explored whether p53-mediated changes in the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system contributes to silica-induced lung injury. We further sought to determine whether caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide (CSP), which inhibits p53 expression, mitigates lung injury associated with exposure to silica. Lung tissues and AECs isolated from wild-type (WT) mice exposed to silica exhibit increased apoptosis, p53 and PAI-1, and suppression of uPA expression. Treatment of WT mice with CSP inhibits PAI-1, restores uPA expression and prevents AEC apoptosis by suppressing p53, which is otherwise induced in mice exposed to silica. The process involves CSP-mediated inhibition of serine-15 phosphorylation of p53 by inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A-C (PP2A-C) interaction with silica-induced caveolin-1 in AECs. These observations suggest that changes in the p53–uPA fibrinolytic system cross-talk contribute to lung injury caused by inhalation of silica dust containing crystalline quartz and is protected by CSP by targeting this pathway. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to quartz dusts is a major cause of lung injury and silicosis. • The survival of patients with silicosis is bleak due to lack of effective treatments. • This study defines a new role of

  4. Cross-talk between non-genomic and genomic signalling pathways - Distinct effect profiles of environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Elisabete; Kabil, Alena; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional cross-talk after activation by 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) has been studied in considerable detail, but comparatively little is known about the ways in which synthetic estrogen-like chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, interfere with these signalling pathways. E2 can stimulate rapid, non-genomic signalling events, such as activation of the Src/Ras/Erk signalling pathway. We investigated how activation of this pathway by E2, the estrogenic environmental contaminants o,p'-DDT, {beta}-HCH and p,p'-DDE, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) influences the expression of ER target genes, such as TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1, and the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Despite commonalities in their estrogenicity as judged by cell proliferation assays, the environmental contaminants exhibited striking differences in their non-genomic and genomic signalling. The gene expression profiles of o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH resembled the effects observed with E2. In the case of {beta}-HCH this is surprising, considering its reported lack of affinity to the 'classical' ER. The expression profiles seen with p,p'-DDE showed some similarities with E2, but overall, p,p'-DDE was a fairly weak transcriptional inducer of TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1. We observed distinct differences in the non-genomic signalling of the tested compounds. p,p'-DDE was unable to stimulate Src and Erk1/Erk2 activations. The effects of E2 on Src and Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation were transient and weak when compared to EGF, but {beta}-HCH induced strong and sustained activation of all tested kinases. Transcription of TFF1, ER, PR and BRCA1 by E2, o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH could be suppressed partially by inhibiting the Src/Ras/Erk pathway with PD 98059. However, this was not seen with p,p'-DDE. Our investigations show that the cellular activities of estrogens and xenoestrogens are the result of a combination of extranuclear (non-genomic) and nuclear (genomic) events and highlight the

  5. Understanding cross sample talk as a result of triboelectric charging on future mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Anderson, R. C.; Fleming, G.

    2009-12-01

    Proper scientific analysis requires the material that is collected and analyzed by in-situ instruments be as close as possible (chemically and mineralogically) to the initial, unaltered surface material prior to its collection and delivery. However this is not always possible for automated robotic in situ analysis. Therefore it is vital to understanding how the sample has been changed/altered prior to analysis so that analysis can be put in the proper context. We have examined the transport of fines when transferred under ambient martian conditions in hardware analogous to that being developed for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sample acquisition flight hardware. We will discuss the amount of cross sample contamination when different mineralogy’s are transferred under Martian environmental conditions. Similar issues have been identified as problems within the terrestrial mining, textile, and pharmaceutical research communities that may alter/change the chemical and mineralogical compositions of samples before they are delivered to the MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical instruments. These cross-sample contamination will affect the overall quality of the science results and each of these processes need to be examined and understood prior to MSL landing on the surface of Mars. There are two forms of triboelectric charging that have been observed to occur on Earth and they are 1) when dissimilar material comes in contact (one material charges positive and the other negative depending on their relative positions on the triboelectric series and the work function of the material) and 2) when two similar materials come in contact, the larger particles can transfer one of their high energy electrons to a smaller particle. During the collisions, the transferred electron tends to lose energy and the charge tends not to move from the smaller particle back to the larger particle in further collisions. This transfer effect

  6. The cross-talk of HIV-1 Tat and methamphetamine in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mediouni, Sonia; Garibaldi Marcondes, Maria Cecilia; Miller, Courtney; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Valente, Susana T.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the lives of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals. Nonetheless, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which range from undetectable neurocognitive impairments to severe dementia, still affect approximately 50% of the infected population, hampering their quality of life. The persistence of HAND is promoted by several factors, including longer life expectancies, the residual levels of virus in the central nervous system (CNS) and the continued presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins such as the transactivator of transcription (Tat) in the brain. Tat is a secreted viral protein that crosses the blood–brain barrier into the CNS, where it has the ability to directly act on neurons and non-neuronal cells alike. These actions result in the release of soluble factors involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and excitotoxicity, ultimately resulting in neuronal damage. The percentage of methamphetamine (MA) abusers is high among the HIV-1-positive population compared to the general population. On the other hand, MA abuse is correlated with increased viral replication, enhanced Tat-mediated neurotoxicity and neurocognitive impairments. Although several strategies have been investigated to reduce HAND and MA use, no clinically approved treatment is currently available. Here, we review the latest findings of the effects of Tat and MA in HAND and discuss a few promising potential therapeutic developments. PMID:26557111

  7. Src-mediated cross-talk between farnesoid X and epidermal growth factor receptors inhibits human intestinal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhongsheng; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Xie, Guofeng

    2012-01-01

    Besides its essential role in controlling bile acid and lipid metabolism, the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) protects against intestinal tumorigenesis by promoting apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms underlying these anti-proliferative actions of FXR remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the effects of FXR activation (FXR overexpression and treatment with an FXR agonist GW4064) and inactivation (treatment with FXR siRNA and an FXR antagonist guggulsterone) on colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro using human colon cancer cell lines (H508, SNU-C4 and HT-29) and in vivo using xenografts in nude mice. Blocking FXR activity with guggulsterone stimulated time- and dose-dependent EGFR (Tyr845) phosphorylation and ERK activation. In contrast, FXR overexpression and activation with GW4064 attenuated cell proliferation by down-regulating EGFR (Tyr845) phosphorylation and ERK activation. Treatment with guggulsterone and GW4064 also caused dose-dependent changes in Src (Tyr416) phosphorylation. In stably-transfected human colon cancer cells, overexpression of FXR reduced EGFR, ERK, Src phosphorylation and cell proliferation, and in nude mice attenuated the growth of human colon cancer xenografts (64% reduction in tumor volume; 47% reduction in tumor weight; both P<0.01). Moreover, guggulsterone-induced EGFR and ERK phosphorylation and cell proliferation were abolished by inhibiting activation of Src, EGFR and MEK. Collectively these data support the novel conclusion that in human colon cancer cells Src-mediated cross-talk between FXR and EGFR modulates ERK phosphorylation, thereby regulating intestinal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis.

  8. Cross-talk between Rho and Rac GTPases drives deterministic exploration of cellular shape space and morphological heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Sailem, Heba; Bousgouni, Vicky; Cooper, Sam; Bakal, Chris

    2014-01-22

    One goal of cell biology is to understand how cells adopt different shapes in response to varying environmental and cellular conditions. Achieving a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between cell shape and environment requires a systems-level understanding of the signalling networks that respond to external cues and regulate the cytoskeleton. Classical biochemical and genetic approaches have identified thousands of individual components that contribute to cell shape, but it remains difficult to predict how cell shape is generated by the activity of these components using bottom-up approaches because of the complex nature of their interactions in space and time. Here, we describe the regulation of cellular shape by signalling systems using a top-down approach. We first exploit the shape diversity generated by systematic RNAi screening and comprehensively define the shape space a migratory cell explores. We suggest a simple Boolean model involving the activation of Rac and Rho GTPases in two compartments to explain the basis for all cell shapes in the dataset. Critically, we also generate a probabilistic graphical model to show how cells explore this space in a deterministic, rather than a stochastic, fashion. We validate the predictions made by our model using live-cell imaging. Our work explains how cross-talk between Rho and Rac can generate different cell shapes, and thus morphological heterogeneity, in genetically identical populations.

  9. Complement-Coagulation Cross-Talk: A Potential Mediator of the Physiological Activation of Complement by Low pH

    PubMed Central

    Kenawy, Hany Ibrahim; Boral, Ismet; Bevington, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a major constituent of the innate immune system. It not only bridges innate and adaptive arms of the immune system but also links the immune system with the coagulation system. Current understanding of the role of complement has extended far beyond fighting of infections, and now encompasses maintenance of homeostasis, tissue regeneration, and pathophysiology of multiple diseases. It has been known for many years that complement activation is strongly pH sensitive, but only relatively recently has the physiological significance of this been appreciated. Most complement assays are carried out at the physiological pH 7.4. However, pH in some extracellular compartments, for example, renal tubular fluid in parts of the tubule, and extracellular fluid at inflammation loci, is sufficiently acidic to activate complement. The exact molecular mechanism of this activation is still unclear, but possible cross-talk between the contact system (intrinsic pathway) and complement may exist at low pH with subsequent complement activation. The current article reviews the published data on the effect of pH on the contact system and complement activity, the nature of the pH sensor molecules, and the clinical implications of these effects. Of particular interest is chronic kidney disease (CKD) accompanied by metabolic acidosis, in which therapeutic alkalinization of urine has been shown significantly to reduce tubular complement activation products, an effect, which may have important implications for slowing progression of CKD. PMID:25999953

  10. Iron Availability Affects Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Responses, and Evidence of Cross-Talk with Auxin and Zinc in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vandna; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Sinilal, Bhaskaran; Yadav, Sandeep; Sarkar, Ananda K; Dantu, Prem Kumar; Jain, Ajay

    2015-06-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is pivotal for plant growth and development. Pi deficiency triggers local and systemically regulated adaptive responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Inhibition of primary root growth (PRG) and retarded development of lateral roots (LRs) are typical local Pi deficiency-mediated responses of the root system. Expression of Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes is regulated systemically. Here, we report the differential influence of iron (Fe) availability on local and systemic sensing of Pi by Arabidopsis. P-Fe- condition disrupted local Pi sensing, resulting in an elongated primary root (PR). Altered Fe homeostasis in the lpsi mutant with aberration in local Pi sensing provided circumstantial evidence towards the role of Fe in the maintenance of Pi homeostasis. Reporter gene assays, expression analysis of auxin-responsive genes (ARGs) and root phenotyping of the arf7arf19 mutant demonstrated the role of Fe availability on local Pi deficiency-mediated LR development. In addition, Fe availability also exerted a significant influence on PSR genes belonging to different functional categories. Together, these results demonstrated a substantial influence of Fe availability on Pi deficiency-mediated responses of ontogenetically distinct traits of the root system and PSR genes. The study also provided evidence of cross-talk between Pi, Fe and Zn, highlighting a complex tripartite interaction amongst them for maintaining Pi homeostasis.

  11. Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlins, Scott A.; Bollinger, Nikki; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2005-08-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca2+o). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca2+]o, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca2+o. Further, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G-protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca2+o-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca2+o. This is consistent with the known expression of TGFa by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR mediated response to increased Ca2+o in Rat-1 fibroblasts, and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

  12. MicroRNA-34a Modulates Cytoskeletal Dynamics through Regulating RhoA/Rac1 Cross-talk in Chondroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongkyun; Song, Jinsoo; Kim, Sunhyo; Park, Hyang Mi; Chun, Churl-Hong; Sonn, Jongkyung; Jin, Eun-Jung

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in various cellular processes, such as cell fate determination, cell death, and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we investigated the role of miRNA-34a (miR-34a) in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is essential for chondrocyte differentiation. miRNA arrays to identify genes that appeared to be up-regulated or down-regulated during chondrogenesis were applied with chondrogenic progenitors treated with JNK inhibitor. PNA-based antisense oligonucleotides and miRNA precursor were used for investigation of the functional roles of miR-34a. We found that, in chick chondroprogenitors treated with JNK inhibitor, which suppresses chondrogenic differentiation, the expression levels of miR-34a and RhoA1 are up-regulated through modulation of Rac1 expression. Blockade of miR-34a via the use of PNA-based antisense oligonucleotides was associated with decreased protein expression of RhoA (a known modulator of stress fiber expression), down-regulation of stress fibers, up-regulation of Rac1, and recovery of protein level of type II collagen. miR-34a regulates RhoA/Rac1 cross-talk and negatively modulates reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is one of the essential processes for establishing chondrocyte-specific morphology. PMID:22351754

  13. Cross-talk between androgen receptor/filamin A and TrkA regulates neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Donato, Marzia; Bilancio, Antonio; D'Amato, Loredana; Claudiani, Pamela; Oliviero, Maria Antonietta; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Auricchio, Alberto; Appella, Ettore; Migliaccio, Antimo; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Castoria, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Steroids and growth factors control neuronal development through their receptors under physiological and pathological conditions. We show that PC12 cells harbor endogenous androgen receptor (AR), whose inhibition or silencing strongly interferes with neuritogenesis stimulated by the nonaromatizable synthetic androgen R1881 or NGF. This implies a role for AR not only in androgen signaling, but also in NGF signaling. In turn, a pharmacological TrkA inhibitor interferes with NGF- or androgen-induced neuritogenesis. In addition, androgen or NGF triggers AR association with TrkA, TrkA interaction with PI3-K δ, and downstream activation of PI3-K δ and Rac in PC12 cells. Once associated with AR, filamin A (FlnA) contributes to androgen or NGF neuritogenesis, likely through its interaction with signaling effectors, such as Rac. This study thus identifies a previously unrecognized reciprocal cross-talk between AR and TrkA, which is controlled by β1 integrin. The contribution of FlnA/AR complex and PI3-K δ to neuronal differentiation by androgens and NGF is also novel. This is the first description of AR function in PC12 cells. PMID:26063730

  14. The intestinal immunoendocrine axis: novel cross-talk between enteroendocrine cells and the immune system during infection and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Worthington, John J

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents one of our most important interfaces with the external environment. It must remain tightly balanced to allow nutrient absorption, but maintain barrier function and immune homoeostasis, a failure of which results in chronic infection or debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The intestinal epithelium mainly consists of absorptive enterocytes and secretory goblet and Paneth cells and has recently come to light as being an essential modulator of immunity as opposed to a simple passive barrier. Each epithelial sub-type can produce specific immune modulating factors, driving innate immunity to pathogens as well as preventing autoimmunity. The enteroendocrine cells comprise just 1% of this epithelium, but collectively form the bodies' largest endocrine system. The mechanisms of enteroendocrine cell peptide secretion during feeding, metabolism and nutrient absorption are well studied; but their potential interactions with the enriched numbers of surrounding immune cells remain largely unexplored. This review focuses on alterations in enteroendocrine cell number and peptide secretion during inflammation and disease, highlighting the few in depth studies which have attempted to dissect the immune driven mechanisms that drive these phenomena. Moreover, the emerging potential of enteroendocrine cells acting as innate sensors of intestinal perturbation and secreting peptides to directly orchestrate immune cell function will be proposed. In summary, the data generated from these studies have begun to unravel a complex cross-talk between immune and enteroendocrine cells, highlighting the emerging immunoendocrine axis as a potential target for therapeutic strategies for infections and inflammatory disorders of the intestine.

  15. Acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated cross talk among epiphytic bacteria modulates behavior of Pseudomonas syringae on leaves.

    PubMed

    Dulla, Glenn F J; Lindow, Steven E

    2009-07-01

    The leaf surface harbors a host of bacterial epiphytes that are capable of influencing the quorum sensing (QS) system of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Pss). Pss uses QS to regulate expression of genes conferring extracellular polysaccharide production, motility and factors contributing to virulence to plants. About 7% of bacterial epiphytes isolated in this study produce the Pss cognate signal, 3-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL), often in amounts more than 10-fold higher than Pss. Premature induction of QS in Pss by these 3OC6HSL-producing epiphytes suppressed swarming motility and subsequent disease of the leaf. Co-inoculation of 3OC6HSL-producing strains with Pss reduced the number of lesions when inoculated together onto leaves compared with that of plants inoculated with Pss alone. Strains in which 3OC6HSL accumulation was quenched by expression of an N-acyl-homoserine lactonase did not decrease disease when co-inoculated with Pss. Disease incidence caused by a nonmotile mutant of Pss was not affected by 3OC6HSL-producing bacteria, suggesting that exogenous 3OC6HSL signal that altered the motility of Pss was responsible for reducing the apparent virulence of this pathogen. Thus, considerable cross talk involving exogenous 3OC6HSL occurs on leaves and this process can be exploited for disease control.

  16. Regulation of Raf-1 kinase by TNF via its second messenger ceramide and cross-talk with mitogenic signalling.

    PubMed

    Müller, G; Storz, P; Bourteele, S; Döppler, H; Pfizenmaier, K; Mischak, H; Philipp, A; Kaiser, C; Kolch, W

    1998-02-01

    Raf-1 kinase is a central regulator of mitogenic signal pathways, whereas its general role in signal transduction of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is less well defined. We have investigated mechanisms of Raf-1 regulation by TNF and its messenger ceramide in cell-free assays, insect and mammalian cell lines. In vitro, ceramide specifically bound to the purified catalytic domain and enhanced association with activated Ras proteins, but did not affect the kinase activity of Raf-1. Cell-permeable ceramides induced a marked increase of Ras-Raf-1 complexes in cells co-expressing Raf-1 and activated Ras. Likewise, a fast elevation of the endogeneous ceramide level, induced by TNF treatment of human Kym-1 rhabdomyosarcoma cells, was followed by stimulation of Ras-Raf-1 association without significant Raf-1 kinase activation. Failure of TNF or ceramide to induce Raf-1 kinase was observed in several TNF-responsive cell lines. Both TNF and exogeneous C6-ceramide interfered with the mitogenic activation of Raf-1 and ERK by epidermal growth factor and down-regulated v-Src-induced Raf-1 kinase activity. TNF also induced the translocation of Raf-1 from the cytosolic to the particulate fraction, indicating that this negative regulatory cross-talk occurs at the cell membrane. Interference with mitogenic signals at the level of Raf-1 could be an important initial step in TNF's cytostatic action.

  17. Structural basis for phosphorylation and lysine acetylation cross-talk in a kinase motif associated with myocardial ischemia and cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Parker, Benjamin L; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Trefely, Sophie; Hoffman, Nolan J; White, Melanie Y; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Hambly, Brett D; Larsen, Martin R; James, David E; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2014-09-12

    Myocardial ischemia and cardioprotection by ischemic pre-conditioning induce signal networks aimed at survival or cell death if the ischemic period is prolonged. These pathways are mediated by protein post-translational modifications that are hypothesized to cross-talk with and regulate each other. Phosphopeptides and lysine-acetylated peptides were quantified in isolated rat hearts subjected to ischemia or ischemic pre-conditioning, with and without splitomicin inhibition of lysine deacetylation. We show lysine acetylation (acetyl-Lys)-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, AKT, and PKA kinases during ischemia. Phosphorylation and acetyl-Lys sites mapped onto tertiary structures were proximal in >50% of proteins investigated, yet they were mutually exclusive in 50 ischemic pre-conditioning- and/or ischemia-associated peptides containing the KXXS basophilic protein kinase consensus motif. Modifications in this motif were modeled in the C terminus of muscle-type creatine kinase. Acetyl-Lys increased proximal dephosphorylation by 10-fold. Structural analysis of modified muscle-type creatine kinase peptide variants by two-dimensional NMR revealed stabilization via a lysine-phosphate salt bridge, which was disrupted by acetyl-Lys resulting in backbone flexibility and increased phosphatase accessibility.

  18. Less is more: Nutrient limitation induces cross-talk of nutrient sensing pathways with NAD+ homeostasis and contributes to longevity

    PubMed Central

    TSANG, Felicia; LIN, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient sensing pathways and their regulation grant cells control over their metabolism and growth in response to changing nutrients. Factors that regulate nutrient sensing can also modulate longevity. Reduced activity of nutrient sensing pathways such as glucose-sensing PKA, nitrogen-sensing TOR and S6 kinase homolog Sch9 have been linked to increased life span in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and higher eukaryotes. Recently, reduced activity of amino acid sensing SPS pathway was also shown to increase yeast life span. Life span extension by reduced SPS activity requires enhanced NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form) and nicotinamide riboside (NR, a NAD+ precursor) homeostasis. Maintaining adequate NAD+ pools has been shown to play key roles in life span extension, but factors regulating NAD+ metabolism and homeostasis are not completely understood. Recently, NAD+ metabolism was also linked to the phosphate (Pi)-sensing PHO pathway in yeast. Canonical PHO activation requires Pi-starvation. Interestingly, NAD+ depletion without Pi-starvation was sufficient to induce PHO activation, increasing NR production and mobilization. Moreover, SPS signaling appears to function in parallel with PHO signaling components to regulate NR/NAD+ homeostasis. These studies suggest that NAD+ metabolism is likely controlled by and/or coordinated with multiple nutrient sensing pathways. Indeed, cross-regulation of PHO, PKA, TOR and Sch9 pathways was reported to potentially affect NAD+ metabolism; though detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This review discusses yeast longevity-related nutrient sensing pathways and possible mechanisms of life span extension, regulation of NAD+ homeostasis, and cross-talk among nutrient sensing pathways and NAD+ homeostasis.

  19. Less is more: Nutrient limitation induces cross-talk of nutrient sensing pathways with NAD+ homeostasis and contributes to longevity

    PubMed Central

    TSANG, Felicia; LIN, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient sensing pathways and their regulation grant cells control over their metabolism and growth in response to changing nutrients. Factors that regulate nutrient sensing can also modulate longevity. Reduced activity of nutrient sensing pathways such as glucose-sensing PKA, nitrogen-sensing TOR and S6 kinase homolog Sch9 have been linked to increased life span in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and higher eukaryotes. Recently, reduced activity of amino acid sensing SPS pathway was also shown to increase yeast life span. Life span extension by reduced SPS activity requires enhanced NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form) and nicotinamide riboside (NR, a NAD+ precursor) homeostasis. Maintaining adequate NAD+ pools has been shown to play key roles in life span extension, but factors regulating NAD+ metabolism and homeostasis are not completely understood. Recently, NAD+ metabolism was also linked to the phosphate (Pi)-sensing PHO pathway in yeast. Canonical PHO activation requires Pi-starvation. Interestingly, NAD+ depletion without Pi-starvation was sufficient to induce PHO activation, increasing NR production and mobilization. Moreover, SPS signaling appears to function in parallel with PHO signaling components to regulate NR/NAD+ homeostasis. These studies suggest that NAD+ metabolism is likely controlled by and/or coordinated with multiple nutrient sensing pathways. Indeed, cross-regulation of PHO, PKA, TOR and Sch9 pathways was reported to potentially affect NAD+ metabolism; though detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This review discusses yeast longevity-related nutrient sensing pathways and possible mechanisms of life span extension, regulation of NAD+ homeostasis, and cross-talk among nutrient sensing pathways and NAD+ homeostasis. PMID:27683589

  20. Cross-Linked Nanoporous Materials from Reactive and Multifunctional Block Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Myungeun; Amendt, Mark A.; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2012-10-10

    Polylactide-b-poly(styrene-co-2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PLA-b-P(S-co-HEMA)) and polylactide-b-poly(styrene-co-2-hydroxyethylacrylate) (PLA-b-P(S-co-HEA)) were synthesized by combination of ring-opening polymerization and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography data indicated that the polymerizations were controlled and that hydroxyl groups were successfully incorporated into the block polymers. The polymers were reacted with 4,4{prime}-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to form the corresponding cross-linked materials. The materials were annealed at 150 C to complete the coupling reaction. Robust nanoporous materials were obtained from the cross-linked polymers by treatment with aqueous base to hydrolyze the PLA phase. Small-angle X-ray scattering study combined with scanning electron microscopy showed that MDI-cross-linked PLA-b-P(S-co-HEMA)/PLA-b-P(S-co-HEA) can adopt lamellar, hexagonally perforated lamellar, and hexagonally packed cylindrical morphologies after annealing. In particular, the HPL morphology was found to evolve from lamellae due to increase in volume fraction of PS phase as MDI reacted with hydroxyl groups. The reaction also kinetically trapped the morphology by cross-linking. Bicontinuous morphologies were also observed when dibutyltin dilaurate was added to accelerate reaction between the polymer and MDI.

  1. Phase diagram of selectively cross-linked block copolymers shows chemically microstructured gel.

    PubMed

    von der Heydt, Alice; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-02-01

    We study analytically the intricate phase behavior of cross-linked AB diblock copolymer melts, which can undergo two main phase transitions due to quenched random constraints. Gelation, i.e., spatially random localisation of polymers forming a system-spanning cluster, is driven by increasing the number parameter μ of irreversible, type-selective cross-links between random pairs of A blocks. Self-assembly into a periodic pattern of A/B-rich microdomains (microphase separation) is controlled by the AB incompatibility χ inversely proportional to temperature. Our model aims to capture the system's essential microscopic features, including an ensemble of random networks that reflects spatial correlations at the instant of cross-linking. We identify suitable order parameters and derive a free-energy functional in the spirit of Landau theory that allows us to trace a phase diagram in the plane of μ and χ. Selective cross-links promote microphase separation at higher critical temperatures than in uncross-linked diblock copolymer melts. Microphase separation in the liquid state facilitates gelation, giving rise to a novel gel state whose chemical composition density mirrors the periodic AB pattern. PMID:25662662

  2. [Roles of the cross talk between MAP kinases and Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling pathways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Jun; Chen, Ya-Jun; Wang, Shan-Shan; Wang, Dian-Lei; Wang, Chen-Yin; Yang, Li-Li; Chen, Jin-Pei

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a common preventable and treatable disease, is characterized by airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory response in the airways. Its main pathological manifestations include airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, oxidative stress and apoptotic epithelial cells. Recent research suggests that MAP kinases and Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway are involved in the pathological process of inflammation and oxidative stress. This review explores the potential role of the cross talk of these signaling pathways in airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, oxidative stress and apoptotic epithelial cells. To clarify the roles of cross talk between MAP kinases and Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway, we also focus on the drugs related to that in the treatment of COPD, and it provides ideas for more drug research in the treatment of COPD.

  3. Angiotensin II enhances adenylyl cyclase signaling via Ca2+/calmodulin. Gq-Gs cross-talk regulates collagen production in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Naugle, Jennifer E; Hase, Miki; Gregorian, Caroline; Swaney, James S; Insel, Paul A; Brunton, Laurence L; Meszaros, J Gary

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts regulate formation of extracellular matrix in the heart, playing key roles in cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. In this study, we sought to characterize cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways and its impact on modulating collagen synthesis by cardiac fibroblasts. Angiotensin II (ANG II) activates cell proliferation and collagen synthesis but also potentiates cyclic AMP (cAMP) production stimulated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-AR). The potentiation of beta-AR-stimulated cAMP production by ANG II is reduced by phospholipase C inhibition and enhanced by overexpression of Gq. Ionomycin and thapsigargin increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and potentiated isoproterenol- and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, whereas chelation of Ca2+ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid/AM inhibited such potentiation. Inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, protein kinase C, or Gbetagamma did not alter this cross-talk. Immunoblot analyses showed prominent expression of adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), a Ca2+-activated isoform, along with AC2, AC4, AC5, AC6, and AC7. Of those isoforms, only AC3 and AC5/6 proteins were detected in caveolin-rich fractions. Overexpression of AC6 increased betaAR-stimulated cAMP accumulation but did not alter the size of the ANG II potentiation, suggesting that the cross-talk is AC isoform-specific. Isoproterenol-mediated inhibition of serum-stimulated collagen synthesis increased from 31 to 48% in the presence of ANG II, indicating that betaAR-regulated collagen synthesis increased in the presence of ANG II. These data indicate that ANG II potentiates cAMP formation via Ca2+-dependent activation of AC activity, which in turn attenuates collagen synthesis and demonstrates one functional consequence of cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:12711600

  4. Angiotensin II enhances adenylyl cyclase signaling via Ca2+/calmodulin. Gq-Gs cross-talk regulates collagen production in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Naugle, Jennifer E; Hase, Miki; Gregorian, Caroline; Swaney, James S; Insel, Paul A; Brunton, Laurence L; Meszaros, J Gary

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts regulate formation of extracellular matrix in the heart, playing key roles in cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. In this study, we sought to characterize cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways and its impact on modulating collagen synthesis by cardiac fibroblasts. Angiotensin II (ANG II) activates cell proliferation and collagen synthesis but also potentiates cyclic AMP (cAMP) production stimulated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-AR). The potentiation of beta-AR-stimulated cAMP production by ANG II is reduced by phospholipase C inhibition and enhanced by overexpression of Gq. Ionomycin and thapsigargin increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and potentiated isoproterenol- and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, whereas chelation of Ca2+ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid/AM inhibited such potentiation. Inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, protein kinase C, or Gbetagamma did not alter this cross-talk. Immunoblot analyses showed prominent expression of adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), a Ca2+-activated isoform, along with AC2, AC4, AC5, AC6, and AC7. Of those isoforms, only AC3 and AC5/6 proteins were detected in caveolin-rich fractions. Overexpression of AC6 increased betaAR-stimulated cAMP accumulation but did not alter the size of the ANG II potentiation, suggesting that the cross-talk is AC isoform-specific. Isoproterenol-mediated inhibition of serum-stimulated collagen synthesis increased from 31 to 48% in the presence of ANG II, indicating that betaAR-regulated collagen synthesis increased in the presence of ANG II. These data indicate that ANG II potentiates cAMP formation via Ca2+-dependent activation of AC activity, which in turn attenuates collagen synthesis and demonstrates one functional consequence of cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways in cardiac fibroblasts.

  5. Cross-talks between microRNAs and mRNAs in pancreatic tissues of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, CAIMING; OUYANG, XIAOXI; LV, QING; ZHANG, YAOU; XIE, WEIDONG

    2015-01-01

    Network cross-talks between microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNAs may be useful to elucidate the pathological mechanisms of pancreatic islet cells in diabetic individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cross-talks between miRNAs and mRNAs in pancreatic tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice through microarray and bioinformatic methods. Based on the miRNA microarray, 64 upregulated and 72 downregulated miRNAs were observed in pancreatic tissues in diabetic mice compared to the normal controls. Based on the mRNA microarrray, 507 upregulated mRNAs and 570 downregulated mRNAs were identified in pancreatic tissues in diabetic mice compared to the normal controls. Notably, there were 246 binding points between upregulated miRNA and downregulated mRNAs; simultaneously, there were 583 binding points between downregulated miRNA and upregulated mRNAs. These changed mRNA may potentially involve the following signaling pathways: Insulin secretion, pancreatic secretion, mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway, forkhead box O signaling pathway and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-protein kinase B signaling. The fluctuating effects of miRNAs and matched mRNAs indicated that miRNAs may have wide cross-talks with mRNAs in pancreatic tissues of type 1 diabetic mice. The cross-talks may play important roles in contributing to impaired islet functions and the development of diabetes. However, further functional validation should be conducted in the future. PMID:26137232

  6. Block Talk: Spatial Language during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Katrina; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Newcombe, Nora S.; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Lam, Wendy Shallcross

    2011-01-01

    Spatial skills are a central component of intellect and show marked individual differences. There is evidence that variations in the spatial language young children hear, which directs their attention to important aspects of the spatial environment, may be one of the mechanisms that contributes to these differences. To investigate how play affects…

  7. MicroRNA-dependent cross-talk between VEGF and HIF1α in the diabetic retina.

    PubMed

    Ling, Shukuan; Birnbaum, Yochai; Nanhwan, Manjyot K; Thomas, Bejoy; Bajaj, Mandeep; Ye, Yumei

    2013-12-01

    Both HIF1α (hypoxia-inducible factor alpha) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) are messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules that affect each other expression through competition for their shared microRNAs (miRNA). However, little is known about the role of ceRNAs in DR. We assess whether the expression of HIF1α and VEGF in DR is interdependent through sequestration of common miRNAs. We used bioinformatics to identify potential miRNAs that affect both genes and validated the interdependence of the genes by silencing or overexpression of the genes and assessed the luciferase-HIF1α 3'UTR activity. We found that HIF1α and VEGF are targeted by 12 common miRNAs. Silencing either HIF1α or VEGF increased the availabilities of the shared miRNAs, therefore suppressed the luciferase-HIF1α 3'UTR activity, whereas over-expressing HIF1α or VEGF increased the luciferase activity. HIF1α was co-expressed with VEGF in-vivo and in-vitro in DR models. Silencing HIF1α transcripts resulted in a significant reduction in VEGF protein levels and vice versa. This interdependence was miRNA- and 3'UTR-dependent, as silencing Dicer abolished the interdependence. Over-expression of a common miRNA (miR-106a) significantly reduced the expression of HIF1α and VEGF and prevented high glucose-induced increased permeability. There is a cross-talk between HIF1α and VEGF through interactions with their common miRNAs. miRNA based therapy can affect the expression of both HIF1α and VEGF and may represent a therapeutic potential for the treatment of DR.

  8. Mechanisms of cross-talk between G-protein-coupled receptors resulting in enhanced release of intracellular Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Werry, Tim D; Wilkinson, Graeme F; Willars, Gary B

    2003-01-01

    Alteration in [Ca(2+)](i) (the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+)) is a key regulator of many cellular processes. To allow precise regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) and a diversity of signalling by this ion, cells possess many mechanisms by which they are able to control [Ca(2+)](i) both globally and at the subcellular level. Among these are many members of the superfamily of GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), which are characterized by the presence of seven transmembrane domains. Typically, those receptors able to activate PLC (phospholipase C) enzymes cause release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and influence Ca(2+) entry across the plasma membrane. It has been well documented that Ca(2+) signalling by one type of GPCR can be influenced by stimulation of a different type of GPCR. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated heterologous desensitization between two different PLC-coupled GPCRs. This is not surprising, given our current understanding of negative-feedback regulation and the likely shared components of the signalling pathway. However, there are also many documented examples of interactions between GPCRs, often coupling preferentially to different signalling pathways, which result in a potentiation of Ca(2+) signalling. Such interactions have important implications for both the control of cell function and the interpretation of in vitro cell-based assays. However, there is currently no single mechanism that adequately accounts for all examples of this type of cross-talk. Indeed, many studies either have not addressed this issue or have been unable to determine the mechanism(s) involved. This review seeks to explore a range of possible mechanisms to convey their potential diversity and to provide a basis for further experimental investigation. PMID:12790797

  9. Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlins, Scott A.; Bolllinger, Nikki; Creim, Jeffrey; Rodland, Karin D. . E-mail: Karin.rodland@pnl.gov

    2005-08-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub o}, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}. Furthermore, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}. This is consistent with the known expression of TGF{alpha} by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR-mediated response to increased Ca {sub o} {sup 2+} in Rat-1 fibroblasts and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

  10. Cross-talk between two antioxidants, thioredoxin reductase and heme oxygenase-1, and therapeutic implications for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Raninga, Prahlad V.; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by an accumulation of abnormal clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite recent advancements in anti-myeloma therapies, MM remains an incurable disease. Antioxidant molecules are upregulated in many cancers, correlating with tumor proliferation, survival, and chemoresistance and therefore, have been suggested as potential therapeutic targets. This study investigated the cross-talk between two antioxidant molecules, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and their therapeutic implications in MM. We found that although auranofin, a TrxR inhibitor, significantly inhibited TrxR activity by more than 50% at lower concentrations, myeloma cell proliferation was only inhibited at higher concentrations of auranofin. Inhibition of TrxR using lower auranofin concentrations induced HO-1 protein expression in myeloma cells. Using a sub-lethal concentration of auranofin to inhibit TrxR activity in conjunction with HO-1 inhibition significantly decreased myeloma cell growth and induced apoptosis. TrxR was shown to regulate HO-1 via the Nrf2 signaling pathway in a ROS-dependent manner. Increased HO-1 mRNA levels were observed in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells compared to parent cells and HO-1 inhibition restored the sensitivity to bortezomib in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells. These findings indicate that concurrent inhibition of HO-1 with either a TrxR inhibitor or with bortezomib would improve therapeutic outcomes in MM patients. Hence, our findings further support the need to target multiple antioxidant systems alone or in combination with other therapeutics to improve therapeutic outcomes in MM patients. PMID:26795735

  11. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Signaling Represses Testicular Steroidogenesis through Cross-Talk with Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nur77

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunsook; Song, Chin-Hee; Park, Jae-Il; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Keesook

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor- β1 (TGF-β1) has been reported to inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH) mediated-steroidogenesis in testicular Leydig cells. However, the mechanism by which TGF-β1 controls the steroidogenesis in Leydig cells is not well understood. Here, we investigated the possibility that TGF-β1 represses steroidogenesis through cross-talk with the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77. Nur77, which is induced by LH/cAMP signaling, is one of major transcription factors that regulate the expression of steroidogenic genes in Leydig cells. TGF-β1 signaling inhibited cAMP-induced testosterone production and the expression of steroidogenic genes such as P450c17, StAR and 3β-HSD in mouse Leydig cells. Further, TGF-β1/ALK5 signaling repressed cAMP-induced and Nur77-activated promoter activity of steroidogenic genes. In addition, TGF-β1/ALK5-activated Smad3 repressed Nur77 transactivation of steroidogenic gene promoters by interfering with Nur77 binding to DNA. In primary Leydig cells isolated from Tgfbr2flox/flox Cyp17iCre mice, TGF-β1-mediated repression of cAMP-induced steroidogenic gene expression was significantly less than that in primary Leydig cells from Tgfbr2flox/flox mice. Taken together, these results suggest that TGF-β1/ALK5/Smad3 signaling represses the expression of steroidogenic genes via the suppression of Nur77 transactivation in testicular Leydig cells. These findings may provide a molecular mechanism involved in the TGF-β1-mediated repression of testicular steroidogenesis. PMID:25140527

  12. The lithium tolerance of the Arabidopsis cat2 mutant reveals a cross-talk between oxidative stress and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Bueso, Eduardo; Alejandro, Santiago; Carbonell, Pablo; Perez-Amador, Miguel A; Fayos, Joaquín; Bellés, Jose M; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Serrano, Ramón

    2007-12-01

    In order to investigate the effects of a permanent increase in cellular H(2)O(2) on cation homeostasis we have studied a T-DNA insertion mutant of the Arabidopsis CATALASE 2 gene. This mutant (cat2-1) exhibits 20% of wild-type leaf catalase activity and accumulates more H(2)O(2) than the wild type under normal growth conditions. In addition to reduced size, a pale green color and great reduction in secondary roots, the cat2-1 mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to H(2)O(2), NaCl, norspermidine, high light and cold stress. On the other hand, the germination of the cat2-1 mutant is more tolerant to lithium than the wild type. This novel phenotype cannot be explained by changes in lithium transport. Actually, the uptake of lithium (and of other toxic cations such as sodium and norspermidine) is increased in the cat2-1 mutant while K(+) levels were decreased. The lithium tolerance of this mutant seems to result both from insensitivity to the inhibitory ethylene induced by this cation and a reduced capability for ethylene production. Accordingly, induction by ethylene of responsive genes such as PR4 and EBP/ERF72 is decreased in cat2-1. Mutants insensitive to ethylene such as etr1-1 and ein3-3 are lithium tolerant, and inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis with 2-aminoisobutyrate protects against lithium toxicity. Microarray analysis of gene expression indicates that the expression of genes related to cation transport and ethylene synthesis and perception was not altered in the cat2-1 mutant, suggesting that H(2)O(2) modulates these processes at the protein level. These results uncover a cross-talk between oxidative stress, cation homeostasis and ethylene.

  13. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors induce calcium mobilization through cross-talk with Gq-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2010-09-10

    The cross-talk between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and muscarinic receptors was investigated by measuring evoked transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration. HEK293 cells stably expressing human CRF type 1 (hCRF(1)) and type 2(a) (hCRF(2(a))) receptors were stimulated with the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol and shortly after by a CRF agonist. Unexpectedly, this second response was enhanced when compared to stimulating naive cells either with carbachol or CRF agonist only. Priming with 100 microM carbachol increased the maximal CRF agonist response and shifted its concentration-response curve to the left to attain almost the same potency as for stimulating the production of the natural second messenger cyclic AMP. Yet, priming did not affect CRF agonist-stimulated cyclic AMP production itself. Carbachol priming was not restricted to recombinant CRF receptors only since endogenously expressed beta(2)-adrenoceptors also started to produce a robust calcium signal. Without priming no such signal was observed. Similar findings were made in the human retinoblastoma cell line Y79 for endogenously expressed CRF(1) receptors and the type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptors but not for the CRF(2(a)) receptors. This differentiation between CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors was further supported by use of selective agonists and antagonists. The results suggest that stimulating a Gq-coupled receptor shortly before stimulating a Gs-coupled receptor may result in a parallel signaling event on top of the classical cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:20594969

  14. Role of p53-fibrinolytic system cross-talk in the regulation of quartz-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Yashodhar P; Shetty, Shwetha K; Marudamuthu, Amarnath S; Fu, Jian; Pinson, Barbara M; Levin, Jeffrey; Shetty, Sreerama

    2015-03-01

    Silica is the major component of airborne dust generated by wind, manufacturing and/or demolition. Chronic occupational inhalation of silica dust containing crystalline quartz is by far the predominant form of silicosis in humans. Silicosis is a progressive lung disease that typically arises after a very long latency and is a major occupational concern with no known effective treatment. The mechanism of silicosis is not clearly understood. However, silicosis is associated with increased cell death, expression of redox enzymes and pro-fibrotic cytokines and chemokines. Since alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) death and disruption of alveolar fibrinolysis is often associated with both acute and chronic lung injuries, we explored whether p53-mediated changes in the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system contributes to silica-induced lung injury. We further sought to determine whether caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide (CSP), which inhibits p53 expression, mitigates lung injury associated with exposure to silica. Lung tissues and AECs isolated from wild-type (WT) mice exposed to silica exhibit increased apoptosis, p53 and PAI-1, and suppression of uPA expression. Treatment of WT mice with CSP inhibits PAI-1, restores uPA expression and prevents AEC apoptosis by suppressing p53, which is otherwise induced in mice exposed to silica. The process involves CSP-mediated inhibition of serine-15 phosphorylation of p53 by inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A-C (PP2A-C) interaction with silica-induced caveolin-1 in AECs. These observations suggest that changes in the p53-uPA fibrinolytic system cross-talk contribute to lung injury caused by inhalation of silica dust containing crystalline quartz and is protected by CSP by targeting this pathway.

  15. Nitric Oxide, Ethylene, and Auxin Cross Talk Mediates Greening and Plastid Development in Deetiolating Tomato Seedlings1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Nielda K.G.; Bianchetti, Ricardo E.; Oliveira, Paulo M.R.; Demarco, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The transition from etiolated to green seedlings involves the conversion of etioplasts into mature chloroplasts via a multifaceted, light-driven process comprising multiple, tightly coordinated signaling networks. Here, we demonstrate that light-induced greening and chloroplast differentiation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings are mediated by an intricate cross talk among phytochromes, nitric oxide (NO), ethylene, and auxins. Genetic and pharmacological evidence indicated that either endogenously produced or exogenously applied NO promotes seedling greening by repressing ethylene biosynthesis and inducing auxin accumulation in tomato cotyledons. Analysis performed in hormonal tomato mutants also demonstrated that NO production itself is negatively and positively regulated by ethylene and auxins, respectively. Representing a major biosynthetic source of NO in tomato cotyledons, nitrate reductase was shown to be under strict control of both phytochrome and hormonal signals. A close NO-phytochrome interaction was revealed by the almost complete recovery of the etiolated phenotype of red light-grown seedlings of the tomato phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant upon NO fumigation. In this mutant, NO supplementation induced cotyledon greening, chloroplast differentiation, and hormonal and gene expression alterations similar to those detected in light-exposed wild-type seedlings. NO negatively impacted the transcript accumulation of genes encoding phytochromes, photomorphogenesis-repressor factors, and plastid division proteins, revealing that this free radical can mimic transcriptional changes typically triggered by phytochrome-dependent light perception. Therefore, our data indicate that negative and positive regulatory feedback loops orchestrate ethylene-NO and auxin-NO interactions, respectively, during the conversion of colorless etiolated seedlings into green, photosynthetically competent young plants. PMID:26829981

  16. Cross Talk Between Growth and Immunity: Coupling of the IGF Axis to Conserved Cytokine Pathways in Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Alzaid, Abdullah; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Boudinot, Pierre; Macqueen, Daniel J; Martin, Samuel A M

    2016-05-01

    Although disease and infection is associated with attenuated growth, the molecular pathways involved are poorly characterized. We postulated that the IGF axis, a central governor of vertebrate growth, is repressed during infection to promote resource reallocation towards immunity. This hypothesis was tested in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) challenged by Aeromonas salmonicida (AS), a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, or viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSv) at hatch, first feeding, and 3 weeks after first feeding. Quantitative transcriptional profiling was performed for genes encoding both IGF hormones, 19 salmonid IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and a panel of marker genes for growth and immune status. There were major differences in the developmental response of the IGF axis to AS and VHSv, with the VHSv challenge causing strong down-regulation of many genes. Despite this, IGFBP-1A1 and IGFBP-6A2 subtypes, each negative regulators of IGF signaling, were highly induced by AS and VHSv in striking correlation with host defense genes regulated by cytokine pathways. Follow-up experiments demonstrated a highly significant coregulation of IGFBP-1A1 and IGFBP-6A2 with proinflammatory cytokine genes in primary immune tissues (spleen and head kidney) when trout were challenged by a different Gram-negative bacterium, Yersinia ruckeri. Based on our findings, we propose a model where certain IGFBP subtypes are directly regulated by cytokine signaling pathways, allowing immediate modulation of growth and/or immune system phenotypes according to the level of activation of immunity. Our findings provide new and comprehensive insights into cross talk between conserved pathways regulating teleost growth, development, and immunity. PMID:27035654

  17. RGS16, a novel p53 and pRb cross-talk candidate inhibits migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carper, Miranda B; Denvir, James; Boskovic, Goran; Primerano, Donald A; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Data collected since the discovery of p53 and pRb/RB1 suggests these tumor suppressors cooperate to inhibit tumor progression. Patients who have mutations in both p53 and RB1 genes have increased tumor reoccurrence and decreased survival compared to patients with only one tumor suppressor gene inactivated. It remains unclear how p53 and pRb cooperate toward inhibiting tumorigenesis. Using RNA expression profiling we identified 179 p53 and pRb cross-talk candidates in normal lung fibroblasts (WI38) cells exogenously coexpressing p53 and pRb. Regulator of G protein signaling 16 (RGS16) was among the p53 and pRb cross-talk candidates and has been implicated in inhibiting activation of several oncogenic pathways associated with proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells. RGS16 has been found to be downregulated in pancreatic cancer patients with metastases compared to patients without metastasis. Expression of RGS16 mRNA was decreased in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested compared to control. Expression of RGS16 inhibited migration of the BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 but not PANC-1 cells and inhibited invasion of BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 cells with no impact on cell viability. We have identified for the first time p53 and pRb cross-talk candidates and a role for RGS16 to inhibit pancreatic cancer migration and invasion.

  18. Arabidopsis MYC Transcription Factors Are the Target of Hormonal Salicylic Acid/Jasmonic Acid Cross Talk in Response to Pieris brassicae Egg Extract.

    PubMed

    Schmiesing, André; Emonet, Aurélia; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline; Reymond, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants recognize insect eggs and activate the salicylic acid (SA) pathway. As a consequence, expression of defense genes regulated by the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway is suppressed and larval performance is enhanced. Cross talk between defense signaling pathways is common in plant-pathogen interactions, but the molecular mechanism mediating this phenomenon is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that egg-induced SA/JA antagonism works independently of the APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factor ORA59, which controls the ERF branch of the JA pathway. In addition, treatment with egg extract did not enhance expression or stability of JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors, and SA/JA cross talk did not involve JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKEs, which are negative regulators of the JA pathway. Investigating the stability of MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that additively control jasmonate-related defense responses, we found that egg extract treatment strongly diminished MYC protein levels in an SA-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identified WRKY75 as a novel and essential factor controlling SA/JA cross talk. These data indicate that insect eggs target the MYC branch of the JA pathway and uncover an unexpected modulation of SA/JA antagonism depending on the biological context in which the SA pathway is activated. PMID:26884488

  19. Arabidopsis MYC Transcription Factors Are the Target of Hormonal Salicylic Acid/Jasmonic Acid Cross Talk in Response to Pieris brassicae Egg Extract1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schmiesing, André; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants recognize insect eggs and activate the salicylic acid (SA) pathway. As a consequence, expression of defense genes regulated by the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway is suppressed and larval performance is enhanced. Cross talk between defense signaling pathways is common in plant-pathogen interactions, but the molecular mechanism mediating this phenomenon is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that egg-induced SA/JA antagonism works independently of the APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factor ORA59, which controls the ERF branch of the JA pathway. In addition, treatment with egg extract did not enhance expression or stability of JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors, and SA/JA cross talk did not involve JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKEs, which are negative regulators of the JA pathway. Investigating the stability of MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that additively control jasmonate-related defense responses, we found that egg extract treatment strongly diminished MYC protein levels in an SA-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identified WRKY75 as a novel and essential factor controlling SA/JA cross talk. These data indicate that insect eggs target the MYC branch of the JA pathway and uncover an unexpected modulation of SA/JA antagonism depending on the biological context in which the SA pathway is activated. PMID:26884488

  20. Talking Black.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Roger D.

    This book contains essays which focus on the systems of communication that operate within and between various social segments of Afro-American communities in the United States. The essays are presented under the following headings: (1) "Getting Into It: Black Talk, Black Life and the Academic," (2) "'Talking My Talk': Black Talk Varieties and…

  1. Preparation of shell cross-linked nano-objects from hybrid-peptide block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan; Babin, Jérôme; Zappone, Bruno; Lecommandoux, Sébastien

    2005-01-01

    Supramolecular structures formed by self-assembly of diblock copolymers in solution are stable over restricted environmental conditions: concentration, temperature, pH, or ion strength among others. To enlarge their domain of application, it appears necessary to develop stabilization strategies. We report here different strategies to stabilize the shell of micelles formed by self-assembly of amphiphilic polydiene-b-polypeptide diblock copolymers. For this purpose, covalent bonds can be formed between either amine or carboxylic acid groups distributed along the soluble peptide block and a cross-linking agent that contains respectively aldehyde or amine functions. Shell stabilization affords systems with unique properties that combine three main advantages: shape persistence, control of the porosity, and stimuli-responsive behavior. The covalent capture of such macromolecular objects has been studied by light scattering, AFM, and conductimetry measurements.

  2. Dynamic analysis of pedestrian crossing behaviors on traffic flow at unsignalized mid-block crosswalks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; He, Jing; Luo, Zhiyong; Yang, Wunian; Zhang, Xiping

    2015-05-01

    It is important to study the effects of pedestrian crossing behaviors on traffic flow for solving the urban traffic jam problem. Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) traffic cellular automata (TCA) model, a new one-dimensional TCA model is proposed considering the uncertainty conflict behaviors between pedestrians and vehicles at unsignalized mid-block crosswalks and defining the parallel updating rules of motion states of pedestrians and vehicles. The traffic flow is simulated for different vehicle densities and behavior trigger probabilities. The fundamental diagrams show that no matter what the values of vehicle braking probability, pedestrian acceleration crossing probability, pedestrian backing probability and pedestrian generation probability, the system flow shows the "increasing-saturating-decreasing" trend with the increase of vehicle density; when the vehicle braking probability is lower, it is easy to cause an emergency brake of vehicle and result in great fluctuation of saturated flow; the saturated flow decreases slightly with the increase of the pedestrian acceleration crossing probability; when the pedestrian backing probability lies between 0.4 and 0.6, the saturated flow is unstable, which shows the hesitant behavior of pedestrians when making the decision of backing; the maximum flow is sensitive to the pedestrian generation probability and rapidly decreases with increasing the pedestrian generation probability, the maximum flow is approximately equal to zero when the probability is more than 0.5. The simulations prove that the influence of frequent crossing behavior upon vehicle flow is immense; the vehicle flow decreases and gets into serious congestion state rapidly with the increase of the pedestrian generation probability.

  3. 17β-estradiol promotes the invasion and migration of nuclear estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells through cross-talk between GPER1 and CXCR1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi-Feng; Wu, Ting-Ting; Yang, Jun-Yan; Dong, Chao-Ran; Wang, Ni; Liu, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Min

    2013-11-01

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) is widely expressed in human breast cancers correlating with increased tumor size and malignancy. Although estrogen signaling via GPER1 was extensively studied in recent years, the underlying molecular mechanism of GPER1-associated metastasis of breast cancer still remains unclear. In this study, the main aims were focused on the potential role of GPER1 in regulating migration and invasion of nuclear estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cells upon 17β-estradiol (E2) stimulation and the involved signaling pathway. Key events in estrogen signaling were chosen for our studies, such as the activation of ERK and AKT, nuclear translocation of NF-κB and secretion of Interleukin-8 (IL-8). The migration and invasion activities upon E2 stimulation were also examined in ER-negative SKBR3 and BT-20 breast cancer cells. Compared with ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, both SKBR3 and BT-20 cells had very similar expression of GPER1, but relatively high expression of CXC receptor-1 (CXCR1), which is considered as an active regulator for cancer metastasis upon binding IL-8. Results showed that E2 facilitated the activation of ERK, AKT and NF-κB, which could be significantly attenuated by GPER1 blockage or knock-down in both SKBR3 and BT-20 cells. Moreover, increased secretion of IL-8 induced by E2 was also inhibited either by specific inhibitors for GPER1, ERK, AKT, and NF-κB, or by knock-down for GPER1. Furthermore, E2 could activate the migration and invasion of both SKBR3 and BT-20 cells, which in turn could also be inhibited by blocking GPER1, ERK, AKT, NF-κB, and CXCR1, respectively, or knock-down for GPER1 and CXCR1. In conclusion, we demonstrated that estrogen signaling via GPER1 associated with the metastasis of breast cancer, which might be through GPER1/ERK&AKT/NF-κB/IL-8/CXCR1 cascade. The cross-talk between GPER1 and CXCR1 could be another potential target for the therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  4. Escape of HIV-1-infected dendritic cells from TRAIL-mediated NK cell cytotoxicity during NK-DC cross-talk--a pivotal role of HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Saïdi, Héla; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2010-04-01

    Early stages of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection are associated with local recruitment and activation of important effectors of innate immunity, i.e. natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs). Immature DCs (iDCs) capture HIV-1 through specific receptors and can disseminate the infection to lymphoid tissues following their migration, which is associated to a maturation process. This process is dependent on NK cells, whose role is to keep in check the quality and the quantity of DCs undergoing maturation. If DC maturation is inappropriate, NK cells will kill them ("editing process") at sites of tissue inflammation, thus optimizing the adaptive immunity. In the context of a viral infection, NK-dependent killing of infected-DCs is a crucial event required for early elimination of infected target cells. Here, we report that NK-mediated editing of iDCs is impaired if DCs are infected with HIV-1. We first addressed the question of the mechanisms involved in iDC editing, and we show that cognate NK-iDC interaction triggers apoptosis via the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-Death Receptor 4 (DR4) pathway and not via the perforin pathway. Nevertheless, once infected with HIV-1, DC(HIV) become resistant to NK-induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. This resistance occurs despite normal amounts of TRAIL released by NK cells and comparable DR4 expression on DC(HIV). The escape of DC(HIV) from NK killing is due to the upregulation of two anti-apoptotic molecules, the cellular-Flice like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (c-IAP2), induced by NK-DC(HIV) cognate interaction. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an alarmin and a key mediator of NK-DC cross-talk, was found to play a pivotal role in NK-dependent upregulation of c-FLIP and c-IAP2 in DC(HIV). Finally, we demonstrate that restoration of DC(HIV) susceptibility to NK-induced TRAIL killing can be obtained either by silencing c-FLIP and c-IAP2 by specific si

  5. A functionally significant cross-talk between androgen receptor and ErbB2 pathways in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Ali; Hughes-Davies, Luke

    2008-06-01

    Recent studies have identified novel subgroups in ER-negative breast cancer based on the expression pattern of androgen receptor (AR). One subtype (molecular apocrine) has an over-expression of steroid-response genes and ErbB2. Using breast cancer cell lines with molecular apocrine features, we demonstrate a functional cross-talk between AR and ErbB2 pathways. We show that stimulation of AR and ErbB2 pathways leads to the cross-regulation of gene expression for AR, ErbB2, FOXA1, XBP1, TFF3, and KLK3. As opposed to the physiologic transient phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) observed with the testosterone treatment, we demonstrate that the addition of ErbB2 inhibition leads to a persistent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which negatively regulates the downstream signaling and cell growth. This suggests a mechanism for the cross-talk involving the ERK pathway. Moreover, testosterone stimulates the proliferation of molecular apocrine breast cell lines, and this effect can be reversed using antiandrogen flutamide and anti-ErbB2 AG825. Conversely, the growth stimulatory effect of heregulin can also be inhibited with flutamide, suggesting a cross-talk between the AR and ErbB2 pathways affecting cell proliferation. Importantly, there is a synergy with the combined use of flutamide and AG825 on cell proliferation and apoptosis, which indicates a therapeutic advantage in the combined blockage of AR and ErbB2 pathways.

  6. Block Copolymer Cross-linked Nanoassemblies Improve Particle Stability and Biocompatibility of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Mo; Scott, Daniel F.; Hardy, Peter A.; Wydra, Robert J.; Hilt, J. Zach; Yokel, Robert A.; Bae, Younsoo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop cross-linked nanoassemblies (CNAs) as carriers for superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). Methods Ferric and ferrous ions were co-precipitated inside core-shell type nanoparticles prepared by cross-linking poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(aspartate) block copolymers to prepare CNAs entrapping Fe3O4 IONPs (CNA-IONPs). Particle stability and biocompatibility of CNA-IONPs were characterized in comparison to citrate-coated Fe3O4 IONPs (Citrate-IONPs). Results CNA-IONPs, approximately 30 nm in diameter, showed no precipitation in water, PBS, or a cell culture medium after 3 or 30 h, at 22, 37, and 43 °C, and 1, 2.5, and 5 mg/mL, whereas Citrate-IONPs agglomerated rapidly (> 400 nm) in all aqueous media tested. No cytotoxicity was observed in a mouse brain endothelial-derived cell line (bEnd.3) exposed to CNA-IONPs up to 10 mg/mL for 30 h. Citrate-IONPs (> 0.05 mg/mL) reduced cell viability after 3 h. CNA-IONPs retained the superparamagnetic properties of entrapped IONPs, enhancing T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) at 0.02 mg/mL, and generating heat at a mild hyperthermic level (40 ~ 42 °C) with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Conclusion Compared to citric acid coating, CNAs with a cross-linked anionic core improved particle stability and biocompatibility of IONPs, which would be beneficial for future MRI and AMF-induced remote hyperthermia applications. PMID:23080062

  7. Thermoreversible Changes in Aligned and Cross-Linked Block Copolymer Melts Studied by Two Color Depolarized Light Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, Jeffrey D.; Gomez, Enrique D.; Ellsworth, Mark W.; Garetz, Bruce A.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2012-09-04

    A procedure for creating samples that can be repeatedly cycled between weakly aligned and strongly aligned states is described. Poly(styrene-b-isoprene) block copolymer samples were first shear-aligned and then cross-linked using a high energy electron beam. Samples with more than 1.0 cross-links per chain on average showed almost complete recovery of their initial alignment state even after 20 cycles of heating above the order–disorder transition temperature of the un-cross-linked block copolymer. Samples with 1.1 cross-links per chain, which showed over 90% loss of alignment on heating and almost 100% recovery of alignment on cooling, provided the best example of a reversible aligned-to-unaligned transition. Samples with lower cross-linking densities exhibited irreversible loss of alignment upon heating, while those with higher cross-linking densities exhibited less than 90% loss of alignment upon heating. Alignment was quantified by a technique that we call two color depolarized light scattering (TCDLS), an extension of the traditional depolarized light scattering experiment used to determine the state of order in block copolymers. Qualitative confirmation of our interpretation of TCDLS data was obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Cross talk between the response regulators PhoB and TctD allows for the integration of diverse environmental signals in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Piotr; Jensen, Vanessa; Schulze, Wiebke; Gödeke, Julia; Strehmel, Janine; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Nicolai, Tanja; Bielecka, Agata; Wille, Thorsten; Gerlach, Roman G; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-07-27

    Two-component systems (TCS) serve as stimulus-response coupling mechanisms to allow organisms to adapt to a variety of environmental conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes for more than 100 TCS components. To avoid unwanted cross-talk, signaling cascades are very specific, with one sensor talking to its cognate response regulator (RR). However, cross-regulation may provide means to integrate different environmental stimuli into a harmonized output response. By applying a split luciferase complementation assay, we identified a functional interaction of two RRs of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily, namely PhoB and TctD in P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional profiling, ChIP-seq analysis and a global motif scan uncovered the regulons of the two RRs as well as a quadripartite binding motif in six promoter regions. Phosphate limitation resulted in PhoB-dependent expression of the downstream genes, whereas the presence of TctD counteracted this activation. Thus, the integration of two important environmental signals e.g. phosphate availability and the carbon source are achieved by a titration of the relative amounts of two phosphorylated RRs that inversely regulate a common subset of genes. In conclusion, our results on the PhoB and TctD mediated two-component signal transduction pathways exemplify how P. aeruginosa may exploit cross-regulation to adapt bacterial behavior to complex environments. PMID:26082498

  9. Sodium transport is modulated by p38 kinase-dependent cross-talk between ENaC and Na,K-ATPase in collecting duct principal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Bao; Leroy, Valérie; Maunsbach, Arvid B; Doucet, Alain; Hasler, Udo; Dizin, Eva; Ernandez, Thomas; de Seigneux, Sophie; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Féraille, Eric

    2014-02-01

    In relation to dietary Na(+) intake and aldosterone levels, collecting duct principal cells are exposed to large variations in Na(+) transport. In these cells, Na(+) crosses the apical membrane via epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) and is extruded into the interstitium by Na,K-ATPase. The activity of ENaC and Na,K-ATPase must be highly coordinated to accommodate variations in Na(+) transport and minimize fluctuations in intracellular Na(+) concentration. We hypothesized that, independent of hormonal stimulus, cross-talk between ENaC and Na,K-ATPase coordinates Na(+) transport across apical and basolateral membranes. By varying Na(+) intake in aldosterone-clamped rats and overexpressing γ-ENaC or modulating apical Na(+) availability in cultured mouse collecting duct cells, enhanced apical Na(+) entry invariably led to increased basolateral Na,K-ATPase expression and activity. In cultured collecting duct cells, enhanced apical Na(+) entry increased the basolateral cell surface expression of Na,K-ATPase by inhibiting p38 kinase-mediated endocytosis of Na,K-ATPase. Our results reveal a new role for p38 kinase in mediating cross-talk between apical Na(+) entry via ENaC and its basolateral exit via Na,K-ATPase, which may allow principal cells to maintain intracellular Na(+) concentrations within narrow limits.

  10. Cross talk between the response regulators PhoB and TctD allows for the integration of diverse environmental signals in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bielecki, Piotr; Jensen, Vanessa; Schulze, Wiebke; Gödeke, Julia; Strehmel, Janine; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Nicolai, Tanja; Bielecka, Agata; Wille, Thorsten; Gerlach, Roman G.; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) serve as stimulus-response coupling mechanisms to allow organisms to adapt to a variety of environmental conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes for more than 100 TCS components. To avoid unwanted cross-talk, signaling cascades are very specific, with one sensor talking to its cognate response regulator (RR). However, cross-regulation may provide means to integrate different environmental stimuli into a harmonized output response. By applying a split luciferase complementation assay, we identified a functional interaction of two RRs of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily, namely PhoB and TctD in P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional profiling, ChIP-seq analysis and a global motif scan uncovered the regulons of the two RRs as well as a quadripartite binding motif in six promoter regions. Phosphate limitation resulted in PhoB-dependent expression of the downstream genes, whereas the presence of TctD counteracted this activation. Thus, the integration of two important environmental signals e.g. phosphate availability and the carbon source are achieved by a titration of the relative amounts of two phosphorylated RRs that inversely regulate a common subset of genes. In conclusion, our results on the PhoB and TctD mediated two-component signal transduction pathways exemplify how P. aeruginosa may exploit cross-regulation to adapt bacterial behavior to complex environments. PMID:26082498

  11. Metabolic danger signals, uric acid and ATP, mediate inflammatory cross-talk between hepatocytes and immune cells in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Petrasek, Jan; Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Saha, Banishree; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Kodys, Karen; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation defines the progression of ALD from reversible to advanced stages. Translocation of bacterial LPS to the liver from the gut is necessary for alcohol-induced liver inflammation. However, it is not known whether endogenous, metabolic danger signals are required for inflammation in ALD. Uric acid and ATP, 2 major proinflammatory danger signals, were evaluated in the serum of human volunteers exposed to a single dose of ethanol or in supernatants of primary human hepatocytes exposed to ethanol. In vitro studies were used to evaluate the role of uric acid and ATP in inflammatory cross-talk between hepatocytes and immune cells. The significance of signaling downstream of uric acid and ATP in the liver was evaluated in NLRP3-deficient mice fed a Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet. Exposure of healthy human volunteers to a single dose of ethanol resulted in increased serum levels of uric acid and ATP. In vitro, we identified hepatocytes as a significant source of these endogenous inflammatory signals. Uric acid and ATP mediated a paracrine inflammatory cross-talk between damaged hepatocytes and immune cells and significantly increased the expression of LPS-inducible cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α, by immune cells. Deficiency of NLRP3, a ligand-sensing component of the inflammasome recognizing uric acid and ATP, prevented the development of alcohol-induced liver inflammation in mice and significantly ameliorated liver damage and steatosis. Endogenous metabolic danger signals, uric acid, and ATP are involved in inflammatory cross-talk between hepatocytes and immune cells and play a crucial role in alcohol-induced liver inflammation.

  12. Elucidation of Cross-Talk and Specificity of Early Response Mechanisms to Salt and PEG-Simulated Drought Stresses in Brassica napus Using Comparative Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junling; Tang, Shaohua; Peng, Xiaojue; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Xinhua; Li, Jun; Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    To understand the cross-talk and specificity of the early responses of plants to salt and drought, we performed physiological and proteome analyses of Brassica napus seedlings pretreated with 245 mM NaCl or 25% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 under identical osmotic pressure (-1.0 MPa). Significant decreases in water content and photosynthetic rate and excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes and oxidative damage were observed in response to both stresses. Unexpectedly, the drought response was more severe than the salt response. We further identified 45 common differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), 143 salt-specific DEPs and 160 drought-specific DEPs by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. The proteome quantitative data were then confirmed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The differences in the proteomic profiles between drought-treated and salt-treated seedlings exceeded the similarities in the early stress responses. Signal perception and transduction, transport and membrane trafficking, and photosynthesis-related proteins were enriched as part of the molecular cross-talk and specificity mechanism in the early responses to the two abiotic stresses. The Ca2+ signaling, G protein-related signaling, 14-3-3 signaling pathway and phosphorylation cascades were the common signal transduction pathways shared by both salt and drought stress responses; however, the proteins with executive functions varied. These results indicate functional specialization of family proteins in response to different stresses, i.e., CDPK21, TPR, and CTR1 specific to phosphorylation cascades under early salt stress, whereas STN7 and BSL were specific to phosphorylation cascades under early drought stress. Only the calcium-binding EF-hand family protein and ZKT were clearly identified as signaling proteins that acted as cross-talk nodes for salt and drought signaling pathways. Our study provides new clues and insights for developing strategies to

  13. Elucidation of Cross-Talk and Specificity of Early Response Mechanisms to Salt and PEG-Simulated Drought Stresses in Brassica napus Using Comparative Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Junling; Tang, Shaohua; Peng, Xiaojue; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Xinhua; Li, Jun; Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    To understand the cross-talk and specificity of the early responses of plants to salt and drought, we performed physiological and proteome analyses of Brassica napus seedlings pretreated with 245 mM NaCl or 25% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 under identical osmotic pressure (-1.0 MPa). Significant decreases in water content and photosynthetic rate and excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes and oxidative damage were observed in response to both stresses. Unexpectedly, the drought response was more severe than the salt response. We further identified 45 common differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), 143 salt-specific DEPs and 160 drought-specific DEPs by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. The proteome quantitative data were then confirmed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The differences in the proteomic profiles between drought-treated and salt-treated seedlings exceeded the similarities in the early stress responses. Signal perception and transduction, transport and membrane trafficking, and photosynthesis-related proteins were enriched as part of the molecular cross-talk and specificity mechanism in the early responses to the two abiotic stresses. The Ca2+ signaling, G protein-related signaling, 14-3-3 signaling pathway and phosphorylation cascades were the common signal transduction pathways shared by both salt and drought stress responses; however, the proteins with executive functions varied. These results indicate functional specialization of family proteins in response to different stresses, i.e., CDPK21, TPR, and CTR1 specific to phosphorylation cascades under early salt stress, whereas STN7 and BSL were specific to phosphorylation cascades under early drought stress. Only the calcium-binding EF-hand family protein and ZKT were clearly identified as signaling proteins that acted as cross-talk nodes for salt and drought signaling pathways. Our study provides new clues and insights for developing strategies to

  14. Functional ET(A)-ET(B) Receptor Cross-talk in Basilar Artery In Situ From ET(B) Receptor Deficient Rats.

    PubMed

    Yoon, SeongHun; Gariepy, Cheryl E; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Zuccarello, Mario; Rapoport, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    The role of endothelin (ET)(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk in limiting the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction is revealed by the partial or complete dependency of the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition on functional removal of the ET(B) receptor. Although functional removal of the ET(B) receptor is generally accomplished with ET(B) receptor antagonist, a novel approach using rats containing a naturally occurring deletion mutation in the ET(B) receptor [rescued "spotting lethal" (sl) rats; ET(B)(sl/sl)] demonstrated increased ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction in vena cava. We investigated whether this deletion mutation was also sufficient to remove the ET(B) receptor dependency of the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction in the basilar artery. Consistent with previous reports, ET-1 plasma levels were elevated in ET(B)(sl/sl) as compared with ET(B)(+/+) rats. ET(B) receptor antagonist failed to relax the ET-1 constricted basilar artery from ET(B)(+/+) and ET(B)(sl/sl) rats. Relaxation to combined ET(A) and ET(B) receptor antagonist was greater than relaxation to ET(A) receptor antagonist in the basilar artery from ET(B)(+/+) and, unexpectedly, ET(B)(sl/sl) rats. These findings confirm the presence of ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk in the basilar artery. We speculate that mutant ET(B) receptor expression produced by alternative splicing may be sufficient to allow cross-talk.

  15. Elucidation of Cross-Talk and Specificity of Early Response Mechanisms to Salt and PEG-Simulated Drought Stresses in Brassica napus Using Comparative Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junling; Tang, Shaohua; Peng, Xiaojue; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Xinhua; Li, Jun; Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    To understand the cross-talk and specificity of the early responses of plants to salt and drought, we performed physiological and proteome analyses of Brassica napus seedlings pretreated with 245 mM NaCl or 25% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 under identical osmotic pressure (-1.0 MPa). Significant decreases in water content and photosynthetic rate and excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes and oxidative damage were observed in response to both stresses. Unexpectedly, the drought response was more severe than the salt response. We further identified 45 common differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), 143 salt-specific DEPs and 160 drought-specific DEPs by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. The proteome quantitative data were then confirmed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The differences in the proteomic profiles between drought-treated and salt-treated seedlings exceeded the similarities in the early stress responses. Signal perception and transduction, transport and membrane trafficking, and photosynthesis-related proteins were enriched as part of the molecular cross-talk and specificity mechanism in the early responses to the two abiotic stresses. The Ca2+ signaling, G protein-related signaling, 14-3-3 signaling pathway and phosphorylation cascades were the common signal transduction pathways shared by both salt and drought stress responses; however, the proteins with executive functions varied. These results indicate functional specialization of family proteins in response to different stresses, i.e., CDPK21, TPR, and CTR1 specific to phosphorylation cascades under early salt stress, whereas STN7 and BSL were specific to phosphorylation cascades under early drought stress. Only the calcium-binding EF-hand family protein and ZKT were clearly identified as signaling proteins that acted as cross-talk nodes for salt and drought signaling pathways. Our study provides new clues and insights for developing strategies to

  16. Smart Hydrogels with Inhomogeneous Structures Assembled Using Nanoclay-Cross-Linked Hydrogel Subunits as Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chen; Liu, Zhuang; Yang, Chao; Wang, Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2016-08-24

    A novel and facile assembly strategy has been successfully developed to construct smart nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels with inhomogeneous structures using nanoclay-cross-linked stimuli-responsive hydrogel subunits as building blocks via rearranged hydrogen bonding between polymers and clay nanosheets. The assembled thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) (poly(NIPAM-co-AM)) hydrogels with various inhomogeneous structures exhibit excellent mechanical properties due to plenty of new hydrogen bonding interactions created at the interface for locking the NC hydrogel subunits, which are strong enough to tolerate external forces such as high levels of elongations and multicycles of swelling/deswelling operations. The proposed approach is featured with flexibility and designability to build assembled hydrogels with diverse architectures for achieving various responsive deformations, which are highly promising for stimuli-responsive manipulation such as actuation, encapsulation, and cargo transportation. Our assembly strategy creates new opportunities for further developing mechanically strong hydrogel systems with complex architectures that composed of diverse internal structures, multistimuli-responsive properties, and controllable shape deformation behaviors in the soft robots and actuators fields. PMID:27490585

  17. Viral miRNAs exploiting the endosomal-exosomal pathway for intercellular cross-talk and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Pegtel, D Michiel; van de Garde, Martijn D B; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2011-01-01

    The class of persistent gamma-herpesviruses has developed a variety of strategies that exploit host-cell regulatory pathways to ensure a long-lasting, well-balanced infection of their host. However when these pathways are deregulated, an otherwise harmless infection can lead to disease including cancer. We recently demonstrated that the human herpes virus 4 (HHV4) also known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), encodes for small regulatory non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) that can be transferred from an infected cell to uninfected neighboring cells. Upon arrival these miRNAs are functional in the recipient cell, in that they are able to down regulate specific target genes. These secreted miRNAs are transported to recipient cells via small nano-sized vesicles (known as exosomes) that are of endosomal origin, formed as intraluminal vesicles (ILV) inside multivesicular bodies (MVB). One question that needs to be addressed is how viral miRNAs are sorted into these exosomes. Mature miRNAs, including those of viral origin, are loaded into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC) for gene silencing via blocking mRNA translation and/or initiating mRNA decay. Recent insights indicate that cytoplasmic RNA granules rich in RISC complexes are closely associated with endosomes. In fact, selective components of RISC, including GW182 and Argonaut proteins, miRNAs and mRNAs are present in exosomes. Thus miRNA function, mRNA stability and exosome-mediated intercellular communication converge at the level of endosomes. Since endosomes can be considered as key intracellular cross-roads that regulate communication of cells with their exterior, including neighboring cells, it is perhaps not surprising that viruses have found means to exploit this pathway to their benefit. Little is known however, how and if (micro) RNA species are specifically sorted into ILVs and what (micro)RNA-binding proteins are involved. Here we discuss recent developments relating to intracellular trafficking and function of

  18. Icariin Attenuates OGD/R-Induced Autophagy via Bcl-2-Dependent Cross Talk between Apoptosis and Autophagy in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Icariin (ICA), an active component of Epimedium brevicornum Maxim, exerts a variety of neuroprotective effects such as antiapoptosis. However, the mechanisms underlying antiapoptosis of ICA in neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) are unclear. The B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family plays an important role in the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy through Bcl-2-dependent cross talk. Bcl-2 suppresses apoptosis by binding to Bax and inhibits autophagy by binding to Beclin-1 which is an autophagy related protein. In the present study, MTT result showed that ICA increased cell viability significantly in OGD/R treated PC12 cells (P < 0.01). Results of western blotting analysis showed that ICA increased Bcl-2 expression significantly and decreased expressions of Bax, cleaved Caspase-3, Beclin-1, and LC3-II significantly in OGD/R treated PC12 cells (P < 0.01). These results suggest that ICA protects PC12 cells from OGD/R induced autophagy via Bcl-2-dependent cross talk between apoptosis and autophagy.

  19. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis to elucidate the cross-talk between one-carbon and xenobiotic metabolic pathways in multi-disease models.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Vijayalakshmi, Sana Venkata; Rupasree, Yedluri; Kumudini, Nadella; Sowganthika, Sampathkumar; Naidu, Janardhanan Venketlakshmi; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Rao, Dunna Nageswara; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Putatively functional polymorphisms of one-carbon and xenobiotic metabolic pathways influence susceptibility for wide spectrum of diseases. The current study was aimed to explore gene-gene interactions among these two metabolic pathways in four diseases i.e. breast cancer, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), coronary artery disease (CAD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis was carried out on four case-control datasets. Cross-talk was observed between one-carbon and xenobiotic pathways in breast cancer (RFC 80 G>A, COMT H108L and TYMS 5'-UTR 28 bp tandem repeat) and SLE (CYP1A1 m1, MTRR 66 A>G and GSTT1). Gene-gene interactions within one-carbon metabolic pathway were observed in CAD (GCPII 1561 C>T, SHMT 1420 C>T and MTHFR 677 C>T) and PD (cSHMT 1420 C>T, MTRR 66 A>G and RFC1 80 G>A). These interaction models showed good predictability of risk for PD (The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (C) = 0.83) and SLE (C = 0.73); and moderate predictability of risk for breast cancer (C = 0.64) and CAD (C = 0.63). Cross-talk between one-carbon and xenobiotic pathways was observed in diseases with female preponderance. Gene-gene interactions within one-carbon metabolic pathway were observed in diseases with male preponderance.

  20. Icariin Attenuates OGD/R-Induced Autophagy via Bcl-2-Dependent Cross Talk between Apoptosis and Autophagy in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, Zhen-Tao; Li, Wen-Na; Zhai, Yu-Rong; Gong, Qi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Icariin (ICA), an active component of Epimedium brevicornum Maxim, exerts a variety of neuroprotective effects such as antiapoptosis. However, the mechanisms underlying antiapoptosis of ICA in neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) are unclear. The B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family plays an important role in the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy through Bcl-2-dependent cross talk. Bcl-2 suppresses apoptosis by binding to Bax and inhibits autophagy by binding to Beclin-1 which is an autophagy related protein. In the present study, MTT result showed that ICA increased cell viability significantly in OGD/R treated PC12 cells (P < 0.01). Results of western blotting analysis showed that ICA increased Bcl-2 expression significantly and decreased expressions of Bax, cleaved Caspase-3, Beclin-1, and LC3-II significantly in OGD/R treated PC12 cells (P < 0.01). These results suggest that ICA protects PC12 cells from OGD/R induced autophagy via Bcl-2-dependent cross talk between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27610184

  1. Icariin Attenuates OGD/R-Induced Autophagy via Bcl-2-Dependent Cross Talk between Apoptosis and Autophagy in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Icariin (ICA), an active component of Epimedium brevicornum Maxim, exerts a variety of neuroprotective effects such as antiapoptosis. However, the mechanisms underlying antiapoptosis of ICA in neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) are unclear. The B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family plays an important role in the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy through Bcl-2-dependent cross talk. Bcl-2 suppresses apoptosis by binding to Bax and inhibits autophagy by binding to Beclin-1 which is an autophagy related protein. In the present study, MTT result showed that ICA increased cell viability significantly in OGD/R treated PC12 cells (P < 0.01). Results of western blotting analysis showed that ICA increased Bcl-2 expression significantly and decreased expressions of Bax, cleaved Caspase-3, Beclin-1, and LC3-II significantly in OGD/R treated PC12 cells (P < 0.01). These results suggest that ICA protects PC12 cells from OGD/R induced autophagy via Bcl-2-dependent cross talk between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27610184

  2. Emerging importance of mismatch repair components including UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with the development of drug resistance in malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-12-01

    Human malaria is an important parasitic infection responsible for a significant number of deaths worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. The recent scenario has worsened mainly because of the emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites having the potential to spread across the world. Drug-resistant parasites possess a defective mismatch repair (MMR); therefore, it is essential to explore its mechanism in detail to determine the underlying cause. Recently, artemisinin-resistant parasites have been reported to exhibit nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in MMR pathways such as MutL homolog (MLH) and UvrD. Plasmodium falciparum MLH is an endonuclease required to restore the defective MMR in drug-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. Although the role of helicases in eukaryotic MMR has been questioned, the identification and characterization of the UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with MLH in P. falciparum suggests the possible involvement of UvrD in MMR. A comparative genome-wide analysis revealed the presence of the UvrD helicase in Plasmodium species, while it is absent in human host. Therefore, PfUvrD may emerge as a suitable drug target to control malaria. This review study is focused on recent developments in MMR biochemistry, emerging importance of the UvrD helicase, possibility of its involvement in MMR and the emerging cross-talk between MMR components and drug resistance in malaria parasite. PMID:25771870

  3. Comparative analysis of the Spirulina platensis subcellular proteome in response to low- and high-temperature stresses: uncovering cross-talk of signaling components

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The present study focused on comparative proteome analyses of low- and high-temperature stresses and potential protein-protein interaction networks, constructed by using a bioinformatics approach, in response to both stress conditions. The data revealed two important points: first, the results indicate that low-temperature stress is tightly linked with oxidative stress as well as photosynthesis; however, no specific mechanism is revealed in the case of the high-temperature stress response. Second, temperature stress was revealed to be linked with nitrogen and ammonia assimilation. Moreover, the data also highlighted the cross-talk of signaling pathways. Some of the detected signaling proteins, e.g., Hik14, Hik26 and Hik28, have potential interactions with differentially expressed proteins identified in both temperature stress conditions. Some differentially expressed proteins found in the Spirulina protein-protein interaction network were also examined for their physical interactions by a yeast two hybrid system (Y2H). The Y2H results obtained in this study suggests that the potential PPI network gives quite reliable potential interactions for Spirulina. Therefore, the bioinformatics approach employed in this study helps in the analysis of phenomena where proteome analyses of knockout mutants have not been carried out to directly examine for specificity or cross-talk of signaling components. PMID:21756373

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  5. A rare cationic building block that generates a new type of polyhedral network with "cross-linked" pto topology.

    PubMed

    Lusi, Matteo; Fechine, Pierre B A; Chen, Kai-Jie; Perry, John J; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-03-18

    A rare 8-connected cationic building block, [Cu2L8(μ-MF6)](2+) (L = pyridyl ligand, M = Si, Ti, Ge, Zr or Sn), enables the formation of a small cubicuboctahedral supramolecular building block, SBB, when complexed by 2,4,6-tris(4-pyridyl)pyridine. The coordination network resulting from fusing the square faces of the SBBs can be described as a pto topology in which half of the square faces are cross-linked by MF6(2-) moieties, and represents the first example of a new 3,5-c topology.

  6. A peptide mimic blocks the cross-reaction of anti-DNA antibodies with glomerular antigens.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Eryilmaz, E; Der, E; Pawar, R D; Guo, X; Cowburn, D; Putterman, C

    2016-03-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with renal antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to self-antigens is isotype-dependent. Furthermore, significant variability in renal pathogenicity was seen among a panel of anti-DNA isotypes [derived from a single murine immunoglobulin (Ig)G3 monoclonal antibody, PL9-11] that share identical variable regions. In this study, we sought to select peptide mimics that effectively inhibit the binding of all murine and human anti-DNA IgG isotypes to glomerular antigens. The PL9-11 panel of IgG anti-DNA antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3) was used for screening a 12-mer phage display library. Binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry and glomerular binding assays were used for the assessment of peptide inhibition of antibody binding to nuclear and kidney antigens. We identified a 12 amino acid peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP, or 'ALW') which binds to all PL9-11 IgG isotypes. Preincubation with the ALW peptide reduced the binding of the PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies to DNA, laminin, mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli significantly. Furthermore, we confirmed the specificity of the amino acid sequence in the binding of ALW to anti-DNA antibodies by alanine scanning. Finally, ALW inhibited the binding of murine and human lupus sera to dsDNA and glomeruli significantly. In conclusion, by inhibiting the binding of polyclonal anti-DNA antibodies to autoantigens in vivo, the ALW peptide (or its derivatives) may potentially be a useful approach to block anti-DNA antibody binding to renal tissue.

  7. Talking Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shwartz, Yael; Weizman, Ayelet; Fortus, David; Sutherland, LeeAnn; Merrit, Joi; Krajcik, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Science is a social process--one that involves particular ways of talking, reasoning, observing, analyzing, and writing, which often have meaning only when shared within the scientific community. Discussions are one of the best ways to help students learn to "talk science" and construct understanding in a social context. Since inquiry is an…

  8. Evaluation of the optical cross talk level in the SiPMs adopted in ASTRI SST-2M Cherenkov Camera using EASIROC front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impiombato, D.; Giarrusso, S.; Mineo, T.; Agnetta, G.; Biondo, B.; Catalano, O.; Gargano, C.; La Rosa, G.; Russo, F.; Sottile, G.; Belluso, M.; Billotta, S.; Bonanno, G.; Garozzo, S.; Marano, D.; Romeo, G.

    2014-02-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana), is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research whose main goal is the design and construction of an end-to-end prototype of the Small Size of Telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array. The prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, will adopt a wide field dual mirror optical system in a Schwarzschild-Couder configuration to explore the VHE range of the electromagnetic spectrum. The camera at the focal plane is based on Silicon Photo-Multipliers detectors which is an innovative solution for the detection astronomical Cherenkov light. This contribution reports some preliminary results on the evaluation of the optical cross talk level among the SiPM pixels foreseen for the ASTRI SST-2M camera.

  9. Cross-talk between human neural stem/progenitor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in an allogeneic co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxia; Shao, Bei; Zhuge, Qichuan; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Chengcai; Huang, Weilong; Yang, Chenqi; Wang, Brian; Su, Dong-Ming; Jin, Kunlin

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSCs) as a regenerative cell replacement therapy holds great promise. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We, here, focused on the interaction between hNSCs and allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a co-culture model. We found that hNSCs significantly decrease the CD3+ and CD8+ T cells, reduce the gamma delta T cells and increase the regulatory T cells, along with reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased anti-inflammatory cytokines after co-culture. We also found that PBMCs, in turn, significantly promote the proliferation and differentiation of hNSCs. Our data suggest that hNSCs cross-talk with immune cells.

  10. Epidermal growth factor induces WISP-2/CCN5 expression in estrogen receptor-alpha-positive breast tumor cells through multiple molecular cross-talks.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Snigdha; Sengupta, Krishanu; Saxena, Neela K; Dhar, Kakali; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2005-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a mitogen for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast tumor cells, and it has been proven that EGF occasionally mimicked estrogen action and cross-talks with ER-alpha to exert its activity. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to explore whether EGF is able to modulate the expression of Wnt-1-induced signaling protein-2/connective tissue growth factor/cysteine-rich 61/nephroblastoma overexpressed 5 (WISP-2/CCN5), an estrogen-responsive gene, in normal and transformed cell lines of the human breast and, if so, whether this induction is critical for EGF mitogenesis and what downstream signaling pathways are associated with this event. Here, we show that EGF-induced WISP-2 expression in ER- and EGF receptor-positive noninvasive MCF-7 breast tumor cells was dose and time dependent and that expression was modulated at transcription level. A synergism was seen in combination with estrogen. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of WISP-2/CCN5 activity in MCF-7 cells resulted in abrogation of proliferation by EGF. The multiple molecular cross-talks, including the interactions between phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and two diverse receptors (i.e., ER-alpha and EGFR), were essential in the event of EGF-induced WISP-2/CCN5 up-regulation in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, EGF action on WISP-2/CCN5 is restricted to ER- and EGFR-positive noninvasive breast tumor cells, and this effect of EGF cannot be instigated in ER-alpha-negative and EGFR-positive normal or invasive breast tumor cells by introducing ER-alpha. Finally, regulation of phosphorylation of ER-alpha and EGFR may play critical roles in EGF-induced transcriptional activation of WISP-2 gene in breast tumor cells.

  11. The cross-talk between canonical and non-canonical Wnt-dependent pathways regulates P-glycoprotein expression in human blood–brain barrier cells

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón-Daza, Martha L; Salaroglio, Iris C; Kopecka, Joanna; Garzòn, Ruth; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ghigo, Dario; Riganti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we investigate if and how transducers of the ‘canonical' Wnt pathway, i.e., Wnt/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3)/β-catenin, and transducers of the ‘non-canonical' Wnt pathway, i.e., Wnt/RhoA/RhoA kinase (RhoAK), cooperate to control the expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) in blood–brain barrier (BBB) cells. By analyzing human primary brain microvascular endothelial cells constitutively activated for RhoA, silenced for RhoA or treated with the RhoAK inhibitor Y27632, we found that RhoAK phosphorylated and activated the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which dephosphorylated tyrosine 216 of GSK3, decreasing the GSK3-mediated inhibition of β-catenin. By contrast, the inhibition of RhoA/RhoAK axis prevented the activation of PTP1B, enhanced the GSK3-induced phosphorylation and ubiquitination of β-catenin, and reduced the β-catenin-driven transcription of Pgp. The RhoAK inhibition increased the delivery of Pgp substrates like doxorubicin across the BBB and improved the doxorubicin efficacy against glioblastoma cells co-cultured under a BBB monolayer. Our data demonstrate that in human BBB cells the expression of Pgp is controlled by a cross-talk between canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathways. The disruption of this cross-talk, e.g., by inhibiting RhoAK, downregulates Pgp and increases the delivery of Pgp substrates across the BBB. PMID:24896565

  12. RAGE and TGF-β1 Cross-Talk Regulate Extracellular Matrix Turnover and Cytokine Synthesis in AGEs Exposed Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Geicu, Ovidiu Ionut; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    AGEs accumulation in the skin affects extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover and triggers diabetes associated skin conditions and accelerated skin aging. The receptor of AGEs (RAGE) has an essential contribution to cellular dysfunction driven by chronic inflammatory responses while TGF-β1 is critical in both dermal homeostasis and inflammation. We investigated the contribution of RAGE and TGF-β1 to the modulation of inflammatory response and ECM turnover in AGEs milieu, using a normal fibroblast cell line. RAGE, TGF-β1, collagen I and III gene and protein expression were upregulated after exposure to AGEs-BSA, and MMP-2 was activated. AGEs-RAGE was pivotal in NF-κB dependent collagen I expression and joined with TGF-β1 to stimulate collagen III expression, probably via ERK1/2 signaling. AGEs-RAGE axis induced upregulation of TGF-β1, TNF-α and IL-8 cytokines. TNF-α and IL-8 were subjected to TGF-β1 negative regulation. RAGE’s proinflammatory signaling also antagonized AGEs-TGF-β1 induced fibroblast contraction, suggesting the existence of an inhibitory cross-talk mechanism between TGF-β1 and RAGE signaling. RAGE and TGF-β1 stimulated anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-2 and IL-4 expression. GM-CSF and IL-6 expression appeared to be dependent only on TGF-β1 signaling. Our data also indicated that IFN-γ upregulated in AGEs-BSA milieu in a RAGE and TGF-β1 independent mechanism. Our findings raise the possibility that RAGE and TGF-β1 are both involved in fibrosis development in a complex cross-talk mechanism, while also acting on their own individual targets. This study contributes to the understanding of impaired wound healing associated with diabetes complications. PMID:27015414

  13. Molecular characterization of the PR-toxin gene cluster in Penicillium roqueforti and Penicillium chrysogenum: cross talk of secondary metabolite pathways.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Pedro I; Ullán, Ricardo V; Albillos, Silvia M; Montero, Olimpio; Fernández-Bodega, María Ángeles; García-Estrada, Carlos; Fernández-Aguado, Marta; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The PR-toxin is a potent mycotoxin produced by Penicillium roqueforti in moulded grains and grass silages and may contaminate blue-veined cheese. The PR-toxin derives from the 15 carbon atoms sesquiterpene aristolochene formed by the aristolochene synthase (encoded by ari1). We have cloned and sequenced a four gene cluster that includes the ari1 gene from P. roqueforti. Gene silencing of each of the four genes (named prx1 to prx4) resulted in a reduction of 65-75% in the production of PR-toxin indicating that the four genes encode enzymes involved in PR-toxin biosynthesis. Interestingly the four silenced mutants overproduce large amounts of mycophenolic acid, an antitumor compound formed by an unrelated pathway suggesting a cross-talk of PR-toxin and mycophenolic acid production. An eleven gene cluster that includes the above mentioned four prx genes and a 14-TMS drug/H(+) antiporter was found in the genome of Penicillium chrysogenum. This eleven gene cluster has been reported to be very poorly expressed in a transcriptomic study of P. chrysogenum genes under conditions of penicillin production (strongly aerated cultures). We found that this apparently silent gene cluster is able to produce PR-toxin in P. chrysogenum under static culture conditions on hydrated rice medium. Noteworthily, the production of PR-toxin was 2.6-fold higher in P. chrysogenum npe10, a strain deleted in the 56.8kb amplifiable region containing the pen gene cluster, than in the parental strain Wisconsin 54-1255 providing another example of cross-talk between secondary metabolite pathways in this fungus. A detailed PR-toxin biosynthesis pathway is proposed based on all available evidence.

  14. RAGE and TGF-β1 Cross-Talk Regulate Extracellular Matrix Turnover and Cytokine Synthesis in AGEs Exposed Fibroblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Geicu, Ovidiu Ionut; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    AGEs accumulation in the skin affects extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover and triggers diabetes associated skin conditions and accelerated skin aging. The receptor of AGEs (RAGE) has an essential contribution to cellular dysfunction driven by chronic inflammatory responses while TGF-β1 is critical in both dermal homeostasis and inflammation. We investigated the contribution of RAGE and TGF-β1 to the modulation of inflammatory response and ECM turnover in AGEs milieu, using a normal fibroblast cell line. RAGE, TGF-β1, collagen I and III gene and protein expression were upregulated after exposure to AGEs-BSA, and MMP-2 was activated. AGEs-RAGE was pivotal in NF-κB dependent collagen I expression and joined with TGF-β1 to stimulate collagen III expression, probably via ERK1/2 signaling. AGEs-RAGE axis induced upregulation of TGF-β1, TNF-α and IL-8 cytokines. TNF-α and IL-8 were subjected to TGF-β1 negative regulation. RAGE's proinflammatory signaling also antagonized AGEs-TGF-β1 induced fibroblast contraction, suggesting the existence of an inhibitory cross-talk mechanism between TGF-β1 and RAGE signaling. RAGE and TGF-β1 stimulated anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-2 and IL-4 expression. GM-CSF and IL-6 expression appeared to be dependent only on TGF-β1 signaling. Our data also indicated that IFN-γ upregulated in AGEs-BSA milieu in a RAGE and TGF-β1 independent mechanism. Our findings raise the possibility that RAGE and TGF-β1 are both involved in fibrosis development in a complex cross-talk mechanism, while also acting on their own individual targets. This study contributes to the understanding of impaired wound healing associated with diabetes complications. PMID:27015414

  15. Functional cross-talk between the α1- and β1-adrenergic receptors modulates the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Di; Wang, Sen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Qian, Jin; Guo, Yan

    2014-08-15

    The rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr) plays a critical role in cardiac repolarization. Although IKr is known to be regulated by both α1- and β1-adrenergic receptors (ARs), the cross-talk and feedback mechanisms that dictate its response to α1- and β1-AR activation are not known. In the present study, IKr was recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. IKr amplitude was measured before and after the sequential application of selective adrenergic agonists targeting α1- and β1-ARs. Stimulation of either receptor alone (α1-ARs using 1 μM phenylephrine (PE) or β1-ARs using 10 μM xamoterol (Xamo)) reduced IKr by 0.22 ± 0.03 and 0.28 ± 0.01, respectively. The voltage-dependent activation curve of IKr shifted in the negative direction. The half-maximal activation voltage (V0.5) was altered by -6.35 ± 1.53 and -1.95 ± 2.22 mV, respectively, with no major change in the slope factor (k). When myocytes were pretreated with Xamo, PE-induced reduction in IKr was markedly blunted and the corresponding change in V0.5 was significantly altered. Similarly, when cells were pretreated with PE, Xamo-induced reduction of IKr was significantly attenuated. The present results demonstrate that functional cross-talk between α1- and β1-AR signaling regulates IKr. Such non-linear regulation may form a protective mechanism under excessive adrenergic stimulation.

  16. The Impact of Intramammary Escherichia coli Challenge on Liver and Mammary Transcriptome and Cross-Talk in Dairy Cows during Early Lactation Using RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, K. M.; Sørensen, P.; Bionaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify the biological response and the cross-talk between liver and mammary tissue after intramammary infection (IMI) with Escherichia coli (E. coli) using RNAseq technology. Sixteen cows were inoculated with live E. coli into one mammary quarter at ~4–6 weeks in lactation. For all cows, biopsies were performed at -144, 12 and 24 h relative to IMI in liver and at 24 h post-IMI in infected and non-infected (control) mammary quarters. For a subset of cows (n = 6), RNA was extracted from both liver and mammary tissue and sequenced using a 100 bp paired-end approach. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and the Dynamic Impact Approach analysis of differentially expressed genes (overall effect False Discovery Rate≤0.05) indicated that IMI induced an overall activation of inflammation at 12 h post-IMI and a strong inhibition of metabolism, especially related to lipid, glucose, and xenobiotics at 24 h post-IMI in liver. The data indicated in mammary tissue an overall induction of inflammatory response with little effect on metabolism at 24 h post-IMI. We identified a large number of up-stream regulators potentially involved in the response to IMI in both tissues but a relatively small core network of transcription factors controlling the response to IMI for liver whereas a large network in mammary tissue. Transcriptomic results in liver and mammary tissue were supported by changes in inflammatory and metabolic mediators in blood and milk. The analysis of potential cross-talk between the two tissues during IMI uncovered a large communication from the mammary tissue to the liver to coordinate the inflammatory response but a relatively small communication from the liver to the mammary tissue. Our results indicate a strong induction of the inflammatory response in mammary tissue and impairment of liver metabolism 24h post-IMI partly driven by the signaling from infected mammary tissue. PMID:27336699

  17. The renin-angiotensin system mediates epidermal growth factor receptor-vitamin D receptor cross-talk in colitis-associated colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Farhana; Almoghrabi, Anas; Mustafi, Devkumar; Kreisheh, Maggi; Sundaramurthy, Sumana; Liu, Weicheng; Konda, Vani J.; Pekow, Joel; Khare, Sharad; Hart, John; Joseph, Loren; Wyrwicz, Alice; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Li, Yan Chun; Bissonnette, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We previously showed that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) promotes tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) model, whereas vitamin D (VD) suppresses tumorigenesis. EGFR-vitamin D receptor (VDR) interactions, however, are incompletely understood. VD inhibits the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), whereas RAS can activate EGFR. We aimed to elucidate EGFR-VDR cross-talk in colorectal carcinogenesis. Experimental Design To examine VDR-RAS interactions, we treated Vdr+/+ and Vdr/− mice with AOM/DSS. Effects of VDR on RAS and EGFR were examined by Westerns, immunostaining and real time PCR. We also examined the effect of vitamin D3 on colonic RAS in Vdr+/+ mice. EGFR regulation of VDR was examined in hypomorphic EgfrWaved2 (Wa2) and Egfrwildtype mice. Ang II-induced EGFR activation was studied in cell culture. Results Vdr deletion significantly increased tumorigenesis, activated EGFR and βcatenin signaling and increased colonic RAS components: including renin and angiotensin II. Dietary VD3 supplementation suppressed colonic renin. Renin was increased in human colon cancers. In studies in vitro, Ang II activated EGFR and stimulated colon cancer cell proliferation by an EGFR-mediated mechanism. Ang II also activated macrophages and colonic fibroblasts. Compared to tumors from EgfrWaved2 mice, tumors from Egfrwildtype mice showed up-regulated Snail1, a suppressor of VDR, and down-regulated VDR. Conclusions VDR suppresses the colonic RAS cascade, limits EGFR signals and inhibits colitis-associated tumorigenesis, whereas EGFR increases Snail1 and down-regulates VDR in colonic tumors. Taken together, these results uncover a RAS-dependent mechanism mediating EGFR and VDR cross-talk in colon cancer. PMID:25212605

  18. A multidisciplinary study using in vivo tumor models and microfluidic cell-on-chip approach to explore the cross-talk between cancer and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Fabrizio; Schiavoni, Giovanna; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Sestili, Paola; Sistigu, Antonella; Fragale, Alessandra; Sanchez, Massimo; Spada, Massimo; Gerardino, Annamaria; Belardelli, Filippo; Businaro, Luca; Gabriele, Lucia

    2014-10-01

    A full elucidation of events occurring inside the cancer microenvironment is fundamental for the optimization of more effective therapies. In the present study, the cross-talk between cancer and immune cells was examined by employing mice deficient (KO) in interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-8, a transcription factor essential for induction of competent immune responses. The in vivo results showed that IRF-8 KO mice were highly permissive to B16.F10 melanoma growth and metastasis due to failure of their immune cells to exert proper immunosurveillance. These events were found to be dependent on soluble factors released by cells of the immune system capable of shaping the malignant phenotype of melanoma cells. An on-chip model was then generated to further explore the reciprocal interactions between the B16.F10 and immune cells. B16.F10 and immune cells were co-cultured in a microfluidic device composed of three culturing chambers suitably inter-connected by an array of microchannels; mutual interactions were then followed using time-lapse microscopy. It was observed that WT immune cells migrated through the microchannels towards the B16.F10 cells, establishing tight interactions that in turn limited tumor spread. In contrast, IRF-8 KO immune cells poorly interacted with the melanoma cells, resulting in a more invasive behavior of the B16.F10 cells. These results suggest that IRF-8 expression plays a key role in the cross-talk between melanoma and immune cells, and under-score the value of cell-on-chip approaches as useful in vitro tools to reconstruct complex in vivo microenvironments on a microscale level to explore cell interactions such as those occurring within a cancer immunoenvironment. PMID:24597645

  19. A Cross-Talk Between NFAT and NF-κB Pathways is Crucial for Nickel-Induced COX-2 Expression in Beas-2B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, T.; Li, X.; Ding, J.; Luo, W.; Li, J.; Huang, C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a critical enzyme implicated in chronic inflammation-associated cancer development. Our studies have shown that the exposure of Beas-2B cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line, to lung carcinogenic nickel compounds results in increased COX-2 expression. However, the signaling pathways leading to nickel-induced COX-2 expression are not well understood. In the current study, we found that the exposure of Beas-2B cells to nickel compounds resulted in the activation of both nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The expression of COX-2 induced upon nickel exposure was inhibited by either a NFAT pharmacological inhibitor or the knockdown of NFAT3 by specific siRNA. We further found that the activation of NFAT and NF-κB was dependent on each other. Since our previous studies have shown that NF-κB activation is critical for nickel-induced COX-2 expression in Beas-2B cells exposed to nickel compounds under same experimental condition, we anticipate that there might be a cross-talk between the activation of NFAT and NF-κB for the COX-2 induction due to nickel exposure in Beas-2B cells. Furthermore, we showed that the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by introduction of mitochondrial catalase inhibited the activation of both NFAT and NF-κB, and the induction of COX-2 due to nickel exposure. Taken together, our results defining the evidence showing a key role of the cross-talk between NFAT and NF-κB pathways in regulating nickel-induced COX-2 expression, further provide insight into the understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking nickel exposure to its lung carcinogenic effects. PMID:21486220

  20. Positive cross talk between protein kinase D and β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells: impact on β-catenin nuclear localization and phosphorylation at Ser552.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Han, Liang; Sinnett-Smith, James; Han, Li-Li; Stevens, Jan V; Rozengurt, Nora; Young, Steven H; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Given the fundamental role of β-catenin signaling in intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and the growth-promoting function of protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in these cells, we hypothesized that PKDs mediate cross talk with β-catenin signaling. The results presented here provide several lines of evidence supporting this hypothesis. We found that stimulation of intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonist angiotensin II (ANG II), a potent inducer of PKD activation, promoted endogenous β-catenin nuclear localization in a time-dependent manner. A significant increase was evident within 1 h of ANG II stimulation (P< 0.01), peaked at 4 h (P< 0.001), and declined afterwards. GPCR stimulation also induced a marked increase in β-catenin-regulated genes and phosphorylation at Ser(552) in intestinal epithelial cells. Exposure to preferential inhibitors of the PKD family (CRT006610 or kb NB 142-70) or knockdown of the isoforms of the PKD family prevented the increase in β-catenin nuclear localization and phosphorylation at Ser(552) in response to ANG II. GPCR stimulation also induced the formation of a complex between PKD1 and β-catenin, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation that depended on PKD1 catalytic activation, as it was abrogated by cell treatment with PKD family inhibitors. Using transgenic mice that express elevated PKD1 protein in the intestinal epithelium, we detected a marked increase in the localization of β-catenin in the nucleus of crypt epithelial cells in the ileum of PKD1 transgenic mice, compared with nontransgenic littermates. Collectively, our results identify a novel cross talk between PKD and β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26739494

  1. A Robust Cross-Linking Strategy for Block Copolymer Worms Prepared via Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) chain transfer agent is chain-extended by reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) statistical copolymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) with glycidyl methacrylate (GlyMA) in concentrated aqueous solution via polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). A series of five free-standing worm gels is prepared by fixing the overall degree of polymerization of the core-forming block at 144 while varying its GlyMA content from 0 to 20 mol %. 1H NMR kinetics indicated that GlyMA is consumed much faster than HPMA, producing a GlyMA-rich sequence close to the PGMA stabilizer block. Temperature-dependent oscillatory rheological studies indicate that increasing the GlyMA content leads to progressively less thermoresponsive worm gels, with no degelation on cooling being observed for worms containing 20 mol % GlyMA. The epoxy groups in the GlyMA residues can be ring-opened using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) in order to prepare core cross-linked worms via hydrolysis-condensation with the siloxane groups and/or hydroxyl groups on the HPMA residues. Perhaps surprisingly, 1H NMR analysis indicates that the epoxy–amine reaction and the intermolecular cross-linking occur on similar time scales. Cross-linking leads to stiffer worm gels that do not undergo degelation upon cooling. Dynamic light scattering studies and TEM analyses conducted on linear worms exposed to either methanol (a good solvent for both blocks) or anionic surfactant result in immediate worm dissociation. In contrast, cross-linked worms remain intact under such conditions, provided that the worm cores comprise at least 10 mol % GlyMA. PMID:27134311

  2. Cross metathesis of unsaturated epoxides for the synthesis of polyfunctional building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Abderrezak, Meriem K; Šichová, Kristýna; Dominguez-Boblett, Nancy; Dupé, Antoine; Kabouche, Zahia; Bruneau, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cross metathesis of 1,2-epoxy-5-hexene (1) with methyl acrylate and acrylonitrile was investigated as an entry to the synthesis of polyfunctional compounds. The resulting cross metathesis products were hydrogenated in a tandem fashion employing the residual ruthenium from the metathesis step as the hydrogenation catalyst. Interestingly, the epoxide ring remained unreactive toward this hydrogenation method. The saturated compound resulting from the cross metathesis of 1 with methyl acrylate was transformed by means of nucleophilic ring-opening of the epoxide to furnish a diol, an alkoxy alcohol and an amino alcohol in high yields. PMID:26664605

  3. Cross talk between angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis and sirtuins in adipose tissue and metabolism of high-fat feed mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Andrade, João Marcus; Paraíso, Alanna Fernandes; Garcia, Zélia Menezes; Ferreira, Adaliene Versiani Matos; Sinisterra, Ruben D M; Sousa, Frederico B; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José; dos Santos, Robson Augusto; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Sousa

    2014-05-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) and resveratrol have been described as new potential therapeutic tools on treating and preventing metabolic disorders. In the present study we aimed to evaluate the effect of an oral formulation of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] included in HPB-cyclodextrin and resveratrol (RSV), in modulation of sirtuin and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in adipose tissue of mice treated with a high-fat diet (HFD). We observed that HFD+Ang-(1-7) and HFD+RSV groups presented marked decrease in the adipose tissue mass. Furthermore, these animals showed improved insulin-sensitivity and glucose tolerance as well as lower plasma levels of fasting glucose and lipids. The RT-PCR analysis revealed decreased expression of ACE and an increase of ACE2 [Ang-(1-7) marker] in group treated with resveratrol and also an increased expression of SIRT1 in groups that received Ang-(1-7). We showed for the first time that improved metabolic profile is associated with increased expression of GLUT4 and high expression of AMPK/FOXO1/PPAR-γ pathway in adipose-tissue. Finally, adipocyte primary cell-culture incubated with and without sirtuin and Ang-(1-7)/Mas antagonists pointed out for a cross-talking between RAS and sirtuins. We conclude that oral administration of Ang-(1-7) and RSV improved metabolic profile through a cross-modulation between RAS and Sirtuins.

  4. Prostate Cancer Cell–Stromal Cell Cross-Talk via FGFR1 Mediates Antitumor Activity of Dovitinib in Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xinhai; Corn, Paul G.; Yang, Jun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Starbuck, Michael W.; Efstathiou, Eleni; Li-Ning Tapia, Elsa M.; Zurita, Amado J.; Aparicio, Ana; Ravoori, Murali K.; Vazquez, Elba S.; Robinson, Dan R.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Iyer, Matthew K.; McKeehan, Wallace; Kundra, Vikas; Wang, Fen; Troncoso, Patricia; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Navone, Nora M.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of prostate cancer (PCa) progression to a therapy-resistant, lethal phenotype. We found that blockade of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib has clinical activity in a subset of men with castration-resistant PCa and bone metastases. Our integrated analyses suggest that FGF signaling mediates a positive feedback loop between PCa cells and bone cells and that blockade of FGFR1 in osteoblasts partially mediates the antitumor activity of dovitinib by improving bone quality and by blocking PCa cell–bone cell interaction. These findings account for clinical observations such as reductions in lesion size and intensity on bone scans, lymph node size, and tumor-specific symptoms without proportional declines in prostate-specific antigen concentration. Our findings suggest that targeting FGFR has therapeutic activity in advanced PCa and provide direction for the development of therapies with FGFR inhibitors. PMID:25186177

  5. The bundle crossing region is responsible for the inwardly rectifying internal spermine block of the Kir2.1 channel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Wei; Kuo, Chung-Chin

    2014-02-01

    Inward rectifier potassium channels conduct K(+) across the cell membrane more efficiently in the inward than outward direction in physiological conditions. Voltage-dependent and flow-dependent blocks of outward K(+) currents by intracellular polyamines (e.g., spermine (SPM)) have been proposed as the major mechanisms underlying inward rectification. In this study, we show that the SPM blocking affinity curve is shifted according to the shift in K(+) reversal potential. Moreover, the kinetics of SPM entry to and exit from the binding site are correlatively slowed by specific E224 and E299 mutations, which always also disrupt the flux coupling feature of SPM block. The entry rates carry little voltage dependence, whereas the exit rates are e-fold decelerated per ∼15 mV depolarization. Interestingly, the voltage dependence remains rather constant among WT and quite a few different mutant channels. This voltage dependence offers an unprecedented chance of mapping the location (electrical distance) of the SPM site in the pore because these kinetic data were obtained along the preponderant direction of K(+) current flow (outward currents for the entry rate and inward currents for the exit rate) and thus contamination from flow dependence should be negligible. Moreover, double mutations involving E224 and A178 or M183 seem to alter the height of the same asymmetrical barrier between the SPM binding site and the intracellular milieu. We conclude that the SPM site responsible for the inward rectifying block is located at an electrical distance of ∼0.5 from the inside and is involved in a flux coupling segment in the bundle crossing region of the pore. With preponderant outward K(+) flow, SPM is "pushed" to the outmost site of this segment (∼D172). On the other hand, the blocking SPM would be pushed to the inner end of this segment (∼M183-A184) with preponderant inward K(+) flow. Moreover, E224 and E299 very likely electrostatically interact with the other residues

  6. Facile synthesis for colloid silica cross-linked threadlike micelles based on block copolymer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhen-An; Dai, Tianyi; Liu, Yunling; Huo, Qisheng

    2010-12-15

    A new class of silica cross-linked threadlike micelles has been successfully synthesized in the form of stable colloidal suspensions by using block copolymer P123 (EO(20)PO(70)EO(20)) as template, tetramethyl orthosilicate as silica source, and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as stabilizing agent. The aggregation of threadlike hybrid micelles is suppressed by electrostatic repulsion from the positive -NH(3)(+) on the surfaces of threadlike hybrid micelles in strong acidic media. Compared with P123 micelles, the threadlike hybrid micelles have significantly improved stability against dilution. Furthermore, the threadlike hybrid micelles are potential drug carrier and have a higher loading capacity and a slower release rate.

  7. Functional cross-talk between Cdc42 and two downstream targets, Par6B and PAK4.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dan; Durgan, Joanne; Hall, Alan

    2015-04-15

    The establishment of polarity is an essential step in epithelial morphogenesis. Polarity proteins promote an apical/basal axis, which, together with the assembly of apical adherens and tight junctions, directed vesicle transport and the reorganization of the actomyosin filament network, generate a stable epithelium. The regulation of these cellular activities is complex, but the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) is known to play a key role in the establishment of polarity from yeast to humans. Two Cdc42 target proteins, the kinase PAK4 [p21 protein (Cdc42/Rac)-activated kinase 4] and the scaffold partitioning defective (Par) 6B, are required to promote the assembly of apical junctions in human bronchial epithelial cells. We show in the present paper that PAK4 phosphorylates Par6B at Ser143 blocking its interaction with Cdc42. This provides a potential new mechanism for controlling the subcellular localization of Par6B and its interaction with other proteins.

  8. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, Peter; Anderson, Jennifer

    2014-10-02

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  9. Determination of Importance Evaluation for the ESF Enhanced Charcterization of the Repository Block Cross Drift

    SciTech Connect

    S. Goodin

    2002-01-09

    The objective of this DIE is to determine whether the ECRB-Cross-Drift-related activities, as identified in Section 6.0, could potentially impact (1) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) testing or (2) the waste isolation capabilities of a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site. Any controls necessary to limit such potential impacts are also identified herein.

  10. ESR1 mutations affect anti-proliferative responses to tamoxifen through enhanced cross-talk with IGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Gelsomino, Luca; Gu, Guowei; Rechoum, Yassine; Beyer, Amanda R; Pejerrey, Sasha M; Tsimelzon, Anna; Wang, Tao; Huffman, Kenneth; Ludlow, Andrew; Andò, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the role of ESR1 hormone-binding mutations in breast cancer. Soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, Western blot, ERE reporter transactivation assay, proximity ligation assay (PLA), coimmunoprecipitation assay, silencing assay, digital droplet PCR (ddPCR), Kaplan-Meier analysis, and statistical analysis. It is now generally accepted that estrogen receptor (ESR1) mutations occur frequently in metastatic breast cancers; however, we do not yet know how to best treat these patients. We have modeled the three most frequent hormone-binding ESR1 (HBD-ESR1) mutations (Y537N, Y537S, and D538G) using stable lentiviral transduction in human breast cancer cell lines. Effects on growth were examined in response to hormonal and targeted agents, and mutation-specific changes were studied using microarray and Western blot analysis. We determined that the HBD-ESR1 mutations alter anti-proliferative effects to tamoxifen (Tam), due to cell-intrinsic changes in activation of the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway and levels of PIK3R1/PIK3R3. The selective estrogen receptor degrader, fulvestrant, significantly reduced the anchorage-independent growth of ESR1 mutant-expressing cells, while combination treatments with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus, or an inhibitor blocking IGF1R, and the insulin receptor significantly enhanced anti-proliferative responses. Using digital drop (dd) PCR, we identified mutations at high frequencies ranging from 12 % for Y537N, 5 % for Y537S, and 2 % for D538G in archived primary breast tumors from women treated with adjuvant mono-tamoxifen therapy. The HBD-ESR1 mutations were not associated with recurrence-free or overall survival in response in this patient cohort and suggest that knowledge of other cell-intrinsic factors in combination with ESR1 mutation status will be needed determine anti-proliferative responses to Tam. PMID:27178332

  11. Ectopic cross-talk between thyroid and retinoic acid signaling: A possible etiology for spinal neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Huili; Bai, Baoling; Zhang, Qin; Bao, Yihua; Guo, Jin; Chen, Shuyuan; Miao, Chunyue; Liu, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Ting

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the connections between neural tube defects (NTDs) and both thyroid hormones (TH) and vitamin A. However, whether the two hormonal signaling pathways interact in NTDs has remained unclear. We measured the expression levels of TH signaling genes in human fetuses with spinal NTDs associated with maternal hyperthyroidism as well as levels of retinoic acid (RA) signaling genes in mouse fetuses exposed to an overdose of RA using NanoString or real-time PCR on spinal cord tissues. Interactions between the two signaling pathways were detected by ChIP assays. The data revealed attenuated DIO2/DIO3 switching in fetuses with NTDs born to hyperthyroid mothers. The promoters of the RA signaling genes CRABP1 and RARB were ectopically occupied by increased RXRG and RXRB but displayed decreased levels of inhibitory histone modifications, suggesting that elevated TH signaling abnormally stimulates RA signaling genes. Conversely, in the mouse model, the observed decrease in Dio3 expression could be explained by increased levels of inhibitory histone modifications in the Dio3 promoter region, suggesting that overactive RA signaling may ectopically derepress TH signaling. This study thus raises in vivo a possible abnormal cross-promotion between two different hormonal signals through their common RXRs and the subsequent recruitment of histone modifications, prompting further investigation into their involvement in the etiology of spinal NTDs. PMID:26188161

  12. Apoptosis induced by trimethyltin chloride in human neuroblastoma cells SY5Y is regulated by a balance and cross-talk between NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Qing, Yan; Liang, Yanfang; Du, Qingqing; Fan, Pan; Xu, Hangong; Xu, Yiping; Shi, Nian

    2013-07-01

    Trimethyltin chloride (TMT) has been known as a classic neurotoxicant which can cause serious neuronal degeneration diseases. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathways play pivotal role in the central nerves system. In the present study, the intracellular pathways involved in TMT-induced apoptosis on human neuroblastoma cells SY5Y (SH-SY5Y) were investigated. We observed high level of nuclear NF-κB p65 submit, activated JNK, ERK, and p38 by TMT exposure. In contrast, low level of Bcl-2 and XIAP (two known NF-κB-regulated endogenous anti-apoptotic molecules) was present. To further investigate the role of these pathways and the relationship between them, specific inhibitors were used and the alteration of each pathway was evaluated. Pretreatment with MG132, an inhibitor of proteasome activity, and BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of IκBα phosphorylation, both inhibited NF-κB p65 translocation and significantly promoted apoptosis. NF-κB inhibition also induced down-expression of Bcl-2 and XIAP, exaggerated JNK phosphorylation, and ERK inhibition. SP600125 and U0126, by blocking the phosphorylation of c-Jun and MEK1/2, inhibited JNK and ERK phosphorylation, respectively, and attenuated apoptosis significantly. JNK and ERK inhibition also induced IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 translocation, leading to expression of Bcl-2 and XIAP. The detrimental role of MG132 and BAY11-7082 appears related to the exaggerated JNK phosphorylation. The SP600125 and U0126 neuroprotection appears related to NF-κB-regulated transcriptional control of Bcl-2 and XIAP. These results suggest that the cross-talk and a balance between NF-κB and MAPKs may be involved in TMT-induced apoptosis on SH-SY5Y cells.

  13. Talking Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darden, Jenee

    2009-01-01

    In many classrooms across America, race and ethnicity are very much on the table. Teachers dream of seeing their students discuss difference in a constructive way. Some educators actively encourage their classes to get outside their comfort zones and confront the country's racial history, but in many faculty rooms, there's little to no talk about…

  14. Catching With Both Hands: An Evaluation of Neural Cross-Talk and Coordinative Structure Models of Bimanual Coordination.

    PubMed

    Tayler, M A; Davids, K

    1997-09-01

    Kelso, Southard, and Goodman (1979) and Marteniuk and MacKenzie (1980) have each proposed a different theoretical model for bimanual coordination. In the model of Kelso et al., a close temporal relationship between the hands in a bimanual task is predicted, even when each hand is required to move different distances. In Marteniuk and MacKenzie's model, separate motor commands are issued so that each limb will arrive simultaneously at the specified movement endpoint, leading to low temporal associations between limbs. In most previous work on bimanual coordination, manual aiming tasks with differing constraints have been used by subjects in individual studies. In this study, the usefulness of existing models for predicting performance in a real-world catching task in which the required movement pattern was constrained by ball flight characteristics was examined. Eleven university students caught tennis balls with both hands in the following 3 conditions: Condition 1. Ball projected to the right shoulder area (left hand moved a greater distance than the right); Condition 2. Ball projected to center of the chest area, (both hands moved same distance); and Condition 3. Ball projected to left shoulder area (right hand moved a greater distance). Kinematic data (time to peak velocity, movement initiation time) indicating significant cross-correlations between the left and right limbs in all 3 conditions concurred with the data of Kelso et al. (1979) on manual aiming. Timing appeared to be an essential variable coordinating bimanual interceptive actions. Although the limbs moved at different speeds when each was required to move different distances, times to peak velocity showed strong associations, suggesting the presence of a coordinative structure. PMID:12453784

  15. Biologic therapies against inflammatory bowel disease: a dysregulated immune system and the cross talk with gastrointestinal mucosa hold the key.

    PubMed

    Dharmani, Poonam; Chadee, Kris

    2008-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a GI tract disorder that manifests as either Ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). The precise etiology of IBD is still not completely elucidated but research into the immunopathogenesis of IBD suggests that dysfunctions of the intestinal immune system and cross-reactivity against host epithelial cells hold the key. In both UC and CD, polarized immune activity towards Th1 (marked by upregulation of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IFN-gamma, IL-6) and Th17 (marked by IL-17 secretion) response is reported, while UC appears to exhibit an added contribution of Th2 responses (characterized by secretion of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13). Additionally, other molecules involved in leukocyte trafficking (adhesion molecules), chemokines (IL-8) and tissue repair molecules (PGE(2) and its receptors) are also crucial. Emergence of these new paradigms in the pathogenesis of IBD led to a recent trend of novel biological therapies that specifically inhibit molecules involved in the inflammatory cascade. In this review, we critically discuss recent advances in the pathogenesis of IBD, drug therapies (conventional versus biologic), drug efficacy and pharmacokinetics (murine versus human versus chimeric) and their adverse effects. We also discuss emerging novel biological therapies targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, cytokine receptors and those targeting adhesion molecules-anti-integrin and anti-ICAM antibodies. Other potential approaches using anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10), anti-sense oligonucleotide and probiotics are also discussed. Finally, we summarized few imperative targets whose more detailed exploration can help to pave the way for an efficacious IBD therapy. PMID:20021434

  16. The class II transactivator (CIITA) is regulated by post-translational modification cross-talk between ERK1/2 phosphorylation, mono-ubiquitination and Lys63 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Julie E; Shanderson, Ronald L; Boyd, Nathaniel H; Cacan, Ercan; Greer, Susanna F

    2015-06-19

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is known as the master regulator for the major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) molecules. CIITA is dynamically regulated through a series of intricate post-translational modifications (PTMs). CIITA's role is to initiate transcription of MHC II genes, which are responsible for presenting extracellular antigen to CD4(+) T-cells. In the present study, we identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as the kinase responsible for phosphorylating the regulatory site, Ser(280), which leads to increased levels of mono-ubiquitination and an overall increase in MHC II activity. Further, we identify that CIITA is also modified by Lys(63)-linked ubiquitination. Lys(63) ubiquitinated CIITA is concentrated in the cytoplasm and following activation of ERK1/2, CIITA phosphorylation occurs and Lys=ubiquitinated CIITA translocates to the nucleus. CIITA ubiquitination and phosphorylation perfectly demonstrates how CIITA location and activity is regulated through PTM cross-talk. Identifying CIITA PTMs and understanding how they mediate CIITA regulation is necessary due to the critical role CIITA has in the initiation of the adaptive immune response.

  17. The Arabidopsis LYSIN MOTIF-CONTAINING RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 Regulates the Cross Talk between Immunity and Abscisic Acid Responses1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Paparella, Chiara; Savatin, Daniel Valentin; Marti, Lucia; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Ferrari, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane receptor-like kinases characterized by the presence of one or more lysin motif (LysM) domains in the extracytoplasmic portion (LysM-containing receptor-like kinases [LYKs]) mediate recognition of symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms in plants. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome encodes five putative LYKs; among them, AtLYK1/CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE1 is required for response to chitin and peptidoglycan, and AtLYK4 contributes to chitin perception. More recently, AtLYK3 has been shown to be required for full repression, mediated by Nod factors, of Arabidopsis innate immune responses. In this work, we show that AtLYK3 also negatively regulates basal expression of defense genes and resistance to Botrytis cinerea and Pectobacterium carotovorum infection. Enhanced resistance of atlyk3 mutants requires PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT3, which is crucial for camalexin biosynthesis. The expression of AtLYK3 is strongly repressed by elicitors and fungal infection and is induced by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA), which has a negative impact on resistance against B. cinerea and P. carotovorum. Plants lacking a functional AtLYK3 also show reduced physiological responses to ABA and are partially resistant to ABA-induced inhibition of PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT3 expression. These results indicate that AtLYK3 is important for the cross talk between signaling pathways activated by ABA and pathogens. PMID:24639336

  18. Caveolin-rich lipid rafts of the plasma membrane of mature cerebellar granule neurons are microcompartments for calcium/reactive oxygen and nitrogen species cross-talk signaling.

    PubMed

    Marques-da-Silva, D; Gutierrez-Merino, C

    2014-08-01

    In previous works, we have shown that L-type voltage-operated calcium channels, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAr), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and cytochrome b5 reductase (Cb5R) co-localize within the same lipid rafts-associated nanodomains in mature cerebellar granule neurons (CGN). In this work, we show that the calcium transport systems of the plasma membrane extruding calcium from the cytosol, plasma membrane calcium pumps (PMCA) and sodium-calcium exchangers (NCX), are also associated with these nanodomains. All these proteins were found to co-immunoprecipitate with caveolin-1 after treatment with 25mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin, a lipid rafts solubilizing agent. However, the treatment of CGN with methyl-β-cyclodextrin largely attenuated the rise of cytosolic calcium induced by l-glutamate through NMDAr. Fluorescence energy transfer imaging revealed that all of them are present in sub-microdomains of a size smaller than 200nm, with a peripheral distribution of the calcium extrusion systems PMCA and NCX. Fluorescence microscopy images analysis revealed high calcium dynamic sub-microcompartments near the plasma membrane in fura-2-loaded CGN at short times after addition of l-glutamate. In addition, the close proximity between sources of nitric oxide (nNOS) and superoxide anion (Cb5R) suggests that these nanodomains are involved in the fast and efficient cross-talk between calcium and redox signaling in neurons. PMID:24996880

  19. Novel Aspects Concerning the Functional Cross-Talk between the Insulin/IGF-I System and Estrogen Signaling in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Marco, Paola; Cirillo, Francesca; Vivacqua, Adele; Malaguarnera, Roberta; Belfiore, Antonino; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The insulin/IGF system plays an important role in cancer progression. Accordingly, elevated levels of circulating insulin have been associated with an increased cancer risk as well as with aggressive and metastatic cancer phenotypes. Numerous studies have documented that estrogens cooperate with the insulin/IGF system in multiple pathophysiological conditions. The biological responses to estrogens are mainly mediated by the estrogen receptors (ER)α and ERβ, which act as transcription factors; however, several studies have recently demonstrated that a member of the G protein-coupled receptors, named GPR30/G-protein estrogen receptor (GPER), is also involved in the estrogen signaling in normal and malignant cells as well as in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). In this regard, novel mechanisms linking the action of estrogens through GPER with the insulin/IGF system have been recently demonstrated. This review recapitulates the relevant aspects of this functional cross-talk between the insulin/IGF and the estrogenic GPER transduction pathways, which occurs in various cell types and may account for cancer progression. PMID:25798130

  20. Cross-talk interactions of exogenous nitric oxide and sucrose modulates phenylpropanoid metabolism in yellow lupine embryo axes infected with Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Morkunas, Iwona; Formela, Magda; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Marczak, Łukasz; Narożna, Dorota; Nowak, Witold; Bednarski, Waldemar

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to examine cross-talk of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) and sucrose in the mechanisms of synthesis and accumulation of isoflavonoids in embryo axes of Lupinus luteus L. cv. Juno. It was verified whether the interaction of these molecules can modulate the defense response of axes to infection and development of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lupini. Sucrose alone strongly stimulated a high level of genistein glucoside in axes pretreated with exogenous nitric oxide (SNP or GSNO) and non-pretreated axes. As a result of amplification of the signal coming from sucrose and GSNO, high isoflavonoids accumulation was observed (+Sn+GSNO). It needs to be stressed that infection in tissues pretreated with SNP/GSNO and cultured on the medium with sucrose (+Si+SNP/+Si+GSNO) very strongly enhances the accumulation of free isoflavone aglycones. In +Si+SNP axes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity was high up to 72h. As early as at 12h in +Si+SNP axes an increase was recorded in gene expression level of the specific isoflavonoid synthesis pathway. At 24h in +Si+SNP axes a very high total antioxidant capacity dependent on the pool of fast antioxidants was noted. Post-infection generation of semiquinone radicals was lower in axes with a high level of sucrose than with a deficit.

  1. Transcriptome comparison of global distinctive features between pollination and parthenocarpic fruit set reveals transcriptional phytohormone cross-talk in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Wu, Zhe; Cui, Li; Zhang, Tinglin; Guo, Qinwei; Xu, Jian; Jia, Li; Lou, Qunfeng; Huang, Sanwen; Li, Zhengguo; Chen, Jinfeng

    2014-07-01

    Parthenocarpy is an important trait determining yield and quality of fruit crops. However, the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parthenocarpy induction is limited. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is abundant in parthenocarpic germplasm resources and is an excellent model organism for parthenocarpy studies. In this study, the transcriptome of cucumber fruits was studied using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of set fruits were compared against aborted fruits. Distinctive features of parthenocarpic and pollinated fruits were revealed by combining the analysis of the transcriptome together with cytomorphological and physiological analysis. Cell division and the transcription of cell division genes were found to be more active in parthenocarpic fruit. The study also indicated that parthenocarpic fruit set is a high sugar-consuming process which is achieved via enhanced carbohydrate degradation through transcription of genes that lead to the breakdown of carbohydrates. Furthermore, the evidence provided by this work supports a hypothesis that parthenocarpic fruit set is induced by mimicking the processes of pollination/fertilization at the transcriptional level, i.e. by performing the same transcriptional patterns of genes inducing pollination and gametophyte development as in pollinated fruit. Based on the RNA-Seq and ovary transient expression results, 14 genes were predicted as putative parthenocarpic genes. The transcription analysis of these candidate genes revealed auxin, cytokinin and gibberellin cross-talk at the transcriptional level during parthenocarpic fruit set. PMID:24733865

  2. Integrated mRNA and miRNA transcriptome reveal a cross-talk between developing response and hormone signaling for the seed kernels of Siberian apricot

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jun; Wang, Jia; An, Jiyong; Liu, Lili; Lin, Zixin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Libing; Ma, Chao; Shi, Lingling; Lin, Shanzhi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, our transcriptomic analysis has identified some functional genes responsible for oil biosynthesis in developing SASK, yet miRNA-mediated regulation for SASK development and oil accumulation is poorly understood. Here, 3 representative periods of 10, 30 and 60 DAF were selected for sRNA sequencing based on the dynamic patterns of growth tendency and oil content of developing SASK. By miRNA transcriptomic analysis, we characterized 296 known and 44 novel miRNAs in developing SASK, among which 36 known and 6 novel miRNAs respond specifically to developing SASK. Importantly, we performed an integrated analysis of mRNA and miRNA transcriptome as well as qRT-PCR detection to identify some key miRNAs and their targets (miR156-SPL, miR160-ARF18, miR164-NAC1, miR171h-SCL6, miR172-AP2, miR395-AUX22B, miR530-P2C37, miR393h-TIR1/AFB2 and psi-miRn5-SnRK2A) potentially involved in developing response and hormone signaling of SASK. Our results provide new insights into the important regulatory function of cross-talk between development response and hormone signaling for SASK oil accumulation. PMID:27762296

  3. Blood borne hormones in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure, the role of circumventricular organs.

    PubMed

    Ufnal, Marcin; Skrzypecki, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that blood borne hormones modulate brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure. This appears to be mediated by the circumventricular organs which are located in the walls of the brain ventricular system and lack the blood-brain barrier. Recent evidence shows that neurons of the circumventricular organs express receptors for the majority of cardiovascular hormones. Intracerebroventricular infusions of hormones and their antagonists is one approach to evaluate the influence of blood borne hormones on the neural mechanisms regulating arterial blood pressure. Interestingly, there is no clear correlation between peripheral and central effects of cardiovascular hormones. For example, angiotensin II increases blood pressure acting peripherally and centrally, whereas peripherally acting pressor catecholamines decrease blood pressure when infused intracerebroventricularly. The physiological role of such dual hemodynamic responses has not yet been clarified. In the paper we review studies on hemodynamic effects of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, angiotensin II, aldosterone, natriuretic peptides, endothelins, histamine and bradykinin in the context of their role in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure.

  4. The Protein Kinase CK2 Mediates Cross-Talk between Auxin- and Salicylic Acid-Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of PINOID Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Armengot, Laia; Caldarella, Eleonora; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Martínez, M. Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous and highly conserved enzyme, the activity of which is vital for eukaryotic cells. We recently demonstrated that CK2 modulates salicylic acid (SA) homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that functional interplay between CK2 and SA sustains transcriptional expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN) genes. In this work, we show that CK2 also plays a key role in the transcriptional regulation of PINOID (PID), an AGC protein kinase that modulates the apical/basal localization of auxin-efflux transporters. We show that PID transcription is up-regulated by auxin and by SA and that CK2 is involved in both pathways. On the one hand, CK2 activity is required for proteosome-dependent degradation of AXR3, a member of the AUX/IAA family of auxin transcriptional repressors that must be degraded to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. On the other hand, the role of CK2 in SA homeostasis and, indirectly, in SA-driven PID transcription, was confirmed by using Arabidopsis NahG transgenic plants, which cannot accumulate SA. In conclusion, our results evidence a role for CK2 as a functional link in the negative cross-talk between auxin- and SA-signaling. PMID:27275924

  5. Transcriptome comparison of global distinctive features between pollination and parthenocarpic fruit set reveals transcriptional phytohormone cross-talk in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Wu, Zhe; Cui, Li; Zhang, Tinglin; Guo, Qinwei; Xu, Jian; Jia, Li; Lou, Qunfeng; Huang, Sanwen; Li, Zhengguo; Chen, Jinfeng

    2014-07-01

    Parthenocarpy is an important trait determining yield and quality of fruit crops. However, the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parthenocarpy induction is limited. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is abundant in parthenocarpic germplasm resources and is an excellent model organism for parthenocarpy studies. In this study, the transcriptome of cucumber fruits was studied using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of set fruits were compared against aborted fruits. Distinctive features of parthenocarpic and pollinated fruits were revealed by combining the analysis of the transcriptome together with cytomorphological and physiological analysis. Cell division and the transcription of cell division genes were found to be more active in parthenocarpic fruit. The study also indicated that parthenocarpic fruit set is a high sugar-consuming process which is achieved via enhanced carbohydrate degradation through transcription of genes that lead to the breakdown of carbohydrates. Furthermore, the evidence provided by this work supports a hypothesis that parthenocarpic fruit set is induced by mimicking the processes of pollination/fertilization at the transcriptional level, i.e. by performing the same transcriptional patterns of genes inducing pollination and gametophyte development as in pollinated fruit. Based on the RNA-Seq and ovary transient expression results, 14 genes were predicted as putative parthenocarpic genes. The transcription analysis of these candidate genes revealed auxin, cytokinin and gibberellin cross-talk at the transcriptional level during parthenocarpic fruit set.

  6. The Protein Kinase CK2 Mediates Cross-Talk between Auxin- and Salicylic Acid-Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of PINOID Transcription.

    PubMed

    Armengot, Laia; Caldarella, Eleonora; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Martínez, M Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous and highly conserved enzyme, the activity of which is vital for eukaryotic cells. We recently demonstrated that CK2 modulates salicylic acid (SA) homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that functional interplay between CK2 and SA sustains transcriptional expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN) genes. In this work, we show that CK2 also plays a key role in the transcriptional regulation of PINOID (PID), an AGC protein kinase that modulates the apical/basal localization of auxin-efflux transporters. We show that PID transcription is up-regulated by auxin and by SA and that CK2 is involved in both pathways. On the one hand, CK2 activity is required for proteosome-dependent degradation of AXR3, a member of the AUX/IAA family of auxin transcriptional repressors that must be degraded to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. On the other hand, the role of CK2 in SA homeostasis and, indirectly, in SA-driven PID transcription, was confirmed by using Arabidopsis NahG transgenic plants, which cannot accumulate SA. In conclusion, our results evidence a role for CK2 as a functional link in the negative cross-talk between auxin- and SA-signaling. PMID:27275924

  7. Signature of positive selection of PTK6 gene in East Asian populations: a cross talk for Helicobacter pylori invasion and gastric cancer endemicity.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pankaj; Lu, Dongsheng; Yuan, Yuan; Xu, Shuhua

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of natural selection events is an attractive strategy for identification of functional variants shaped by gene-environmental interactions and human adaptation. Here, we identified PTK6, a Src-related tyrosine kinase gene, underlying positive selection in East Asian populations. Interestingly, PTK6 variant showed significant correlation with gastric cancer incidences which was the highest in East Asian populations. The high prevalence of gastric cancer in East Asians was also believed to be strongly affected by Helicobacter pylori infection and dietary habit. Therefore, we speculated a competitive interaction of cancer-associated molecules for activation/reduction, where PTK6 likely plays a role through CagA-driven signaling pathway after H. pylori infection. This hypothesis was also supported by our gene expression analysis and the dating of the selective event which was estimated to be ~16,500 years ago, much later than H. pylori invasion in human 50,000 years ago. Establishment of cross talk between PTK6 and CagA by functional studies may further elucidate the underlying biology of H. pylori-mediated gastric cancer.

  8. Sulphur alters NFκB-p300 cross-talk in favour of p53-p300 to induce apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shilpi; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Guha, Deblina; Kajal, Kirti; Khan, Poulami; Chakraborty, Sreeparna; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Paul, Shrutarshi; Manchanda, Rajkumar; Khurana, Anil; Nayak, Debadatta; Chakrabarty, Rathin; Sa, Gaurisankar; Das, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    Adverse side effects of chemotherapy during cancer treatment have shifted considerable focus towards therapies that are not only targeted but are also devoid of toxic side effects. We evaluated the antitumorigenic activity of sulphur, and delineated the molecular mechanisms underlying sulphur-induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. A search for the underlying mechanism revealed that the choice between the two cellular processes, NFκBp65-mediated survival and p53-mediated apoptosis, was decided by the competition for a limited pool of transcriptional coactivator protein p300 in NSCLC cells. In contrast, sulphur inhibited otherwise upregulated survival signaling in NSCLC cells by perturbing the nuclear translocation of p65NFκB, its association with p300 histone acetylase, and subsequent transcription of Bcl-2. Under such anti-survival condition, induction of p53-p300 cross-talk enhanced the transcriptional activity of p53 and intrinsic mitochondrial death cascade. Overall, the findings of this preclinical study clearly delineated the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptogenic effect of the non-toxic homeopathic remedy, sulphur, in NSCLC cells.

  9. Ephrin-A1 Is Up-Regulated by Hypoxia in Cancer Cells and Promotes Angiogenesis of HUVECs through a Coordinated Cross-Talk with eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, ephrin-A1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) have been proved to play critical roles in tumor angiogenesis. However, how ephrin-A1 is regulated by hypoxia and whether ephrin-A1 cooperates with eNOS in modulation of angiogenesis remain to be addressed in details. Here we demonstrated that both ephrin-A1 in squamous cell carcinoma cells (SCC-9) and especially soluble ephrin-A1 in the supernatants were up-regulated under hypoxic condition. An increased nitric oxide (NO) production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was observed in ephrin-A1-induced angiogenesis which was reversed after co-culture with eNOS specific inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME). Western blot analysis confirmed that both phosphorylation of AktSer473 and eNOSSer1177 were up-regulated in ephrin-A1-stimulated HUVECs, with the total eNOS expression unchanged. The specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, significantly down-regulated ephrin-A1-induced expression of phosphorylated AktSer473 as well as phosphorylation of eNOSSer1177. These results revealed a possible novel mechanism whereby ephrin-A1 is regulated in tumor microenvironment and promotes angiogenesis through a coordinated cross-talk with PI3K/Akt-dependent eNOS activation which may relate to normal vascular development and tumor neovascularization. PMID:24040255

  10. The Arabidopsis LYSIN MOTIF-CONTAINING RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 regulates the cross talk between immunity and abscisic acid responses.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Chiara; Savatin, Daniel Valentin; Marti, Lucia; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Ferrari, Simone

    2014-05-01

    Transmembrane receptor-like kinases characterized by the presence of one or more lysin motif (LysM) domains in the extracytoplasmic portion (LysM-containing receptor-like kinases [LYKs]) mediate recognition of symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms in plants. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome encodes five putative LYKs; among them, AtLYK1/CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE1 is required for response to chitin and peptidoglycan, and AtLYK4 contributes to chitin perception. More recently, AtLYK3 has been shown to be required for full repression, mediated by Nod factors, of Arabidopsis innate immune responses. In this work, we show that AtLYK3 also negatively regulates basal expression of defense genes and resistance to Botrytis cinerea and Pectobacterium carotovorum infection. Enhanced resistance of atlyk3 mutants requires PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT3, which is crucial for camalexin biosynthesis. The expression of AtLYK3 is strongly repressed by elicitors and fungal infection and is induced by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA), which has a negative impact on resistance against B. cinerea and P. carotovorum. Plants lacking a functional AtLYK3 also show reduced physiological responses to ABA and are partially resistant to ABA-induced inhibition of PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT3 expression. These results indicate that AtLYK3 is important for the cross talk between signaling pathways activated by ABA and pathogens.

  11. Pathway Model of the Kinetics of the TGFbeta Antagonist Smad7 and Cross-Talk with the ATM and WNT Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carra, Claudio; Wang, Minli; Huff, Janice L.; Hada, Megumi; ONeill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Signal transduction controls cellular and tissue responses to radiation. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) is an important regulator of cell growth and differentiation and tissue homeostasis, and is often dis-regulated in tumor formation. Mathematical models of signal transduction pathways can be used to elucidate how signal transduction varies with radiation quality, and dose and dose-rate. Furthermore, modeling of tissue specific responses can be considered through mechanistic based modeling. We developed a mathematical model of the negative feedback regulation by Smad7 in TGFbeta-Smad signaling and are exploring possible connections to the WNT/beta -catenin, and ATM/ATF2 signaling pathways. A pathway model of TGFbeta-Smad signaling that includes Smad7 kinetics based on data in the scientific literature is described. Kinetic terms included are TGFbeta/Smad transcriptional regulation of Smad7 through the Smad3-Smad4 complex, Smad7-Smurf1 translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm, and Smad7 negative feedback regulation of the TGFO receptor through direct binding to the TGFO receptor complex. The negative feedback controls operating in this pathway suggests non-linear responses in signal transduction, which are described mathematically. We then explored possibilities for cross-talk mediated by Smad7 between DNA damage responses mediated by ATM, and with the WNT pathway and consider the design of experiments to test model driven hypothesis. Numerical comparisons of the mathematical model to experiments and representative predictions are described.

  12. Cross-talk modulation between ABA and ethylene by transcription factor SlZFP2 during fruit development and ripening in tomato.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lin; Zhao, Fangfang; Li, Rong; Xiao, Han

    2015-01-01

    The stress hormone ABA not only regulates stress response, but is also required for plant development and growth. Some evidences indicate that ABA plays a pivotal role in the ripening process of non climacteric as well as climacteric fruits. In a recent study, we showed that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) transcription factor SlZFP2 fine tunes ABA biosynthesis during fruit development through direct suppression of ABA biosynthetic genes and it also regulates fruit ripening through transcriptional suppression of the ripening regulator CNR. This indicates that SlZFP2 likely modulates the cross-talk between ABA and ethylene in regulation of fruit development and ripening in tomato. Gene expression analysis using ABA deficient mutants sit and flc as well as the SlZFP2 RNAi lines of high fruit ABA production showed that ethylene biosynthetic genes LeACS1A, LeACS1 and LeACO1 were positively regulated by ABA during early fruit growth. We reason that ABA promotes basal ethylene biosynthesis in system 1 during fruit growth and likely plays a minor role in ripening regulation after the onset of ripening process.

  13. The Mt. Perkins block, northwestern Arizona: An exposed cross section of a synextensional volcano in highly extended terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Despite widespread and voluminous middle to late Tertiary volcanism in the Basin and Range province, relatively few volcanic centers have been located, especially in highly extended regions. Although large-magnitude tilting and structural dismemberment generally obscure conventional exposures of volcanic centers, they can potentially provide cross sectional views of major volcanic edifices. In the northern Colorado River extensional corridor, the steeply (90[degree]) W-tilted Mt. Perkins block incorporates a cross-sectional view of part of a major Miocene volcanic center. In ascending structural order from east to west, the Mt. Perkins block includes (a) a 15.96 Ma quartz monzonite to diorite pluton emplaced in Proterozoic gneiss, (b) a 20 km long, NNW-striking, gently to moderately (0--45[degree]) E-dipping felsic dike swarm (one dike dated at 14.7 Ma), (c) a nonconformity at the base of the Miocene volcanic section, (d) basaltic andesite flows and dacite flows and domes, (e) a 300--1,500 m thick section of rhyolite flows, surges, and tuffs bracketed between 16.4 and 14.4 Ma, and (f) capping basalt flows. Tilts decrease from 90 to 30 W between the base of the rhyolite section and upper basalt flows. Geologic and paleomagnetic data indicate 40--90 of W-tilting of the dike swarm and pluton. The felsic dike swarm invades the lower part of the volcanic section and terminates upward in the coeval sequence of rhyolites. In addition, the dike swarm and rhyolite section terminate along-strike in roughly the same area. Restoration places the rhyolites above the dike swarm, which in turn is situated directly above the pluton. These data indicate a genetic tie between at least the felsic dike swarm and thick sequence of rhyolites. Geochemical fingerprinting of the lavas, dike swarm, and pluton is underway to test the tilted volcano'' hypothesis.

  14. Enhanced cross-talk correction technique for simultaneous dual-isotope imaging: a TL-201/Tc-99m myocardial perfusion SPECT dog study.

    PubMed

    Knesaurek, K; Machac, J

    1997-12-01

    A newly developed cross-talk correction method for simultaneous dual-isotope SPECT imaging was tested in a canine model. The method is based on the assumption that the transformations, which modify the primary energy window images into the scatter images as viewed in the other energy windows, are known. These transformations were found by measuring the point spread functions (PSFs) in two different energy windows for both isotopes in water. The dual-isotope correction method is described by two convolution equations which were applied in frequency space. The equations take into account the different spatial distributions of the primary and scatter cross-talk photons. The new enhancement of the method was in applying restoration filters to the resulting corrected images. Three separate studies were acquired in our dog study: two single-isotope and one dual-isotope study. The single isotope images were used as references. The contrast between the left ventricle cavity (LVC) and the myocardium was used in transaxial and short-axis slices as a parameter to evaluate results of dual-isotope correction method with restoration. The change in contrast in the dual-isotope corrected images in both energy windows, i.e., Tc-99m primary window (140 keV) and Tl-201 primary window (70 keV), was significant. The only exception was for the short-axis Tc-99m window images. The corrected 140 keV dual-isotope short-axis slice had the contrast of 0.60 vs 0.58, which was the value in the noncorrected dual-isotope short-axis slice. For dual-isotope 140 keV transaxial slice, the contrast changed from 0.72 to 0.82 after correction. In comparison, for single-isotope Tc-99m 140 keV transaxial slice, contrast changed from 0.62 to 0.84 after restoration correction. There was less change in contrast in the short-axis Tc-99m 140 keV slice, i.e., from 0.56 to 0.61. In the Tl-201 primary window for the transaxial slices the improvement of contrast was from 0.38 to 0.64, and for short-axis slices

  15. Molecular Profiling of the Phytophthora plurivora Secretome: A Step towards Understanding the Cross-Talk between Plant Pathogenic Oomycetes and Their Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Frank; Dalio, Ronaldo J. D.; Di Maro, Antimo; Scognamiglio, Monica; Fiorentino, Antonio; Parente, Augusto; Osswald, Wolfgang; Chambery, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying host–pathogen interactions in plant diseases is of crucial importance to gain insights on different virulence strategies of pathogens and unravel their role in plant immunity. Among plant pathogens, Phytophthora species are eliciting a growing interest for their considerable economical and environmental impact. Plant infection by Phytophthora phytopathogens is a complex process coordinated by a plethora of extracellular signals secreted by both host plants and pathogens. The characterization of the repertoire of effectors secreted by oomycetes has become an active area of research for deciphering molecular mechanisms responsible for host plants colonization and infection. Putative secreted proteins by Phytophthora species have been catalogued by applying high-throughput genome-based strategies and bioinformatic approaches. However, a comprehensive analysis of the effective secretome profile of Phytophthora is still lacking. Here, we report the first large-scale profiling of P. plurivora secretome using a shotgun LC-MS/MS strategy. To gain insight on the molecular signals underlying the cross-talk between plant pathogenic oomycetes and their host plants, we also investigate the quantitative changes of secreted protein following interaction of P. plurivora with the root exudate of Fagus sylvatica which is highly susceptible to the root pathogen. We show that besides known effectors, the expression and/or secretion levels of cell-wall-degrading enzymes were altered following the interaction with the host plant root exudate. In addition, a characterization of the F. sylvatica root exudate was performed by NMR and amino acid analysis, allowing the identification of the main released low-molecular weight components, including organic acids and free amino acids. This study provides important insights for deciphering the extracellular network involved in the highly susceptible P. plurivora-F. sylvatica interaction

  16. ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 Protects Arabidopsis Desiccating and Germinating Seeds from Stress and Mediates Cross Talk between Reactive Oxygen Species, Abscisic Acid, and Auxin1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changming; Letnik, Ilya; Hacham, Yael; Dobrev, Petre; Ben-Daniel, Bat-Hen; Vanková, Radomíra; Amir, Rachel; Miller, Gad

    2014-01-01

    A seed’s ability to properly germinate largely depends on its oxidative poise. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is controlled by a large gene network, which includes the gene coding for the hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme, cytosolic ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 (APX6), yet its specific function has remained unknown. In this study, we show that seeds lacking APX6 accumulate higher levels of ROS, exhibit increased oxidative damage, and display reduced germination on soil under control conditions and that these effects are further exacerbated under osmotic, salt, or heat stress. In addition, ripening APX6-deficient seeds exposed to heat stress displayed reduced germination vigor. This, together with the increased abundance of APX6 during late stages of maturation, indicates that APX6 activity is critical for the maturation-drying phase. Metabolic profiling revealed an altered activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, changes in amino acid levels, and elevated metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin in drying apx6 mutant seeds. Further germination assays showed an impaired response of the apx6 mutants to ABA and to indole-3-acetic acid. Relative suppression of abscisic acid insensitive3 (ABI3) and ABI5 expression, two of the major ABA signaling downstream components controlling dormancy, suggested that an alternative signaling route inhibiting germination was activated. Thus, our study uncovered a new role for APX6, in protecting mature desiccating and germinating seeds from excessive oxidative damage, and suggested that APX6 modulate the ROS signal cross talk with hormone signals to properly execute the germination program in Arabidopsis. PMID:25049361

  17. Cellular Response of Pea Plants to Cadmium Toxicity: Cross Talk between Reactive Oxygen Species, Nitric Oxide, and Calcium1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Romero-Puertas, María C.; Pazmiño, Diana M.; Testillano, Pilar S.; Risueño, María C.; del Río, Luis A.; Sandalio, Luisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) toxicity has been widely studied in different plant species; however, the mechanism involved in its toxicity as well as the cell response against the metal have not been well established. In this work, using pea (Pisum sativum) plants, we studied the effect of Cd on antioxidants, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide (NO) metabolism of leaves using different cellular, molecular, and biochemical approaches. The growth of pea plants with 50 μm CdCl2 affected differentially the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isozymes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, giving rise to a SOD activity reduction. The copper/zinc-SOD down-regulation was apparently due to the calcium (Ca) deficiency induced by the heavy metal. In these circumstances, the overproduction of the ROS hydrogen peroxide and superoxide could be observed in vivo by confocal laser microscopy, mainly associated with vascular tissue, epidermis, and mesophyll cells, and the production of superoxide radicals was prevented by exogenous Ca. On the other hand, the NO synthase-dependent NO production was strongly depressed by Cd, and treatment with Ca prevented this effect. Under these conditions, the pathogen-related proteins PrP4A and chitinase and the heat shock protein 71.2, were up-regulated, probably to protect cells against damages induced by Cd. The regulation of these proteins could be mediated by jasmonic acid and ethylene, whose contents increased by Cd treatment. A model is proposed for the cellular response to long-term Cd exposure consisting of cross talk between Ca, ROS, and NO. PMID:19279198

  18. Dual RNA-seq of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Host Cell Transcriptomes Reveals Novel Insights into Host-Pathogen Cross Talk

    PubMed Central

    Baddal, Buket; Muzzi, Alessandro; Censini, Stefano; Calogero, Raffaele A.; Torricelli, Giulia; Guidotti, Silvia; Taddei, Anna R.; Covacci, Antonello; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Pezzicoli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to adhere and adapt to the human respiratory tract mucosa plays a pivotal role in the pathogenic lifestyle of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). However, the temporal events associated with a successful colonization have not been fully characterized. In this study, by reconstituting the ciliated human bronchial epithelium in vitro, we monitored the global transcriptional changes in NTHi and infected mucosal epithelium simultaneously for up to 72 h by dual RNA sequencing. The initial stage of colonization was characterized by the binding of NTHi to ciliated cells. Temporal profiling of host mRNA signatures revealed significant dysregulation of the target cell cytoskeleton elicited by bacterial infection, with a profound effect on the intermediate filament network and junctional complexes. In response to environmental stimuli of the host epithelium, NTHi downregulated its central metabolism and increased the expression of transporters, indicating a change in the metabolic regime due to the availability of host substrates. Concurrently, the oxidative environment generated by infected cells instigated bacterial expression of stress-induced defense mechanisms, including the transport of exogenous glutathione and activation of the toxin-antitoxin system. The results of this analysis were validated by those of confocal microscopy, Western blotting, Bio-plex, and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Notably, as part of our screening for novel signatures of infection, we identified a global profile of noncoding transcripts that are candidate small RNAs (sRNAs) regulated during human host infection in Haemophilus species. Our data, by providing a robust and comprehensive representation of the cross talk between the host and invading pathogen, provides important insights into NTHi pathogenesis and the development of efficacious preventive strategies. PMID:26578681

  19. Cross talk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 methylation and oxidative stress involved in the toxic effect of anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Gao, Ai

    2015-01-01

    Given the tremendous growth in the application of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs), concerns about the potential health hazards of TNPs to humans have been raised. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, is involved in many molecular and cellular processes. Limited data demonstrated that certain nanomaterials induced the aberrant hypermethylation of PARP-1. However, the mechanism involved in TNP-induced PARP-1 abnormal methylation has not been studied. A549 cells were incubated with anatase TNPs (22.1 nm) for 24 hours pretreatment with or without methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger α-lipoic acid to assess the possible role of methylation and ROS in the toxic effect of TNPs. After TNPs characterization, a battery of assays was performed to evaluate the toxic effect of TNPs, PARP-1 methylation status, and oxidative damage. Results showed that TNPs decreased the cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, in accordance with the increase of lactate dehydrogenase activity, which indicated membrane damage of cells. Similar to the high level of PARP-1 methylation, the generation of ROS was significantly increased after exposure to TNPs for 24 hours. Furthermore, α-lipoic acid decreased TNP-induced ROS generation and then attenuated TNP-triggered PARP-1 hypermethylation. Meanwhile, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine simultaneously decreased the ROS generation induced by TNPs, resulting in the decline of PARP-1 methylation. In summary, TNPs triggered the aberrant hypermethylation of the PARP-1 promoter and there was a cross talk between oxidative stress and PARP-1 methylation in the toxic effect of TNPs.

  20. Cross-talk between macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells in response to cigarette smoke: the effects on MMP2 and 9.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Pechota, L V T Angela; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Eliason, Jonathan L

    2015-12-01

    We hypothesized that matrix metalloproteinase secretion in response to cigarette smoke is modulated by cross-talk between resident cells within the aorta, namely, aortic smooth muscles, endothelial cells, and infiltrating macrophages, and this may be crucial for in vivo formation/progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Cigarette smoke extract (CSE) was applied to rat aortic smooth muscle (RASMC), endothelial (RAEC) or RAW cells, and conditioned media (CSE-CM) collected. Fresh cells were treated with CSE-CM for 24 h and then maintained in serum-free medium (SFM) for 72 h to analyze MMP2 and MMP9 in media by zymography and the ratio (pS/pJ) of phospho-Stat3 (pStat3) and phospho-Jak2 (pJak2) inside the cells by Western blot. We observed that CSE-CM from RAW and RAEC increased MMP9 by 200 and 17 %, respectively, in RASMC and also increased pS/pJ ratio (305 and 228 %, respectively) in RASMC. RAW cell-derived CSE-CM induced RAEC to produce moderate amounts of MMP2 (17 %), MMP9 (30 %), and a 137 % increase in pS/pJ. RAW cells receiving unstimulated CM from RASMC and RAEC produced significant amounts of MMP9 (128 and 155 %, respectively) and increased pS/pJ (45 and 1283 %, respectively). CSE-CM from RASMC and RAEC induced significant production of MMP9 from RAW cells (237 and 162 %, respectively) and increase in pS/pJ ratios (1348 and 1494 %, respectively). This is the first in vitro study demonstrating cigarette smoke extract-mediated differential interactions between resident cells in the aorta leads to altered modulation of signaling molecules that may be vital for AAA formation under in vivo conditions.

  1. Global Rsh-dependent transcription profile of Brucella suis during stringent response unravels adaptation to nutrient starvation and cross-talk with other stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the intracellular pathogen Brucella spp., the activation of the stringent response, a global regulatory network providing rapid adaptation to growth-affecting stress conditions such as nutrient deficiency, is essential for replication in the host. A single, bi-functional enzyme Rsh catalyzes synthesis and hydrolysis of the alarmone (p)ppGpp, responsible for differential gene expression under stringent conditions. Results cDNA microarray analysis allowed characterization of the transcriptional profiles of the B. suis 1330 wild-type and Δrsh mutant in a minimal medium, partially mimicking the nutrient-poor intramacrophagic environment. A total of 379 genes (11.6% of the genome) were differentially expressed in a rsh-dependent manner, of which 198 were up-, and 181 were down-regulated. The pleiotropic character of the response was confirmed, as the genes encoded an important number of transcriptional regulators, cell envelope proteins, stress factors, transport systems, and energy metabolism proteins. Virulence genes such as narG and sodC, respectively encoding respiratory nitrate reductase and superoxide dismutase, were under the positive control of (p)ppGpp, as well as expression of the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase, essential for chronic murine infection. Methionine was the only amino acid whose biosynthesis was absolutely dependent on stringent response in B. suis. Conclusions The study illustrated the complexity of the processes involved in adaptation to nutrient starvation, and contributed to a better understanding of the correlation between stringent response and Brucella virulence. Most interestingly, it clearly indicated (p)ppGpp-dependent cross-talk between at least three stress responses playing a central role in Brucella adaptation to the host: nutrient, oxidative, and low-oxygen stress. PMID:23834488

  2. Rho/Rock cross-talks with transforming growth factor-β/Smad pathway participates in lung fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Tang, Haiying; Lin, Hongli; Mao, Jingwei; Gao, Lili; Liu, Jia; Wu, Taihua

    2014-11-01

    The differentiation of fibroblasts, which are promoted by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad, is involved in the process of pulmonary fibrosis. The Rho/Rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein kinase (Rock) pathway may regulate the fibroblast differentiation and myofibroblast expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), however, the mechanism is not clear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of Rho/Rock and TGF-β/Smad in TGF-β1-induced lung fibroblasts differentiation. Human embryonic lung fibroblasts were stimulated by TGF-β1, Y-27632 (inhibitor of Rho/Rock signaling) and staurosporine (inhibitor of TGF-β/Smad signaling). The α-SMA expression, cell cycle progression, content of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in cell culture supernatants and the expression of RhoA, RhoC, Rock1 and Smad2 were detected. The results demonstrated that α-SMA-positive cells significantly increased following TGF-β1 stimulation. Rho/Rock and TGF-β/Smad inhibitors suppressed TGF-β1-induced lung fibroblast differentiation. The inhibitors increased G0/G1 and decreased S and G2/M percentages. The concentrations of the ECM proteins in the supernatant were significantly increased by TGF-β1 stimulation, whereas they were decreased by inhibitor stimulation. RhoA, RhoC, Rock1, Smad2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 were upregulated by TGF-β1 stimulation. The Rho/Rock inhibitor downregulated Smad2 expression and the TGF-β/Smad inhibitor downregulated RhoA, RhoC and Rock1 expression. Therefore, the Rho/Rock pathway and Smad signaling were involved in the process of lung fibroblasts transformation, induced by TGF-β1, to myofibroblasts. The two pathways may undergo cross-talk in the lung fibroblasts differentiation in vitro.

  3. ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 protects Arabidopsis desiccating and germinating seeds from stress and mediates cross talk between reactive oxygen species, abscisic acid, and auxin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changming; Letnik, Ilya; Hacham, Yael; Dobrev, Petre; Ben-Daniel, Bat-Hen; Vanková, Radomíra; Amir, Rachel; Miller, Gad

    2014-09-01

    A seed's ability to properly germinate largely depends on its oxidative poise. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is controlled by a large gene network, which includes the gene coding for the hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme, cytosolic ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 (APX6), yet its specific function has remained unknown. In this study, we show that seeds lacking APX6 accumulate higher levels of ROS, exhibit increased oxidative damage, and display reduced germination on soil under control conditions and that these effects are further exacerbated under osmotic, salt, or heat stress. In addition, ripening APX6-deficient seeds exposed to heat stress displayed reduced germination vigor. This, together with the increased abundance of APX6 during late stages of maturation, indicates that APX6 activity is critical for the maturation-drying phase. Metabolic profiling revealed an altered activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, changes in amino acid levels, and elevated metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin in drying apx6 mutant seeds. Further germination assays showed an impaired response of the apx6 mutants to ABA and to indole-3-acetic acid. Relative suppression of abscisic acid insensitive3 (ABI3) and ABI5 expression, two of the major ABA signaling downstream components controlling dormancy, suggested that an alternative signaling route inhibiting germination was activated. Thus, our study uncovered a new role for APX6, in protecting mature desiccating and germinating seeds from excessive oxidative damage, and suggested that APX6 modulate the ROS signal cross talk with hormone signals to properly execute the germination program in Arabidopsis. PMID:25049361

  4. M-ficolin interacts with the long pentraxin PTX3: a novel case of cross-talk between soluble pattern-recognition molecules.

    PubMed

    Gout, Evelyne; Moriscot, Christine; Doni, Andrea; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Lacroix, Monique; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Mantovani, Alberto; Arlaud, Gérard J; Thielens, Nicole M

    2011-05-15

    Ficolins and pentraxins are soluble oligomeric pattern-recognition molecules that sense danger signals from pathogens and altered self-cells and might act synergistically in innate immune defense and maintenance of immune tolerance. The interaction of M-ficolin with the long pentraxin pentraxin 3 (PTX3) has been characterized using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy. M-ficolin was shown to bind PTX3 with high affinity in the presence of calcium ions. The interaction was abolished in the presence of EDTA and inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, indicating involvement of the fibrinogen-like domain of M-ficolin. Removal of sialic acid from the single N-linked carbohydrate of the C-terminal domain of PTX3 abolished the interaction. Likewise, an M-ficolin mutant with impaired sialic acid-binding ability did not interact with PTX3. Interaction was also impaired when using the isolated recognition domain of M-ficolin or the monomeric C-terminal domain of PTX3, indicating requirement for oligomerization of both proteins. Electron microscopy analysis of the M-ficolin-PTX3 complexes revealed that the M-ficolin tetramer bound up to four PTX3 molecules. From a functional point of view, immobilized PTX3 was able to trigger M-ficolin-dependent activation of the lectin complement pathway. These data indicate that interaction of M-ficolin with PTX3 arises from its ability to bind sialylated ligands and thus differs from the binding to the short pentraxin C-reactive protein and from the binding of L-ficolin to PTX3. The M-ficolin-PTX3 interaction described in this study represents a novel case of cross-talk between soluble pattern-recognition molecules, lending further credit to the integrated view of humoral innate immunity that emerged recently.

  5. Cross-talk between freezing response and signaling for regulatory transcriptions of MIR475b and its targets by miR475b promoter in Populus suaveolens

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jun; Wang, Jia; Hu, Huiwen; Chen, Yinlei; An, Jiyong; Cai, Jian; Sun, Runze; Sheng, Zhongting; Liu, Xieping; Lin, Shanzhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that play important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of their target genes, yet the transcriptional regulation of plant miRNAs by promoter is poorly understood. Here, we firstly clone pri-miR475b cDNA and its native promoter from P. suaveolens, and characterize Psu-MIR475b as class-II gene transcribed by RNA polymerase II. By 5′ deletion analysis of Psu-miR475b promoter in a series of promoter-GUS chimeric vectors, we functionally identify three positive regulatory regions and multiple cis-acting elements responsible for Psu-miR475b promoter activity in response to freezing stress and exogenous hormone treatment. Moreover, the Psu-miR475b promoter activity displays a tissue-specific manner, negatively regulated by freezing stress and positively by MeJA, SA or GA treatment. Importantly, we comparatively analyze the time-course transcriptional profiles of Psu-miR475b and its targets in Psu-miR475b over-expression transgenic plants controlled by Psu-miR475b-specific promoter or CaMV 35S constitutive promoter, and explore the regulatory mechanism of Psu-miR475b promoter controlling transcriptional expressions of Psu-MIR475b and its targets in response to freezing stress and exogenous hormone treatment. Our results reveal that Psu-miR475b promoter-mediated transcriptions of Psu-MIR475b and its targets in response to freezing stress may be involved in a cross-talk between freezing response and stress signaling process. PMID:26853706

  6. Cross talk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 methylation and oxidative stress involved in the toxic effect of anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Gao, Ai

    2015-01-01

    Given the tremendous growth in the application of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs), concerns about the potential health hazards of TNPs to humans have been raised. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, is involved in many molecular and cellular processes. Limited data demonstrated that certain nanomaterials induced the aberrant hypermethylation of PARP-1. However, the mechanism involved in TNP-induced PARP-1 abnormal methylation has not been studied. A549 cells were incubated with anatase TNPs (22.1 nm) for 24 hours pretreatment with or without methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger α-lipoic acid to assess the possible role of methylation and ROS in the toxic effect of TNPs. After TNPs characterization, a battery of assays was performed to evaluate the toxic effect of TNPs, PARP-1 methylation status, and oxidative damage. Results showed that TNPs decreased the cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, in accordance with the increase of lactate dehydrogenase activity, which indicated membrane damage of cells. Similar to the high level of PARP-1 methylation, the generation of ROS was significantly increased after exposure to TNPs for 24 hours. Furthermore, α-lipoic acid decreased TNP-induced ROS generation and then attenuated TNP-triggered PARP-1 hypermethylation. Meanwhile, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine simultaneously decreased the ROS generation induced by TNPs, resulting in the decline of PARP-1 methylation. In summary, TNPs triggered the aberrant hypermethylation of the PARP-1 promoter and there was a cross talk between oxidative stress and PARP-1 methylation in the toxic effect of TNPs. PMID:26366077

  7. Cross-talk between the two divergent insulin signaling pathways is revealed by the protein kinase B (Akt)-mediated phosphorylation of adapter protein APS on serine 588.

    PubMed

    Katsanakis, Kostas D; Pillay, Tahir S

    2005-11-11

    The APS adapter protein is recruited to the autophosphorylated kinase domain of the insulin receptor and initiates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-independent pathway of insulin-stimulated glucose transport by recruiting CAP and c-Cbl. In this study, we have identified APS as a novel substrate for protein kinase B/Akt using an antibody that exhibits insulin-dependent immunoreactivity with a phosphospecific antibody raised against the protein kinase B substrate consensus sequence RXRXX(pS/pT) and a phosphospecific antibody that recognizes serine 21/9 of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha/beta. This phosphorylation of APS is observed in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and transfected cells. The insulin-stimulated serine phosphorylation of APS was inhibited by a PI3-kinase inhibitor, LY290004, a specific protein kinase B (PKB) inhibitor, deguelin, and knockdown of Akt. Serine 588 of APS is contained in a protein kinase B consensus sequence for phosphorylation conserved in APS across multiple species but not found in other members of this family, including SH2-B and Lnk. Mutation of serine 588 to alanine abolished the insulin-stimulated serine phosphorylation of APS and prevented the localization of APS to membrane ruffles. A glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing amino acids 534-621 of APS was phosphorylated by purified PKB in vitro, and mutation of serine 588 abolished the PKB-mediated phosphorylation of APS in vitro. Taken together, this study identifies APS as a novel physiological substrate for PKB and the first serine phosphorylation site on APS. These data therefore reveal the molecular cross-talk between the insulin-activated PI3-kinase-dependent and -independent pathways previously thought to be distinct and divergent.

  8. Cross-talk between p(38)MAPK and G iα in regulating cPLA 2 activity by ET-1 in pulmonary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Sajal; Chowdhury, Animesh; Chakraborti, Tapati

    2015-02-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as the most potent vasoconstrictor yet described. Infusion of ET-1 into isolated rabbit lung has been shown to cause pulmonary vasoconstriction with the involvement of arachidonic acid metabolites. Given the potency of arachidonic acid metabolites, the activity of phospholipase A2 must be tightly regulated. Herein, we determined the mechanisms by which ET-1 stimulates cPLA2 activity during ET-1 stimulation of bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. We demonstrated that (i) treatment of bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with ET-1 stimulates cPLA2 activity in the cell membrane; (ii) ET-1 caused increase in O 2 (·-) production occurs via NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanism; (iii) ET-1-stimulated NADPH oxidase activity is markedly prevented upon pretreatment with PKC-ζ inhibitor, indicating that PKC-ζ plays a prominent role in this scenario; (iv) ET-1-induced NADPH oxidase-derived O 2 (·-) stimulates an aprotinin sensitive protease activity due to prominent increase in [Ca(2+)]i; (v) the aprotinin sensitive protease plays a pivotal role in activating PKC-α, which in turn phosphorylates p(38)MAPK and subsequently Giα leading to the activation of cPLA2. Taken together, we suggest that cross-talk between p(38)MAPK and Giα with the involvement of PKC-ζ, NADPH oxidase-derived O 2 (·-) , [Ca(2+)]i, aprotinin-sensitive protease and PKC-α play a pivotal role for full activation of cPLA2 during ET-1 stimulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

  9. Regulation of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter 1 Trafficking by the Canonical Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells Requires Cross-talk with Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zejian; Sneve, Mary; Haroldson, Thomas A; Smith, Jeffrey P; Drewes, Lester R

    2016-04-01

    The transport of monocarboxylate fuels such as lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies across brain endothelial cells is mediated by monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 (MCT1). Although the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for rodent blood-brain barrier development and for the expression of associated nutrient transporters, the role of this pathway in the regulation of brain endothelial MCT1 is unknown. Here we report expression of nine members of the frizzled receptor family by the RBE4 rat brain endothelial cell line. Furthermore, activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RBE4 cells via nuclear β-catenin signaling with LiCl does not alter brain endothelialMct1mRNA but increases the amount of MCT1 transporter protein. Plasma membrane biotinylation studies and confocal microscopic examination of mCherry-tagged MCT1 indicate that increased transporter results from reduced MCT1 trafficking from the plasma membrane via the endosomal/lysosomal pathway and is facilitated by decreased MCT1 ubiquitination following LiCl treatment. Inhibition of the Notch pathway by the γ-secretase inhibitorN-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester negated the up-regulation of MCT1 by LiCl, demonstrating a cross-talk between the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch pathways. Our results are important because they show, for the first time, the regulation of MCT1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by the multifunctional canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways.

  10. FERONIA interacts with ABI2-type phosphatases to facilitate signaling cross-talk between abscisic acid and RALF peptide in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Yu, Feng; Liu, Ying; Du, Changqing; Li, Xiushan; Zhu, Sirui; Wang, Xianchun; Lan, Wenzhi; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Liu, Xuanming; Li, Dongping; Chen, Liangbi; Luan, Sheng

    2016-09-13

    Receptor-like kinase FERONIA (FER) plays a crucial role in plant response to small molecule hormones [e.g., auxin and abscisic acid (ABA)] and peptide signals [e.g., rapid alkalinization factor (RALF)]. It remains unknown how FER integrates these different signaling events in the control of cell growth and stress responses. Under stress conditions, increased levels of ABA will inhibit cell elongation in the roots. In our previous work, we have shown that FER, through activation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1)/4/10-Rho of Plant 11 (ROP11) pathway, enhances the activity of the phosphatase ABA Insensitive 2 (ABI2), a negative regulator of ABA signaling, thereby inhibiting ABA response. In this study, we found that both RALF and ABA activated FER by increasing the phosphorylation level of FER. The FER loss-of-function mutant displayed strong hypersensitivity to both ABA and abiotic stresses such as salt and cold conditions, indicating that FER plays a key role in ABA and stress responses. We further showed that ABI2 directly interacted with and dephosphorylated FER, leading to inhibition of FER activity. Several other ABI2-like phosphatases also function in this pathway, and ABA-dependent FER activation required PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE (PYR)/PYR1-LIKE (PYL)/REGULATORY COMPONENTS OF ABA RECEPTORS (RCAR)-A-type protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2CA) modules. Furthermore, suppression of RALF1 gene expression, similar to disruption of the FER gene, rendered plants hypersensitive to ABA. These results formulated a mechanism for ABA activation of FER and for cross-talk between ABA and peptide hormone RALF in the control of plant growth and responses to stress signals. PMID:27566404

  11. Cross-talk between freezing response and signaling for regulatory transcriptions of MIR475b and its targets by miR475b promoter in Populus suaveolens.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jun; Wang, Jia; Hu, Huiwen; Chen, Yinlei; An, Jiyong; Cai, Jian; Sun, Runze; Sheng, Zhongting; Liu, Xieping; Lin, Shanzhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that play important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of their target genes, yet the transcriptional regulation of plant miRNAs by promoter is poorly understood. Here, we firstly clone pri-miR475b cDNA and its native promoter from P. suaveolens, and characterize Psu-MIR475b as class-II gene transcribed by RNA polymerase II. By 5' deletion analysis of Psu-miR475b promoter in a series of promoter-GUS chimeric vectors, we functionally identify three positive regulatory regions and multiple cis-acting elements responsible for Psu-miR475b promoter activity in response to freezing stress and exogenous hormone treatment. Moreover, the Psu-miR475b promoter activity displays a tissue-specific manner, negatively regulated by freezing stress and positively by MeJA, SA or GA treatment. Importantly, we comparatively analyze the time-course transcriptional profiles of Psu-miR475b and its targets in Psu-miR475b over-expression transgenic plants controlled by Psu-miR475b-specific promoter or CaMV 35S constitutive promoter, and explore the regulatory mechanism of Psu-miR475b promoter controlling transcriptional expressions of Psu-MIR475b and its targets in response to freezing stress and exogenous hormone treatment. Our results reveal that Psu-miR475b promoter-mediated transcriptions of Psu-MIR475b and its targets in response to freezing stress may be involved in a cross-talk between freezing response and stress signaling process. PMID:26853706

  12. Cross-talk between the epidermal growth factor-like repeats/fibronectin 6-8 repeats domains of Tenascin-R and microglia modulates neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong; Huang, Wenhui; Niu, Rui; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong

    2008-01-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that the microenvironment of stem/progenitor cells plays an important role in their proliferation and commitment to their fate. However, it remains unclear how all elements, such as astrocytes, microglia, extracellular matrix molecules, soluble factors, and their cross-talk interactions in the microenvironments, affect neural stem/progenitor cell fate. This work explored the influences of cross-talk between Tenascin-R (TN-R) and microglia on neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Our results show that microglia triggered by TN-R distinct domains EGF-like repeats (EGFL) and fibronectin 6-8 repeats (FN6-8) significantly enhanced the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells and also obviously induced the differentiation into neurons but not oligodendrocytes. Neurite processes of neurons generated from neural progenitor cells were promoted by both EGFL and FN6-8 domains-activated microglia. Microglia triggered by EGFL and FN6-8 secreted brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta); interestingly, FN6-8 could activate microglia to secrete nerve growth factor in addition to BDNF and TGF-beta, but EGFL domain could not. All these data implied that the cross-talk between TN-R distinct domains EGFL/FN6-8 and microglia promoted neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and induced their differentiation into neurons.

  13. Embedding intensity image in grid-cross down-sampling (GCD) binary holograms based on block truncation coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, T.-C.; Jiao, A. S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Past research has demonstrated that a three-dimensional (3D) intensity image can be preserved to a reasonable extent with a binary Fresnel hologram called the grid-cross down-sampling (GCD) binary hologram, if the intensity image is first down-sampled with a grid-cross lattice prior to the generation of the hologram. It has also been shown that the binary hologram generated with such means can be embedded with a binary image without causing observable artifact on the reconstructed image. Hence, the method can be further extended to embed an intensity image by binarizing it with error diffusion. Despite the favorable findings, the visual quality of the retrieved embedded intensity image from the hologram is rather poor. In this paper, we propose a method to overcome this problem. First, we employ the block truncation coding (BTC) to convert the intensity image into a binary bit stream. Next, the binary bit stream is embedded into the GCD binary hologram. The embedded image can be recovered with a BTC decoder, as well as a noise suppression scheme if the hologram is partially damaged. Experimental results demonstrate that with our proposed method, the visual quality of the embedded intensity image is superior to that of the existing approach, and the extracted image preserves favorably even if the binary hologram is damaged and contaminated with noise.

  14. Induction of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 contributes to the cross-talk between mu and ORL1 receptors following prolonged agonist exposure.

    PubMed

    Thakker, D R; Standifer, K M

    2002-11-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) underlying cross-tolerance between mu and opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL1) receptor agonists were investigated using two human neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Prolonged (24 h) activation of the mu receptor desensitized both mu and ORL1 receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and upregulated GRK2 levels in SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-C cells. Prolonged ORL1 activation increased GRK2 levels and desensitized both receptors in SH-SY5Y cells. Upregulation of GRK2 correlated with increases in levels of transcription factors Sp1 or AP-2. PD98059, an upstream inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), reversed all these events. Pretreatment with orphanin FQ/nociceptin (OFQ/N) also upregulated GRK3 levels in both cell lines, and desensitized both receptors in BE(2)-C cells. Protein kinase C (PKC), but not ERK1/2, inhibition blocked OFQ/N-mediated GRK3 induction and mu and ORL1 receptor desensitization in BE(2)-C cells. Antisense DNA treatment confirmed the involvement of GRK2/3 in mu and ORL1 desensitization. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a role for ERK1/2-mediated GRK2 induction in the development of tolerance to mu agonists, as well as cross-tolerance to OFQ/N. We also demonstrate that chronic OFQ/N-mediated desensitization of ORL1 and mu receptors occurs via cell-specific pathways, involving ERK1/2-dependent GRK2, or PKC-dependent and ERK1/2-independent GRK3 induction.

  15. Induction of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 contributes to the cross-talk between mu and ORL1 receptors following prolonged agonist exposure.

    PubMed

    Thakker, D R; Standifer, K M

    2002-11-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) underlying cross-tolerance between mu and opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL1) receptor agonists were investigated using two human neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Prolonged (24 h) activation of the mu receptor desensitized both mu and ORL1 receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and upregulated GRK2 levels in SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-C cells. Prolonged ORL1 activation increased GRK2 levels and desensitized both receptors in SH-SY5Y cells. Upregulation of GRK2 correlated with increases in levels of transcription factors Sp1 or AP-2. PD98059, an upstream inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), reversed all these events. Pretreatment with orphanin FQ/nociceptin (OFQ/N) also upregulated GRK3 levels in both cell lines, and desensitized both receptors in BE(2)-C cells. Protein kinase C (PKC), but not ERK1/2, inhibition blocked OFQ/N-mediated GRK3 induction and mu and ORL1 receptor desensitization in BE(2)-C cells. Antisense DNA treatment confirmed the involvement of GRK2/3 in mu and ORL1 desensitization. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a role for ERK1/2-mediated GRK2 induction in the development of tolerance to mu agonists, as well as cross-tolerance to OFQ/N. We also demonstrate that chronic OFQ/N-mediated desensitization of ORL1 and mu receptors occurs via cell-specific pathways, involving ERK1/2-dependent GRK2, or PKC-dependent and ERK1/2-independent GRK3 induction. PMID:12423667

  16. Talking Wheelchair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Communication is made possible for disabled individuals by means of an electronic system, developed at Stanford University's School of Medicine, which produces highly intelligible synthesized speech. Familiarly known as the "talking wheelchair" and formally as the Versatile Portable Speech Prosthesis (VPSP). Wheelchair mounted system consists of a word processor, a video screen, a voice synthesizer and a computer program which instructs the synthesizer how to produce intelligible sounds in response to user commands. Computer's memory contains 925 words plus a number of common phrases and questions. Memory can also store several thousand other words of the user's choice. Message units are selected by operating a simple switch, joystick or keyboard. Completed message appears on the video screen, then user activates speech synthesizer, which generates a voice with a somewhat mechanical tone. With the keyboard, an experienced user can construct messages as rapidly as 30 words per minute.

  17. Investigation of cross-linking poly(methyl methacrylate) as a guiding material in block copolymer directed self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Robert; Rincon Delgadillo, Paulina; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Wu, Hengpeng; Her, Youngjun; Yin, Jian; Nealey, Paul; de Pablo, Juan; Gronheid, Roel

    2014-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DDSA) of block copolymers ((BCP) is attracting a growing amount of interest as a techhnique to expand traditional lithography beyond its current limits. It has reecently been demonstrated that chemoepitaxy can be used to successfully ddirect BCP assembly to form large arrays off high-density features. The imec DSA LiNe flow uses lithography and trim-etch to produce a "prepattern" of cross-linked polystyrene (PS) stripes, which in turn guide the formation of assembled BCPP structures. Thhe entire process is predicated on the preferential interaction of the respective BCP domains with particular regionss of the underlying prepattern. The use of polystyrene as the guiding material is not uniquely required, however, and in fact may not even be preferable. This study investigates an alternate chemistry -- crosslinked poly(methyl methacrylate), X-PMMA, -- as the underlying polymer mat, providing a route to higher auto-affinity and therefore a stronger guiding ability. In addition to tthe advantages of the chemistry under investigation, this study explores the broader theme of extending BCP DSA to other materials.

  18. Risperidone-induced inactivation and clozapine-induced reactivation of rat cortical astrocyte 5-hydroxytryptamine₇ receptors: evidence for in situ G protein-coupled receptor homodimer protomer cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carol; Toohey, Nicole; Knight, Jessica A; Klein, Michael T; Teitler, Milt

    2011-02-01

    We have reported previously novel drug-induced inactivation and reactivation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine₇ (5-HT₇) receptors in a recombinant cell line. To explain these novel observations, a homodimer structure displaying protomer-protomer cross-talk was proposed. To determine whether these novel observations and interpretations are due to an artifactual G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mechanism unique to the recombinant cell line, we explored the properties of r5-HT₇ receptors expressed by cortical astrocytes in primary culture. As in the recombinant cell line, risperidone, 9-OH-risperidone, methiothepin, and bromocriptine were found to potently inactivate r5-HT₇ receptors. As in the recombinant cell line, exposure of risperidone-inactivated astrocyte r5-HT₇ receptors to competitive antagonists resulted in the reactivation of r5-HT₇ receptors. The potencies of the reactivating drugs closely correlated with their affinities for h5-HT₇ receptors. These results indicate the novel inactivating and reactivating property of drugs is not due to an artifact of the recombinant cell line expressing h5-HT₇ receptors but is an intrinsic property of 5-HT₇ receptors in vitro and ex vivo. This evidence suggests that a native (nonmutated) GPCR, in its native membrane environment (cortical astrocyte primary culture), can function as a homodimer with protomer-protomer cross-talk. Homodimers may be a common GPCR structure. The experimental design used in our studies can be used to explore the properties of other GPCRs in their native forms in recombinant cells, primary cultures expressing the endogenous GPCRs, and possibly in vivo. The homodimer structure and protomer-protomer cross-talk offer new avenues of research into receptor dysfunction in disease states and the development of novel drugs. PMID:21062995

  19. Why Talk Is Important

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In this brief retrospective essay, the value of a particular kind of classroom talk is extolled--not the kind of talk that simply feeds back information, but rather talk that has the power to shape knowledge through participant engagement with a range of processes: hypothesising, exploration, debate and synthesis. This kind of talk is the…

  20. Systematic evaluation of matrix effect and cross-talk-free method for simultaneous determination of zolmitriptan and N-desmethyl zolmitriptan in human plasma: a sensitive LC-MS/MS method validation and its application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhargav; Suhagia, B N; Jangid, Arvind G; Mistri, Hiren N; Desai, Nirmal

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present work was to carry out systematic evaluation to eliminate matrix effect owing to plasma phospholipids as observed during sample preparation and to develop a cross-talk-free sensitive, selective and rapid bioanalytical method for the simultaneous determination of zolmitriptan (ZT) and N-desmethyl zolmitriptan (DZT) in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using naratriptan as internal standard (IS). The analytes and IS were quantitatively extracted from 200 μL human plasma by solid phase extraction. No cross-talk was found between ZT and DZT having identical product ions. Quantitation was performed on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer employing electrospray ionization technique, operating in multiple reaction monitoring and positive ion mode. The total chromatographic run time was 2.5 min. The method was fully validated for sensitivity, selectivity, specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix effect, dilution integrity and stability studies. The method was validated over a dynamic concentration range of 0.1-15 ng/mL for ZT and DZT. The method was successfully applied to a bioequivalence study of 2.5 mg ZT tablet formulation in 18 healthy Indian male subjects under fasting conditions. Assay reproducibility was assessed by reanalysis of 62 incurred samples. PMID:26189757

  1. Multi-step control over self-assembled hydrogels of peptide-derived building blocks and a polymeric cross-linker.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Duc; Pal, Asish; Snijkers, Frank; Colomb-Delsuc, Mathieu; Leonetti, Giulia; Otto, Sijbren; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2016-01-14

    We present a detailed study of self-assembled hydrogels of bundled and cross-linked networks consisting of positively charged amyloid-like nanofibers and a triblock copolymer with negatively charged end blocks as a cross-linker. In a first step small oligopeptides self-assemble into macrocycles which are held together by reversible disulfide bonds. Interactions between the peptides cause the macrocycles to assemble into nanofibers, which form a reversible hydrogel. The physical properties of the hydrogel are tuned using various methods such as control over the fibre length, addition of a cross-linking copolymer, and addition of salt. We establish a relationship between the bulk mechanical properties, the properties of the individual fibers and the hydrogel morphology using characterization techniques operating at different length scales such as rheology, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryo transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). This allows for a precise control of the elastic behaviour of these networks. PMID:26477580

  2. Fish-oil-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce NLRP3 inflammasome activity and obesity-related inflammatory cross-talk between adipocytes and CD11b(+) macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Boer, Anna A; Monk, Jennifer M; Liddle, Danyelle M; Hutchinson, Amber L; Power, Krista A; Ma, David W L; Robinson, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Adipocyte-macrophage cross-talk propagates immune responses in obese adipose tissue (AT). Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) mitigate inflammation, partly through up-regulation of adiponectin; however, specific mechanisms are unclear. We determined if adipocyte-macrophage cross-talk could be mitigated by dietary LC n-3 PUFA and if this was dependent on adiponectin-mediated signaling. We utilized an in vitro co-culture model mimicking the ratio of adipocytes:macrophages in obese AT, whereby 3T3-L1 adipocytes were co-cultured with splenic CD11b(+) macrophages from C57BL/6 mice fed high-fat control (HF-CON; 34% w/w fat) or fish oil diets (HF-FO; 34% w/w fat containing 7.6% w/w FO), as well as mice fed low-fat control (LF-CON; 10% w/w fat) or FO diets (LF-FO; 10% w/w fat containing 3% w/w FO). Co-culture conditions tested effects of soluble mediator-driven mechanisms (trans-well system), cell contact and low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mimicking acute or chronic inflammatory conditions. HF-FO macrophages from acute LPS-stimulated trans-well co-cultures had decreased mRNA expression of Casp1, Il1β and Il18, as well as cellular caspase-1 activity compared to HF-CON macrophages (P≤.05). Moreover, adipocytes from acute LPS-stimulated HF-FO co-cultures had decreased caspase-1 activity and decreased IL-1β/IL-18 levels following chronic LPS pretreatment compared to HF-CON co-cultures (P≤.05). Additionally, in contact co-cultures with adiponectin-neutralizing antibody, the FO-mediated modulation of NFκB activity and decrease in phosphorylated p65 NFκB, expression of NLRP3 inflammasome genes, M1 macrophage marker genes and inflammatory cytokine/chemokine secretion were controlled partly through adiponectin, while cellular caspase-1 activity and IL-1β/1L-18 levels were decreased independently of adiponectin (P≤.05). LC n-3 PUFA may decrease the intensity of adipocyte-macrophage cross-talk to mitigate obesity-associated pathologies. PMID

  3. Fish-oil-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce NLRP3 inflammasome activity and obesity-related inflammatory cross-talk between adipocytes and CD11b(+) macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Boer, Anna A; Monk, Jennifer M; Liddle, Danyelle M; Hutchinson, Amber L; Power, Krista A; Ma, David W L; Robinson, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Adipocyte-macrophage cross-talk propagates immune responses in obese adipose tissue (AT). Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) mitigate inflammation, partly through up-regulation of adiponectin; however, specific mechanisms are unclear. We determined if adipocyte-macrophage cross-talk could be mitigated by dietary LC n-3 PUFA and if this was dependent on adiponectin-mediated signaling. We utilized an in vitro co-culture model mimicking the ratio of adipocytes:macrophages in obese AT, whereby 3T3-L1 adipocytes were co-cultured with splenic CD11b(+) macrophages from C57BL/6 mice fed high-fat control (HF-CON; 34% w/w fat) or fish oil diets (HF-FO; 34% w/w fat containing 7.6% w/w FO), as well as mice fed low-fat control (LF-CON; 10% w/w fat) or FO diets (LF-FO; 10% w/w fat containing 3% w/w FO). Co-culture conditions tested effects of soluble mediator-driven mechanisms (trans-well system), cell contact and low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mimicking acute or chronic inflammatory conditions. HF-FO macrophages from acute LPS-stimulated trans-well co-cultures had decreased mRNA expression of Casp1, Il1β and Il18, as well as cellular caspase-1 activity compared to HF-CON macrophages (P≤.05). Moreover, adipocytes from acute LPS-stimulated HF-FO co-cultures had decreased caspase-1 activity and decreased IL-1β/IL-18 levels following chronic LPS pretreatment compared to HF-CON co-cultures (P≤.05). Additionally, in contact co-cultures with adiponectin-neutralizing antibody, the FO-mediated modulation of NFκB activity and decrease in phosphorylated p65 NFκB, expression of NLRP3 inflammasome genes, M1 macrophage marker genes and inflammatory cytokine/chemokine secretion were controlled partly through adiponectin, while cellular caspase-1 activity and IL-1β/1L-18 levels were decreased independently of adiponectin (P≤.05). LC n-3 PUFA may decrease the intensity of adipocyte-macrophage cross-talk to mitigate obesity-associated pathologies.

  4. Let's Talk... Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2012-01-01

    Talk about analytics seems to be everywhere. Everyone is talking about analytics. Yet even with all the talk, many in higher education have questions about--and objections to--using analytics in colleges and universities. In this article, the author explores the use of analytics in, and all around, higher education. (Contains 1 note.)

  5. Bidirectional cross metathesis and ring-closing metathesis/ring opening of a C 2-symmetric building block: a strategy for the synthesis of decanolide natural products

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Summary Starting from the conveniently available ex-chiral pool building block (R,R)-hexa-1,5-diene-3,4-diol, the ten-membered ring lactones stagonolide E and curvulide A were synthesized using a bidirectional olefin-metathesis functionalization of the terminal double bonds. Key steps are (i) a site-selective cross metathesis, (ii) a highly diastereoselective extended tethered RCM to furnish a (Z,E)-configured dienyl carboxylic acid and (iii) a Ru–lipase-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution to establish the desired configuration at C9. Ring closure was accomplished by macrolactonization. Curvulide A was synthesized from stagonolide E through Sharpless epoxidation. PMID:24367418

  6. Bidirectional cross metathesis and ring-closing metathesis/ring opening of a C 2-symmetric building block: a strategy for the synthesis of decanolide natural products.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bernd; Kunz, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the conveniently available ex-chiral pool building block (R,R)-hexa-1,5-diene-3,4-diol, the ten-membered ring lactones stagonolide E and curvulide A were synthesized using a bidirectional olefin-metathesis functionalization of the terminal double bonds. Key steps are (i) a site-selective cross metathesis, (ii) a highly diastereoselective extended tethered RCM to furnish a (Z,E)-configured dienyl carboxylic acid and (iii) a Ru-lipase-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution to establish the desired configuration at C9. Ring closure was accomplished by macrolactonization. Curvulide A was synthesized from stagonolide E through Sharpless epoxidation.

  7. Gene expression as a circular process: cross-talk between transcription and mRNA degradation in eukaryotes; International University of Andalusia (UNIA) Baeza, Spain.

    PubMed

    Collart, Martine A; Reese, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes in the past 20 years have consistently revealed increasing levels of complexity. Thirty years ago it seemed that we had understood the basic principles of gene regulation in eukaryotes. It was thought that regulation of transcription was the first and most important stage at which gene expression was regulated, and transcriptional regulation was considered to be very simple, with DNA-binding activators and repressors talking to the basic transcription machinery. This simple model was overthrown when it became clear that other stages of gene expression are also highly regulated. More recently, other dogmas have started to collapse. In particular, the idea that a linkage between the different steps in gene expression is restricted to processes ongoing in the same compartment has fallen out of favor. It is now evident that functional and physical linkage occurs in eukaryotes. We know that factors contributing to transcription in the nucleus can be found in the cytoplasm, and that RNA binding proteins that contribute to RNA decay in the cytoplasm are present in the nucleus. However, shuttling of such factors between nucleus and cytoplasm has traditionally been thought to serve a simple regulatory purpose, for instance, to avoid untimely activation of a transcription factor in the nucleus. Alternatively, it was thought to be necessary to recruit RNA binding proteins to the relevant RNAs. The notion that is now emerging is that factors thought to have evolved to specialize in regulating a single step of gene regulation in one cellular compartment may be contributing to the regulation of mRNAs at multiple steps along the lifecycle of an mRNA.

  8. Cross-talk between ICAM-1 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor signaling modulates eosinophil survival and activation.

    PubMed

    Pazdrak, Konrad; Young, Travis W; Stafford, Susan; Olszewska-Pazdrak, Barbara; Straub, Christof; Starosta, Vitaliy; Brasier, Allan; Kurosky, Alexander

    2008-03-15

    Reversal of eosinophilic inflammation has been an elusive therapeutic goal in the management of asthma pathogenesis. In this regard, GM-CSF is a primary candidate cytokine regulating eosinophil activation and survival in the lung; however, its molecular mechanism of propagation and maintenance of stimulated eosinophil activation is not well understood. In this study, we elucidate those late interactions occurring between the GM-CSF receptor and activated eosinophil signaling molecules. Using coimmunoprecipitation with GM-CSF-stimulated eosinophils, we have identified that the GM-CSF receptor beta-chain (GMRbeta) interacted with ICAM-1 and Shp2 phosphatase, as well as Slp76 and ADAP adaptor proteins. Separate experiments using affinity binding with a tyrosine-phosphorylated peptide containing an ITIM (ICAM-1 residues 480-488) showed binding to Shp2 phosphatase and GMRbeta. However, the interaction of GMRbeta with the phosphorylated ICAM-1-derived peptide was observed only with stimulated eosinophil lysates, suggesting that the interaction of GMRbeta with ICAM-1 required phosphorylated Shp2 and/or phosphorylated GMRbeta. Importantly, we found that inhibition of ICAM-1 in activated eosinophils blocked GM-CSF-induced expression of c-fos, c-myc, IL-8, and TNF-alpha. Moreover, inhibition of ICAM-1 expression with either antisense oligonucleotide or an ICAM-1-blocking Ab effectively inhibited ERK activation and eosinophil survival. We concluded that the interaction between ICAM-1 and the GM-CSF receptor was essential for GM-CSF-induced eosinophil activation and survival. Taken together, these results provide novel mechanistic insights defining the interaction between ICAM-1 and the GM-CSF receptor and highlight the importance of targeting ICAM-1 and GM-CSF/IL-5/IL-3 receptor systems as a therapeutic strategy to counter eosinophilia in asthma.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) induces WISP-2/CCN5 via multiple molecular cross-talks and is essential for mitogenic switch by IGF-1 axis in estrogen receptor-positive breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Kakali; Banerjee, Snigdha; Dhar, Gopal; Sengupta, Krishanu; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2007-02-15

    Previously, we have shown that the expression of Wnt-1-induced signaling protein-2 (WISP-2), also known as CCN5, can be regulated by multiple stimulants in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast tumor cells to exert their mitogenic action in these cells. Here, we show that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a strong mitogen, enhanced the expression of the WISP-2/CCN5 gene parallel with the induction of proliferation of ER-positive breast tumor cells. An additive effect was also seen in combination with estrogen. Perturbation of IGF-1-induced WISP-2/CCN5 expression by WISP-2-specific RNA interference impaired the mitogenic action of IGF-1 on ER-positive breast tumor cells. Furthermore, the studies have shown that the multiple molecular cross-talks and side-talks among IGF-1R, ER-alpha, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling molecules are required to induce WISP-2/CCN5 mRNA by IGF-1 in ER-positive, noninvasive breast tumor cells. Because a pure anti-ER ICI 182,780 is not only able to suppress the up-regulation of WISP-2/CCN5 mRNA expression by IGF-1, it also suppresses the PI3K/Akt activity induced by IGF-1 in MCF-7 cells; we anticipate that the membrane ER receptor may participate in this event. Collectively, these studies propose for the first time that WISP-2/CCN5 is an integral signaling molecule in mitogenic action of IGF-1 axis in ER-positive human breast tumor cells.

  10. Hydralazine inhibits rapid acrolein-induced protein oligomerization: role of aldehyde scavenging and adduct trapping in cross-link blocking and cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Burcham, Philip C; Pyke, Simon M

    2006-03-01

    Hydralazine strongly suppresses the toxicity of acrolein, a reactive aldehyde that contributes to numerous health disorders. At least two mechanisms may underlie the cytoprotection, both of which involve the nucleophilic hydrazine possessed by hydralazine. Under the simplest scenario, hydralazine directly scavenges free acrolein, decreasing intracellular acrolein availability and thereby suppressing macromolecular adduction. In a second "adduct-trapping" mechanism, the drug forms hydrazones with acrolein-derived Michael adducts in cell proteins, preventing secondary reactions of adducted proteins that may trigger cell death. To identify the most important mechanism, we explored these two pathways in mouse hepatocytes poisoned with the acrolein precursor allyl alcohol. Intense concentration-dependent adduct-trapping in cell proteins accompanied the suppression of toxicity by hydralazine. However, protective concentrations of hydralazine did not alter extracellular free acrolein levels, cellular glutathione loss, or protein carbonylation, suggesting that the cytoprotection is not due to minimization of intracellular acrolein availability. To explore ways whereby adduct-trapping might confer cytoprotection, the effect of hydralazine on acrolein-induced protein cross-linking was examined. Using bovine pancreas ribonuclease A as a model protein, acrolein caused rapid time- and concentration-dependent cross-linking, with dimerized protein detectable within 45 min of commencing protein modification. Lysine adduction in monomeric protein preceded the appearance of oligomers, whereas reductive methylation of protein amine groups abolished both adduction and oligomerization. Hydralazine inhibited cross-linking if added 30 min after commencing acrolein exposure but was ineffective if added after a 90-min delay. Adduct-trapping closely accompanied the inhibition of cross-linking by hydralazine. These findings suggest that cross-link blocking may contribute to hydralazine

  11. Moderate salinity reduced phenanthrene-induced stress in the halophyte plant model Thellungiella salsuginea compared to its glycophyte relative Arabidopsis thaliana: Cross talk and metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Moez; Rabhi, Mokded; Abdelly, Chedly; Bouchereau, Alain; El Amrani, Abdelhak

    2016-07-01

    It was shown that halophytes experience higher cross-tolerance to stresses than glycophytes, which was often associated with their more powerful antioxidant systems. Moreover, salinity was reported to enhance halophyte tolerance to several stresses. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether a moderate salinity enhances phenanthrene stress tolerance in the halophyte Thellungiella salsuginea. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, considered as its glycophyte relative, was used as reference. Our study was based on morpho-physiological, antioxidant, and metabolomic parameters. Results showed that T. salsuginea was more tolerant to phenanthrene stress as compared to A. thaliana. An improvement of phenanthrene-induced responses was recorded in the two plants in the presence of 25 mM NaCl, but the effect was significantly more obvious in the halophyte. This observation was particularly related to the higher antioxidant activities and the induction of more adapted metabolism in the halophyte. Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify alcohols, ammonium, sugars, and organic acids. It showed the accumulation of several metabolites, many of them are known to be involved in signaling and abiotic stress tolerance. Moderate salinity and phenanthrene cross-tolerance involved in these two stresses was discussed. PMID:27139124

  12. Cross-talk between glucagon- and adenosine-mediated signalling systems in rat hepatocytes: effects on cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Flores, M; Allende, G; Piña, E; García-Sáinz, J A

    1995-01-01

    The effect of adenosine analogues on glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in rat hepatocytes was explored. N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine and N6-(R-phenylisopropyl)adenosine inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the cyclic AMP accumulation induced by glucagon. This effect seems to be mediated through A1 adenosine receptors. Pertussis toxin completely abolished the effect of CPA on glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in whole cells which suggested that a pertussis-toxin-sensitive G-protein was involved. On the other hand, this action of adenosine analogues on glucagon-induced cyclic AMP accumulation was reverted by the selective low-Km cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724. Analysis of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase activity in purified hepatocyte plasma membranes showed that glucagon in the presence of GTP inhibited basal PDE activity by 45% and that CPA reverted this inhibition in dose-dependent manner. In membranes derived from pertussis-toxin-treated rats, we observed no inhibition of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase activity by glucagon in the absence or presence of CPA. Our results indicate that in hepatocyte plasma membranes, stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity and inhibition of a low-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity are co-ordinately regulated by glucagon, and that A1 adenosine receptors can inhibit glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation by blocking glucagon's effect on phosphodiesterase activity. Images Figure 2 PMID:8554517

  13. Cross-talk between human mast cells and bronchial epithelial cells in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production via transforming growth factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong H; Lee, Sun H; Kato, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Kulka, Marianna; Shin, Soon C; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promotes airway remodeling and that human and mouse mast cells (MCs) are an important source of PAI-1. In the present study we investigated MC-epithelial cell (EC) interactions in the production of PAI-1. We stimulated the human MC line LAD2 with IgE-receptor cross-linking and collected the supernatants. We incubated the human bronchial EC line BEAS-2B with the LAD2 supernatants and measured the level of PAI-1. When the supernatants from IgE-stimulated LAD2 were added to BEAS-2B, there was a significant enhancement of PAI-1 production by BEAS-2B. When we treated the MC supernatants with a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 neutralizing antibody, the MC-derived induction of PAI-1 from BEAS-2B was completely abrogated. Although TGF-β1 mRNA was constitutively expressed in resting LAD2, it was not highly induced by IgE-mediated stimulation. Nonetheless, active TGF-β1 protein was significantly increased in LAD2 after IgE-mediated stimulation. Active TGF-β1 produced by primary cultured human MCs was significantly reduced in the presence of a chymase inhibitor, suggesting a role of MC chymase as an activator of latent TGF-β1. This study indicates that stimulation of human MCs by IgE receptor cross-linking triggers activation of TGF-β1, at least in part via chymase, which in turn induces the production of PAI-1 by bronchial ECs. Our data suggest that human MCs may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma as a direct source of PAI-1 and by activating bronchial ECs to produce further PAI-1 via a TGF-β1-mediated activation pathway.

  14. Real Talk, Real Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Maria

    2014-01-01

    What happens in classrooms when we create the time and space for authentic talk about texts? Extended, collaborative conversations that allow understanding to unfold over time can be messy and dynamic. As students wrestle with complex texts and ideas, talk can become lively--and predictable problems can arise. In this article, Marie Nichols uses…

  15. Talking to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Why should teachers bother with student-driven discussions? Elizabeth A. City offers three reasons: (1) talking and thinking reinforce each other; (2) dialogue is a necessary skill of democracy, so schools should teach thinking, speaking, and listening as "practices of freedom"; and (3) student-driven talk is fun. Yet student-driven…

  16. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates cross-talk between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and nuclear factor-κB in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Necela, Brian M; Su, Weidong; Thompson, E Aubrey

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is expressed in macrophages and plays an important role in suppressing the inflammatory response. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), reduced PPARγ expression and function in peritoneal macrophages and macrophage cell lines. Moreover, pretreatment with the synthetic PPARγ ligand, rosiglitazone did not prevent LPS-mediated downregulation of PPARγ. Inhibition of PPARγ expression was not blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that de novo protein synthesis is not required for LPS-mediated suppression of PPARγ. Destabilization of PPARγ messenger RNA (mRNA) was not observed in LPS-stimulated macrophages, suggesting that LPS regulates the synthesis of PPARγ mRNA. LPS had no effect on PPARγ expression in macrophages from TLR4 knockout mice, whereas LPS inhibited PPARγ expression in cells that had been reconstituted to express functional TLR4. Targeting the TLR4 pathway with inhibitors of MEK1/2, p38, JNK and AP-1 had no effect on PPARγ downregulation by LPS. However, inhibitors that target NEMO, IκB and NF-κB abolished LPS-mediated downregulation of PPARγ in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Our data indicate that activation of TLR4 inhibits PPARγ mRNA synthesis by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Low-density genomic profiling of macrophage-specific PPARγ knockout cells indicated that PPARγ suppresses inflammation under basal conditions, and that loss of PPARγ expression is sufficient to induce a proinflammatory state. Our data reveal a regulatory feedback loop in which PPARγ represses NF-κB-mediated inflammatory signalling in unstimulated macrophages; however, upon activation of TLR4, NF-κB drives down PPARγ expression and thereby obviates any potential anti-inflammatory effects of PPARγ in LPS-stimulated macrophages. PMID:18422969

  17. Cross-talk between 4-1BB and TLR1-TLR2 Signaling in CD8+ T Cells Regulates TLR2's Costimulatory Effects.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Ann Mary; Srivastava, Ratika; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Davila, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    The activation of TLR-MyD88 (Toll-like receptor-myeloid differentiation factor 88) signaling within T cells functions as a potent costimulatory signal that boosts antitumor and antiviral responses. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the costimulatory processes are poorly understood. We compared microarray gene analysis data between TLR1-TLR2-stimulated and unstimulated T-cell receptor transgenic "pmel" and MyD88(-/-) pmel CD8(+) T cells and identified changes in the expression of several TNF family members. In particular, TLR stimulation increased 4-1BB levels in pmel but not in MyD88(-/-)pmel T cells. A link between 4-1BB and TLR1-TLR2 signaling in CD8(+) T cells was highlighted by the suboptimal responses of 4-1BB(-/-) T cells to TLR1-TLR2 agonist, but their normal response to CD28 or OX40 costimulation. Blocking 4-1BB signaling with antibodies also hindered the costimulatory effects of the TLR1-TLR2 agonist. The elevated levels of 4-1BB transcripts in TLR1-TLR2-stimulated cells were not due to increased mRNA stability nor increased histone activation, but instead were associated with increased binding of p65 and c-Jun to two distinct 4-1BB promoter sites. Combining TLR1-TLR2 ligand with an agonistic antibody to 4-1BB enhanced the antitumor activity in mice with established melanoma tumors. These studies reveal that the costimulatory effects of TLR1-TLR2 signaling in CD8(+) T cells are in part mediated by 4-1BB and are important for mounting an effective antitumor immune response. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 708-16. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27267778

  18. Specific cerebral heat shock proteins and histamine receptor cross-talking mechanisms promote distinct lead-dependent neurotoxic responses in teleosts

    SciTech Connect

    Giusi, Giuseppina; Alo, Raffaella; Crudo, Michele; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Canonaco, Marcello

    2008-03-01

    Recent interests are beginning to be directed towards toxic neurobiological dysfunctions caused by lead (Pb) in aquatic vertebrates. In the present work, treatment with a maximum acceptable toxic concentration of this heavy metal was responsible for highly significant (p < 0.01) abnormal motor behaviors such as hyperactive movements in the teleost Thalassoma pavo and the same treatment accounted for significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced hyperventilating states. On the other hand, greater abnormal motor behaviors were detected in the presence of the histamine (HA) receptor subtype 2 (H{sub 2}R) antagonist cimetidine (Cim), as shown by the very robust (p < 0.001) increases of the two behavioral states. Interestingly, elevated expression levels of stress-related factors, i.e. heat shock protein70/90 (HSP90/70) orthologs were reported for the first time in hypothalamic and mesencephalic areas of Pb-treated teleosts. In particular, an up-regulation of HSP70 was readily detected when this heavy metal was given concomitantly with Cim, while the histamine subtype 3 antagonist (H{sub 3}R) thioperamide (Thio), instead, blocked Pb-dependent up-regulatory trends of both chaperones in mostly hypothalamic areas. Moreover, intense neuronal damages of the above brain regions coincided with altered expressions of HSP70 and HSP90 when treated only with Cim. Overall these first results show that distinct H{sub n}R are able to exert a net neuroprotective role arising from their interaction with chaperones in fish exposed to Pb-dependent stressful conditions making this a potentially key interaction especially for T. pavo, aquatic species which plays an important ecological role towards the survival of other commercially vital fishes.

  19. Talking the Talk and Walking the Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Steven

    2010-01-01

    In this diverse collection, editors Killoran and Pendleton Jimenez bring together an important collection of chapters that tackle homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism. From the hallways and classrooms of elementary and secondary schools to the lecture halls of postsecondary institutions, "Unleashing the Unpopular: Talking About Sexual…

  20. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  1. Low-temperature cross-talk magnetic-field sensor based on tapered all-solid waveguide-array fiber and magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinping; Ma, Xixi; Wu, Jixuan; Song, Binbin; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Kailiang; Liu, Bo; Yao, Jianquan

    2015-08-15

    A compact fiber-optic magnetic-field sensor based on tapered all-solid waveguide-array fiber (WAF) and magnetic fluid (MF) has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The tapered all-solid WAF is fabricated by using a fusion splicer, and the sensor is formed by immersing the tapered all-solid WAF into the MF. The transmission spectra have been measured and analyzed under different magnetic-field intensities. Experimental results show that the acquired magnetic-field sensitivity is 44.57 pm/Oe for a linear magnetic-field intensity range from 50 to 200 Oe. All-solid WAF has very similar thermal expansion coefficient for high- and low-refractive-index glasses, so mode profile is not affected by thermal drifts. Also, magnetically induced refractive-index changes into the ferrofluid are of the order of ∼5×10(-2), while the corresponding thermally induced refractive-index changes into the ferrofluid are expected to be lower. The temperature response has also been detected, and the temperature-induced wavelength shift perturbation is less than 0.3 nm from temperature of 26.9°C-44°C. The proposed magnetic-field sensor has such advantages as low temperature sensitivity, simple structure, and ease of fabrication. It also indicates that the magnetic-field sensor based on tapered all-solid WAF and MF is helpful to reduce temperature cross-sensitivity for the measurement of magnetic field.

  2. Low-temperature cross-talk magnetic-field sensor based on tapered all-solid waveguide-array fiber and magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinping; Ma, Xixi; Wu, Jixuan; Song, Binbin; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Kailiang; Liu, Bo; Yao, Jianquan

    2015-08-15

    A compact fiber-optic magnetic-field sensor based on tapered all-solid waveguide-array fiber (WAF) and magnetic fluid (MF) has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The tapered all-solid WAF is fabricated by using a fusion splicer, and the sensor is formed by immersing the tapered all-solid WAF into the MF. The transmission spectra have been measured and analyzed under different magnetic-field intensities. Experimental results show that the acquired magnetic-field sensitivity is 44.57 pm/Oe for a linear magnetic-field intensity range from 50 to 200 Oe. All-solid WAF has very similar thermal expansion coefficient for high- and low-refractive-index glasses, so mode profile is not affected by thermal drifts. Also, magnetically induced refractive-index changes into the ferrofluid are of the order of ∼5×10(-2), while the corresponding thermally induced refractive-index changes into the ferrofluid are expected to be lower. The temperature response has also been detected, and the temperature-induced wavelength shift perturbation is less than 0.3 nm from temperature of 26.9°C-44°C. The proposed magnetic-field sensor has such advantages as low temperature sensitivity, simple structure, and ease of fabrication. It also indicates that the magnetic-field sensor based on tapered all-solid WAF and MF is helpful to reduce temperature cross-sensitivity for the measurement of magnetic field. PMID:26274690

  3. Vpu Exploits the Cross-Talk between BST2 and the ILT7 Receptor to Suppress Anti-HIV-1 Responses by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bego, Mariana G.; Côté, Édouard; Aschman, Nick; Mercier, Johanne; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Cohen, Éric A.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) constitute a major source of type-I interferon (IFN-I) production during acute HIV infection. Their activation results primarily from TLR7-mediated sensing of HIV-infected cells. However, the interactions between HIV-infected T cells and pDCs that modulate this sensing process remain poorly understood. BST2/Tetherin is a restriction factor that inhibits HIV release by cross-linking virions onto infected cell surface. BST2 was also shown to engage the ILT7 pDC-specific inhibitory receptor and repress TLR7/9-mediated IFN-I production by activated pDCs. Here, we show that Vpu, the HIV-1 antagonist of BST2, suppresses TLR7-mediated IFN-I production by pDC through a mechanism that relies on the interaction of BST2 on HIV-producing cells with ILT7. Even though Vpu downregulates surface BST2 as a mean to counteract the restriction on HIV-1 release, we also find that the viral protein re-locates remaining BST2 molecules outside viral assembly sites where they are free to bind and activate ILT7 upon cell-to-cell contact. This study shows that through a targeted regulation of surface BST2, Vpu promotes HIV-1 release and limits pDC antiviral responses upon sensing of infected cells. This mechanism of innate immune evasion is likely to be important for an efficient early viral dissemination during acute infection. PMID:26172439

  4. Natural Variation at the FRD3 MATE Transporter Locus Reveals Cross-Talk between Fe Homeostasis and Zn Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pineau, Christophe; Loubet, Stéphanie; Lefoulon, Cécile; Chalies, Claude; Fizames, Cécile; Lacombe, Benoit; Ferrand, Marina; Loudet, Olivier; Berthomieu, Pierre; Richard, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is essential for the optimal growth of plants but is toxic if present in excess, so Zn homeostasis needs to be finely tuned. Understanding Zn homeostasis mechanisms in plants will help in the development of innovative approaches for the phytoremediation of Zn-contaminated sites. In this study, Zn tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified by analyzing differences in the Bay-0 and Shahdara accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. Fine-scale mapping showed that a variant of the Fe homeostasis-related FERRIC REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE3 (FRD3) gene, which encodes a multidrug and toxin efflux (MATE) transporter, is responsible for reduced Zn tolerance in A. thaliana. Allelic variation in FRD3 revealed which amino acids are necessary for FRD3 function. In addition, the results of allele-specific expression assays in F1 individuals provide evidence for the existence of at least one putative metal-responsive cis-regulatory element. Our results suggest that FRD3 works as a multimer and is involved in loading Zn into xylem. Cross-homeostasis between Fe and Zn therefore appears to be important for Zn tolerance in A. thaliana with FRD3 acting as an essential regulator. PMID:23236296

  5. Comparison of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and an artificial neural network in the cross-talk correction of simultaneous 99 m Tc / 201Tl SPECT imaging using a GATE Monte-Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidary, Saeed; Setayeshi, Saeed; Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and the artificial neural network (ANN) to estimate the cross-talk contamination of 99 m Tc / 201 Tl image acquisition in the 201 Tl energy window (77 ± 15% keV). GATE (Geant4 Application in Emission and Tomography) is employed due to its ability to simulate multiple radioactive sources concurrently. Two kinds of phantoms, including two digital and one physical phantom, are used. In the real and the simulation studies, data acquisition is carried out using eight energy windows. The ANN and the ANFIS are prepared in MATLAB, and the GATE results are used as a training data set. Three indications are evaluated and compared. The ANFIS method yields better outcomes for two indications (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and contrast) and the two phantom results in each category. The maximum image biasing, which is the third indication, is found to be 6% more than that for the ANN.

  6. Scaffold Protein Ahk1, Which Associates with Hkr1, Sho1, Ste11, and Pbs2, Inhibits Cross Talk Signaling from the Hkr1 Osmosensor to the Kss1 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Akiko; Yamamoto, Katsuyoshi; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, osmostress activates the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which regulates diverse osmoadaptive responses. Hkr1 is a large, highly glycosylated, single-path transmembrane protein that is a putative osmosensor in one of the Hog1 upstream pathways termed the HKR1 subbranch. The extracellular region of Hkr1 contains both a positive and a negative regulatory domain. However, the function of the cytoplasmic domain of Hkr1 (Hkr1-cyto) is unknown. Here, using a mass spectrometric method, we identified a protein, termed Ahk1 (Associated with Hkr1), that binds to Hkr1-cyto. Deletion of the AHK1 gene (in the absence of other Hog1 upstream branches) only partially inhibited osmostress-induced Hog1 activation. In contrast, Hog1 could not be activated by constitutively active mutants of the Hog1 pathway signaling molecules Opy2 or Ste50 in ahk1Δ cells, whereas robust Hog1 activation occurred in AHK1+ cells. In addition to Hkr1-cyto binding, Ahk1 also bound to other signaling molecules in the HKR1 subbranch, including Sho1, Ste11, and Pbs2. Although osmotic stimulation of Hkr1 does not activate the Kss1 MAPK, deletion of AHK1 allowed Hkr1 to activate Kss1 by cross talk. Thus, Ahk1 is a scaffold protein in the HKR1 subbranch and prevents incorrect signal flow from Hkr1 to Kss1. PMID:26787842

  7. Summary of experimental talks

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1999-12-08

    This final talk of the meeting briefly discussed a number of experimental topics that the author found particularly interesting in the area of High Energy Physics. It also includes some critical comments about the future direction of their discipline.

  8. PPE26 induces TLR2-dependent activation of macrophages and drives Th1-type T-cell immunity by triggering the cross-talk of multiple pathways involved in the host response

    PubMed Central

    Su, Haibo; Kong, Cong; Zhu, Lin; Huang, Qi; Luo, Liulin; Wang, Honghai; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological functions and the underlying molecular basis of PE /PPE proteins of M. tuberculosis remain largely unknown. In this study, we focused on the link between PPE26 and host response. We demonstrated that PPE26 can induce extensive inflammatory responses in macrophages through triggering the cross-talk of multiple pathways involved in the host response, as revealed by iTRAQ-based subcellular quantitative proteomics. We observed that PPE26 is able to specifically bind to TLR2 leading to the subsequent activation of MAPKs and NF-κB signaling. PPE26 functionally stimulates macrophage activation by augmenting pro-inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12 p40) and the expression of cell surface markers (CD80, CD86, MHC class I and II). We observed that PPE26-treated macrophages effectively polarizes naïve CD4+ T cells to up-regulate CXCR3 expression, and to secrete IFN-γ and IL-2, indicating PPE26 contributes to the Th1 polarization during the immune response. Importantly, rBCG::PPE26 induces stronger antigen-specific TNF-α and IFN-γ activity, and higher levels of the Th1 cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ comparable to BCG. Moreover, PPE26 effectively induces the reciprocal expansion of effector/memory CD4+/CD8+ CD44highCD62Llow T cells in the spleens of mice immunized with this strain. These results suggest that PPE26 may be a TLR2 agonist that stimulates innate immunity and adaptive immunity, indicating that PPE26 is a potential antigen for the rational design of an efficient vaccine against M. tuberculosis. PMID:26439698

  9. Cross-talk between NADPH oxidase-PKCα-p(38)MAPK and NF-κB-MT1MMP in activating proMMP-2 by ET-1 in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Jaganmay; Chowdhury, Animesh; Chakraborti, Tapati; Chakraborti, Sajal

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with endothelin-1 (ET-1) caused an increase in the expression and activation of proMMP-2 in the cells. The present study was undertaken to determine the underlying mechanisms involved in this scenario. We demonstrated that (i) pretreatment with NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin; PKC-α inhibitor, Go6976; p(38)MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and NF-κB inhibitor, Bay11-7082 inhibited the expression and activation of proMMP-2 induced by ET-1; (ii) ET-1 treatment to the cells stimulated NADPH oxidase and PKCα activity, p(38)MAPK phosphorylation as well as NF-κB activation by translocation of NF-κBp65 subunit from cytosol to the nucleus, and subsequently by increasing its DNA-binding activity; (iii) ET-1 increases MT1-MMP expression, which was inhibited upon pretreatment with apocynin, Go6976, SB293580, and Bay 11-7082; (iv) ET-1 treatment to the cells downregulated TIMP-2 level. Although apocynin and Go6976 pretreatment reversed ET-1 effect on TIMP-2 level, yet pretreatment of the cells with SB203580 and Bay 11-7082 did not show any discernible change in TIMP-2 level by ET-1. Overall, our results suggest that ET-1-induced activation of proMMP-2 is mediated via cross-talk between NADPH oxidase-PKCα-p(38)MAPK and NFκB-MT1MMP signaling pathways along with a marked decrease in TIMP-2 expression in the cells. PMID:26910780

  10. Evidence of a cross-talk regulation of a GA 20-oxidase (FsGA20ox1) by gibberellins and ethylene during the breaking of dormancy in Fagus sylvatica seeds.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Angel Pablo; Nicolás, Carlos; Nicolás, Gregorio; Rodríguez, Dolores

    2004-04-01

    Gibberellin 20-oxidase (GA 20-oxidase) is an enzyme that catalyses the last three steps in the synthesis of active GAs and is a potential control point in the regulation of GA biosynthesis. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction with degenerated oligonucleotides conserved among GA 20-oxidases was used to isolate a cDNA clone for this enzyme in Fagus sylvatica L. seeds. This clone contains all the features and exhibits homology to GA 20 oxidases from several plant species. Expression of this clone, named FsGA20ox1, as a fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli confirmed that it was able to metabolize [(14)C]GA(12) to [(14)C]GA(9) and [(14)C]GA(53) to [(14)C]GA(20). Analysis of FsGA20ox1 transcript levels showed similar low expression during stratification at 4 degrees C and in the presence of gibberellic acid or ethephon (compound that releases ethylene in solution), treatments proved to be efficient in breaking the dormancy of beech seeds. However, there was a drastic increase of FsGA20ox1 transcript levels in the presence of paclobutrazol (PCB), a well-known GAs biosynthesis inhibitor, or of 2-aminoxyacetic acid (AOA), an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis. Furthermore, the effect of AOA was reversed by the addition of GA(3) and that of PCB by ethephon. This indicates that the gene product is subjected to down-regulation by GA and ethylene, and further suggests a cross-talk gene regulation by these two hormones during the transition from seed dormancy to germination.

  11. The Chaperone-Like Activity of α-Synuclein Attenuates Aggregation of Its Alternatively Spliced Isoform, 112-Synuclein In Vitro: Plausible Cross-Talk between Isoforms in Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Manda, Krishna Madhuri; Yedlapudi, Deepthi; Korukonda, Srikanth; Bojja, Sreedhar; Kalivendi, Shasi V.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal oligomerization and aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn/WT-syn) has been shown to be a precipitating factor in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Earlier observations on the induced-alternative splicing of α-syn by Parkinsonism mimetics as well as identification of region specific abnormalities in the transcript levels of 112-synclein (112-syn) in diseased subjects underscores the role of 112-syn in the pathophysiology of PD. In the present study, we sought to identify the aggregation potential of 112-syn in the presence or absence of WT-syn to predict its plausible role in protein aggregation events. Results demonstrate that unlike WT-syn, lack of 28 aa in the C-terminus results in the loss of chaperone-like activity with a concomitant gain in vulnerability to heat-induced aggregation and time-dependent fibrillation. The effects were dose and time-dependent and a significant aggregation of 112-syn was evident at as low as 45°C following 10 min of incubation. The heat-induced aggregates were found to be ill-defined structures and weakly positive towards Thioflavin-T (ThT) staining as compared to clearly distinguishable ThT positive extended fibrils resulting upon 24 h of incubation at 37°C. Further, the chaperone-like activity of WT-syn significantly attenuated heat-induced aggregation of 112-syn in a dose and time-dependent manner. On contrary, WT-syn synergistically enhanced fibrillation of 112-syn. Overall, the present findings highlight a plausible cross-talk between isoforms of α-syn and the relative abundance of these isoforms may dictate the nature and fate of protein aggregates. PMID:24892822

  12. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 04: An iterative triple energy window (TEW) approach to cross talk correction in quantitative small animal Tc99m and In111 SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, P; Timmins, R; Wells, R G

    2014-08-15

    Dual isotope SPECT allows simultaneous measurement of two different tracers in vivo. With In111 (emission energies of 171keV and 245keV) and Tc99m (140keV), quantification of Tc99m is degraded by cross talk from the In111 photons that scatter and are detected at an energy corresponding to Tc99m. TEW uses counts recorded in two narrow windows surrounding the Tc99m primary window to estimate scatter. Iterative TEW corrects for the bias introduced into the TEW estimate resulting from un-scattered counts detected in the scatter windows. The contamination in the scatter windows is iteratively estimated and subtracted as a fraction of the scatter-corrected primary window counts. The iterative TEW approach was validated with a small-animal SPECT/CT camera using a 2.5mL plastic container holding thoroughly mixed Tc99m/In111 activity fractions of 0.15, 0.28, 0.52, 0.99, 2.47 and 6.90. Dose calibrator measurements were the gold standard. Uncorrected for scatter, the Tc99m activity was over-estimated by as much as 80%. Unmodified TEW underestimated the Tc99m activity by 13%. With iterative TEW corrections applied in projection space, the Tc99m activity was estimated within 5% of truth across all activity fractions above 0.15. This is an improvement over the non-iterative TEW, which could not sufficiently correct for scatter in the 0.15 and 0.28 phantoms.

  13. Cross-talk between NADPH oxidase-PKCα-p(38)MAPK and NF-κB-MT1MMP in activating proMMP-2 by ET-1 in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Jaganmay; Chowdhury, Animesh; Chakraborti, Tapati; Chakraborti, Sajal

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with endothelin-1 (ET-1) caused an increase in the expression and activation of proMMP-2 in the cells. The present study was undertaken to determine the underlying mechanisms involved in this scenario. We demonstrated that (i) pretreatment with NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin; PKC-α inhibitor, Go6976; p(38)MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and NF-κB inhibitor, Bay11-7082 inhibited the expression and activation of proMMP-2 induced by ET-1; (ii) ET-1 treatment to the cells stimulated NADPH oxidase and PKCα activity, p(38)MAPK phosphorylation as well as NF-κB activation by translocation of NF-κBp65 subunit from cytosol to the nucleus, and subsequently by increasing its DNA-binding activity; (iii) ET-1 increases MT1-MMP expression, which was inhibited upon pretreatment with apocynin, Go6976, SB293580, and Bay 11-7082; (iv) ET-1 treatment to the cells downregulated TIMP-2 level. Although apocynin and Go6976 pretreatment reversed ET-1 effect on TIMP-2 level, yet pretreatment of the cells with SB203580 and Bay 11-7082 did not show any discernible change in TIMP-2 level by ET-1. Overall, our results suggest that ET-1-induced activation of proMMP-2 is mediated via cross-talk between NADPH oxidase-PKCα-p(38)MAPK and NFκB-MT1MMP signaling pathways along with a marked decrease in TIMP-2 expression in the cells.

  14. Evidence of vitamin D and interferon-β cross-talk in human osteoblasts with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 being dominant over interferon-β in stimulating mineralization.

    PubMed

    Woeckel, V J; Koedam, M; van de Peppel, J; Chiba, H; van der Eerden, B C J; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2012-09-01

    It is well established that 1α-25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) regulates osteoblast function and stimulates mineralization by human osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to identify processes underlying the 1,25D3 effects on mineralization. We started with gene expression profiling analyses of differentiating human pre-osteoblast treated with 1,25D3. Bioinformatic analyses showed interferon-related and -regulated genes (ISG) to be overrepresented in the set of 1,25D3-regulated genes. 1,25D3 down-regulated ISGs predominantly during the pre-mineralization period. This pointed to an interaction between the vitamin D and IFN signaling cascades in the regulation of osteoblast function. Separately, 1,25D3 enhances while IFNβ inhibits mineralization. Treatment of human osteoblasts with 1,25D3 and IFNβ showed that 1,25D3 completely overrules the IFNβ inhibition of mineralization. This was supported by analyses of extracellular matrix gene expression, showing a dominant effect of 1,25D3 over the inhibitory effect of IFNβ. We identified processes shared by IFNβ- and 1,25D3-mediated signaling by performing gene expression profiling during early osteoblast differentiation. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that genes being correlated or anti-correlated with interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 1 (IFIT1) were associated with osteoblast proliferation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates a cross talk between 1,25D3 and IFNβ in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation/mineralization. The interaction is complex and depends on the process but importantly, 1,25D3 stimulation of mineralization is dominant over the inhibitory effect of IFNβ. These observations are of potential clinical relevance considering the impact of the immune system on bone metabolism in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Examples of doping control analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: ephedrines, beta-receptor blocking agents, diuretics, sympathomimetics, and cross-linked hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2005-01-01

    The application of modern and powerful analytical instruments consisting of liquid chromatographs (LCs), sophisticated atmospheric pressure ion sources, and sensitive mass analyzers has improved quality as well as speed of doping control analyses markedly during the last 5 years. Numerous compounds such as beta-receptor blocking agents or diuretics require derivatization prior to gas chromatographic (GC) and mass spectrometric (MS) measurement, which is the reason for extended sample preparation periods. In addition, several substances demonstrate poor GC-MS properties even after chemical modification, and peptide hormones such as cross-linked hemoglobins cannot be analyzed at all by means of GC-MS. With the availability of electrospray ionization and robust tandem MSs (e.g., triple-stage quadrupole or ion trap instruments) many new or complementary screening and confirmation assays have been developed, providing detailed qualitative and quantitative information on prohibited drugs. With selected categories of compounds (ephedrines, beta-blockers, b2-agonists, diuretics, and bovine hemoglobin-based oxygen therapeutics) that are banned according to the rules of the World Anti-Doping Agency and International Olympic Committee, the advantages of LC-MS-MS procedures over conventional GC-MS assays are demonstrated, such as enhanced separation of analytes, shorter sample pretreatment, and identification of substances that are not identified by GC-MS. PMID:15808003

  16. Morbidity Among Tribal Under-Five Children of Tea Garden Areas in a Block of Darjeeling District, West Bengal: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ishore, Kaushik; Das, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background In the developing world, more than half of infant and childhood mortality is related to childhood diseases particularly- acute respiratory infections (ARI) and diarrhoea. The situation is worse among underprivileged population such as tribals and people living in tea garden areas. Aim To identify the morbidity pattern and the associated factors among tribal, under five, children living in tea garden areas of Darjeeling district. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in three randomly chosen tea garden areas of a block in Darjeeling District, West Bengal, India from September 2013-February 2014. The collected data was analysed using SPSS software and binary logistic regression was applied to test association between morbidity and other epidemiological correlates. Results Morbidity was noted among 74 out of 192 children studied. Major causes of morbidity were- diarrhoea (26%), acute respiratory infections (24.5%) and fever (16.7%). Proportion of underweight children according to their age was 64.4%. Morbidity status was found statistically significant with some factors, like- religion, socio-economic status, immunization status and number of siblings. Conclusion There is high prevalence of diarrhoea and ARI associated morbidity in this part of the country. PMID:26468469

  17. Identification of Putative Ortholog Gene Blocks Involved in Gestant and Lactating Mammary Gland Development: A Rodent Cross-Species Microarray Transcriptomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.; Hernández-Stengele, Gabriel; Sánchez, Raúl; Salazar, Emmanuel; Sanchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio; Ramírez-Salcedo, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland (MG) undergoes functional and metabolic changes during the transition from pregnancy to lactation, possibly by regulation of conserved genes. The objective was to elucidate orthologous genes, chromosome clusters and putative conserved transcriptional modules during MG development. We analyzed expression of 22,000 transcripts using murine microarrays and RNA samples of MG from virgin, pregnant, and lactating rats by cross-species hybridization. We identified 521 transcripts differentially expressed; upregulated in early (78%) and midpregnancy (89%) and early lactation (64%), but downregulated in mid-lactation (61%). Putative orthologous genes were identified. We mapped the altered genes to orthologous chromosomal locations in human and mouse. Eighteen sets of conserved genes associated with key cellular functions were revealed and conserved transcription factor binding site search entailed possible coregulation among all eight block sets of genes. This study demonstrates that the use of heterologous array hybridization for screening of orthologous gene expression from rat revealed sets of conserved genes arranged in chromosomal order implicated in signaling pathways and functional ontology. Results demonstrate the utilization power of comparative genomics and prove the feasibility of using rodent microarrays to identification of putative coexpressed orthologous genes involved in the control of human mammary gland development. PMID:24288657

  18. Coactivator cross-talk specifies transcriptional output

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Michael T.; Isogai, Yoh; Wright, Kevin J.; Tjian, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Cells often fine-tune gene expression at the level of transcription to generate the appropriate response to a given environmental or developmental stimulus. Both positive and negative influences on gene expression must be balanced to produce the correct level of mRNA synthesis. To this end, the cell uses several classes of regulatory coactivator complexes including two central players, TFIID and Mediator (MED), in potentiating activated transcription. Both of these complexes integrate activator signals and convey them to the basal apparatus. Interestingly, many promoters require both regulatory complexes, although at first glance they may seem to be redundant. Here we have used RNA interference (RNAi) in Drosophila cells to selectively deplete subunits of the MED and TFIID complexes to dissect the contribution of each of these complexes in modulating activated transcription. We exploited the robust response of the metallothionein genes to heavy metal as a model for transcriptional activation by analyzing direct factor recruitment in both heterogeneous cell populations and at the single-cell level. Intriguingly, we find that MED and TFIID interact functionally to modulate transcriptional response to metal. The metal response element-binding transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) recruits TFIID, which then binds promoter DNA, setting up a “checkpoint complex” for the initiation of transcription that is subsequently activated upon recruitment of the MED complex. The appropriate expression level of the endogenous metallothionein genes is achieved only when the activities of these two coactivators are balanced. Surprisingly, we find that the same activator (MTF-1) requires different coactivator subunits depending on the context of the core promoter. Finally, we find that the stability of multi-subunit coactivator complexes can be compromised by loss of a single subunit, underscoring the potential for combinatorial control of transcription activation. PMID:16751183

  19. Talking About Looking

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Richard Philip; Thompson, Ben; Whybrow, Paul; Rapley, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Given the profusion of illness-related information, in this article, we consider how talking about information seeking—and in particular Internet use—is difficult, not because it is necessarily a highly sensitive topic (though it may be), but rather due to the unusual and unfamiliar situation of talking about information seeking. Drawing on interviews conducted as part of a study on the educational needs of carers of people with rheumatoid arthritis, we compare three types of interview for understanding online information seeking: interviews (recall), researcher-led observation (joining participant at the computer), and diaries. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach and discuss how changing interview questions and the form of interaction can help to produce different types of data, and potentially more meaningful insights. Of the three approaches, conducting interviews with participants while looking at a computer (talking while looking) offered the best opportunities to understand Internet-based information seeking. PMID:26290541

  20. Talking Science, Modeling Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Elizabeth; Leonard, William H.; Peters, Chris; Baldwin, Anna O.

    2006-01-01

    The Experimental Reflection Portal, or "XRePort" is an online system that pairs students and teachers from different schools and allows them to "talk" about their common science investigations. In this way, students communicate their science knowledge "and" experience firsthand the benefits of the collaborative nature of science. The XRePort…

  1. Talk Like a Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum-Dietrich, Nanette

    2010-01-01

    In the scientific community, the symposium is one formal structure of conversation. Scientists routinely hold symposiums to gather and talk about a common topic. To model this method of communication in the classroom, the author designed an activity in which students conduct their own science symposiums. This article presents the science symposium…

  2. Teachers, Let Students Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigford, Aretha Butler

    1988-01-01

    To improve oral communication skills of their students, teachers should provide opportunities for students to talk in class. Teachers are advised to: begin early, be sensitive to the individuality of students' speech patterns, and stress that there are different kinds of speech patterns for different situations. (JDD)

  3. Talking Sport and Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon-Watmough, Rebecca; Keogh, Brenda; Naylor, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    For some time the Association for Science Education (ASE) has been aware that it would be useful to have some resources available to get children talking and thinking about issues related to health, sport and fitness. Some of the questions about pulse, breathing rate and so on are pretty obvious to everyone, and there is a risk of these being…

  4. Talking with Mel Levine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    In his third book, "Ready or Not, Here Life Comes" (Simon & Shuster, 2005), pediatrician and brain researcher Dr. Mel Levine talks about the rising number of "start-up adults"--students who emerge from high school or college to find themselves woefully unprepared for the realities of a career. This article presents an interview with Dr. Levine…

  5. Moving beyond Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Debra; Wilson, Bruce; Corbett, Dick

    2009-01-01

    It's easy for professional learning communities to become stalled at the stage of collegial discussions about improving teaching practice. The authors explore what spurs communities to progress beyond talk to collective action that brings change. Smith, Wilson, and Corbett participated in the creation of teacher learning communities in urban…

  6. Learning Talk Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markee, Numa; Seo, Mi-Suk

    2009-01-01

    Since the beginning, second language acquisition (SLA) studies have been predominantly cognitive in their theoretical assumptions and programmatic agendas. This is still largely true today. In this paper, we set out our proposals for learning talk analysis (LTA). LTA synthesizes insights from linguistic philosophy, ethnomethodology, conversation…

  7. Let Them Talk!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Wayne E.

    2016-01-01

    Although human beings communicate mainly through talking and listening, schools tend to spend little classroom instruction time helping ELLs develop their English oral language skills, writes Wayne E. Wright. In reviewing the research on ELLs' oral language development, Wright concludes that bilingual programs give ELLs the best opportunities to…

  8. Talking Back to Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischman, Josh

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about Classroom Presenter, a computer program that aids in student participation during class discussions and makes boring lectures more interactive. The program was created by Richard J. Anderson, a professor of computer science at the University of Washington, in Seattle. Classroom Presenter is now in use in…

  9. The Talking Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Jacqui

    2009-01-01

    Every year, fourth graders at Sterling Morton Elementary School in Ohio present a talking art museum for the school and community. In this article, the author describes a lesson on art history which culminates in an activity showcasing all the students' finished paintings in gold frames. A student stands behind the painting and pokes his or her…

  10. Aerospace Medicine Talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation is next Sunday, May 10th. It will be to the Civil Aviation Medical Association, for 2 hours at Disney World in Orlando. It is a high level talk on space medicine, including history, the role of my office, human health risks of space flight, general aspects of space medicine practice, human health risk management (including integrated activities of medical operations and the Human Research Program, and thoughts concerning health risks for long duration exploration class space missions. No proprietary data or material will be used, all is readily available in the public sector. There is also a short (30 min) talk on Monday at the CAMA lunch. There we will describe the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure syndrome, with possible etiologies and plans for research (already selected studies). Again, nothing proprietary will be discussed.

  11. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  12. Making time to talk.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    NHS Employers has updated its people performance management toolkit, which now includes links to new guidance and resources. The toolkit encourages managers to 'make time to talk' about performance with staff, provides practical support, increases managers' knowledge about what good performance management is, and aims to increase their confidence in dealing with associated challenges, such as what to do if a team member is underperforming and how to give constructive feedback. PMID:27581903

  13. Learning to talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messum, Piers

    2001-05-01

    Is imitation a necessary part of learning to talk? The faithful replication by children of such arbitrary phenomena of English as tense and lax vowel properties, ``rhythm,'' and context-dependent VOT's seems to insist that it is. But a nonimitative account of this is also possible. It relies on two principal mechanisms. First, basic speech sounds are learned by emulation: attempting to reproduce the results achieved by other speakers but without copying their actions to do so. The effectiveness of the output provides sufficient feedback to inform the child of the adequacy of its performance and to guide refinement. Second, phonetic phenomena such as those above appear through aerodynamic accommodation. Key elements of this are (a) that speech breathing is a complex motor skill which dominates other articulatory processes during acquisition and starts pulsatile before becoming smooth, and (b) that a child-scale production system imposes constraints on talking which do not operate in the adult speaker. Much of ``the terrible complexity of phonetic patterns'' [J. Pierrehumbert, Lang. Speech 46, 115-154 (2003)] then becomes epiphenomenal: appearing not as a result of young learners copying phonetic detail that is not linguistically significant, but of them reconciling conflicting production demands while just talking.

  14. Quantifying athlete self-talk.

    PubMed

    Hardy, James; Hall, Craig R; Hardy, Lew

    2005-09-01

    Two studies were conducted. The aims of Study 1 were (a) to generate quantitative data on the content of athletes' self-talk and (b) to examine differences in the use of self-talk in general as well as the functions of self-talk in practice and competition settings. Differences in self-talk between the sexes, sport types and skill levels were also assessed. Athletes (n = 295, mean age = 21.9 years) from a variety of sports and competitive levels completed the Self-Talk Use Questionnaire (STUQ), which was developed specifically for the study. In Study 1, single-factor between-group multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant differences across sex and sport type for the content of self-talk. Mixed-model multivariate analyses of variance revealed overall greater use of self-talk, as well as increased use of the functions of self-talk, in competition compared with practice. Moreover, individual sport athletes reported greater use of self-talk, as well as the functions of self-talk, than their team sport counterparts. In Study 2, recreational volleyball players (n = 164, mean age = 21.5 years) completed a situationally modified STUQ. The results were very similar to those of Study 1. That the content of athlete self-talk was generally positive, covert and abbreviated lends support to the application of Vygotsky's (1986) verbal self-regulation theory to the study of self-talk in sport. Researchers are encouraged to examine the effectiveness of self-talk in future studies.

  15. Flattening basic blocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Utke, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2006-01-01

    The application of cross country elimination strategies requires access to the computational graph or at least subgraphs for certain scopes, e.g. a basic block. Under the presence of aliased variables the construction of these (sub)graphs encounters ambiguities. We propose an algorithm to construct ambiguity free subgraphs.

  16. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  17. Straight Talk about Prejudice. The Straight Talk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranz, Rachel

    The Straight Talk series is designed for teenagers today. It presents the most factual, up-to-date information available. "Straight Talk about Prejudice" provides readers with clear, factual information about prejudice and explores how unjust and destructive prejudice and discrimination really are. Prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination are…

  18. Bus Talk: A Preliminary Analysis of Children's Decontextualized Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvin, Christine A.; Cline, Keely D.

    2010-01-01

    Decontextualized conversational talk has been recognized as an important foundation for young children's early literacy and academic success. In this study, the authors explore the tape-recorded conversations of 15 typically developing preschool-age children. The children's talk was recorded as they traveled home from preschool on a school bus…

  19. William James's Talks about Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    More than 100 years after it was published, William James's (1899/1939) book, "Talks to Teachers on Psychology," is relevant and helpful for teachers and those who aspire to teach. In this article, I highlight certain memorable points in "Talks" and relate them to James's (1890) classic work, "The Principles of Psychology." Many of James's…

  20. Talking Circles Promote Equitable Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Teachers facilitate math talk in the classroom, but introducing a structured discussion format called the "talking circle" can influence opportunities for equitable student participation. Drawing on his reflections over the 2013-14 academic year and reviewing his detailed teaching notes and lesson plans, Marcus Hung takes a close look at…

  1. Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms The Human Genome Defined by Professionals at the National Human Genome Research Institute Home A B C D E ... V W X Y Z The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) created the Talking Glossary of ...

  2. Anti-La (SS-B) but not anti-Ro52 (SS-A) antibodies cross-react with laminin--a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block?

    PubMed Central

    Li, J M; Horsfall, A C; Maini, R N

    1995-01-01

    Cross-reactions between maternally derived autoantibodies and fetal cardiac antigens have been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block (CHB). We have explored the cross-reactivity of autoantibodies to the small ribonuclear autoantigens, La/SS-B and Ro/SS-A, with laminin, the major component of cardiac sarcolemmal membrane using affinity-purified antibodies from patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Anti-La antibodies purified from eight of 10 patients cross-reacted significantly with mouse laminin by ELISA. In contrast, purified antibodies to Ro52 from the same 10 patients showed little or no binding to laminin. Laminin inhibited up to 70% binding of anti-La antibodies to La antigen, and La inhibited up to 65% binding of anti-La antibodies to laminin. The cross-reaction was further examined on cryosections of 10 human fetal hearts aged from 8.7 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, two normal adult hearts, and one pathological adult heart with a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Anti-Ro52 antibodies did not bind to the surface of cardiac cells. However, anti-La antibodies from seven of 10 patients tested bound to the surface of fetal myocytes from hearts aged 9.4 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, and also to the myocytes from the pathological adult heart but not to normal adult hearts. Preincubation with La antigen abolished the binding of anti-La antibodies to the surface of adult heart myocytes with dilated cardiomyopathy, and pre-incubation with mouse laminin could partially block this binding. These results suggest that molecular mimicry between laminin and La, but not Ro52, may act as a target for specific maternal autoantibodies, and contribute to the pathogenesis of CHB at a critical stage during fetal cardiac development. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7882552

  3. Anti-La (SS-B) but not anti-Ro52 (SS-A) antibodies cross-react with laminin--a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block?

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Horsfall, A C; Maini, R N

    1995-03-01

    Cross-reactions between maternally derived autoantibodies and fetal cardiac antigens have been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block (CHB). We have explored the cross-reactivity of autoantibodies to the small ribonuclear autoantigens, La/SS-B and Ro/SS-A, with laminin, the major component of cardiac sarcolemmal membrane using affinity-purified antibodies from patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Anti-La antibodies purified from eight of 10 patients cross-reacted significantly with mouse laminin by ELISA. In contrast, purified antibodies to Ro52 from the same 10 patients showed little or no binding to laminin. Laminin inhibited up to 70% binding of anti-La antibodies to La antigen, and La inhibited up to 65% binding of anti-La antibodies to laminin. The cross-reaction was further examined on cryosections of 10 human fetal hearts aged from 8.7 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, two normal adult hearts, and one pathological adult heart with a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Anti-Ro52 antibodies did not bind to the surface of cardiac cells. However, anti-La antibodies from seven of 10 patients tested bound to the surface of fetal myocytes from hearts aged 9.4 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, and also to the myocytes from the pathological adult heart but not to normal adult hearts. Preincubation with La antigen abolished the binding of anti-La antibodies to the surface of adult heart myocytes with dilated cardiomyopathy, and pre-incubation with mouse laminin could partially block this binding. These results suggest that molecular mimicry between laminin and La, but not Ro52, may act as a target for specific maternal autoantibodies, and contribute to the pathogenesis of CHB at a critical stage during fetal cardiac development. PMID:7882552

  4. Talking About Antismoking Campaigns: What Do Smokers Talk About, and How Does Talk Influence Campaign Effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Brennan, Emily; Durkin, Sarah J; Wakefield, Melanie A; Kashima, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Campaign-stimulated conversations have been shown to increase the effectiveness of antismoking campaigns. In order to explore why such effects occur, in the current study we coded the content of naturally occurring conversations. We also examined whether the short-term effects of talking, and of different types of talk, on quitting intentions were mediated through intrapersonal message responses. Using the Natural Exposure(SM) methodology, we exposed 411 smokers to 1 of 6 antismoking advertisements while they were watching television at home. Responses to the advertisement-conversation participation and content, emotional responses, personalized perceived effectiveness, and changes in intentions to quit-were measured within 3 days of exposure. Conversations were coded for appraisal of the advertisement (favorable, neutral, or unfavorable) and the presence of quitting talk and emotion talk. Mediation analyses indicated that the positive effects of talking on intention change were mediated through personalized perceived effectiveness and that the positive effects were driven by conversations that contained a favorable appraisal and/or quitting talk. Conversely, conversations that contained an unfavorable appraisal of the advertisement were negatively associated with campaign effectiveness. These findings highlight the importance of measuring interpersonal communication when evaluating campaigns and the need for further research to identify the message characteristics that predict when smokers talk and when they talk only in desirable ways. PMID:26376358

  5. On talking-as-dreaming.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2007-06-01

    Many patients are unable to engage in waking-dreaming in the analytic setting in the form of free association or in any other form. The author has found that "talking-as-dreaming" has served as a form of waking-dreaming in which such patients have been able to begin to dream formerly undreamable experience. Such talking is a loosely structured form of conversation between patient and analyst that is often marked by primary process thinking and apparent non sequiturs. Talking-as-dreaming superficially appears to be "unanalytic" in that it may seem to consist "merely" of talking about such topics as books, films, etymology, baseball, the taste of chocolate, the structure of light, and so on. When an analysis is "a going concern," talking-as-dreaming moves unobtrusively into and out of talking about dreaming. The author provides two detailed clinical examples of analytic work with patients who had very little capacity to dream in the analytic setting. In the first clinical example, talking-as-dreaming served as a form of thinking and relating in which the patient was able for the first time to dream her own (and, in a sense, her father's) formerly unthinkable, undreamable experience. The second clinical example involves the use of talking-as-dreaming as an emotional experience in which the formerly "invisible" patient was able to begin to dream himself into existence. The analyst, while engaging with a patient in talking-as-dreaming, must remain keenly aware that it is critical that the difference in roles of patient and analyst be a continuously felt presence; that the therapeutic goals of analysis be firmly held in mind; and that the patient be given the opportunity to dream himself into existence (as opposed to being dreamt up by the analyst).

  6. Hot Topic Talk 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Huanqian

    2016-05-01

    A trapped sample of ultracold polar molecules, where long-range anisotropic interactions can be tuned at will, offers rich possibilities for quantum information processing and for exploring novel Hamiltonians. For these applications, two important prerequisites must be fulfilled: the ability to manipulate single quantum states and long coherence times between the quantum states. In particular, a long coherence time translates to long information storage times and to precise measurements of energy levels for probing new physics. In this talk, we report on the microwave control of individual hyperfine levels in the lowest two rotational states of ultracold fermionic 23Na 40K molecules. Using Ramsey spectroscopy, we observe coherence times as long as 0.5 seconds between two nuclear spin states in the singlet rovibronic ground state. Upon decoherence, the mixture of two spin states remains fairly long lived, demonstrating the chemical stability of the 23Na 40K molecules against two-body collisions and may enable further evaporative cooling of the molecular sample.

  7. Hot Topic Talk 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, Onur

    2016-05-01

    I will focus on our experiments with cold atoms highlighting some of the most recent developments in the prospect of using quantum entanglement to improve the precision of atomic and optical sensors. The first part of the talk will describe the generation of 20 dB spin-squeezed states of half a million 87Rb atoms inside of an optical cavity. The second part will describe the experimental demonstration of a new concept we call quantum phase magnification. The demonstrated 20 dB squeezing enables a 100-fold reduction in averaging time or a 100-fold reduction in atom numbers to achieve a given sensing precision. As part of this work we show an atomic clock operating 10 dB beyond the classical limit. Some of the states prepared in these experiments possess in excess of 680 atom entanglement. The quantum phase magnification experiment shows that detection noise levels below the standard quantum limit is in fact not a requirement to realize the benefits of the intrinsic sensitivity provided by exotic quantum states. Here, optical cavity-aided effective interactions between atoms magnify signals to-be-measured to levels that can easily be detected with a rather inefficient fluorescence imaging system. The method relaxes stringent detection requirements which have been the main bottleneck in quantum metrology experiments, and can also be implemented in physical platforms other than cold atom-cavity systems.

  8. Neuromuscular block

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them especially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are especially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of especial interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors. PMID:16402115

  9. Causes and Cures of Writing Blocks: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    To provide a broad view of writer's block and the composing process, this annotated bibliography includes 100 sources that discuss (1) early views of blocking, e.g., Freud's warning about internal critics; (2) contemporary curatives, e.g., cognitive therapies that purport to change a writer's inhibitory self-talk; (3) successful writers' accounts…

  10. Reliability on ISS Talk Outline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misiora, Mike

    2015-01-01

    1. Overview of ISS 2. Space Environment and it effects a. Radiation b. Microgravity 3. How we ensure reliability a. Requirements b. Component Selection i. Note: I plan to stay away from talk about Rad Hardened components and talk about why we use older processors because they are less susceptible to SEUs. c. Testing d. Redundancy / Failure Tolerance e. Sparing strategies 4. Operational Examples a. Multiple MDM Failures on 6A due to hard drive failure In general, my plan is to only talk about data that is currently available via normal internet sources to ensure that I stay away from any topics that would be Export Controlled, ITAR, or NDA-controlled. The operational example has been well-reported on in the media and those are the details that I plan to cover. Additionally I am not planning on using any slides or showing any photos during the talk.

  11. Cross-Linking the Fibers of Supramolecular Gels Formed from a Tripodal Terpyridine Derived Ligand with d-Block Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kotova, Oxana; Daly, Ronan; dos Santos, Cidália M G; Kruger, Paul E; Boland, John J; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2015-08-17

    The tripodal terpyridine ligand, L, forms 1D helical supramolecular polymers/gels in H2O-CH3OH solution mediated through hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions. These gels further cross-link into 3D supramolecular metallogels with a range of metal ions (M) such as Fe(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Ru(III); the cross-linking resulting in the formation of colored or colorless gels. The fibrous morphology of these gels was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM); while the self-assembly processes between L and M were investigated by absorbance and emission spectroscopy from which their binding constants were determined by using a nonlinear regression analysis. PMID:26222397

  12. Reviews Book: Voyage to the Heart of the Matter: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN Equipment: SEP Spectroscope Books: Quantum Gods / The Universe Places to visit: The Royal Institution of Great Britain Book: What is this Thing Called Science? Book: Don't be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in the Age of Style Equipment: La Crosse Anemometer Book: Wonder and Delight Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    WE RECOMMEND SEP Spectroscope Flatpacked classroom equipment for pupils aged 10 and over Quantum Gods Book attacks spiritualism and religion with physics The Universe Study of whether physics alone can explain origin of universe La Crosse Anemometer Handheld monitor is packed with useful features Wonder and Delight Essays in science education in honour of Eric Rogers WORTH A LOOK Voyage to the Heart of the Matter: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN Pop-up book explains background to complex physics The Royal Institution of Great Britain RI museum proves interesting but not ideal for teaching What is this Thing Called Science? Theory and history of science in an opinionated study Don't be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in the Age of Style Explanation of how science is best communicated to the public WEB WATCH Particle physics simulations vary in complexity, usefulness and how well they work

  13. Block People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rayma

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an activity in which students in an after-school art class drew one another on pieces of 2-by-4 scrap lumber in order to create a class portrait in three dimensions. Stresses that the portraits on the wood blocks were done in-the-round, or each side was covered. (CMK)

  14. The smart-talk trap.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, J; Sutton, R I

    1999-01-01

    In today's business world, there's no shortage of know-how. When companies get into trouble, their executives have vast resources at their disposal: their own experiences, colleagues' ideas, reams of computer-generated data, thousands of publications, and consultants armed with the latest managerial concepts and tools. But all too often, even with all that knowledge floating around, companies are plagued with an inertia that comes from knowing too much and doing too little--a phenomenon the authors call the knowing-doing gap. The gap often can be traced to a basic human propensity: the willingness to let talk substitute for action. When confronted with a problem, people act as though discussing it, formulating decisions, and hashing out plans for action are the same as actually fixing it. And after researching organizations of all shapes and sizes, the authors concluded that a particular kind of talk is an especially insidious inhibitor of action: "smart talk." People who can engage in such talk generally sound confident and articulate; they can spout facts and may even have interesting ideas. But such people often exhibit the less benign aspects of smart talk as well: They focus on the negative, and they favor unnecessarily complex or abstract language. The former lapses into criticism for criticism's sake; the latter confuses people. Both tendencies can stop action in its tracks. How can you shut the smart-talk trap and close the knowing-doing gap? The authors lay out five methods that successful companies employ in order to translate the right kind of talk into intelligent action. PMID:10387575

  15. Spin-Blocking Effect in CO and H2 Binding Reactions to Molybdenocene and Tungstenocene: A Theoretical Study on the Reaction Mechanism via the Minimum Energy Intersystem Crossing Point.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K-Jiro; Nakatani, Naoki; Nakayama, Akira; Higashi, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya

    2016-08-15

    Potential energy profiles and electronic structural interpretation of the CO and H2 binding reactions to molybdenocene and tungstenocene complexes [MCp2] (M = Mo and W, Cp = cycropentadienyl) were studied using density functional theory calculations and ab initio multiconfigurational electronic structure calculations. Experimentally observed slow H2 binding was reasonably explained in terms of the spin-blocking effect. Electronic structural analysis at the minimum-energy intersystem crossing point (MEISCP) revealed that the singly occupied molecular orbital's π-bonding/σ-antibonding character in the M-CO/H2 moiety determines the energy levels of the MEISCP. Analysis of the reaction coordinate showed that the singlet-triplet gap significantly depends on the Cp-M-Cp angle. Therefore, not only the metal-ligand distance but also the Cp-M-Cp angle is an important reaction coordinate to reach the MEISCP, the transition state of H2 binding. The role of spin-orbit coupling is also discussed.

  16. Studying the structure of a zone in which the single-phase flow moving in an annular channel with partially blocked cross section becomes spatially disturbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinskii, O. N.; Lobanov, P. D.; Kurdyumov, A. S.; Pribaturin, N. A.

    2013-05-01

    The flow of liquid in an annular channel with a partially shaded flow section is experimentally studied using the electrodiffusion method. The effect on the flow structure produced by a shutter closing one-quarter of the channel cross section is shown. An obstacle installed in the channel causes the flow to attain a 3D structure. The flow pattern in such channel differs significantly from that observed in undisturbed flow moving in an annular channel. It is revealed that the friction stress values measured on the channel's inner wall depend essentially on the azimuth angle over the channel height. With distance away from the obstacle, the influence it has on the hydrodynamic flow structure tends to decrease, but the disturbance produced by it does not die out completely even at a distance of more than 600 mm from the obstacle. Data quantitatively characterizing the disturbance of flow structure in the studied channel are presented.

  17. Talking in Class: Remembering What Is Important about Classroom Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter H.; Ivey, Gay; Faulkner, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The writers describe how apparently ordinary decisions about what to say when talking with children can have substantial effects on their learning and development. The language we use with children influences, among other things, who they think they are, what they think they're doing, the relationships they have with others, the strategic…

  18. Medical crises and therapeutic talk.

    PubMed

    Parkin, David

    2013-01-01

    Coexisting medical traditions operate at different levels of scale. In rural eastern Africa there are diviners and herbalists whose clients are drawn from the immediate neighbourhood. Some develop healing reputations more widely over a region or nation, sometimes with prophetic and witch-finding powers. Biomedical clinics and hospitals are also interlinked regionally, nationally and internationally. Patients or carers may seek healthcare by moving through these different levels, sometimes beginning with a neighbourhood healer and sometimes trying out different therapies simultaneously. Sicknesses and misfortunes are often first discussed within a family or homestead, with concern for the victim extending to all its members. The talk is based on assumed trust among its members. However, if unresolved, the affliction may trigger a crisis that breaks the trust, so that healers beyond the neighbourhood are sought, whether prophetic/witch-finding or biomedical. Taken out of the context of family and homestead intimacy, the talk blames the ailment on the malevolence or negligence of individuals in the community. Talk about sickness among sufferers and between them and healers, is thus transformed from that which seeks resolution in amity to that which seeks culpability and, sometimes, retribution. A similar process of sickness talk changing through its appropriation by wider scale and more powerful medical authority also occurs in western biomedical hospitals and clinics. PMID:23898834

  19. Making Data Talk: A Workbook

    Cancer.gov

    This workbook provides an overview of the main points continued in the book Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, POlicy Makers, and the Press, as well as practical exercises for applying the book's concepts and communication principles to your unique situation.

  20. Let's Talk about Student Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doree, Suzanne; Jardine, Richard; Linton, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This article offers our ideas on why it is important to teach our students how to speak about mathematics and some practical resources for incorporating speaking activities, helping students prepare, evaluating student presentations, and getting your department to talk about student presentations. The ideas in this article were compiled when the…

  1. Machines That Make Books Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Vicki, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes playback equipment provided by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped's Talking Books program. The history of these machines is reviewed from 1933 to the present and includes activities during World War II, the introduction of flexible discs and cassettes, descriptions of a variety of machines…

  2. How to Talk about Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Given the prevalence of religion talk in today's world, another form of fluency is needed. Civic multilingualism is the ability to converse across different religious and ethical perspectives in search of understanding, compromise, and common ground. According to the author, this may represent the greatest social challenge of the 21st century.…

  3. Combining Clozapine and Talk Therapies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin

    Clozapine is an antipsychotic medication used in the treatment of schizophrenia. This paper reviews articles concerning clozapine therapy. It considers its benefits and dangers in various situations, and how it can be successfully combined with talk therapies. Studies are reviewed concerning patients in outpatient clinics, partial hospitalization…

  4. Talking about Poems, Elaborating Barnes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, John

    2010-01-01

    In "Language, the Learner and the School", Douglas Barnes recognised that intonation was important to classroom interaction but also acknowledged that his own research team did not choose to analyse it. This article presents instances of classroom talk about poetry and reflects on them using Barnes' concepts of pupil participation, exploratory…

  5. Trainer Talk: Levels of Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engin, Marion

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to present examples of trainer talk that scaffold trainee teachers' understanding of teaching in a post-observation feedback session. Previous research into scaffolding in a teacher training context describes scaffolding at a technique or strategy level, without describing how, in linguistic terms, the trainer can support and…

  6. Maternal Talk About Disappearance Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfield, Beverly A.

    1995-01-01

    Examined maternal talk about events regarding hidden, missing, or absent persons or objects, and the relationship of maternal language to children's acquisition of words for disappearance, among 12 mother-infant pairs. Results found that infants who had acquired "gone" and similar terms experienced more disappearance events than children who had…

  7. Talk to Your Kids about Sex

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic En español Talk to Your Kids about Sex Browse Sections The Basics Overview When to Start ... healthy expectations for their relationships. Talk about opposite-sex (straight) and same-sex (gay or lesbian) relationships. ...

  8. In vitro immunological effects of blocking CCR5 on T cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Ren, Han-Yun; Shi, Yong-Jin; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Blockade of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) by maraviroc may induce immunological changes independent of its antiviral effects and may have immunoregulation properties. This study was designed to determine the effects of blocking CCR5 on human activated T cells in vitro and investigate the potential immunological mechanisms. Human CD3+ T cells were purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and then activated by cytokines. We tested the surface expressions and relative messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CCR2, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, and CXCR3, chemotaxis toward their cognate ligands, internalization of chemokine receptors, and production of cytokines. In conclusion, blocking CCR5 by maraviroc not only can block CCR5 and CCR2 internalization processes induced by CCL5 and CCL2, but also inhibit T cell chemotactic activities toward their cognate ligands, respectively. Moreover, blocking CCR5 with maraviroc at high doses tends to decrease the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ. In addition, there might be a form of cross talk between CCR5 and CCR2, and this may offer a novel immunological effect for blockade of CCR5.

  9. Genderlects: Girl Talk and Boy Talk in a Middle-Years Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Heather A.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the gendered nature of talk in one multicultural, eighth-grade classroom, discussing how talk is an integral part of engendering. Looks at how the genderlects "Boy Talk" and "Girl Talk" contributed to classroom inequities. Offers suggestions to teachers for ways to validate and utilize the girls' discourse practices to their advantage,…

  10. Spin-Blocking Effect in CO and H2 Binding Reactions to Molybdenocene and Tungstenocene: A Theoretical Study on the Reaction Mechanism via the Minimum Energy Intersystem Crossing Point.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K-Jiro; Nakatani, Naoki; Nakayama, Akira; Higashi, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya

    2016-08-15

    Potential energy profiles and electronic structural interpretation of the CO and H2 binding reactions to molybdenocene and tungstenocene complexes [MCp2] (M = Mo and W, Cp = cycropentadienyl) were studied using density functional theory calculations and ab initio multiconfigurational electronic structure calculations. Experimentally observed slow H2 binding was reasonably explained in terms of the spin-blocking effect. Electronic structural analysis at the minimum-energy intersystem crossing point (MEISCP) revealed that the singly occupied molecular orbital's π-bonding/σ-antibonding character in the M-CO/H2 moiety determines the energy levels of the MEISCP. Analysis of the reaction coordinate showed that the singlet-triplet gap significantly depends on the Cp-M-Cp angle. Therefore, not only the metal-ligand distance but also the Cp-M-Cp angle is an important reaction coordinate to reach the MEISCP, the transition state of H2 binding. The role of spin-orbit coupling is also discussed. PMID:27482717

  11. Hormones talking: does hormonal cross-talk shape the Arabidopsis gynoecium?

    PubMed

    Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Reyes-Olalde, J Irepan; Ramos-Cruz, Daniela; Lozano-Sotomayor, Paulina; Zúñiga-Mayo, Victor M; de Folter, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    The proper development of fruits is important for the sexual reproduction and propagation of many plant species. The fruit of Arabidopsis derives from the fertilized gynoecium, which initiates at the center of the flower and obtains its final shape, size, and functional tissues through progressive stages of development. Hormones, specially auxins, play important roles in gynoecium and fruit patterning. Cytokinins, which act as counterparts to auxins in other plant tissues, have been studied more in the context of ovule formation and parthenocarpy. We recently studied the role of cytokinins in gynoecium and fruit patterning and found that they have more than one role during gynoecium and fruit patterning. We also compared the cytokinin response localization to the auxin response localization in these organs, and studied the effects of spraying cytokinins in young flowers of an auxin response line. In this addendum, we discuss further the implications of the observed results in the knowledge about the relationship between cytokinins and auxins at the gynoecium. PMID:23072997

  12. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... the P and the R waves on the EKG (electrocardiogram). First-degree heart block may not cause ...

  13. Psychoneuroimmunology--cross-talk between the immune and nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Kern, Simone

    2007-05-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively new field of study that investigates interactions between behaviour and the immune system, mediated by the endocrine and nervous systems. The immune and central nervous system (CNS) maintain extensive communication. On the one hand, the brain modulates the immune system by hardwiring sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves (autonomic nervous system) to lymphoid organs. On the other hand, neuroendocrine hormones such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone or substance P regulate cytokine balance. Vice versa, the immune system modulates brain activity including sleep and body temperature. Based on a close functional and anatomical link, the immune and nervous systems act in a highly reciprocal manner. From fever to stress, the influence of one system on the other has evolved in an intricate manner to help sense danger and to mount an appropriate adaptive response. Over recent decades, reasonable evidence has emerged that these brain-to-immune interactions are highly modulated by psychological factors which influence immunity and immune system-mediated disease.

  14. Cross-talk free, low-noise optical amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dijaili, Sol P.; Patterson, Frank G.; Deri, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A low-noise optical amplifier solves crosstalk problems in optical amplifiers by using an optical cavity oriented off-axis (e.g. perpendicular) to the direction of a signal amplified by the gain medium of the optical amplifier. Several devices are used to suppress parasitic lasing of these types of structures. The parasitic lasing causes the gain of these structures to be practically unusable. The lasing cavity is operated above threshold and the gain of the laser is clamped to overcome the losses of the cavity. Any increase in pumping causes the lasing power to increase. The clamping action of the gain greatly reduces crosstalk due to gain saturation for the amplified signal beam. It also reduces other nonlinearities associated with the gain medium such as four-wave mixing induced crosstalk. This clamping action can occur for a bandwidth defined by the speed of the laser cavity. The lasing field also reduces the response time of the gain medium. By having the lasing field off-axis, no special coatings are needed. Other advantages are that the lasing field is easily separated from the amplified signal and the carrier grating fluctuations induced by four-wave mixing are decreased. Two related methods reduce the amplified spontaneous emission power without sacrificing the gain of the optical amplifier.

  15. Cross-talk free, low-noise optical amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dijaili, S.P.; Patterson, F.G.; Deri, R.J.

    1995-07-25

    A low-noise optical amplifier solves crosstalk problems in optical amplifiers by using an optical cavity oriented off-axis (e.g. perpendicular) to the direction of a signal amplified by the gain medium of the optical amplifier. Several devices are used to suppress parasitic lasing of these types of structures. The parasitic lasing causes the gain of these structures to be practically unusable. The lasing cavity is operated above threshold and the gain of the laser is clamped to overcome the losses of the cavity. Any increase in pumping causes the lasing power to increase. The clamping action of the gain greatly reduces crosstalk due to gain saturation for the amplified signal beam. It also reduces other nonlinearities associated with the gain medium such as four-wave mixing induced crosstalk. This clamping action can occur for a bandwidth defined by the speed of the laser cavity. The lasing field also reduces the response time of the gain medium. By having the lasing field off-axis, no special coatings are needed. Other advantages are that the lasing field is easily separated from the amplified signal and the carrier grating fluctuations induced by four-wave mixing are decreased. Two related methods reduce the amplified spontaneous emission power without sacrificing the gain of the optical amplifier. 11 figs.

  16. TSLP in Epithelial Cell and Dendritic Cell Cross Talk

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that have the ability to sense infection and tissue stress, sample and present antigen to T lymphocytes, and instruct the initiation of different forms of immunity and tolerance. The functional versatility of DCs depends on their remarkable ability to translate collectively the information from the invading microbes, as well as their resident tissue microenvironments. Recent progress in understanding Toll-like receptor (TLR) biology has illuminated the mechanisms by which DCs link innate and adaptive antimicrobial immune responses. However, how tissue microenvironments shape the function of DCs has remained elusive. Recent studies of TSLP (thymic stromal lymphopoietin), an epithelial cell-derived cytokine that strongly activates DCs, provide strong evidence at a molecular level that epithelial cells/tissue microenvironments directly communicate with DCs, the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. We review recent progress on how TSLP expressed within thymus and peripheral lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues regulates DC-mediated central tolerance, peripheral T cell homeostasis, and inflammatory Th2 responses. PMID:19231591

  17. GA signalling and cross-talk with other signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lor, Vai S; Olszewski, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones that regulate growth and development. DELLA proteins repress GA responses. GA binding to its receptor triggers a series of events that culminate in the destruction of DELLA proteins by the 26S proteasome, which removes the repression of GA signalling. DELLA proteins are transcription co-activators that induce the expression of genes which encode products that inhibit GA responses. In addition to repressing GA responses, DELLA proteins influence the activity of other signalling pathways and serve as a central hub from which other pathways influence GA signalling. In this role, DELLA proteins bind to and inhibit proteins, including transcription factors that act in the signalling pathways of other hormones and light. The binding of these proteins to DELLA proteins also inhibits DELLA activity. GA signalling is subject to homoeostatic regulation through GA-induced repression of GA biosynthesis gene expression, and increased production of the GA receptor and enzymes that catabolize bioactive GAs. This review also discusses the nature of mutant DELLA alleles that are used to produce high-yielding 'Green Revolution' cereal varieties, and highlights important gaps in our knowledge of GA signalling. PMID:26374886

  18. Signaling pathway cross talk in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest energy failure and accumulative intracellular waste play a causal role in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in particular. AD is characterized by extracellular amyloid deposits, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, cholinergic deficits, synaptic loss, inflammation and extensive oxidative stress. These pathobiological changes are accompanied by significant behavioral, motor, and cognitive impairment leading to accelerated mortality. Currently, the potential role of several metabolic pathways associated with AD, including Wnt signaling, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1, silent mating-type information regulator 2 homolog 1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α (PGC-1α) have widened, with recent discoveries that they are able to modulate several pathological events in AD. These include reduction of amyloid-β aggregation and inflammation, regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, and increased availability of neuronal energy. This review aims to highlight the involvement of these new set of signaling pathways, which we have collectively termed “anti-ageing pathways”, for their potentiality in multi-target therapies against AD where cellular metabolic processes are severely impaired. PMID:24679124

  19. Cross-talk between the kidney and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Amann, Kerstin; Wanner, Christoph; Ritz, Eberhard

    2006-08-01

    In recent years, increasing evidence has been provided that even minor renal dysfunction is a powerful cardiovascular risk factor that induces typical cardiovascular alterations and thus predisposes to coronary heart disease as well as to noncoronary cardiovascular problems. This first had been noted in patients with diabetes but now has been confirmed amply in patients without diabetes as well. Numerous heterogeneous abnormalities have been described in patients with early renal dysfunction (e.g., microalbuminuria, reduced estimated GFR). One final common pathway seems to be endothelial cell dysfunction. The link between albuminuria and generalized endothelial cell dysfunction (as indicated by diminished flow-mediated vasodilation, markers of endothelial cell dysfunction, sloughed off endothelial cells, and high transcapillary albumin escape rate) is unclear. In patients with early renal dysfunction, a long list of classical and nonclassical cardiovascular risk factors have been identified: Elevated asymmetric dimethyl-l-arginine concentrations, markers of microinflammation, oxidative stress, features of metabolic syndrome, abnormal adipokine concentrations, dyslipidemia, inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin system, and sympathetic overactivity. The mechanisms that link dysfunction of the kidney and the cardiovascular system are being sought. The most interesting unifying concept, however, is deranged fetal programming linking nephron underdosing to the increased cardiovascular risk.

  20. Cytokinin cross-talking during biotic and abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, José A.; Benková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants have to be able to adapt to a continuously changing environment. Plants that perceive some of these changes as stress signals activate signaling pathways to modulate their development and to enable them to survive. The complex responses to environmental cues are to a large extent mediated by plant hormones that together orchestrate the final plant response. The phytohormone cytokinin is involved in many plant developmental processes. Recently, it has been established that cytokinin plays an important role in stress responses, but does not act alone. Indeed, the hormonal control of plant development and stress adaptation is the outcome of a complex network of multiple synergistic and antagonistic interactions between various hormones. Here, we review the recent findings on the cytokinin function as part of this hormonal network. We focus on the importance of the crosstalk between cytokinin and other hormones, such as abscisic acid, jasmonate, salicylic acid, ethylene, and auxin in the modulation of plant development and stress adaptation. Finally, the impact of the current research in the biotechnological industry will be discussed. PMID:24312105

  1. Sugar-Hormone Cross-Talk in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Prasanta Kumar; Shin, Dong Ho; Choi, Sang-Bong; Park, Youn-Il

    2012-01-01

    Anthocyanins, a class of flavonoids, are recognized for their diverse functions in plant development and beneficial effects on human health. Many of the genes encoding anthocyanin biosynthesis enzymes and the transcription factors that activate or repress them have been identified. Regulatory proteins that control anthocyanin biosynthesis by regulating the expression of different structural genes at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels are differentially modulated by environmental and biological factors such as light, temperature, sugar and hormones. This minireview summarizes the recent findings contributing to our understanding of the role of sugars and hormones in the modulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway with emphasis on the coordinated regulation of the critical transcriptional R2R3-MYB/bHLH/WD40 (MBW) complex in Arabidopsis. PMID:22936387

  2. Cross talk between animal and human influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the past decade, the first pandemic of the twenty-first century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assess the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

  3. Talking the talk: a discourse analysis of mental health nurses talking about their practice.

    PubMed

    Leishman, June L

    2004-08-01

    Mental Health nursing exists as a discipline in the UK within the wider contemporary health care establishment. Throughout its history it has attempted to define itself in ways that differentiate mental health nursing practice from other health care professions and fields of nursing. However, it is not surprising in this climate of contemporary healthcare for individual professional identities to become 'lost' in the melange of interdisciplinary practice. This research presents a discourse analysis of individual mental health nurses' rhetorical constructions of their professional role(s) as they emerge in their talk with each other in focus group discussions. In particular, the focus in this paper is their discursive repertoires related to the historical legacy of mental health nursing and how this sits with what they consider to be a 'custodial and controlling' element of their role. The particular discourse analytic approach adopted in this study illustrates how individuals use language in a particular way to make justifications and explanations of mental health nursing identities. This analytic approach is ensconced within the domain of social psychology and lies at the interface of ethno-methodology and conversation analysis. It is concerned with structural units of discourse, beyond the level of the sentence, that emerge as the nurse participants engage in talking about their practice (Potter and Wetherell, 1987 p.53). PMID:15468606

  4. Advice on Giving a Scientific Talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    2006-04-01

    What makes one speaker exciting and another boring? You have been to good talks and you have sat through far too many poor ones, so what makes the difference? It doesn't really matter whether it is a scientific talk, a public talk or a classroom lecture: Your prime concern is to think about the audience. You are talking to them. You are performing. Look at them; talk to them; think about what they are hearing and seeing. They very much want you to give a good talk -- that is why they have chosen to be your audience. But at the start of your talk they are worried you might not, so they are nervous. Your first job is to relax them and get their trust that you are going to do a good job. Then you will relax and you will be off to a great start. Of course your content matters; if you have a great discovery, they will forgive you anything. But it is still better to make a good presentation. I give some advice here on what to do, and what not to do, when giving any kind of talk, but with emphasis on short scientific talks presented at conferences. You should be a little nervous at the start of a talk - that is caused by your concern to do a good job. With a good start your talk will flow, you will then present your discoveries, and with a good ending your audience will applaud appreciatively and want to ask you questions. You will have enjoyed performing and want to do it again. Speaking can be fun for you, and rewarding for your audiences.

  5. Exploring TED Talks as Linked Data for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taibi, Davide; Chawla, Saniya; Dietze, Stefan; Marenzi, Ivana; Fetahu, Besnik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the TED Talks dataset which exposes all metadata and the actual transcripts of available TED talks as structured Linked Data. The TED talks collection is composed of more than 1800 talks, along with 35?000 transcripts in over 30 languages, related to a wide range of topics. In this regard, TED talks metadata available in…

  6. Creative Construction: Unit Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of unit blocks with young children in early childhood education (ECE) settings to expand all areas of the curriculum. Discusses the origin of blocks in ECE programs, presents developmental stages of block play, describes children's building styles, and makes recommendations for getting started in block play for children of…

  7. Puppets Promoting Engagement and Talk in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Shirley; Naylor, Stuart; Keogh, Brenda; Maloney, Jane; Downing, Brigid

    2008-01-01

    Research into classroom interactions has shown that talk that promotes reasoning can help children in their learning of science. Such talk can only be generated when teachers are willing to take a dialogic approach that is stimulating and provides opportunities for children to articulate their ideas. This research set out to determine whether the…

  8. Talking Science: Language, Learning, and Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, Jay L.

    "Talking Science" does not mean simply talking about science; it means doing science through the medium of language. This is a book about communication, scientific, and technical education. Chapters 1 and 2 introduce the specific themes and methods of the book. Each analyzes a brief classroom episode, looking from two different points of view at…

  9. Talking Shop: Authentic Conversation and Teacher Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Christopher M., Ed.

    This book presents a set of stories that focus on what teachers learn from talking to one another about their practice, presenting a case for how the ordinary talk among teachers is a potent medium for teacher learning and professional development. Drawing from the work of eight groups of teachers in the United States and Israel who met in…

  10. Text, Talk, and Journalistic Quoting Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelizer, Barbie

    1995-01-01

    Explores journalistic quoting practices as an interface between written and oral modes of communication, or between text and talk. Examines both prescriptive and performative dimensions of journalistic quoting across the media. States that when quoting, journalists creatively mix and meld text and talk. Suggests that the cogency of news…

  11. Early Environmental Correlates of Maternal Emotion Talk.

    PubMed

    Garrett-Peters, Patricia; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Adkins, Daniel; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Cox, Martha

    2008-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: The primary goal of this study was to examine contextual, child, and maternal factors that are associated with mothers' early emotion talk in an ethnically diverse, low-income sample. DESIGN: Emotion talk (positive and negative labels) was coded for 1111 mothers while engaged with their 7-month-olds in viewing an emotion-faces picture book. Infant attention during the interaction was also coded. Mothers' parenting style (positive engagement and negative intrusiveness) was coded during a dyadic free-play interaction. Demographic information was obtained, as well as maternal ratings of child temperament and mother's knowledge of infant development. RESULTS: Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that social context and maternal qualities are significant predictors of mothers' early positive and negative emotion talk. In particular, mothers who were African American, had higher income, and who showed more positive engagement when interacting with their infants demonstrated increased rates of positive and negative emotion talk with their infants. For negative emotion talk, social context variables moderated other predictors. Specifically, infant attention was positively associated with negative emotion talk only for African American mothers, and knowledge of infant development was positively associated with negative emotion talk only for non-African American mothers. The positive association between maternal positive engagement and negative emotion talk was greater for lower-income families than for higher-income families. CONCLUSIONS: Mothers' emotion language with infants is not sensitive to child factors but is associated with social contextual factors and characteristics of the mothers themselves.

  12. Pickle Fights: Gendered Talk in Preschool Disputes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes conflict talk among three-year-old friends playing in same-sex triads at their day care center. Interprets the gendered aspects of two disputes in terms of an anthropological linguistic model and a psychological framework. Demonstrates the gendered nature of children's peer talk at as young as three years of age. (RS)

  13. Early Environmental Correlates of Maternal Emotion Talk

    PubMed Central

    Garrett-Peters, Patricia; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Adkins, Daniel; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Cox, Martha

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objective The primary goal of this study was to examine contextual, child, and maternal factors that are associated with mothers’ early emotion talk in an ethnically diverse, low-income sample. Design Emotion talk (positive and negative labels) was coded for 1111 mothers while engaged with their 7-month-olds in viewing an emotion-faces picture book. Infant attention during the interaction was also coded. Mothers’ parenting style (positive engagement and negative intrusiveness) was coded during a dyadic free-play interaction. Demographic information was obtained, as well as maternal ratings of child temperament and mother’s knowledge of infant development. Results Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that social context and maternal qualities are significant predictors of mothers’ early positive and negative emotion talk. In particular, mothers who were African American, had higher income, and who showed more positive engagement when interacting with their infants demonstrated increased rates of positive and negative emotion talk with their infants. For negative emotion talk, social context variables moderated other predictors. Specifically, infant attention was positively associated with negative emotion talk only for African American mothers, and knowledge of infant development was positively associated with negative emotion talk only for non-African American mothers. The positive association between maternal positive engagement and negative emotion talk was greater for lower-income families than for higher-income families. Conclusions Mothers’ emotion language with infants is not sensitive to child factors but is associated with social contextual factors and characteristics of the mothers themselves. PMID:19946464

  14. School Talk: Gender and Adolescent Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eder, Donna; And Others

    This book reports the findings of a study of adolescent culture and language in eighth graders. The books consists of ten chapters including discussions of the following topics: (1) "Remember When?" a theoretical framework; (2) "Gender, Talk, and School Culture," an interpretive and a dialectic approach to the study of gender, talk, and…

  15. The Relationship Talk: Assessing Partner Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelms, Bobbie Jo; Knox, David; Easterling, Beth

    2012-01-01

    "The talk" is culturally understood to mean a discussion whereby both partners in a relationship reveal their feelings about each other and their commitment to a future together. Typically, one partner feels a greater need to clarity the future and instigates "the talk." This study reports the analysis of a 15 item questionnaire completed by 211…

  16. Communicative Teacher Talk in the English Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Xuelian

    2009-01-01

    Communicative approach has become popular in ELT in recent years. Good teacher talk lays focus on how effectively it could promote genuine communication in the classroom. In this essay, communicative teacher talk is studied, and its features are explored based on authentic classroom transcripts, and a summary of the existing problems is provided.

  17. Facilitator Talk in EAP Reading Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Current sociocultural perspectives on language learning call on teachers to reinvent themselves in ways which facilitate student learning rather than transmit knowledge. For teachers, this means adopting new roles, and acquiring a new repertoire of teacher talk. This paper aims to further the work on facilitator talk begun by Clifton (2006) and…

  18. "Eugenics talk" and the language of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S

    2008-06-01

    In bioethical discussions of preimplantation genetic diagnosis and prenatal screening, accusations of eugenics are commonplace, as are counter-claims that talk of eugenics is misleading and unhelpful. This paper asks whether "eugenics talk", in this context, is legitimate and useful or something to be avoided. It also looks at the extent to which this linguistic question can be answered without first answering relevant substantive moral questions. Its main conclusion is that the best and most non-partisan argument for avoiding eugenics talk is the Autonomy Argument. According to this, eugenics talk per se is not wrong, but there is something wrong with using its emotive power as a means of circumventing people's critical-rational faculties. The Autonomy Argument does not, however, tell against eugenics talk when such language is used to shock people into critical-rational thought. These conclusions do not depend on unique features of eugenics: similar considerations apply to emotive language throughout bioethics.

  19. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  20. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Talk: Hard scattering factorization in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John

    2009-05-01

    Many important cross sections in high-energy collisions are analyzed using factorization properties. I review the nature of factorization, how it arose from the parton model, and current issues in its development. This talk will be coordinated with the one by Soper.

  1. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Talk: Partons, QCD, and Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, Davison

    2009-05-01

    Many important cross sections in high-energy collisions are analyzed using factorization properties. I review the nature of factorization, how it arose from the parton model, and current issues in its development. This talk will be coordinated with the one by Collins.

  2. Do manatees talk during sex?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self-Sullivan, Caryn; Gilbertson, Tamra; Evans, William E.

    2002-05-01

    On January 13, 1999, manatee vocalizations were recorded during a mating herd event in the Orange River, Florida. Although copulation could not be observed, multiple males were observed with exposed penises. During one 25 min sample (1300-1325 h), over 400 manatee signals were recorded. In March 2000, each signal was captured and digitized from the analog tape using a Marantz PMD 501, Ashly equalizer (gain=0, filter=0), MAC 8100, and Canary 1.2.1. In general, signals were 100-200 ms in length, highly harmonic (up to 8 harmonics ranging from 1 to 16 kHz), with little or no frequency modulation. Intervals between signals ranged from less than 1 s to 14 s (mean = 3 s), indicating that manatees do indeed talk (a lot) during sex. Noise from two passing boats was also recorded during the sample period. One abnormally low-frequency signal (0.4 kHz) was recorded during one boat pass. This apparent manatee vocalization could be seen and heard below the boat noise frequency band.

  3. Future talk in later life.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Isabella; Gomes, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    This article focuses on the relevance that the dimension of the future has for promoting healthy and active aging. Older people generally have difficulties in talking about the future and when they do they generally express very negative perspectives on it. The data analyzed in this paper are part of an on-going interdisciplinary research project: "Aging, poverty and social exclusion: an interdisciplinary study on innovative support services" (https://apseclunl.wordpress.com/). The project aims at documenting good practices in social intervention with older people who are at risk of exclusion. This study describes and critically discusses an activity carried out in Portugal among older women in a poor area in the suburb of Lisbon entitled "self-awareness workshop on the future". Through a detailed discourse analysis within an ethnomethodological framework the study shows age membership categorizations in use and categorization processes, examining the workshop interaction. In particular, the article describes how the psychologist works at deconstructing and problematizing the negative connotations related to age membership categories. Taking into consideration the interactionally constructed nature of aging and the material consequences that different attitudes towards aging can imply is very important in particular in relation to the provision of services to older people. PMID:24655681

  4. Learning with Large Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how large hollow blocks can meet many preschool children's learning needs through creative dramatic play, and also gives some guidelines on how these blocks can be constructed by parents and teachers. (BB)

  5. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, ... surgical procedures block activity in all types of neurons. This can cause numbness, paralysis, and other nervous ...

  6. Talk and task mastery: the importance of socially shared talk during computer-based problem solving.

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, Fran; White, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    In order to examine more closely the ways that children use socially constructed dialogue to mediate task mastery a hierarchical set of computer tasks were presented in an animated game format (ToonTalk) to three adult/child (US Kindergarten) dyads over five sessions. Transcriptions of the adult-child talk were used to determine (1) the types of discourses utilized by the children (i.e., procedural, conversation, narrative) during problem solving and (2) the relationship of this talk to task mastery. It was found that (1) shared talk was associated with more successful problem solving; (2) socially shared talk did not have to be on task to be beneficial; and (3) procedural discourse was more successfully and frequently used for independent problem solving if first requested by the child. These results highlight the importance of socially shared talk in the development of problem solving strategies even when using computer technology.

  7. Talking to the Pharmacist (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... serve. To encourage questions from their customers, many pharmacies provide counseling rooms where pharmacists can talk to ... popular for pharmacists to receive a doctor of pharmacy degree. This 6- to 8-year-program requires ...

  8. Talking to someone with hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000361.htm Talking to someone with hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, ... It may be hard for a person with hearing loss to understand a conversation with another person. Being ...

  9. Talking to Your Child about Menstruation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Her Period? Talking to Your Daughter About Puberty Female Reproductive System Getting Your Period at School Do Periods Ever ... My First Period. How Can I Be Sure? Female Reproductive System Coping With Common Period Problems All About Menstruation ...

  10. Mealtime Talk that Supports Literacy Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Catherine E.; Beals, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Participation in dinner table conversations offers children opportunities to acquire vocabulary, practice producing and understanding stories and explanations, acquire general knowledge, and learn how to talk in culturally appropriate ways. (Contains 1 table.)

  11. STS-134 Crew Talks With Sam Ting

    NASA Video Gallery

    The STS-134 crew talks with Sam Ting, principal investigator for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, following the installation of the particle physics detector on the International Space Station duri...

  12. Peter Gabriel Talks With Space Station Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Singer-songwriter Peter Gabriel and family visit Mission Control Houston and talk with Expedition 33 Commander Kevin Ford and Flight Engineers Tom Marshburn and Chris Hadfield aboard the Internatio...

  13. How Does Your Child Hear and Talk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Development How Does Your Child Hear and Talk? [ en Español ] The ... not accomplished one skill within an age range does not mean the child has a disorder. However, ...

  14. Block Scheduling. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2003-01-01

    What are the effects of block scheduling? Results of transitioning from traditional to block scheduling are mixed. Some studies indicate no change in achievement results, nor change in teachers' opinions about instructional strategies. Other studies show that block scheduling doesn't work well for Advanced Placement or Music courses, that "hard to…

  15. Blocking and associability change.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; Haselgrove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Blocking of learning about a conditioned stimulus (the "blocked" cue) occurs when it is trained alongside an additional stimulus (the "blocking" cue) that has been previously presented with the outcome. A number of theories (e.g., N. J. Mackintosh. 1975a. A Theory of Attention: Variations in the Associability of Stimuli With Reinforcement. Psychological Review, 82, 276-298; J. M. Pearce & G. Hall. 1980. A Model for Pavlovian Learning: Variation in the Effectiveness of Conditioned But Not Unconditioned Stimuli. Psychological Review, 87, 532-552) account for this attenuation in learning by proposing that attention paid to the blocked cue is restricted. In three experiments, we examined the associability of both blocked and blocking cues. In Experiment 1, rats were trained with a blocking protocol before being given a test discrimination composed of two components; one of these components required the use of the previously blocked cue as a discriminative stimulus, and the other component was soluble by using the blocking cue. To our surprise, the component that depended on the blocked cue was more readily solved than the component dependent on the blocking cue. The results of Experiments 2 and 3 suggest that this is due to the quantity of exposure that each stimulus received during initial training. Implications for theories of blocking, and more widely associative learning, are discussed.

  16. Preparing Prekindergartners with Math Readiness Skills: The Effect of Children's Talk, Focus, and Engagement on Math Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Tracy; Hofer, Kerry G.; Farran, Dale C.; Lipsey, Mark W.; Bilbrey, Carol; Vorhaus, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The "Building Blocks PreK Math Curriculum" (Clements & Sarama, 2007) was designed to facilitate children's engagement in math and talk about math. Much research investigates the effect of curriculum on classrooms or teacher practices. This study used a mediational model to look at a curriculum's effect on children's achievement gain, operating…

  17. Block LU factorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, James W.; Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the currently popular 'block algorithms' are scalar algorithms in which the operations have been grouped and reordered into matrix operations. One genuine block algorithm in practical use is block LU factorization, and this has recently been shown by Demmel and Higham to be unstable in general. It is shown here that block LU factorization is stable if A is block diagonally dominant by columns. Moreover, for a general matrix the level of instability in block LU factorization can be founded in terms of the condition number kappa(A) and the growth factor for Gaussian elimination without pivoting. A consequence is that block LU factorization is stable for a matrix A that is symmetric positive definite or point diagonally dominant by rows or columns as long as A is well-conditioned.

  18. Liver X receptors regulate dendritic cell phenotype and function through blocked induction of the actin-bundling protein fascin.

    PubMed

    Geyeregger, René; Zeyda, Maximilian; Bauer, Wolfgang; Kriehuber, Ernst; Säemann, Marcus D; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Maurer, Dieter; Stulnig, Thomas M

    2007-05-15

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors regulating lipid and cholesterol metabolism. Recent data revealed a cross talk between LXR and Toll-like receptor signaling in macrophages, indicating a role in immunity. Here, we show that LXRalpha is expressed in human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) and induced during differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs, whereas LXRbeta is expressed constitutively at a very low level. LXR activation by 2 different LXR agonists strongly interfered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced but not with CD40L-induced DC maturation by altering DC morphology and suppressing interleukin-12-but enhancing interleukin-10-secretion. LXR activation in DCs largely blocked their T-cell stimulatory ability despite essentially unaltered expression of various antigen-presenting and costimulatory molecules. Immunologic synapse formation was significantly inhibited by LXR activation along with a complete block in LPS- but not CD40L-induced expression of the actin-bundling protein fascin. Notably, overexpression of fascin in LXR agonist-treated DCs restored immunologic synapse formation and restored their ability to activate T cells. In conclusion, our data reveal LXR as a potent modulator of DC maturation and function mediated in part by blocking the expression of fascin. Due to the central position of DCs in immunity, LXRalpha could be a potential novel target for immunomodulation.

  19. Correlates, causes, and consequences of fat talk: A review.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Amy; Mills, Jennifer S

    2015-09-01

    Fat talk is a term used to describe self-disparaging remarks made to other people about one's weight or body. Fat talk has been both causally and correlationally linked to a number of negative body image-related variables including low body esteem, body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, body-related cognitive distortions, and perceived sociocultural pressure to be thin. As such, body image researchers and clinicians would benefit from increased awareness of the current literature concerning fat talk. A narrative synthesis approach is used to summarize all research containing the keywords fat talk, body talk, or weight talk that was published from 1994 to 2014 inclusive. The measures used to study fat talk, outcomes and correlates associated with fat talk, theories that may help explain these findings, and the purpose served by fat talk are reviewed and discussed. In addition, directions for future research on fat talk, including intervention strategies, are examined. PMID:26479947

  20. Light extraction block with curved surface

    DOEpatents

    Levermore, Peter; Krall, Emory; Silvernail, Jeffrey; Rajan, Kamala; Brown, Julia J.

    2016-03-22

    Light extraction blocks, and OLED lighting panels using light extraction blocks, are described, in which the light extraction blocks include various curved shapes that provide improved light extraction properties compared to parallel emissive surface, and a thinner form factor and better light extraction than a hemisphere. Lighting systems described herein may include a light source with an OLED panel. A light extraction block with a three-dimensional light emitting surface may be optically coupled to the light source. The three-dimensional light emitting surface of the block may includes a substantially curved surface, with further characteristics related to the curvature of the surface at given points. A first radius of curvature corresponding to a maximum principal curvature k.sub.1 at a point p on the substantially curved surface may be greater than a maximum height of the light extraction block. A maximum height of the light extraction block may be less than 50% of a maximum width of the light extraction block. Surfaces with cross sections made up of line segments and inflection points may also be fit to approximated curves for calculating the radius of curvature.

  1. Get Them Talking! Using Student-Led Book Talks in the Primary Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Alida K.

    2016-01-01

    This teaching tip details one teacher's implementation of student-led book talks in her primary-grade classroom. The author describes a simple gradual-release method that she has successfully used with her students in order to get them talking about the books that they are reading independently. She found that when used in the readers' workshop…

  2. Argumentative Discourse of Kindergarten Children: Features of Peer Talk and Children-Teacher Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Sara Zadunaisky

    2011-01-01

    Taking into consideration the central role played by argumentation in children's culture, comparative studies regarding the relative contribution of peer talk and children-teacher talk to children's argumentative discourse at kindergarten are relatively scarce. In this study, the researchers gathered ethnographic data of natural peer interactions…

  3. Staying on the Same Wavelength: Talking about Talking in Paediatric Speech and Language Therapy Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrills, Dariel

    2009-01-01

    Participants in speech and language therapy sessions engage in talk about talking to accomplish different social actions: identifying and explaining linguistic concepts; correcting language use; and repairing misunderstanding. Different traditions in interaction research have examined the practices of topic management, correction, and repair in…

  4. Island custom blocking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Carabetta, R.J. )

    1988-03-01

    The technique of Island blocking is being used more frequently since the advent of our new head and neck blocking techniques and the implementation of a newly devised lung protocol. The system presented affords the mould room personnel a quick and accurate means of island block fabrication without the constant remeasuring or subtle shifting to approximate correct placement. The cookie cutter is easily implemented into any department's existing block cutting techniques. The device is easily and inexpensively made either in a machine shop or acquired by contacting the author.

  5. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  6. Race talk: the psychology of racial dialogues.

    PubMed

    Sue, Derald Wing

    2013-11-01

    Constructive dialogues on race have been proposed as a means to heal racial and ethnic divides, reduce prejudice and misinformation, increase racial literacy, and foster improved race relations. Studies on the psychology of racial dialogues indicate social and academic norms that dictate against race talk between White Americans and persons of color: (a) the politeness protocol, (b) the academic protocol, and (c) the color-blind protocol. These protocols discourage race talk and allow society to enter into a conspiracy of silence regarding the detrimental impact oppression plays on persons of color. Facilitating difficult dialogues on race requires educators to recognize what makes such discussions difficult. For people of color, engaging in race talk exposes them to microaggressions that invalidate and assail their racial/ethnic identities. For Whites, honest discussions are impeded by fears of appearing racist, of realizing their racism, of acknowledging White privilege, and of taking responsibility to combat racism. PMID:24320648

  7. Race talk: the psychology of racial dialogues.

    PubMed

    Sue, Derald Wing

    2013-11-01

    Constructive dialogues on race have been proposed as a means to heal racial and ethnic divides, reduce prejudice and misinformation, increase racial literacy, and foster improved race relations. Studies on the psychology of racial dialogues indicate social and academic norms that dictate against race talk between White Americans and persons of color: (a) the politeness protocol, (b) the academic protocol, and (c) the color-blind protocol. These protocols discourage race talk and allow society to enter into a conspiracy of silence regarding the detrimental impact oppression plays on persons of color. Facilitating difficult dialogues on race requires educators to recognize what makes such discussions difficult. For people of color, engaging in race talk exposes them to microaggressions that invalidate and assail their racial/ethnic identities. For Whites, honest discussions are impeded by fears of appearing racist, of realizing their racism, of acknowledging White privilege, and of taking responsibility to combat racism.

  8. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  9. High Relief Block Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Explains a method of block printing using styrofoam shapes to make high relief. Describes the creation of the block design as well as the actual printing process. Uses a range of paper types for printing so children can see the results of using different media. (LS)

  10. Surviving Block Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Marjorie

    A discussion of block scheduling for second language instruction looks at the advantages and disadvantages and offers some suggestions for classroom management and course organization. It is argued that block scheduling may offer a potential solution to large classes, insufficient time for labs, too little individualized instruction; few…

  11. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  12. Talk-in-Interaction: Multilingual Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Hanh thi, Ed.; Kasper, Gabriele, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Talk-in-interaction: Multilingual perspectives" offers original studies of interaction in a range of languages and language varieties, including Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Swahili, Thai, and Vietnamese; monolingual and bilingual interactions; and activities designed for second or foreign language learning. Conducted from the…

  13. Talking and Thinking about Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Carolyn; Bochner, Arthur; Denzin, Norman; Lincoln, Yvonna; Morse, Janice; Pelias, Ronald; Richardson, Laurel

    2008-01-01

    This script comes from an edited transcript of a session titled "Talking and Thinking About Qualitative Research," which was part of the 2006 International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on May 4-6, 2006. This special session featured scholars informally responding to questions about their…

  14. Recognition of Unfamiliar Talking Faces at Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulon, Marion; Guellai, Bahia; Streri, Arlette

    2011-01-01

    Sai (2005) investigated the role of speech in newborns' recognition of their mothers' faces. Her results revealed that, when presented with both their mother's face and that of a stranger, newborns preferred looking at their mother only if she had previously talked to them. The present study attempted to extend these findings to any other faces.…

  15. Astro Talk in Social Media - Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamani, A.; Soegijoko, W.

    2015-03-01

    Social media is a new trend in communicating and connecting to people. It is also a good choice to build awareness of astronomy as issues spread easily and quickly, creating hot topics. This paper will analyze the trend of astro talk in Indonesia and hope to inspire astronomers to use social media in raising awareness.

  16. More Professionals Talking Physics than Ever Before!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kirsty

    2013-01-01

    In this article, "TalkPhysics," the Institute of Physics' (UK) community website for teachers of physics and their supporters, is described. It is now used by over 7,500 professionals in physics education, whether they are seeking or giving advice, contributing to discussions, or accessing the wealth of resources available, but will also…

  17. Talking with Children about Natural Disasters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodkin, Adele M.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Rita, and other natural disasters will be felt by young children in the affected areas for a long time to come. This article offers tips on how to talk with children about natural disasters in order to clear up any confusion they might have, how to answer their questions with sensitivity, and how to…

  18. The End of "Chalk and Talk"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Tim

    2012-01-01

    "Chalk and talk" had been the staple pedagogical approach of my Science teaching practice since entering the profession. I felt that there was a great deal of information that I must impart to my students. My tried and tested way to deliver information to my students had always been simply to stand in front of them and tell it to them... So what…

  19. Talking with Kids about Tough Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Lynne S.

    Raising a child can be the most gratifying (and the most difficult) job a person can have. Communication is essential when parenting children, and practical guidance in learning how to speak openly and listen attentively is presented in this booklet. It gives parents and caregivers concrete tips and techniques on talking with young children, ages…

  20. Scientists Talking to Students through Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Junjun; Cowie, Bronwen

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of connecting school students with scientists are well documented. This paper reports how New Zealand teachers brought scientists into the classrooms through the use of videos of New Zealand scientists talking about themselves and their research. Two researchers observed lessons in 9 different classrooms in which 23 educational videos…