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Sample records for cross-sectional multilevel analysis

  1. Drinking Water in Transition: A Multilevel Cross-sectional Analysis of Sachet Water Consumption in Accra.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Justin; Weeks, John R; Appiah Otoo, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Rapid population growth in developing cities often outpaces improvements to drinking water supplies, and sub-Saharan Africa as a region has the highest percentage of urban population without piped water access, a figure that continues to grow. Accra, Ghana, implements a rationing system to distribute limited piped water resources within the city, and privately-vended sachet water-sealed single-use plastic sleeves-has filled an important gap in urban drinking water security. This study utilizes household survey data from 2,814 Ghanaian women to analyze the sociodemographic characteristics of those who resort to sachet water as their primary drinking water source. In multilevel analysis, sachet use is statistically significantly associated with lower overall self-reported health, younger age, and living in a lower-class enumeration area. Sachet use is marginally associated with more days of neighborhood water rationing, and significantly associated with the proportion of vegetated land cover. Cross-level interactions between rationing and proxies for poverty are not associated with sachet consumption after adjusting for individual-level sociodemographic, socioeconomic, health, and environmental factors. These findings are generally consistent with two other recent analyses of sachet water in Accra and may indicate a recent transition of sachet consumption from higher to lower socioeconomic classes. Overall, the allure of sachet water displays substantial heterogeneity in Accra and will be an important consideration in planning for future drinking water demand throughout West Africa.

  2. Drinking Water in Transition: A Multilevel Cross-sectional Analysis of Sachet Water Consumption in Accra

    PubMed Central

    Stoler, Justin; Weeks, John R.; Appiah Otoo, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Rapid population growth in developing cities often outpaces improvements to drinking water supplies, and sub-Saharan Africa as a region has the highest percentage of urban population without piped water access, a figure that continues to grow. Accra, Ghana, implements a rationing system to distribute limited piped water resources within the city, and privately-vended sachet water–sealed single-use plastic sleeves–has filled an important gap in urban drinking water security. This study utilizes household survey data from 2,814 Ghanaian women to analyze the sociodemographic characteristics of those who resort to sachet water as their primary drinking water source. In multilevel analysis, sachet use is statistically significantly associated with lower overall self-reported health, younger age, and living in a lower-class enumeration area. Sachet use is marginally associated with more days of neighborhood water rationing, and significantly associated with the proportion of vegetated land cover. Cross-level interactions between rationing and proxies for poverty are not associated with sachet consumption after adjusting for individual-level sociodemographic, socioeconomic, health, and environmental factors. These findings are generally consistent with two other recent analyses of sachet water in Accra and may indicate a recent transition of sachet consumption from higher to lower socioeconomic classes. Overall, the allure of sachet water displays substantial heterogeneity in Accra and will be an important consideration in planning for future drinking water demand throughout West Africa. PMID:23840643

  3. Are socioeconomic disparities in tobacco consumption increasing in India? A repeated cross-sectional multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Nandita; Srivastava, Swati; Agrawal, Sutapa; Subramanyam, Malavika; Millett, Christopher; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Subramanian, S V

    2012-01-01

    Objectives India bears a significant portion of the global tobacco burden with high prevalence of tobacco use. This study examines the socioeconomic patterning of tobacco use and identifies the changing gender and socioeconomic dynamics in light of the Cigarette Epidemic Model. Design Secondary analyses of second and third National Family Health Survey (NFHS) data. Setting and participants Data were analysed from 201 219 men and 255 028 women over two survey rounds. Outcomes and methods Outcomes included smoking (cigarettes, bidis and pipes/cigar), chewed tobacco (paan masala, gutkha and others) and dual use, examined by education, wealth, living environment and caste. Standardised prevalence and percentage change were estimated. Pooled multilevel models estimated the effect of socioeconomic covariates on the log odds of tobacco use by gender, along with fixed and random parameters. Findings Among men (2005−2006), gradients in smoking by education (illiterates: 44% vs postgraduates: 15%) and chewing (illiterates: 47% vs postgraduates: 19%) were observed. Inverse gradients were also observed by wealth, living environment and caste. Chewed tobacco use by women showed inverse socioeconomic status (SES) gradients comparing the illiterates (7.4%) versus postgraduates (0.33%), and poorest (17%) versus richest (2%) quintiles. However, proportional increases in smoking were higher among more educated (postgraduates (98%) vs high schooling only (17%)) and chewing among richer (richest quintile (49%) vs poorest quintile (35%)). Among women, higher educated showed larger declines for smoking—90% (postgraduates) versus 12% (illiterates). Younger men (15–24 years) showed increasing tobacco use (smoking: 123% and chewing: 112%). Older women (35–49 years) show higher prevalence of smoking (3.2%) compared to younger women (0.3%). Conclusions Indian tobacco use patterns show significant diversions from the Cigarette Epidemic Model—from gender and socioeconomic

  4. Reciprocity and depressive symptoms in Belgian workers: a cross-sectional multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Bart; Clays, Els; Janssens, Heidi; De Bacquer, Dirk; Casini, Annalisa; Kittel, France; Braeckman, Lutgart

    2013-07-01

    This study examines the multidimensional association between reciprocity at work and depressive symptoms. Data from the Belgian BELSTRESS survey (32 companies; N = 24,402) were analyzed. Multilevel statistical procedures were used to account for company-level associations while controlling for individual-level associations. Different dimensions of individual reciprocity were negatively associated with depressive symptoms. On the company level, only vertical emotional reciprocity was negatively associated (β = -4.660; SE = 1.117) independently from individual reciprocity (β = -0.557; SE = 0.042). Complex interactions were found such that workplace reciprocity (1) may not uniformly benefit individuals and (2) related differently to depressive symptoms, depending on occupational group. This study extends the existing literature with evidence on the multidimensional, contextual, and cross-level interaction associations of reciprocity as a key aspect of social capital on depressive symptoms.

  5. Adolescent substance use and peer use: a multilevel analysis of cross-sectional population data.

    PubMed

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Allegrante, John P

    2013-07-31

    Limited evidence exists concerning the importance of social contexts in adolescent substance use prevention. In addition to the important role schools play in educating young people, they are important ecological platforms for adolescent health, development and behaviors. In this light, school community contexts represent an important, but largely neglected, area of research in adolescent substance use and prevention, particularly with regard to peer influences. This study sought to add to a growing body of literature into peer contexts by testing a model of peer substance use simultaneously on individual and school community levels while taking account of several well established individual level factors. We analyzed population-based data from the 2009 Youth in Iceland school survey, with 7,084 participants (response rate of 83.5%) nested within 140 schools across Iceland. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to analyze the data. School-level peer smoking and drunkenness were positively related to adolescent daily smoking and lifetime drunkenness after taking account of individual level peer smoking and drunkenness. These relationships held true for all respondents, irrespective of socio-economic status and other background variables, time spent with parents, academic performance, self-assessed peer respect for smoking and alcohol use, or if they have substance-using friends or not. On the other hand, the same relationships were not found with regard to individual and peer cannabis use. The school-level findings in this study represent context effects that are over and above individual-level associations. This holds although we accounted for a large number of individual level variables that studies generally have not included. For the purpose of prevention, school communities should be targeted as a whole in substance use prevention programs in addition to reaching to individuals of particular concern.

  6. A cross-sectional study of workplace social capital and blood pressure: a multilevel analysis at Japanese manufacturing companies

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Yoshihisa; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Kunimoto, Masamizu; Tabata, Hidetoshi; Tsuchiya, Takuto; Kadowaki, Koji; Nakamura, Takehiro; Oyama, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined the contextual effect of workplace social capital on systolic blood pressure (SBP). Design Cross-sectional. Setting A conglomerate from 58 workplaces in Japan. Participants Of the 5844 workers at a Japanese conglomerate from 58 workplaces, 5368 were recruited. Individuals who received drugs for hypertension (n=531) and who lacked information on any variable (n=167) were excluded from the analyses, leaving 4735 individuals (3281 men and 1454 women) for inclusion. Primary and secondary outcome measures Systolic blood pressure. Results The contextual effect of workplace social capital on SBP was examined using a multilevel regression analysis with a random intercept. Coworker support had a contextual effect at the workplace level (coefficient=−1.97, p=0.043), while a lack of trust for coworkers (coefficient=0.27, p=0.039) and lack of helpfulness from coworkers were associated with SBP (coefficient=0.28, p=0.002). Conclusions The present study suggested that social capital at the workplace level has beneficial effects on SBP. PMID:23386581

  7. Who is left behind on the road to universal facility delivery? A cross-sectional multilevel analysis in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Margaret E; Hermosilla, Sabrina; Larson, Elysia; Vail, Daniel; Chen, Qixuan; Mazuguni, Festo; Byalugaba, Beatrice; Mbaruku, Godfrey

    2015-08-01

    To examine factors associated with home delivery among women in Pwani Region, Tanzania, which has experienced a rapid rise in facility delivery coverage. Cross-sectional data from a population-based survey of women residing in rural areas of Pwani Region were linked to health facility locations. We fitted multilevel logistic models to examine individual and community factors associated with home delivery. A total of 752 (27.95%) of the 2691 women who completed the survey delivered their last child at home. Women were less likely to deliver at home if they had any primary education [odds ratio (OR) 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50, 0.79], were primiparous (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.37, 0.73), had more exposure to media (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.66, 0.96) or had received more (OR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.96) or better quality antenatal care (ANC) services (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.67). Increased wealth was strongly associated with lower odds of home delivery (OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.39), as was living in a village that grew cash crops (OR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.88). Farther distance to hospital, but not to lower level facilities, was associated with higher likelihood of home delivery (OR 2.49; 95% CI: 1.60, 3.88). Poverty, multiparity, weak ANC and distance to hospital were associated with persistence of home delivery in a region with high coverage of facility delivery. A pro-poor path to universal coverage of safe delivery requires a greater focus on quality of care and more intensive outreach to poor and multiparous women. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Association of Workplace Social Capital With Work Engagement of Employees in Health Care Settings: A Multilevel Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Sumiko; Kawakami, Norito; Ando, Emiko; Inoue, Akiomi; Tsuno, Kanami; Kurioka, Sumiko; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the cross-sectional multilevel association between unit-level workplace social capital and individual-level work engagement among employees in health care settings. The data were collected from employees of a Japanese health care corporation using a questionnaire. The analyses were limited to 440 respondents from 35 units comprising five or more respondents per unit. Unit-level workplace social capital was calculated as an average score of the Workplace Social Capital Scale for each unit. Multilevel regression analysis with a random intercept model was conducted. After adjusting for demographic variables, unit-level workplace social capital was significantly and positively associated with respondents' work engagement (P < 0.001). The association remained significant after additionally adjusting for individual-level perceptions of workplace social capital (P < 0.001). Workplace social capital might exert a positive contextual effect on work engagement of employees in health care settings.

  9. Subjective Health and Mental Well-Being of Adolescents and the Health Promoting School: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Kate; Inchley, Jo; Currie, Dorothy; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of the health promoting school (HPS) on adolescent well-being. Design/methodology/approach: Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland were analysed using multilevel linear regression analyses for outcome measures: happiness, confidence,…

  10. Subjective Health and Mental Well-Being of Adolescents and the Health Promoting School: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Kate; Inchley, Jo; Currie, Dorothy; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of the health promoting school (HPS) on adolescent well-being. Design/methodology/approach: Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland were analysed using multilevel linear regression analyses for outcome measures: happiness, confidence,…

  11. Individual and community level socioeconomic inequalities in contraceptive use in 10 Newly Independent States: a multilevel cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Little is known regarding the association between socioeconomic factors and contraceptive use in the Newly Independent States (NIS), countries that have experienced profound changes in reproductive health services during the transition from socialism to a market economy. Methods Using 2005–2006 data from Demographic Health Surveys (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Moldova) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan), we examined associations between individual and community socioeconomic status with current modern contraceptive use (MCU) among N = 55,204 women aged 15–49 married or in a union. Individual socioeconomic status was measured using quintiles of wealth index and education level (higher than secondary school, secondary school or less). Community socioeconomic status was measured as the percentage of households in the poorest quintile of the nationals household wealth index (0%, 0–25%, or greater than 25%). We used multilevel logistic regression to estimate associations adjusted for age, number of children, urban/rural, and socioeconomic variables. Results MCU varied by country from 14% (in Azerbaijan) to 62% (in Belarus). Overall, women living in the poorest communities were less likely than those in the richest to use modern contraceptives (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.82, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.76, 0.89). Similarly, there was an increasing odds of MCU with increasing individual-level wealth. Women with a lower level of education also had lower odds of MCU than those with a higher level of education (aOR = .75, 95%CI = 0.71, 0.79). In country-specific analyses, community-level socioeconomic inequalities were apparent in 4 of 10 countries; in contrast, inequalities by individual-level wealth were apparent in 7 countries and by education in 8 countries. All countries in which community-level socioeconomic status was associated with MCU were in

  12. Individual and community level socioeconomic inequalities in contraceptive use in 10 Newly Independent States: a multilevel cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Janevic, Teresa; Sarah, Pallas W; Leyla, Ismayilova; Elizabeth, Bradley H

    2012-11-16

    Little is known regarding the association between socioeconomic factors and contraceptive use in the Newly Independent States (NIS), countries that have experienced profound changes in reproductive health services during the transition from socialism to a market economy. Using 2005-2006 data from Demographic Health Surveys (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Moldova) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan), we examined associations between individual and community socioeconomic status with current modern contraceptive use (MCU) among N = 55,204 women aged 15-49 married or in a union. Individual socioeconomic status was measured using quintiles of wealth index and education level (higher than secondary school, secondary school or less). Community socioeconomic status was measured as the percentage of households in the poorest quintile of the nationals household wealth index (0%, 0-25%, or greater than 25%). We used multilevel logistic regression to estimate associations adjusted for age, number of children, urban/rural, and socioeconomic variables. MCU varied by country from 14% (in Azerbaijan) to 62% (in Belarus). Overall, women living in the poorest communities were less likely than those in the richest to use modern contraceptives (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.82, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.76, 0.89). Similarly, there was an increasing odds of MCU with increasing individual-level wealth. Women with a lower level of education also had lower odds of MCU than those with a higher level of education (aOR = .75, 95%CI = 0.71, 0.79). In country-specific analyses, community-level socioeconomic inequalities were apparent in 4 of 10 countries; in contrast, inequalities by individual-level wealth were apparent in 7 countries and by education in 8 countries. All countries in which community-level socioeconomic status was associated with MCU were in Central Asia, whereas at the individual

  13. Neighborhood Health Care Access and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Women in the Southern United States: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haley, Danielle F; Edmonds, Andrew; Belenky, Nadya; Hickson, DeMarc A; Ramirez, Catalina; Wingood, Gina M; Bolivar, Hector; Golub, Elizabeth; Adimora, Adaora A

    2017-08-02

    The United States has experienced an increase in reportable sexually transmitted infections (STIs) while simultaneously experiencing a decline in safety net services for STI testing and treatment. This multilevel study assessed relationships between neighborhood-level access to health care and STIs among a predominantly Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-seropositive cohort of women living in the south. This cross-sectional multilevel analysis included baseline data from HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study sites in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina between 2013 and 2015 (N = 666). Administrative data (eg, United States Census) described health care access (eg, percentage of residents with a primary care provider, percentage of residents with health insurance) in the census tracts where women lived. Sexually transmitted infections (chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, or early syphilis) were diagnosed using laboratory testing. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine relationships between tract-level characteristics and STIs. Analyses were conducted using SAS 9.4. Seventy percent of participants were HIV-seropositive. Eleven percent of participants had an STI. A 4-unit increase in the percentage of residents with a primary care provider was associated with 39% lower STI risk (risk ratio, 0.61, 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.99). The percentage of tract residents with health insurance was not associated with STIs (risk ratio, 0.98, 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.05). Relationships did not vary by HIV status. Greater neighborhood health care access was associated with fewer STIs. Research should establish the causality of this relationship and pathways through which neighborhood health care access influences STIs. Structural interventions and programs increasing linkage to care may reduce STIs.

  14. Relationships between neighbourhood characteristics and current STI status among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women living in the Southern USA: a cross-sectional multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Haley, Danielle F; Kramer, Michael R; Adimora, Adaora A; Haardörfer, Regine; Wingood, Gina M; Ludema, Christina; Rubtsova, Anna; Hickson, DeMarc A; Ross, Zev; Golub, Elizabeth; Bolivar, Hector; Cooper, Hannah Lf

    2017-03-07

    Neighbourhood characteristics (eg, high poverty rates) are associated with STIs among HIV-uninfected women in the USA. However, no multilevel analyses investigating the associations between neighbourhood exposures and STIs have explored these relationships among women living with HIV infection. The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine relationships between neighbourhood characteristics and current STI status and (2) investigate whether the magnitudes and directions of these relationships varied by HIV status in a predominantly HIV-infected cohort of women living in the Southern USA. This cross-sectional multilevel analysis tests relationships between census tract characteristics and current STI status using data from 737 women enrolled at the Women's Interagency HIV Study's southern sites (530 HIV-infected and 207 HIV-uninfected women). Administrative data (eg, US Census) described the census tract-level social disorder (eg, violent crime rate) and social disadvantage (eg, alcohol outlet density) where women lived. Participant-level data were gathered via survey. Testing positive for a current STI was defined as a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of chlamydia, gonorrhoea, trichomoniasis or syphilis. Hierarchical generalised linear models were used to determine relationships between tract-level characteristics and current STI status, and to test whether these relationships varied by HIV status. Eleven per cent of participants tested positive for at least one current STI. Greater tract-level social disorder (OR=1.34, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.87) and social disadvantage (OR=1.34, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.86) were associated with having a current STI. There was no evidence of additive or multiplicative interaction between tract-level characteristics and HIV status. Findings suggest that neighbourhood characteristics may be associated with current STIs among women living in the South, and that relationships do not vary by HIV status. Future research should establish the

  15. Are school physical activity characteristics associated with weight status in primary school children? A multilevel cross-sectional analysis of routine surveillance data.

    PubMed

    Pallan, Miranda J; Adab, Peymane; Sitch, Alice J; Aveyard, Paul

    2014-02-01

    The school environment potentially influences the development of childhood obesity. Changes to schooling could be used as an intervention to reduce obesity but the features of the school environment that influence obesity are unknown. To estimate the interschool variation in body mass index (BMI) z-scores in primary school children and examine the individual and school physical activity characteristics contributing to this. Cross-sectional analysis and multilevel modelling at individual and school level, with BMI SD scores (z-scores) as the outcome. Individual and school data were obtained for 11 118 reception year children (age 4-5) and 10 151 year 6 children (age 10-11) from 296 primary schools in Birmingham. Data sources were the UK National Child Measurement Programme and the annual National School Sport Survey in 2006/7. In reception year children, 4.2% of the variation in BMI z-scores is attributed to differences between schools. Individual characteristics explained 24% of this between-school variation and certain school physical activity characteristics (the time schools devote to physical education) explained a further 28%. In year 6 children, only 0.9% of the variation in BMI z-scores was between-school variation. BMI z-scores were significantly higher in year 6 than reception year children, with the largest increases between year groups in the South Asian and African-Caribbean ethnic groups. Deprivation was positively associated with BMI z-scores. In addition to the association between individual characteristics and BMI z-score, there is a small but significant association between school characteristics and BMI z-score, which is in part explained by the time schools devote to physical education. This modest school effect has the potential to have a substantial impact on children's weight status at a population level.

  16. Authoritative School Climate and High School Student Risk Behavior: A Cross-sectional Multi-level Analysis of Student Self-Reports.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Dewey; Huang, Francis

    2016-11-01

    Many adolescents engage in risk behaviors such as substance use and aggression that jeopardize their healthy development. This study tested the hypothesis that an authoritative school climate characterized by strict but fair discipline and supportive teacher-student relationships is conducive to lower risk behavior for high school students. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to analyze cross-sectional, student-report survey data from a statewide sample of 47,888 students (50.6 % female) in 319 high schools. The students included ninth (26.6 %), tenth (25.5 %), eleventh (24.1 %) and twelfth (23.8 %) grade with a racial/ethnic breakdown of 52.2 % White, 18.0 % Black, 13.1 % Hispanic, 5.9 % Asian, and 10.8 % reporting another or two or more race/ethnicities. Schools with an authoritative school climate had lower levels of student-reported alcohol and marijuana use; bullying, fighting, and weapon carrying at school; interest in gang membership; and suicidal thoughts and behavior. These results controlled for demographic variables of student gender, race, grade, and parent education level as well as school size, percentage of minority students, and percentage of low income students. Overall, these findings add new evidence that an authoritative school climate is associated with positive student outcomes.

  17. Algorithmic analysis of quantum radar cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2015-05-01

    Sidelobe structures on classical radar cross section graphs are a consequence of discontinuities in the surface currents. In contrast, quantum radar theory states that sidelobe structures on quantum radar cross section graphs are due to quantum interference. Moreover, it is conjectured that quantum sidelobe structures may be used to detect targets oriented off the specular direction. Because of the high data bandwidth expected from quantum radar, it may be necessary to use sophisticated quantum signal analysis algorithms to determine the presence of stealth targets through the sidelobe structures. In this paper we introduce three potential quantum algorithmic techniques to compute classical and quantum radar cross sections. It is our purpose to develop a computer science-oriented tool for further physical analysis of quantum radar models as well as applications of quantum radar technology in various fields.

  18. Synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug prescribing variability in rheumatoid arthritis: a multilevel analysis of a cross-sectional national study.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Seoane-Mato, Daniel; Sánchez-Alonso, Fernando; Martín-Martínez, María A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the variability in the prescription of csDMARDs for the treatment of RA between centers in Spain and to explore how this variability relates to demographic, disease, physician, and institutional characteristics. A cross-sectional nationwide study was carried out to examine data from 1352 patients. Multilevel logistic regression with two levels was performed to assess the relationships between individual and disease-related factors, as well as physician and hospital characteristics, vis-à-vis csDMARD prescription. Having three or more comorbidities (OR 0.353 [0.173-0.721]), disease duration (OR 0.321 [0.174-0.595]), and the existence of an early-arthritis unit (OR 0.552 [0.335-0.910]) were negatively associated with the prescription of one csDMARD versus nonprescription; contrary, the presence of rheumatoid factor (OR 1.909, 95 % CI [1.181-3.086]) was positively associated. On the other hand, while corticoid intake (OR 1.561 [1.088-2.240]), the maximum number of painful joints, and the presence of nursing consultation (OR 1.626 [1.078-2.452]) were positively associated with the prescription of multiple csDMARDs versus one csDMARD, patient's age (OR 0.984 [0.974-0.995]) and disease duration (OR 0.669 [0.462-0.968]) were negatively associated. Despite all these, variability in the prescription of csDMARDs between hospitals remained statistically significant after adjusting for these individual and hospital characteristics. Within the emAR II study, there was a marked variation in the number of csDMARDs prescribed between hospitals. The reasons for these variations remain unclear and cannot be solely related to disease or center characteristics.

  19. Shorter lunch breaks lead secondary-school students to make less healthy dietary choices: multilevel analysis of cross-sectional national survey data.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    At the time of the study a number of schools within Wales had shortened the amount of time they allow for lunch break. The study investigated the association between length of lunch break and the dietary choices of students in secondary schools. Student-level data, collected through anonymised questionnaires, included reported dietary choices and correlates of these; data on school approaches to food were collected through postal surveys. Multilevel analysis was used to study the independent association between lunch-break length and student dietary choice. Data were collected from secondary schools in Wales that were part of the 2005/2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study. The final sample for analysis included data from 6693 students aged 11-16 years and 289 teachers from sixty-four secondary schools in Wales. Once controlling for many individual-level and school-level factors, the length of time allowed for lunch across the range for schools included in the study (minimum =25 min, maximum =62.5 min) was associated with higher odds of students eating fruit for lunch (2.20; 95% CI 1.18, 4.11) and fruit and vegetables on a daily basis (2.15; 95% CI 1.33, 3.47) but lower odds of eating unhealthy foods on a daily basis (0.44; 95% CI 0.24, 0.80). Shorter lunch breaks are associated with less healthy dietary choices by students. Schools should consider the impact that lunch-break length has on student dietary choice as well as on other behaviours. Policy makers should work with schools in encouraging them to maintain lunch breaks of a length that allow pupils to make healthy choices.

  20. Does workplace social capital buffer the effects of job stress? A cross-sectional, multilevel analysis of cigarette smoking among U.S. manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Sapp, Amy L; Kawachi, Ichiro; Sorensen, Glorian; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Subramanian, S V

    2010-07-01

    To investigate whether workplace social capital buffers the association between job stress and smoking status. As part of the Harvard Cancer Prevention Project's Healthy Directions--Small Business Study, interviewer-administered questionnaires were completed by 1740 workers and 288 managers in 26 manufacturing firms (84% and 85% response). Social capital was assessed by multiple items measured at the individual level among workers and contextual level among managers. Job stress was operationalized by the demand-control model. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations between job stressors and smoking and test for effect modification by social capital measures. Workplace social capital (both summary measures) buffered associations between high job demands and smoking. One compositional item--worker trust in managers--buffered associations between job strain and smoking. Workplace social capital may modify the effects of psychosocial working conditions on health behaviors.

  1. Does workplace social capital buffer the effects of job stress? A cross-sectional, multilevel analysis of cigarette smoking among U.S. manufacturing workers

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Amy L.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Sorensen, Glorian; LaMontagne, Anthony D.; Subramanian, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether workplace social capital buffers the association between job stress and smoking status. Methods As part of the Harvard Cancer Prevention Project’s Healthy Directions-Small Business Study, interviewer-administered questionnaires were completed by 1740 workers and 288 managers in 26 manufacturing firms (84% and 85% response). Social capital was assessed by multiple items measured at the individual-level among workers, and contextual-level among managers. Job stress was operationalized by the demand-control model. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations between job stressors and smoking, and test for effect modification by social capital measures. Results Workplace social capital (both summary measures) buffered associations between high job demands and smoking. One compositional item—worker trust in managers—buffered associations between job strain and smoking. Conclusion Workplace social capital may modify the effects of psychosocial working conditions on health behaviors. PMID:20595910

  2. Shuttle orbiter radar cross-sectional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; James, R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and model simulation studies on signal to noise levels and shuttle radar cross section are described. Pre-mission system calibrations, system configuration, and postmission system calibration of the tracking radars are described. Conversion of target range, azimuth, and elevation into radar centered east north vertical position coordinates are evaluated. The location of the impinging rf energy with respect to the target vehicles body axis triad is calculated. Cross section correlation between the two radars is presented.

  3. Age differences in the association of childhood obesity with area-level and school-level deprivation: cross-classified multilevel analysis of cross-sectional data.

    PubMed

    Townsend, N; Rutter, H; Foster, C

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that area-level deprivation is associated with obesity independently of individual socioeconomic status; however, although the school may also have an impact on child health, few studies have investigated the association between school-level deprivation and the body mass index (BMI) of students. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the BMI for children of different ages and area-level and school-level deprivation. BMI measurements were collected through the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) that samples from two school years: 396,171 reception year pupils (4-5-year olds) and 392,344 year 6 pupils (10-11-year olds) from 14,054 primary schools in England. Cross-classified multilevel models with four levels: individual (n=788,525), lower super output areas corresponding to area of residence (n=29,606), schools (n=14,054) and primary care trusts (PCTs, n=143), which coordinate the collection of data within a large area, were used to study the relationship between measures of deprivation at an area and school level, and childhood BMI within England. A positive association was found between the area and school measures of deprivation, and student BMI. Both the measures of deprivation explained a greater proportion of variance in BMI z-scores for year 6 students than for the reception year students, with a greater difference between the year groups found with the school-level measure of socioeconomic status than for the the area-level measure. Deprivation explains a greater proportion of the variance in BMI for older compared with younger children, perhaps reflecting the impact of deprivation as children age, highlighting the widening of health inequalities through childhood. The association with school-level deprivation illustrates the impact of the school on BMI status throughout the primary school years.

  4. A multilevel analysis to explain self-reported adverse health effects and adaptation to urban heat: a cross-sectional survey in the deprived areas of 9 Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Diane; Abdous, Belkacem; Valois, Pierre; Gosselin, Pierre; Sidi, Elhadji A Laouan

    2016-02-12

    This study identifies the characteristics and perceptions related to the individual, the dwelling and the neighbourhood of residence associated with the prevalence of self-reported adverse health impacts and an adaptation index when it is very hot and humid in summer in the most disadvantaged sectors of the nine most populous cities of Québec, Canada, in 2011. The study uses a cross-sectional design and a stratified representative sample; 3485 people (individual-level) were interviewed in their residence. They lived in 1647 buildings (building-level) in 87 most materially and socially disadvantaged census dissemination areas (DA-level). Multilevel analysis was used to perform 3-level models nested one in the other to examine individual impacts as well as the adaptation index. For the prevalence of impacts, which is 46 %, the logistic model includes 13 individual-level indicators (including air conditioning and the adaptation index) and 1 building-level indicator. For the adaptation index, with values ranging from -3 to +3, the linear model has 10 individual-level indicators, 1 building-level indicator and 2 DA-level indicators. Of all these indicators, 9 were associated to the prevalence of impacts only and 8 to the adaptation index only. This 3-level analysis shows the differential importance of the characteristics of residents, buildings and their surroundings on self-reported adverse health impacts and on adaptation (other than air conditioning) under hot and humid summer conditions. It also identifies indicators specific to impacts or adaptation. People with negative health impacts from heat rely more on adaptation strategies while low physical activity and good dwelling/building insulation lead to lower adaptation. Better neighbourhood walkability favors adaptations other than air conditioning. Thus, adaptation to heat in these neighbourhoods seems reactive rather than preventive. These first multi-level insights pave the way for the development of a

  5. Resonance Analysis and Evaluation of the Uranium -235 Neutron-Induced Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Luiz Carlos

    Neutron cross sections of fissile nuclei are of considerable interest for the understanding of parameters such as resonance absorption, resonance escape probability, resonance self-shielding, and the dependence of the reactivity on temperature. In the present study, new techniques for the evaluation of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections are described. The Reich-Moore formalism of the Bayesian computer code SAMMY was used to perform consistent R-matrix multilevel analyses of the selected neutron cross-section data. The Delta_3 -statistics of Dyson and Mehta, along with high -resolution data and the spin-separated fission cross-section data, have provided the possibility of developing a new methodology for the analysis and evaluation of neutron -nucleus cross-sections. The result of the analysis consists of a set of resonance parameters which describe the ^{235}U neutron cross sections up to 500 eV. The set of resonance parameters obtained through a R-matrix analysis are expected to satisfy statistical properties which lead to information on the nuclear structure. The resonance parameters were tested and showed good agreement with the theory. It is expected that the parametrization of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections obtained in this dissertation represents the current state of art in data as well as in theory and, therefore, can be of direct use in reactor calculations.

  6. The Social Gap Index and the prevalence of osteoarthritis in the community: a cross-sectional multilevel study in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Moreno-Montoya, Jose; Alvarez-Nemegyei, Jose; Goycochea-Robles, Maria Victoria; Sanin, Luz Helena; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Cardiel, Mario Humberto; Garza-Elizondo, Mario Alberto; Maradiaga, Marco; Pelaez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-01-01

    Multilevel studies have gained importance for highlighting social inequalities in health. These associations have been reported previously in diseases such as arthritis and chronic pain. We conducted a cross-sectional study using multilevel analysis to identify individual and contextual factors associated with the variation of prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Mexican population. The sample included 17,566 individuals of which 10,666 (60.7%) were women. The relationship between individual and contextual factors and OA were analyzed with a multilevel strategy. From the total population, 1,681 individuals had OA. Multilevel analysis showed that individual variables such as female gender (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 1.4), age range 55-65 years (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.3, 2.0), musculoskeletal pain in the last 7 days (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 2.3, 3.0), and use of pain treatments (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.2, 1.7) were associated with OA. At the regional level, the Social Gap Index (SGIx) was associated with the diagnosis of OA (coefficient 0.5, 95% CI 0.2-1.1). The SGIx contextual variable was positively associated with the regional prevalence of OA and the variation in prevalence of OA in different regions. The larger the social gap, the greater the variation in OA prevalence. These factors were independently associated with the prevalence of OA: female gender, pain intensity, physical limitation, and the use of pain treatments were individual variables associated with OA. The association between OA prevalence and regional variations with SGIx reflects inequities in health provisions that should be considered in health programs.

  7. Analysis and Simulation of Quantum Radar Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kang; Xiao, Huai-Tie; Fan, Hong-Qi

    2014-03-01

    We derive a modified analytical expression of a quantum radar cross section (QRCS). Subsequently, we present a comparison between the QRCS and a classical radar cross section (RCS) and analyze the factors that can affect the intensity of the peak and side lobes. Simulation results on a flat rectangular plate demonstrate that QRCS has a similar structure to that of RCS. The analysis of side-lobe structure can benefit the design of quantum stealth platforms as well as the research on quantum radars.

  8. Workplace sexual harassment and depressive symptoms: a cross-sectional multilevel analysis comparing harassment from clients or customers to harassment from other employees amongst 7603 Danish employees from 1041 organizations.

    PubMed

    Friborg, Maria K; Hansen, Jørgen V; Aldrich, Per T; Folker, Anna P; Kjær, Susie; Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Rugulies, Reiner; Madsen, Ida E H

    2017-09-25

    Previous research has reported that sexual harassment can lead to reduced mental health. Few studies have focused on sexual harassment conducted by clients or customers, which might occur in person-related occupations such as eldercare work, social work or customer service work. This study examined the cross-sectional association between sexual harassment by clients or customers and depressive symptoms. We also examined if this association was different compared to sexual harassment conducted by a colleague, supervisor or subordinate. Further, we investigated if psychosocial workplace initiatives modified the association between sexual harassment by clients or customers and level of depressive symptoms. We used data from the Work Environment and Health in Denmark cohort study (WEHD) and the Work Environment Activities in Danish Workplaces Study (WEADW) collected in 2012. WEHD is based on a random sample of employed individuals aged 18-64. In WEADW, organizational supervisors or employee representatives provided information on workplace characteristics. By combining WEHD and WEADW we included self-reported information on working conditions and health from 7603 employees and supervisors in 1041 organizations within 5 occupations. Data were analyzed using multilevel regression and analyses adjusted for gender, age, occupation and socioeconomic position. Exposure to workplace sexual harassment from clients or customers was statistically significantly associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms (2.05; 95% CI: 0.98-3.12) compared to no exposure. Employees harassed by colleagues, supervisors or subordinates had a higher mean level of depressive symptoms (2.45; 95% CI: 0.57-4.34) than employees harassed by clients or customers. We observed no statistically significant interactions between harassment from clients and customers and any of the examined psychosocial workplace initiatives (all p > 0.05). The association between sexual harassment and depressive

  9. Exploring sources of variability in adherence to guidelines across hospitals in low-income settings: a multi-level analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 22 hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gathara, David; English, Mike; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Todd, Jim; Allen, Elizabeth

    2015-04-28

    Variability in processes of care and outcomes has been reported widely in high-income settings (at geographic, hospital, physician group and individual physician levels); however, such variability and the factors driving it are rarely examined in low-income settings. Using data from a cross-sectional survey undertaken in 22 hospitals (60 case records from each hospital) across Kenya that aimed at evaluating the quality of routine hospital services, we sought to explore variability in four binary inpatient paediatric process indicators. These included three prescribing tasks and use of one diagnostic. To examine for sources of variability, we examined intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and their changes using multi-level mixed models with random intercepts for hospital and clinician levels and adjusting for patient and clinician level covariates. Levels of performance varied substantially across indicators and hospitals. The absolute values for ICCs also varied markedly ranging from a maximum of 0.48 to a minimum of 0.09 across the models for HIV testing and prescription of zinc, respectively. More variation was attributable at the hospital level than clinician level after allowing for nesting of clinicians within hospitals for prescription of quinine loading dose for malaria (ICC = 0.30), prescription of zinc for diarrhoea patients (ICC = 0.11) and HIV testing for all children (ICC = 0.43). However, for prescription of correct dose of crystalline penicillin, more of the variability was explained by the clinician level (ICC = 0.21). Adjusting for clinician and patient level covariates only altered, marginally, the ICCs observed in models for the zinc prescription indicator. Performance varied greatly across place and indicator. The variability that could be explained suggests interventions to improve performance might be best targeted at hospital level factors for three indicators and clinician factors for one. Our data suggest that better

  10. The prevalence, prevention and multilevel variance of pressure ulcers in Norwegian hospitals: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bredesen, Ida Marie; Bjøro, Karen; Gunningberg, Lena; Hofoss, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are preventable adverse events. Organizational differences may influence the quality of prevention across wards and hospitals. To investigate the prevalence of pressure ulcers, patient-related risk factors, the use of preventive measures and how much of the pressure ulcer variance is at patient, ward and hospital level. A cross-sectional study. Six of the 11 invited hospitals in South-Eastern Norway agreed to participate. Inpatients ≥18 years at 88 somatic hospital wards (N=1209). Patients in paediatric and maternity wards and day surgery patients were excluded. The methodology for pressure ulcer prevalence studies developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel was used, including demographic data, the Braden scale, skin assessment, the location and severity of pressure ulcers and preventive measures. Multilevel analysis was used to investigate variance across hierarchical levels. The prevalence was 18.2% for pressure ulcer category I-IV, 7.2% when category I was excluded. Among patients at risk of pressure ulcers, 44.3% had pressure redistributing support surfaces in bed and only 22.3% received planned repositioning in bed. Multilevel analysis showed that although the dominant part of the variance in the occurrence of pressure ulcers was at patient level there was also a significant amount of variance at ward level. There was, however, no significant variance at hospital level. Pressure ulcer prevalence in this Norwegian sample is similar to comparable European studies. At-risk patients were less likely to receive preventive measures than patients in earlier studies. There was significant variance in the occurrence of pressure ulcers at ward level but not at hospital level, indicating that although interventions for improvement are basically patient related, improvement of procedures and organization at ward level may also be important. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cross sections of deposited layers investigated by micronuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jet-Efda Contributors Petersson, P.; Bergsåker, H.; Possnert, G.; Coad, J. P.; Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S.; Hakola, A.

    2011-08-01

    Cross sections of deposited layers from the divertor of the Joint European Torus (JET) have been investigated, microscopically and by ion microbeam analysis. The thickness of these layers on the studied samples varies between about 50 μm and 800 μm depending on the exposure time and poloidal location of the sample. For most of the thicker layers a laminar structure is observed. In some locations changes, such as gaps, are also observed along the laminar structure as well as more complex structures. The possibility to use the layers as historical reference was also investigated.

  12. SCALE system cross-section validation for criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, A M; Westfall, R M; Dodds, Jr, H L

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test selected data from three cross-section libraries for use in the criticality safety analysis of UO/sub 2/ fuel rod lattices. The libraries, which are distributed with the SCALE system, are used to analyze potential criticality problems which could arise in the industrial fuel cycle for PWR and BWR reactors. Fuel lattice criticality problems could occur in pool storage, dry storage with accidental moderation, shearing and dissolution of irradiated elements, and in fuel transport and storage due to inadequate packing and shipping cask design. The data were tested by using the SCALE system to analyze 25 recently performed critical experiments.

  13. Formulation and Analysis of the Quantum Radar Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsema, Matthew J.

    In radar, the amount of returns that an object sends back to the receiver after being struck by an electromagnetic wave is characterized by what is known as the radar cross section, denoted by sigma typically. There are many mechanisms that affect how much radiation is reflected back in the receiver direction, such as reflectivity, physical contours and dimensions, attenuation properties of the materials, projected cross sectional area and so on. All of these characteristics are lumped together in a single value of sigma, which has units of m2. Stealth aircrafts for example are designed to minimize its radar cross section and return the smallest amount of radiation possible in the receiver direction. A new concept has been introduced called quantum radar, that uses correlated quantum states of photons as well as the unique properties of quantum mechanics to ascertain information on a target at a distance. At the time of writing this dissertation, quantum radar is very much in its infancy. There still exist fundamental questions about the feasibility of its implementation, especially in the microwave spectrum. However, what has been theoretically determined, is that quantum radar has a fundamental advantage over classical radar in terms of resolution and returns in certain regimes. Analogous to the classical radar cross section (CRCS), the concept of the quantum radar cross section (QRCS) has been introduced. This quantity measures how an object looks to a quantum radar be describing how a single photon, or small cluster of photons scatter off of a macroscopic target. Preliminary simulations of the basic quantum radar cross section equation have yielded promising results showing an advantage in sidelobe response in comparison to the classical RCS. This document expands upon this idea by providing insight as to where this advantage originates, as well as developing more rigorous simulation analysis, and greatly expanding upon the theory. The expanded theory presented

  14. Development of radar cross section analysis system of naval ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kookhyun; Kim, Jin-Hyeong; Choi, Tae-Muk; Cho, Dae-Seung

    2012-03-01

    A software system for a complex object scattering analysis, named SYSCOS, has been developed for a systematic radar cross section (RCS) analysis and reduction design. The system is based on the high frequency analysis methods of physical optics, geometrical optics, and physical theory of diffraction, which are suitable for RCS analysis of electromagnetically large and complex targets as like naval ships. In addition, a direct scattering center analysis function has been included, which gives relatively simple and intuitive way to discriminate problem areas in design stage when comparing with conventional image-based approaches. In this paper, the theoretical background and the organization of the SYSCOS system are presented. To verify its accuracy and to demonstrate its applicability, numerical analyses for a square plate, a sphere and a cylinder, a weapon system and a virtual naval ship have been carried out, of which results have been compared with analytic solutions and those obtained by the other existing software.

  15. Using the SPSS Mixed Procedure to Fit Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Multilevel Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peugh, James L.; Enders, Craig K.

    2005-01-01

    Beginning with Version 11, SPSS implemented the MIXED procedure, which is capable of performing many common hierarchical linear model analyses. The purpose of this article was to provide a tutorial for performing cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses using this popular software platform. In doing so, the authors borrowed heavily from Singer's…

  16. Analysis of cross sections using various nuclear potential

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Azni Abdul; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Yusof, Norhasliza; Muhammad Zamrun, F.

    2014-05-02

    The relevant astrophysical reaction rates which are derived from the reaction cross sections are necessary input to the reaction network. In this work, we analyse several theoretical models of the nuclear potential which give better prediction of the cross sections for some selected reactions.

  17. Interpreting sediment transport data with channel cross section analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Hunt, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Suspended sediment load estimation is important for the management of stream environments. However suspended load data are uncommon and scalable models are needed to take maximum advantage of the measurements available. One of the most commonly used models for correlating suspended sediment load is an empirical power law relationship (Qs=aQ^b, Qs: suspended load, Q: flow rate). However, the relationship of log-scaled suspended load to flow rate has multiple exponents for different flow regimes at a given site, so a single power law relationship is not a good fit. Thus we are exploring an alternative approach that employs channel cross section data historically collected by the US Geological Survey during stream gauge calibration. For our research, daily flow and sediment discharge were selected from about 180 possible USGS gauging sites in California. Among those, about 20 sites were relatively unaffected by human activities, and had more than three years of data including near monthly measurements of channel cross section data. From our analysis, a slope break was consistently observed in the relationship of log-scaled suspended load to flow rate as illustrated in Figure 1 for Redwood Creek at Orick, CA. Most of the selected natural sites clearly show this slope break. The slope break corresponds to a transition of flow from a flat, wide stream to flow constrained by steep banks as verified in Figure 2 for the same site. This suggests that physical factors in the streams such as shear stress are affected by this channel morphological change and result in the greater exponent of sediment load during higher flow regime. Figure1. Daily values of measured sediment transport and flow rate reported by USGS between 1970 and 2001. Figure2. Near monthly values of measured mean water depth and width reported by USGS between 1969 and 1987.

  18. EGAF: Measurement and Analysis of Gamma-ray Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Abusaleem, K.; Basunia, M. S.; Bečvář, F.; Belgya, T.; Bernstein, L. A.; Choi, H. D.; Escher, J. E.; Genreith, C.; Hurst, A. M.; Krtička, M.; Renne, P. R.; Révay, Zs.; Rogers, A. M.; Rossbach, M.; Siem, S.; Sleaford, B.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; van Bibber, K.; Wiedeking, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) is the result of a 2000-2007 IAEA Coordinated Research Project to develop a database of thermal, prompt γ-ray cross sections, σγ, for all elemental and selected radioactive targets. No previous database of this kind had existed. EGAF was originally based on measurements using guided neutron beams from the Budapest Reactor on all elemental targets from Z=1-82, 90 and 92, except for He and Pm. The EGAF σγ data were published in the Database of Prompt Gamma Rays from Slow Neutron Capture for Elemental Analysis [1]. An international collaboration has formed to continue the EGAF measurements with isotopically enriched targets, derive total radiative thermal neutron cross sections, σ0, extend the σγ data from thermal to 20 MeV neutrons, compile a completed activation data file, improve sections of the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) with more complete and up to date level and γ-ray data, evaluate statistical γ-ray data from reaction studies, and determine recommended neutron separations energies, Sn, for atomic mass evaluations. A new guided neutron beam facility has become available at the Garching (Munich) FRM II Reactor, and high energy neutron experimental facilities are being developed by a Berkeley area collaboration where 5-33 MeV neutron beams are available at the LBNL 88” cyclotron, 2.5 and 14 MeV beams at the University of California, Berkeley neutron generator laboratory, and high flux, 10 nṡcmṡ-2 s-1, neutron pulses available from the LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  19. Workplace Social Capital and Mental Health among Chinese Employees: A Multi-Level, Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Junling; Weaver, Scott R.; Dai, Junming; Jia, Yingnan; Liu, Xingdi; Jin, Kezhi; Fu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Whereas the majority of previous research on social capital and health has been on residential neighborhoods and communities, the evidence remains sparse on workplace social capital. To address this gap in the literature, we examined the association between workplace social capital and health status among Chinese employees in a large, multi-level, cross-sectional study. Methods By employing a two-stage stratified random sampling procedure, 2,796 employees were identified from 35 workplaces in Shanghai during March to November 2012. Workplace social capital was assessed using a validated and psychometrically tested eight-item measure, and the Chinese language version of the WHO-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5) was used to assess mental health. Control variables included sex, age, marital status, education level, occupation status, smoking status, physical activity, and job stress. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was conducted to explore whether individual- and workplace-level social capital was associated with mental health status. Results In total, 34.9% of workers reported poor mental health (WHO-5<13). After controlling for individual-level socio-demographic and lifestyle variables, compared to workers with the highest quartile of personal social capital, workers with the third, second, and lowest quartiles exhibited 1.39 to 3.54 times greater odds of poor mental health, 1.39 (95% CI: 1.10–1.75), 1.85 (95% CI: 1.38–2.46) and 3.54 (95% CI: 2.73–4.59), respectively. Corresponding odds ratios for workplace-level social capital were 0.95 (95% CI: 0.61–1.49), 1.14 (95% CI: 0.72–1.81) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.05–2.53) for the third, second, and lowest quartiles, respectively. Conclusions Higher workplace social capital is associated with lower odds of poor mental health among Chinese employees. Promoting social capital at the workplace may contribute to enhancing employees’ mental health in China. PMID:24404199

  20. Centering Predictor Variables in Cross-Sectional Multilevel Models: A New Look at an Old Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Craig K.; Tofighi, Davood

    2007-01-01

    Appropriately centering Level 1 predictors is vital to the interpretation of intercept and slope parameters in multilevel models (MLMs). The issue of centering has been discussed in the literature, but it is still widely misunderstood. The purpose of this article is to provide a detailed overview of grand mean centering and group mean centering in…

  1. Experimental nuclear cross sections for spacecraft shield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peelle, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to validate and to supplement the intranuclear cascade model as a method for estimating cross sections of importance to spacecraft shield design. The experimental situation is inconclusive particularly for neutron-producing reactions, but is relatively sound for reaction cross sections and for proton spectra at several hundred MeV at medium forward angles. Secondary photon contributions are imprecisely known.

  2. Multi-level, cross-sectional study of workplace social capital and smoking among Japanese employees.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Etsuji; Fujiwara, Takeo; Takao, Soshi; Subramanian, S V; Yamamoto, Eiji; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2010-08-17

    Social capital is hypothesized to be relevant to health promotion, and the association between community social capital and cigarette smoking has been examined. Individual-level social capital has been found to be associated with smoking cessation, but evidence remains sparse on the contextual effect of social capital and smoking. Further, evidence remains sparse on the association between smoking and social capital in the workplace, where people are spending an increasing portion of their daily lives. We examined the association between workplace social capital and smoking status among Japanese private sector employees. We employed a two-stage stratified random sampling procedure. Of the total of 1,800 subjects in 60 companies, 1,171 (men/women; 834/337) employees (65.1%) were identified from 46 companies in Okayama in 2007. Workplace social capital was assessed in two dimensions; trust and reciprocity. Company-level social capital was based on inquiring about employee perceptions of trust and reciprocity among co-workers, and then aggregating their responses in order to calculate the proportion of workers reporting mistrust and lack of reciprocity. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was conducted using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to explore whether individual- and company-level social capital was associated with smoking. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% credible intervals (CIs) for current smoking were obtained. Overall, 33.3% of the subjects smoked currently. There was no relationship between individual-level mistrust of others and smoking status. By contrast, one-standard deviation change in company-level mistrust was associated with higher odds of smoking (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.06-1.46) even after controlling for individual-level mistrust, sex, age, occupation, educational attainment, alcohol use, physical activity, body mass index, and chronic diseases. No clear associations were found between lack of reciprocity and smoking both at the individual- and

  3. An evaluation of wind turbine blade cross section analysis techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Griffith, Daniel Todd; Laird, Daniel L.; Resor, Brian Ray

    2010-03-01

    The blades of a modern wind turbine are critical components central to capturing and transmitting most of the load experienced by the system. They are complex structural items composed of many layers of fiber and resin composite material and typically, one or more shear webs. Large turbine blades being developed today are beyond the point of effective trial-and-error design of the past and design for reliability is always extremely important. Section analysis tools are used to reduce the three-dimensional continuum blade structure to a simpler beam representation for use in system response calculations to support full system design and certification. One model simplification approach is to analyze the two-dimensional blade cross sections to determine the properties for the beam. Another technique is to determine beam properties using static deflections of a full three-dimensional finite element model of a blade. This paper provides insight into discrepancies observed in outputs from each approach. Simple two-dimensional geometries and three-dimensional blade models are analyzed in this investigation. Finally, a subset of computational and experimental section properties for a full turbine blade are compared.

  4. Social capital and dental pain in Brazilian northeast: a multilevel cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence on possible associations between social determinants and dental pain. This study investigated the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain in adolescents, adults and the elderly. Methods A population-based multilevel study was conducted involving 624 subjects from 3 age groups: 15–19, 35–44 and 65–74 years. They were randomly selected from 30 census tracts in three cities in the State of Paraíba, Brazil. A two-stage cluster sampling was used considering census tracts and households as sampling units. The outcome of study was the presence of dental pain in the last 6 months. Information on dental pain, demographic, socio-economic, health-related behaviors, use of dental services, self-perceived oral health and social capital measures was collected through interviews. Participants underwent a clinical examination for assessment of dental caries. Neighborhood social capital was evaluated using aggregated measures of social trust, social control, empowerment, political efficacy and neighborhood safety. Individual social capital assessment included bonding and bridging social capital. Multilevel logistic regression was used to test the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain after sequential adjustment for covariates. Results Individuals living in neighborhoods with high social capital were 52% less likely to report dental pain than those living in neighborhoods with low social capital (OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.27-0.85). Bonding social capital (positive interaction) was independently associated with dental pain (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.80-0.91). Last dental visit, self-perceived oral health and number of decayed teeth were also significantly associated with dental pain. Conclusions Our findings suggest that contextual and individual social capital are independently associated with dental pain. PMID:23289932

  5. Social capital and dental pain in Brazilian northeast: a multilevel cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Bianca Marques; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim; Vettore, Mario Vianna

    2013-01-04

    There is limited evidence on possible associations between social determinants and dental pain. This study investigated the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain in adolescents, adults and the elderly. A population-based multilevel study was conducted involving 624 subjects from 3 age groups: 15-19, 35-44 and 65-74 years. They were randomly selected from 30 census tracts in three cities in the State of Paraíba, Brazil. A two-stage cluster sampling was used considering census tracts and households as sampling units. The outcome of study was the presence of dental pain in the last 6 months. Information on dental pain, demographic, socio-economic, health-related behaviors, use of dental services, self-perceived oral health and social capital measures was collected through interviews. Participants underwent a clinical examination for assessment of dental caries. Neighborhood social capital was evaluated using aggregated measures of social trust, social control, empowerment, political efficacy and neighborhood safety. Individual social capital assessment included bonding and bridging social capital. Multilevel logistic regression was used to test the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain after sequential adjustment for covariates. Individuals living in neighborhoods with high social capital were 52% less likely to report dental pain than those living in neighborhoods with low social capital (OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.27-0.85). Bonding social capital (positive interaction) was independently associated with dental pain (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.80-0.91). Last dental visit, self-perceived oral health and number of decayed teeth were also significantly associated with dental pain. Our findings suggest that contextual and individual social capital are independently associated with dental pain.

  6. Cross section measurements via residual nuclear decays: Analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fengqun; Gao Lei; Li Kuohu; Song Yueli; Zhang Fang; Kong Xiangzhong; Luo Junhua

    2009-11-15

    We develop an approach to calculating the pure cross section of the ground state of artificial radioactive nuclides that subtracts the effect of an excited state on the ground state. We apply a formalism to obtaining pure cross sections by subtracting the effect of excited states in the reactions {sup 122}Te(n,2n){sup 121}Te{sup g} and {sup 128}Te(n,2n){sup 127}Te{sup g}, induced by neutrons of about 14 MeV. The cross sections are measured by an activation relative to the {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} reaction and are compared with results that take into account the effect of the excited state. Measurements are carried out by {gamma} detection using a coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. As samples, spectroscopically pure Te powder is used. The fast neutrons are produced by the {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction. The neutron energies in these measurements are determined using the method of cross-section ratios between the {sup 90}Zr(n,2n){sup 89}Zr{sup m+g} and {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} reactions.

  7. Substance Use among Adolescents Involved in Bullying: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Jorge; Tornero, Bernardita; Valenzuela, Daniela; Rojas-Barahona, Cristian A.; Salmivalli, Christina; Valenzuela, Eduardo; Araya, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Being involved in bullying as a victim or perpetrator could have deleterious health consequences. Even though there is some evidence that bullies and victims of bullying have a higher risk for drug use, less is known about bystanders. The aim of this research was to study the association between bullying experience (as victims, bullies, or bystanders) and substance use. We gathered complete information from a nationally representative sample of 36,687 students (51.4% female) attending 756 schools in Chile. We used a self-reported questionnaire which was developed based on similar instruments used elsewhere. This questionnaire was piloted and presented to an expert panel for approval. We used multilevel multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for several variables at the individual (e.g., school membership, parental monitoring) and school levels (e.g., school type, school denomination). This study shows that bullies and bully-victims have a high risk for cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use than bystanders. This is one of the few studies exploring the association between witnessing bullying and substance use. These findings add new insights to the study of the co-occurrence of bullying and substance use. Other factors, such as higher academic performance, stronger school membership, and better parental monitoring reduced the risk of any substance use, while the experience of domestic violence and the perception of social disorganization in the neighborhood, increased the risk. These findings may help the design of preventive interventions. PMID:28701974

  8. Substance Use among Adolescents Involved in Bullying: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Study.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Jorge; Tornero, Bernardita; Valenzuela, Daniela; Rojas-Barahona, Cristian A; Salmivalli, Christina; Valenzuela, Eduardo; Araya, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Being involved in bullying as a victim or perpetrator could have deleterious health consequences. Even though there is some evidence that bullies and victims of bullying have a higher risk for drug use, less is known about bystanders. The aim of this research was to study the association between bullying experience (as victims, bullies, or bystanders) and substance use. We gathered complete information from a nationally representative sample of 36,687 students (51.4% female) attending 756 schools in Chile. We used a self-reported questionnaire which was developed based on similar instruments used elsewhere. This questionnaire was piloted and presented to an expert panel for approval. We used multilevel multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for several variables at the individual (e.g., school membership, parental monitoring) and school levels (e.g., school type, school denomination). This study shows that bullies and bully-victims have a high risk for cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use than bystanders. This is one of the few studies exploring the association between witnessing bullying and substance use. These findings add new insights to the study of the co-occurrence of bullying and substance use. Other factors, such as higher academic performance, stronger school membership, and better parental monitoring reduced the risk of any substance use, while the experience of domestic violence and the perception of social disorganization in the neighborhood, increased the risk. These findings may help the design of preventive interventions.

  9. A Theoretical Analysis of the Radar Cross Section of the Biconical Corner Reflector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    radar ,and hence the enhancement of the radar cross section is not as great as, say, that of the trihedral corner reflector . In practical...AUSTRALIA TECHNICAL REPORT ERL-0134-TR A THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RADAR CROSS SECTION OF THE BICONICAL CORNER REFLECTOR J.L. WHIT ROW ~~T!: S fl-PO.AT...biconical corner reflector is a useful device where moderate enhancement of the radar cross section

  10. Section Builder: A finite element tool for analysis and design of composite beam cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Uttam Kumar

    SectionBuilder is an innovative finite element based tool, developed for analysis and design of composite beam cross-sections. The tool can handle the cross-sections with parametric shapes and arbitrary configurations. It can also handle arbitrary lay-ups for predefined beam cross-section geometries in a consistent manner. The material properties for each layer of the cross-section can be defined on the basis of the design requirements. This tool is capable of dealing with multi-cell composite cross-sections with arbitrary lay-ups. It has also the benefit of handling the variation of thickness of skin and D-spars for beams such as rotor blades. A typical cross-section is considered as a collection of interconnected walls. Walls with arbitrary lay-ups based on predefined geometries and material properties are generated first. The complex composite beam cross-sections are developed by connecting the walls using various types of connectors. These connectors are compatible with the walls, i.e., the thickness of the layers of the walls must match with those of the connectors at the place of connection. Cross-sections are often reinforced by core material for constructing realistic rotor blade cross-sections. The tool has the ability to integrate core materials into the cross-sections. A mapped mesh is considered for meshing parametric shapes, walls and various connectors, whereas a free mesh is considered for meshing the core materials. A new algorithm based on the Delaunay refinement algorithm is developed for creating the best possible free mesh for core materials. After meshing the cross-section, the tool determines the sectional properties using finite element analysis. This tool computes sectional properties including stiffness matrix, compliance matrix, mass matrix, and principal axes. A visualization environment is integrated with the tool for visualizing the stress and strain distributions over the cross-section.

  11. Cross-sectional analysis of renal transplantation osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Parker, C R; Freemont, A J; Blackwell, P J; Grainge, M J; Hosking, D J

    1999-11-01

    We report a cross-sectional study of 54 adult female renal transplant recipients. We measured bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine, femoral neck, total hip, and mid- and total radius, and 38 patients underwent transiliac crest bone biopsy. Osteopenia was widespread with 31/54 (57%) of patients osteoporotic at one or more sites. Seventeen out of 54 (32%) of the patients had a prevalent low-trauma fracture. There was a clear trend in BMD reduction across spine, hip and midradius, with the predominantly cortical midradial site showing the greatest loss. We found no relationship between BMD and body mass index, parathyroid hormone (PTH), dose of immunosuppressant, years since transplantation, age at menopause, or years since menopause. Histologically, abnormal biopsies could be classified into three categories: hyperparathyroid (n = 20), adynamic (n = 14), and osteomalacic (n = 2). Mean PTH was lower (p = NS) and mean cumulative prednisolone dose was higher (p = 0.04) in the adynamic group compared with the hyperparathyroid group, but because of overlap between groups neither was an effective discriminator of histology. We suggest that bone biopsy is indicated in these patients to direct appropriate treatment. At the cellular level, there were significant negative correlations between osteoclast function (eroded surface, r = 0.47, p = 0.003) and osteoblast numbers (osteoblast surface, r = -0.40, p = 0.01) and cumulative exposure to prednisolone. We postulate that suppression of osteoblast function by prednisolone with unopposed bone resorption may result in relative hypercalcaemia and low PTH. This progressive reduction in bone turnover may promote or prolong the adynamic state.

  12. Within- and between-group regression for improving the robustness of causal claims in cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Genser, Bernd; Teles, Carlos A; Barreto, Mauricio L; Fischer, Joachim E

    2015-07-10

    A major objective of environmental epidemiology is to elucidate exposure-health outcome associations. To increase the variance of observed exposure concentrations, researchers recruit individuals from different geographic areas. The common analytical approach uses multilevel analysis to estimate individual-level associations adjusted for individual and area covariates. However, in cross-sectional data this approach does not differentiate between residual confounding at the individual level and at the area level. An approach allowing researchers to distinguish between within-group effects and between-group effects would improve the robustness of causal claims. We applied an extended multilevel approach to a large cross-sectional study aimed to elucidate the hypothesized link between drinking water pollution from perfluoroctanoic acid (PFOA) and plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) or lymphocyte counts. Using within- and between-group regression of the individual PFOA serum concentrations, we partitioned the total effect into a within- and between-group effect by including the aggregated group average of the individual exposure concentrations as an additional predictor variable. For both biomarkers, we observed a strong overall association with PFOA blood levels. However, for lymphocyte counts the extended multilevel approach revealed the absence of a between-group effect, suggesting that most of the observed total effect was due to individual level confounding. In contrast, for CRP we found consistent between- and within-group effects, which corroborates the causal claim for the association between PFOA blood levels and CRP. Between- and within-group regression modelling augments cross-sectional analysis of epidemiological data by supporting the unmasking of non-causal associations arising from hidden confounding at different levels. In the application example presented in this paper, the approach suggested individual confounding as a probable explanation for

  13. Covariance of Neutron Cross Sections for {sup 16}O through R-matrix Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.; Paris, M.; Hale, G.M.; Shibata, K.; Fukahori, T.

    2015-01-15

    Through the R-matrix analysis, neutron cross sections as well as the covariance are estimated for {sup 16}O in the resolved resonance range. Although we consider the current results are still preliminary, we present the summary of the cross section analysis and the results of data uncertainty/covariance, including those for the differential cross sections. It is found that the values obtained highlight consequences of nature in the theory as well as knowledge from measurements, which gives a realistic quantification of evaluated nuclear data covariances.

  14. A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Impact of Rehabilitation Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Howard E. A.; Gaughan, Suzanne M.

    1975-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of the data, stratified by length of time between case closure and follow-up, supported the conclusion that rehabilitation counseling has a lasting impact on the work adjustment of the client. (Author)

  15. A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Impact of Rehabilitation Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Howard E. A.; Gaughan, Suzanne M.

    1975-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of the data, stratified by length of time between case closure and follow-up, supported the conclusion that rehabilitation counseling has a lasting impact on the work adjustment of the client. (Author)

  16. Cross-Sectional Analysis of National Dental Residency Match Data.

    PubMed

    Prakasam, Sivaraman; Brady, Patrick; Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Rampa, Sankeerth; Shin, Kyungsup; Nalliah, Romesh; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2017-03-01

    The Dental Residency Match (DRM) program provides an ethical and unbiased selection process for applicants to postdoctoral dental programs, based on mutual interests of applicants and programs. The aims of this study were to conduct a descriptive analysis of DRM metrics for the years 2008 to 2015 and to test the hypothesis that there was a difference in number of ranks submitted between programs that filled all their offered positions and those that did not. DRM metrics data from years 2008 to 2015 were obtained from the National Matching Service. Trend analyses and panel data assessments were made. Six types of postdoctoral dental programs (GPR, AEGD, oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, and dental anesthesiology) participate in the DRM program. The results showed that the number of programs participating and number of residency positions offered increased over the study period. The programs that filled all their positions ranked more applicants than the programs that did not fill their positions (p<0.05). The number of acceptable applicants increased over the study period for all programs except those in dental anesthesiology. These results suggest that participation in DRM is increasing, most programs are able to fill their positions with acceptable applicants, and programs seeking to fill all their positions need to submit a large number of ranks.

  17. Hospital organizational factors influence work-family conflict in registered nurses: Multilevel modeling of a nation-wide cross-sectional survey in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Leineweber, C; Chungkham, H S; Westerlund, H; Tishelman, C; Lindqvist, R

    2014-05-01

    The present shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in many European countries is expected to continue and worsen, which poses a substantial threat to the maintenance of healthcare in this region. Work-family conflict is a known risk factor for turnover and sickness absence. This paper empirically examines whether the nurse practice environment is associated with experienced work-family conflict. A multilevel model was fit with the individual RN at the 1st, and the hospital department at the 2nd level using cross-sectional RN survey data from the Swedish part of RN4CAST, an EU 7th framework project. The data analyzed here is based on a national sample of 8356 female and 592 male RNs from 369 hospital departments. We found that 6% of the variability in work-family conflict experienced by RNs was at the department level. Organizational level factors significantly accounted for most of the variability at this level with two of the work practice environment factors examined, staffing adequacy and nurse involvement in hospital affairs, significantly related to work-family conflict. Due to the design of the study, factors on ward and work group levels could not be analyzed, but are likely to account for additional variance which in the present analysis appears to be on the individual level, with private life factors likely explaining another major part. These results suggest that higher level organizational factors in health care have a significant impact on the risk of work-family conflict among RNs through their impact on the nurse practice environment. Lower level organizational factors should be investigated in future studies using hierarchical multilevel sampling. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Buckling and vibration analysis of a simply supported column with a piecewise constant cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis and sample results for the lateral buckling and vibration of a compressively loaded column is presented whose cross section is piecewise constant along its length. The column is symmetric about its mid-span and consists of three sections, the center section having a stiffer cross section than the two identical end sections. Buckling and vibration characteristics of the column are determined from numerical solution of the exact eigenvalue problems. Parametric structural efficiency analyses are performed using a nondimensionalized set of governing equations to determine the optimum ratio between the lengths of the center section and the outer sections based on both buckling load and vibration frequency requirements. In these analyses, two relationships exist. One is between cross-sectional mass and the cross section, and the other is a high-efficiency scheme. The effect of axial load on vibration frequency is also examined and compared with that of a uniform column.

  19. Multidimensional analysis of fast-spectrum material replacement measurements for systematic estimation of cross section uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.; Lantz, E.; Mayo, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    A series of central core and core-reflector interface sample replacement experiments for 16 materials performed in the NASA heavy-metal-reflected, fast spectrum critical assembly (NCA) were analyzed in four and 13 groups using the GAM 2 cross-section set. The individual worths obtained by TDSN and DOT multidimensional transport theory calculations showed significant differences from the experimental results. These were attributed to cross-section uncertainties in the GAM 2 cross sections. Simultaneous analysis of the measured and calculated sample worths permitted separation of the worths into capture and scattering components which systematically provided fast spectrum averaged correction factors to the magnitudes of the GAM 2 absorption and scattering cross sections. Several Los Alamos clean critical assemblies containing Oy, Ta, and Mo as well as one of the NCA compositions were reanalyzed using the corrected cross sections. In all cases the eigenvalues were significantly improved and were recomputed to within 1 percent of the experimental eigenvalue. A comparable procedure may be used for ENDF cross sections when these are available.

  20. Effective inelastic scattering cross-sections for background analysis in HAXPES of deeply buried layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risterucci, P.; Renault, O.; Zborowski, C.; Bertrand, D.; Torres, A.; Rueff, J.-P.; Ceolin, D.; Grenet, G.; Tougaard, S.

    2017-04-01

    Inelastic background analysis of HAXPES spectra was recently introduced as a powerful method to get access to the elemental distribution in deeply buried layers or interfaces, at depth up to 60 nm below the surface. However the accuracy of the analysis highly relies on suitable scattering cross-sections able to describe effectively the transport of photoelectrons through overlayer structures consisting of individual layers with potentially very different scattering properties. Here, we show that within Tougaard's practical framework as implemented in the Quases-Analyze software, the photoelectron transport through thick (25-40 nm) multi-layer structures with widely different cross-sections can be reliably described with an effective cross-section in the form of a weighted sum of the individual cross-section of each layer. The high-resolution core-level analysis partly provides a guide for determining the nature of the individual cross-sections to be used. We illustrate this novel approach with the practical case of a top Al/Ti bilayer structure in an AlGaN/GaN power transistor device stack before and after sucessive annealing treatments. The analysis provides reliable insights on the Ti and Ga depth distributions up to nearly 50 nm below the surface.

  1. Comprehensive neutron cross-section and secondary energy distribution uncertainty analysis for a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; LaBauve, R.J.; Young, P.G.

    1980-05-01

    On the example of General Atomic's well-documented Power Generating Fusion Reactor (PGFR) design, this report exercises a comprehensive neutron cross-section and secondary energy distribution (SED) uncertainty analysis. The LASL sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code SENSIT is used to calculate reaction cross-section sensitivity profiles and integral SED sensitivity coefficients. These are then folded with covariance matrices and integral SED uncertainties to obtain the resulting uncertainties of three calculated neutronics design parameters: two critical radiation damage rates and a nuclear heating rate. The report documents the first sensitivity-based data uncertainty analysis, which incorporates a quantitative treatment of the effects of SED uncertainties. The results demonstrate quantitatively that the ENDF/B-V cross-section data files for C, H, and O, including their SED data, are fully adequate for this design application, while the data for Fe and Ni are at best marginally adequate because they give rise to response uncertainties up to 25%. Much higher response uncertainties are caused by cross-section and SED data uncertainties in Cu (26 to 45%), tungsten (24 to 54%), and Cr (up to 98%). Specific recommendations are given for re-evaluations of certain reaction cross-sections, secondary energy distributions, and uncertainty estimates.

  2. Improvement of the Work Environment and Work-Related Stress: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Study of a Nationally Representative Sample of Japanese Workers.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tabuchi, Takahiro; Kawakami, Norito

    2017-03-01

    This cross-sectional multilevel study aimed to investigate the relationship between improvement of the work environment and work-related stress in a nationally representative sample in Japan. The study was based on a national survey that randomly sampled 1745 worksites and 17,500 nested employees. The survey asked the worksites whether improvements of the work environment were conducted; and it asked the employees to report the number of work-related stresses they experienced. Multilevel multinominal logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted. Improvement of the work environment was not significantly associated with any level of work-related stress. Among men, it was significantly and negatively associated with the severe level of work-related stress. The association was not significant among women. Improvements to work environments may be associated with reduced work-related stress among men nationwide in Japan.

  3. Analysis of approximations used in calculations of radiative corrections to electron-proton scattering cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, R. E.; Fadin, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of approximations used in calculations of radiative corrections to electron-proton scattering cross section is presented. We investigate the difference between the relatively recent Maximon and Tjon result and the Mo and Tsai result, which was used in the analysis of experimental data. We also discuss the proton form factors ratio dependence on the way we take into account radiative corrections.

  4. Analysis of approximations used in calculations of radiative corrections to electron-proton scattering cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, R. E. Fadin, V. S.

    2015-01-15

    An analysis of approximations used in calculations of radiative corrections to electron-proton scattering cross section is presented. We investigate the difference between the relatively recent Maximon and Tjon result and the Mo and Tsai result, which was used in the analysis of experimental data. We also discuss the proton form factors ratio dependence on the way we take into account radiative corrections.

  5. Optimization of multi-group cross sections for fast reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, M. R.; Manalo, K. L.; Edgar, C. A.; Paul, J. N.; Molinar, M. P.; Redd, E. M.; Yi, C.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    The selection of the number of broad energy groups, collapsed broad energy group boundaries, and their associated evaluation into collapsed macroscopic cross sections from a general 238-group ENDF/B-VII library dramatically impacted the k eigenvalue for fast reactor analysis. An analysis was undertaken to assess the minimum number of energy groups that would preserve problem physics; this involved studies using the 3D deterministic transport parallel code PENTRAN, the 2D deterministic transport code SCALE6.1, the Monte Carlo based MCNP5 code, and the YGROUP cross section collapsing tool on a spatially discretized MOX fuel pin comprised of 21% PUO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} with sodium coolant. The various cases resulted in a few hundred pcm difference between cross section libraries that included the 238 multi-group reference, and cross sections rendered using various reaction and adjoint weighted cross sections rendered by the YGROUP tool, and a reference continuous energy MCNP case. Particular emphasis was placed on the higher energies characteristic of fission neutrons in a fast spectrum; adjoint computations were performed to determine the average per-group adjoint fission importance for the MOX fuel pin. This study concluded that at least 10 energy groups for neutron transport calculations are required to accurately predict the eigenvalue for a fast reactor system to within 250 pcm of the 238 group case. In addition, the cross section collapsing/weighting schemes within YGROUP that provided a collapsed library rendering eigenvalues closest to the reference were the contribution collapsed, reaction rate weighted scheme. A brief analysis on homogenization of the MOX fuel pin is also provided, although more work is in progress in this area. (authors)

  6. Photoneutron reaction cross sections from various experiments - analysis and evaluation using physical criteria of data reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, Vladimir; Ishkhanov, Boris; Orlin, Vadim; Peskov, Nikolai; Stepanov, Mikhail

    2017-09-01

    The majority of photonuclear reaction cross sections important for many fields of science and technology and various data files (EXFOR, RIPL, ENDF, etc.) supported by the IAEA were obtained in experiments using quasimonoenergetic annihilation photons. There are well-known systematic discrepancies between the partial photoneutron reactions (γ, 1n), (γ, 2n), (γ, 3n). For analysis of the data reliability the objective physical criteria were proposed. It was found out that the experimental data for many nuclei are not reliable because of large systematic uncertainties of the neutron multiplicity sorting method used. The experimentally-theoretical method was proposed for evaluating the reaction cross sections data satisfying the reliability criteria. The partial and total reaction cross sections were evaluated for many nuclei. In many cases evaluated data differ noticeably from both the experimental data and the data evaluated before for the IAEA Photonuclear Data Library. Therefore it became evident that the IAEA Library needs to be revised and updated.

  7. Medium effects in K+ nucleus interaction from consistent analysis of integral and differential cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    1997-02-01

    Self-consistency in the analysis of transmission measurements for K+ on several nuclei in the momentum range of 500-700 MeV/c is achieved with a `teff(ρ)ρ' potential and new results are derived for total cross sections. The imaginary part of the teff amplitude is found to increase linearly with the average nuclear density in excess of a threshold value of 0.088+/-0.004 fm-3. This phenomenological density dependence of the K+ nucleus optical potential also gives rise to good agreement with recent measurements of differential cross sections for elastic scattering of 715 MeV/c K+ by 6Li and C.

  8. Slow Wave Vane Structure with Elliptical Cross-Section Slots, an Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical analysis of the wave equation in cylinders with elliptical cross-section slots was performed. Compared to slow wave structures with rectangular slots higher impedance and lower power dissipation losses are evident. These features could lead to improved designs of traveling wave magnetrons and gigahertz backward-wave oscillators as well as linear traveling wave tubes with relatively shallow slots.

  9. Exploring Students' Conceptions of Science Learning via Drawing: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Wen-Min; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explored students' conceptions of science learning via drawing analysis. A total of 906 Taiwanese students in 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, and 12th grade were asked to use drawing to illustrate how they conceptualise science learning. Students' drawings were analysed using a coding checklist to determine the presence or absence…

  10. Multilevel Correlates of Non-Adherence in Kidney Transplant Patients Benefitting from Full Cost Coverage for Immunosuppressives: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Marsicano, Elisa Oliveira; Fernandes, Neimar Silva; Colugnati, Fernando Antônio Basile; Fernandes, Natalia Maria Silva; De Geest, Sabina; Sanders-Pinheiro, Helady

    2015-01-01

    Adherence is the result of the interaction of the macro, meso, micro, and patient level factors. The macro level includes full coverage of immunosuppressive medications as is the case in Brazil. We studied the correlates of immunosuppressive non-adherence in post kidney transplant patients in the Brazilian health care system. Using a cross-sectional design, adherence to immunosuppressives was assessed in a sample of 100 kidney transplant patients using a composite non-adherence score consisting of three methods (self-report [i.e., The Basel Adherence Scale for Assessment of Immunossupressives-BAASIS], collateral report, and immunosuppressive blood levels). Multilevel correlations of non-adherence were assessed (macro, meso, micro and patient level). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the correlates of non-adherence. Our sample consisted primarily of male (65%), Caucasians (72%) with a mean age of 45.0 ± 13.5 years old, who received grafts from a living donor (89%), with a mean time after transplantation of 72.3 ± 44.4 months. Prevalence of non-adherence was 51%. Family income higher than five reference wages (21.6 vs. 4%; OR 6.46 [1.35-30.89], p = 0.009; patient level), and having access to private health insurance (35.3% vs. 18.4%; OR 2.42 [0.96-6.10], p = 0.04; meso level) were associated with non-adherence in univariate analysis. Only the higher family income variable was retained in the multiple logistic regression model (OR 5.0; IC: 1.01-25.14; p = 0.04). Higher family income was the only factor that was associated with immunosuppressive non-adherence. In Brazil, lower income recipients benefit from better access to care and coverage of health care costs after transplantation. This is supposed to result in a better immunosuppressive adherence compared to high-income patients who have experienced these benefits continuously.

  11. Analysis and Parametric Investigation of Active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James

    The static behaviour of active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams (OCSTWB) with embedded Active/Macro Fibre Composites (AFCs/MFCs) has been investigated for the purpose of advancing the fundamental theory needed in the development of advanced smart structures. An efficient code that can analyze active OCSTWB using analytical equations has been studied. Various beam examples have been investigated in order to verify this recently developed analytical active OCSTWB analysis tool. The cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force, moments and bimoment predicted by this analytical code have been compared with those predicted by the 2-D finite element beam cross section analysis codes called the Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional (VABS) analysis and the University of Michigan VABS (UM/VABS). Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from the analytical tool and VABS. The calculated cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force/moments, the constitutive relation and the six intrinstic static equilibrium equations for OCSTWB were all used together in a first-order accurate forward difference scheme in order to determine the average twist and deflections along the beam span. In order to further verify the analytical code, the static behaviour of a number of beam examples was investigated using 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For a particular cross section, the rigid body twist and displacements were minimized with the displacements of all the nodes in the 3-D FEA model that compose the cross section. This was done for a number of cross sections along the beam span in order to recover the global beam twist and displacement profiles from the 3-D FEA results. The global twist and deflections predicted by the analytical code agreed closely with those predicted by UM/VABS and 3-D FEA. The study was completed by a parametric investigation to determine the boundary conditions and the composite ply lay-ups of the active and passive plies that

  12. Unified nonlinear analysis for nonhomogeneous anisotropic beams with closed cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atilgan, Ali R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1991-01-01

    A unified methodology for geometrically nonlinear analysis of nonhomogeneous, anisotropic beams is presented. A 2D cross-sectional analysis and a nonlinear 1D global deformation analysis are derived from the common framework of a 3D, geometrically nonlinear theory of elasticity. The only restrictions are that the strain and local rotation are small compared to unity and that warping displacements are small relative to the cross-sectional dimensions. It is concluded that the warping solutions can be affected by large deformation and that this could alter the incremental stiffnes of the section. It is shown that sectional constants derived from the published, linear analysis can be used in the present nonlinear, 1D analysis governing the global deformation of the beam, which is based on intrinsic equations for nonlinear beam behavior. Excellent correlation is obtained with published experimental results for both isotropic and anisotropic beams undergoing large deflections.

  13. Unified nonlinear analysis for nonhomogeneous anisotropic beams with closed cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atilgan, Ali R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1991-01-01

    A unified methodology for geometrically nonlinear analysis of nonhomogeneous, anisotropic beams is presented. A 2D cross-sectional analysis and a nonlinear 1D global deformation analysis are derived from the common framework of a 3D, geometrically nonlinear theory of elasticity. The only restrictions are that the strain and local rotation are small compared to unity and that warping displacements are small relative to the cross-sectional dimensions. It is concluded that the warping solutions can be affected by large deformation and that this could alter the incremental stiffnes of the section. It is shown that sectional constants derived from the published, linear analysis can be used in the present nonlinear, 1D analysis governing the global deformation of the beam, which is based on intrinsic equations for nonlinear beam behavior. Excellent correlation is obtained with published experimental results for both isotropic and anisotropic beams undergoing large deflections.

  14. Modeling spanwise nonuniformity in the cross-sectional analysis of composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Jimmy Cheng-Chung

    Spanwise nonuniformity effects are modeled in the cross-sectional analysis of beam theory. This modeling adheres to an established numerical framework on cross-sectional analysis of uniform beams with arbitrary cross-sections. This framework is based on two concepts: decomposition of the rotation tensor and the variational-asymptotic method. Allowance of arbitrary materials and geometries in the cross-section is from discretization of the warping field by finite elements. By this approach, dimensional reduction from three-dimensional elasticity is performed rigorously and the sectional strain energy is derived to be asymptotically-correct. Elastic stiffness matrices are derived for inputs into the global beam analysis. Recovery relations for the displacement, stress, and strain fields are also derived with care to be consistent with the energy. Spanwise nonuniformity effects appear in the form of pointwise and sectionwise derivatives, which are approximated by finite differences. The formulation also accounts for the effects of spanwise variations in initial twist and/or curvature. A linearly tapered isotropic strip is analyzed to demonstrate spanwise nonuniformity effects on the cross-sectional analysis. The analysis is performed analytically by the variational-asymptotic method. Results from beam theory are validated against solutions from plane stress elasticity. These results demonstrate that spanwise nonuniformity effects become significant as the rate at which the cross-sections vary increases. The modeling of transverse shear modes of deformation is accomplished by transforming the strain energy into generalized Timoshenko form. Approximations in this transformation procedure from previous works, when applied to uniform beams, are identified. The approximations are not used in the present work so as to retain more accuracy. Comparison of present results with those previously published shows that these approximations sometimes change the results measurably

  15. DIFFERENTIAL CROSS SECTION ANALYSIS IN KAON PHOTOPRODUCTION USING ASSOCIATED LEGENDRE POLYNOMIALS

    SciTech Connect

    P. T. P. HUTAURUK, D. G. IRELAND, G. ROSNER

    2009-04-01

    Angular distributions of differential cross sections from the latest CLAS data sets,6 for the reaction γ + p→K+ + Λ have been analyzed using associated Legendre polynomials. This analysis is based upon theoretical calculations in Ref. 1 where all sixteen observables in kaon photoproduction can be classified into four Legendre classes. Each observable can be described by an expansion of associated Legendre polynomial functions. One of the questions to be addressed is how many associated Legendre polynomials are required to describe the data. In this preliminary analysis, we used data models with different numbers of associated Legendre polynomials. We then compared these models by calculating posterior probabilities of the models. We found that the CLAS data set needs no more than four associated Legendre polynomials to describe the differential cross section data. In addition, we also show the extracted coefficients of the best model.

  16. Cross sections for n+{sup 14}N from an R-matrix analysis of the {sup 15}N system

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.; Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program, a new evaluation of the neutron cross sections for {sup 14}N was made for ENDF/B-VI, based at energies below 2.5 MeV on a multichannel R-matrix analysis of reactions in the {sup 15}N system. The types of data used in the analysis, and the resulting cross sections and resonance structure for {sup 15}N are briefly described. The resonant features of the neutron cross sections were especially well determined by including precise, high-resolution neutron total cross section measurements from ORNL. While the new evaluated cross section appear to be significant improvements over the earlier ones, they still need to be tested more extensively against recent measurements of the differential elastic cross section from Oak Ridge.

  17. Autism Symptoms across Adulthood in Men with Fragile X Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Wheeler, Anne C.; Mailick, Marsha R.; Raspa, Melissa; Mihaila, Iulia; Bishop, Ellen; Bailey, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis was used to examine age-related differences in ASD symptoms and corresponding differences in disruptive behavior and social skills in 281 adult men with fragile X syndrome. Four age groups were created: 18-21, 22-29, 30-39, and 40-49 years. The 18-21 year-old group was reported to have more impairments in verbal…

  18. Autism Symptoms across Adulthood in Men with Fragile X Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Wheeler, Anne C.; Mailick, Marsha R.; Raspa, Melissa; Mihaila, Iulia; Bishop, Ellen; Bailey, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis was used to examine age-related differences in ASD symptoms and corresponding differences in disruptive behavior and social skills in 281 adult men with fragile X syndrome. Four age groups were created: 18-21, 22-29, 30-39, and 40-49 years. The 18-21 year-old group was reported to have more impairments in verbal…

  19. Analysis of starch distribution in the paper cross-section by Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pigorsch, Enrico; Finger, Matthias; Thiele, Steffen; Brunner, Eike

    2013-01-01

    A new Raman microscopy approach was developed to analyze the starch distribution of paper cross-sections in a faster and more specific way than is possible with the currently used iodine-staining method. Raman images were recorded and analyzed from cross-sections of cellulose hand sheets surface-sized with 1% or 2% starch solutions and with different film thicknesses. In addition, Raman imaging analysis of the starch distribution was performed on two industrial papers, an abrasive base paper and a surface-sized recycling paper. The visualization and the quantitative analysis of the starch distribution were performed by using the intensity changes of the Raman starch band at 855 cm(-1) and by principal component analysis. Distribution curves were calculated from the intensity data and compared for the samples with different starch concentrations and with results obtained from iodine-stained cross-sections of the same samples. The results of this study demonstrate the great potential and the new possibilities of Raman microscopy for studying the z-distribution of chemical components and additives in paper.

  20. Theoretical and computational analysis of the quantum radar cross section for simple geometrical targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsema, Matthew J.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Lanzagorta, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The concept of the quantum radar cross section (QRCS) has generated interest due to its promising feature of enhanced side lobe target visibility in comparison to the classical radar cross section. Researchers have simulated the QRCS for very limited geometries and even developed approximations to reduce the computational complexity of the simulations. This paper develops an alternate theoretical framework for calculating the QRCS. This new framework yields an alternative form of the QRCS expression in terms of Fourier transforms. This formulation is much easier to work with mathematically and allows one to derive analytical solutions for various geometries, which provides an explanation for the aforementioned sidelobe advantage. We also verify the resulting equations by comparing with numerical simulations, as well as provide an error analysis of these simulations to ensure the accuracy of the results. Comparison of our simulation results with the analytical solutions reveal that they agree with one another extremely well.

  1. SENSIT: a cross-section and design sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code. [In FORTRAN for CDC-7600, IBM 360

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1980-01-01

    SENSIT computes the sensitivity and uncertainty of a calculated integral response (such as a dose rate) due to input cross sections and their uncertainties. Sensitivity profiles are computed for neutron and gamma-ray reaction cross sections of standard multigroup cross section sets and for secondary energy distributions (SEDs) of multigroup scattering matrices. In the design sensitivity mode, SENSIT computes changes in an integral response due to design changes and gives the appropriate sensitivity coefficients. Cross section uncertainty analyses are performed for three types of input data uncertainties: cross-section covariance matrices for pairs of multigroup reaction cross sections, spectral shape uncertainty parameters for secondary energy distributions (integral SED uncertainties), and covariance matrices for energy-dependent response functions. For all three types of data uncertainties SENSIT computes the resulting variance and estimated standard deviation in an integral response of interest, on the basis of generalized perturbation theory. SENSIT attempts to be more comprehensive than earlier sensitivity analysis codes, such as SWANLAKE.

  2. A Multilevel Approach on Self-Reported Dental Caries in Subjects of Minority Ethnic Groups: A Cross-Sectional Study of 6440 Adults.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Carlos M; Posada-López, Adriana; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés A

    2016-02-01

    Regional contextual factors and dental caries using multilevel modeling related to adults in minority ethnic groups have been scantily explored. The influence of the socioeconomic context on self-reported dental caries (SRDC) in individuals of minority ethnic groups (IEG) in Colombia was studied. Data from the 2007 National Public Health Survey were collected in 34,843 participants of the population. The influence of different factors on SRDC in IEG was investigated with logistic and multilevel regression analyses. A total of 6440 individuals belonged to an ethnic group. Multilevel analysis showed a significant variance in SRDC that was smaller in IEG level than between states. Multilevel multivariate analysis also associated SRDC with increasing age, lower education level, last dental visit >1 year, unmet dental need and low Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Minority ethnic groups were at risk to report higher dental caries, where low GDP was an important variable to be considered.

  3. Multi-Dimensional, Discrete-Ordinates Based Cross Section Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    KODELI, IVAN-ALEXANDER

    2008-05-22

    latest versions available from NEA-DB). o The memory and data management was updated as well as the language level (code was rewritten from Fortran-77 to Fortran-95). SUSD3D is coupled to several discrete‑ordinates codes via binary interface files. SUSD3D can use the flux moment files produced by discrete ordinates codes: ANISN, DORT, TORT, ONEDANT, TWODANT, and THREEDANT. In some of these codes minor modifications are required. Variable dimensions used in the TORT‑DORT system are supported. In 3D analysis the geometry and material composition is taken directly from the TORT produced VARSCL binary file, reducing in this way the user's input to SUSD3D. Multigroup cross‑section sets are read in the GENDF format of the NJOY/GROUPR code system, and the covariance data are expected in the COVFIL format of NJOY/ERRORR or the COVERX format of PUFF‑2. The ZZ‑VITAMIN‑J/COVA cross section covariance matrix library can be used as an alternative to the NJOY code system. The package includes the ANGELO code to produce the covariance data in the required energy structure in the COVFIL format. The following cross section processing modules to be added to the NJOY‑94 code system are included in the package: o ERR34: an extension of the ERRORR module of the NJOY code system for the File‑34 processing. It is used to prepare multigroup SAD cross sections covariance matrices. o GROUPSR: An additional code module for the preparation of partial cross sections for SAD sensitivity analysis. Updated version of the same code from SUSD, extended to the ENDF‑6 format. o SEADR: An additional code module to prepare group covariance matrices for SAD/SED uncertainty analysis.

  4. Multilevel Correlates of Non-Adherence in Kidney Transplant Patients Benefitting from Full Cost Coverage for Immunosuppressives: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Marsicano, Elisa Oliveira; Fernandes, Neimar Silva; Colugnati, Fernando Antônio Basile; Fernandes, Natalia Maria Silva; De Geest, Sabina; Sanders-Pinheiro, Helady

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence is the result of the interaction of the macro, meso, micro, and patient level factors. The macro level includes full coverage of immunosuppressive medications as is the case in Brazil. We studied the correlates of immunosuppressive non-adherence in post kidney transplant patients in the Brazilian health care system. Methods Using a cross-sectional design, adherence to immunosuppressives was assessed in a sample of 100 kidney transplant patients using a composite non-adherence score consisting of three methods (self-report [i.e., The Basel Adherence Scale for Assessment of Immunossupressives–BAASIS], collateral report, and immunosuppressive blood levels). Multilevel correlations of non-adherence were assessed (macro, meso, micro and patient level). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the correlates of non-adherence. Results Our sample consisted primarily of male (65%), Caucasians (72%) with a mean age of 45.0 ± 13.5 years old, who received grafts from a living donor (89%), with a mean time after transplantation of 72.3 ± 44.4 months. Prevalence of non-adherence was 51%. Family income higher than five reference wages (21.6 vs. 4%; OR 6.46 [1.35–30.89], p = 0.009; patient level), and having access to private health insurance (35.3% vs. 18.4%; OR 2.42 [0.96–6.10], p = 0.04; meso level) were associated with non-adherence in univariate analysis. Only the higher family income variable was retained in the multiple logistic regression model (OR 5.0; IC: 1.01–25.14; p = 0.04). Conclusions Higher family income was the only factor that was associated with immunosuppressive non-adherence. In Brazil, lower income recipients benefit from better access to care and coverage of health care costs after transplantation. This is supposed to result in a better immunosuppressive adherence compared to high-income patients who have experienced these benefits continuously. PMID:26619070

  5. Three-dimensional vibration analysis of a torus with circular cross section.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Au, F T K; Lo, S H; Cheung, Y K

    2002-12-01

    The free vibration characteristics of a torus with a circular cross section are studied by using the three-dimensional, small-strain, elasticity theory. A set of three-dimensional orthogonal coordinates system, comprising the polar coordinate (r, theta) at each circular cross section and the circumferential coordinate phi around the ring, is developed. Each of the displacement components u(r), v(theta), and w(phi) in the r, theta, and phi directions, respectively, is taken as a product of the Chebyshev polynomials in the r direction and the trigonometric functions in the theta and phi directions. Eigenfrequencies and vibration mode shapes have been obtained via a three-dimensional displacement-based extremum energy principle. Upper bound convergence of the first seven eigenfrequencies accurate to at least six significant figures is obtained by using only a few terms of the admissible functions. The eigenfrequency responses due to variation of the ratio of the radius of the ring centroidal axis to the cross-sectional radius are investigated in detail. Very accurate eigenfrequencies and deformed mode shapes of the three-dimensional vibration are presented. All major modes such as flexural thickness-shear modes, in-plane stretching modes, and torsional modes are included in the analysis. The results may serve as a benchmark reference for validating other computational techniques for the problem.

  6. Geographic and socioeconomic variations in adolescent toothbrushing: A multilevel cross-sectional study of 15 year olds in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Levin, KA; Nicholls, N; Macdonald, S; Dundas, R; Douglas, GVA

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined urban-rural and socioeconomic differences in adolescent toothbrushing. Methods The data were modelled using logistic multilevel modelling and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method of estimation. Twice-a-day toothbrushing was regressed upon age, family affluence, family structure, school type, area-level deprivation and rurality, for boys and girls separately. Results Boys’ toothbrushing was associated with area- level deprivation but not rurality. Variance at the school level remained significant in the final model for boys’ toothbrushing. The association between toothbrushing and area-level deprivation was particularly strong for girls, after adjustment for individuals’ family affluence and type of school attended. Rurality too was independently significant with lower odds of brushing teeth in accessible rural areas. Conclusions The findings are at odds with the results of a previous study which showed, lower caries prevalence among children living in rural Scotland. A further study concluded that adolescents have a better diet in rural Scotland. In total, these studies highlight the need for an examination into the relative importance of diet and oral health on caries, as increases are observed in population obesity and consumption of sugars. PMID:24917568

  7. Socioeconomic and geographic inequalities in adolescent smoking: A multilevel cross-sectional study of 15 year olds in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Levin, K.A.; Dundas, R.; Miller, M.; McCartney, G.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to present socioeconomic and geographic inequalities in adolescent smoking in Scotland. The international literature suggests there is no obvious pattern in the geography of adolescent smoking, with rural areas having a higher prevalence than urban areas in some countries, and a lower prevalence in others. These differences are most likely due to substantive differences in rurality between countries in terms of their social, built and cultural geography. Previous studies in the UK have shown an association between lower socioeconomic status and smoking. The Scottish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study surveyed 15 year olds in schools across Scotland between March and June of 2010. We ran multilevel logistic regressions using Markov chain Monte Carlo method and adjusting for age, school type, family affluence, area level deprivation and rurality. We imputed missing rurality and deprivation data using multivariate imputation by chained equations, and re-analysed the data (N = 3577), comparing findings. Among boys, smoking was associated only with area-level deprivation. This relationship appeared to have a quadratic S-shape, with those living in the second most deprived quintile having highest odds of smoking. Among girls, however, odds of smoking increased with deprivation at individual and area-level, with an approximate dose–response relationship for both. Odds of smoking were higher for girls living in remote and rural parts of Scotland than for those living in urban areas. Schools in rural areas were no more or less homogenous than schools in urban areas in terms of smoking prevalence. We discuss possible social and cultural explanations for the high prevalence of boys' and girls' smoking in low SES neighbourhoods and of girls' smoking in rural areas. We consider possible differences in the impact of recent tobacco policy changes, primary socialization, access and availability, retail outlet density and the home

  8. Statistical Model Analysis of (n, α) Cross Sections for 4.0-6.5 MeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Odsuren, M.; Gledenov, Y. M.; Zhang, G. H.; Sedysheva, M. V.; Munkhsaikhan, J.; Sansarbayar, E.

    2016-02-01

    The statistical model based on the Weisskopf-Ewing theory and constant nuclear temperature approximation is used for systematical analysis of the 4.0-6.5 MeV neutron induced (n, α) reaction cross sections. The α-clusterization effect was considered in the (n, α) cross sections. A certain dependence of the (n, α) cross sections on the relative neutron excess parameter of the target nuclei was observed. The systematic regularity of the (n, α) cross sections behaviour is useful to estimate the same reaction cross sections for unstable isotopes. The results of our analysis can be used for nuclear astrophysical calculations such as helium burning and possible branching in the s-process.

  9. The Neutron Time-of-Flight Cross Section Program at the University of Kentucky - Adventures in Analysis II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B. C.; Crider, B. P.; French, A. J.; Garza, E. A.; Henderson, S. L.; Howard, T. J.; Liu, S. H.; Nigam, S.; Pecha, R. L.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Rice, B. J.; Ross, T. J.; Santonil, Z. C.; Sidwell, L. C.; Steves, J. L.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-05-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron differential cross sections are measured at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (www.pa.uky.edu/accelerator/) at incident energies in the fast neutron region. The labo- ratorys facilities and instrumentation will be described and our measurement and analysis procedures outlined. Many corrections are required for neutron scattering experiments and the analysis utilizes information from many other cross section data sets and model calculations. Exploring and understanding the limitations of the foundational information and procedures are important for controlling the accuracy of the cross section results. We are examining the limitations in neutron detection efficiency, the normalization of (n,n'γ) cross sections,background reduction, spectrum stripping techniques, and attenuation and multiple scattering corrections. The resulting differential cross sections provide information on the compound elastic and coupled channels reaction mechanisms important for advanced reactor designs

  10. CHOROIDAL THICKNESS IN UNILATERAL IDIOPATHIC MACULAR HOLE: A Cross-Sectional Study and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhou, Minwen; Wu, Ying; Lu, Bing; Li, Tong; Zhao, Jingke; Wang, Fenghua; Sun, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the choroidal thickness in unilateral idiopathic macular hole (IMH) eyes and compare them with normal control eyes using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). In this cross-sectional study, the subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) and choroidal thickness at 1 mm and 3 mm nasal, temporal, superior, and inferior to the fovea of IMH eyes and normal control eyes were measured using EDI-OCT. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the correlation between choroidal thickness at various locations and clinical factors. A meta-analysis was conducted using the Stata software package to calculate the summary of weighted mean differences (WMDs). Thirty-two unilateral IMH patients and 32 controls were enrolled in this study. The IMH eyes had a thinner choroid than the control eyes at all macular locations (all P < 0.001). Multivariate linear regression analysis further showed that the choroidal thickness at any of the nine points was significantly thinner in association with the IMH diagnosis, as well as being somewhat thinner in association with age and axial length. The result of our cross-sectional study was consistent with the meta-analysis with a pooled WMD of -56.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -68.58 to -45.41) for subfoveal choroidal thickness. The study of Chinese unilateral IMH patients, along with the comprehensive meta-analysis, suggested that the choroidal thickness at all macular locations in unilateral IMH eyes significantly decreased relative to the control group.

  11. Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications: a cross-sectional analysis among 451 nursing homes in France.

    PubMed

    Herr, Marie; Grondin, Helene; Sanchez, Stéphane; Armaingaud, Didier; Blochet, Caroline; Vial, Antoine; Denormandie, Philippe; Ankri, Joël

    2017-05-01

    The quality of drug therapy is an important issue for nursing homes. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in a large sample of nursing home residents by using the data recorded during the preparation of pill dispensers. This is a cross-sectional study that included 451 nursing homes across France. Information about the medications received by the 30,702 residents (73.8% women) living in these nursing homes was extracted from the system that assists in the preparation of pill dispensers in pharmacies. The anonymized database included age, sex, and medications prescribed to residents, as well as nursing home characteristics (capacity, legal status). Factors associated with excessive polypharmacy (≥10 different drugs) and PIMs according to the Laroche list were studied using multilevel regression models. The average number of drugs prescribed was 6.9 ± 3.3, and excessive polypharmacy concerned 21.1% of the residents (n = 6468). According to the Laroche list, 47.4% of residents (n = 14,547) received at least one PIM. Benzodiazepines (excessive doses, long-acting benzodiazepines, and combination of benzodiazepines) and anticholinergic medications (hydroxyzine, cyamemazine, alimemazine) accounted for a large part of PIMs. Individual characteristics (age, gender) influenced the risk of receiving PIMs whereas nursing home characteristics (capacity, legal status) influenced the risk of excessive polypharmacy. This study shows that polypharmacy and PIMs remain highly prevalent among nursing home residents. Main PIMs concerned psychotropic and anticholinergic medications.

  12. R-matrix analysis of Cl neutron cross sections up to 1.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.; Guber, K.H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Rauscher, T.

    2006-04-15

    We have analyzed and evaluated {sup 35}Cl, {sup 37}Cl, and {sup nat}Cl neutron cross section data in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Energies and widths were determined for 388 resonances in the range 0.2 to 1200 keV. New J assignments were made for 33 resonances, and parities were assigned for 15 of these resonances. Neutron strength functions were calculated for both s and p waves; our results include the first reported p-wave values for Cl. Resonance analyses were carried out with the computer code SAMMY, which utilizes Bayes' method, a generalized least-squares technique. Because SAMMY now has the ability to calculate charged-particle penetrabilities, it was possible to include a proton exit channel in the analysis and to deduce proton widths for several resonances. Our resonance parameter representation describes the data much better than previous evaluations, and it should lead to improved criticality safety calculations for systems where Cl is present.

  13. Retinal microaneurysm detection through local rotating cross-section profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Istvan; Hajdu, Andras

    2013-02-01

    A method for the automatic detection of microaneurysms (MAs) in color retinal images is proposed in this paper. The recognition of MAs is an essential step in the diagnosis and grading of diabetic retinopathy. The proposed method realizes MA detection through the analysis of directional cross-section profiles centered on the local maximum pixels of the preprocessed image. Peak detection is applied on each profile, and a set of attributes regarding the size, height, and shape of the peak are calculated subsequently. The statistical measures of these attribute values as the orientation of the cross-section changes constitute the feature set that is used in a naïve Bayes classification to exclude spurious candidates. We give a formula for the final score of the remaining candidates, which can be thresholded further for a binary output. The proposed method has been tested in the Retinopathy Online Challenge, where it proved to be competitive with the state-of-the-art approaches. We also present the experimental results for a private image set using the same classifier setup.

  14. Temperature Analysis of Coronal Loop Cross-Sections: Monolithic vs. Nanoflare Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Boerner, P.

    2011-05-01

    We present a first systematic study on the cross-sectional temperature structure of coronal loops using the six coronal temperature filters of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We analyze a sample of 100 loop snapshots measured at 10 different locations and 10 different times in active region NOAA 11089 on 2010 July 24, 21:00-22:00 UT. The cross-sectional flux profiles are measured and a cospatial background is subtracted in 6 filters in a temperature range of T ≈ 0.5-16 MK, and 4 different parameterizations of differential emission measure (DEM) distributions are fitted. We find that the reconstructed DEMs consist predominantly of narrowband peak temperature components with a thermal width of σlog(T) ≤ 0.11±0.02, close to the temperature resolution limit of the instrument, consistent with earlier triple-filter analysis from TRACE by Aschwanden and Nightingale (2005) and from EIS/Hinode by Warren et al. (2008) or Tripathi et al. (2009). We find that 66% of the loops could be fitted with a narrowband single-Gaussian DEM model, and 19% with a DEM consisting of two narrowband Gaussians (which mostly result from pairs of intersecting loops along the same line-of-sight). The mostly isothermal loop DEMs allow us also to derive an improved empirical response function of the AIA 94 [[Unable to Display Character: Ǻ

  15. [Patient satisfaction in hemodialysis: a pilot cross-sectional analysis and a review].

    PubMed

    Pansini, F; Gargano, L; Sambati, M; Dambrosio, N; D'Altri, C; Giannoccaro, G; Boccia, E; Cecilia, A; Di Toro Mammarella, R; Flammini, A; Larosa, S; Fici, M; Sabella, V; Falco, M; Montalto, G; Rindone, F; Murgo, A M; Greco, V; Giannetto, M; D'Agostino, F; Pellegrini, F; Invernizzi, C; Strippoli, G F M; Manno, C

    2007-01-01

    Assessment of patient satisfaction is not performed routinely in many healthcare institutions. In this review, we discuss methodological aspects of assessment of patient satisfaction in hemodialysis. We also present a pilot study conducted in the Gambro Healthcare Italy dialysis clinics network. Patient satisfaction was assessed in a network of hemodialysis units by using an internally validated Italian translation of the Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for ESRD (CHOICE) questionnaire. A cross-sectional analytic study design was used and data analysed with univariate and multivariate hierarchical logistic regression to explore correlates of the risk of being unsatisfied with dialysis treatment. Covariates which were considered include a series of over 20 clinical, demographic, organizational and structural aspects. In addition, unexplained inter-centre residual variability due to 'case-mix' was explored and plotted. Seventeen dialysis units participated in this cross-sectional analysis and 758/1001 (75.7%) provided answers to the questionnaires. There was a statistically significant association on multivariate hierarchical analysis between the risk of being unsatisfied with dialysis treatment and interdialysis body weight gain (unit of increase: 1 kg, p=0.004). On the contrary, the risk of unsatisfaction with dialysis treatment was significantly lower in patients with higher dry weight (unit of increase: 1 kg, p=0.002). Our multivariate hierarchical analysis identified some residual variability between dialysis units (n=6 outliers) which may not be explained by any of over 20 potential confounding covariates which were explored. Assessment of ''customer satisfaction'' is standard practice in private for profit product companies in general but needs to be increasingly recognized as a standard in both public and private providers of healthcare services. Social research methods, which are used for this type of analysis, need to be fine tuned and actively

  16. Principal-components analysis of fluorescence cross-section spectra from pathogenic and simulant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Harold I.

    2005-10-01

    Principal-components analysis of a new set of highly resolved (<1 nm) fluorescence cross-section spectra excited at 354.7 nm over the 370 646 nm band has been used to demonstrate the potential ability of UV standoff lidars to discriminate among particular biological warfare agents and simulants over short ranges. The remapped spectra produced by this technique from Bacillus globigii (Bg) and Bacillus anthracis (Ba) spores were sufficiently different to allow them to be cleanly separated, and the Ba spectra obtained from Sterne and Ames strain spores were distinguishable. These patterns persisted as the spectral resolution was subsequently degraded in processing from ˜1 to 34 nm. This is to the author's knowledge the first time that resolved fluorescence spectra from biological warfare agents have been speciated or shown to be distinguishably different from those normally used surrogates by optical spectroscopy.

  17. Analysis of influential factors on a space target's laser radar cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi; Sun, Huayan; Guo, Huichao

    2014-03-01

    This paper utilises the idea of theoretical analysis to introduce a fast and visual laser radar cross-section (LRCS) calculation method for space targets that is implemented with OpenGL. We chose the cube, cylinder and cone as targets based on the general characteristics of satellite shapes. The four-parameter mono-station BRDF is used, and we assume the surface materials are either purely diffuse, purely specular or mixed. The degree of influence on a target's total LRCS of the target's shape and size and the surface materials' BRDF are described. We describe the general laws governing influential factors by comparing simulated results. These conclusions can provide a reference for new research directions and methods to determine a target's laser scattering characteristics.

  18. Does Habituation Differ in Chronic Low Back Pain Subjects Compared to Pain-Free Controls? A Cross-Sectional Pain Rating ERP Study Reanalyzed with the ERFIA Multilevel Method

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Catherine J.; Vossen, Helen G.M.; Joosten, Engelbert A.; van Os, Jim; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the present study was to investigate cortical differences between chronic low back pain (CLBP) subjects and pain-free controls with respect to habituation and processing of stimulus intensity. The use of a novel event-related fixed-interval areas (ERFIA) multilevel technique enables the analysis of event-related electroencephalogram (EEG) of the whole post stimulus range at a single trial level. This technique makes it possible to disentangle the cortical processes of habituation and stimulus intensity. In a cross-sectional study, 78 individuals with CLBP and 85 pain-free controls underwent a rating paradigm of 150 nonpainful and painful somatosensory electrical stimuli. For each trial, the entire epoch was partitioned into 20-ms ERFIAs, which acted as dependent variables in a multilevel analysis. The variability of each consecutive ERFIA period was modeled with a set of predictor variables, including 3 forms of habituation and stimulus intensity. Seventy-six pain-free controls and 65 CLBP subjects were eligible for analysis. CLBP subjects showed a significantly decreased linear habituation at 340 to 460 ms in the midline electrodes and C3 (Ps < .05) and had a significantly more pronounced dishabituation for the regions of 400 to 460 ms and 800 to 820 ms for all electrodes, except for T3 and T4 (Ps < .05). No significant group differences for stimulus intensity processing were observed. In this study, group differences with respect to linear habituation and dishabituation were demonstrated. By means of the ERFIA multilevel technique, habituation effects were found in a broad post stimulus range and were not solely limited to peaks. This study suggests that habituation may be a key mechanism involved in the transition process to chronic pain. Future studies with a longitudinal design are required to solve this issue. PMID:25984683

  19. Does habituation differ in chronic low back pain subjects compared to pain-free controls? A cross-sectional pain rating ERP study reanalyzed with the ERFIA multilevel method.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Catherine J; Vossen, Helen G M; Joosten, Engelbert A; van Os, Jim; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate cortical differences between chronic low back pain (CLBP) subjects and pain-free controls with respect to habituation and processing of stimulus intensity. The use of a novel event-related fixed-interval areas (ERFIA) multilevel technique enables the analysis of event-related electroencephalogram (EEG) of the whole post stimulus range at a single trial level. This technique makes it possible to disentangle the cortical processes of habituation and stimulus intensity.In a cross-sectional study, 78 individuals with CLBP and 85 pain-free controls underwent a rating paradigm of 150 nonpainful and painful somatosensory electrical stimuli. For each trial, the entire epoch was partitioned into 20-ms ERFIAs, which acted as dependent variables in a multilevel analysis. The variability of each consecutive ERFIA period was modeled with a set of predictor variables, including 3 forms of habituation and stimulus intensity.Seventy-six pain-free controls and 65 CLBP subjects were eligible for analysis. CLBP subjects showed a significantly decreased linear habituation at 340 to 460 ms in the midline electrodes and C3 (Ps < .05) and had a significantly more pronounced dishabituation for the regions of 400 to 460 ms and 800 to 820 ms for all electrodes, except for T3 and T4 (Ps < .05). No significant group differences for stimulus intensity processing were observed.In this study, group differences with respect to linear habituation and dishabituation were demonstrated. By means of the ERFIA multilevel technique, habituation effects were found in a broad post stimulus range and were not solely limited to peaks. This study suggests that habituation may be a key mechanism involved in the transition process to chronic pain. Future studies with a longitudinal design are required to solve this issue.

  20. Trends in binge drinking in Canada from 1996 to 2013: a repeated cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bulloch, Andrew G.M.; Williams, Jeanne V.A.; Lavorato, Dina H.; Patten, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heavy drinking is a major factor in morbidity and mortality worldwide. Little information is available on trends in Canada regarding alcohol abuse. We sought to estimate abstinence, binge drinking and alcohol intake exceeding low-risk drinking guidelines in the Canadian population from 1996 to 2013. Methods: The data sources for this analysis were a series of cross-sectional national health surveys of the Canadian population carried out by Statistics Canada between 1996 and 2013. These were cross-sectional files from the National Population Health Surveys of 1996 and 1998, plus the Canadian Community Health Surveys from 2000 to 2013. Respondents were aged 18 years and older. Results: The proportion of binge drinkers increased steadily from 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 13.2%-14.2%) in 1996 to 19.7% (95% CI 19.1%-20.3%) in 2013. The corresponding proportions for men were 20.8% (95% CI 19.9%-21.7%) in 1996, and 25.7% (95% CI 24.7%-26.6%) in 2013; for women, these proportions were 6.9% (95% CI 6.4%-7.5%) in 1996, and 13.8% (95% CI 13.1%-14.5%) in 2013. No significant increases were seen in the proportion of people who exceeded low-risk drinking guidelines or of abstainers during the same period. Interpretation: The rate of self-reported binge drinking in Canada has increased from 1996 to 2013, relatively more so among women than among men. No evidence of an increase in the proportion of people exceeding low-risk drinking guidelines or of abstainers was seen during the same period. These results suggest that binge drinking is of particular concern regarding intervention strategies aimed at improvement of public health. PMID:28018872

  1. Capture cross section measurement analysis in the Californium-252 spectrum with the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Manojlovič, Stanko; Trkov, Andrej; Žerovnik, Gašper; Snoj, Luka

    2015-07-01

    Absolute average capture cross sections of gold, thorium, tantalum, molybdenum, copper and strontium in (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron spectrum were simulated for two types of experiment setups preformed by Z. Dezso and J. Csikai and by L. Green. The experiments were simulated with MCNP5 using cross section data from the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The determination of neutron backscattering was calculated with the use of neutron flagging. Correction factors to experimentally measured values were determined to obtain average cross sections in a pure (252)Cf spontaneous fission spectrum. Influence of concrete wall thickness, air moisture and room size on the average cross section was analyzed. Correction factors amounted to about 30%. Corrected values corresponding to average cross sections in a pure (252)Cf spectrum were calculated for (197)Au, (232)Th, (181)Ta, (98)Mo, (65)Cu and (84)Sr. Average cross sections were also calculated with the RR_UNC software using IRDFF-v.1.05 and ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries. The revised average radiative capture cross sections are 75.5±0.1 mb for (197)Au, 87.0±1.6 mb for (232)Th , 98.0±4.5 mb for (181)Ta, 21.2±0.5 mb for (98)Mo, 10.3±0.3 mb for (63)Cu, and 34.9±6.5 mb for (84)Sr.

  2. Cross-section Effects in the Super-Kamiokande Tau Appearance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Christopher

    2011-11-23

    In this talk, I explain the search for tau neutrino appearance in the atmospheric neutrino flux at Super-Kamiokande with a particular emphasis on the effect deep inelastic cross section uncertainties have on interpreting the result. In particular, I explain why the normalization of the DIS cross-section also needs to be treated as a parameter in the fit of tau normalization, and show how a neural net based on event parameters can separate various cross-section modes in the background sample.

  3. Measurement and analysis of the Am243 neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Guerrero, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Balibrea, J.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lo Meo, S.; Lopes, I.; Lossito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.; n TOF Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Background: The design of new nuclear reactors and transmutation devices requires to reduce the present neutron cross section uncertainties of minor actinides. Purpose: Improvement of the Am243(n,γ) cross section uncertainty. Method: The Am243(n,γ) cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility at CERN with a BaF2 total absorption calorimeter, in the energy range between 0.7 eV and 2.5 keV. Results: The Am243(n ,γ) cross section has been successfully measured in the mentioned energy range. The resolved resonance region has been extended from 250 eV up to 400 eV. In the unresolved resonance region our results are compatible with one of the two incompatible capture data sets available below 2.5 keV. The data available in EXFOR and in the literature have been used to perform a simple analysis above 2.5 keV. Conclusions: The results of this measurement contribute to reduce the Am243(n,γ) cross section uncertainty and suggest that this cross section is underestimated up to 25% in the neutron energy range between 50 eV and a few keV in the present evaluated data libraries.

  4. Chronic exposure to outdoor air pollution and diagnosed cardiovascular disease: meta-analysis of three large cross-sectional surveys

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Higher exposure to outdoor air pollution is associated with increased cardiopulmonary deaths, but there is limited evidence about the association between outdoor air pollution and diagnosed cardiovascular disease. Our study aimed to estimate the size of the association between long term exposure to outdoor air pollution and prevalent cardiovascular disease. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of data on more than 19,000 white adults aged 45 and older who participated in three representative surveys of the English population in 1994, 1998 and 2003, examining the relationship between self-reported doctor-diagnosed cardiovascular disease and exposure to outdoor air pollutants using multilevel regression techniques and meta-analysis. Results The combined estimates suggested that an increase of 1 μg m-3 in concentration of particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter was associated with an increase of 2.9% (95% CI -0.6% to 6.5%) in prevalence of cardiovascular disease in men, and an increase of 1.6% (95%CI -2.1% to 5.5%) in women. The year-specific analyses showed strongly positive associations in 2003 between odds of cardiovascular disease in both men and women and exposure to particulate matter but not in 1994 or 1998. We found no consistent associations between exposure to gaseous air pollutants and doctor-diagnosed cardiovascular disease. Conclusion The associations of prevalent cardiovascular disease with concentration of particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter, while only weakly positive, were consistent with the effects reported in cohort studies. The results provide evidence of the size of the association between particulate air pollution and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease but no evidence for an association with gaseous pollutants. We found strongly positive associations between particulate matter and cardiovascular disease in 2003 only, which highlights the importance of replicating findings in more than

  5. Older patients’ perceived burdens of their health problems: a cross-sectional analysis in 74 German general practices

    PubMed Central

    Junius-Walker, Ulrike; Wiese, Birgitt; Klaaßen-Mielke, Renate; Theile, Gudrun; Müller, Christiane Annette; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background Older patients often experience the burden of multiple health problems. Physicians need to consider them to arrive at a holistic treatment plan. Yet, it has not been systematically investigated as to which personal burdens ensue from certain health conditions. Objective The objective of this study is to examine older patients’ perceived burden of their health problems. Patients and methods The study presents a cross-sectional analysis in 74 German general practices; 836 patients, 72 years and older (mean 79±4.4), rated the burden of each health problem disclosed by a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Patients rated each burden using three components: importance, emotional impact, and impact on daily activities. Cluster analyses were performed to define patterns in the rating of these components of burden. In a multilevel logistic regression analysis, independent factors that predict high and low burden were explored. Results Patients had a median of eleven health problems and rated the burden of altogether 8,900 health problems. Four clusters provided a good clustering structure. Two clusters describe a high burden, and a further two, a low burden. Patients attributed a high burden to social and psychological health problems (especially being a caregiver: odds ratio [OR] 10.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4–24.4), to specific symptoms (eg, claudication: OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3–4.0; pain: OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.6–3.1), and physical disabilities. Patients rated a comparatively low burden for most of their medical findings, for cognitive impairment, and lifestyle issues (eg, hypertension: OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.2–0.3). Conclusion The patients experienced a relatively greater burden for physical disabilities, mood, or social issues than for diseases themselves. Physicians should interpret these burdens in the individual context and consider them in their treatment planning. PMID:26124648

  6. The age of peak performance in Ironman triathlon: a cross-sectional and longitudinal data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aims of the present study were, firstly, to investigate in a cross-sectional analysis the age of peak Ironman performance within one calendar year in all qualifiers for Ironman Hawaii and Ironman Hawaii; secondly, to determine in a longitudinal analysis on a qualifier for Ironman Hawaii whether the age of peak Ironman performance and Ironman performance itself change across years; and thirdly, to determine the gender difference in performance. Methods In a cross-sectional analysis, the age of the top ten finishers for all qualifier races for Ironman Hawaii and Ironman Hawaii was determined in 2010. For a longitudinal analysis, the age and the performance of the annual top ten female and male finishers in a qualifier for Ironman Hawaii was determined in Ironman Switzerland between 1995 and 2010. Results In 19 of the 20 analyzed triathlons held in 2010, there was no difference in the age of peak Ironman performance between women and men (p > 0.05). The only difference in the age of peak Ironman performance between genders was in ‘Ironman Canada’ where men were older than women (p = 0.023). For all 20 races, the age of peak Ironman performance was 32.2 ± 1.5 years for men and 33.0 ± 1.6 years for women (p > 0.05). In Ironman Switzerland, there was no difference in the age of peak Ironman performance between genders for top ten women and men from 1995 to 2010 (F = 0.06, p = 0.8). The mean age of top ten women and men was 31.4 ± 1.7 and 31.5 ± 1.7 years (Cohen's d = 0.06), respectively. The gender difference in performance in the three disciplines and for overall race time decreased significantly across years. Men and women improved overall race times by approximately 1.2 and 4.2 min/year, respectively. Conclusions Women and men peak at a similar age of 32–33 years in an Ironman triathlon with no gender difference. In a qualifier for Ironman Hawaii, the age of peak Ironman performance remained unchanged across years. In contrast, gender

  7. An Evaluation of Mass Absorption Cross-Section for Optical Carbon Analysis on Teflon Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Presler-Jur, Paige; Doraiswamy, Prakash; Hammond, Oki; Rice, Joann

    2017-04-05

    Black carbon (BC) or elemental carbon (EC) is a by-product of incomplete fuel combustion, and contributes adversely to human health, visibility, and climate impacts. Previous studies have examined non-destructive techniques for particle light attenuation measurements on Teflon(®) filters to estimate BC. The incorporation of an inline Magee Scientific OT21 Transmissometer into the MTL AH-225 robotic weighing system provides the opportunity to perform optical transmission measurements on Teflon(®) filters at the same time as the gravimetric mass measurement. In this study, we characterize the performance of the inline OT21, and apply it to determine the mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of PM2.5 BC across the U.S. We analyzed 5393 archived Teflon(®) filters from the Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) collected during 2010-2011 and determined MAC by comparing light attenuation on Teflon(®) filters to corresponding thermal EC on quartz-fiber filters. Results demonstrated the importance of the initial transmission (I0) value used in light attenuation calculations. While light transmission varied greatly within filter lots, the average I0 of filter blanks during from the sampling period provided an estimate for archived filters. For newly collected samples, it is recommended that filter-specific I0 measurements be made (i.e., same filter before sample collection). The estimated MAC ranged from 6.9 to 9.4 m(2)/g that varied by region and season across the U.S., indicating that using a default value may lead to under- or over-estimated BC concentrations. An analysis of the chemical composition of these samples indicated good correlation with EC for samples with higher EC content as a fraction of total PM2.5 mass, while the presence of light scattering species such as crustal elements impacted the correlation affecting the MAC estimate. Overall, the method is demonstrated to be a quick, cost-effective approach to estimate BC from archived and newly sampled Teflon

  8. Transport model based on three-dimensional cross-section generation for TRIGA core analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriangchaiporn, Nateekool

    This dissertation addresses the development of a reactor core physics model based on 3-D transport methodology utilizing 3-D multigroup fuel lattice cross-section generation and core calculation for PSBR. The proposed 3-D transport calculation scheme for reactor core simulations is based on the TORT code. The methodology includes development of algorithms for 2-D and 3-D cross-section generation. The fine- and broad-group structures for the TRIGA cross-section generation problems were developed based on the CPXSD (Contributon and Point-wise Cross-Section Driven) methodology that selects effective group structure. Along with the study of cross section generation, the parametric studies for SN calculations were performed to evaluate the impact of the spatial meshing, angular, and scattering order variables and to obtain the suitable values for cross-section collapsing of the TRIGA cell problem. The TRIGA core loading 2 is used to verify and validate the selected effective group structures. Finally, the 13 group structure was selected to use for core calculations. The results agree with continuous energy for eigenvalues and normalized pin power distribution. The Monte Carlo solutions are used as the references.

  9. Clinical Relevance of Sleep Duration: Results from a Cross-Sectional Analysis Using NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, M. Soledad; Stang, Paul; Blacketer, Clair; Kent, Justine M.; Wittenberg, Gayle M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the clinical relevance of sleep duration, hours slept were compared by health status, presence of insomnia, and presence of depression, and the association of sleep duration with BMI and cardiovascular risk was quantified. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of subjects in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys using adjusted linear and logistic regressions. Results: A total of 22,281 adults were included, 37% slept ≤ 6 hours, 36% were obese, and 45% reported cardiovascular conditions. Mean sleep duration was 6.87 hours. Better health was associated with more hours of sleep. Subjects with poor health reported sleeping 46 min, (95% CI −56.85 to −35.67) less than subjects with excellent health. Individuals with depression (vs. not depressed) reported 40 min less sleep, (95% CI −47.14 to −32.85). Individuals with insomnia (vs. without insomnia) reported 39 min less sleep, (95% CI −56.24 to −22.45). Duration of sleep was inversely related to BMI; for every additional hour of sleep, there was a decrease of 0.18 kg/m2 in BMI, (95% CI −0.30 to −0.06). The odds of reporting cardiovascular problems were 6.0% lower for every hour of sleep (odds ratio = 0.94, 95% CI [0.91 to 0.97]). Compared with subjects who slept ≤ 6 h, subjects who slept more had lower odds of reporting cardiovascular problems, with the exception of subjects ≥ 55 years old who slept ≥ 9 hours. Conclusions: Long sleep duration is associated with better health. The fewer the hours of sleep, the greater the BMI and reported cardiovascular disease. A difference of 30 minutes of sleep is associated with substantive impact on clinical well-being. Citation: Cepeda MS, Stang P, Blacketer C, Kent JM, Wittenberg GM. Clinical relevance of sleep duration: results from a cross-sectional analysis using NHANES. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(6):813–819. PMID:26951419

  10. Characterization of microfluidic mixing and reaction in microchannels via analysis of cross-sectional patterns

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei-Feng; Hsu, Miao-Hsing; Chen, Yu-Tzu; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2011-01-01

    For the diagnosis of biochemical reactions, the investigation of microflow behavior, and the confirmation of simulation results in microfluidics, experimentally quantitative measurements are indispensable. To characterize the mixing and reaction of fluids in microchannel devices, we propose a mixing quality index (Mqi) to quantify the cross-sectional patterns (also called mixing patterns) of fluids, captured with a confocal-fluorescence microscope (CFM). The operating parameters of the CFM for quantification were carefully tested. We analyzed mixing patterns, flow advection, and mass exchange of fluids in the devices with overlapping channels of two kinds. The mixing length of the two devices derived from the analysis of Mqi is demonstrated to be more precise than that estimated with a commonly applied method of blending dye liquors. By means of fluorescence resonance-energy transfer (FRET), we monitored the hybridization of two complementary oligonucleotides (a FRET pair) in the devices. The captured patterns reveal that hybridization is a progressive process along the downstream channel. The FRET reaction and the hybridization period were characterized through quantification of the reaction patterns. This analytical approach is a promising diagnostic tool that is applicable to the real-time analysis of biochemical and chemical reactions such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), catalytic, or synthetic processes in microfluidic devices. PMID:21503162

  11. Scanning electron microscopical and cross-sectional analysis of extraterrestrial carbonaceous nanoglobules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Baumgardner, Grant; Buseck, Peter R.

    2008-05-01

    Carbonaceous nanoglobules are ubiquitous in carbonaceous chondrite (CC) meteorites. The Tagish Lake (C2) meteorite is particularly intriguing in containing an abundance of nanoglobules, with a wider range of forms and sizes than encountered in other CC meteorites. Previous studies by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have provided a wealth of information on chemistry and structure. In this study low voltage scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the globule forms and external structures. The internal structure of the globules was investigated after sectioning by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The FIB-SEM analysis shows that the globules range from solid to hollow. Some hollow globules show a central open core, with adjoining smaller cores. The FIB with an SEM is a valuable tool for the analysis of extraterrestrial materials, even of sub-micron-sized "soft" carbonaceous particles. The rapid site-specific cross-sectioning capabilities of the FIB allow the preservation of the internal morphology of the nanoglobules, with minimal damage or alteration of the unsectioned areas.

  12. Defect analysis in GaN films of HEMT structure by cross-sectional cathodoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Yasuhiro; Hung, Hung; Oasa, Kohei; Ono, Tasuku; Onizawa, Takashi; Yoshioka, Akira; Takada, Yoshiharu; Saito, Yasunobu; Sugiyama, Naoharu; Tsuda, Kunio; Sugiyama, Toru; Mizushima, Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Defect analysis of GaN films in high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures by cross-sectional cathodoluminescence (X-CL) is demonstrated as a useful technique for improving the current collapse of GaN-HEMT devices, and the relationship between crystal quality and device characteristics is also investigated. The crystal quality of intrinsic-GaN (i-GaN) and carbon-doped GaN produced clearly different peak intensities of blue luminescence (BL), yellow luminescence (YL), and band-edge emission (BE), which is independently detected by X-CL. Current collapse in GaN-HEMT devices is found to be determined by the BL/BE and YL/BE ratios at the top of the i-GaN layer, which is close to the channel. Moreover, the i-GaN thickness required in order to minimize the BL/BE and YL/BE ratios and the thickness dependency of GaN for minimizing the BL/BE and YL/BE ratios depending on the growth conditions can be evaluated by X-CL. However, there is no correlation between current collapse in GaN-HEMT devices and the YL/BE ratio by conventional photoluminescence because HEMT devices consist of multiple GaN layers and the YL signal is detected from the carbon-doped GaN layer. Thus, the X-CL analysis method is a useful technique for device design in order to suppress current collapse.

  13. Awareness and analysis of a significant event by general practitioners: a cross sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Bowie, P; McKay, J; Norrie, J; Lough, M

    2004-04-01

    To determine the extent to which general practitioners (GPs) were aware of a recent significant event and whether a structured analysis of this event was undertaken to minimise the perceived risk of recurrence. Cross sectional survey using a postal questionnaire. Greater Glasgow primary care trust. 466 principals in general practice from 188 surgeries. GPs' self-reported personal and practice characteristics, awareness of a recent significant event, participation in the structured analysis of the identified significant event, perceived chance of recurrence, forums for discussing and analysing significant events, and levels of primary care team involvement. Four hundred and sixty six GPs (76%) responded to the survey. GPs from single handed practices were less likely to respond than those in multi-partner training and non-training practices. 401 (86%) reported being aware of a recent significant event; lack of awareness was clearly associated with GPs from non-training practices. 219 (55%) had performed all the necessary stages of a structured analysis (as determined by the authors) of the significant event. GPs from training practices were more likely to report participation in the structured analysis of the recent event, to perceive the chance of this event recurring as "nil" or "very low", and to report significant event discussions taking place. Most GPs were aware of a recent significant event and participated in the structured analysis of this event. The wider primary care team participated in the analysis process where GPs considered this involvement relevant. There is variation in the depth of and approach to significant event analysis within general practice, which may have implications for the application of the technique as part of the NHS quality agenda.

  14. Generalized warping effect in the dynamic analysis of beams of arbitrary cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikaros, I. C.; Sapountzakis, E. J.; Argyridi, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a general formulation for the nonuniform warping dynamic analysis of beams of arbitrary simply or multiply connected cross section, under arbitrary external loading and general boundary conditions is presented taking into account the effects of rotary and warping inertia. The nonuniform warping distributions are taken into account by employing four independent warping parameters multiplying a shear warping function in each direction and two torsional warping functions, respectively, which are obtained by solving the corresponding boundary value problems, formulated exploiting the longitudinal local equilibrium equation. A shear stress "correction" is also performed in order to improve the stress field arising from the employed kinematical considerations. Ten initial boundary value problems are formulated with respect to the displacement and rotation components as well as to the independent warping parameters and solved using the Analog Equation Method, a Boundary Element Method based technique in combination with an appropriate time integration scheme. The warping functions and the geometric constants including the additional ones due to warping are evaluated employing a pure BEM approach.

  15. Analysis of Ku-band cross section at low incidence angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapron, B.; Vandemark, D.

    1993-01-01

    This study is using airborne Ku-band data to address questions which have implications for both model function development and for advancing our physical understanding of the sea surface. Concurrent measurements of ocean directional spectra, significant wave height, and mean surface roughness are made using the capabilities of the radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS). The NASA/GSFC's ROWS is a 15 GHz pulse compressed radar which is a radar sensor designed to measure the direction of the long wave components using spectral analysis of the tilt induced reflectively modulation. The ROWS are modified to cycle at 50 Hz for the scanning spectrometer antenna and a wide beamwidth nadir altimeter mode. This change allows the sensor to simultaneously measure directional wave spectra, wave height, mean square slope parameter, and small scale surface roughness. The surface stress caused by the wind is widely believed to be the predominant quantity related to the Ku-band radar cross section for a wide range of incidence angles. The complete coverage in the quasi specular region provided by one sensor is essential to understand the uncertainties between the scattering model and what is happening on the surface. For this presentation, special attention is devoted to sort out some measurement of the anisotropy associated with the band of high frequencies. Using the other geophysical parameters, comparisons are then made with the classic spectral form currentlyused to describe the wind impact on the sea surface.

  16. Testing and screening for chlamydia in general practice: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Allison; Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim; Tapley, Amanda; Spike, Neil; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke; Magin, Parker

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydia screening is widely advocated. General practice registrars are an important stage of clinical behaviour development. This study aimed to determine rates of, and factors associated with, registrars' chlamydia testing including asymptomatic screening. A cross-sectional analysis of data from Registrars Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT), a cohort study of registrars' consultations. Registrars record details of 60 consecutive consultations in each GP-term of training. Outcome factors were chlamydia testing, asymptomatic screening and doctor-initiated screening. Testing occurred in 2.5% of 29,112 consultations (398 registrars) and in 5.8% of patients aged 15-25. Asymptomatic screening comprised 47.5% of chlamydia tests, and 55.6% of screening tests were doctor-initiated. Chlamydia testing was associated with female gender of doctor and patient, younger patient age, and patients new to doctor or practice. Asymptomatic screening was associated with practices where patients incur no fees, and in patients new to doctor or practice. Screening of female patients was more often doctor-initiated. GP registrars screen for chlamydia disproportionately in younger females and new patients. Our findings highlight potential opportunities to improve uptake of screening for chlamydia, including targeted education and training for registrars, campaigns targeting male patients, and addressing financial barriers to accessing screening services. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  17. Variation in charges for 10 common blood tests in California hospitals: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Renee Y; Akosa Antwi, Yaa; Nath, Julia B; Nath, Julia P

    2014-08-14

    To determine the variation in charges for 10 common blood tests across California hospitals in 2011, and to analyse the hospital and market-level factors that may explain any observed variation. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the degree of charge variation between hospitals for 10 common blood tests using charge data reported by all non-federal California hospitals to the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development in 2011. Charges for 10 common blood tests at California hospitals during 2011. We found that charges for blood tests varied significantly between California hospitals. For example, charges for a lipid panel ranged from US$10 to US$10,169, a thousand-fold difference. Although government hospitals and teaching hospitals were found to charge significantly less than their counterparts for many blood tests, few other hospital characteristics and no market-level predictors significantly predicted charges for blood tests. Our models explained, at most, 21% of the variation between hospitals in charges for the blood test in question. These findings demonstrate the seemingly arbitrary nature of the charge setting process, making it difficult for patients to act as true consumers in this era of 'consumer-directed healthcare.' Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Inconsistent Reporting Between Meta-analysis Protocol and Publication - A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Alberto Falk; Delgado, Anna Falk

    2017-09-01

    Inconsistent reporting in published meta-analyses compared to registered protocol are poorly understood. The aim of the study was to assess inconsistencies between registered protocols and published reports among oncology drug meta-analyses. A cross-sectional study was performed including oncology drug meta-analyses published between January 1st and November 14th 2016 with a published protocol. Two investigators extracted data on: selection criteria, outcome(s) and statistical plan in protocol and manuscript, plus self-acknowledgement of inconsistent reporting between protocol and publication. Protocol registration was present in 19% (23/119) of all oncology drug meta-analyses. In meta-analyses with protocol (n=23), 70% (16/23) had issues with inconsistent reporting between protocol and published report concerning; inclusion criteria, comparator group, intervention, outcome (PICO) or statistical analysis. Self-acknowledgement of changes between protocol and publication was found in 50% (8/16). In meta-analyses with protocol, discrepancies between registered protocols and publications are frequent. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Variation in charges for 10 common blood tests in California hospitals: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Renee Y; Akosa Antwi, Yaa; Nath, Julia P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the variation in charges for 10 common blood tests across California hospitals in 2011, and to analyse the hospital and market-level factors that may explain any observed variation. Design, setting and participants We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the degree of charge variation between hospitals for 10 common blood tests using charge data reported by all non-federal California hospitals to the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development in 2011. Outcome measures Charges for 10 common blood tests at California hospitals during 2011. Results We found that charges for blood tests varied significantly between California hospitals. For example, charges for a lipid panel ranged from US$10 to US$10 169, a thousand-fold difference. Although government hospitals and teaching hospitals were found to charge significantly less than their counterparts for many blood tests, few other hospital characteristics and no market-level predictors significantly predicted charges for blood tests. Our models explained, at most, 21% of the variation between hospitals in charges for the blood test in question. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the seemingly arbitrary nature of the charge setting process, making it difficult for patients to act as true consumers in this era of ‘consumer-directed healthcare.’ PMID:25127708

  20. Analysis of Ku-band cross section at low incidence angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapron, B.; Vandemark, D.

    1993-01-01

    This study is using airborne Ku-band data to address questions which have implications for both model function development and for advancing our physical understanding of the sea surface. Concurrent measurements of ocean directional spectra, significant wave height, and mean surface roughness are made using the capabilities of the radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS). The NASA/GSFC's ROWS is a 15 GHz pulse compressed radar which is a radar sensor designed to measure the direction of the long wave components using spectral analysis of the tilt induced reflectively modulation. The ROWS are modified to cycle at 50 Hz for the scanning spectrometer antenna and a wide beamwidth nadir altimeter mode. This change allows the sensor to simultaneously measure directional wave spectra, wave height, mean square slope parameter, and small scale surface roughness. The surface stress caused by the wind is widely believed to be the predominant quantity related to the Ku-band radar cross section for a wide range of incidence angles. The complete coverage in the quasi specular region provided by one sensor is essential to understand the uncertainties between the scattering model and what is happening on the surface. For this presentation, special attention is devoted to sort out some measurement of the anisotropy associated with the band of high frequencies. Using the other geophysical parameters, comparisons are then made with the classic spectral form currentlyused to describe the wind impact on the sea surface.

  1. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 55Mn from Reich-Moore Analysis of Recent Experimental Neutron Transmission and Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution neutron capture cross section measurements of 55Mn were recently performed at GELINA by Schillebeeckx et al. (2005) and at ORELA by Guber et al. (2007). The analysis of the experimental data was performed with the computer code SAMMY using the Bayesian approach in the resonance parameters representation of the cross sections. The neutron transmission data taken in 1988 by Harvey et al. (2007) and not analyzed before were added to the SAMMY experimental data base. More than 95% of the s-wave resonances and more than 85% of the p-wave resonances were identified in the energy range up to 125 keV, leading to the neutron strength functions S0 = (3.90 0.78) x 10-4 and S1 = (0.45 0.08) x 10-4. About 25% of the d-wave resonances were identified with a possible strength function of S2 = 1.0 x 10-4. The capture cross section calculated at 0.0253 eV is 13.27 b, and the capture resonance integral is 13.52 0.30 b. In the energy range 15 to 120 keV, the average capture cross section is 12% lower than Lerigoleur value and 25% smaller than Macklin value. GELINA and ORELA experimental capture cross sections show a background cross section not described by the Reich-Moore resonance parameters. Part of this background could be due to a direct capture component and/or to the missing d-wave resonances. The uncertainty of 10% on the average capture cross section above 20 keV is mainly due to the inaccuracy in the calculation of the background components.

  2. Parametrizations and dynamical analysis of angle-integrated cross sections for double photoionization including nondipole effects

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Andrei Y.; Starace, Anthony F.; Manakov, N. L.; Meremianin, A. V.; Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, Igor

    2005-11-15

    Similarly to differential cross sections for one-electron photoionization, the doubly differential cross section for double photoionization (DPI) may be conveniently described by four parameters: the singly differential (with respect to energy sharing) cross section ({sigma}{sub 0}), the dipole asymmetry parameter ({beta}), and two nondipole asymmetry parameters ({gamma} and {delta}). Here we derive two model-independent representations for these parameters for DPI from a {sup 1}S{sub 0} atomic bound state: (i) in terms of one-dimensional integrals of the polarization-invariant DPI amplitudes and (ii) in terms of the exact two-electron reduced matrix elements. For DPI of He at excess energies, E{sub exc}, of 100 eV, 450 eV, and 1 keV, we present numerical results for the asymmetry parameters within the framework of the convergent close-coupling theory and compare them with results of lowest-order (in the interelectron interaction) perturbation theory (LOPT). The results for E{sub exc}=1 keV exhibit a nondipole asymmetry that is large enough to be easily measured experimentally. We find excellent agreement between our LOPT results and other theoretical predictions and experimental data for total cross sections and ratios of double to single ionization cross sections for K-shell DPI from several multielectron atoms.

  3. Combined SERS and Raman analysis for the identification of red pigments in cross-sections from historic oil paintings.

    PubMed

    Frano, Kristen A; Mayhew, Hannah E; Svoboda, Shelley A; Wustholz, Kristin L

    2014-12-21

    The analysis of paint cross-sections can reveal a remarkable amount of information about the layers and materials in a painting without visibly altering the artwork. Although a variety of analytical approaches are used to detect inorganic pigments as well as organic binders, proteins, and lipids in cross-sections, they do not provide for the unambiguous identification of natural, organic colorants. Here, we develop a novel combined surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), light microscopy, and normal Raman scattering (NRS) approach for the identification of red organic and inorganic pigments in paint cross-sections obtained from historic 18th and 19th century oil paintings. In particular, Ag nanoparticles are directly applied to localized areas of paint cross-sections mounted in polyester resin for SERS analysis of the organic pigments. This combined extractionless non-hydrolysis SERS and NRS approach provides for the definitive identification of carmine lake, madder lake, and vermilion in multiple paint layers. To our knowledge, this study represents the first in situ identification of natural, organic pigments within paint cross-sections from oil paintings. Furthermore, the combination of SERS and normal Raman, with light microscopy provides conservators with a more comprehensive understanding of a painting from a single sample and without the need for sample pretreatment.

  4. The effects of workplace flexibility on health behaviors: a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Casey, Patrick R; Jones, Fiona A

    2007-12-01

    To examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between workplace flexibility and health behaviors, and estimate the potential importance of flexibility for effective worksite health promotion programs. Cross-sectional and longitudinal health risk appraisal data were obtained from US based employees of a multinational pharmaceutical company (n = 3193). Examined health behaviors were hours of sleep, physical activity frequency, health education seminar attendance, frequency of practicing personal resilience techniques, and self-appraised lifestyle. Self-reported flexibility in the workplace was the primary independent variable. Each health behavior, except regular attendance in health education seminars, was positively related to perceived flexibility in cross-sectional analyses. Sleep and self-appraised lifestyle were significantly related to changes in perceived flexibility over time. Workplace flexibility may contribute to positive lifestyle behaviors, and may play an important role in effective worksite health promotion programs.

  5. Identifying patient and practice characteristics associated with patient-reported experiences of safety problems and harm: a cross-sectional study using a multilevel modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Reeves, David; Bell, Brian G; Valderas, Jose M

    2017-08-07

    To identify patient and family practice characteristics associated with patient-reported experiences of safety problems and harm. Cross-sectional study combining data from the individual postal administration of the validated Patient Reported Experiences and Outcomes of Safety in Primary Care (PREOS-PC) questionnaire to a random sample of patients in family practices (response rate=18.4%) and practice-level data for those practices obtained from NHS Digital. We built linear multilevel multivariate regression models to model the association between patient-level (clinical and sociodemographic) and practice-level (size and case-mix, human resources, indicators of quality and safety of care, and practice safety activation) characteristics, and outcome measures. practices distributed across five regions in the North, Centre and South of England. 1190 patients registered in 45 practices purposefully sampled (maximal variation in practice size and levels of deprivation). Self-reported safety problems, harm and overall perception of safety. Higher self-reported levels of safety problems were associated with younger age of patients (beta coefficient 0.15) and lower levels of practice safety activation (0.44). Higher self-reported levels of harm were associated with younger age (0.13) and worse self-reported health status (0.23). Lower self-reported healthcare safety was associated with lower levels of practice safety activation (0.40). The fully adjusted models explained 4.5% of the variance in experiences of safety problems, 8.6% of the variance in harm and 4.4% of the variance in perceptions of patient safety. Practices' safety activation levels and patients' age and health status are associated with patient-reported safety outcomes in English family practices. The development of interventions aimed at improving patient safety outcomes would benefit from focusing on the identified groups. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of

  6. Implementation of chronic illness care in German primary care practices – how do multimorbid older patients view routine care? A cross-sectional study using multilevel hierarchical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In primary care, patients with multiple chronic conditions are the rule rather than the exception. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an evidence-based framework for improving chronic illness care, but little is known about the extent to which it has been implemented in routine primary care. The aim of this study was to describe how multimorbid older patients assess the routine chronic care they receive in primary care practices in Germany, and to explore the extent to which factors at both the practice and patient level determine their views. Methods This cross-sectional study used baseline data from an observational cohort study involving 158 general practitioners (GP) and 3189 multimorbid patients. Standardized questionnaires were employed to collect data, and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire used to assess the quality of care received. Multilevel hierarchical modeling was used to identify any existing association between the dependent variable, PACIC, and independent variables at the patient level (socio-economic factors, weighted count of chronic conditions, instrumental activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, graded chronic pain, no. of contacts with GP, existence of a disease management program (DMP) disease, self-efficacy, and social support) and the practice level (age and sex of GP, years in current practice, size and type of practice). Results The overall mean PACIC score was 2.4 (SD 0.8), with the mean subscale scores ranging from 2.0 (SD 1.0, subscale goal setting/tailoring) to 3.5 (SD 0.7, delivery system design). At the patient level, higher PACIC scores were associated with a DMP disease, more frequent GP contacts, higher social support, and higher autonomy of past occupation. At the practice level, solo practices were associated with higher PACIC values than other types of practice. Conclusions This study shows that from the perspective of multimorbid patients receiving care in German

  7. Implementation of chronic illness care in German primary care practices--how do multimorbid older patients view routine care? A cross-sectional study using multilevel hierarchical modeling.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Juliana J; Paulitsch, Michael A; Mergenthal, Karola; Gensichen, Jochen; Hansen, Heike; Weyerer, Siegfried; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Fuchs, Angela; Maier, Wolfgang; Bickel, Horst; König, Hans-Helmut; Wiese, Birgitt; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Scherer, Martin; Dahlhaus, Anne

    2014-08-07

    In primary care, patients with multiple chronic conditions are the rule rather than the exception. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an evidence-based framework for improving chronic illness care, but little is known about the extent to which it has been implemented in routine primary care. The aim of this study was to describe how multimorbid older patients assess the routine chronic care they receive in primary care practices in Germany, and to explore the extent to which factors at both the practice and patient level determine their views. This cross-sectional study used baseline data from an observational cohort study involving 158 general practitioners (GP) and 3189 multimorbid patients. Standardized questionnaires were employed to collect data, and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire used to assess the quality of care received. Multilevel hierarchical modeling was used to identify any existing association between the dependent variable, PACIC, and independent variables at the patient level (socio-economic factors, weighted count of chronic conditions, instrumental activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, graded chronic pain, no. of contacts with GP, existence of a disease management program (DMP) disease, self-efficacy, and social support) and the practice level (age and sex of GP, years in current practice, size and type of practice). The overall mean PACIC score was 2.4 (SD 0.8), with the mean subscale scores ranging from 2.0 (SD 1.0, subscale goal setting/tailoring) to 3.5 (SD 0.7, delivery system design). At the patient level, higher PACIC scores were associated with a DMP disease, more frequent GP contacts, higher social support, and higher autonomy of past occupation. At the practice level, solo practices were associated with higher PACIC values than other types of practice. This study shows that from the perspective of multimorbid patients receiving care in German primary care practices, the

  8. Do Robotic Surgical Systems Improve Profit Margins? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of California Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Shen, Chan; Hu, Jim C

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between ownership of robotic surgical systems and hospital profit margins. This study used hospital annual utilization data, annual financial data, and discharge data for year 2011 from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. We first performed bivariate analysis to compare mean profit margin by hospital and market characteristics and to examine whether these characteristics differed between hospitals that had one or more robotic surgical systems in 2011 and those that did not. We applied the t test and the F test to compare mean profit margin between two groups and among three or more groups, respectively. We then conducted multilevel logistic regression to determine the association between ownership of robotic surgical systems and having a positive profit margin after controlling for other hospital and market characteristics and accounting for possible correlation among hospitals located within the same market. The study sample included 167 California hospitals with valid financial information. Hospitals with robotic surgical systems tended to report more favorable profit margins. However, multilevel logistic regression showed that this relationship (an association, not causality) became only marginally significant (odds ratio [OR] = 6.2; P = 0.053) after controlling for other hospital characteristics, such as ownership type, teaching status, bed size, and surgical volumes, and market characteristics, such as total number of robotic surgical systems owned by other hospitals in the same market area. As robotic surgical systems become widely disseminated, hospital decision makers should carefully evaluate the financial and clinical implications before making a capital investment in this technology. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Out of pocket expenditure to deliver at public health facilities in India: a cross sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Issac, Anns; Chatterjee, Susmita; Srivastava, Aradhana; Bhattacharyya, Sanghita

    2016-08-24

    To expand access to safe deliveries, some developing countries have initiated demand-side financing schemes promoting institutional delivery. In the context of conditional cash incentive scheme and free maternity care in public health facilities in India, studies have highlighted high out of pocket expenditure (OOPE) of Indian families for delivery and maternity care. In this context the study assesses the components of OOPE that women incurred while accessing maternity care in public health facilities in Uttar Pradesh, India. It also assesses the determinants of OOPE and the level of maternal satisfaction while accessing care from these facilities. It is a cross-sectional analysis of 558 recently delivered women who have delivered at four public health facilities in Uttar Pradesh, India. All OOPE related information was collected through interviews using structured pre-tested questionnaires. Frequencies, Mann-Whitney test and categorical regression were used for data reduction. The analysis showed that the median OOPE was INR 700 (US$ 11.48) which varied between INR 680 (US$ 11.15) for normal delivery and INR 970 (US$ 15.9) for complicated cases. Tips for getting services (consisting of gifts and tips for services) with a median value of INR 320 (US$ 5.25) contributed to the major share in OOPE. Women from households with income more than INR 4000 (US$ 65.57) per month, general castes, primi-gravida, complicated delivery and those not accompanied by community health workers incurred higher OOPE. The significant predictors for high OOPE were caste (General Vs. OBC, SC/ST), type of delivery (Complicated Vs. Normal), and presence of ASHA (No Vs. Yes). OOPE while accessing care for delivery was one among the least satisfactory items and 76 % women expressed their dissatisfaction. Even though services at the public health facilities in India are supposed to be provided free of cost, it is actually not free, and the women in this study paid almost half of their mandated

  10. Health insurance selection in Chile: a cross-sectional and panel analysis.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Cristian; Schott, Whitney

    2014-05-01

    In Chile, workers are mandated to choose either public or private health insurance coverage. Although private insurance premiums depend on health risk, public insurance premiums are solely linked to income. This structure implies that individuals with higher health risks may tend to avoid private insurance, leaving the public insurance system responsible for their care. This article attempts to explore the determinants of health insurance selection (private vs public) by individuals in Chile and to test empirically whether adverse selection indeed exists. We use panel data from Chile's 'Encuesta de Proteccion Social' survey, which allows us to control for a rich set of individual observed and unobserved characteristics using both a cross-sectional analysis and fixed-effect methods. Results suggest that age, sex, job type, income quintile and self-reported health are the most important factors in explaining the type of insurance selected by individuals. Asymmetry in insurance mobility caused by restrictions on pre-existing conditions may explain why specific illnesses have an unambiguous relationship with insurance selection. Empirical evidence tends to indicate that some sorting by health risk and income levels takes place in Chile. In addition, by covering a less healthy population with higher utilization of general health consultations, the public insurance system may be incurring disproportionate expenses. Results suggest that if decreasing segmentation and unequal access to health services are important policy objectives, special emphasis should be placed on asymmetries in the premium structure and inter-system mobility within the health care system. Preliminary analysis of the impact of the 'Garantias Explicitas de Salud' plan (explicit guarantees on health care plan) on insurance selection is also considered.

  11. Referrals to dietitians/nutritionists: A cross-sectional analysis of Australian GP registrars' clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mulquiney, Katie J; Tapley, Amanda; van Driel, Mieke L; Morgan, Simon; Davey, Andrew R; Henderson, Kim M; Spike, Neil A; Kerr, Rohan H; Watson, Jane F; Catzikiris, Nigel F; Magin, Parker J

    2017-09-14

    The present study aimed to describe referral patterns of general practitioner (GP) registrars to dietitians/nutritionists. There is a paucity of research regarding GP referral patterns to dietitians/nutritionists. Limited data show increasing referrals from established GPs to dietitians/nutritionists. There are no data on GP registrar (trainee) referrals. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) study. ReCEnT is an ongoing, multicentre, prospective cohort study of registrars, which documents 60 consecutive consultations of each registrar in each of the three six-month GP training terms. The outcome factor in this analysis was a problem/diagnosis resulting in dietitian/nutritionist referral (2010-2015). Independent variables were related to registrar, patient, practice and consultation. A total of 1124 registrars contributed data from 145 708 consultations. Of 227 190 problems/diagnoses, 587 (0.26% (confidence interval: 0.23-0.29)) resulted in dietitian/nutritionist referral. The most common problems/diagnoses referred related to overweight/obesity (27.1%) and type 2 diabetes (21.1%). Of referrals to a dietitian/nutritionist, 60.8% were for a chronic disease, and 38.8% were related to a Chronic Disease Management plan. Dietitian/nutritionist referral was significantly associated with a number of independent variables reflecting continuity of care, patient complexity, chronic disease, health equity and registrar engagement. Established patients with chronic disease and complex care needs are more likely than other patients to be referred by registrars to dietitians/nutritionists. Nutrition behaviours are a major risk factor in chronic disease, and we have found evidence for dietitian/nutritionist referrals representing one facet of engagement by registrars with patients' complex care needs. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  12. Factor analysis of self-treatment in diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Self-treatment is a treatment of oneself without professional help, which may cause health-related consequences. This investigation examined the self-treatment behaviors in patients with diabetes mellitus in Iran/kashan. Methods The patients who referred to the clinic of diabetes and those who were admitted to the General hospital in the city of Kashan due to diabetes mellitus were asked to participate in this cross-sectional study. For data collection, The 25 item questionnaire of Likert scale type with four scales was used. Factor analysis was performed to define the patterns of self-treatment. Results 398 patients participated in the study. The mean age of the study population was 54.9 ± 12.9 years. The majority (97%) had type 2 diabetes. 50% of patients reported self- treatment. The self-treatment score was 45.8 ± 8.8 (25-100). Female gender, lower education and co-morbid illnesses of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and cardiac disease had significant relationship with self-treatment. The factor analysis procedure revealed seven factors that explained the 43% of variation in the self-treatment. These seven factors were categorized as knowledge, deficiencies of formal treatments, available self-treatment methods, physician related factors, the tendency to use herbal remedies, underlying factors such as gender and factors related to diabetes. Conclusions There is a medium tendency for self-treatment in diabetic patients. The assessment of self-treatment practices must be an essential part of patients' management in diabetes care. PMID:21970577

  13. Health insurance selection in Chile: a cross-sectional and panel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Cristian; Schott, Whitney

    2014-01-01

    In Chile, workers are mandated to choose either public or private health insurance coverage. Although private insurance premiums depend on health risk, public insurance premiums are solely linked to income. This structure implies that individuals with higher health risks may tend to avoid private insurance, leaving the public insurance system responsible for their care. This article attempts to explore the determinants of health insurance selection (private vs public) by individuals in Chile and to test empirically whether adverse selection indeed exists. We use panel data from Chile’s ‘Encuesta de Proteccion Social’ survey, which allows us to control for a rich set of individual observed and unobserved characteristics using both a cross-sectional analysis and fixed-effect methods. Results suggest that age, sex, job type, income quintile and self-reported health are the most important factors in explaining the type of insurance selected by individuals. Asymmetry in insurance mobility caused by restrictions on pre-existing conditions may explain why specific illnesses have an unambiguous relationship with insurance selection. Empirical evidence tends to indicate that some sorting by health risk and income levels takes place in Chile. In addition, by covering a less healthy population with higher utilization of general health consultations, the public insurance system may be incurring disproportionate expenses. Results suggest that if decreasing segmentation and unequal access to health services are important policy objectives, special emphasis should be placed on asymmetries in the premium structure and inter-system mobility within the health care system. Preliminary analysis of the impact of the ‘Garantias Explicitas de Salud’ plan (explicit guarantees on health care plan) on insurance selection is also considered. PMID:23558960

  14. Cross-sectional analysis of W-cored Ni nanoparticle via focused ion beam milling with impregnation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel bimetallic nanoparticle is synthesized by radio frequency thermal plasma process which belongs to the vapor phase condensation technology. The morphology and chemical composition of the synthesized particle were investigated using the conventional nanoparticle transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample. A few part of them looked like core/shell structured particle, but ambiguities were caused by either TEM sample preparation or TEM analysis. In order to clarify whether a core/shell structure is developed for the particle, various methodologies were tried to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling was conducted for cold-compacted particles, dispersed particles on silicon wafer, and impregnated particles with epoxy which is compatible with electron beam. A sound cross-sectional sample was just obtained from cyanoacrylate impregnation and FIB milling procedure. A tungsten-cored nickel shell structure was precisely confirmed with aid of cross-sectional sample preparation method. PMID:25288920

  15. An X-Ray Analysis Database of Photoionization Cross Sections Including Variable Ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ping; Cohen, David H.; MacFarlane, Joseph J.; Cassinelli, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of research efforts in the following areas are discussed: review of the major theoretical and experimental data of subshell photoionization cross sections and ionization edges of atomic ions to assess the accuracy of the data, and to compile the most reliable of these data in our own database; detailed atomic physics calculations to complement the database for all ions of 17 cosmically abundant elements; reconciling the data from various sources and our own calculations; and fitting cross sections with functional approximations and incorporating these functions into a compact computer code.Also, efforts included adapting an ionization equilibrium code, tabulating results, and incorporating them into the overall program and testing the code (both ionization equilibrium and opacity codes) with existing observational data. The background and scientific applications of this work are discussed. Atomic physics cross section models and calculations are described. Calculation results are compared with available experimental data and other theoretical data. The functional approximations used for fitting cross sections are outlined and applications of the database are discussed.

  16. Non-publication of large randomized clinical trials: cross sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Handler, Lara; Crowell, Karen E; Keil, Lukas G; Weaver, Mark A; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the frequency with which results of large randomized clinical trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov are not available to the public. Design Cross sectional analysis Setting Trials with at least 500 participants that were prospectively registered with ClinicalTrials.gov and completed prior to January 2009. Data sources PubMed, Google Scholar, and Embase were searched to identify published manuscripts containing trial results. The final literature search occurred in November 2012. Registry entries for unpublished trials were reviewed to determine whether results for these studies were available in the ClinicalTrials.gov results database. Main outcome measures The frequency of non-publication of trial results and, among unpublished studies, the frequency with which results are unavailable in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. Results Of 585 registered trials, 171 (29%) remained unpublished. These 171 unpublished trials had an estimated total enrollment of 299 763 study participants. The median time between study completion and the final literature search was 60 months for unpublished trials. Non-publication was more common among trials that received industry funding (150/468, 32%) than those that did not (21/117, 18%), P=0.003. Of the 171 unpublished trials, 133 (78%) had no results available in ClinicalTrials.gov. Conclusions Among this group of large clinical trials, non-publication of results was common and the availability of results in the ClinicalTrials.gov database was limited. A substantial number of study participants were exposed to the risks of trial participation without the societal benefits that accompany the dissemination of trial results. PMID:24169943

  17. Newer anti-epileptic drugs, vitamin status and neuropathy: A cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Cahill, V; McCorry, D; Soryal, I; Rajabally, Y A

    Whether new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may result in neuropathy is unknown but possible given their effects on vitamin metabolism. This analysis aimed to determine frequency and correlates of neuropathy in subjects treated with new AEDs in relation to drug used, length of exposure and serum vitamin B12 and folate levels. We performed a cross-sectional study of 52 consecutive epileptic subjects. Presence of neuropathy was determined using the Utah Early Neuropathy Score (UENS). Exposure to anti-epileptic drugs was quantified. Serum vitamin B12 and folate levels were measured. Commonly used AEDs were levetiracetam (28/52), carbamazepine (20/52), lamotrigine (20/52), sodium valproate (10/52) and zonisamide (10/52). Eight of 52 (15.4%) patients had neuropathy. There was no association with any particular AED. Neuropathy correlated with age (P=0.038) and total exposure to AEDs (P=0.032). UENS correlated with age (P=0.001), total AED exposure (P=0.001) and serum vitamin B12<240ng/L (P=0.018). Independent association of neuropathy was found with total AED exposure (P=0.032), but not age. UENS was independently associated with total exposure to AEDs (P<0.001), vitamin B12<240ng/L (P=0.002), but not age. Serum vitamin B12 and folate levels were highly inter-correlated (P<0.001). Neuropathy appears to be associated with the length of exposure to new AEDs. This may relate to the effects of new AEDs on vitamin B12 and folate metabolism. Although further research from controlled studies is needed and despite the presence of other possible confounding factors, monitoring for neuropathy and vitamin B12 and folate levels merits consideration in patients on long-term treatment with new AEDs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomedical journals lack a consistent method to detect outcome reporting bias: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Huan, L N; Tejani, A M; Egan, G

    2014-10-01

    An increasing amount of recently published literature has implicated outcome reporting bias (ORB) as a major contributor to skewing data in both randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews; however, little is known about the current methods in place to detect ORB. This study aims to gain insight into the detection and management of ORB by biomedical journals. This was a cross-sectional analysis involving standardized questions via email or telephone with the top 30 biomedical journals (2012) ranked by impact factor. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was excluded leaving 29 journals in the sample. Of 29 journals, 24 (83%) responded to our initial inquiry of which 14 (58%) answered our questions and 10 (42%) declined participation. Five (36%) of the responding journals indicated they had a specific method to detect ORB, whereas 9 (64%) did not have a specific method in place. The prevalence of ORB in the review process seemed to differ with 4 (29%) journals indicating ORB was found commonly, whereas 7 (50%) indicated ORB was uncommon or never detected by their journal previously. The majority (n = 10/14, 72%) of journals were unwilling to report or make discrepancies found in manuscripts available to the public. Although the minority, there were some journals (n = 4/14, 29%) which described thorough methods to detect ORB. Many journals seemed to lack a method with which to detect ORB and its estimated prevalence was much lower than that reported in literature suggesting inadequate detection. There exists a potential for overestimation of treatment effects of interventions and unclear risks. Fortunately, there are journals within this sample which appear to utilize comprehensive methods for detection of ORB, but overall, the data suggest improvements at the biomedical journal level for detecting and minimizing the effect of this bias are needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cardiovascular disease in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: A cross-sectional analysis of 6 cohorts.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Perrotti, Pedro P; Gisbert, Javier P; Domènech, Eugeni; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Cañete, Juan D; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Tornero, Jesús; García-Sánchez, Valle; Panés, Julián; Fonseca, Eduardo; Blanco, Francisco; Rodríguez-Moreno, Jesús; Carreira, Patricia; Julià, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis

    2017-06-01

    To analyze in several immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) the influence of demographic and clinical-related variables on the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and compare their standardized prevalences.Cross-sectional study, including consecutive patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Crohn disease, or ulcerative colitis, from rheumatology, gastroenterology, and dermatology tertiary care outpatient clinics located throughout Spain, between 2007 and 2010. Our main outcome was defined as previous diagnosis of angina, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, and/or stroke. Bivariate and multivariate logistic and mixed-effects logistic regression models were performed for each condition and the overall cohort, respectively. Standardized prevalences (in subjects per 100 patients, with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated using marginal analysis.We included 9951 patients. For each IMID, traditional cardiovascular risk factors had a different contribution to CVD. Overall, older age, longer disease duration, presence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and male sex were independently associated with a higher CVD prevalence. After adjusting for demographic and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, systemic lupus erythematosus exhibited the highest CVD standardized prevalence, followed by rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohn disease, psoriatic arthritis, and ulcerative colitis (4.5 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.2, 6.8], 1.3 [95% CI: 0.8, 1.8], 0.9 [95% CI: 0.5, 1.2], 0.8 [95% CI: 0.2, 1.3], 0.6 [95% CI: 0.2, 1.0], and 0.5 [95% CI: 0.1, 0.8], respectively).Systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis are associated with higher prevalence of CVD compared with other IMIDs. Specific prevention programs should be established in subjects affected with these conditions to prevent CVD.

  20. Durability of Vaccine-Induced Immunity Against Tetanus and Diphtheria Toxins: A Cross-sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hammarlund, Erika; Thomas, Archana; Poore, Elizabeth A.; Amanna, Ian J.; Rynko, Abby E.; Mori, Motomi; Chen, Zunqiu; Slifka, Mark K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many adult immunization schedules recommend that tetanus and diphtheria vaccination be performed every 10 years. In light of current epidemiological trends of disease incidence and rates of vaccine-associated adverse events, the 10-year revaccination schedule has come into question. Methods. We performed cross-sectional analysis of serum antibody titers in 546 adult subjects stratified by age or sex. All serological results were converted to international units after calibration with international serum standards. Results. Approximately 97% of the population was seropositive to tetanus and diphtheria as defined by a protective serum antibody titer of ≥0.01 IU/mL. Mean antibody titers were 3.6 and 0.35 IU/mL against tetanus and diphtheria, respectively. Antibody responses to tetanus declined with an estimated half-life of 14 years (95% confidence interval, 11–17 years), whereas antibody responses to diphtheria were more long-lived and declined with an estimated half-life of 27 years (18–51 years). Mathematical models combining antibody magnitude and duration predict that 95% of the population will remain protected against tetanus and diphtheria for ≥30 years without requiring further booster vaccination. Conclusions. These studies demonstrate that durable levels of protective antitoxin immunity exist in the majority of vaccinated individuals. Together, this suggests that it may no longer be necessary to administer booster vaccinations every 10 years and that the current adult vaccination schedule for tetanus and diphtheria should be revisited. PMID:27060790

  1. A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Alice; Grundy, Quinn; Mintzes, Barbara; Swandari, Swestika; Moynihan, Ray; Walkom, Emily; Bero, Lisa A

    2017-06-30

    To analyse patterns and characteristics of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of events for Australian health professionals and to understand the implications of recent changes in transparency provisions that no longer require reporting of payments for food and beverages. Cross-sectional analysis. 301 publicly available company transparency reports downloaded from the website of Medicines Australia, the pharmaceutical industry trade association, covering the period from October 2011 to September 2015. Forty-two companies sponsored 116 845 events for health professionals, on average 608 per week with 30 attendees per event. Events typically included a broad range of health professionals: 82.0% included medical doctors, including specialists and primary care doctors, and 38.3% trainees. Oncology, surgery and endocrinology were the most frequent clinical areas of focus. Most events (64.2%) were held in a clinical setting. The median cost per event was $A263 (IQR $A153-1195) and over 90% included food and beverages. Over this 4-year period, industry-sponsored events were widespread and pharmaceutical companies maintained a high frequency of contact with health professionals. Most events were held in clinical settings, suggesting a pervasive commercial presence in everyday clinical practice. Food and beverages, known to be associated with changes to prescribing practice, were almost always provided. New Australian transparency provisions explicitly exclude meals from the reporting requirements; thus, a large proportion of potentially influential payments from pharmaceutical companies to health professionals will disappear from public view. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. The Variation of Statin Use Among Nursing Home Residents and Physicians: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Campitelli, Michael A; Maxwell, Colleen J; Giannakeas, Vasily; Bell, Chaim M; Daneman, Nick; Jeffs, Lianne; Morris, Andrew M; Austin, Peter C; Hogan, David B; Ko, Dennis T; Lapane, Kate L; Maclagan, Laura C; Seitz, Dallas P; Bronskill, Susan E

    2017-08-09

    To examine the variability of statin use among nursing home residents and prescribing physicians, and to assess statin use by resident frailty. Population-based, cross-sectional analysis. All nursing home facilities (N = 631) in Ontario, Canada between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014. All adults aged 66 years and older who received a full clinical assessment while residing in a nursing home facility and their assigned, most responsible, physician. Statin use on date of clinical assessment. Resident- and physician-level characteristics ascertained through clinical assessment and health administrative data. Resident frailty was derived using a previously validated index. Among 76,226 nursing home residents assigned to 1,919 physicians, 25,648 (33.6%) were statin users. There were 13,331 (30.1%) statin users among the 44,290 residents categorized as frail. In an adjusted mixed-effects logistic regression model, frail residents (adjusted odds ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.65) were significantly less likely to be statin users compared with non-frail residents. After adjustment for resident characteristics, the intraclass correlation coefficient indicated that between-physician variability accounted for 9.1% of the residual unexplained variation in statin use (P < .001). Among the 894 physicians assigned 20 or more residents, funnel plots confirmed there were more low-outlying (17.4%) and high-outlying (12.0%) prescribers of statins than expected by chance. Physicians who were high-outlying prescribers had higher historical rates of statin prescribing. Statin prescribing was substantial within nursing homes, even among frail residents. After controlling for resident characteristics, the likelihood of statin prescribing varied significantly across physicians. Further studies are required to evaluate the risks and benefits of statin use, and discontinuation, among nursing home residents to better inform clinical practice in this setting. © 2017, Copyright

  3. Practice of Physical Activity among Future Doctors: A Cross Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chythra R; Darshan, BB; Das, Nairita; Rajan, Vinaya; Bhogun, Meemansha; Gupta, Aditya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non communicable diseases (NCD) will account for 73% of deaths and 60% of the global disease burden by 2020. Physical activity plays a major role in the prevention of these non-communicable diseases. The stress involved in meeting responsibilities of becoming a physician may adversely affect the exercise habits of students. So, the current study aimed to study the practice of physical activity among undergraduate medical students. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among 240 undergraduate medical students. Quota sampling method was used to identify 60 students from each of the four even semesters. A pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 was used for data entry and analysis and results are expressed as percentages and proportions. Results: In our study, 55% were 20 to 22 years old. Over half of the students were utilizing the sports facilities provided by the university in the campus. Majority of students 165 (69%) had normal body mass index (BMI), (51) 21% were overweight, while 7 (3%) were obese. Of the 62% who were currently exercising, the practice of physical activity was more among boys as compared to girls (62% v/s 38%). Lack of time 46 (60.5%), laziness (61.8%), and exhaustion from academic activities (42%) were identified as important hindering factors among medical students who did not exercise. Conclusion: A longitudinal study to follow-up student behavior throughout their academic life is needed to identify the factors promoting the practice of physical activity among students. PMID:22708033

  4. [Potential sponsorship bias in cost-effectiveness analyses of healthcare interventions: A cross-sectional analysis].

    PubMed

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Ridao, Manuel

    To examine the relationship between the funding source of cost-effectiveness analyses of healthcare interventions published in Spain and study conclusions. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Scientific literature databases (until December 2014). Cohort of cost-effectiveness analysis of healthcare interventions published in Spain between 1989-2014 (n=223) presenting quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) as the outcome measure. The relationship between qualitative conclusions of the studies and the type of funding source were established using Fisher's exact test in contingency tables. Distributions of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios by source of funding in relation to hypothetical willingness to pay thresholds between €30,000-€50,000 per QALY were explored. A total of 136 (61.0%) studies were funded by industry. The industry-funded studies were less likely to report unfavorable or neutral conclusions than studies non-funded by industry (2.2% vs. 23.0%; P<.0001), largely driven by studies evaluating drugs (0.9% vs. 21.4%; P<.0001). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in studies funded by industry were more likely to be below the hypothetical willingness to pay threshold of €30,000 (73.8% vs. 56.3%; P<.0001) and €50,000 (89.4% vs. 68.2%; P<.0001) per QALY. This study reveals a potential sponsorship bias in cost-effectiveness analyses of healthcare interventions. Studies funded by industry could be favoring the efficiency profile of their products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Do socioeconomic inequalities in mortality vary between different Spanish cities? a pooled cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between deprivation and mortality in urban settings is well established. This relationship has been found for several causes of death in Spanish cities in independent analyses (the MEDEA project). However, no joint analysis which pools the strength of this relationship across several cities has ever been undertaken. Such an analysis would determine, if appropriate, a joint relationship by linking the associations found. Methods A pooled cross-sectional analysis of the data from the MEDEA project has been carried out for each of the causes of death studied. Specifically, a meta-analysis has been carried out to pool the relative risks in eleven Spanish cities. Different deprivation-mortality relationships across the cities are considered in the analysis (fixed and random effects models). The size of the cities is also considered as a possible factor explaining differences between cities. Results Twenty studies have been carried out for different combinations of sex and causes of death. For nine of them (men: prostate cancer, diabetes, mental illnesses, Alzheimer’s disease, cerebrovascular disease; women: diabetes, mental illnesses, respiratory diseases, cirrhosis) no differences were found between cities in the effect of deprivation on mortality; in four cases (men: respiratory diseases, all causes of mortality; women: breast cancer, Alzheimer’s disease) differences not associated with the size of the city have been determined; in two cases (men: cirrhosis; women: lung cancer) differences strictly linked to the size of the city have been determined, and in five cases (men: lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease; women: ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, all causes of mortality) both kinds of differences have been found. Except for lung cancer in women, every significant relationship between deprivation and mortality goes in the same direction: deprivation increases mortality. Variability in the relative risks across

  6. Do socioeconomic inequalities in mortality vary between different Spanish cities? a pooled cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Beneito, Miguel A; Zurriaga, Oscar; Botella-Rocamora, Paloma; Marí-Dell'Olmo, Marc; Nolasco, Andreu; Moncho, Joaquín; Daponte, Antonio; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Gandarillas, Ana; Martos, Carmen; Montoya, Imanol; Sánchez-Villegas, Pablo; Taracido, Margarita; Borrell, Carme

    2013-05-16

    The relationship between deprivation and mortality in urban settings is well established. This relationship has been found for several causes of death in Spanish cities in independent analyses (the MEDEA project). However, no joint analysis which pools the strength of this relationship across several cities has ever been undertaken. Such an analysis would determine, if appropriate, a joint relationship by linking the associations found. A pooled cross-sectional analysis of the data from the MEDEA project has been carried out for each of the causes of death studied. Specifically, a meta-analysis has been carried out to pool the relative risks in eleven Spanish cities. Different deprivation-mortality relationships across the cities are considered in the analysis (fixed and random effects models). The size of the cities is also considered as a possible factor explaining differences between cities. Twenty studies have been carried out for different combinations of sex and causes of death. For nine of them (men: prostate cancer, diabetes, mental illnesses, Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovascular disease; women: diabetes, mental illnesses, respiratory diseases, cirrhosis) no differences were found between cities in the effect of deprivation on mortality; in four cases (men: respiratory diseases, all causes of mortality; women: breast cancer, Alzheimer's disease) differences not associated with the size of the city have been determined; in two cases (men: cirrhosis; women: lung cancer) differences strictly linked to the size of the city have been determined, and in five cases (men: lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease; women: ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, all causes of mortality) both kinds of differences have been found. Except for lung cancer in women, every significant relationship between deprivation and mortality goes in the same direction: deprivation increases mortality. Variability in the relative risks across cities was found for general

  7. A Descriptive Analysis of Oral Health Systematic Reviews Published 1991–2012: Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Saltaji, Humam; Cummings, Greta G.; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Major, Michael P.; Amin, Maryam; Major, Paul W.; Hartling, Lisa; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify all systematic reviews (SRs) published in the domain of oral health research and describe them in terms of their epidemiological and descriptive characteristics. Design Cross sectional, descriptive study. Methods An electronic search of seven databases was performed from inception through May 2012; bibliographies of relevant publications were also reviewed. Studies were considered for inclusion if they were oral health SRs defined as therapeutic or non-therapeutic investigations that studied a topic or an intervention related to dental, oral or craniofacial diseases/disorders. Data were extracted from all the SRs based on a number of epidemiological and descriptive characteristics. Data were analysed descriptively for all the SRs, within each of the nine dental specialities, and for Cochrane and non-Cochrane SRs separately. Results 1,188 oral health (126 Cochrane and 1062 non-Cochrane) SRs published from 1991 through May 2012 were identified, encompassing the nine dental specialties. Over half (n = 676; 56.9%) of the SRs were published in specialty oral health journals, with almost all (n = 1,178; 99.2%) of the SRs published in English and almost none of the non-Cochrane SRs (n = 11; 0.9%) consisting of updates of previously published SRs. 75.3% of the SRs were categorized as therapeutic, with 64.5% examining non-drug interventions, while approximately half (n = 150/294; 51%) of the non-therapeutic SRs were classified as epidemiological SRs. The SRs included a median of 15 studies, with a meta-analysis conducted in 43.6%, in which a median of 9 studies/1 randomized trial were included in the largest meta-analysis conducted. Funding was received for 25.1% of the SRs, including nearly three-quarters (n = 96; 76.2%) of the Cochrane SRs. Conclusion Epidemiological and descriptive characteristics of the 1,188 oral health SRs varied across the nine dental specialties and by SR category (Cochrane vs. non-Cochrane). There is a

  8. Essential Indicators Identifying Chronic Inorganic Mercury Intoxication: Pooled Analysis across Multiple Cross-Sectional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background The continuous exposure to inorganic mercury vapour in artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) areas leads to chronic health problems. It is therefore essential to have a quick, but reliable risk assessing tool to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication. This study re-evaluates the state-of-the-art toolkit to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication by analysing data from multiple pooled cross-sectional studies. The primary research question aims to reduce the currently used set of indicators without affecting essentially the capability to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on established biomonitoring exposure limits for mercury in blood, hair, urine and urine adjusted by creatinine, where the biomonitoring exposure limits are compared to thresholds most associated with chronic inorganic mercury intoxication in artisanal small-scale gold mining. Methods Health data from miners and community members in Indonesia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe were obtained as part of the Global Mercury Project and pooled into one dataset together with their biomarkers mercury in urine, blood and hair. The individual prognostic impact of the indicators on the diagnosis of mercury intoxication is quantified using logistic regression models. The selection is performed by a stepwise forward/backward selection. Different models are compared based on the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) and Cohen`s kappa is used to evaluate the level of agreement between the diagnosis of mercury intoxication based on the currently used set of indicators and the result based on our reduced set of indicators. The sensitivity analysis of biomarker exposure limits of mercury is based on a sequence of chi square tests. Results The variable selection in logistic regression reduced the number of medical indicators from thirteen to ten in addition to the biomarkers. The estimated level of agreement using ten of thirteen medical

  9. A descriptive analysis of oral health systematic reviews published 1991-2012: cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Saltaji, Humam; Cummings, Greta G; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Major, Michael P; Amin, Maryam; Major, Paul W; Hartling, Lisa; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    To identify all systematic reviews (SRs) published in the domain of oral health research and describe them in terms of their epidemiological and descriptive characteristics. Cross sectional, descriptive study. An electronic search of seven databases was performed from inception through May 2012; bibliographies of relevant publications were also reviewed. Studies were considered for inclusion if they were oral health SRs defined as therapeutic or non-therapeutic investigations that studied a topic or an intervention related to dental, oral or craniofacial diseases/disorders. Data were extracted from all the SRs based on a number of epidemiological and descriptive characteristics. Data were analysed descriptively for all the SRs, within each of the nine dental specialities, and for Cochrane and non-Cochrane SRs separately. 1,188 oral health (126 Cochrane and 1062 non-Cochrane) SRs published from 1991 through May 2012 were identified, encompassing the nine dental specialties. Over half (n = 676; 56.9%) of the SRs were published in specialty oral health journals, with almost all (n = 1,178; 99.2%) of the SRs published in English and almost none of the non-Cochrane SRs (n = 11; 0.9%) consisting of updates of previously published SRs. 75.3% of the SRs were categorized as therapeutic, with 64.5% examining non-drug interventions, while approximately half (n = 150/294; 51%) of the non-therapeutic SRs were classified as epidemiological SRs. The SRs included a median of 15 studies, with a meta-analysis conducted in 43.6%, in which a median of 9 studies/1 randomized trial were included in the largest meta-analysis conducted. Funding was received for 25.1% of the SRs, including nearly three-quarters (n = 96; 76.2%) of the Cochrane SRs. Epidemiological and descriptive characteristics of the 1,188 oral health SRs varied across the nine dental specialties and by SR category (Cochrane vs. non-Cochrane). There is a clear need for more updates of SRs in all the

  10. Italian hospitals on the web: a cross-sectional analysis of official websites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the use of the Internet for health purposes has increased steadily in the last decade, only a few studies have explored the information provided by the websites of health institutions and no studies on the on-line activities of Italian hospitals have been performed to date. The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics of the contents and the user-orientation of Italian hospital websites. Methods The cross-sectional analysis considered all the Italian hospitals with a working website between December 2008 and February 2009. The websites were coded using an ad hoc Codebook, comprising eighty-nine items divided into five sections: technical characteristics, hospital information and facilities, medical services, interactive on-line services and external activities. We calculated a website evaluation score, on the basis of the items satisfied, to compare private (PrHs) and public hospitals, the latter divided into ones with their own website (PubHs-1) and ones with a section on the website of their Local Health Authority (PubHs-2). Lastly, a descriptive analysis of each item was carried out. Results Out of the 1265 hospitals in Italy, we found that 419 of the 652 public hospitals (64.3%) and 344 of the 613 PrHs (56.1%) had a working website (p = 0.01). The mean website evaluation score was 41.9 for PubHs-1, 21.2 for PubHs-2 and 30.8 for PrHs (p < 0.001). Only 5 hospitals out of 763 (< 1%) provided specific clinical performance indicators, such as the nosocomial infection rate or the surgical mortality rates. Regarding interactive on-line services, although nearly 80% of both public and private hospitals enabled users to communicate on-line, less than 18% allowed the reservation of medical services, and only 8 websites (1%) provided a health-care forum. Conclusions A high percentage of hospitals did not provide an official website and the majority of the websites found had several limitations. Very few hospitals provided information to

  11. Essential Indicators Identifying Chronic Inorganic Mercury Intoxication: Pooled Analysis across Multiple Cross-Sectional Studies.

    PubMed

    Doering, Stefan; Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; Berger, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The continuous exposure to inorganic mercury vapour in artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) areas leads to chronic health problems. It is therefore essential to have a quick, but reliable risk assessing tool to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication. This study re-evaluates the state-of-the-art toolkit to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication by analysing data from multiple pooled cross-sectional studies. The primary research question aims to reduce the currently used set of indicators without affecting essentially the capability to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on established biomonitoring exposure limits for mercury in blood, hair, urine and urine adjusted by creatinine, where the biomonitoring exposure limits are compared to thresholds most associated with chronic inorganic mercury intoxication in artisanal small-scale gold mining. Health data from miners and community members in Indonesia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe were obtained as part of the Global Mercury Project and pooled into one dataset together with their biomarkers mercury in urine, blood and hair. The individual prognostic impact of the indicators on the diagnosis of mercury intoxication is quantified using logistic regression models. The selection is performed by a stepwise forward/backward selection. Different models are compared based on the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) and Cohen`s kappa is used to evaluate the level of agreement between the diagnosis of mercury intoxication based on the currently used set of indicators and the result based on our reduced set of indicators. The sensitivity analysis of biomarker exposure limits of mercury is based on a sequence of chi square tests. The variable selection in logistic regression reduced the number of medical indicators from thirteen to ten in addition to the biomarkers. The estimated level of agreement using ten of thirteen medical indicators and all four

  12. Prevalence of Smokeless Tobacco among Low Socioeconomic Populations: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammad Nurul; Shahjahan, Mohammad; Yeasmin, Mahbuba; Ahmed, Nasar U.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cost, social acceptability and non-stringent regulations pertaining to smokeless tobacco (SLT) product sales have made people choose and continue using SLT. If disaggregated data on smokeless forms and smoked practices of tobacco are reviewed, the incidence of SLT remains static. There is a strong positive correlation of SLT intake with the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular disease, particularly in the low socioeconomic populations. Aims To investigate the prevalence of smokeless tobacco, its initiation influence and risk factors associated with the practice among lower socioeconomic populations of Bangladesh. In this study, we explore the utilization of SLT among lower socioeconomic populations in industrialized zone of Bangladesh. Methods A cross-sectional analysis using both quantitative and categorical approaches was employed. Using systematic random sampling method, four focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted and 459 participants were interviewed. Multiple logistic regression model was applied to distinguish the significant factors among the SLT users. Results Almost fifty percent of the respondents initiated SLT usage at the age of 15–24 years and another 22 percent respondents were smoking and using SLT concurrently. The bulk of the women respondents used SLT during their pregnancy. Nearly twenty five percent of the respondents tried to quit the practice of SLT and one-quarter had a plan to quit SLT in the future. More than twenty percent respondents were suffering from dental decay. A noteworthy correlation was found by gender (p<0.01), sufferings from SLT related disease (p<0.05). The multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that, males were 2.7 times more knowledgeable than that of females (p<0.01) about the adversative health condition of SLT usage. The respondents suffering from SLT related diseases were 3.7 times as more knowledgeable about the effect of the practice of SLT than the respondents without diseases (p<0

  13. The use of cross-section warping functions in composite rotor blade analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    During the contracted period, our research was concentrated into three areas. The first was the development of an accurate and a computationally efficient method for predicting the cross-section warping functions in an arbitrary cross-section composed of isotropic and/or anisotropic materials. The second area of research was the development of a general higher-order one-dimensional theory for anisotropic beams. The third area of research was the development of an analytical model for assessing the extension-bend-twist coupling behavior of nonhomogeneous anisotropic beams with initial twist. In the remaining six chapters of this report, the three different research areas and associated sub-research areas are covered independently including separate introductions, theoretical developments, numerical results, and references.

  14. The LAW Library -- A multigroup cross-section library for use in radioactive waste analysis calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, N.M.; Arwood, J.W.; Wright, R.Q.; Parks, C.V.

    1994-08-01

    The 238-group LAW Library is a new multigroup neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-V data, with five sets of data taken from ENDF/B-VI ({sup 14}N{sub 7}, {sup 15}N{sub 7}, {sup 16}O{sub 8}, {sup 154Eu}{sub 63}, and {sup 155}Eu{sub 63}). These five nuclides are included because the new evaluations are thought to be superior to those in Version 5. The LAW Library contains data for over 300 materials and will be distributed by the Radiation Shielding Information Center, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was generated for use in neutronics calculations required in radioactive waste analyses, although it has equal utility in any study requiring multigroup neutron cross sections.

  15. Reaction Cross Sections for Two DSMC Models: Accuracy and Sensitivity Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-15

    trajectory (QCT) cross sections for N2+N dissociation and for N2+O endothermic exchange pro- vide a good test case. A DSMC simulation of a simple... endothermic reactions considered here, we have made the common simplifying assumption that Ea is equal to the heat of reaction. However, since some reactions...especially exothermic ones) have a non- negligible energy barrier, the QK model (like all others) in these cases would have to use an adjustable input

  16. Caffeine Consumption and General Health in Secondary School Children: A Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Gareth; Smith, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Although caffeine is sometimes associated with beneficial effects in adults, the substance may be dangerous if intake is too high. This concern is particularly relevant in regards to children and adolescents, as consumption of energy drinks may be particularly high in such populations. For this reason, the current study examined data from the Cornish Academies Project to determine whether caffeine intake in secondary school children was related to responses to a single-item measure of general health. Two cross-sections of data were available: questionnaires were completed by 2030 at baseline, by 2307 at 6-month follow-up, and by 1660 at both time-points. Relationships were, therefore, explored both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. High caffeine consumption (i.e., 1000 mg/week) was associated with low general health in both cross-sections of data, and analyses of individual caffeine sources suggested that the effects related specifically to cola and energy drinks. However, after controlling for additional aspects of diet, demography, and lifestyle, total weekly intake only remained significantly associated with general health at the latter time-point. Further to this, null findings from cross-lag and change-score analyses suggest that caffeine and general health were unlikely to be causally linked in this sample. However, due to methodological limitations, such as the two cross-sections of data being collected only 6 months apart, it is suggested that further longitudinal and intervention studies are required in order for firm conclusions to be drawn. PMID:27965962

  17. Caffeine Consumption and General Health in Secondary School Children: A Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gareth; Smith, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Although caffeine is sometimes associated with beneficial effects in adults, the substance may be dangerous if intake is too high. This concern is particularly relevant in regards to children and adolescents, as consumption of energy drinks may be particularly high in such populations. For this reason, the current study examined data from the Cornish Academies Project to determine whether caffeine intake in secondary school children was related to responses to a single-item measure of general health. Two cross-sections of data were available: questionnaires were completed by 2030 at baseline, by 2307 at 6-month follow-up, and by 1660 at both time-points. Relationships were, therefore, explored both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. High caffeine consumption (i.e., 1000 mg/week) was associated with low general health in both cross-sections of data, and analyses of individual caffeine sources suggested that the effects related specifically to cola and energy drinks. However, after controlling for additional aspects of diet, demography, and lifestyle, total weekly intake only remained significantly associated with general health at the latter time-point. Further to this, null findings from cross-lag and change-score analyses suggest that caffeine and general health were unlikely to be causally linked in this sample. However, due to methodological limitations, such as the two cross-sections of data being collected only 6 months apart, it is suggested that further longitudinal and intervention studies are required in order for firm conclusions to be drawn.

  18. Predicting Children's Media Use in the USA: Differences in Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sook-Jung; Bartolic, Silvia; Vandewater, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictors of children's media use in the USA, comparing cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Data come from Waves 1 and 2 of the Child Development Supplement (CDS-I; CDS-II), a nationally representative sample of American children aged 0-12 in 1997 and 5-18 in 2002. Twenty-four hour time use…

  19. Predicting Children's Media Use in the USA: Differences in Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sook-Jung; Bartolic, Silvia; Vandewater, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictors of children's media use in the USA, comparing cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Data come from Waves 1 and 2 of the Child Development Supplement (CDS-I; CDS-II), a nationally representative sample of American children aged 0-12 in 1997 and 5-18 in 2002. Twenty-four hour time use…

  20. Supplier-induced demand: re-examining identification and misspecification in cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Stuart J; Richardson, Jeffrey R J

    2007-09-01

    This paper re-examines criticisms of cross-sectional methods used to test for supplier-induced demand (SID) and re-evaluates the empirical evidence using data from Australian medical services. Cross-sectional studies of SID have been criticised on two grounds. First, and most important, the inclusion of the doctor supply in the demand equation leads to an identification problem. This criticism is shown to be invalid, as the doctor supply variable is stochastic and depends upon a variety of other variables including the desirability of the location. Second, cross-sectional studies of SID fail diagnostic tests and produce artefactual findings due to model misspecification. Contrary to this, the re-evaluation of cross-sectional Australian data indicate that demand equations that do not include the doctor supply are misspecified. Empirical evidence from the re-evaluation of Australian medical services data supports the notion of SID. Demand and supply equations are well specified and have very good explanatory power. The demand equation is identified and the desirability of a location is an important predictor of the doctor supply. Results show an average price elasticity of demand of 0.22 and an average elasticity of demand with respect to the doctor supply of 0.46, with the impact of SID becoming stronger as the doctor supply rises. The conclusion we draw from this paper is that two of the main criticisms of the empirical evidence supporting the SID hypothesis have been inappropriately levelled at the methods used. More importantly, SID provides a satisfactory, and robust, explanation of the empirical data on the demand for medical services in Australia.

  1. Analysis of active closed cross-section slender beams based on asymptotically correct thin-wall beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouli, F.; Langlois, R. G.; Afagh, F. F.

    2007-02-01

    An asymptotically correct theory for multi-cell thin-wall anisotropic slender beams that includes the shell bending strain measures is extended to include embedded active fibre composites (AFCs). A closed-form solution of the asymptotically correct cross-sectional actuation force and moments is obtained. Active thin-wall beam theories found in the literature neglect the shell bending strains, which lead to incorrect predictions for certain cross-sections, while the theory presented is shown to overcome this shortcoming. The theory is implemented and verified against single-cell examples that were solved using the University of Michigan/Variational Beam Sectional Analysis (UM/VABS) software. The stiffness constants and the actuation vector are obtained for two-cell and three-cell active cross-sections. The theory is argued to be reliable for efficient initial design analysis and interdisciplinary parametric or optimization studies of thin-wall closed cross-section slender beams with no initial twist or obliqueness.

  2. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  3. Medication safety and chronic kidney disease in older adults prescribed metformin: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication safety in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing concern. This is particularly relevant in older adults due to underlying CKD. Metformin use is contraindicated in patients with abnormal kidney function; however, many patients are potentially prescribed metformin inappropriately. We evaluated the prevalence of CKD among older adults prescribed metformin for type 2 diabetes mellitus using available equations to estimate kidney function and examined demographic characteristics of patients who were potentially inappropriately prescribed metformin. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of older adults aged ≥65 years prescribed metformin from March 2008-March 2009 at an urban tertiary-care facility in Seattle, Washington, USA. CKD was defined using National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative criteria. Creatinine clearance was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation; estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated using the abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and CKD-Epidemiology (EPI) Collaboration equations. Regression analyses were used to determine the associations between demographic characteristics and prevalent CKD. Results Among 356 subjects (median age 69 years, 52.5% female, 39.4% non-Hispanic black), prevalence of stage 3 or greater CKD calculated by any of the equations was 31.4%. The Cockcroft-Gault equation identified more subjects as having CKD (23.7%) than the abbreviated MDRD (21.1%) or CKD-EPI (21.7%) equations (P < 0.001). Older age (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.08-1.19) and female sex (OR = 2.51, 95% CI 1.44-4.38) were associated with increased odds of potentially inappropriate metformin prescription due to CKD; non-Hispanic black race was associated with decreased odds of potentially inappropriate metformin prescription due to CKD (OR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.23-0.71). Conclusions CKD is common in older adults prescribed metformin for type 2

  4. Work and family roles of Soviet women: historical trends and cross-section analysis.

    PubMed

    Ofer, G; Vinokur, A

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the way of life of USSR women over the last 2 generations are very similar to those experienced by women in most industrialized and industializing societies. The rate of participation of women in the labor force increased substantially, and this movement was accompanied by a marked rise in the level of women's general and professional education. As a result, women occupy more white collar positions than they did in older generations, but these developments have created a double burden for most women who complain that increased resonsibilities outside the home have not been synchronized with an adequate increase in men's sharing household responsibilities. Historical explanations for changes in women's role particularly emphasize the nature of relationships between participation, wages, incomes, fertility, education and labor market conditions. The long term changes of these major variables, since the 1920s, along with an investigation based on an income survey of 1000 immigrant families, are studied in this paper. Cross sectional analysis examines a longer life cycle, participation decisions, and relates them to decisions on fertility and education. Fertility rates among the Jewish immigrants are much higher and labor participation rates of women much lower than for the rest of the population. Some of the main features of the long trends since 1926 are: 1) of the overall measures of participation of women, only those in the 15-54 and 20-54 age ranges show some increase over the 1926-1980 period, 2) sharp rises in specific participation rates for 25-44 and 45-54 age groups since 1950, and for urban women overall, 3) only a small fraction of the total increase in participation can be attributed to the increase in the proportion of single women, and 4) by 1980 the overall female participation figure rose to 80%--and 88% for the 20-54 age group--the difference reflecting the sharp decline in 15-19 age group participation. While the short run decision about

  5. Risk adjustment for hospital use using social security data: cross sectional small area analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Hill, Roy A; Jamison, James Q; O'Reilly, Dermot; Stevenson, Michael R; Reid, James; Merriman, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To identify demographic and socioeconomic determinants of need for acute hospital treatment at small area level. To establish whether there is a relation between poverty and use of inpatient services. To devise a risk adjustment formula for distributing public funds for hospital services using, as far as possible, variables that can be updated between censuses. Design Cross sectional analysis. Spatial interactive modelling was used to quantify the proximity of the population to health service facilities. Two stage weighted least squares regression was used to model use against supply of hospital and community services and a wide range of potential needs drivers including health, socioeconomic census variables, uptake of income support and family credit, and religious denomination. Setting Northern Ireland. Main outcome measure Intensity of use of inpatient services. Results After endogeneity of supply and use was taken into account, a statistical model was produced that predicted use based on five variables: income support, family credit, elderly people living alone, all ages standardised mortality ratio, and low birth weight. The main effect of the formula produced is to move resources from urban to rural areas. Conclusions This work has produced a population risk adjustment formula for acute hospital treatment in which four of the five variables can be updated annually rather than relying on census derived data. Inclusion of the social security data makes a substantial difference to the model and to the results produced by the formula. What is already known on this topicUse of hospital services at small area level is related to supply and census derived proxy measures of socioeconomic status as well as morbidityChanges to census data can be determined only every 10 yearsWhat this study addsSocial security data directly reflecting household income predicts use of inpatient servicesUse of social security data allowed development of a risk adjustment

  6. Personal health record reach in the Veterans Health Administration: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Stephanie Leah; Brandt, Cynthia A; Feng, Hua; McInnes, D Keith; Rao, Sowmya R; Rothendler, James A; Haggstrom, David A; Abel, Erica A; Cioffari, Lisa S; Houston, Thomas K

    2014-12-12

    My HealtheVet (MHV) is the personal health record and patient portal developed by the United States Veterans Health Administration (VA). While millions of American veterans have registered for MHV, little is known about how a patient's health status may affect adoption and use of the personal health record. Our aim was to characterize the reach of the VA personal health record by clinical condition. This was a cross-sectional analysis of all veterans nationwide with at least one inpatient admission or two outpatient visits between April 2010 and March 2012. We compared adoption (registration, authentication, opt-in to use secure messaging) and use (prescription refill and secure messaging) of MHV in April 2012 across 18 specific clinical conditions prevalent in and of high priority to the VA. We calculated predicted probabilities of adoption by condition using multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidities, and clustering of patients within facilities. Among 6,012,875 veterans, 6.20% were women, 61.45% were Caucasian, and 26.31% resided in rural areas. The mean age was 63.3 years. Nationwide, 18.64% had registered for MHV, 11.06% refilled prescriptions via MHV, and 1.91% used secure messaging with their clinical providers. Results from the multivariable regression suggest that patients with HIV, hyperlipidemia, and spinal cord injury had the highest predicted probabilities of adoption, whereas those with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder, alcohol or drug abuse, and stroke had the lowest. Variation was observed across diagnoses in actual (unadjusted) adoption and use, with registration rates ranging from 29.19% of patients with traumatic brain injury to 14.18% of those with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder. Some of the variation in actual reach can be explained by facility-level differences in MHV adoption and by differences in patients' sociodemographic characteristics (eg, age, race, income) by diagnosis. In this

  7. Combination and QCD analysis of charm production cross section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kötz, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohmann, W.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of open charm production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are combined. Reduced cross sections σ_red^{cbar{c}} for charm production are obtained in the kinematic range of photon virtuality 2.5≤ Q 2≤2000 GeV2 and Bjorken scaling variable 3ṡ10-5≤ x≤5ṡ10-2. The combination method accounts for the correlations of the systematic uncertainties among the different data sets. The combined charm data together with the combined inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from HERA are used as input for a detailed NLO QCD analysis to study the influence of different heavy flavour schemes on the parton distribution functions. The optimal values of the charm mass as a parameter in these different schemes are obtained. The implications on the NLO predictions for W ± and Z production cross sections at the LHC are investigated. Using the fixed flavour number scheme, the running mass of the charm quark is determined.

  8. Sensitivity of calculations of {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurements to cross sections for aqueous fissile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1993-09-01

    Previous experiments have shown large changes in measured parameters such as the coherences and ratio of spectral densities for small changes in the measured configuration of fissile material and for small changes in k. This sensitivity was investigated by a variant of the Monte Carlo neutron transport code KENO-V.a, which calculates the time sequences of pulses at two detectors near a fissile assembly from the fission chain multiplication process initiated by a {sup 252}Cf source in or near the fissile assembly. This code directly calculates the noise analysis data from the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven neutron noise measurement method. Direct calculation of the experimental observables by the Monte Carlo method allows the benchmarking of calculational methods and cross sections. These calculations have shown a higher sensitivity of noise-measured quantities to cross sections and calculational methods than the neutron multiplication factor for aqueous fissile solutions. For example, the calculation with ENDF/B-IV cross sections yields a value of the coherence {gamma}{sub 23}{sup 2} 300% larger at low frequency than that from the Hansen-Roach cross sections. The coherence between detectors is a factor of 67 more sensitive to cross sections than the neutron multiplication factor, and this results from the coherence at low k being proportional to the fourth power of (k/{Delta}k). This increased sensitivity to calculational methods means that as far as validating calculational methods, a subcritical experiment at a k {approx} 0.9 by the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method may be more useful than an experiment at k {approx} 1. The noise-measured parameters can easily be obtained from measurements with an accuracy of {plus_minus}1% or less, and the precision of the Monte Carlo calculation of these quantities can also be {plus_minus}1% or less.

  9. Determinants of the range of drugs prescribed in general practice: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Bakker, Dinny H; Coffie, Dayline SV; Heerdink, Eibert R; van Dijk, Liset; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2007-01-01

    Background Current health policies assume that prescribing is more efficient and rational when general practitioners (GPs) work with a formulary or restricted drugs lists and thus with a limited range of drugs. Therefore we studied determinants of the range of drugs prescribed by general practitioners, distinguishing general GP-characteristics, characteristics of the practice setting, characteristics of the patient population and information sources used by GPs. Methods Secondary analysis was carried out on data from the Second Dutch Survey in General Practice. Data were available for 138 GPs working in 93 practices. ATC-coded prescription data from electronic medical records, census data and data from GP/practice questionnaires were analyzed with multilevel techniques. Results The average GP writes prescriptions for 233 different drugs, i.e. 30% of the available drugs on the market within one year. There is considerable variation between ATC main groups and subgroups and between GPs. GPs with larger patient lists, GPs with higher prescribing volumes and GPs who frequently receive representatives from the pharmaceutical industry have a broader range when controlled for other variables. Conclusion The range of drugs prescribed is a useful instrument for analysing GPs' prescribing behaviour. It shows both variation between GPs and between therapeutic groups. Statistically significant relationships found were in line with the hypotheses formulated, like the one concerning the influence of the industry. Further research should be done into the relationship between the range and quality of prescribing and the reasons why some GPs prescribe a greater number of different drugs than others. PMID:17711593

  10. Statistical model analysis of α -induced reaction cross sections of 64Zn at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, P.; Gyürky, Gy.; Fülöp, Zs.

    2017-01-01

    Background: α -nucleus potentials play an essential role in the calculation of α -induced reaction cross sections at low energies in the statistical model. Uncertainties of these calculations are related to ambiguities in the adjustment of the potential parameters to experimental elastic scattering angular distributions (typically at higher energies) and to the energy dependence of the effective α -nucleus potentials. Purpose: The present work studies cross sections of α -induced reactions for 64Zn at low energies and their dependence on the chosen input parameters of the statistical model calculations. The new experimental data from the recent Atomki experiments allow for a χ2-based estimate of the uncertainties of calculated cross sections at very low energies. Method: Recently measured data for the (α ,γ ), (α ,n ), and (α ,p ) reactions on 64Zn are compared to calculations in the statistical model. A survey of the parameter space of the widely used computer code talys is given, and the properties of the obtained χ2 landscape are discussed. Results: The best fit to the experimental data at low energies shows χ2/F ≈7.7 per data point, which corresponds to an average deviation of about 30% between the best fit and the experimental data. Several combinations of the various ingredients of the statistical model are able to reach a reasonably small χ2/F , not exceeding the best-fit result by more than a factor of 2. Conclusions: The present experimental data for 64Zn in combination with the statistical model calculations allow us to constrain the astrophysical reaction rate within about a factor of 2. However, the significant excess of χ2/F of the best fit from unity demands further improvement of the statistical model calculations and, in particular, the α -nucleus potential.

  11. Estimating Transitional Probabilities with Cross-Sectional Data to Assess Smoking Behavior Progression: A Validation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinguang; Lin, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective New analytical tools are needed to advance tobacco research, tobacco control planning and tobacco use prevention practice. In this study, we validated a method to extract information from cross-sectional survey for quantifying population dynamics of adolescent smoking behavior progression. Methods With a 3-stage 7-path model, probabilities of smoking behavior progression were estimated employing the Probabilistic Discrete Event System (PDES) method and the cross-sectional data from 1997-2006 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Validity of the PDES method was assessed using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and trends in smoking transition covering the period during which funding for tobacco control was cut substantively in 2003 in the United States. Results Probabilities for all seven smoking progression paths were successfully estimated with the PDES method and the NSDUH data. The absolute difference in the estimated probabilities between the two approaches varied from 0.002 to 0.076 (p>0.05 for all) and were highly correlated with each other (R2=0.998, p<0.01). Changes in the estimated transitional probabilities across the 1997-2006 reflected the 2003 funding cut for tobacco control. Conclusions The PDES method has validity in quantifying population dynamics of smoking behavior progression with cross-sectional survey data. The estimated transitional probabilities add new evidence supporting more advanced tobacco research, tobacco control planning and tobacco use prevention practice. This method can be easily extended to study other health risk behaviors. PMID:25279247

  12. Analysis of Charge Changing Cross Sections with the Glauber-Abrasion-Ablation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaishi, Tomohide; Hagino, Kouichi

    We calculate the charge changing cross sections (CCCS) for 28Si + 12C reaction using the Glauber-abrasion-ablation model, which considers a fragment-production in two stages, that is, a fragmentation and particle evaporations. We show that this model underestimates CCCS in a wide energy region if only the first stage is taken into account. This is the case both in the optical limit approximation (OLA) and in the beyond OLA calculation. This indicates that the second stage for the particle evaporation has to be taken into account in order to quantitatively estimate CCCS.

  13. Workplace Bullying and Mental Health: A Meta-Analysis on Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Data.

    PubMed

    Verkuil, Bart; Atasayi, Serpil; Molendijk, Marc L

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research has confirmed that workplace bullying is a source of distress and poor mental health. Here we summarize the cross-sectional and longitudinal literature on these associations. Systematic review and meta-analyses on the relation between workplace bullying and mental health. The cross-sectional data (65 effect sizes, N = 115.783) showed positive associations between workplace bullying and symptoms of depression (r = .28, 95% CI = .23-.34), anxiety (r = .34, 95% CI = .29-.40) and stress-related psychological complaints (r = .37, 95% CI = .30-.44). Pooling the literature that investigated longitudinal relationships (26 effect sizes, N = 54.450) showed that workplace bullying was related to mental health complaints over time (r = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.13-0.21). Interestingly, baseline mental health problems were associated with subsequent exposure to workplace bullying (r = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.10-0.27; 11 effect sizes, N = 27.028). All data were self-reported, raising the possibility of reporting- and response set bias. Workplace bullying is consistently, and in a bi-directional manner, associated with reduced mental health. This may call for intervention strategies against bullying at work.

  14. Workplace Bullying and Mental Health: A Meta-Analysis on Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A growing body of research has confirmed that workplace bullying is a source of distress and poor mental health. Here we summarize the cross-sectional and longitudinal literature on these associations. Methods Systematic review and meta-analyses on the relation between workplace bullying and mental health. Results The cross-sectional data (65 effect sizes, N = 115.783) showed positive associations between workplace bullying and symptoms of depression (r = .28, 95% CI = .23–.34), anxiety (r = .34, 95% CI = .29–.40) and stress-related psychological complaints (r = .37, 95% CI = .30–.44). Pooling the literature that investigated longitudinal relationships (26 effect sizes, N = 54.450) showed that workplace bullying was related to mental health complaints over time (r = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.13–0.21). Interestingly, baseline mental health problems were associated with subsequent exposure to workplace bullying (r = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.10–0.27; 11 effect sizes, N = 27.028). Limitations All data were self-reported, raising the possibility of reporting- and response set bias. Conclusions Workplace bullying is consistently, and in a bi-directional manner, associated with reduced mental health. This may call for intervention strategies against bullying at work. PMID:26305785

  15. Sensitivity analysis of neutron total and absorption cross sections within the optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigni, M. T.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Dietrich, F. S.

    2011-02-01

    Distinct maxima and minima in neutron total and absorption cross-section uncertainties when optical-model parameters are varied have been observed in large-scale covariance calculations. These features were seen over a wide mass range (20-210) and for energies up to 20 MeV. Here we investigate the physical origin of the observed patterns over an extended energy range (1 keV to 200 MeV). We have calculated the sensitivity of the cross sections for a specific nucleus (Fe56) to variations of the 15 parameters of a standard global optical potential parametrization, and have also carried out calculations for alternative global optical potentials over the original wide mass and energy ranges. We find that simple physical descriptions can be found in two energy ranges. Below approximately 100 keV, the patterns arise from the interplay of the s- and p-wave single-particle resonances. Above approximately 4 MeV, a single-phase-shift approximation (the Ramsauer model) describes the observed behavior. We discuss the potential importance of such sensitivity studies for further development of optical potentials.

  16. Ideal angle of syndesmotic screw fixation: A CT-based cross-sectional image analysis study.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Hwan; Choi, Won Seok; Choi, Gi Won; Kim, Hak Jun

    2017-09-06

    Without clear reference, the precision of syndesmotic screw placement cannot be guaranteed and malposition of these screws leads to poor results. Therefore, to prevent malpositioning of syndesmotic screws, an improved understanding of the orientation of tibiofibular syndesmosis is essential. We analyzed cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) scans of the foot and ankle to identify precise screw positions for the treatment of syndesmotic injuries. A total of 134 calcaneal fractures with intact tibiofibular syndesmosis were enrolled in this retrospective study. We measured the angle between the perpendicular line of the second proximal phalanx and the line start apex of the lateral cortex of the fibula bisecting the tibial incisura and crossing the center of the tibia in neutral ankle joints, with the second toe positioned anteriorly using a short leg splint. The second toe was used as the reference for clarity and applicability. The ideal angle of syndesmotic screw placement in cross-sectional CT images was 18.8±5.6° (mean±standard deviation) and did not differ according to independent variables (P>0.05). In neutral ankle joints with the second toe positioned anteriorly, the ideal angle of syndesmotic screw placement is 18.8°, which is less than that currently in used in conventional methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. K+ nucleus reaction and total cross sections: New analysis of transmission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Weiss, R.; Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Mardor, I.; Mardor, Y.; May-Tal Beck, S.; Piasetzky, E.; Yavin, A. I.; Bart, S.; Chrien, R. E.; Pile, P. H.; Sawafta, R.; Sutter, R. J.; Barakat, M.; Johnston, K.; Krauss, R. A.; Seyfarth, H.; Stearns, R. L.

    1997-03-01

    The attenuation cross sections measured in transmission experiments at the alternating-gradient synchrotron for K+ on 6Li, C, Si, and Ca at pL = 488, 531, 656, and 714 MeV/c are reanalyzed in order to derive total (σT) and reaction (σR) cross sections. The effect of plural (Molière) scattering is properly accounted for, leading to revised values of σT. We demonstrate the model dependence of these values, primarily due to the choice of K+ nuclear optical potential used to generate the necessary Coulomb-nuclear and nuclear elastic corrections. Values of σR are also derived, for the first time, from the same data and exhibit a remarkable degree of model independence. The derived values of σT and σR exceed those calculated by the first-order tρ optical potential for C, Si, and Ca, but not for 6Li, particularly at 656 and 714 MeV/c where the excess is 10-25%. Relative to 6Li, this excess is found to be nearly energy independent and its magnitude of 15-25% is not reproduced by any nuclear medium effect studied so far.

  18. Measurement and resonance analysis of the 237Np neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvár, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lossito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 237Np was measured between 0.7 and 500 eV at the CERN n_TOF facility using the 4π BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter. The experimental capture yield was extracted minimizing all the systematic uncertainties and was analyzed together with the most reliable transmission data available using the sammy code. The result is a complete set of individual as well as average resonance parameters [D0=0.56(2) eV, <Γγ>=40.9(18) meV, 104S0=0.98(6), R'=9.8(6) fm]. The capture cross section obtained in this work is in overall agreement with the evaluations and the data of Weston and Todd [Nucl. Sci. Eng. 79, 184 (1981)], thus showing sizable differences with respect to previous data from Scherbakov [J. Nucl. Sci. Technol. 42, 135 (2005)] and large discrepancies with data Kobayashi [J. Nucl. Sci. Technol.JNSTAX0022-313110.3327/jnst.39.111 39, 111 (2002)]. The results indicate that a new evaluation combining the present capture data with reliable transmission data would allow reaching an accuracy better than 4%, in line with the uncertainty requirements of the nuclear data community for the design and operation of current and future nuclear devices.

  19. A double fluorescence staining protocol to determine the cross-sectional area of myofibers using image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Fassel, T. A.; Schultz, E.; Greaser, M. L.; Cassens, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    A double fluorescence staining protocol was developed to facilitate computer based image analysis. Myofibers from experimentally treated (irradiated) and control growing turkey skeletal muscle were labeled with the anti-myosin antibody MF-20 and detected using fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC). Extracellular material was stained with concanavalin A (ConA)-Texas red. The cross-sectional area of the myofibers was determined by calculating the number of pixels (0.83 mu m(2)) overlying each myofiber after subtracting the ConA-Texas red image from the MF-20-FITC image for each region of interest. As expected, myofibers in the irradiated muscle were smaller (P < 0.05) than those in the non-irradiated muscle. This double fluorescence staining protocol combined with image analysis is accurate and less labor-intensive than classical procedures for determining the cross-sectional area of myofibers.

  20. Three-Dimensional Blood Vessel Segmentation and Centerline Extraction based on Two-Dimensional Cross-Section Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul Prasanna; Albregtsen, Fritz; Reimers, Martin; Edwin, Bjørn; Langø, Thomas; Elle, Ole Jakob

    2015-05-01

    The segmentation of tubular tree structures like vessel systems in volumetric datasets is of vital interest for many medical applications. In this paper we present a novel, semi-automatic method for blood vessel segmentation and centerline extraction, by tracking the blood vessel tree from a user-initiated seed point to the ends of the blood vessel tree. The novelty of our method is in performing only two-dimensional cross-section analysis for segmentation of the connected blood vessels. The cross-section analysis is done by our novel single-scale or multi-scale circle enhancement filter, used at the blood vessel trunk or bifurcation, respectively. The method was validated for both synthetic and medical images. Our validation has shown that the cross-sectional centerline error for our method is below 0.8 pixels and the Dice coefficient for our segmentation is 80% ± 2.7%. On combining our method with an optional active contour post-processing, the Dice coefficient for the resulting segmentation is found to be 94% ± 2.4%. Furthermore, by restricting the image analysis to the regions of interest and converting most of the three-dimensional calculations to two-dimensional calculations, the processing was found to be more than 18 times faster than Frangi vesselness with thinning, 8 times faster than user-initiated active contour segmentation with thinning and 7 times faster than our previous method.

  1. Neuropsychological Performance in Older Patients With Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis of Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Farzin; Kalkstein, Solomon; Moberg, Emily A.; Moberg, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive deficits are among the most reliable predictors of functional impairment in schizophrenia and a particular concern for older individuals with schizophrenia. Previous reviews have focused on the nature and course of cognitive impairments in younger cohorts, but a quantitative meta-analysis in older patients is pending. Method: A previously used search strategy identified studies assessing performance on tests of global cognition and specific neuropsychological domains in older patients with schizophrenia and age-matched comparison groups. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were included. Potential methodological, demographic, and clinical moderators were analyzed. Results: Twenty-nine cross-sectional (2110 patients, 1738 comparison subjects) and 14 longitudinal (954 patients) studies met inclusion criteria. Patients were approximately 65 years old, with 11 years of education, 53% male and 79% Caucasian. Longitudinal analysis (range 1–6 years) revealed homogeneity with small effect sizes (d = −0.097) being observed. Cross-sectional analyses revealed large and heterogeneous deficits in global cognition (d = −1.19) and on specific neuropsychological tests (d = −0.7 to −1.14). Moderator analysis revealed a significant role for demographic (age, sex, education, race) and clinical factors (diagnosis, inpatient status, age of onset, duration of illness, positive and negative symptomology). Medication status (medicated vs nonmedicated) and chlorpromazine equivalents were inconsequential, albeit underrepresented. Conclusions: Large and generalized cognitive deficits in older individuals with schizophrenia represent a robust finding paralleling impairments across the life span, but these deficits do not decline over a 1–6 year period. The importance of considering demographic and clinical moderators in cross-sectional analyses is highlighted. PMID:20547571

  2. Heavy ion induced mutations in mammalian cells: Cross sections and molecular analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, U.; Schmidt, P.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Our investigations of heavy ion-induced mutations in mammalian cells, which had been begun a few years ago, were systematically continued. For the first time, it was possible to cover a large LET range with a few kinds of ions. To do this, both UNILAC and SIS were used to yield comparable data for a large energy range. This is a necessary condition for a comprehensive description of the influence of such ion parameters as energy and LET. In these experiments, the induced resistance against the poison 6-thioguanin (6-TG), which is linked to the HPRT locus on the genome, is being used as mutation system. In addition to the mutation-induction cross-section measurements, the molecular changes of the DNA are being investigated by means of Multiplex PCR ('Polymerase Chain Reaction') gene amplification. From these experiments we expect further elucidation of the mutation-inducing mechanisms composing the biological action of heavy-ion radiation.

  3. Analysis of the nuclear dependence of the νμ charged-current inclusive cross section with MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Brian; Minerva Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Neutrino experiments use heavy nuclei (Fe, Pb, C) to achieve necessary statistics. However, the use of heavy nuclei exposes these experiments to the nuclear dependence of neutrino-nucleus cross sections, which are poorly known and difficult to model. The MINERvA (Main INjector ExpeRiment for ν-A), a few-GeV neutrino nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab, seeks to remedy the situation by directly studying the A-dependence of exclusive and inclusive channels. The MINERvA detector contains an 8 ton fully active fine-grained scintillator tracking core and targets of carbon, iron, lead, water and liquid helium which sit upstream of the tracking core. We present results from our first analysis using the nuclear targets: ratios of the νμ charged-current inclusive cross section in carbon, iron, lead and plastic.

  4. Analysis of the nuclear dependence of the νμ charged current inclusive cross section with MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransome, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    Neutrino experiments use heavy nuclei (Fe, Pb, C) to achieve necessary statistics. However, the use of heavy nuclei exposes these experiments to the nuclear dependence of neutrino-nucleus cross sections, which are poorly known and difficult to model. The MINERvA (Main INjector ExpeRiment for ?-A), a few-GeV neutrino nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab, seeks to remedy the situation by directly studying the A-dependence of exclusive and inclusive channels. The MINERvA detector contains an 8 ton fully active fine-grained scintillator tracking core and targets of carbon, iron, lead, water and liquid helium which sit upstream of the tracking core. We present results from our analysis using the nuclear targets: ratios of the ?? charged-current inclusive cross section in carbon, iron, lead and plastic scintillator (CH). Supported in part by the US National Science Foundation and the Dept. of Energy.

  5. Retrodeformable cross sections for 3-dimensional structural analysis, Ouachita orogen, Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. E.; Wiltschko, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    A fundamental tectonic problem is how deformation proceeds from hinterland to foreland in a fold and thrust belt (FTB). Wedge models explain many of the first-order observations found in most FTBs such as the internal deformation of material, thickening of hinterland, presence of a basal décollement, and an overall wedge shape that tapers to the foreland. These models currently have not been tested at the scale of the individual folds and faults. Moreover, most of the data available on, for instance, the sequence of events is best dated in the syntectonic sediments. Timing of uplift and motion of interior structures are not clear when using dates from these syntectonic sediments to some extent because an absolute connection between them is lacking. The purpose of this project is to develop a model for the evolution of the Ouachita orogen through the construction of a series of retrodeformable cross sections. A novel aspect of these cross sections is the combination of new and published thermal (i.e., illite ‘crystallinity’) and thermochronologic (i.e., zircon fission track) data collected at a variety of stratigraphic depths along the lines of section. These data will help to determine the cessation of thrust motion as well as the initial depth from which the thrust sheet emerged. An Ordovician Mazarn sample in the eastern exposed orogenic core has zircon grains with 55% reset fission track ages, whereas an overlying Ordovician Blakely sample about ~30 km to the southwest along strike has 15% being reset. Illite ‘crystallinity’ (IC) values indicate maximum burial metamorphism temperatures of anchizone (~250-350°C) coinciding with the location of the Ordovician Mazarn sample. Regionally, IC decreases from the culmination of the Benton Uplift and to the southwest along regional strike for samples that have similar stratigraphic age. These new timing and thermal constraints on an improved kinematic model are the necessary first steps in testing wedge models

  6. Tracing Developmental Changes through Conversation Analysis: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yo-An; Hellermann, John

    2014-01-01

    The descriptive focus of conversation analysis (CA) has not been considered optimal for second language (L2) acquisition research. Recently, however, some CA researchers have addressed the developmental agenda by examining longitudinal data (e.g., Brouwer, C., 2004; Ishida, M., 2009; Markee, N., 2008; Pekarek-Doehler, S., 2010). The present…

  7. Tracing Developmental Changes through Conversation Analysis: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yo-An; Hellermann, John

    2014-01-01

    The descriptive focus of conversation analysis (CA) has not been considered optimal for second language (L2) acquisition research. Recently, however, some CA researchers have addressed the developmental agenda by examining longitudinal data (e.g., Brouwer, C., 2004; Ishida, M., 2009; Markee, N., 2008; Pekarek-Doehler, S., 2010). The present…

  8. VELM61 and VELM22: Multigroup cross-section libraries for sodium-cooled reactor shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.Y.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1987-04-01

    Two coupled neutron and photon multigroup cross-section libraries, derived from ENDF/B-V nuclear data, are described. The energy group structures, 61n/23..gamma.. and 22n/10..gamma.., are subsets of the Vitamin-E 174n/38..gamma.. group structure, and are tailored to the iron and sodium resonances, windows, and capture gamma-ray spectra. Each of the two libraries are available in two formats, the AMPX master format and the ANISN format. Cross sections for all materials in the Vitamin-E library were collapsed using a standard energy weighting function, and in addition, several cross-section sets for each of the major constituents of commercial grade sodium, stainless steel (types 304 and 316), and carbon steel were derived using several problem-dependent weighting functions for averaging the fine groups. Effects of various group structures and weighting functions on the accuracy of the broad group libraries are studied by ANISN analysis of a typical sodium-iron shield configuration.

  9. Analysis and testing of a bistatic radar cross section measurement capability for the AFIT anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCool, Timothy D.

    1990-12-01

    This research effort examined the feasibility of performing bistatic radar cross section (RCS) measurements in the AFIT anechoic chamber. The capability was established to measure the bistatic RCS of a target versus frequency and versus target azimuth angle. In either case, one of three bistatic angles (angle between transmit and receive antennas) is available: 45, 90, and 135 degrees. Accurate bistatic RCS measurements were obtained using a CW radar and utilizing background subtraction, bistatic calibration, and software range gating. Simple targets were selected for validation purposes since their bistatic RCS could be predicted. These consisted of spheres and flat plates (square, triangle, and five sided). Several computer codes were utilized for system validation. Two codes based on the uniform theory of diffraction were used to predict the scattering from the flat plates. A program using a Mie series solution provided the exact scattering from the flat plates. A program using a Mie series solution provided the exact scattering for the spheres, which were used for both RCS predictions and system calibrations.

  10. Ego defense mechanisms in Pakistani medical students: a cross sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ego defense mechanisms (or factors), defined by Freud as unconscious resources used by the ego to reduce conflict between the id and superego, are a reflection of how an individual deals with conflict and stress. This study assesses the prevalence of various ego defense mechanisms employed by medical students of Karachi, which is a group with higher stress levels than the general population. Methods A questionnaire based cross-sectional study was conducted on 682 students from five major medical colleges of Karachi over 4 weeks in November 2006. Ego defense mechanisms were assessed using the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40) individually and as grouped under Mature, Immature, and Neurotic factors. Results Lower mean scores of Immature defense mechanisms (4.78) were identified than those for Neurotic (5.62) and Mature (5.60) mechanisms among medical students of Karachi. Immature mechanisms were more commonly employed by males whereas females employed more Neurotic mechanisms than males. Neurotic and Immature defenses were significantly more prevalent in first and second year students. Mature mechanisms were significantly higher in students enrolled in Government colleges than Private institutions (p < 0.05). Conclusions Immature defense mechanisms were less commonly employed than Neurotic and Mature mechanisms among medical students of Karachi. The greater employment of Neurotic defenses may reflect greater stress levels than the general population. Employment of these mechanisms was associated with female gender, enrollment in a private medical college, and students enrolled in the first 2 years of medical school. PMID:20109240

  11. Ego defense mechanisms in Pakistani medical students: a cross sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Maria A; Majeed, Hina; Khan, Tuba R; Khan, Anum B; Khalid, Salman; Khwaja, Nadia M; Khalid, Roha; Khan, Mohammad A; Rizqui, Ibrahim M; Jehan, Imtiaz

    2010-01-29

    Ego defense mechanisms (or factors), defined by Freud as unconscious resources used by the ego to reduce conflict between the id and superego, are a reflection of how an individual deals with conflict and stress. This study assesses the prevalence of various ego defense mechanisms employed by medical students of Karachi, which is a group with higher stress levels than the general population. A questionnaire based cross-sectional study was conducted on 682 students from five major medical colleges of Karachi over 4 weeks in November 2006. Ego defense mechanisms were assessed using the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40) individually and as grouped under Mature, Immature, and Neurotic factors. Lower mean scores of Immature defense mechanisms (4.78) were identified than those for Neurotic (5.62) and Mature (5.60) mechanisms among medical students of Karachi. Immature mechanisms were more commonly employed by males whereas females employed more Neurotic mechanisms than males. Neurotic and Immature defenses were significantly more prevalent in first and second year students. Mature mechanisms were significantly higher in students enrolled in Government colleges than Private institutions (p < 0.05). Immature defense mechanisms were less commonly employed than Neurotic and Mature mechanisms among medical students of Karachi. The greater employment of Neurotic defenses may reflect greater stress levels than the general population. Employment of these mechanisms was associated with female gender, enrollment in a private medical college, and students enrolled in the first 2 years of medical school.

  12. Predicting children's media use in the USA: differences in cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Jung; Bartolic, Silvia; Vandewater, Elizabeth A

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictors of children's media use in the USA, comparing cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Data come from Waves I and 2 of the Child Development Supplement (CDS-I; CDS-II), a nationally representative sample of American children aged 0-12 in 1997 and 5-18 in 2002. Twenty-four hour time use diaries are used to assess children's time spent with media (television, video games, computers, and reading). Predictors examined include socio-demographics, neighbourhood quality, family factors, and other media use. Ordinary least square (OLS) multiple regressions were performed by three age groups (preschoolers, early school age, and preadolescence). The findings suggest that neighbourhood quality, parental limits and family conflict are significant predictors of children's media use within time or over time, but the significance depends on the type of media and child's developmental stage. In addition, children's television viewing and reading habits are formed early in life and reinforced over time. This study is among the first to provide empirical evidence for the effect of early contextual factors on the life course of children's media use from a developmental perspective.

  13. International nurse recruitment and NHS vacancies: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Batata, Amber S

    2005-04-22

    BACKGROUND: Foreign-trained nurse recruits exceeded the number of new British-trained recruits on the UK nurse register for the first time in 2001. As the nursing shortage continues, health care service providers rely increasingly on overseas nurses to fill the void. Which areas benefit the most? And where would the NHS be without them? METHODS: Using cross-sectional data from the 2004 Nursing and Midwifery Council register, nurse resident postcodes are mapped to Strategic Health Authorities to see where foreign recruits locate and how they affect nurse shortages throughout the UK. RESULTS: Areas with the highest vacancy rates also have the highest representation of foreign recruits, with 24% of foreign-trained nurses in the UK residing in the London area and another 16% in the SouthEast (comparable numbers for British-trained nurses are 11% and 13%, respectively). Without foreign recruitment, vacancy rates could be up to five times higher (three times higher if only Filipino recruits remained). CONCLUSION: The UK heavily relies on foreign recruitment to fill vacancies, without which the staffing crisis would be far worse, particularly in high vacancy areas.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Nuclear Cross Sections in Monte Carlo Methods for Medical Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Chris; Kirk, Bernadette Lugue; Leal, Luiz C

    2007-01-01

    The data used in two Monte Carlo (MC) codes, EGSnrc and MCNPX were compared and a majority of the data used in MCNPX was imported into EGSnrc. The effects of merging the data of the two codes were then examined. MCNPX was run using the ITS electron step algorithm and the default data libraries mcplib04 and el03. Two runs are made with EGSnrc. The first simulation uses the default PEGS cross section library. The second simulation utilizes the data imported from MCNPX. All energy threshold values and physics options are made to be identical. A simple case was created in both EGSnrc and MCNPX that calculates the radial depth dose from an isotropically radiating disc in water for various incident, monoenergetic photon and electron energies. Initial results show that much less central processing unit (cpu) time is required by the EGSnrc code for simulations involving large numbers of particles, primarily electrons, when compared to MCNPX. The detailed particle history files - ptrac and iwatch - are investigated to compare the number and types of events being simulated in order to determine the reasons for the run time differences

  15. Plasma selenium levels and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese adults: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Yan, Chonghuai; Liu, Gang; Niu, Yixin; Zhang, Weiwei; Lu, Shuai; Li, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Hongmei; Ning, Guang; Fan, Jiangao; Qin, Li; Su, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Selenium exposure can induce liver insulin resistance and increased liver triglyceride concentrations in animals, which may link to an increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, epidemiological studies investigating the association between elevated plasma selenium levels and NAFLD were not available. We aimed to investigate the association of selenium levels with the prevalence of NAFLD in Chinese adults. This was a cross-sectional study of 8550 Chinese adults aged 40 yr or older in Shanghai, China. A questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, and laboratory tests were conducted. NAFLD was diagnosed by hepatic ultrasound after the exclusion of alcohol abuse and other liver diseases. Plasma selenium concentration was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The median concentration of plasma selenium was 213.0 μg/L. Elevated plasma selenium levels were associated with higher triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, post-loading plasma glucose, A1c, HOMA-IR, as well as ALT, AST and γ-GT (all P < 0.05). The odds ratios were substantially higher for NAFLD (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.13–2.18) in the highest selenium quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile, after adjustment for potential cofounder. The results of this study provided epidemiological evidence that increased plasma selenium level is associated with elevated prevalence of NAFLD. PMID:27853246

  16. Cross-sectional analysis of health-related quality of life and elements of yoga practice.

    PubMed

    Birdee, Gurjeet S; Ayala, Sujata G; Wallston, Kenneth A

    2017-01-31

    Mind-body practices such as yoga have been studied for their generally positive effects on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The association between how a person practices yoga and the person's HRQOL is not known. Yoga practitioners were sent invitations to participate in an online survey via email. Yoga characteristics, HRQOL, and other sociodemographics were collected. Analyses of data from 309 consenting responders evaluated associations between yoga practice characteristics (use of yoga tools, length of practice, location, method, etc.) and the 10-item PROMIS Global Health scale for both physical and mental health components. Multivariable regression models demonstrated higher mental health scores were associated with regular meditation practice, higher income, and the method of practicing in a community group class (versus one-on-one). Higher physical health scores were associated with length of lifetime practice, teacher status, Krishnamacharya yoga style, and practicing in a yoga school/studio (versus at home). Meditation practice in yoga is positively associated with mental health. Length of lifetime yoga practice was significantly associated with better physical health, suggesting yoga has a potential cumulative benefit over time. Different locations and methods of practice may be associated with varying effects on health outcomes. Comparative cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the variations in yoga practice are needed to further characterize health benefits of yoga.

  17. Brief Report: Multilevel Analysis of School Smoking Policy and Pupil Smoking Behaviour in Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiium, Nora; Burgess, Stephen; Moore, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    A multilevel analysis of cross-sectional data from a survey involving 1941 pupils (in grades 10 and 11) and policy indicators developed from interviews with staff from 45 secondary schools in Wales examined the hypotheses that pupil smoking prevalence would be associated with: restrictive staff and pupil smoking policies; dissemination of school…

  18. Brief Report: Multilevel Analysis of School Smoking Policy and Pupil Smoking Behaviour in Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiium, Nora; Burgess, Stephen; Moore, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    A multilevel analysis of cross-sectional data from a survey involving 1941 pupils (in grades 10 and 11) and policy indicators developed from interviews with staff from 45 secondary schools in Wales examined the hypotheses that pupil smoking prevalence would be associated with: restrictive staff and pupil smoking policies; dissemination of school…

  19. The association of nephrolithiasis with metabolic syndrome and its components: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Tze; Yang, Pei-Yu; Yang, Yu-Wen; Sun, Hung-Yu; Lin, I-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a worldwide disorder and also the major risk factor of several systemic diseases. Evidence identifying the association between metabolic syndrome and nephrolithiasis is lacking, especially in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between nephrolithiasis and metabolic syndrome and its components. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Health Examination Department of a medical center in Changhua, Taiwan, from January 2010 to December 2010. We reviewed the medical records of patients who had visited the Health Examination Center of Changhua Christian Hospital in 2010. A total of 3,886 individuals were enrolled. According to the exclusion criteria, those with an age <20 years and an abnormal renal function were excluded. A total of 3,793 subjects were included. All P-values are two tailed, and P<0.05 was defined as statistically significant. The results showed a correlation between nephrolithiasis and metabolic syndrome and its components. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) of metabolic syndrome for nephrolithiasis was 1.318 (1.083-1.604), with a P-value of 0.006. Larger waist circumference (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.338; 95% CI 1.098-1.631; P=0.004), higher blood pressure (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.333; 95% CI 1.106-1.607; P=0.003), and increased fasting glucose (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.276; 95% CI 1.054-1.546; P=0.01) were associated with nephrolithiasis. This is the first study in Taiwan to investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome and nephrolithiasis. The mechanism is controversial, and several hypotheses are offered. Adequate lifestyle modification and proper treatment in metabolic syndrome management may both contribute to nephrolithiasis prevention.

  20. Health literacy and quality of care of patients with diabetes: A cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuercher, Emilie; Diatta, Ibrahima Dina; Burnand, Bernard; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2017-06-01

    Limited health literacy (HL) may lead to poor health outcomes and inappropriate healthcare use, particularly in patients with chronic diseases. We aimed to assess the association between functional HL (FHL) and quality of care, as measured by process- and outcome-of-care indicators, in patients with diabetes. This cross-sectional study used data from the 2013 CoDiab-VD cohort follow-up, which included non-institutionalised adults with diabetes from canton of Vaud, Switzerland. Using self-administered questionnaires, we collected patients' characteristics, processes [annual HbA1C check, lipid profile, urine test, foot examination, influenza vaccination, eye examination (24 months), physical activity and diet recommendations] and outcomes of care (HbA1C knowledge, HbA1C value, SF-12, ADDQoL, PACIC, self-efficacy). A single validated screening question assessed FHL. Unadjusted and adjusted regression analyses were performed. Of 381 patients 52.5% (95%CI: 47.5%-57.5%), 40.7% (95%CI: 35.7%-45.6%) and 6.8% (95%CI: 4.3%-9.4%) reported high, medium and poor FHL, respectively. Significant associations were found for two out of seven outcomes of care; lower self-efficacy scores associated with medium and poor FHL (adjusted: β -0.6, 95%CI -0.9 to -0.2 and β -1.8, 95%CI -2.5 to -1.2, respectively), lower SF-12 mental scores associated with poor FHL (adjusted: β -8.4, 95%CI -12.5 to -4.2). This study found few outcomes of care associated with FHL. Further exploration of the impact of limited HL on quality of care indicators will help tailor initiatives - both on patients' and providers' side - to improve diabetes care. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 2005 cross section analysis and recommendations for further studies at Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    On September 8-9, 2005, representatives of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), and Argonne National Laboratory met at the KDHE's offices in Topeka to review the status of the CCC/USDA's environmental activities in Kansas. A key CCC/USDA goal for this meeting was to discuss the recent (Phase III) environmental studies performed by Argonne at Everest, Kansas, and to obtain KDHE input on the selection of possible remedial approaches to be examined as part of the Corrective Action Study (CAS) for this site. Argonne distributed a brief Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) to the CCC/USDA and the KDHE before the meeting to facilitate the intended pre-CAS discussions. As a result of the September meeting, the KDHE recommended several additional activities for the Everest site, for further assistance in identifying and evaluating remedial alternatives for the CAS. The requested actions include the following: (1) Construction of one or more additional, strategically located interpretive cross sections to improve the depiction of the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater and contaminant movement along the apparent main plume migration pathway to the north-northwest of the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) Development of technical recommendations for a stepwise pumping study of the Everest aquifer unit in the area near and to the north of the Nigh property. (3) Identification of potential locations for several additional monitoring wells, to better constrain the apparent western and northwestern margins of the existing groundwater plume. This report presents an update on efforts of the CCC/USDA and Argonne to address the KDHE concerns, and it proposes several additional actions for consideration.

  2. Risk of child obesity from parental obesity: analysis of repeat national cross-sectional surveys.

    PubMed

    McLoone, Philip; Morrison, David S

    2014-04-01

    To estimate the potential to reduce childhood obesity through targeted interventions of overweight households. Cross-sectional nationally representative samples of the Scottish population. Households in Scotland during 2008 and 2009. A total of 1651 households with parents and children aged 2-15 years. The WHO cut-off points for adult body mass index (BMI): overweight (25 to <30 kg/m2) and obese (≥30 kg/m2). Overweight and obesity in childhood respectively defined as a BMI 85th to <95th percentile and ≥95th percentile based on 1990 reference centiles. Thirty-two percent (600/1849) of children and 75% (966/1290) of adults were overweight or obese. Seventy-five percent (1606/2128) of all children lived with a parent who was overweight or obese. Among obese children, 58% (185/318) lived with an obese parent. The population attributable risk percentage of child obesity associated with parental obesity was 32.5%. Targeting obese households would require substantial falls in adult weight and need to reach 38% of all children; it might achieve a reduction in the prevalence of childhood obesity of 14% in these households (from 26% to 12%). Targeting parents with BMI ≥ 40 might reduce the overall prevalence of child obesity by 9%. Such an intervention would require large weight loss, consistent with approaches used for morbidly obese adults; it would involve 4% of all children and lead to a reduction in the prevalence of obesity in these households from 57% to 16%. Family-based interventions for obesity would be most efficiently targeted at obese children whose parents are morbidly obese.

  3. Individual and interpersonal triggers to quit smoking in China: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Im, Pek Kei; McNeill, Ann; Thompson, Mary E.; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Xu, Steve; Quah, Anne C. K.; Jiang, Yuan; Shahab, Lion

    2015-01-01

    Aims To determine the most prominent individual and interpersonal triggers to quit smoking in China and their associations with socio-demographic characteristics. Methods Data come from Waves 1-3 (2006-2009) of the ITC China Survey, analysed cross-sectionally as person-waves (N=14,358). Measures included socio-demographic and smoking characteristics. Those who quit between waves (4.3%) were asked about triggers that “very much” led them to stop smoking, and continuing smokers about triggers that “very much” made them think about quitting. Triggers covered individual (personal health concerns, cigarette price, smoking restrictions, advertisements, warning labels) and interpersonal factors (family/societal disapproval of smoking, setting an example to children, concerns about second-hand smoke). Results Over a third of respondents (34.9%) endorsed at least one trigger strongly; quitters were more likely than smokers to mention any trigger. While similar proportions of smokers endorsed individual (24.4%) and interpersonal triggers (24.0%), quitters endorsed more individual (61.1%) than interpersonal (48.3%) triggers. However, the most common triggers (‘personal health concerns’; ‘setting an example to children’) were the same, endorsed by two-thirds of quitters and a quarter of smokers, as were the least common triggers (‘warning labels’; ‘cigarette price’), endorsed by one in ten quitters and one in twenty smokers. Lower dependence among smokers and greater education among all respondents were associated with endorsing any trigger. Conclusions Individual rather than interpersonal triggers appear more important for quitters. Major opportunities to motivate quit attempts are missed in China, particularly with regard to taxation and risk communication. Interventions need to focus on more dependent and less-educated smokers. PMID:25888422

  4. The association of nephrolithiasis with metabolic syndrome and its components: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Tze; Yang, Pei-Yu; Yang, Yu-Wen; Sun, Hung-Yu; Lin, I-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a worldwide disorder and also the major risk factor of several systemic diseases. Evidence identifying the association between metabolic syndrome and nephrolithiasis is lacking, especially in Taiwan. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the association between nephrolithiasis and metabolic syndrome and its components. Design and setting This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Health Examination Department of a medical center in Changhua, Taiwan, from January 2010 to December 2010. Methods We reviewed the medical records of patients who had visited the Health Examination Center of Changhua Christian Hospital in 2010. A total of 3,886 individuals were enrolled. According to the exclusion criteria, those with an age <20 years and an abnormal renal function were excluded. A total of 3,793 subjects were included. All P-values are two tailed, and P<0.05 was defined as statistically significant. Results The results showed a correlation between nephrolithiasis and metabolic syndrome and its components. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) of metabolic syndrome for nephrolithiasis was 1.318 (1.083–1.604), with a P-value of 0.006. Larger waist circumference (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.338; 95% CI 1.098–1.631; P=0.004), higher blood pressure (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.333; 95% CI 1.106–1.607; P=0.003), and increased fasting glucose (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.276; 95% CI 1.054–1.546; P=0.01) were associated with nephrolithiasis. Conclusion This is the first study in Taiwan to investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome and nephrolithiasis. The mechanism is controversial, and several hypotheses are offered. Adequate lifestyle modification and proper treatment in metabolic syndrome management may both contribute to nephrolithiasis prevention. PMID:28123300

  5. Cross-sectional analysis of patient phone calls to an inflammatory bowel disease clinic

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Yarur, Andres J.; Diaz, Liege; Simmons, Okeefe L.; Sussman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) require close follow up and frequently utilize healthcare services. We aimed to identify the main reasons that prompted patient calls to gastroenterology providers and further characterize the “frequent callers”. Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study included all phone calls registered in medical records of IBD patients during 2012. Predictive variables included demographics, psychiatric history, IBD phenotype, disease complications and medical therapies. Primary outcome was the reason for call (symptoms, medication refill, procedures and appointment issues). Secondary outcome was the frequency of changes in management prompted by the call. Results 209 patients participated in 526 calls. The mean number of calls per patient was 2.5 (range 0-27); 49 (23.4%) patients met the criterion of “frequent caller”. Frequent callers made or received 75.9% of all calls. Crohn’s disease, anxiety, extra-intestinal manifestations and high sedimentation rate were significantly associated with higher call volume. 85.7% of frequent callers had at least one call that prompted a therapeutic intervention, compared to 18.9% of non-frequent callers (P<0.001). The most common interventions were ordering laboratory or imaging studies (15.4%), dose adjustments (12.1%), changes in medication class (8.4%), and expediting clinic visits (8.4%). Conclusion Most phone calls originated from a minority of patients. Repeated calling by the same patient and new onset of gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI symptoms were important factors predicting the order of diagnostic modalities or therapeutic changes in care. Triaging calls to IBD healthcare providers for patients more likely to require a change in management may improve healthcare delivery. PMID:26126710

  6. Sodium and potassium urinary excretion and dietary intake: a cross-sectional analysis in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Carla; Abreu, Sandra; Padrão, Patrícia; Pinho, Olívia; Graça, Pedro; Breda, João; Santos, Rute; Moreira, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension is the leading cause for heart disease and stroke, for mortality and morbidity worldwide, and a high sodium-to-potassium intake ratio is considered a stronger risk factor for hypertension than sodium alone. Objective This study aims to evaluate sodium and potassium urinary excretion, and assess the food sources of these nutrients in a sample of Portuguese adolescents. Design A cross-sectional study with a sample of 250 Portuguese adolescents. Sodium and potassium excretion were measured by one 24-h urinary collection, and the coefficient of creatinine was used to validate completeness of urine collections. Dietary sources of sodium and potassium were assessed using a 24-h dietary recall. Results Valid urine collections were provided by 200 adolescents (118 girls) with a median age of 14.0 in both sexes (p=0.295). Regarding sodium, the mean urinary excretion was 3,725 mg/day in boys and 3,062 mg/day in girls (p<0.01), and 9.8% of boys and 22% of girls met the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for sodium intake. Concerning potassium, the mean urinary excretion was 2,237 mg/day in boys and 1,904 mg/day in girls (p<0.01), and 6.1% of boys and 1.7% of girls met the WHO recommendations for potassium intake. Major dietary sources for sodium intake were cereal and cereal products (41%), meat products (16%), and milk and milk products (11%); and for potassium intake, main sources were milk and milk products (21%), meat products (17%), and vegetables (15%). Conclusions Adolescents had a high-sodium and low-potassium diet, well above the WHO recommendations. Health promotion interventions are needed in order to decrease sodium and increase potassium intake. PMID:27072344

  7. Which adults in the Paris metropolitan area have never been tested for HIV? A 2010 multilevel, cross-sectional, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Massari, Véronique; Lapostolle, Annabelle; Grupposo, Marie-Catherine; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Costagliola, Dominique; Chauvin, Pierre

    2015-07-22

    Despite the widespread offer of free HIV testing in France, the proportion of people who have never been tested remains high. The objective of this study was to identify, in men and women separately, the various factors independently associated with no lifetime HIV testing. We used multilevel logistic regression models on data from the SIRS cohort, which included 3006 French-speaking adults as a representative sample of the adult population in the Paris metropolitan area in 2010. The lifetime absence of any HIV testing was studied in relation to individual demographic and socioeconomic factors, psychosocial characteristics, sexual biographies, HIV prevention behaviors, attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), and certain neighborhood characteristics. In 2010, in the Paris area, men were less likely to have been tested for HIV at least once during their lifetime than women. In multivariate analysis, in both sexes, never having been tested was significantly associated with an age younger or older than the middle-age group (30-44 years), a low education level, a low self-perception of HIV risk, not knowing any PLWHA, a low lifetime number of couple relationships, and the absence of any history of STIs. In women, other associated factors were not having a child < 20 years of age, not having additional health insurance, having had no or only one sexual partner in the previous 5 years, living in a cohabiting couple or having no relationship at the time of the survey, and a feeling of belonging to a community. Men with specific health insurance for low-income individuals were less likely to have never been tested, and those with a high stigma score towards PLWHA were more likely to be never-testers. Our study also found neighborhood differences in the likelihood of men never having been tested, which was, at least partially, explained by the neighborhood proportion of immigrants. In contrast, in women, no contextual variable was significantly associated with

  8. A one- and two-dimensional cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty path of the AARE (Advanced Analysis for Reactor Engineering) modular code system

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.W.; Dudziak, D.J.; Higgs, C.E.; Stepanek, J.

    1988-01-01

    AARE, a code package to perform Advanced Analysis for Reactor Engineering, is a linked modular system for fission reactor core and shielding, as well as fusion blanket, analysis. Its cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty path presently includes the cross-section processing and reformatting code TRAMIX, cross-section homogenization and library reformatting code MIXIT, the 1-dimensional transport code ONEDANT, the 2-dimensional transport code TRISM, and the 1- and 2- dimensional cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty code SENSIBL. IN the present work, a short description of the whole AARE system is given, followed by a detailed description of the cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty path. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  9. The multi-dimensional neighbourhood and health: a cross-sectional analysis of the Scottish Household Survey, 2001.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Alison; Kearns, Ade

    2006-03-01

    Neighbourhoods may influence the health of individual residents in different ways: via the social and physical environment, as well as through facilities and services. Not all factors may be equally important for all population subgroups. A cross-sectional analysis of the Scottish Household Survey 2001 examined a range of neighbourhood factors for links with three health outcomes and two health-related behaviours. The results support the hypothesis that the neighbourhood has a multi-dimensional impact on health. There was also some evidence that the relationship between neighbourhood factors and health varied according to the population subgroup, although not in a consistent manner.

  10. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  11. R-MATRIX ANALYSIS of 232Th NEUTRON TRANSMISSIONS and CAPTURE CROSS SECTIONS in the ENERGY RANGE THERMAL to 4 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-01-01

    Neutron resonance parameters of 232Th were obtained from the Reich-Moore SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) by Olsen in 1981, along with the high-resolution neutron capture measurements performed in 2005 at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA, Belgium) by Schillebeeckx and at the n-TOF facility (CERN, Switzerland) by Aerts. The ORELA data were analyzed previously by Olsen with the Breit-Wigner multilevel code SIOB, and the results were used in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. In the new analysis of the Olsen neutron transmissions by the modern computer code SAMMY, better accuracy is obtained for the resonance parameters by including in the experimental data base the recent experimental neutron capture data. The experimental data base and the method of analysis are described in the report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared to the experimental values. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters. The new evaluation results in a decrease in the capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks.

  12. Cost analysis of multiple sclerosis in Brazil: a cross-sectional multicenter study.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nilceia Lopes; Takemoto, Maira L S; Damasceno, Alfredo; Fragoso, Yara D; Finkelsztejn, Alessandro; Becker, Jefferson; Gonçalves, Marcus V M; Tilbery, Charles; de Oliveira, Enedina M L; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Boulos, Fernanda C

    2016-03-24

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system disease associated with irreversible progression of disability, which imposes a substantial socioeconomic onus. The objective of this study was to determine the economic impact of multiple sclerosis from the Brazilian household and healthcare system perspectives. Secondary objectives were to assess the impact of fatigue on daily living and health-related quality of life (HRQL) of MS patients. This is a cross-sectional study in which Brazilian eligible patients attending eight major MS specialized sites answered an interview capturing data on demographics, disease characteristics and severity, comorbidities, resource utilization, fatigue, utilities and health-related quality of life from November/2011 to May/2012 . Costs were assessed considering a prevalence-based approach within 1 year of resource consumption and were estimated by multiplying the amount used by the corresponding unit cost. Patients were classified as having mild, moderate or severe disability according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). In total, 210 patients who met eligibility criteria were included, 40 % had mild, 43 % moderate and 16 % severe disability; disability level was missing for 1 %. The average total direct cost per year was USD 19,012.32 (SD = 10,465.96), and no statistically significant differences were not observed according to MS disability level (p = 0.398). The use of disease modifying therapies (DMTs) corresponded to the majority of direct expenditures, especially among those patients with lower levels of disability, representing around 90 % of total costs for mild and moderate MS patients. It was also observed that expenses with medical (except DMTs) and non-medical resources are higher among patients with more severe disease. Worsening disability also had an important influence on health-related quality of life and self-perceived impact of fatigue on daily living. Our data demonstrates the

  13. A cross-sectional retrospective analysis of the regionalization of complex surgery.

    PubMed

    Studnicki, James; Craver, Christopher; Blanchette, Christopher M; Fisher, John W; Shahbazi, Sara

    2014-08-16

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system has assigned a surgical complexity level to each of its medical centers by specifying requirements to perform standard, intermediate or complex surgical procedures. No study to similarly describe the patterns of relative surgical complexity among a population of United States (U.S) civilian hospitals has been completed. single year, retrospective, cross-sectional. the study used Florida Inpatient Discharge Data from short-term acute hospitals for calendar year 2009. Two hundred hospitals with 2,542,920 discharges were organized into four quartiles (Q 1, 2, 3, 4) based on the number of complex procedures per hospital. The VHA surgical complexity matrix was applied to assign relative complexity to each procedure. The Clinical Classification Software (CCS) system assigned complex procedures to clinically meaningful groups. For outcome comparisons, propensity score matching methods adjusted for the surgical procedure, age, gender, race, comorbidities, mechanical ventilator use and type of admission. in-hospital mortality and length-of-stay (LOS). Only 5.2% of all inpatient discharges involve a complex procedure. The highest volume complex procedure hospitals (Q4) have 49.8% of all discharges but 70.1% of all complex procedures. In the 133,436 discharges with a primary complex procedure, 374 separate specific procedures are identified, only about one third of which are performed in the lowest volume complex procedure (Q1) hospitals. Complex operations of the digestive, respiratory, integumentary and musculoskeletal systems are the least concentrated and proportionately more likely to occur in the lower volume hospitals. Operations of the cardiovascular system and certain technology dependent miscellaneous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are the most concentrated in high volume hospitals. Organ transplants are only done in Q4 hospitals. There were no significant differences in in-hospital mortality rates and the

  14. A cross-sectional retrospective analysis of the regionalization of complex surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system has assigned a surgical complexity level to each of its medical centers by specifying requirements to perform standard, intermediate or complex surgical procedures. No study to similarly describe the patterns of relative surgical complexity among a population of United States (U.S) civilian hospitals has been completed. Methods Design: single year, retrospective, cross-sectional. Setting/Participants: the study used Florida Inpatient Discharge Data from short-term acute hospitals for calendar year 2009. Two hundred hospitals with 2,542,920 discharges were organized into four quartiles (Q 1, 2, 3, 4) based on the number of complex procedures per hospital. The VHA surgical complexity matrix was applied to assign relative complexity to each procedure. The Clinical Classification Software (CCS) system assigned complex procedures to clinically meaningful groups. For outcome comparisons, propensity score matching methods adjusted for the surgical procedure, age, gender, race, comorbidities, mechanical ventilator use and type of admission. Main Outcome Measures: in-hospital mortality and length-of-stay (LOS). Results Only 5.2% of all inpatient discharges involve a complex procedure. The highest volume complex procedure hospitals (Q4) have 49.8% of all discharges but 70.1% of all complex procedures. In the 133,436 discharges with a primary complex procedure, 374 separate specific procedures are identified, only about one third of which are performed in the lowest volume complex procedure (Q1) hospitals. Complex operations of the digestive, respiratory, integumentary and musculoskeletal systems are the least concentrated and proportionately more likely to occur in the lower volume hospitals. Operations of the cardiovascular system and certain technology dependent miscellaneous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are the most concentrated in high volume hospitals. Organ transplants are only done in Q4 hospitals

  15. Association Between Diabetes-related Knowledge and Medication Adherence: Results From Cross-sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Saeed Ur Rashid; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Bashir, Sajid; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-11-01

    Context • Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing health problem worldwide. To have optimal glycemic control, T2DM patients must have sufficient diabetes-related knowledge and must adhere positively and closely to a prescribed regimen. Medication adherence is a key determinant of therapeutic success in patients with T2DM. However, adherence to medications among T2DM patients varies widely, with estimates ranging from 36%-94%. Objective • The purpose of the study was to assess the level of and the association between diabetes-related knowledge and medication adherence among T2DM patients in Pakistan. Design • The research team conducted a cross-sectional survey. Setting • The study was carried out at the outpatient clinic of a public-sector teaching hospital in Sargodha, Pakistan. Participants • Participants were 392 diabetic patients of the hospital. Outcome Measures • In addition to the collection of data on the demographic and disease-related characteristics of the participants, the Urdu versions of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-U) and the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test (MDKT-U) were used to assess medication adherence and diabetes-related knowledge, respectively. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the demographic and disease characteristics, whereas a Spearman rank correlation was used to measure the association between medication adherence and diabetes-related knowledge. Results • The mean age of the participants was 50.77 ± 9.671 y, with males being the dominant gender (n = 222, 56.6%). The mean duration of diabetes was 5.58 ± 4.09 y. Of the 392 patients, 245 (62.5%) had an average knowledge of diabetes. Furthermore, 282 (71.9%) were categorized as showing poor adherence. A significant but weak positive correlation between diabetes-related knowledge and medication adherence was found for the study (r = 0.036, P < .05). Conclusions • Although diabetes-related knowledge among the patients was average, the

  16. Trial Publication after Registration in ClinicalTrials.Gov: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S.; Mulvey, Gregory K.; Hines, Elizabeth M.; Nissen, Steven E.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2009-01-01

    Background ClinicalTrials.gov is a publicly accessible, Internet-based registry of clinical trials managed by the US National Library of Medicine that has the potential to address selective trial publication. Our objectives were to examine completeness of registration within ClinicalTrials.gov and to determine the extent and correlates of selective publication. Methods and Findings We examined reporting of registration information among a cross-section of trials that had been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov after December 31, 1999 and updated as having been completed by June 8, 2007, excluding phase I trials. We then determined publication status among a random 10% subsample by searching MEDLINE using a systematic protocol, after excluding trials completed after December 31, 2005 to allow at least 2 y for publication following completion. Among the full sample of completed trials (n = 7,515), nearly 100% reported all data elements mandated by ClinicalTrials.gov, such as intervention and sponsorship. Optional data element reporting varied, with 53% reporting trial end date, 66% reporting primary outcome, and 87% reporting trial start date. Among the 10% subsample, less than half (311 of 677, 46%) of trials were published, among which 96 (31%) provided a citation within ClinicalTrials.gov of a publication describing trial results. Trials primarily sponsored by industry (40%, 144 of 357) were less likely to be published when compared with nonindustry/nongovernment sponsored trials (56%, 110 of 198; p<0.001), but there was no significant difference when compared with government sponsored trials (47%, 57 of 122; p = 0.22). Among trials that reported an end date, 75 of 123 (61%) completed prior to 2004, 50 of 96 (52%) completed during 2004, and 62 of 149 (42%) completed during 2005 were published (p = 0.006). Conclusions Reporting of optional data elements varied and publication rates among completed trials registered within ClinicalTrials.gov were low

  17. Trial publication after registration in ClinicalTrials.Gov: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph S; Mulvey, Gregory K; Hines, Elizabeth M; Nissen, Steven E; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2009-09-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov is a publicly accessible, Internet-based registry of clinical trials managed by the US National Library of Medicine that has the potential to address selective trial publication. Our objectives were to examine completeness of registration within ClinicalTrials.gov and to determine the extent and correlates of selective publication. We examined reporting of registration information among a cross-section of trials that had been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov after December 31, 1999 and updated as having been completed by June 8, 2007, excluding phase I trials. We then determined publication status among a random 10% subsample by searching MEDLINE using a systematic protocol, after excluding trials completed after December 31, 2005 to allow at least 2 y for publication following completion. Among the full sample of completed trials (n = 7,515), nearly 100% reported all data elements mandated by ClinicalTrials.gov, such as intervention and sponsorship. Optional data element reporting varied, with 53% reporting trial end date, 66% reporting primary outcome, and 87% reporting trial start date. Among the 10% subsample, less than half (311 of 677, 46%) of trials were published, among which 96 (31%) provided a citation within ClinicalTrials.gov of a publication describing trial results. Trials primarily sponsored by industry (40%, 144 of 357) were less likely to be published when compared with nonindustry/nongovernment sponsored trials (56%, 110 of 198; p<0.001), but there was no significant difference when compared with government sponsored trials (47%, 57 of 122; p = 0.22). Among trials that reported an end date, 75 of 123 (61%) completed prior to 2004, 50 of 96 (52%) completed during 2004, and 62 of 149 (42%) completed during 2005 were published (p = 0.006). Reporting of optional data elements varied and publication rates among completed trials registered within ClinicalTrials.gov were low. Without greater attention to reporting of all data elements

  18. Second premolar agenesis is associated with mandibular form: a geometric morphometric analysis of mandibular cross-sections

    PubMed Central

    Bertl, Michael H; Bertl, Kristina; Wagner, Manuel; Gahleitner, André; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Ulm, Christian; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare mandibular form (i.e., size and shape) between patients with agenesis of the lower second premolar (P2) and a control group with no agenesis. Three hypotheses were tested: (H1) agenesis causes a change in mandibular morphology because of inadequate alveolar ridge development in the area of the missing tooth (mandibular plasticity); (H2) agenesis is caused by spatial limitations within the mandible (dental plasticity); and (H3) common genetic/epigenetic factors cause agenesis and affect mandibular form (pleiotropy). A geometric morphometric analysis was applied to cross-sectional images of computed tomography (CT) scans of three matched groups (n=50 each): (1) regularly erupted P2; (2) agenesis of P2 and the primary second molar in situ; and (3) agenesis of P2 and the primary second molar missing for >3 months. Cross-sections of the three areas of interest (first premolar, P2, first molar) were digitized with 23 landmarks and superimposed by a generalized Procrustes analysis. On average, the mandibular cross-sections were narrower and shorter in patients with P2 agenesis compared with that in the control group. Both agenesis groups featured a pronounced submandibular fossa. These differences extended at least one tooth beyond the agenesis-affected region. Taken together with the large interindividual variation that resulted in massively overlapping group distributions, these findings support genetic and/or epigenetic pleiotropy (H3) as the most likely origin of the observed covariation between mandibular form and odontogenesis. Clinically, reduced dimensions and greater variability of mandibular form, as well as a pronounced submandibular fossa, should be expected during the treatment planning of patients with P2 agenesis. PMID:27857074

  19. Second premolar agenesis is associated with mandibular form: a geometric morphometric analysis of mandibular cross-sections.

    PubMed

    Bertl, Michael H; Bertl, Kristina; Wagner, Manuel; Gahleitner, André; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Ulm, Christian; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2016-12-16

    The aim of this study was to compare mandibular form (i.e., size and shape) between patients with agenesis of the lower second premolar (P2) and a control group with no agenesis. Three hypotheses were tested: (H1) agenesis causes a change in mandibular morphology because of inadequate alveolar ridge development in the area of the missing tooth (mandibular plasticity); (H2) agenesis is caused by spatial limitations within the mandible (dental plasticity); and (H3) common genetic/epigenetic factors cause agenesis and affect mandibular form (pleiotropy). A geometric morphometric analysis was applied to cross-sectional images of computed tomography (CT) scans of three matched groups (n=50 each): (1) regularly erupted P2; (2) agenesis of P2 and the primary second molar in situ; and (3) agenesis of P2 and the primary second molar missing for >3 months. Cross-sections of the three areas of interest (first premolar, P2, first molar) were digitized with 23 landmarks and superimposed by a generalized Procrustes analysis. On average, the mandibular cross-sections were narrower and shorter in patients with P2 agenesis compared with that in the control group. Both agenesis groups featured a pronounced submandibular fossa. These differences extended at least one tooth beyond the agenesis-affected region. Taken together with the large interindividual variation that resulted in massively overlapping group distributions, these findings support genetic and/or epigenetic pleiotropy (H3) as the most likely origin of the observed covariation between mandibular form and odontogenesis. Clinically, reduced dimensions and greater variability of mandibular form, as well as a pronounced submandibular fossa, should be expected during the treatment planning of patients with P2 agenesis.

  20. Exploring the Potential of a School Impact on Pupil Weight Status: Exploratory Factor Analysis and Repeat Cross-Sectional Study of the National Child Measurement Programme

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew James; Wyatt, Katrina M.; Williams, Craig A.; Logan, Stuart; Henley, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Schools are common sites for obesity prevention interventions. Although many theories suggest that the school context influences weight status, there has been little empirical research. The objective of this study was to explore whether features of the school context were consistently and meaningfully associated with pupil weight status (overweight or obese). Exploratory factor analysis of routinely collected data on 319 primary schools in Devon, England, was used to identify possible school-based contextual factors. Repeated cross-sectional multilevel analysis of five years (2006/07-2010/11) of data from the National Child Measurement Programme was then used to test for consistent and meaningful associations. Four school-based contextual factors were derived which ranked schools according to deprivation, location, resource and prioritisation of physical activity. None of which were meaningfully and consistently associated with pupil weight status, across the five years. The lack of consistent associations between the factors and pupil weight status suggests that the school context is not inherently obesogenic. In contrast, incorporating findings from education research indicates that schools may be equalising weight status, and obesity prevention research, policy and practice might need to address what is happening outside schools and particularly during the school holidays. PMID:26700027

  1. Cardiovascular risk profile: cross-sectional analysis of motivational determinants, physical fitness and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Sassen, Barbara; Kok, Gerjo; Schaalma, Herman; Kiers, Henri; Vanhees, Luc

    2010-10-07

    Cardiovascular risk factors are associated with physical fitness and, to a lesser extent, physical activity. Lifestyle interventions directed at enhancing physical fitness in order to decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases should be extended. To enable the development of effective lifestyle interventions for people with cardiovascular risk factors, we investigated motivational, social-cognitive determinants derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and other relevant social psychological theories, next to physical activity and physical fitness. In the cross-sectional Utrecht Police Lifestyle Intervention Fitness and Training (UP-LIFT) study, 1298 employees (aged 18 to 62) were asked to complete online questionnaires regarding social-cognitive variables and physical activity. Cardiovascular risk factors and physical fitness (peak VO2) were measured. For people with one or more cardiovascular risk factors (78.7% of the total population), social-cognitive variables accounted for 39% (p < .001) of the variance in the intention to engage in physical activity for 60 minutes every day. Important correlates of intention to engage in physical activity were attitude (beta = .225, p < .001), self-efficacy (beta = .271, p < .001), descriptive norm (beta = .172, p < .001) and barriers (beta = -.169, p < .01). Social-cognitive variables accounted for 52% (p < .001) of the variance in physical active behaviour (being physical active for 60 minutes every day). The intention to engage in physical activity (beta = .469, p < .001) and self-efficacy (beta = .243, p < .001) were, in turn, important correlates of physical active behavior.In addition to the prediction of intention to engage in physical activity and physical active behavior, we explored the impact of the intensity of physical activity. The intensity of physical activity was only significantly related to physical active behavior (beta = .253, p < .01, R2 = .06, p < .001). An important goal of our study was to

  2. Cardiovascular risk profile: Cross-sectional analysis of motivational determinants, physical fitness and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular risk factors are associated with physical fitness and, to a lesser extent, physical activity. Lifestyle interventions directed at enhancing physical fitness in order to decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases should be extended. To enable the development of effective lifestyle interventions for people with cardiovascular risk factors, we investigated motivational, social-cognitive determinants derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and other relevant social psychological theories, next to physical activity and physical fitness. Methods In the cross-sectional Utrecht Police Lifestyle Intervention Fitness and Training (UP-LIFT) study, 1298 employees (aged 18 to 62) were asked to complete online questionnaires regarding social-cognitive variables and physical activity. Cardiovascular risk factors and physical fitness (peak VO2) were measured. Results For people with one or more cardiovascular risk factors (78.7% of the total population), social-cognitive variables accounted for 39% (p < .001) of the variance in the intention to engage in physical activity for 60 minutes every day. Important correlates of intention to engage in physical activity were attitude (beta = .225, p < .001), self-efficacy (beta = .271, p < .001), descriptive norm (beta = .172, p < .001) and barriers (beta = -.169, p < .01). Social-cognitive variables accounted for 52% (p < .001) of the variance in physical active behaviour (being physical active for 60 minutes every day). The intention to engage in physical activity (beta = .469, p < .001) and self-efficacy (beta = .243, p < .001) were, in turn, important correlates of physical active behavior. In addition to the prediction of intention to engage in physical activity and physical active behavior, we explored the impact of the intensity of physical activity. The intentsity of physical activity was only significantly related to physical active behavior (beta = .253, p < .01, R2 = .06, p < .001). An

  3. Improvement of Modeling HTGR Neutron Physics by Uncertainty Analysis with the Use of Cross-Section Covariance Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Grol, A. V.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Ternovykh, M. Yu

    2017-01-01

    This work is aimed at improvement of HTGR neutron physics design calculations by application of uncertainty analysis with the use of cross-section covariance information. Methodology and codes for preparation of multigroup libraries of covariance information for individual isotopes from the basic 44-group library of SCALE-6 code system were developed. A 69-group library of covariance information in a special format for main isotopes and elements typical for high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) was generated. This library can be used for estimation of uncertainties, associated with nuclear data, in analysis of HTGR neutron physics with design codes. As an example, calculations of one-group cross-section uncertainties for fission and capture reactions for main isotopes of the MHTGR-350 benchmark, as well as uncertainties of the multiplication factor (k∞) for the MHTGR-350 fuel compact cell model and fuel block model were performed. These uncertainties were estimated by the developed technology with the use of WIMS-D code and modules of SCALE-6 code system, namely, by TSUNAMI, KENO-VI and SAMS. Eight most important reactions on isotopes for MHTGR-350 benchmark were identified, namely: 10B(capt), 238U(n,γ), ν5, 235U(n,γ), 238U(el), natC(el), 235U(fiss)-235U(n,γ), 235U(fiss).

  4. Balanced cross section, kinematic deformation model, and palinspastic facies analysis for the Bogota fold belt, Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Villamil, T. ); Restrepo, P. ); Ratliff, R.; Wu, S.; Kligfield, R.; Geiser, P. )

    1993-02-01

    The Bogota fold belt of the Eastern Cordillera, Colombia has long been considered a relatively simple zone of Tertiary-aged folding. To a large degree this picture is due to the presence of a monotonous sequence of turbidites which containes very few distinct formation boundaries useful for delineating the structural geometry. However, new surface mapping together with biostratigraphic and sequence stratigraphic zonation have been used to define a complex thrust system involving southeast vergent imbricate and duplex structures. Biozone and facies boundaries are recognizable throughout the mapped area and provide a high resolution stratigraphic template for structural analysis. The thrustbell architecture is illustrated by a 17 km long balanced cross section which has been constructed using kinematic fault bend and fault propagation fold models. The use of balanced section construction techniques has in turn allowed further refinement of the stratigraphic model and facies analysis in the palinspastic restoration. The cross section constrains an overall breakforward sequence of thrust initiation with a lower detachment in shales at the base of the Cretaceous Caqueza Group. There are a minimum of 16 major ramps through the Cretaceous section and an irregularly developed upper detachment near the top of the Caqueza Group. The deformation has resulted in a minimum of 13 km of horizontal shortening in this portion of the Eastern Cordillera.

  5. Nuclear reaction analysis with ion microbeam of cross sections of surface layers deposited in a tokamak divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Emmoth, B.; Petersson, P.; Possnert, G.; Coad, J. P.; Likonen, J.; Renvall, T.

    2007-05-01

    Ion micro beam analysis has been applied to the investigation of plasma deposited layers covering the divertor tiles in the JET tokamak. Since the layers are about 100 μm thick they are too thick to be completely investigated by ordinary ion beam analysis. Cross sections of the layers were prepared by cutting and polishing. Elemental depth profiles were determined from the two dimensional images that could be derived by nuclear reaction analysis and resonant backscattering spectrometry, using ion beams focused to a few μm spot size. A combination of analysis methods are shown, which allow measurements of the concentration profiles of carbon, beryllium, deuterium, oxygen and stainless steel components at levels of a few percent, with an accuracy better than 10%.

  6. Benchmarking the evaluated proton differential cross sections suitable for the EBS analysis of natSi and 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkoris, M.; Dede, S.; Kantre, K.; Lagoyannis, A.; Ntemou, E.; Paneta, V.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.; Provatas, G.; Vlastou, R.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Siketić, Z.; Obajdin, N.

    2017-08-01

    The evaluated proton differential cross sections suitable for the Elastic Backscattering Spectroscopy (EBS) analysis of natSi and 16O, as obtained from SigmaCalc 2.0, have been benchmarked over a wide energy and angular range at two different accelerator laboratories, namely at N.C.S.R. 'Demokritos', Athens, Greece and at Ruđer Bošković Institute (RBI), Zagreb, Croatia, using a variety of high-purity thick targets of known stoichiometry. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms, while the observed discrepancies, as well as, the limits in accuracy of the benchmarking procedure, along with target related effects, are thoroughly discussed and analysed. In the case of oxygen the agreement between simulated and experimental spectra was generally good, while for silicon serious discrepancies were observed above Ep,lab = 2.5 MeV, suggesting that a further tuning of the appropriate nuclear model parameters in the evaluated differential cross-section datasets is required.

  7. Training-mediated leftward asymmetries during music processing: a cross-sectional and longitudinal fMRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert J; Bruijn, Bente; Norton, Andrea C; Winner, Ellen; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-07-15

    Practicing a musical instrument has a profound impact on the structure and function of the human brain. The present fMRI study explored how relative hemispheric asymmetries in task-related activity during music processing (same/different discrimination) are shaped by musical training (quantified as cumulative hours of instrument practice), using both a large (N=84) cross-sectional data set of children and adults, and a smaller (N=20) two time-point longitudinal data set of children tracked over 3 to 5 years. The cross-sectional analysis revealed a significant leftward asymmetry in task-related activation, with peaks in Heschl's gyrus and supramarginal gyrus (SMG). The SMG peak was further characterized by a leftward asymmetry in the partial correlation strength with subjects' cumulative hours of practice, controlling for subjects' age and task performance. This SMG peak was found to exhibit a similar pattern of response in the longitudinal data set (in this case, with subjects' cumulative hours of practice over the course of the study), controlling for age, scan interval, and amount of instrument practice prior to the first scan. This study presents novel insights into the ways musical instrument training shapes task-related asymmetries in neural activity during music processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fourier analysis of iteration schemes for k-eigenvalue transport problems with flux-dependent cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochunas, Brendan; Fitzgerald, Andrew; Larsen, Edward

    2017-09-01

    A central problem in nuclear reactor analysis is calculating solutions of steady-state k-eigenvalue problems with thermal hydraulic feedback. In this paper we propose and utilize a model problem that permits the theoretical analysis of iterative schemes for solving such problems. To begin, we discuss a model problem (with nonlinear cross section feedback) and its justification. We proceed with a Fourier analysis for source iteration schemes applied to the model problem. Then we analyze commonly-used iteration schemes involving non-linear diffusion acceleration and feedback. For each scheme we show (1) that they are conditionally stable, (2) the conditions that lead to instability, and (3) that traditional relaxation approaches can improve stability. Lastly, we propose a new iteration scheme that theory predicts is an improvement upon the existing methods.

  9. Analysis of Collisional Cross Sections of Rydberg nS and nD States of Ultracold Caesium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhigang; Miao, Jingyuan; Zhao, Kejia; Li, Difei; Yang, Zhijun; Wu, Fan; Wu, Zhaochun; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-05-01

    We present a simple analytical formula derived from an existing theoretical model and a detailed theoretical investigation of effects of the van der Waals interaction and dipole-dipole interaction on collisional cross sections as functions of various parameters. We analyze the main mechanism leading to large collisional cross sections on the basis of our previous experimental results using the present formula and also analyze the effects of some other factors on collisional cross sections.

  10. Neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This handbook displays curves of neutron cross sections in the energy range of 0.01 eV to 200 MeV (and associated information) as a function of incident neutron energy. Tables include reference to all data. Information on isomeric state production is also included. This book represents the fourth edition of what was previously known as BNL-325, Neutron Cross Sections, Volume 2, the third edition of which was published in 1976.

  11. A Meta-Analysis of Cross Sectional Studies Investigating Language in Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Jarrad A. G.; Powell, Martine; Timms, Lydia; Snow, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this review article, meta-analysis was used to summarize research investigating language skills in maltreated children. Method: A systematic search of published studies was undertaken. Studies were included in the meta-analysis if they investigated language skills in groups comprising maltreated and nonmaltreated children. Studies were…

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk of colorectal adenomas: cross-sectional study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Noh; Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jeong Han; Lee, Tae Yoon; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Choe, Won Hyeok; Lee, Sun-Young; Cheon, Young Koog; Sung, In Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-08-01

    The studies concerning the association between Helicobacter pylori status and colorectal adenoma, premalignant lesions of colorectal cancers, are not consistent. This cross-sectional study investigated the association of colorectal adenoma with H. pylori infection in a consecutive series of 2,195 asymptomatic average-risk subjects who underwent screening colonoscopy and H. pylori testing. Multivariate analyses were adjusted for potential relevant confounders, including age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, family history of colorectal cancer, and regular use of aspirin. Furthermore, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of available studies, including the current study, to clarify whether H. pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenoma. Among 2,195 eligible subjects, 1,253 subjects were H. pylori seropositive and 942 subjects were seronegative. In the H. pylori (+) group, the prevalence of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma was significantly higher than in the H. pylori (-) group (25.3 vs. 20.1 %, p = 0.004 and 6.1 vs. 2.9 %, p < 0.001, respectively). In our multivariate analysis, H. pylori seropositivity was an independent risk factor for overall colorectal adenoma (OR = 1.36, 95 % CI = 1.10-1.68) and advanced adenoma (OR = 2.21, 95 % CI = 1.41-3.48). The positive association was confined in cases with any proximal adenoma. In the meta-analysis, which included ten studies and 15,863 patients, the pooled OR for colorectal adenoma related to H. pylori infection was 1.58 (95 % CI = 1.32-1.88). Our results from this cross-sectional study and current studies included in our meta-analysis indicated that H. pylori infection was associated with a modest increase in the risk for colorectal adenoma.

  13. Economic impacts of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic : a cross-sectional analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Braeton J.; Shaneyfelt, Calvin R.

    2010-06-01

    A NISAC study on the economic effects of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic was done in order to assess the differential impacts at the state and industry levels given changes in absenteeism, mortality, and consumer spending rates. Part of the analysis was to determine if there were any direct relationships between pandemic impacts and gross domestic product (GDP) losses. Multiple regression analysis was used because it shows very clearly which predictors are significant in their impact on GDP. GDP impact data taken from the REMI PI+ (Regional Economic Models, Inc., Policy Insight +) model was used to serve as the response variable. NISAC economists selected the average absenteeism rate, mortality rate, and consumer spending categories as the predictor variables. Two outliers were found in the data: Nevada and Washington, DC. The analysis was done twice, with the outliers removed for the second analysis. The second set of regressions yielded a cleaner model, but for the purposes of this study, the analysts deemed it not as useful because particular interest was placed on determining the differential impacts to states. Hospitals and accommodation were found to be the most important predictors of percentage change in GDP among the consumer spending variables.

  14. A Cross-Sectional Behavioral Genetic Analysis of Task Persistence in the Transition to Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Petrill, Stephen A.; Thompson, Lee A.; DeThorne, Laura S.

    2005-01-01

    Task persistence, measured by a composite score of independent teacher, tester and observer reports, was examined using behavioral genetic analysis. Participants included 92 monozygotic and 137 same-sex dizygotic twin pairs in Kindergarten or 1st grade (4.3 to 7.9 years old). Task persistence was widely distributed, higher among older children,…

  15. High precision analysis of isotopic composition for samples used for nuclear cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, Yuji; Hori, Jun-ichi; Takamiya, Koichi; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Fukutani, Satoshi; Sano, Tadafumi; Harada, Hideo

    2017-09-01

    For the accuracy improvement of nuclear data of minor actinides and long-lived fission products in the project of "Research and development for Accuracy Improvement of neutron nuclear data on Minor Actinides", the isotopic compositions of two Am samples (241Am sample and 243Am sample) were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Only the peak of 241Am was observed in the analysis of 241Am sample, and level of isotopic impurities were improved from 0.1% to 0.0004%. In the analysis of 243Am sample, the peak of unreported isotope of 242mAm was observed in addition to the peaks of 243Am and 241Am. The mass spectrometry also showed that 243Am sample has other unreported impurities such as 239Pu and 240Pu.

  16. Migration, age, and education: a cross-sectional analysis of geographic labor mobility in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoki, T; Suruga, T

    1981-11-01

    "This paper presents some new empirical evidence on the determinants of prefecture-to-city migration in Japan, using a model based on the human capital-search theoretic approach." Several hypotheses relating the rate of migration to age, education, distance moved, and earnings are tested, and the applicability of the theoretical framework to the analysis of labor migration in Japan is evaluated. Data are from the 1970 census and the 1968 Employment Status Survey.

  17. Cross-sectional analysis of intimacy, passion, and commitment: testing the assumptions of the triangular theory of love.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Robert; Hale, Jerold L

    2002-06-01

    Using data from two previous studies, the current study tested the assumptions in the Triangular Theory of Love about changes in intimacy, passion, and commitment over time. Using a cross-sectional design, the study examined differences in the three components among 446 romantically involved individuals who were either casually dating, exclusively dating, engaged, or married. In support for the assumptions in the Triangular Theory specifically, analyses indicated significant negative partial correlations between intimacy and relationship length as well as between passion and relationship length. The correlation between commitment and relationship length was significant and positive. One-way analysis of variance of relational stage gave similar results. Reported intimacy and passion scores were lowest for participants who were casually dating, higher for participants who were engaged, and lower for married participants. Reported commitment scores increased from casually dating participants to the married participants.

  18. Identification badge lanyards as infection control risk: a cross-sectional observation study with epidemiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C M; Di Ruscio, F; Lynskey, M; Collins, J; McCullough, E; Cosgrave, R; McDonnell, D; Fennell, J

    2017-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus cultures from name badge lanyards were phenotypically and genotypically indistinguishable from the wearer's nasal carrier strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Lanyards had a mean age of 22 months and hygiene was poor with only 9% ever having been laundered. Molecular analysis showed that 26% of S. aureus nasal carriers shared an indistinguishable strain on their lanyard. Lanyards should not be recommended for staff in frontline clinical care. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Rasch analysis of the London Handicap Scale in stroke patients: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although activity and participation are the target domains in stroke rehabilitation interventions, there is insufficient evidence available regarding the validity of participation measurement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale in community-dwelling stroke patients, using Rasch analysis. Methods Participants were 170 community-dwelling stroke survivors. The data were analyzed using Winsteps (version 3.62) with the Rasch model to determine the unidimensionality of item fit, the distribution of item difficulty, and the reliability and suitability of the rating process for the London Handicap Scale. Results Data of 16 participants did not fit the Rasch model and there were no misfitting items. The person separation value was 2.42, and the reliability was .85; furthermore, the rating process for the London Handicap Scale was found to be suitable for use with stroke patients. Conclusions This was the first trial to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale using Rasch analysis; the results supported the suitability of this scale for use with stroke patients. PMID:25077991

  20. Policies on Conflicts of Interest in Health Care Guideline Development: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morciano, Cristina; Basevi, Vittorio; Faralli, Carla; Hilton Boon, Michele; Tonon, Sabina; Taruscio, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether organisations that develop health care guidelines have conflict of interest (COI) policies and to review the content of the available COI policies. Methods Survey and content analysis of COI policies available in English, French, Spanish, and Italian conducted between September 2014 and June 2015. A 24-item data abstraction instrument was created on the basis of guideline development standards. Results The survey identified 29 organisations from 19 countries that met the inclusion criteria. From these organisations, 19 policies were eligible for inclusion in the content analysis. Over one-third of the policies (7/19, 37%) did not report or did not clearly report whether disclosure was a prerequisite for membership of the guideline panel. Strategies for the prevention of COI such as divestment were mentioned by only two organisations. Only 21% of policies (4/19) used criteria to determine whether an interest constitutes a COI and to assess the severity of the risk imposed. Conclusions The finding that some organisations, in contradiction of widely available standards, still do not have COI policies publicly available is concerning. Also troubling were the findings that some policies did not clearly report critical steps in obtaining, managing and communicating disclosure of relationships of interest. This in addition to the variability encountered in content and accessibility of COI policies may cause confusion and distrust among guideline users. It is in the interest of guideline users and developers to design an agreed-upon, comprehensive, clear, and accessible COI policy. PMID:27846255

  1. Electromyography and sonomyography analysis of the tibialis anterior: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Foot dorsiflexion plays an essential role in both controlling balance and human gait. Electromyography (EMG) and sonomyography (SMG) can provide information on several aspects of muscle function. The aim was to establish the relationship between the EMG and SMG variables during isotonic contractions of foot dorsiflexors. Methods Twenty-seven healthy young adults performed the foot dorsiflexion test on a device designed ad hoc. EMG variables were maximum peak and area under the curve. Muscular architecture variables were muscle thickness and pennation angle. Descriptive statistical analysis, inferential analysis and a multivariate linear regression model were carried out. The confidence level was established with a statistically significant p-value of less than 0.05. Results The correlation between EMG variables and SMG variables was r = 0.462 (p < 0.05). The linear regression model to the dependent variable “peak normalized tibialis anterior (TA)” from the independent variables “pennation angle and thickness”, was significant (p = 0.002) with an explained variance of R2 = 0.693 and SEE = 0.16. Conclusions There is a significant relationship and degree of contribution between EMG and SMG variables during isotonic contractions of the TA muscle. Our results suggest that EMG and SMG can be feasible tools for monitoring and assessment of foot dorsiflexors. TA muscle parameterization and assessment is relevant in order to know that increased strength accelerates the recovery of lower limb injuries. PMID:24507748

  2. Rasch analysis of the London Handicap Scale in stroke patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Choi, Yoo-Im

    2014-07-31

    Although activity and participation are the target domains in stroke rehabilitation interventions, there is insufficient evidence available regarding the validity of participation measurement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale in community-dwelling stroke patients, using Rasch analysis. Participants were 170 community-dwelling stroke survivors. The data were analyzed using Winsteps (version 3.62) with the Rasch model to determine the unidimensionality of item fit, the distribution of item difficulty, and the reliability and suitability of the rating process for the London Handicap Scale. Data of 16 participants did not fit the Rasch model and there were no misfitting items. The person separation value was 2.42, and the reliability was .85; furthermore, the rating process for the London Handicap Scale was found to be suitable for use with stroke patients. This was the first trial to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale using Rasch analysis; the results supported the suitability of this scale for use with stroke patients.

  3. Fast interactive integration of cross-sectional image datasets and surface data for morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Meruvia-Pastor, Oscar; Soh, Jung; Xiao, Mei; Schmidt, Eric; Logan, Cairine; Boughner, Julia C; Jones, Nicholas; Osborn, David; Santiago, Johanna; Gittleman, Julian; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Sensen, Christoph W

    2009-01-01

    To investigate external facial morphology and cell proliferation patterns and their relationship with cleft lip malformation in mice, we need to compare samples of mice tissue photographs and surface reconstructions from micro-CT scans obtained from mouse embryos. Tissue samples obtained through digital photography are typically misaligned with respect to each other, which prevents further analysis. We have developed a system for fast interactive alignment of these image stacks for volume reconstruction and data visualization and analysis in 3D. The system is designed to work in multiprocessor environments and can utilize an arbitrary number of processors, cutting down significantly the turnaround time and allowing users to quickly process sets of hundreds of high resolution images using a combination of automated and interactive tools. Additional modules are used to reconstruct the shape of the original subject. Our system is interactive, fully scalable and can be applied to any photographic sliced dataset, regardless of subject and reduces significantly the processing time for stack alignment.

  4. Creating normograms of dural sinuses in healthy persons using computer-assisted detection for analysis and comparison of cross-section dural sinuses in the brain.

    PubMed

    Anconina, Reut; Zur, Dinah; Kesler, Anat; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Toledano, Ronen; Novack, Victor; Benkobich, Elya; Novoa, Rosa; Novic, Evelyne Farkash; Shelef, Ilan

    2017-06-01

    Dural sinuses vary in size and shape in many pathological conditions with abnormal intracranial pressure. Size and shape normograms of dural brain sinuses are not available. The creation of such normograms may enable computer-assisted comparison to pathologic exams and facilitate diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate normal magnetic resonance venography (MRV) studies in order to create normograms of dural sinuses using a computerized algorithm for vessel cross-sectional analysis. This was a retrospective analysis of MRV studies of 30 healthy persons. Data were analyzed using a specially developed Matlab algorithm for vessel cross-sectional analysis. The cross-sectional area and shape measurements were evaluated to create normograms. Mean cross-sectional size was 53.27±13.31 for the right transverse sinus (TS), 46.87+12.57 for the left TS (p=0.089) and 36.65+12.38 for the superior sagittal sinus. Normograms were created. The distribution of cross-sectional areas along the vessels showed distinct patterns and a parallel course for the median, 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles. In conclusion, using a novel computerized method for vessel cross-sectional analysis we were able to quantitatively characterize dural sinuses of healthy persons and create normograms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Maternal Complications Associated with Stillbirth Delivery: a Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Katherine J.; Mozurkewich, Ellen L.; Puder, Karoline S.; Treadwell, Marjorie C.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to identify delivery complications associated with stillbirth labor and delivery. We conducted a retrospective chart review evaluating stillbirth demographics, pregnancy and maternal risk factors, and complications of labor and delivery. We performed bivariable analysis and multivariable logistic regression to evaluate factors associated with medical complications and variations by race. Our cohort included 543 mothers with stillbirth, of which two-thirds were African-American. We noted high rates of shoulder dystocia, clinical chorioamnionitis, postpartum hemorrhage, and retained placenta in women with stillbirths. 33 women (6%) experienced at least one serious maternal complication. Complication rates did not vary by maternal race. Providers who perform obstetrical care should be alert to the high rate of maternal medical complications associated with labor and delivery of a stillbirth fetus. PMID:26479679

  6. Mental health related Internet use among psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalckreuth, Sophie; Trefflich, Friederike; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

    2014-12-24

    The Internet is of great importance in today's health sector, as most Internet users utilize online functions for health related purposes. Concerning the mental health care sector, little data exist about the Internet use of psychiatric patients. It is the scope of this current study to analyze the quantity and pattern of Internet usage among mental health patients. Patients from all services of the Department of Psychiatry at a university hospital were surveyed by completing a 29-item questionnaire. The data analysis included evaluation of frequencies, as well as group comparisons. 337 patients participated in the survey, of whom 79.5% were Internet users. Social media was utilized by less than half of the users: social networks (47.8%), forums (19.4%), chats (18.7%), blogs (12.3%). 70.9% used the Internet for mental health related reasons. The contents accessed by the patients included: information on mental disorders (57.8%), information on medication (43.7%), search for mental health services (38.8%), platforms with other patients (19.8%) and platforms with mental health professionals (17.2%). Differences in the pattern of use between users with low, medium and high frequency of Internet use were statistically significant for all entities of social media (p < 0.01), search for mental health services (p = 0.017) and usage of platforms with mental health professionals (p = 0. 048). The analysis of differences in Internet use depending on the participants' type of mental disorder revealed no statistically significant differences, with one exception. Regarding the Internet's role in mental health care, the participants showed differing opinions: 36.2% believe that the Internet has or may have helped them in coping with their mental disorder, while 38.4% stated the contrary. Most psychiatric patients are Internet users. Mental health related Internet use is common among patients, mainly for information seeking. The use of social media is generally less

  7. A comprehensive analysis of association of medical history with airflow limitation: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yayoi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Tezuka, Kotoe; Yamazaki, Keiko; Yada, Yoichi; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Asai, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Multiple comorbidity is common and increases the complexity of the presentation of patients with COPD. This study was a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between a medical history of 22 disease categories and the presence of airflow limitation (AL) without any history of asthma or bronchiectasis, compatible with COPD. A total of 11,898 Japanese patients aged ≥40 years, who underwent spirometry tests, comprising patients with AL (n=2,309) or without AL (n=9,589), were evaluated. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess the relationship between the presence of AL and each disease. The model was adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI) and pack-years of smoking. In multivariate analysis, female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.52-0.67), age (OR for 10-year age increase: 1.99; CI: 1.90-2.09), BMI (OR for 1 kg/m(2) increase: 0.96; CI: 0.95-0.98) and smoking history (<15 vs 15-24, 25-49 and ≥50 pack-years; OR: 1.78, 2.6 and 3.69, respectively; CI: 1.46-2.17, 2.24-3.0 and 3.15-4.33, respectively) were significantly associated with the presence of AL. In addition, a history of tuberculosis (OR: 1.72; CI: 1.39-2.11), primary lung cancer (OR: 1.50; CI: 1.28-1.77), myocardial infarction (OR: 1.22; CI: 1.01-1.48), heart failure (OR: 1.53; CI: 1.29-1.81), arrhythmia (OR: 1.19; CI: 1.03-1.38) or heart valve disorder (OR: 1.33; CI: 1.14-1.56) was significantly associated with the presence of AL, after adjustment. This study suggests that a history of heart disease leading to abnormal cardiac function may be associated with AL and that the presence of certain types of heart disease provides a rationale to assess lung status and look for respiratory impairment, including COPD.

  8. Oral health conditions and frailty in Mexican community-dwelling elderly: a cross sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral health is an important component of general well-being for the elderly. Oral health-related problems include loss of teeth, nonfunctional removable dental prostheses, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontitis, and root caries. They affect food selection, speaking ability, mastication, social relations, and quality of life. Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that confers vulnerability to negative health-related outcomes. The association between oral health and frailty has not been explored thoroughly. This study sought to identify associations between the presence of some oral health conditions, and frailty status among Mexican community-dwelling elderly. Methods Analysis of baseline data of the Mexican Study of Nutritional and Psychosocial Markers of Frailty, a cohort study carried out in a representative sample of people aged 70 and older residing in one district of Mexico City. Frailty was defined as the presence of three or more of the following five components: weight loss, exhaustion, slowness, weakness, and low physical activity. Oral health variables included self-perception of oral health compared with others of the same age; utilization of dental services during the last year, number of teeth, dental condition (edentate, partially edentate, or completely dentate), utilization and functionality of removable partial or complete dentures, severe periodontitis, self-reported chewing problems and xerostomia. Covariates included were gender, age, years of education, cognitive performance, smoking status, recent falls, hospitalization, number of drugs, and comorbidity. The association between frailty and dental variables was determined performing a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Final models were adjusted by socio-demographic and health factors Results Of the 838 participants examined, 699 had the information needed to establish the criteria for diagnosis of frailty. Those who had a higher probability of being frail included women (OR

  9. Oral health conditions and frailty in Mexican community-dwelling elderly: a cross sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Castrejón-Pérez, Roberto Carlos; Borges-Yáñez, S Aída; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis M; Avila-Funes, J Alberto

    2012-09-12

    Oral health is an important component of general well-being for the elderly. Oral health-related problems include loss of teeth, nonfunctional removable dental prostheses, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontitis, and root caries. They affect food selection, speaking ability, mastication, social relations, and quality of life. Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that confers vulnerability to negative health-related outcomes. The association between oral health and frailty has not been explored thoroughly. This study sought to identify associations between the presence of some oral health conditions, and frailty status among Mexican community-dwelling elderly. Analysis of baseline data of the Mexican Study of Nutritional and Psychosocial Markers of Frailty, a cohort study carried out in a representative sample of people aged 70 and older residing in one district of Mexico City. Frailty was defined as the presence of three or more of the following five components: weight loss, exhaustion, slowness, weakness, and low physical activity. Oral health variables included self-perception of oral health compared with others of the same age; utilization of dental services during the last year, number of teeth, dental condition (edentate, partially edentate, or completely dentate), utilization and functionality of removable partial or complete dentures, severe periodontitis, self-reported chewing problems and xerostomia. Covariates included were gender, age, years of education, cognitive performance, smoking status, recent falls, hospitalization, number of drugs, and comorbidity. The association between frailty and dental variables was determined performing a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Final models were adjusted by socio-demographic and health factors Of the 838 participants examined, 699 had the information needed to establish the criteria for diagnosis of frailty. Those who had a higher probability of being frail included women (OR = 1.9), those who reported

  10. Dental treatment needs in the Canadian population: analysis of a nationwide cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nationally representative clinical data on the oral health needs of Canadians has not been available since the 1970s. The purpose of this study was to determine the normative treatment needs of a nationally representative sample of Canadians and describe how these needs were distributed. Methods A secondary analysis of data collected through the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) was undertaken. Sampling and bootstrap weights were applied to make the data nationally representative. Descriptive frequencies were used to examine the sample characteristics and to examine the treatment type(s) needed by the population. Bivariate logistic regressions were used to see if any characteristics were predictive of having an unmet dental treatment need, and of having specific treatment needs. Lastly, multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the strongest predictors of having an unmet dental treatment need. Results Most of the population had no treatment needs and of the 34.2% who did, most needed restorative (20.4%) and preventive (13.7%) care. The strongest predictors of need were having poor oral health, reporting a self-perceived need for treatment and visiting the dentist infrequently. Conclusions It is estimated that roughly 12 million Canadians have at least one unmet dental treatment need. Policymakers now have information by which to assess if programs match the dental treatment needs of Canadians and of particular subgroups experiencing excess risk. PMID:23102263

  11. Quantitative clinical characteristics of 53 patients with MPS VII: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Matthias; Garbade, Sven F; Kölker, Stefan; Hoffmann, Georg F; Ries, Markus

    2017-04-06

    The main purpose of the study was to provide quantitative data regarding survival and diagnostic delay. Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VII (OMIM 253220) is a progressive neurometabolic disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS). Hard clinical end points have not been quantitatedMethods:We quantitatively analyzed published cases with MPS VII (N = 53/88 with sufficient data). Main outcome measures were onset of disease and survival. The role of biomarkers such as GUS residual enzyme activity and levels of storage material assessed as urinary excretion of glucosaminoglycans (GAG) as potential predictors of clinical outcomes were investigated. The analysis was conducted according to STROBE criteria. Median survival of the postnatally diagnosed population was 42 months. Median age of disease onset was the first day of life; median age at diagnosis was 11 months. Hydrops fetalis was frequent. Patients with residual GUS activity in fibroblasts more than 1.4% or urinary GAG excretion less than 602% of normal survived longer than patients with GUS enzyme activity below or GAG excretion above these thresholds. MPS VII has its disease onset prenatally. In the absence of a prenatal diagnosis, most cases are clinically apparent at birth. Our data corroborate a phenotype-biomarker association in MPS VII. The survival data characterize the natural history with important implications for therapeutic studies.Genet Med advance online publication 06 April 2017Genetics in Medicine (2017); doi:10.1038/gim.2017.10.

  12. A cross-sectional content analysis of Android applications for asthma.

    PubMed

    Househ, Mowafa; Hossain, Nassif; Jamal, Amr; Zakaria, Nasriah; Elmetwally, Ashraf; Alsalamah, Majid; Khalifa, Mohamed

    2016-03-03

    Providing patients opportunities for self-management and education about their disease, asthma applications designed for use on an Android operating system can have positive health outcomes across the range of demographics who use mHealth applications. This study provides a content analysis of freely available Google Android Platform Mobile Applications for Asthma. A list of applications was collected on 26 October 2014, using the search feature of the Google Play Android platform and using the words and phrases "Asthma," "Lung Function" and "Peak Flow." Each application was coded for its approach to asthma self-management, based on categories adapted by Huckvale et al., which are based on the Global Initiative for Asthma and the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. The characteristics of the 15 asthma applications are described. Most of the asthma applications' primary function focused on patient self-monitoring and self-assessment. Using the HON Code, we found low health information quality across all asthma applications. Android asthma applications can have positive outcomes in helping patients as they provide opportunities for self-management and education about their disease. Future research should continue to monitor and evaluate the development and use of mHealth Asthma Applications. Based on these findings, and their indication of a gap in existing research, subsequent studies can continue to evaluate the development and use of mHealth Asthma Applications with increasing methodological consistency to improve the quality of in-app health information.

  13. Chronic low back pain patient groups in primary care--a cross sectional cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Viniol, Annika; Jegan, Nikita; Hirsch, Oliver; Leonhardt, Corinna; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin; Barth, Jürgen; Baum, Erika; Becker, Annette

    2013-10-16

    Due to the heterogeneous nature of chronic low back pain (CLBP), it is necessary to identify patient groups and evaluate treatments within these groups. We aimed to identify groups of patients with CLBP in the primary care setting. We performed a k-means cluster analysis on a large data set (n = 634) of primary care patients with CLBP. Variables of sociodemographic data, pain characteristics, psychological status (i.e., depression, anxiety, somatization), and the patient resources of resilience and coping strategies were included. We found three clusters that can be characterized as "pensioners with age-associated pain caused by degenerative diseases", "middle-aged patients with high mental distress and poor coping resources", and "middle-aged patients who are less pain-affected and better positioned with regard to their mental health". Our results supported current knowledge concerning groups of CLBP patients in primary care. In particular, we identified a group that was most disabled and distressed, and which was mainly characterized by psychological variables. As shown in our study, pain-related coping strategies and resilience were low in these patients and might be addressed in differentiating treatment strategies. Future studies should focus on the identification of this group in order to achieve effective treatment allocation. German Clinical Trial Register DRKS00003123.

  14. Person-job fit: an exploratory cross-sectional analysis of hospitalists.

    PubMed

    Hinami, Keiki; Whelan, Chad T; Miller, Joseph A; Wolosin, Robert J; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2013-02-01

    Person-job fit is an organizational construct shown to impact the entry, performance, and retention of workers. Even as a growing number of physicians work under employed situations, little is known about how physicians select, develop, and perform in organizational settings. Our objective was to validate in the hospitalist physician workforce features of person-job fit observed in workers of other industries. The design was a secondary survey data analysis from a national stratified sample of practicing US hospitalists. The measures were person-job fit; likelihood of leaving practice or reducing workload; organizational climate; relationships with colleagues, staff, and patients; participation in suboptimal patient care activities. Responses to the Hospital Medicine Physician Worklife Survey by 816 (sample response rate 26%) practicing hospitalists were analyzed. Job attrition and reselection improved job fit among hospitalists entering the job market. Better job fit was achieved through hospitalists engaging a variety of personal skills and abilities in their jobs. Job fit increased with time together with socialization and internalization of organizational values. Hospitalists with higher job fit felt they performed better in their jobs. Features of person-job fit for hospitalists conformed to what have been observed in nonphysician workforces. Person-job fit may be a useful complementary survey measure related to job satisfaction but with a greater focus on function. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  15. A cross-sectional analysis of how young adults perceive tobacco brands: implications for FCTC signatories

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control calls for the elimination of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. To test whether tobacco packaging functions as advertising by communicating attractive and distinctive brand attributes, we explored how young adult smokers and non-smokers interpreted familiar and unfamiliar tobacco brands. Methods We conducted an on-line survey of 1035 young adult smokers and non-smokers aged 18–30. Participants evaluated eight tobacco brands using ten attributes based on brand personality scales. We used factor analysis and ANOVA to examine patterns in brand-attribute associations. Results Young adults distinguished between brands on the basis of their packaging alone, associated each brand with specific attributes, and were equally able to interpret familiar and unfamiliar brands. Contrary to our expectations, non-smokers made more favourable brand-attribute associations than smokers, but both groups described Basic, a near generic brand, as ‘plain’ or ‘budget’. There were no significant gender or ethnicity differences. Conclusions Tobacco packaging uses logos, colours and imagery to create desirable connotations that promote and reinforce smoking. By functioning in the same way as advertising, on-pack branding breaches Article 13 of the FCTC and refutes tobacco companies’ claims that pack livery serves only as an indentifying device that simplifies smokers’ decision-making. Given this evidence, signatories should see plain packaging policies as a priority consistent with their FCTC obligations to eliminate all tobacco advertising and promotion. PMID:22985407

  16. A cross-sectional analysis of how young adults perceive tobacco brands: implications for FCTC signatories.

    PubMed

    Gendall, Philip; Hoek, Janet; Edwards, Richard; McCool, Judith

    2012-09-17

    The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control calls for the elimination of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. To test whether tobacco packaging functions as advertising by communicating attractive and distinctive brand attributes, we explored how young adult smokers and non-smokers interpreted familiar and unfamiliar tobacco brands. We conducted an on-line survey of 1035 young adult smokers and non-smokers aged 18-30. Participants evaluated eight tobacco brands using ten attributes based on brand personality scales. We used factor analysis and ANOVA to examine patterns in brand-attribute associations. Young adults distinguished between brands on the basis of their packaging alone, associated each brand with specific attributes, and were equally able to interpret familiar and unfamiliar brands. Contrary to our expectations, non-smokers made more favourable brand-attribute associations than smokers, but both groups described Basic, a near generic brand, as 'plain' or 'budget'. There were no significant gender or ethnicity differences. Tobacco packaging uses logos, colours and imagery to create desirable connotations that promote and reinforce smoking. By functioning in the same way as advertising, on-pack branding breaches Article 13 of the FCTC and refutes tobacco companies' claims that pack livery serves only as an indentifying device that simplifies smokers' decision-making. Given this evidence, signatories should see plain packaging policies as a priority consistent with their FCTC obligations to eliminate all tobacco advertising and promotion.

  17. An Odontometric Approach for Estimation of Stature in Indians: Cross- Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sumit Kumar; Kedia, Neal Bharat; Singh, Abhinav Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Height/stature is one of the useful anthropometric parameter for individual identification. Correlation of stature to long bones, even fragmentary bones is frequently reported among various populations. As teeth have the advantage of being composed largely of hard tissue which is relatively indestructible, the careful study of these can enable reliable determination of stature of the person in life. Aim The present study was designed to elucidate the anthropometric correlation of tooth dimensions with stature and also devises regression formulae. Materials and Methods This study was carried out on 361 Indian students (151 males and 210 females) in the age range of 21- 45 years to estimate stature using odontometry. Stature and tooth measurements were taken on each partcipant following standard methods and techniques. Karl Pearson’s correlation co-efficient and linear regression was used to estimate stature. Results Regression analysis showed that the canine width can aid in estimation of stature as an adjunct when only teeth are available for identification. Conclusion Tooth dimensions can be used only as a supplementary approach for the estimation of stature but with caution. PMID:27134995

  18. Aerobic work capacity in elite wheelchair athletes: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, L H V; Bouten, C; Veeger, H E J; Gwinn, T

    2002-04-01

    To give a descriptive analysis of aerobic capacity among elite wheelchair athletes in association with various personal characteristics and sprint or anaerobic capacity. Sixty-eight wheelchair athletes who participated in the World Games and Championships for the Disabled were included. Parameters for aerobic capacity were evaluated in a standardized wheelchair exercise test on a computer-controlled wheelchair ergometer at the games. The ergometer setting was individually tuned according to standardized procedures. Mean maximum power output was 72.2 +/- 36.7 W. Peak oxygen uptake showed similar strong variations among different subject groups. High values were seen in a group of six subjects with amputations. Results stressed that, apart from sex, functionality and training status had a strong influence on aerobic capacity. Anaerobic and aerobic capacity were strongly associated. Functionality, training status, and sex are important determinants of aerobic capacity. The functional classification used at international sports events is represented in the data, and further study into the possible contribution of standardized exercise tests within the issue of classification must be considered. The use of standardized exercise tests for the evaluation of training and for rehabilitation progress must be advocated, with power output being an important outcome measure at the level of ability, whereas oxygen uptake represents outcome at the level of organ systems.

  19. Cross sectional analysis of mortality by country of birth in England and Wales, 1970-92.

    PubMed Central

    Wild, S.; McKeigue, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare mortalities for selected groups of immigrants with the national average. DESIGN: Analysis of mortality for adults aged 20-69 in 1970-2 and 1989-92 using population data from 1971 and 1991 censuses. Mortality of Scottish and Irish immigrants aged 25-74 was also compared with mortality in Scotland and Ireland for 1991. SETTING: England and Wales. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Standardised mortality ratios for deaths from all causes, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, lung cancer, and breast cancer. RESULTS: In 1989-92 mortality from all causes was higher than the national average for Scottish immigrants, by 32% for men and 36% for women; for Irish immigrants it was higher by 39% for men and 20% for women; and for Caribbean born men it was lower by 23%. Ischaemic heart disease and lung cancer accounted for 30-40% of the excess mortality in Scottish and Irish immigrants. For south Asians, excess mortality from circulatory disease was balanced by lower mortality from cancer. Standardised mortality ratios for cerebrovascular disease in 1989-92 were highest for west African immigrants (271 for men and 181 for women). CONCLUSIONS: Widening differences in mortality ratios for migrants compared with the general population were not simply due to socioeconomic inequalities. The low mortality from all causes for Caribbean immigrants could largely be attributed to low mortality from ischaemic heart disease, which is unexplained. The excess mortality from cerebrovascular and hypertensive diseases in migrants from both west Africa and the Caribbean suggests that genetic factors underlie the susceptibility to hypertension in people of black African descent. PMID:9116545

  20. [Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Health and Social Structure in Germany].

    PubMed

    Wittmann, N; Meinlschmidt, G; Czaja, M

    2016-12-14

    This research was conducted to find out if there are differences in health and social structure and, thus, living conditions within Germany on a federal state level. So far, research projects have mainly focused on either more aggregate or more small-scale, regional planning areas. However, due to the political, governmental, and institutional structures prevalent in Germany, it seems necessary to conduct health and social structure analyses not only on the macro and micro but also on the meso level. This would enable meeting the specific information requirements of all existing German political spheres and public health planning levels comprehensively. A set of 53 indicators taken from official German statistics was used to conduct a factor analysis. The latter revealed that the health and social structures could be thoroughly depicted by a total of 3 factors (indices) that, in total, explain roughly 80% of the total variance. In this case, the first index accounts for about 38%, the second for about 31%, and the third index explain roughly 11%. Testing the results through hierarchical as well k-Means cluster analyses provided additional confirmation. Overall, the results show great differences in health and social structures in Germany on a federal state level. In addition, a more in-depth look at the nature of the results shows that one needs to distinguish between 4, or rather even a total of 8 subregions. Most importantly, these findings reveal that the frequently and widely discussed East-West discrepancies do not enable an adequately differentiated approach to this issue. Rather, aside from aspects such as federal city state and state area differences, structures in Germany show several different and highly significant types of North-South divides.

  1. A cross-sectional analysis of reported corporate environmental sustainability practices.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Dallas M; Dopart, Pamela; Ferracini, Tyler; Sahmel, Jennifer; Merryman, Kimberly; Gaffney, Shannon; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2010-12-01

    The concept of sustainability evolved throughout the 1970s and 1980s, but was formally described by the 27 principles of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development in 1992. Despite the passage of nearly 20years, to date there are no uniform set of federal rules, regulations, or guidelines specifically governing the environmental aspects of sustainability practices or related requirements in the United States. In this benchmark analysis, we have collected information on the sustainability programs of the five largest US companies in each of the 26 industrial sectors [based on the Forbes Global 2000 through 2009 (n=130)]. For each company, we reviewed the most recent corporate sustainability, citizenship, or responsibility report, limiting our scope to environmental components, if available. Ten criteria were identified and analyzed, including leadership, reporting, external review, certification, and individual components of environmental sustainability programs. With respect to the prevalence of sustainability components between various business sectors, we found that the Drugs and Biotechnology (87%), Household and Personal Products (87%) and Oil and Gas Operations (87%) industries had the most comprehensive environmental sustainability programs. Using the nine components of environmental sustainability as a benchmark, we identified four key components as the characteristics of the most comprehensive environmental sustainability programs. These were (1) empowering leadership with a commitment to sustainability (80%), (2) standardized reporting (87%), (3) third-party evaluation of the sustainability programs (73%), and (4) obtaining ISO 14001 certification (73%). We found that many firms shaped their own definition of sustainability and developed their associated sustainability programs based on their sector, stakeholder interests, products or services, and business model. We noted an emerging area that we have called product sustainability - one in which

  2. Lack of timely accrual information in oncology clinical trials: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Aaron P; Hirsch, Bradford R; Abernethy, Amy P

    2014-03-25

    Poor accrual is a significant barrier to the successful completion of oncology clinical trials; half of all phase 3 oncology trials close due to insufficient accrual. Timely access to accrual data fosters an understanding of successful trial design and can be used to inform the design of new clinical trials prospectively. Accrual statistics are available within research networks, such as the cancer cooperative groups, but comprehensive data reflecting the overall portfolio of cancer clinical trials are lacking. As a demonstration case, the purpose of this study was to quantify the public availability of accrual data across all recent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) trials. The database for the Aggregate Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov (AACT) summarizes all trials registered between October 2007 and September 2010. In total, 108 trials of pharmacologic therapy for RCC were included. Accrual data on these trials were gathered via ClinicalTrials.gov (CTG), a manual review of resulting publications, and online surveys sent to principle investigators or trial coordinators. In total, 26% (20 of 76) of trials listing a government, academic, or cooperative group (GAC) sponsor responded to the survey vs 0% (0 of 32) of those listing only industry sponsors. Across all methods, accrual data were available for only 40% (43 of 108) of trials, including 37% (28 of 76) of GAC trials and 47% (15 of 32) of industry trials. Moreover, 87% (66 of 76) of GAC trials were ongoing (open, actively recruiting, or of unknown status) vs 75% (24 of 32) of industry trials, while 9% (10 of 108) of trials were terminated or suspended. Despite extensive efforts (surveys, phone calls, CTG abstraction, publication searches), accurate accrual data remained inaccessible for 60% of the RCC trial cohort. While CTG reports trial results, ongoing accrual data are also critically needed. Poor access to accrual data will continue to limit attempts to develop a national summary of clinical trials metrics and to

  3. Internet Searches and Their Relationship to Cognitive Function in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hollingshead, Kristy; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a very challenging experience for all those affected. Unfortunately, detection of Alzheimer disease in its early stages when clinical treatments may be most effective is challenging, as the clinical evaluations are time-consuming and costly. Recent studies have demonstrated a close relationship between cognitive function and everyday behavior, an avenue of research that holds great promise for the early detection of cognitive decline. One area of behavior that changes with cognitive decline is language use. Multiple groups have demonstrated a close relationship between cognitive function and vocabulary size, verbal fluency, and semantic ability, using conventional in-person cognitive testing. An alternative to this approach which is inherently ecologically valid may be to take advantage of automated computer monitoring software to continually capture and analyze language use while on the computer. Objective The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between Internet searches as a measure of language and cognitive function in older adults. We hypothesize that individuals with poorer cognitive function will search using fewer unique terms, employ shorter words, and use less obscure words in their searches. Methods Computer monitoring software (WorkTime, Nestersoft Inc) was used to continuously track the terms people entered while conducting searches in Google, Yahoo, Bing, and Ask.com. For all searches, punctuation, accents, and non-ASCII characters were removed, and the resulting search terms were spell-checked before any analysis. Cognitive function was evaluated as a z-normalized summary score capturing five unique cognitive domains. Linear regression was used to determine the relationship between cognitive function and Internet searches by controlling for variables such as age, sex, and education. Results Over a 6-month monitoring period, 42 participants (mean age 81 years [SD 10.5], 83% [35/42] female) conducted

  4. Internet Searches and Their Relationship to Cognitive Function in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Austin, Johanna; Hollingshead, Kristy; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2017-09-06

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a very challenging experience for all those affected. Unfortunately, detection of Alzheimer disease in its early stages when clinical treatments may be most effective is challenging, as the clinical evaluations are time-consuming and costly. Recent studies have demonstrated a close relationship between cognitive function and everyday behavior, an avenue of research that holds great promise for the early detection of cognitive decline. One area of behavior that changes with cognitive decline is language use. Multiple groups have demonstrated a close relationship between cognitive function and vocabulary size, verbal fluency, and semantic ability, using conventional in-person cognitive testing. An alternative to this approach which is inherently ecologically valid may be to take advantage of automated computer monitoring software to continually capture and analyze language use while on the computer. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between Internet searches as a measure of language and cognitive function in older adults. We hypothesize that individuals with poorer cognitive function will search using fewer unique terms, employ shorter words, and use less obscure words in their searches. Computer monitoring software (WorkTime, Nestersoft Inc) was used to continuously track the terms people entered while conducting searches in Google, Yahoo, Bing, and Ask.com. For all searches, punctuation, accents, and non-ASCII characters were removed, and the resulting search terms were spell-checked before any analysis. Cognitive function was evaluated as a z-normalized summary score capturing five unique cognitive domains. Linear regression was used to determine the relationship between cognitive function and Internet searches by controlling for variables such as age, sex, and education. Over a 6-month monitoring period, 42 participants (mean age 81 years [SD 10.5], 83% [35/42] female) conducted 2915 searches using these top search

  5. Metropolitan-level ethnic residential segregation, racial identity, and body mass index among U.S. Hispanic adults: a multilevel cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The few studies that have examined whether metropolitan-level ethnic residential segregation is associated with obesity among Hispanics are mixed. The segmented assimilation theory, which suggests patterns of integration for immigrant groups varies by social factors, may provide an explanation for these mixed findings. In this study we examined whether one social factor, racial identity, modified the association between ethnic residential segregation and body mass index (BMI) among Hispanics. Methods We used data on 22,901 male and 37,335 non-pregnant female Hispanic adult participants of the 2003–2008 U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System living in 227 metropolitan or micropolitan areas (MMSAs). Participants self-identified as White, Black, and ‘some other race’. BMI was calculated using self-reported height and weight; the Hispanic isolation index was used to measure Hispanic residential segregation. Using multi-level linear regression models, we examined the association of Hispanic residential segregation with BMI, and we investigated whether this relationship varied by race. Results Among men, Hispanic segregation was unassociated with BMI after adjusting for age, race, MMSA-level poverty, and MMSA-level population size; there was no variation in this relationship by race. Among women, significant associations between Hispanic segregation and BMI in models adjusted for demographics and MMSA-level confounders became attenuated with further adjustment for education and language of exam. However, there was statistically significant variation by race (Pinteraction = 0.03 and 0.09 for Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics who identified as some other race, respectively, vs. Hispanic Whites). Specifically, higher segregation was associated with higher mean BMI among Hispanic Whites, but it was associated with lower mean BMI among Hispanic Blacks. Segregation was unassociated with BMI among Hispanic women identifying as some other race

  6. Multilevel analysis of elastic morphology: The mantis shrimp's spring.

    PubMed

    Rosario, M V; Patek, S N

    2015-09-01

    Spring systems, whether natural or engineered, are composed of compliant and rigid regions. Biological springs are often similar to monolithic structures that distribute compliance and rigidity across the whole system. For example, to confer different amounts of compliance in distinct regions within a single structure, biological systems typically vary regional morphology through thickening or elongation. Here, we analyze the monolithic spring in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) raptorial appendages to rapidly acquire or process prey. We quantified the shape of cross-sections of the merus segment of the raptorial appendage. We also examined specific regions of the merus that are hypothesized to either store elastic energy or provide structural support to permit energy storage in other regions of the system. We found that while all mantis shrimp contain thicker ventral bars in distal cross-sections, differences in thickness are more pronounced in high-impact "smasher" mantis shrimp than in the slower-striking "spearer" mantis shrimp. We also found that spearer cross-sections are more circular while those of smashers are more eccentric with elongation along the dorso-ventral axis. The results suggest that the regional thickening of ventral bars provides structural support for resisting spring compression and also reduces flexural stiffness along the system's long axis. This multilevel morphological analysis offers a foundation for understanding the evolution and mechanics of monolithic systems in biology. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Air Pollution and Atherosclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Four European Cohort Studies in the ESCAPE Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Kathrin; Hennig, Frauke; Penell, Johanna; Basagaña, Xavier; Foraster, Maria; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Agis, David; Beelen, Rob; Brunekreef, Bert; Cyrys, Josef; Fuks, Kateryna B.; Adam, Martin; Baldassarre, Damiano; Cirach, Marta; Elosua, Roberto; Dratva, Julia; Hampel, Regina; Koenig, Wolfgang; Marrugat, Jaume; de Faire, Ulf; Pershagen, Göran; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rivera, Marcela; Seissler, Jochen; Schindler, Christian; Thiery, Joachim; Hoffmann, Barbara; Peters, Annette; Künzli, Nino

    2015-01-01

    Background: In four European cohorts, we investigated the cross-sectional association between long-term exposure to air pollution and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (CIMT), a preclinical marker of atherosclerosis. Methods: Individually assigned levels of nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), absorbance of PM2.5 (PM2.5abs), PM10, PMcoarse, and two indicators of residential proximity to highly trafficked roads were obtained under a standard exposure protocol (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects—ESCAPE study) in the Stockholm area (Sweden), the Ausburg and Ruhr area (Germany), and the Girona area (Spain). We used linear regression and meta-analyses to examine the association between long-term exposure to air pollution and CIMT. Results: The meta-analysis with 9,183 individuals resulted in an estimated increase in CIMT (geometric mean) of 0.72% (95% CI: –0.65%, 2.10%) per 5-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and 0.42% (95% CI: –0.46%, 1.30%) per 10–5/m increase in PM2.5abs. Living in proximity to high traffic was also positively but not significantly associated with CIMT. Meta-analytic estimates for other pollutants were inconsistent. Results were similar across different adjustment sets and sensitivity analyses. In an extended meta-analysis for PM2.5 with three other previously published studies, a 0.78% (95% CI: –0.18%, 1.75%) increase in CIMT was estimated for a 5-μg/m3 contrast in PM2.5. Conclusions: Using a standardized exposure and analytical protocol in four European cohorts, we found that cross-sectional associations between CIMT and the eight ESCAPE markers of long-term residential air pollution exposure did not reach statistical significance. The additional meta-analysis of CIMT and PM2.5 across all published studies also was positive but not significant. Citation: Perez L, Wolf K, Hennig F, Penell J, Basagaña X, Foraster M, Aguilera I, Agis D, Beelen R, Brunekreef B, Cyrys J, Fuks KB

  8. Air pollution and atherosclerosis: a cross-sectional analysis of four European cohort studies in the ESCAPE study.

    PubMed

    Perez, Laura; Wolf, Kathrin; Hennig, Frauke; Penell, Johanna; Basagaña, Xavier; Foraster, Maria; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Agis, David; Beelen, Rob; Brunekreef, Bert; Cyrys, Josef; Fuks, Kateryna B; Adam, Martin; Baldassarre, Damiano; Cirach, Marta; Elosua, Roberto; Dratva, Julia; Hampel, Regina; Koenig, Wolfgang; Marrugat, Jaume; de Faire, Ulf; Pershagen, Göran; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rivera, Marcela; Seissler, Jochen; Schindler, Christian; Thiery, Joachim; Hoffmann, Barbara; Peters, Annette; Künzli, Nino

    2015-06-01

    In four European cohorts, we investigated the cross-sectional association between long-term exposure to air pollution and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (CIMT), a preclinical marker of atherosclerosis. Individually assigned levels of nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), absorbance of PM2.5 (PM2.5abs), PM10, PMcoarse, and two indicators of residential proximity to highly trafficked roads were obtained under a standard exposure protocol (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects-ESCAPE study) in the Stockholm area (Sweden), the Ausburg and Ruhr area (Germany), and the Girona area (Spain). We used linear regression and meta-analyses to examine the association between long-term exposure to air pollution and CIMT. The meta-analysis with 9,183 individuals resulted in an estimated increase in CIMT (geometric mean) of 0.72% (95% CI: -0.65%, 2.10%) per 5-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and 0.42% (95% CI: -0.46%, 1.30%) per 10-5/m increase in PM2.5abs. Living in proximity to high traffic was also positively but not significantly associated with CIMT. Meta-analytic estimates for other pollutants were inconsistent. Results were similar across different adjustment sets and sensitivity analyses. In an extended meta-analysis for PM2.5 with three other previously published studies, a 0.78% (95% CI: -0.18%, 1.75%) increase in CIMT was estimated for a 5-μg/m3 contrast in PM2.5. Using a standardized exposure and analytical protocol in four European cohorts, we found that cross-sectional associations between CIMT and the eight ESCAPE markers of long-term residential air pollution exposure did not reach statistical significance. The additional meta-analysis of CIMT and PM2.5 across all published studies also was positive but not significant.

  9. Self-reported quality of life of adolescents with cerebral palsy: a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colver, Allan; Rapp, Marion; Eisemann, Nora; Ehlinger, Virginie; Thyen, Ute; Dickinson, Heather O; Parkes, Jackie; Parkinson, Kathryn; Nystrand, Malin; Fauconnier, Jérôme; Marcelli, Marco; Michelsen, Susan I; Arnaud, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Children with cerebral palsy who can self-report have similar quality of life (QoL) to their able-bodied peers. Is this similarity also found in adolescence? We examined how self-reported QoL of adolescents with cerebral palsy varies with impairment and compares with the general population, and how factors in childhood predict adolescent QoL. Methods We report QoL outcomes in a longitudinal follow-up and cross-sectional analysis of individuals included in the SPARCLE1 (childhood) and SPARCLE2 (adolescent) studies. In 2004 (SPARCLE1), a cohort of 818 children aged 8–12 years were randomly selected from population-based cerebral palsy registers in nine European regions. We gathered data from 500 participants about QoL with KIDSCREEN (ten domains); frequency of pain; child psychological problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire); and parenting stress (Parenting Stress Index). At follow-up in 2009 (SPARCLE2), 355 (71%) adolescents aged 13–17 years remained in the study and self-reported QoL (longitudinal sample). 76 additional adolescents self-reported QoL in 2009, providing data for 431 adolescents in the cross-sectional sample. Researchers gathered data at home visits. We compared QoL against matched controls in the general population. We used multivariable regression to relate QoL of adolescents with cerebral palsy to impairments (cross-sectional analysis) and to childhood QoL, pain, psychological problems, and parenting stress (longitudinal analysis). Findings Severity of impairment was significantly associated (p<0·01) with reduced adolescent QoL on only three domains (Moods and emotions, Autonomy, and Social support and peers); average differences in QoL between the least and most able groups were generally less than 0·5 SD. Adolescents with cerebral palsy had significantly lower QoL than did those in the general population in only one domain (Social support and peers; mean difference −2·7 [0·25 SD], 95% CI −4·3 to −1·4

  10. New analysis of the low-energy π±p differential cross-sections of the CHAOS Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsinos, E.; Rasche, G.

    2015-07-01

    In a previous paper, we reported the results of a partial-wave analysis (PWA) of the pion-nucleon (πN) differential cross-sections (DCSs) of the CHAOS Collaboration and came to the conclusion that the angular distribution of their π+p data sets is incompatible with the rest of the modern (meson factory) database. The present work, re-addressing this issue, has been instigated by a number of recent improvements in our analysis, namely regarding the inclusion of the theoretical uncertainties when investigating the reproduction of experimental data sets on the basis of a given "theoretical" solution, modifications in the parametrization of the form factors of the proton and of the pion entering the electromagnetic part of the πN amplitude, and the inclusion of the effects of the variation of the σ-meson mass when fitting the ETH model of the πN interaction to the experimental data. The new analysis of the CHAOS DCSs confirms our earlier conclusions and casts doubt on the value for the πN Σ term, which Stahov, Clement and Wagner have extracted from these data.

  11. Extended phenotype and clinical subgroups in unilateral Meniere disease: A cross-sectional study with cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Frejo, L; Martin-Sanz, E; Teggi, R; Trinidad, G; Soto-Varela, A; Santos-Perez, S; Manrique, R; Perez, N; Aran, I; Almeida-Branco, M S; Batuecas-Caletrio, A; Fraile, J; Espinosa-Sanchez, J M; Perez-Guillen, V; Perez-Garrigues, H; Oliva-Dominguez, M; Aleman, O; Benitez, J; Perez, P; Lopez-Escamez, J A

    2017-02-06

    To define clinical subgroups by cluster analysis in patients with unilateral Meniere disease (MD) and to compare them with the clinical subgroups found in bilateral MD. A cross-sectional study with a two-step cluster analysis. A tertiary referral multicenter study. Nine hundred and eighty-eight adult patients with unilateral MD. best predictors to define clinical subgroups with potential different aetiologies. We established five clusters in unilateral MD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 53% of patients, and it is defined as the sporadic, classic MD without migraine and without autoimmune disorder (AD). Group 2 is found in 8% of patients, and it is defined by hearing loss, which antedates the vertigo episodes by months or years (delayed MD), without migraine or AD in most of cases. Group 3 involves 13% of patients, and it is considered familial MD, while group 4, which includes 15% of patients, is linked to the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by a comorbid AD. We found significant differences in the distribution of AD in clusters 3, 4 and 5 between patients with uni- and bilateral MD. Cluster analysis defines clinical subgroups in MD, and it extends the phenotype beyond audiovestibular symptoms. This classification will help to improve the phenotyping in MD and facilitate the selection of patients for randomised clinical trials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Two-dimensional cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the LBM (Lithium Blanket Module) experiments at LOTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.W.; Dudziak, D.J.; Pelloni, S.; Stepanek, J.

    1988-01-01

    In a recent common Los Alamos/PSI effort, a sensitivity and nuclear data uncertainty path for the modular code system AARE (Advanced Analysis for Reactor Engineering) was developed. This path includes the cross-section code TRAMIX, the one-dimensional finite difference S/sub N/-transport code ONEDANT, the two-dimensional finite element S/sub N/-transport code TRISM, and the one- and two-dimensional sensitivity and nuclear data uncertainty code SENSIBL. Within the framework of the present work a complete set of forward and adjoint two-dimensional TRISM calculations were performed both for the bare, as well as for the Pb- and Be-preceeded, LBM using MATXS8 libraries. Then a two-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for all cases was performed. The goal of this analysis was the determination of the uncertainties of a calculated tritium production per source neutron from lithium along the central Li/sub 2/O rod in the LBM. Considered were the contributions from /sup 1/H, /sup 6/Li, /sup 7/Li, /sup 9/Be, /sup nat/C, /sup 14/N, /sup 16/O, /sup 23/Na, /sup 27/Al, /sup nat/Si, /sup nat/Cr, /sup nat/Fe, /sup nat/Ni, and /sup nat/Pb. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Determinants of HIV prevalence among female sex workers in four south Indian states: analysis of cross-sectional surveys in twenty-three districts.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Banadakoppa M; Moses, Stephen; Washington, Reynold; Isac, Shajy; Mohapatra, Bidhubhushan; Mahagaonkar, Sangameshwar B; Adhikary, Rajatashuvra; Brahmam, Ginnela N V; Paranjape, Ramesh S; Subramanian, Thilakavathi; Blanchard, James F

    2008-12-01

    In four states in southern India we explored the determinants of HIV prevalence among female sex workers (FSW), as well as factors associated with district-level variations in HIV prevalence among FSW. Data from cross-sectional surveys in 23 districts were analysed, with HIV prevalence as the outcome variable, and sociodemographic and sex work characteristics as predictor variables. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to identify factors that could explain variations in HIV prevalence among districts. HIV prevalence among the 10 096 FSW surveyed was 14.5% (95% confidence interval 14.0-15.4), with a large interdistrict variation, ranging from 2% to 38%. Current marital status and the usual place of solicitation emerged as important factors that determine individual probability of being HIV positive, as well as the HIV prevalence within districts. In multivariate analysis, compared with home-based FSW, the odds of being HIV positive was greater for brothel-based FSW [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.17, P

  14. Tibialis anterior analysis from functional and architectural perspective during isometric foot dorsiflexion: a cross-sectional study of repeated measures.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Muñoz, Maria; González-Sánchez, Manuel; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to establish the relationship and degree of contribution between torque and sonomiography variables (pennation angle - muscle thickness), and electromyography variables (EMGAreaUnderCurve - EMGMaximalPeak) of the tibialis anterior muscle during (TA) maximal and relative isometric foot dorsiflexion (IFD). Secondary aim: To determine the measurement's reliability. Cross-sectional study. 31 participants (15 men; 16 women) performed IFD at different intensities (100, 75, 50, and 25 %) of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (three times for each intensity). To determine the torque, pennation angle, muscle thickness, EMGMaximalPeak, and EMGAreaUnderCurve. In order to test the measurement's reliability, Cronbach's alpha and standard error of the measurement were determined. An inferential analysis was carried out using Pearson correlations(r). For each contraction intensity, a multiple regression analysis was performed, where the dependent variable was torque and the independent variables were EMGAreaUnderCurve, EMGMaximalPeak, muscle thickness and pennation angle. All outcome variables show excellent reliability. The highest correlation value was 0.955 (thickness 100 % - thickness 25 %). R (2) values ranged from 0.713 (100 % MVC) to 0.588 (25 % MVC). The outcome variables demonstrated excellent reliability in terms of measuring IFD at different intensities. The correlations between all outcome variables were moderate-to-strong. TA functional and architectural variables have a significant impact on the torque variance during IFD at different intensities.

  15. Bifactor analysis and construct validity of the HADS: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Juan V; Barrada, Juan R; Aguado, Jaume; Osma, Jorge; García-Campayo, Javier

    2014-06-01

    The dimensionality of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a current source of controversy among experts. The present study integrates a solid theoretical framework (Clark & Watson's, 1991, tripartite theory) and a fine-grained methodological approach (structural equation modeling; SEM) to examine the dimensionality and construct validity of the HADS in fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Using the HADS data of 269 Spanish patients with FM, we estimated the cross-sectional and, for the first time, longitudinal fit (autoregressive model) of 2 competing models (oblique 2-factor vs. bifactor) via confirmatory factor analysis. The pattern of relationships between the HADS latent dimensions and positive and negative affect (PA and NA) was analyzed using SEM. HADS reliability was assessed by computing the omega and omega hierarchical coefficients. The bifactor model, which accounted for the covariance among HADS items with regard to 1 general factor (psychological distress) and 2 specific factors (depression and anxiety), described the HADS structure better than the original oblique 2-factor model during both study periods. All latent dimensions of the bifactor model were temporally stable. The SEM analysis revealed a significant link between psychological distress and NA as well as between depression and low PA. Only the general factor of psychological distress showed adequate reliability. In conclusion, the HADS shows a clear bifactor structure among FM patients. Our results indicate that it is not recommendable to compute anxiety and depression scores separately because anxiety variance is tapped primarily by the broader construct of psychological distress, and both specific dimensions show low reliability.

  16. Prevalence and associations of general practice nurses' involvement in consultations of general practitioner registrars: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Turnock, Allison; Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim; Tapley, Amanda; van Driel, Mieke; Oldmeadow, Chris; Ball, Jean; Davey, Andrew; Scott, John; Magin, Parker

    2016-02-01

    To establish prevalence and associations of general practice nurses' (GPNs) involvement in general practitioner (GP) registrars' consultations. A cross-sectional analysis from an ongoing cohort study of registrars' clinical consultations in five Australian states. Registrars recorded detailed data from 60 consecutive consultations per 6-month training term. Problems and diagnoses encountered, including chronic disease classification, were coded using the International Classification of Primary Care, second edition duplication system (ICPC-2plus) classification system. The outcome factor in our analysis was GPN involvement in management of individual problems and diagnoses. Independent variables were a range of patient, registrar, practice, consultation and educational factors. We analysed 108 759 consultations of 856 registrars including 169 307 problems or diagnoses. Of the problems/diagnoses, 5.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.0-5.2) involved a GPN. Follow-up with a GPN was organised for 1.5% (95% CI 1.4-1.5) of all problems/diagnoses. Significant associations of GPN involvement included patient age, male sex, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status, non-English-speaking background (NESB) and the patient being new to the practice. Larger practice size, the particular training organisation, and the problem/diagnosis being new and not a chronic disease were other associations. Associations with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status and NESB status suggest GPNs are addressing healthcare needs of these under-serviced groups. But GPNs may be underutilised in chronic disease care.

  17. Coping and back problems: analysis of multiple data sources on an entire cross-sectional cohort of Swedish military recruits

    PubMed Central

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Larsen, Kristian; Ahlstrand, Ingvar; Volinn, Ernest

    2006-01-01

    Background As the literature now stands, a bewildering number and variety of biological, psychological and social factors are, apparently, implicated in back problems. However, if and how these have a direct influence on back problems is not clear. Obesity, for example, has in many studies been shown to be associated with back problems but there is no evidence for a causal link. This could be explained by a dearth of suitably designed studies but also because obesity may be but a proxy for some other, truly explanatory variable. Coping has been linked with, particularly, persistent back problems as well as with health in general. The question is, whether coping could be the explanatory link between, for example, these two variables. A cross-sectional study was undertaken using data from the Swedish Army, consisting of the entire cohort of males (N = 48,502) summoned in 1998 to serve in the military. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relation between five independent variables and two dependent variables ("outcome variables"). The independent variables were two anthropomorphic variables (height and body mass index), two psychological variables (intellectual capacity and coping in relation to stress), and one social variable (type of education). The two outcome variables were back problems and ill health. In particular, we wanted to determine whether controlling for coping would affect the associations between the other four independent variables and the two outcome variables. Methods Data for the analysis come from a battery of standardized examinations, including medical examinations, a test of intellectual capacity, and a test of coping in relation to stress. Each of these examinations was conducted independently of the others. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were calculated for the outcome variables of back problems and ill health. Results The associations between height, body mass index, intellectual capacity, type of education and the two

  18. Relations of low contrast visual acuity, quality of life and multiple sclerosis functional composite: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Schinzel, Johann; Zimmermann, Hanna; Paul, Friedemann; Ruprecht, Klemens; Hahn, Katrin; Brandt, Alexander U; Dörr, Jan

    2014-02-20

    Although common and often disabling in multiple sclerosis (MS), visual dysfunction is currently not adequately accounted for in both clinical routine and MS trials. Sloan low contrast letter acuity (SLCLA) is a standardised chart-based measure of visual function particular at low contrast and has been suggested as additional visual component to the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC). Here, we evaluate the relations between SLCLA, retinal integrity, MSFC, and quality of life (QoL) in MS patients. Cross-sectional analysis of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness, MSFC, SLCLA (2.5% and 1.25% contrast levels), visual evoked potentials, and QoL (Short Form (SF) 36, National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEIVFQ)) using baseline data of 92 MS patients from an ongoing prospective longitudinal trial. Relations between RNFL thickness or P100 latency and SLCLA were analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) accounting for intra-individual inter-eye dependencies and corrected for age, gender, and history of optic neuritis. Pearson's correlations were used to assess relations between SLCLA, MSFC, and QoL. SLCLA reflected RNFL thickness (p = 0.021) and P100 latency (p = 0.004) and predicted vision-related QoL, reflected by the NEIVFQ39 subscores "general vision" and "near activities" (p < 0.008 for both). SLCLA did not predict general QoL reflected by SF36. Implementing SLCLA into MSFC, thus creating a four-dimensional MSFC4, captured aspects of disability reflected by the NEIVFQ39 subscores "general vision" (r = 0.42, p < 0.0001) and "near activity" (r = 0.3, p = 0.014) which were not captured by standard MSFC3. SLCLA at 2.5% and 1.25% contrast levels correlates with retinal morphology and P100 latency and predicts some aspects of vision-related QoL in MS. More importantly, using a prospective cross-sectional approach we provide evidence that extending the MSFC by SLCLA as an additional visual component

  19. Mammographic density and ageing: A collaborative pooled analysis of cross-sectional data from 22 countries worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Vachon, Celine; Miao, Hui; Lajous, Martín; López-Ridaura, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Bertrand, Kimberly; Kwong, Ava; Ursin, Giske; Lee, Eunjung; Qureshi, Samera A.; Ma, Huiyan; Moss, Sue; Allen, Steve; Ndumia, Rose; Vinayak, Sudhir; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Fadzli, Farhana; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Nagata, Chisato; Stone, Jennifer; Ozmen, Vahit; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Schüz, Joachim; Wanders, Johanna O. P.; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Kim, Jisun; Lee, Jong Won; Dickens, Caroline; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee-Seng; Chiarelli, Anna M.; Linton, Linda; Pollan, Marina; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Boyd, Norman; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; McCormack, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD) is one of the strongest breast cancer risk factors. Its age-related characteristics have been studied in women in western countries, but whether these associations apply to women worldwide is not known. Methods and findings We examined cross-sectional differences in MD by age and menopausal status in over 11,000 breast-cancer-free women aged 35–85 years, from 40 ethnicity- and location-specific population groups across 22 countries in the International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD). MD was read centrally using a quantitative method (Cumulus) and its square-root metrics were analysed using meta-analysis of group-level estimates and linear regression models of pooled data, adjusted for body mass index, reproductive factors, mammogram view, image type, and reader. In all, 4,534 women were premenopausal, and 6,481 postmenopausal, at the time of mammography. A large age-adjusted difference in percent MD (PD) between post- and premenopausal women was apparent (–0.46 cm [95% CI: −0.53, −0.39]) and appeared greater in women with lower breast cancer risk profiles; variation across population groups due to heterogeneity (I2) was 16.5%. Among premenopausal women, the √PD difference per 10-year increase in age was −0.24 cm (95% CI: −0.34, −0.14; I2 = 30%), reflecting a compositional change (lower dense area and higher non-dense area, with no difference in breast area). In postmenopausal women, the corresponding difference in √PD (−0.38 cm [95% CI: −0.44, −0.33]; I2 = 30%) was additionally driven by increasing breast area. The study is limited by different mammography systems and its cross-sectional rather than longitudinal nature. Conclusions Declines in MD with increasing age are present premenopausally, continue postmenopausally, and are most pronounced over the menopausal transition. These effects were highly consistent across diverse groups of women worldwide, suggesting that they result from an

  20. Outcomes of variation in hospital nurse staffing in English hospitals: Cross-sectional analysis of survey data and discharge records

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Anne Marie; Clarke, Sean P.; Coles, James; Ball, Jane; James, Philip; McKee, Martin; Aiken, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    Context Despite growing evidence in the US, little evidence has been available to evaluate whether internationally, hospitals in which nurses care for fewer patients have better outcomes in terms of patient survival and nurse retention. Objectives To examine the effects of hospital-wide nurse staffing levels (patient-to-nurse ratios) on patient mortality, failure to rescue (mortality risk for patients with complicated stays) and nurse job dissatisfaction, burnout and nurse-rated quality of care. Design and setting Cross-sectional analysis combining nurse survey data with discharge abstracts. Participants Nurses (N = 3984) and general, orthopaedic, and vascular surgery patients (N = 118 752) in 30 English acute trusts. Results Patients and nurses in the quartile of hospitals with the most favourable staffing levels (the lowest patient-to-nurse ratios) had consistently better outcomes than those in hospitals with less favourable staffing. Patients in the hospitals with the highest patient to nurse ratios had 26% higher mortality (95% CI: 12–49%); the nurses in those hospitals were approximately twice as likely to be dissatisfied with their jobs, to show high burnout levels, and to report low or deteriorating quality of care on their wards and hospitals. Conclusions Nurse staffing levels in NHS hospitals appear to have the same impact on patient outcomes and factors influencing nurse retention as have been found in the USA. PMID:17064706

  1. A cross-sectional analysis of dioxins and health effects in municipal and private waste incinerator workers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Kenya; KUDO, Mitsuhiro; ARITO, Heihachiro; OGAWA, Yasutaka; TAKATA, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was intended to examine health effects of 678 male workers employed during an 8-yr period from 2000 to 2007 at 36 municipal and private waste incineration plants in Japan. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of concentrations of dioxins including coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (coplanar PCBs) and evaluation of health effects. Health effects including diabetes were surveyed via a physician’s interview or clinical data from blood samples. There was a certain difference in serum concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) between the incinerator workers and Japanese general population, although no differences in the concentrations of total dioxins or polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) were found between the two groups. A few positive correlations between serum levels of PCDDs and PCDFs and the results of laboratory and physiological tests were found, but coplanar PCBs showed significant relations with 14 parameters of the tests. The background serum levels of PCDDs, PCDFs and total dioxins were significantly associated with the prevalence of diabetes. No essential differences in serum concentrations of total dioxins and in prevalence of diabetes between our subjects and the general population suggested that the incinerator workers were marginally exposed to dioxins in the workplace without any recognizable adverse health effects. PMID:26212412

  2. A cross-sectional analysis of dioxins and health effects in municipal and private waste incinerator workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenya; Kudo, Mitsuhiro; Arito, Heihachiro; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Takata, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was intended to examine health effects of 678 male workers employed during an 8-yr period from 2000 to 2007 at 36 municipal and private waste incineration plants in Japan. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of concentrations of dioxins including coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (coplanar PCBs) and evaluation of health effects. Health effects including diabetes were surveyed via a physician's interview or clinical data from blood samples. There was a certain difference in serum concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) between the incinerator workers and Japanese general population, although no differences in the concentrations of total dioxins or polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) were found between the two groups. A few positive correlations between serum levels of PCDDs and PCDFs and the results of laboratory and physiological tests were found, but coplanar PCBs showed significant relations with 14 parameters of the tests. The background serum levels of PCDDs, PCDFs and total dioxins were significantly associated with the prevalence of diabetes. No essential differences in serum concentrations of total dioxins and in prevalence of diabetes between our subjects and the general population suggested that the incinerator workers were marginally exposed to dioxins in the workplace without any recognizable adverse health effects.

  3. Cognitive Functioning in Adults Aging with HIV: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Cognitive Subtypes and Influential Factors.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pariya L; Crowe, Michael; Ross, Lesley A; Wadley, Virginia; Ball, Karlene; Vance, David E

    2014-02-18

    This cross-sectional study examined cognitive subtypes and influential factors in HIV-positive (HIV+) adults. Two-step cluster analysis was conducted on a neurocognitive test battery in a sample (N = 78) of adults and older adults with HIV (Mage = 46.1). Next, cognitive, functional, and mental and physical health differences were compared between the HIV+ clusters and an HIV- reference group (N = 84; Mage = 47.9). A two-cluster solution emerged, with a lower performing cluster exhibiting poorer performance across all domains except psychomotor speed, and a "normal" cluster displaying similar performance as the HIV- group. The most influential factors to classification in the lower performing cluster were older age and presence of stroke and hypertension. There were trends for longer duration of HIV-infection, higher unemployment rates, and greater prevalence of Hepatitis C co-infection in the lower performing cluster. These findings suggest that there are not unique cognitive subtypes in HIV, but rather a subset of individuals who exhibit globally normal performance and those with below average performance. Older age and the related cardiovascular comorbidities of both aging and HIV medications may be key influential factors to variability in neurocognitive functioning in this population and thus should be considered in future studies. Implications for research and practice are provided.

  4. Air Force Hearing Conservation Program data 1998-2008: a cross-sectional analysis of positive threshold shifts.

    PubMed

    Cason, Eboniece M

    2012-05-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is an area of concern for military personnel. The purpose of this study was to conduct an analysis of hearing loss in military and civilian personnel enrolled in the Air Force Hearing Conservation Program between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2008. The research employed a cross-sectional design. Data stored in the Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System-Data Repository was analyzed. Among military personnel, the logistic regression model demonstrated a protective effect for enlisted members (OR = 0.78, p < 0.0001) and women (OR = 0.63, p < 0.0001) and an increased odds of having a positive threshold shift (PTS) with increasing age group (OR = 1.919, p < 0.001). Among civilians, the logistic regression model demonstrated a protective effect for women (OR = 0.52, p < 0.0001) and increased odds of having a PTS with increasing age group (OR = 1.73, p < 0.001). When compared to military personnel, civilian personnel had increased risk for PTS (RR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.67-1.69). Increasing age and being male were associated with higher PTS rates. PTS rates were higher in officers than in enlisted military members. When compared to military personnel, civilian personnel were found to have an increased risk for PTS.

  5. Psoriatic patients have an increased risk of polycystic ovary syndrome: results of a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Moro, Francesca; De Simone, Clara; Morciano, Andrea; Tropea, Anna; Sagnella, Francesca; Palla, Carola; Scarinci, Elisa; Teti, Angela; Caldarola, Giacomo; D'Agostino, Magda; Mancuso, Salvatore; Lanzone, Antonio; Apa, Rosanna

    2013-03-01

    To define the prevalence and the features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in patients with psoriasis. To our knowledge, the association between PCOS and psoriasis has not been explored in previous studies. Psoriasis is linked with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which are features often associated with PCOS. A cross-sectional analysis was performed between January 2010 and April 2012. Unit of human reproductive pathophysiology, Catholic University Hospital. We prospectively analyzed 51 patients with psoriasis and 102 healthy age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls. None. The prevalence and characteristics of PCOS women of reproductive age with chronic plaque psoriasis. The prevalence of PCOS was greater in patients with psoriasis than in matched control subjects (47.05% and 11.76%, respectively; odds ratio, 6.66; 95% confidence interval 2.95-15.07). Among the women with psoriasis, the prevalence of Psoriasis Area and Severity Index ≥10 was higher in patients with PCOS than in subjects without PCOS (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval 1.04-11.72). The prevalence of PCOS in women with psoriasis is remarkably greater than in age- and BMI-matched control women. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. No preventive effect of dietary fiber against colon cancer in the Japanese population: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Wada, Seiko; Sugawara, Kazuo; Tokunaga, Shoji; MacAuley, Domhnall; Baxter, David

    2003-01-01

    The report of Fuchs et al. in 1999 on the protective effects of dietary fiber (DF) against colon carcinogenesis has led many researchers to question the benefits of DF. We analyzed the relationship between dietary intake and mortality from colon cancer in Japan cross-sectionally. Dietary data were taken from the National Nutrition Survey. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated using data from "Vital Statistics" and "the Population Census in Japan." Multiple regression analysis (stepwise variable selection method) was performed with the SMR of colon cancer as the objective variable and intake of DF, nutrients, and food groups in 1966 as the explanatory variables. The beta regression coefficient was significantly positive for intakes of fat, protein, and vitamin C and significantly negative for intakes of calcium and vitamin A to the SMR of colon cancer. However, no significant correlation was observed for DF or for any of the various food groups analyzed. In conclusion, our data do not demonstrate any protective effect of DF on colon cancer in subjects with a low fat intake (Japanese subjects), which supports Fuchs' findings in subjects with high fat intake (U.S. subjects).

  7. Cholesteatoma as a complication of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the temporal bone: A nationwide cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Jonathan C; Vecchiotti, Mark

    2017-09-01

    To determine if patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) of the temporal bone have a higher risk of developing cholesteatoma. Review of literature and cross-sectional weighted analysis of patients under 19 with a diagnosis of LCH from the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) and Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) from 2000 to 2013. ICD-9 codes and demographics were analyzed; pairwise comparisons and multivariate analyses were performed. Only seven cases of cholesteatoma after the treatment for LCH of the temporal bone have been documented in the literature. No significant association between cholesteatoma and LCH was seen (OR 0.747 [0.149-3.751]). Patients with LCH did have a higher incidence of chronic otitis media, chronic otitis externa, chronic sinusitis, hearing loss, and otitis media with effusion. Our results show that patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis do not appear to have a higher risk of developing cholesteatoma. However they are more likely to be diagnosed with chronic otitis externa which should be differentiated from cholesteatoma or recurrence of LCH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of 3D metrology techniques as an alternative to cross-sectional analysis at the R&D level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, Johann; Miller, Kirk

    2004-05-01

    The decrease in critical dimension (CD) of integrated circuits (IC) always challenges metrology tools capabilities. In less than ten years we will reach the limit of CMOS technology with typical printed gate length less than 20 nm and physical gate length of less than 15nm. Advanced R&D departments must already address today all the issues related to so small devices otherwise the roadmap requirements would not be fulfilled. Indeed most of the issues are directly related to metrology capabilities such as precise control of the shape of etched features, sidewall roughness, wafer CD uniformity, and mask inspection (. . .). All these parameters will represent a bottleneck for advanced patterning if metrology tools are unable to measure them with a precision better than few nanometers. In this paper we show that 3D metrology is mandatory to succeed in reaching future roadmap requirements. We address in details the CD AFM technique capabilities which is a potential candidate for advanced patterning metrology. The experimental data are compared with today"s reference: cross-sectional analysis (X-SEM). We also discuss on other techniques such as scatterometry and top view CD-SEM which are also candidates for 3D metrology.

  9. Evaluation of Collision Cross Section Calibrants for Structural Analysis of Lipids by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Collision cross section (CCS) measurement of lipids using traveling wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TWIM-MS) is of high interest to the lipidomics field. However, currently available calibrants for CCS measurement using TWIM are predominantly peptides that display quite different physical properties and gas-phase conformations from lipids, which could lead to large CCS calibration errors for lipids. Here we report the direct CCS measurement of a series of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) in nitrogen using a drift tube ion mobility (DTIM) instrument and an evaluation of the accuracy and reproducibility of PCs and PEs as CCS calibrants for phospholipids against different classes of calibrants, including polyalanine (PolyAla), tetraalkylammonium salts (TAA), and hexakis(fluoroalkoxy)phosphazines (HFAP), in both positive and negative modes in TWIM-MS analysis. We demonstrate that structurally mismatched calibrants lead to larger errors in calibrated CCS values while the structurally matched calibrants, PCs and PEs, gave highly accurate and reproducible CCS values at different traveling wave parameters. Using the lipid calibrants, the majority of the CCS values of several classes of phospholipids measured by TWIM are within 2% error of the CCS values measured by DTIM. The development of phospholipid CCS calibrants will enable high-accuracy structural studies of lipids and add an additional level of validation in the assignment of identifications in untargeted lipidomics experiments. PMID:27321977

  10. Current smoking and secondhand smoke exposure and depression among Korean adolescents: analysis of a national cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between cigarette smoke exposure and depression among Korean adolescents using the seventh Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting A nationally representative sample of middle and high school students across South Korea. Participants 75 643 eligible participants across the country. Primary outcome measures Current smoking, secondhand smoke exposure and depression. Methodology Data were analysed from a nationally representative survey of 75 643 participants (37 873 men and 37 770 women). Data were gathered on extensive information including current smoking, secondhand smoke exposure and depression in adolescence. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between current smoking, secondhand smoke exposure and depression in Korean adolescents. Results Among those who had never smoked, secondhand smoke exposure was positively associated with depression in male and female adolescents in a dose–response relation (OR 1.27, OR 1.52 in males; OR 1.25, OR 1.72 in females). Similar associations were observed among currently smoking men and women in a dose–response manner (OR 1.29, OR 1.55 in males; OR 1.22, OR 1.41 in females). These significant trends were consistently observed even after adjustments. Conclusions We suggested that current smoking and secondhand smoke exposure were positively associated with depression in male and female adolescents. Efforts to encourage no smoking and no secondhand smoke exposure will be established for adolescents. PMID:24503297

  11. Current smoking and secondhand smoke exposure and depression among Korean adolescents: analysis of a national cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae

    2014-02-06

    To examine the association between cigarette smoke exposure and depression among Korean adolescents using the seventh Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS). Cross-sectional study. A nationally representative sample of middle and high school students across South Korea. 75 643 eligible participants across the country. Current smoking, secondhand smoke exposure and depression. Data were analysed from a nationally representative survey of 75 643 participants (37 873 men and 37 770 women). Data were gathered on extensive information including current smoking, secondhand smoke exposure and depression in adolescence. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between current smoking, secondhand smoke exposure and depression in Korean adolescents. Among those who had never smoked, secondhand smoke exposure was positively associated with depression in male and female adolescents in a dose-response relation (OR 1.27, OR 1.52 in males; OR 1.25, OR 1.72 in females). Similar associations were observed among currently smoking men and women in a dose-response manner (OR 1.29, OR 1.55 in males; OR 1.22, OR 1.41 in females). These significant trends were consistently observed even after adjustments. We suggested that current smoking and secondhand smoke exposure were positively associated with depression in male and female adolescents. Efforts to encourage no smoking and no secondhand smoke exposure will be established for adolescents.

  12. Prevalence of joint replacement surgery in rheumatoid arthritis patients: cross-sectional analysis in a large observational cohort in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Jinju; Tanaka, Sakae; Matsui, Toshihiro; Mori, Toshihito; Nishimura, Keita; Eto, Yoshito; Kaneko, Atsushi; Saisho, Koichiro; Yasuda, Masayuki; Chiba, Noriyuki; Yoshinaga, Yasuhiko; Saeki, Yukihiko; Seki, Atsuhito; Tohma, Shigeto

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of total joint arthroplasty (TJA) in Japanese rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients undergoing conventional drug treatment in a large observational cohort in Japan. A total of 5,177 RA patients were studied for the prevalence of TJA, who were enrolled in the NinJa database during the fiscal year of 2006. The cases of 2,695 RA patients with more than ten years of disease duration were extracted and subjected to further analysis. The prevalence of TJA increased in accordance with the disease duration, and the prevalence was markedly increased after ten years. Among the 2,695 patients with more than ten years of disease duration, 1,431 TJAs were performed in 645 (24.6%) patients. The patients with TJA had higher disease activity than those without TJA. In this cross-sectional study, TJAs were performed in approximately a quarter of the Japanese RA patients with more than ten years of disease duration. The result showed that patients with higher disease activity required TJA.

  13. Employees' Willingness to Participate in Work-Related Learning: A Multilevel Analysis of Employees' Learning Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyndt, Eva; Onghena, Patrick; Smet, Kelly; Dochy, Filip

    2014-01-01

    The current study focuses on employees' learning intentions, or the willingness to undertake formal work-related learning. This cross-sectional survey study included a sample of 1,243 employees that are nested within 21 organisations. The results of the multilevel analysis show that self-directedness in career processes, time management,…

  14. Employees' Willingness to Participate in Work-Related Learning: A Multilevel Analysis of Employees' Learning Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyndt, Eva; Onghena, Patrick; Smet, Kelly; Dochy, Filip

    2014-01-01

    The current study focuses on employees' learning intentions, or the willingness to undertake formal work-related learning. This cross-sectional survey study included a sample of 1,243 employees that are nested within 21 organisations. The results of the multilevel analysis show that self-directedness in career processes, time management,…

  15. Status of the R-matrix Code AMUR toward a consistent cross-section evaluation and covariance analysis for the light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunieda, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    We report the status of the R-matrix code AMUR toward consistent cross-section evaluation and covariance analysis for the light-mass nuclei. The applicable limit of the code is extended by including computational capability for the charged-particle elastic scattering cross-sections and the neutron capture cross-sections as example results are shown in the main texts. A simultaneous analysis is performed on the 17O compound system including the 16O(n,tot) and 13C(α,n)16O reactions together with the 16O(n,n) and 13C(α,α) scattering cross-sections. It is found that a large theoretical background is required for each reaction process to obtain a simultaneous fit with all the experimental cross-sections we analyzed. Also, the hard-sphere radii should be assumed to be different from the channel radii. Although these are technical approaches, we could learn roles and sources of the theoretical background in the standard R-matrix.

  16. Differential collision cross-sections for atomic oxygen: Analysis of space flight instruments for solar terrestrial physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the status of the Cross-section Facility at MSFC is presented. A facility was designed, fabricated, assembled, tested, and operated for measurement of differential scattering cross sections important to understand the induced environment for a vehicle (e.g., Space Station) in low earth orbit. A user's manual for the facility is also presented. The performance of the facility was evaluated and found to be satisfactory in all the essential areas. Differential scattering cross sections were measured and results for the scattering measurements are included. Input to the development of the Ultraviolet Imager Optical System is also discussed. Design, fabrication, and evaluation of UV filters using a four-layer aluminum base are reported.

  17. Analysis of colliding nuclear matter in terms of symmetry energy and cross-section using computational method

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Arun Bharti, Arun; Gautam, Sakshi

    2015-08-28

    Here we perform a systematic study to extract the information for colliding nuclear matter via symmetry energy and nucleon-nucleon cross section in the fragmentation of some asymmetric colliding nuclei (O{sup 16}+Br{sup 80,} {sup 84,} {sup 92}) in the energy range between 50-200 MeV/nucleon. The simulations are carried out using isospin-dependent quantum-molecular dynamics (IQMD) computational approach for central collisions. Our study reveals that fragmentation pattern of neutron-rich colliding nuclei is sensitive to symmetry energy at lower incident energies, whereas isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon cross section becomes dominant for reactions at higher incident energies.

  18. Decision-tree analysis of clinical data to aid diagnostic reasoning for equine laminitis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wylie, C E; Shaw, D J; Verheyen, K L P; Newton, J R

    2016-04-23

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare the prevalence of selected clinical signs in laminitis cases and non-laminitic but lame controls to evaluate their capability to discriminate laminitis from other causes of lameness. Participating veterinary practitioners completed a checklist of laminitis-associated clinical signs identified by literature review. Cases were defined as horses/ponies with veterinary-diagnosed, clinically apparent laminitis; controls were horses/ponies with any lameness other than laminitis. Associations were tested by logistic regression with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals, with veterinary practice as an a priori fixed effect. Multivariable analysis using graphical classification tree-based statistical models linked laminitis prevalence with specific combinations of clinical signs. Data were collected for 588 cases and 201 controls. Five clinical signs had a difference in prevalence of greater than +50 per cent: 'reluctance to walk' (OR 4.4), 'short, stilted gait at walk' (OR 9.4), 'difficulty turning' (OR 16.9), 'shifting weight' (OR 17.7) and 'increased digital pulse' (OR 13.2) (all P<0.001). 'Bilateral forelimb lameness' was the best discriminator; 92 per cent of animals with this clinical sign had laminitis (OR 40.5, P<0.001). If, in addition, horses/ponies had an 'increased digital pulse', 99 per cent were identified as laminitis. 'Presence of a flat/convex sole' also significantly enhanced clinical diagnosis discrimination (OR 15.5, P<0.001). This is the first epidemiological laminitis study to use decision-tree analysis, providing the first evidence base for evaluating clinical signs to differentially diagnose laminitis from other causes of lameness. Improved evaluation of the clinical signs displayed by laminitic animals examined by first-opinion practitioners will lead to equine welfare improvements.

  19. Time From Smoking Cessation and Inflammatory Markers: New Evidence From a Cross-Sectional Analysis of ELSA-Brasil.

    PubMed

    Peres, Flávia Soares; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Camelo, Lidyane V; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P; Vidigal, Pedro Guatimosim; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Giatti, Luana

    2017-07-01

    The time for inflammatory markers of former smokers to revert to never smoker levels is still controversial, ranging from 5 to 20 years. We aimed to determine the time from smoking cessation for white blood cell (WBC) count and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels to return to those of never-smokers, after adjusting for confounding factors and for secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among participants of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Cross-sectional analysis of baseline participants of ELSA-Brasil. We used linear regression analysis and generalized linear models with gamma distribution and logarithmic link function to estimate the association of WBC count and CRP levels with time from smoking cessation. The following confounding factors were considered: sex, age, education, SHS, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, BMI, total cholesterol/HDL ratio, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Results: After all adjustments, time from smoking cessation <10 years remained associated with higher WBC count (eg, time from smoking cessation ≥ 5 and <10 years: β: 167.92; 95%CI: 23.52 312.31), while only time from smoking cessation <1 year remained associated with higher arithmetic mean of CRP (AMR: 1.26, 95%CI: 1.03‒1.54). Levels of inflammatory markers were similar to those of never-smokers 1 year after smoking cessation for CRP and 10 years after for WBC. The results may add to the arsenal health professionals have to encourage their patients to quit smoking, as some harms from smoking appear to revert to never-smokers' level sooner than previously reported. Longitudinal studies should confirm our findings.

  20. Social class, marginality and self-assessed health: a cross-sectional analysis of the health gradient in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Adolfo Martinez

    2009-01-01

    Background Examining the association between social inequality and health is not new. However, there is little empirical evidence of this association in the Latin American literature, much less from the Mexican scholars. Its research, including the one conducted in Mexico, has mostly followed a theoretical approach and has not been able to provide strong empirical evidence of their important theoretical and conceptual contributions, mainly because reliable, complete and valid data are unavailable. Methods To empirically examine the gradient effect of social class on self-rated health in Mexico, a secondary cross-sectional mixed-level analysis was designed. Using individual level data from the Second National Health Survey (ENSA II), social class categories were specified following a stratification approach according to the occupation and education indicators available from ENSA II. Two types of categories were made, one for t urban and one for the rural labor force. Two indicators of perceived health status were used as health outcomes: self-assessed health and reported morbidity. Furthermore, the marginality index, an indicator of relative deprivation was used to examine its contextual effect at the state and regional level. The analysis was conducted using logistic multivariate models. Results The cross-sectional analysis showed a gradient effect of social class for good assessed-health. Relative to the low urban class, the odds ratio (OR) for a good perception of health for individuals belonging to the high urban class was 2.9 (95% confidence interval: 2.1–3.9). The OR for the middle high class was 2.8 (95% confidence interval: 2.4–3.4), while the OR for the middle low class was 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.6–2.1). However, for the rural labour force an OR of 1.5 was only significant between the high class who considered their health as good relative to the low class (95% confidence interval: 1.02–2.2). At the aggregate level, the results also showed

  1. Analysis of nucleon-induced fission cross sections of lead and bismuth at energies from 45 to 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Prokofyev, A.V.; Mashnik, S.G.; Sierk, A.J.

    1998-08-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of the Cascade-Exciton model (CEM) of nuclear reactions to fission cross sections and hoping to learn more about intermediate-energy fission, the authors use an extended version of the CEM, as realized in the code CEM95 to perform a detailed analysis of proton- and neutron-induced fission cross sections of {sup 209}Bi and {sup 208}Pb nuclei and of the linear momentum transfer to the fissioning nuclei in the 45--500 meV energy range.

  2. The Awareness and Educational Status on Oral Health of Elite Athletes: A Cross-Sectional Study with Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgur, Bahar Odabas

    2016-01-01

    In this cross-sectional survey, this study aimed to determine the factors associated with oral health of elite athletes and to determine the clustering tendency of the variables by dendrogram, and to determine the relationship between predefined clusters and see how these clusters can converge. A total of 97 elite (that is, top-level performing)…

  3. Pattern Generalization with Graphs and Words: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analysis of Middle School Students' Representational Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Mitchell J.; Kim, Sunae

    2007-01-01

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal data from students as they advance through the middle school years (grades 6-8) reveal insights into the development of students' pattern generalization abilities. As expected, students show a preference for lower-level tasks such as "reading the data," over more distant predictions and generation of abstractions.…

  4. Transport analysis of measured neutron leakage spectra from spheres as tests of evaluated high energy cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, D. D.; Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.

    1973-01-01

    Integral tests of evaluated ENDF/B high-energy cross sections have been made by comparing measured and calculated neutron leakage flux spectra from spheres of various materials. An Am-Be (alpha,n) source was used to provide fast neutrons at the center of the test spheres of Be, CH2, Pb, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W. The absolute leakage flux spectra were measured in the energy range 0.5 to 12 MeV using a calibrated NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometer. Absolute calculations of the spectra were made using version 3 ENDF/B cross sections and an S sub n discrete ordinates multigroup transport code. Generally excellent agreement was obtained for Be, CH2, Pb, and Mo, and good agreement was observed for Nb although discrepancies were observed for some energy ranges. Poor comparative results, obtained for Ta and W, are attributed to unsatisfactory nonelastic cross sections. The experimental sphere leakage flux spectra are tabulated and serve as possible benchmarks for these elements against which reevaluated cross sections may be tested.

  5. The Importance of Physical Fitness versus Physical Activity for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deborah Rohm; Steinhardt, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships among physical fitness, physical activity, and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) in male police officers. Data from screenings and physical fitness assessments indicated physical activity must be sufficient to influence fitness before obtaining statistically significant risk-reducing…

  6. The Importance of Physical Fitness versus Physical Activity for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deborah Rohm; Steinhardt, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships among physical fitness, physical activity, and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) in male police officers. Data from screenings and physical fitness assessments indicated physical activity must be sufficient to influence fitness before obtaining statistically significant risk-reducing…

  7. Anti-Bullying/Harassment Legislation and Educator Perceptions of Severity, Effectiveness, and School Climate: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosgrove, Heather E.; Nickerson, Amanda B.

    2017-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we examined a matched sample of 924 educators' perceptions of severity of bullying and harassment and school climate prior to (Wave 1 n = 435) and following (Wave 2 n = 489) the implementation of New York's anti-bullying and harassment legislation, the Dignity for All Students Act (DASA). Alignment with DASA mandates…

  8. Variability and Variation of L2 Grammar: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of German Learners' Performance on Two Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Zsuzsanna; Rott, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Research on second language (L2) grammar in task-based language learning has yielded inconsistent results regarding the effects of task-complexity, prompting calls for more nuanced analyses of L2 development and task performance. The present cross-sectional study contributes to this discussion by comparing the performance of 245 learners of German…

  9. Upper body and lower limbs musculoskeletal symptoms and health inequalities in Europe: an analysis of cross-sectional data.

    PubMed

    Montano, Diego

    2014-08-26

    Musculoskeletal disorders are the most frequent occupational diseases in Europe. However, their multifactorial aetiology poses several challenges concerning not only the estimation of relative prevalence rates across occupational groups but also how the co-occurrence of known risk factors might differ between disorders of the upper and lower limbs. Against this background, the following objectives are pursued: (1) to estimate the relative odds and prevalence rates of self-reported disorders of the upper limbs and/or shoulders and neck (upper body) and the lower limbs for major ISCO-88 occupational groups, (2) to evaluate to what extent the associations between known risk factors differ for musculoskeletal disorders of the upper body and the lower limbs. Statistical analysis of cross-sectional data from the European Working Conditions Survey 1995-2010. The probability of reporting upper body and lower limbs pain in the survey sample 2010 is estimated by mixed logistic regression models using the Markov chain Monte Carlo Sampler. Independent variables include some known physical and psychosocial risk factors. Concerning the first objective, an excess risk of reporting musculoskeketal disorders of the upper body was observed among craft workers (ISCO 7), machine operators (ISCO 8) and workers in elementary occupations (ISCO 9). Concerning musculoskeletal disorders of the lower limbs, service and sales workers (ISCO 5) and workers in ISCO groups 7, 8 and 9 reported symptoms more frequently. Regarding the second objective, similar association patterns were observed for upper body and lower limbs symptoms. Major physical risk factors associated with both symptom types were very frequent exposure to tiring positions, carrying heavy loads and performing repetitive tasks. Standing appears to be an important risk factor for lower limbs symptoms only. Results suggest that the unequal burden of exposure has not changed substantially across occupational groups since 1995, and

  10. Endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, Katherine A.; Proctor, David N.; Chow, Mosuk; Troy, Lisa M.; Wang, Na; Vita, Joseph A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Jacques, Paul F.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; West, Sheila G.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are early predictors of cardiovascular disease. Intervention studies suggest that diet is related to vascular health, but most prior studies tested individual foods or nutrients and relied on small samples of younger adults. The purpose of this study was to examine relations between adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and vascular health in a large, cross-sectional analysis. In 5887 adults in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts, diet quality was quantified with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Index (DGAI-2010). Endothelial function was assessed via brachial artery ultrasound and arterial stiffness via arterial tonometry. In age-, sex-, and cohort-adjusted analyses, higher DGAI-2010 score (greater adherence) was modestly associated with lower resting flow velocity, hyperemic response, mean arterial pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index, but not associated with resting arterial diameter or flow-mediated dilation. In multivariable models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, only the association of higher DGAI-2010 with lower baseline flow and augmentation index persisted (β=−0.002, P=0.003 and β=−0.05 ± 0.02, P<0.001, respectively). Age-stratified multivariate-adjusted analyses suggested that the relation of higher DGAI-2010 scores with lower mean arterial pressure, pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index was more pronounced among adults younger than 50 years. Better adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, particularly in younger adults, is associated with lower peripheral blood flow velocity and arterial wave reflection but not flow-mediated dilation. Our results suggest a link between adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and favorable vascular health. PMID:25885520

  11. Health-Related Quality of Life and its Determinants Among Women With Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Didarloo, Alireza; Alizadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a chronic and threatening condition. However, there are controversies on the factors affecting the health related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with diabetes. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate HRQOL and its determinants among females with type II diabetes referred to Diabetes Clinic of Khoy city, Northwest of Iran. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 352 eligible females with diabetes referring to Diabetes Clinic of Khoy. The study data were collected using a three-part instrument including a socio-demographic questionnaire, a questionnaire to assess patients’ knowledge on diabetes and the world health organization’s quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Based on descriptive and inferential statistics, analyses were conducted using frequency, independent samples t–test, correlation coefficient and regression analysis. Results The total mean score of QOL was 58.02 ± 17.63. The lowest and the highest mean scores were observed in physical health and social relationship domains (53.84 ± 17.09) and (65.08 ± 14.87), respectively. The regression models revealed that age, education, duration of disease, and family income were significantly associated with all areas of quality of life (P < 0.05). The results also revealed that co-morbidity was significantly correlated with the overall quality of life and the physical health domain (P < 0.01). Conclusions The mean score of quality of life (QOL) in females with diabetes was far from desirable condition. These findings can help physicians and healthcare providers to design suitable interventions to improve the patients QOL. PMID:27331054

  12. The Collision Cross Sections of Iodide Salt Cluster Ions in Air via Differential Mobility Analysis-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hui; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Oberreit, Derek R.; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    To date, most collision cross section (CCS) predictions have invoked gas molecule impingement-reemission rules in which specular and elastic scattering of spherical gas molecules from rigid polyatomic surfaces are assumed. Although such predictions have been shown to agree well with CCSs measured in helium bath gas, a number of studies reveal that these predictions do not agree with CCSs for ions in diatomic gases, namely, air and molecular nitrogen. To further examine the validity of specular-elastic versus diffuse-inelastic scattering models, we measured the CCSs of positively charged metal iodide cluster ions of the form [MI]n[M+]z, where M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs, n = 1 - 25, and z = 1 - 2. Measurements were made in air via differential mobility analysis mass spectrometry (DMA-MS). The CCSs measured are compared with specular-elastic as well as diffuse-inelastic scattering model predictions with candidate ion structures determined from density functional theory. It is found that predictions from diffuse-inelastic collision models agree well (within 5 %) with measurements from sodium iodide cluster ions, while specular-elastic collision model predictions are in better agreement with cesium iodide cluster ion measurements. The agreement with diffuse-inelastic and specular-elastic predictions decreases and increases, respectively, with increasing cation mass. However, even when diffuse-inelastic cluster ion predictions disagree with measurements, the disagreement is of a near-constant factor for all ions, indicating that a simple linear rescaling collapses predictions to measurements. Conversely, rescaling cannot be used to collapse specular-elastic predictions to measurements; hence, although the precise impingement reemission rules remain ambiguous, they are not specular-elastic.

  13. Estimation of thigh muscle cross-sectional area by single- and multifrequency segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yosuke; Ikenaga, Masahiro; Takeda, Noriko; Morimura, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Nobuyuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Kimura, Misaka; Higaki, Yasuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2014-01-15

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has been used to estimate skeletal muscle mass, but its application in the elderly is not optimal. The accuracy of BIA may be influenced by the expansion of extracellular water (ECW) relative to muscle mass with aging. Multifrequency BIA (MFBIA) can evaluate the distribution between ECW and intracellular water (ICW), and thus may be superior to single-frequency BIA (SFBIA) to estimate muscle mass in the elderly. A total of 58 elderly participants aged 65-85 years were recruited. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was obtained from computed tomography scans at the mid-thigh. Segmental SFBIA and MFBIA were measured for the upper legs. An index of the ratio of ECW and ICW was calculated using MFBIA. The correlation between muscle CSA and SFBIA was moderate (r = 0.68), but strong between muscle CSA and MFBIA (r = 0.85). ECW/ICW index was significantly and positively correlated with age (P < 0.001). SFBIA tends to significantly overestimate muscle CSA in subjects who had relative expansion of ECW in the thigh segment (P < 0.001). This trend was not observed for MFBIA (P = 0.42). Relative expansion of ECW was observed in older participants. The relative expansion of ECW affects the validity of traditional SFBIA, which is lowered when estimating muscle CSA in the elderly. By contrast, MFBIA was not affected by water distribution in thigh segments, thus rendering the validity of MFBIA for estimating thigh muscle CSA higher than SFBIA in the elderly.

  14. Reporting standards for Bland-Altman agreement analysis in laboratory research: a cross-sectional survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Chhapola, Viswas; Kanwal, Sandeep Kumar; Brar, Rekha

    2015-05-01

    To carry out a cross-sectional survey of the medical literature on laboratory research papers published later than 2012 and available in the common search engines (PubMed, Google Scholar) on the quality of statistical reporting of method comparison studies using Bland-Altman (B-A) analysis. Fifty clinical studies were identified which had undertaken method comparison of laboratory analytes using B-A. The reporting of B-A was evaluated using a predesigned checklist with following six items: (1) correct representation of x-axis on B-A plot, (2) representation and correct definition of limits of agreement (LOA), (3) reporting of confidence interval (CI) of LOA, (4) comparison of LOA with a priori defined clinical criteria, (5) evaluation of the pattern of the relationship between difference (y-axis) and average (x-axis) and (6) measures of repeatability. The x-axis and LOA were presented correctly in 94%, comparison with a priori clinical criteria in 74%, CI reporting in 6%, evaluation of pattern in 28% and repeatability assessment in 38% of studies. There is incomplete reporting of B-A in published clinical studies. Despite its simplicity, B-A appears not to be completely understood by researchers, reviewers and editors of journals. There appear to be differences in the reporting of B-A between laboratory medicine journals and other clinical journals. A uniform reporting of B-A method will enhance the generalizability of results. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Potential Predictors of Plasma Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Concentrations: Cross-Sectional Analysis in the EPIC-Germany Study

    PubMed Central

    di Giuseppe, Romina; Kühn, Tilman; Hirche, Frank; Buijsse, Brian; Dierkes, Jutta; Fritsche, Andreas; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner; Stangl, Gabriele I.; Weikert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone involved in the regulation of phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, has been related to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in chronic kidney disease patients and in the general population. However, what determines higher FGF23 levels is still unclear. Also, little is known about the influence of diet on FGF23. The aim of this study was therefore to identify demographic, clinical and dietary correlates of high FGF23 concentrations in the general population. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis within a randomly selected subcohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Germany comprising 2134 middle-aged men and women. The Human FGF23 (C-Terminal) ELISA kit was used to measure FGF23 in citrate plasma. Dietary data were obtained at baseline via validated food frequency questionnaires including up to 148 food items. Results Multivariable adjusted logistic regression showed that men had a 66% lower and smokers a 64% higher probability of having higher FGF23 (≥ 90 RU/mL) levels compared, respectively, with women and nonsmokers. Each doubling in parathyroid hormone, creatinine, and C-reactive protein was related to higher FGF23. Among the dietary factors, each doubling in calcium and total energy intake was related, respectively, to a 1.75 and to a 4.41 fold increased probability of having higher FGF23. Finally, each doubling in the intake of iron was related to an 82% lower probability of having higher FGF23 levels. Results did not substantially change after exclusion of participants with lower kidney function. Conclusions In middle-aged men and women traditional and non-traditional CVD risk factors were related to higher FGF23 concentrations. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the potential mechanisms linking increased FGF23 to increased CVD risk. PMID:26193703

  16. Understanding the drive to escort: a cross-sectional analysis examining parental attitudes towards children's school travel and independent mobility.

    PubMed

    Mammen, George; Faulkner, Guy; Buliung, Ron; Lay, Jennifer

    2012-10-11

    The declining prevalence of Active School Transportation (AST) has been accompanied by a decrease in independent mobility internationally. The objective of this study was to compare family demographics and AST related perceptions of parents who let their children walk unescorted to/from school to those parents who escort (walk and drive) their children to/from school. By comparing these groups, insight was gained into how we may encourage greater AST and independent mobility in youth living in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, Canada. This study involved a cross-sectional design, using data from a self-reported questionnaire (n =1,016) that examined parental perceptions and attitudes regarding AST. A multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to explore the differences between households where children travelled independently to school or were escorted. Findings revealed that unescorted children were: significantly older, the families spoke predominantly English at home, more likely to live within one kilometer from school, and their parents agreed to a greater extent that they chose to reside in the current neighborhood in order for their child to walk to/from school. The parents of the escorted children worried significantly more about strangers and bullies approaching their child as well as the traffic volume around school. From both a policy and research perspective, this study highlights the value of distinguishing between mode (i.e., walking or driving) and travel independence. For policy, our findings highlight the need for planning decisions about the siting of elementary schools to include considerations of the impact of catchment size on how children get to/from school. Given the importance of age, distance, and safety issues as significant correlates of independent mobility, research and practice should focus on the development and sustainability of non-infrastructure programs that alleviate parental safety concerns.

  17. Who has undiagnosed dementia? A cross-sectional analysis of participants of the Aging, Demographics and Memory Study

    PubMed Central

    Savva, George M.; Arthur, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Background: delays in diagnosing dementia may lead to suboptimal care, yet around half of those with dementia are undiagnosed. Any strategy for case finding should be informed by understanding the characteristics of the undiagnosed population. We used cross-sectional data from a population-based sample with dementia aged 71 years and older in the United States to describe the undiagnosed population and identify factors associated with non-diagnosis. Methods: the Aging, Demographics and Memory Study (ADAMS) Wave A participants (N = 856) each underwent a detailed neuropsychiatric investigation. Informants were asked whether the participant had ever received a doctor's diagnosis of dementia. We used multiple logistic regression to identify factors associated with informant report of a prior dementia diagnosis among those with a study diagnosis of dementia. Results: of those with a study diagnosis of dementia (n = 307), a prior diagnosis of dementia was reported by 121 informants (weighted proportion = 42%). Prior diagnosis was associated with greater clinical dementia rating (CDR), from 26% (CDR = 1) to 83% (CDR = 5). In multivariate analysis, those aged 90 years or older were less likely to be diagnosed (P = 0.008), but prior diagnosis was more common among married women (P = 0.038) and those who had spent more than 9 years in full-time education (P = 0.043). Conclusions: people with dementia who are undiagnosed are older, have fewer years in education, are more likely to be unmarried, male and have less severe dementia than those with a diagnosis. Policymakers and clinicians should be mindful of the variation in diagnosis rates among subgroups of the population with dementia. PMID:25758406

  18. A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Variation in Charges and Prices across California for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Renee Y.; Akosa Antwi, Yaa; Weber, Ellerie; Brownell Nath, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Background Though past studies have shown wide variation in aggregate hospital price indices and specific procedures, few have documented or explained such variation for distinct and common episodes of care. Objectives We sought to examine the variability in charges for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a drug-eluting stent and without major complications (MS-DRG-247), and determine whether hospital and market characteristics influenced these charges. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of adults admitted to California hospitals in 2011 for MS-DRG-247 using patient discharge data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. We used a two-part linear regression model to first estimate hospital-specific charges adjusted for patient characteristics, and then examine whether the between-hospital variation in those estimated charges was explained by hospital and market characteristics. Results Adjusted charges for the average California patient admitted for uncomplicated PCI ranged from $22,047 to $165,386 (median: $88,350) depending on which hospital the patient visited. Hospitals in areas with the highest cost of living, those in rural areas, and those with more Medicare patients had higher charges, while government-owned hospitals charged less. Overall, our model explained 43% of the variation in adjusted charges. Estimated discounted prices paid by private insurers ranged from $3,421 to $80,903 (median: $28,571). Conclusions Charges and estimated discounted prices vary widely between hospitals for the average California patient undergoing PCI without major complications, a common and relatively homogeneous episode of care. Though observable hospital characteristics account for some of this variation, the majority remains unexplained. PMID:25089905

  19. Metabolic Syndrome, Sarcopenia and Role of Sex and Age: Cross-Sectional Analysis of Kashiwa Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shinya; Tanaka, Tomoki; Akishita, Masahiro; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Tuji, Tetsuo; Iijima, Katsuya

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that effects of cardiovascular risk factors may vary depending on sex and age. In this study, we assessed the associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with sarcopenia and its components in older adults, and examined whether the associations vary by sex and age. We also tested if any one of the MetS components could explain the associations. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the cohort study conducted in Kashiwa city, Chiba, Japan in 2012 which included 1971 functionally-independent, community-dwelling Japanese adults aged 65 years or older (977 men, 994 women). Sarcopenia was defined based on appendicular skeletal muscle mass, grip strength and usual gait speed. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 14.2% in men and 22.1% in women, while the prevalence of MetS was 43.6% in men and 28.9% in women. After adjustment for potential confounders, MetS was positively associated with sarcopenia in men aged 65 to 74 years (odds ratio 5.5; 95% confidence interval 1.9–15.9) but not in older men or women. Among the sarcopenia components, MetS was associated with lower muscle mass and grip strength, particularly in men aged 65 to 74 years. The associations of MetS with sarcopenia and its components were mainly driven by abdominal obesity regardless of sex or age. In conclusion, MetS is positively associated with sarcopenia in older men. The association is modified by sex and age, but abdominal obesity is the main contributor to the association across sex and age. PMID:25405866

  20. Gender Roles and Physical Function in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional Analysis of the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tamer; Vafaei, Afshin; Auais, Mohammad; Guralnik, Jack; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria

    2016-01-01

    To examine the relationships between physical function and gender-stereotyped traits and whether these relationships are modified by sex or social context. A total of 1995 community-dwelling older adults from the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS) aged 65 to 74 years were recruited in Natal (Brazil), Manizales (Colombia), Tirana (Albania), Kingston (Ontario, Canada), and Saint-Hyacinthe (Quebec, Canada). We performed a cross-sectional analysis. Study outcomes were mobility disability, defined as having difficulty in walking 400 meters without assistance or climbing a flight of stairs without resting, and low physical performance, defined as a score < 8 on the Short Physical Performance Battery. The 12-item Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) was used to classify participants into four gender roles (Masculine, Feminine, Androgynous, and Undifferentiated) using site-specific medians of femininity and masculinity as cut-off points. Poisson regression models were used to estimate prevalence rate ratios (PRR) of mobility disability and poor physical performance according to gender roles. In models adjusted for sex, marital status, education, income, and research site, when comparing to the androgynous role, we found higher prevalence of mobility disability and poor physical performance among participants endorsing the feminine role (PRR = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.39 and PRR = 1.37, CI 1.01-1.88, respectively) or the undifferentiated role (PRR = 1.23, 95% CI 1.07-1.42 and PRR = 1.58, CI 1.18-2.12, respectively). Participants classified as masculine did not differ from androgynous participants in prevalence rates of mobility disability or low physical performance. None of the multiplicative interactions by sex and research site were significant. Feminine and undifferentiated gender roles are independent risk factors for mobility disability and low physical performance in older adults. Longitudinal research is needed to assess the mediation pathways

  1. Potential Predictors of Plasma Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Concentrations: Cross-Sectional Analysis in the EPIC-Germany Study.

    PubMed

    di Giuseppe, Romina; Kühn, Tilman; Hirche, Frank; Buijsse, Brian; Dierkes, Jutta; Fritsche, Andreas; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner; Stangl, Gabriele I; Weikert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Increased fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone involved in the regulation of phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, has been related to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in chronic kidney disease patients and in the general population. However, what determines higher FGF23 levels is still unclear. Also, little is known about the influence of diet on FGF23. The aim of this study was therefore to identify demographic, clinical and dietary correlates of high FGF23 concentrations in the general population. We performed a cross-sectional analysis within a randomly selected subcohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Germany comprising 2134 middle-aged men and women. The Human FGF23 (C-Terminal) ELISA kit was used to measure FGF23 in citrate plasma. Dietary data were obtained at baseline via validated food frequency questionnaires including up to 148 food items. Multivariable adjusted logistic regression showed that men had a 66% lower and smokers a 64% higher probability of having higher FGF23 (≥ 90 RU/mL) levels compared, respectively, with women and nonsmokers. Each doubling in parathyroid hormone, creatinine, and C-reactive protein was related to higher FGF23. Among the dietary factors, each doubling in calcium and total energy intake was related, respectively, to a 1.75 and to a 4.41 fold increased probability of having higher FGF23. Finally, each doubling in the intake of iron was related to an 82% lower probability of having higher FGF23 levels. Results did not substantially change after exclusion of participants with lower kidney function. In middle-aged men and women traditional and non-traditional CVD risk factors were related to higher FGF23 concentrations. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the potential mechanisms linking increased FGF23 to increased CVD risk.

  2. Frequency and risk indicators of tooth decay among pregnant women in France: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Kaminski, Monique; Lelong, Nathalie; Musset, Anne-Marie; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Little is known on the prevalence of tooth decay among pregnant women. Better knowledge of tooth decay risk indicators during pregnancy could help to develop follow-up protocols for women at risk, along with better prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth per woman in a large sample of pregnant women in France, and to study associated risk indicators. A secondary cross-sectional analysis of data from a French multicentre case-control study was performed. The sample was composed of 1094 at-term women of six maternity units. A dental examination was carried out within 2 to 4 days post-partum. Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics were obtained through a standardised interview with the women. Medical characteristics were obtained from the women's medical records. Risk indicators associated with tooth decay were identified using a negative binomial hurdle model. 51.6% of the women had tooth decay. The mean number of decayed teeth among women having at least one was 3.1 (s.d. = 2.8). Having tooth decay was statistically associated with lower age (aOR = 1.58, 95%CI [1.03,2.45]), lower educational level (aOR = 1.53, 95%CI [1.06,2.23]) and dental plaque (aOR = 1.75, 95%CI [1.27,2.41]). The number of decayed teeth was associated with the same risk indicators and with non-French nationality and inadequate prenatal care. The frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth among pregnant women were high. Oral health promotion programmes must continue to inform women and care providers about the importance of dental care before, during and after pregnancy. Future research should also assess the effectiveness of public policies related to oral health in target populations of pregnant women facing challenging social or economic situations.

  3. The collision cross sections of iodide salt cluster ions in air via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Hui; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Oberreit, Derek R; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    To date, most collision cross section (CCS) predictions have invoked gas molecule impingement-reemission rules in which specular and elastic scattering of spherical gas molecules from rigid polyatomic surfaces are assumed. Although such predictions have been shown to agree well with CCSs measured in helium bath gas, a number of studies reveal that these predictions do not agree with CCSs for ions in diatomic gases, namely, air and molecular nitrogen. To further examine the validity of specular-elastic versus diffuse-inelastic scattering models, we measured the CCSs of positively charged metal iodide cluster ions of the form [MI]n[M(+)]z, where M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs, n = 1 - 25, and z = 1 - 2. Measurements were made in air via differential mobility analysis mass spectrometry (DMA-MS). The CCSs measured are compared with specular-elastic as well as diffuse-inelastic scattering model predictions with candidate ion structures determined from density functional theory. It is found that predictions from diffuse-inelastic collision models agree well (within 5%) with measurements from sodium iodide cluster ions, while specular-elastic collision model predictions are in better agreement with cesium iodide cluster ion measurements. The agreement with diffuse-inelastic and specular-elastic predictions decreases and increases, respectively, with increasing cation mass. However, even when diffuse-inelastic cluster ion predictions disagree with measurements, the disagreement is of a near-constant factor for all ions, indicating that a simple linear rescaling collapses predictions to measurements. Conversely, rescaling cannot be used to collapse specular-elastic predictions to measurements; hence, although the precise impingement reemission rules remain ambiguous, they are not specular-elastic.

  4. Missed diagnosis of stroke in the emergency department: a cross-sectional analysis of a large population-based sample

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Ernest; Valente, Ernest; Coffey, Rosanna; Hines, Anika L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Some cerebrovascular events are not diagnosed promptly, potentially resulting in death or disability from missed treatments. We sought to estimate the frequency of missed stroke and examine associations with patient, emergency department (ED), and hospital characteristics. Methods Cross-sectional analysis using linked inpatient discharge and ED visit records from the 2009 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases and 2008–2009 State ED Databases across nine US states. We identified adult patients admitted for stroke with a treat-and-release ED visit in the prior 30 days, considering those given a non-cerebrovascular diagnosis as probable (benign headache or dizziness diagnosis) or potential (any other diagnosis) missed strokes. Results There were 23,809 potential and 2243 probable missed strokes representing 12.7% and 1.2% of stroke admissions, respectively. Missed hemorrhages (n = 406) were linked to headache while missed ischemic strokes (n = 1435) and transient ischemic attacks (n = 402) were linked to headache or dizziness. Odds of a probable misdiagnosis were lower among men (OR 0.75), older individuals (18–44 years [base]; 45–64:OR 0.43; 65–74:OR 0.28; ≥ 75:OR 0.19), and Medicare (OR 0.66) or Medicaid (OR 0.70) recipients compared to privately insured patients. Odds were higher among Blacks (OR 1.18), Asian/Pacific Islanders (OR 1.29), and Hispanics (OR 1.30). Odds were higher in non-teaching hospitals (OR 1.45) and low-volume hospitals (OR 1.57). Conclusions We estimate 15,000–165,000 misdiagnosed cerebrovascular events annually in US EDs, disproportionately presenting with headache or dizziness. Physicians evaluating these symptoms should be particularly attuned to the possibility of stroke in younger, female, and non-White patients.

  5. Isolation Facilities for Highly Infectious Diseases in Europe – A Cross-Sectional Analysis in 16 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Stefan; Fusco, Francesco Maria; De Iaco, Giuseppina; Bannister, Barbara; Maltezou, Helena C.; Carson, Gail; Gottschalk, Rene; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Brouqui, Philippe; Puro, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background Highly Infectious Diseases (HIDs) are (i) easily transmissible form person to person; (ii) cause a life-threatening illness with no or few treatment options; and (iii) pose a threat for both personnel and the public. Hence, even suspected HID cases should be managed in specialised facilities minimizing infection risks but allowing state-of-the-art critical care. Consensus statements on the operational management of isolation facilities have been published recently. The study presented was set up to compare the operational management, resources, and technical equipment among European isolation facilities. Due to differences in geography, population density, and national response plans it was hypothesized that adherence to recommendations will vary. Methods and Findings Until mid of 2010 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a cross-sectional analysis of isolation facilities in Europe, recruiting 48 isolation facilities in 16 countries. Three checklists were disseminated, assessing 44 items and 148 specific questions. The median feedback rate for specific questions was 97.9% (n = 47/48) (range: n = 7/48 (14.6%) to n = 48/48 (100%). Although all facilities enrolled were nominated specialised facilities' serving countries or regions, their design, equipment and personnel management varied. Eighteen facilities fulfilled the definition of a High Level Isolation Unit'. In contrast, 24 facilities could not operate independently from their co-located hospital, and five could not ensure access to equipment essential for infection control. Data presented are not representative for the EU in general, as only 16/27 (59.3%) of all Member States agreed to participate. Another limitation of this study is the time elapsed between data collection and publication; e.g. in Germany one additional facility opened in the meantime. Conclusion There are disparities both within and between European countries regarding the design and equipment

  6. Distinct impact of education and income on habitual exercise: a cross-sectional analysis in a rural city in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Hashimoto, Hideki; Lee, Jung Su; Kawakubo, Kiyoshi; Mori, Katsumi; Akabayashi, Akira

    2011-12-01

    Education and income are important socioeconomic indicators that reflect different aspects of social hierarchy. However, only a few studies have explicitly examined how different the relationship between education and health behaviour is from that between income and health behaviour. According to the human capital theory of health investment, education would reflect knowledge assets that allow an efficient investment in health, while income would relate to the value of healthy days and/or the time cost of health investment. Since time cost and the relative price of health would differ across age strata, we examined the significance of effect modification by age strata to distinguish the effects of education on habitual exercise from the effects of income. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire in a rural city in northern Japan in January 2007 (n = 3385). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association of educational attainment and household income with habitual exercise. Interaction terms of these socioeconomic indicators with age strata (<60 years versus ≥60 years) were included to test the distinctive association across age, followed by a stratified analysis. As theoretically predicted, higher income was significantly associated with habitual exercise among those aged 25-59 years, while the association was null or negative among those aged 60 and above. Education was significantly associated with habitual exercise regardless of the age groups. These results suggest that the effects of socioeconomic factors on health behaviours vary according to which socioeconomic indicators are analysed, and which age group is selected. We conclude that studies on the socioeconomic disparity of health behaviours should carefully choose socioeconomic indicators to explain specific health behaviours to reveal underlying mechanisms and provide relevant policy implications, based on explicit behavioural models

  7. Evaluation of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Identifying Overweight Individuals at Increased Cardiometabolic Risk: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Maxine J. E.; Byrne, Christopher D.; Wilson, James F.; Wild, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether bioelectrical impedance analysis could be used to identify overweight individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk, defined as the presence of metabolic syndrome and/or diabetes. Design and Methods Cross-sectional study of a Scottish population including 1210 women and 788 men. The diagnostic performance of thresholds of percentage body fat measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis to identify people at increased cardiometabolic risk was assessed using receiver-operating characteristic curves. Odds ratios for increased cardiometabolic risk in body mass index categories associated with values above compared to below sex-specific percentage body fat thresholds with optimal diagnostic performance were calculated using multivariable logistic regression analyses. The validity of bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure percentage body fat in this population was tested by examining agreement between bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in a subgroup of individuals. Results Participants were aged 16-91 years and the optimal bioelectrical impedance analysis cut-points for percentage body fat for identifying people at increased cardiometabolic risk were 25.9% for men and 37.1% for women. Stratifying by these percentage body fat cut-points, the prevalence of increased cardiometabolic risk was 48% and 38% above the threshold and 24% and 19% below these thresholds for men and women, respectively. By comparison, stratifying by percentage body fat category had little impact on identifying increased cardiometabolic risk in normal weight and obese individuals. Fully adjusted odds ratios of being at increased cardiometabolic risk among overweight people with percentage body fat ≥25.9/37.1% compared with percentage body fat <25.9/37.1% as a reference were 1.93 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–3.10) for men and 1.79 (1.10–2.92) for women. Conclusion Percentage body fat measured using bioelectrical impedance

  8. Quantum radar cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2010-06-01

    The radar cross section σC is an objective measure of the "radar visibility" of an object. As such, σC is an important concept for the correct characterization of the operational performance of radar systems. Furthermore, σC is equally essential for the design and development of stealth weapon systems and platforms. Recent years have seen the theoretical development of quantum radars, that is, radars that operate with a small number of photons. In this regime, the radar-target interaction is described through photon-atom scattering processes governed by the laws of quantum electrodynamics. As such, it is theoretically inconsistent to use the same σC to characterize the performance of a quantum radar. In this paper we define a quantum radar cross section σQ based on quantum electrodynamics and interferometric considerations. We discuss the theoretical challenges of defining σQ, as well as computer simulations of σC and σQ for simple targets.

  9. Participation and Performance Trends in Triple Iron Ultra-triathlon – a Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aims of the present study were to investigate (i) the changes in participation and performance and (ii) the gender difference in Triple Iron ultra-triathlon (11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling and 126.6 km running) across years from 1988 to 2011. Methods For the cross-sectional data analysis, the association between with overall race times and split times was investigated using simple linear regression analyses and analysis of variance. For the longitudinal data analysis, the changes in race times for the five men and women with the highest number of participations were analysed using simple linear regression analyses. Results During the studied period, the number of finishers were 824 (71.4%) for men and 80 (78.4%) for women. Participation increased for men (r 2=0.27, P<0.01) while it remained stable for women (8%). Total race times were 2,146 ± 127.3 min for men and 2,615 ± 327.2 min for women (P<0.001). Total race time decreased for men (r 2=0.17; P=0.043), while it increased for women (r 2=0.49; P=0.001) across years. The gender difference in overall race time for winners increased from 10% in 1992 to 42% in 2011 (r 2=0.63; P<0.001). The longitudinal analysis of the five women and five men with the highest number of participations showed that performance decreased in one female (r 2=0.45; P=0.01). The four other women as well as all five men showed no change in overall race times across years. Conclusions Participation increased and performance improved for male Triple Iron ultra-triathletes while participation remained unchanged and performance decreased for females between 1988 and 2011. The reasons for the increase of the gap between female and male Triple Iron ultra-triathletes need further investigations. PMID:23012633

  10. The Influence of Various Factors on High School Football Helmet Face Mask Removal: A Retrospective, Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Erik E; Decoster, Laura C; Norkus, Susan A; Cappaert, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Context: Most research on face mask removal has been performed on unused equipment. Objective: To identify and compare factors that influence the condition of helmet components and their relationship to face mask removal. Design: A cross-sectional, retrospective study. Setting: Five athletic equipment reconditioning/recertification facilities. Participants: 2584 helmets from 46 high school football teams representing 5 geographic regions. Intervention(s): Helmet characteristics (brand, model, hardware components) were recorded. Helmets were mounted and face mask removal was attempted using a cordless screwdriver. The 2004 season profiles and weather histories were obtained for each high school. Main Outcome Measure(s): Success and failure (including reason) for removal of 4 screws from the face mask were noted. Failure rates among regions, teams, reconditioning year, and screw color (type) were compared. Weather histories were compared. We conducted a discriminant analysis to determine if weather variables, region, helmet brand and model, reconditioning year, and screw color could predict successful face mask removal. Metallurgic analysis of screw samples was performed. Results: All screws were successfully removed from 2165 (84%) helmets. At least 1 screw could not be removed from 419 (16%) helmets. Significant differences were found for mean screw failure per helmet among the 5 regions, with the Midwest having the lowest failure rate (0.08 ± 0.38) and the Southern (0.33 ± 0.72), the highest. Differences were found in screw failure rates among the 46 teams (F1,45 = 9.4, P < .01). Helmets with the longest interval since last reconditioning (3 years) had the highest failure rate, 0.47 ± 0.93. Differences in success rates were found among 4 screw types (χ21,4 = 647, P < .01), with silver screws having the lowest percentage of failures (3.4%). A discriminant analysis (Λ = .932, χ214,n=2584 = 175.34, P < .001) revealed screw type to be the strongest predictor of

  11. Shifting tides in the emigration patterns of Canadian physicians to the United States: a cross-sectional secondary data analysis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Thomas R; Petterson, Stephen; Finnegan, Sean; Bazemore, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The relative ease of movement of physicians across the Canada/US border has led to what is sometimes referred to as a 'brain drain' and previous analysis estimated that the equivalent of two graduating classes from Canadian medical schools were leaving to practice in the US each year. Both countries fill gaps in physician supply with international medical graduates (IMGs) so the movement of Canadian trained physicians to the US has international ramifications. Medical school enrolments have been increased on both sides of the border, yet there continues to be concerns about adequacy of physician human resources. This analysis was undertaken to re-examine the issue of Canadian physician migration to the US. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2015 American Medical Association (AMA) Masterfile to identify and locate any graduates of Canadian schools of medicine (CMGs) working in the United States in direct patient care. We reviewed annual reports of the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS); the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry (CAPER); and the Canadian Collaborative Centre for Physician Resources (C3PR). Beginning in the early 1990s the number of CMGs locating in the U.S. reached an all-time high and then abruptly dropped off in 1995. CMGs are going to the US for post-graduate training in smaller numbers and, are less likely to remain than at any time since the 1970's. This four decade retrospective found considerable variation in the migration pattern of CMGs to the US. CMGs' decision to emigrate to the U.S. may be influenced by both 'push' and 'pull' factors. The relative strength of these factors changed and by 2004, more CMGs were returning from abroad than were leaving and the current outflow is negligible. This study supports the need for medical human resource planning to assume a long-term view taking into account national and international trends to avoid the rapid changes that were observed. These results are of importance to medical

  12. The influence of various factors on high school football helmet face mask removal: a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Erik E; Decoster, Laura C; Norkus, Susan A; Cappaert, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Most research on face mask removal has been performed on unused equipment. To identify and compare factors that influence the condition of helmet components and their relationship to face mask removal. A cross-sectional, retrospective study. Five athletic equipment reconditioning/recertification facilities. 2584 helmets from 46 high school football teams representing 5 geographic regions. Helmet characteristics (brand, model, hardware components) were recorded. Helmets were mounted and face mask removal was attempted using a cordless screwdriver. The 2004 season profiles and weather histories were obtained for each high school. Success and failure (including reason) for removal of 4 screws from the face mask were noted. Failure rates among regions, teams, reconditioning year, and screw color (type) were compared. Weather histories were compared. We conducted a discriminant analysis to determine if weather variables, region, helmet brand and model, reconditioning year, and screw color could predict successful face mask removal. Metallurgic analysis of screw samples was performed. All screws were successfully removed from 2165 (84%) helmets. At least 1 screw could not be removed from 419 (16%) helmets. Significant differences were found for mean screw failure per helmet among the 5 regions, with the Midwest having the lowest failure rate (0.08 +/- 0.38) and the Southern (0.33 +/- 0.72), the highest. Differences were found in screw failure rates among the 46 teams (F(1,45) = 9.4, P < .01). Helmets with the longest interval since last reconditioning (3 years) had the highest failure rate, 0.47 +/- 0.93. Differences in success rates were found among 4 screw types (chi(2) (1,4) = 647, P < .01), with silver screws having the lowest percentage of failures (3.4%). A discriminant analysis (Lambda = .932, chi(2) (14,n=2584) = 175.34, P < .001) revealed screw type to be the strongest predictor of successful removal. Helmets with stainless steel or nickel-plated carbon steel

  13. Urban sprawl, obesity, and cancer mortality in the United States: cross-sectional analysis and methodological challenges.

    PubMed

    Berrigan, David; Tatalovich, Zaria; Pickle, Linda W; Ewing, Reid; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2014-01-06

    Urban sprawl has the potential to influence cancer mortality via direct and indirect effects on obesity, access to health services, physical activity, transportation choices and other correlates of sprawl and urbanization. This paper presents a cross-sectional analysis of associations between urban sprawl and cancer mortality in urban and suburban counties of the United States. This ecological analysis was designed to examine whether urban sprawl is associated with total and obesity-related cancer mortality and to what extent these associations differed in different regions of the US. A major focus of our analyses was to adequately account for spatial heterogeneity in mortality. Therefore, we fit a series of regression models, stratified by gender, successively testing for the presence of spatial heterogeneity. Our resulting models included county level variables related to race, smoking, obesity, access to health services, insurance status, socioeconomic position, and broad geographic region as well as a measure of urban sprawl and several interactions. Our most complex models also included random effects to account for any county-level spatial autocorrelation that remained unexplained by these variables. Total cancer mortality rates were higher in less sprawling areas and contrary to our initial hypothesis; this was also true of obesity related cancers in six of seven U.S. regions (census divisions) where there were statistically significant associations between the sprawl index and mortality. We also found significant interactions (p < 0.05) between region and urban sprawl for total and obesity related cancer mortality in both sexes. Thus, the association between urban sprawl and cancer mortality differs in different regions of the US. Despite higher levels of obesity in more sprawling counties in the US, mortality from obesity related cancer was not greater in such counties. Identification of disparities in cancer mortality within and between geographic regions

  14. Urban sprawl, obesity, and cancer mortality in the United States: cross-sectional analysis and methodological challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Urban sprawl has the potential to influence cancer mortality via direct and indirect effects on obesity, access to health services, physical activity, transportation choices and other correlates of sprawl and urbanization. Methods This paper presents a cross-sectional analysis of associations between urban sprawl and cancer mortality in urban and suburban counties of the United States. This ecological analysis was designed to examine whether urban sprawl is associated with total and obesity-related cancer mortality and to what extent these associations differed in different regions of the US. A major focus of our analyses was to adequately account for spatial heterogeneity in mortality. Therefore, we fit a series of regression models, stratified by gender, successively testing for the presence of spatial heterogeneity. Our resulting models included county level variables related to race, smoking, obesity, access to health services, insurance status, socioeconomic position, and broad geographic region as well as a measure of urban sprawl and several interactions. Our most complex models also included random effects to account for any county-level spatial autocorrelation that remained unexplained by these variables. Results Total cancer mortality rates were higher in less sprawling areas and contrary to our initial hypothesis; this was also true of obesity related cancers in six of seven U.S. regions (census divisions) where there were statistically significant associations between the sprawl index and mortality. We also found significant interactions (p < 0.05) between region and urban sprawl for total and obesity related cancer mortality in both sexes. Thus, the association between urban sprawl and cancer mortality differs in different regions of the US. Conclusions Despite higher levels of obesity in more sprawling counties in the US, mortality from obesity related cancer was not greater in such counties. Identification of disparities in cancer

  15. Violence against Congolese refugee women in Rwanda and mental health: a cross-sectional study using latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Sipsma, Heather L; Falb, Kathryn L; Willie, Tiara; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Bienkowski, Lauren; Meerdink, Ned; Gupta, Jhumka

    2015-04-23

    To examine patterns of conflict-related violence and intimate partner violence (IPV) and their associations with emotional distress among Congolese refugee women living in Rwanda. Cross-sectional study. Two Congolese refugee camps in Rwanda. 548 ever-married Congolese refugee women of reproductive age (15-49 years) residing in Rwanda. Our primary outcome was emotional distress as measured using the Self-Report Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20). For analysis, we considered participants with scores greater than 10 to be experiencing emotional distress and participants with scores of 10 or less not to be experiencing emotional distress. Almost half of women (49%) reported experiencing physical, emotional or sexual violence during the conflict, and less than 10% of women reported experiencing of any type of violence after fleeing the conflict. Lifetime IPV was reported by approximately 22% of women. Latent class analysis derived four distinct classes of violence experiences, including the Low All Violence class, the High Violence During Conflict class, the High IPV class and the High Violence During and After Conflict class. In multivariate regression models, latent class was strongly associated with emotional distress. Compared with women in the Low All Violence class, women in the High Violence During and After Conflict class and women in the High Violence During Conflict had 2.7 times (95% CI 1.11 to 6.74) and 2.3 times (95% CI 1.30 to 4.07) the odds of experiencing emotional distress in the past 4 weeks, respectively. Furthermore, women in the High IPV class had a 4.7 times (95% CI 2.53 to 8.59) greater odds of experiencing emotional distress compared with women in the Low All Violence class. Experiences of IPV do not consistently correlate with experiences of conflict-related violence, and women who experience high levels of IPV may have the greatest likelihood for poor mental health in conflict-affected settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  16. Violence against Congolese refugee women in Rwanda and mental health: a cross-sectional study using latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sipsma, Heather L; Falb, Kathryn L; Willie, Tiara; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Bienkowski, Lauren; Meerdink, Ned; Gupta, Jhumka

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine patterns of conflict-related violence and intimate partner violence (IPV) and their associations with emotional distress among Congolese refugee women living in Rwanda. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Two Congolese refugee camps in Rwanda. Participants 548 ever-married Congolese refugee women of reproductive age (15–49 years) residing in Rwanda. Primary outcome measure Our primary outcome was emotional distress as measured using the Self-Report Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20). For analysis, we considered participants with scores greater than 10 to be experiencing emotional distress and participants with scores of 10 or less not to be experiencing emotional distress. Results Almost half of women (49%) reported experiencing physical, emotional or sexual violence during the conflict, and less than 10% of women reported experiencing of any type of violence after fleeing the conflict. Lifetime IPV was reported by approximately 22% of women. Latent class analysis derived four distinct classes of violence experiences, including the Low All Violence class, the High Violence During Conflict class, the High IPV class and the High Violence During and After Conflict class. In multivariate regression models, latent class was strongly associated with emotional distress. Compared with women in the Low All Violence class, women in the High Violence During and After Conflict class and women in the High Violence During Conflict had 2.7 times (95% CI 1.11 to 6.74) and 2.3 times (95% CI 1.30 to 4.07) the odds of experiencing emotional distress in the past 4 weeks, respectively. Furthermore, women in the High IPV class had a 4.7 times (95% CI 2.53 to 8.59) greater odds of experiencing emotional distress compared with women in the Low All Violence class. Conclusions Experiences of IPV do not consistently correlate with experiences of conflict-related violence, and women who experience high levels of IPV may have the greatest likelihood for poor mental health

  17. Nephrology co-management versus primary care solo management for early chronic kidney disease: a retrospective cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Samal, Lipika; Wright, Adam; Waikar, Sushrut S; Linder, Jeffrey A

    2015-10-12

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) typically manage early chronic kidney disease (CKD), but recent guidelines recommend nephrology co-management for some patients with stage 3 CKD and all patients with stage 4 CKD. We sought to compare quality of care for co-managed patients to solo managed patients. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis. Patients included in the study were adults who visited a PCP during 2009 with laboratory evidence of CKD in the preceding two years, defined as two estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) between 15-59 mL/min/1.73 m(2) separated by 90 days. We assessed process measures (serum eGFR test, urine protein/albumin test, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker [ACE/ARB] prescription, and several tests monitoring for complications) and intermediate clinical outcomes (mean blood pressure and blood pressure control) and performed subgroup analyses by CKD stage. Of 3118 patients, 11 % were co-managed by a nephrologist. Co-management was associated with younger age (69 vs. 74 years), male gender (46 % vs. 34 %), minority race/ethnicity (black 32 % vs. 22 %; Hispanic 13 % vs. 8 %), hypertension (75 % vs. 66 %), diabetes (42 % vs. 26 %), and more PCP visits (5.0 vs. 3.9; p < 0.001 for all comparisons). After adjustment, co-management was associated with serum eGFR test (98 % vs. 94 %, p = <0.0001), urine protein/albumin test (82 % vs 36 %, p < 0.0001), and ACE/ARB prescription (77 % vs. 69 %, p = 0.03). Co-management was associated with monitoring for anemia and metabolic bone disease, but was not associated with lipid monitoring, differences in mean blood pressure (133/69 mmHg vs. 131/70 mmHg, p > 0.50) or blood pressure control. A subgroup analysis of Stage 4 CKD patients did not show a significant association between co-management and ACE/ARB prescription (80 % vs. 73 %, p = 0.26). For stage 3 and 4 CKD patients, nephrology co-management was associated with increased stage

  18. Differential cross section measurements of the 19F(d,d0) elastic scattering for Ion Beam Analysis purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foteinou, V.; Provatas, G.; Aslanoglou, X.; Axiotis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Kokkoris, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Misaelides, P.; Ntemou, E.; Patronis, N.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.

    2017-04-01

    The differential cross sections of the 19F(d,d0) elastic scattering were determined at five backward angles from 125° to 170°. Two independent experiments were performed, one for the determination of the cross sections and one for the validation of the obtained results. In the first experiment, a thin natLiF target was bombarded with deuterons in the energy region from 0.94 to 2.0 MeV. In the benchmarking experiment, a thick ZnF2 pellet was irradiated with deuterons at Ed,lab = 1.11, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8and 2.0MeV .

  19. Calculation and analysis of cross-sections for p+184W reactions up to 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Jun; Han, Yin-Lu

    2015-08-01

    A set of optimal proton optical potential parameters for p+ 184W reactions are obtained at incident proton energy up to 250 MeV. Based on these parameters, the reaction cross-sections, elastic scattering angular distributions, energy spectra and double differential cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 184W are calculated and analyzed by using theoretical models which integrate the optical model, distorted Born wave approximation theory, intra-nuclear cascade model, exciton model, Hauser-Feshbach theory and evaporation model. The calculated results are compared with existing experimental data and good agreement is achieved. Supported by National Basic Research Program of China, Technology Research of Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System for Nuclear Waste Transmutation (2007CB209903) and Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Thorium Molten Salt Reactor Nuclear Energy System (XDA02010100)

  20. The African Origin of Complex Projectile Technology: An Analysis Using Tip Cross-Sectional Area and Perimeter

    PubMed Central

    Sisk, Matthew L.; Shea, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a body of literature focusing on the functionality of modern and stylistically distinct projectile points, comparatively little attention has been paid to quantifying the functionality of the early stages of projectile use. Previous work identified a simple ballistics measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Area, as a way of determining if a given class of stone points could have served as effective projectile armatures. Here we use this in combination with an alternate measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Perimeter, a more accurate proxy of the force needed to penetrate a target to a lethal depth. The current study discusses this measure and uses it to analyze a collection of measurements from African Middle Stone Age pointed stone artifacts. Several point types that were rejected in previous studies are statistically indistinguishable from ethnographic projectile points using this new measure. The ramifications of this finding for a Middle Stone Age origin of complex projectile technology is discussed. PMID:21755048

  1. The african origin of complex projectile technology: an analysis using tip cross-sectional area and perimeter.

    PubMed

    Sisk, Matthew L; Shea, John J

    2011-01-01

    Despite a body of literature focusing on the functionality of modern and stylistically distinct projectile points, comparatively little attention has been paid to quantifying the functionality of the early stages of projectile use. Previous work identified a simple ballistics measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Area, as a way of determining if a given class of stone points could have served as effective projectile armatures. Here we use this in combination with an alternate measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Perimeter, a more accurate proxy of the force needed to penetrate a target to a lethal depth. The current study discusses this measure and uses it to analyze a collection of measurements from African Middle Stone Age pointed stone artifacts. Several point types that were rejected in previous studies are statistically indistinguishable from ethnographic projectile points using this new measure. The ramifications of this finding for a Middle Stone Age origin of complex projectile technology is discussed.

  2. MRI analysis and clinical significance of lower extremity muscle cross-sectional area after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Robert M.; Johnson, Kori; Khalil, Refka E.; Khan, Rehan; Gorgey, Ashraf S.

    2017-01-01

    Shortly after spinal cord injury (SCI), the musculoskeletal system undergoes detrimental changes in size and composition, predominantly below the level of injury. The loss of muscle size and strength, along with increased immobility, predisposes persons with SCI to rapid and severe loss in bone mineral density and other health related consequences. Previous studies have highlighted the significance of measuring thigh muscle cross-sectional area, however, measuring the size and composition of muscles of the lower leg may provide insights on how to decrease the risk of various comorbidities. The purpose of the current review was to summarize the methodological approach to manually trace and measure the muscles of the lower leg in individuals with SCI, using magnetic resonance imaging. We also intend to highlight the significance of analyzing lower leg muscle cross-sectional area and its relationship to musculoskeletal and vascular systems in persons with SCI. PMID:28616021

  3. Quantitative Microstructural Analysis of Unidirectional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites. Part 1. Microstructural Characterization of Composite Cross Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    CHARACTERIZATION OF COMPOSITE CROSS SECTION 7. AUTIIHOR() S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) John J. Ricca and Rebecca M. Jurta s. PERFORING ORG~ANVTOe NAM...Dep for Sci & Tech 1 D. Rose 1 Dr. J. R. Sculley , SARD I AMSTA-RKA 1 AMSTA-UL, Technical Library Deputy Chief of Staff, Research, Development, and 1...Gerstle, Div 5814 The John Hopkins University, Department of Civil Engineering/ Materials Science and Engineering, Baltimore, MD 28218 1 ATTN: Dr. R

  4. Embedding-Free Method for Preparation of Cross-Sections of Organic Materials for Micro Chemical Analysis Using Gas Cluster Ion Beam Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Ichiro; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S

    2017-05-02

    We present a novel in situ mask method for the preparation of cross-sections of organic materials such as polymer multilayer films suitable for chemical imaging of buried interfaces. We demonstrate this method on a model buried interface system consisting of a piece of Scotch tape adhered to a PET substrate and a protective film used in consumer packaging. A high dose of gallium from a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to produce a damaged overlayer on the surface of the organic sample. The damaged layer has a significantly slower sputter rate compared to the native undamaged organic material. Therefore, during gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) depth profiling experiments the damaged layer functions as a mask, protecting the sample beneath and producing a cross-section at the edge of the mask. The FIB itself cannot be used directly to prepare the cross-section since the organic materials are easily damaged. A four step workflow is described including a final cleaning procedure to remove redeposited material from the cross-section. The workflow is completed in a few hours for samples up to 100 μm thickness. The method does not require sample embedding and is suited to automated analysis, which can be important benefits for industrial analysis where a variety of samples are analyzed routinely.

  5. Analysis of the low- and high-energy fusion cross sections: the case of 58Ni+54Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.

    2017-04-01

    The importance of the saturation effect of cold nuclear matter (NM) on describing the fusion hindrance phenomenon at extremely low incident energies is investigated for the medium-heavy mass system of 58Ni+54Fe. From the theoretical viewpoint, for considering the mentioned property during the fusion process one can use the double-folding (DF) model which is modified through the repulsive core effects as a basic heavy ion-ion potential. The theoretical calculations of the fusion cross sections are performed using the coupled-channel technique, including couplings to the low-lying {2}+ and {3}- states in target and projectile. It is shown that the corrective effects of the cold NM provide an appropriate description for the energy-dependent behavior of the measured fusion cross sections at extremely low incident energies. Moreover, we find that the calculated results of the astrophysical S factor and the logarithmic derivative based on the modified form of the DF model are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data at these energies. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present sudden approach for the behavior of the fusion cross sections at high incident energies. The obtained results reveal that this behavior depends on the nuclear structure of the reacting nuclei.

  6. New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2015-03-04

    This report presents calculations for the new arsenic cross section. Cross sections for 73,74,75 As above the resonance range were calculated with a newly developed Hauser-Feshbach code, CoH3.

  7. Frequency and Risk Indicators of Tooth Decay among Pregnant Women in France: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Kaminski, Monique; Lelong, Nathalie; Musset, Anne-Marie; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Little is known on the prevalence of tooth decay among pregnant women. Better knowledge of tooth decay risk indicators during pregnancy could help to develop follow-up protocols for women at risk, along with better prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth per woman in a large sample of pregnant women in France, and to study associated risk indicators. Methods A secondary cross-sectional analysis of data from a French multicentre case-control study was performed. The sample was composed of 1094 at-term women of six maternity units. A dental examination was carried out within 2 to 4 days post-partum. Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics were obtained through a standardised interview with the women. Medical characteristics were obtained from the women’s medical records. Risk indicators associated with tooth decay were identified using a negative binomial hurdle model. Results 51.6% of the women had tooth decay. The mean number of decayed teeth among women having at least one was 3.1 (s.d. = 2.8). Having tooth decay was statistically associated with lower age (aOR = 1.58, 95%CI [1.03,2.45]), lower educational level (aOR = 1.53, 95%CI [1.06,2.23]) and dental plaque (aOR = 1.75, 95%CI [1.27,2.41]). The number of decayed teeth was associated with the same risk indicators and with non-French nationality and inadequate prenatal care. Discussion The frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth among pregnant women were high. Oral health promotion programmes must continue to inform women and care providers about the importance of dental care before, during and after pregnancy. Future research should also assess the effectiveness of public policies related to oral health in target populations of pregnant women facing challenging social or economic situations. PMID:22586442

  8. Novel Treatments for Rare Cancers: The U.S. Orphan Drug Act Is Delivering-A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stockklausner, Clemens; Lampert, Anette; Hoffmann, Georg F; Ries, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Rare cancers are a heterogeneous group of conditions with highly unmet medical needs. Although infrequent in individuals, rare cancers affect millions of people who deserve effective treatments. Therefore, we systematically analyzed the impact of the U.S. Orphan Drug Act of 1983 on delivery of novel treatments for rare cancers. Quantitative cross-sectional analysis was conducted on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Orphan Drug Product database according to Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Statement criteria between 1983 and 2015. Since 1983, a total of 177 approvals have originated from 1,391 orphan drug designations to treat rare cancers, which represents 36% of all approvals within the U.S. orphan drug act (n = 492). Two compounds (1%) to treat rare cancer were withdrawn after approval. Median time from designation to approval was 2.49 years (interquartile range 1.13-4.64) and decreased significantly over time (p < .001, linear regression). Over the last decade, rare cancer treatments have been transformed from nonspecific cytotoxic agents toward targeted therapies, such as protein kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, representing the largest groups of innovative rare cancer treatments today. Most compounds were approved to treat solid tumors and hematological malignancies. The U.S. Orphan Drug Act and associated incentives, such as 7 years of marketing exclusivity, have fostered delivery of novel treatments for rare cancers. More than one-third of all orphan drug approvals address needs of patients suffering from rare cancers. Over the last decade, the understanding of tumorigenesis and genetic driver mutations in different tumor entities has produced innovative treatments, of which many were first approved within the U.S. Orphan Drug Act. Over the last 30 years, the U.S. Orphan Drug Act successfully delivered numerous novel treatments for rare cancers, of which some were subsequently used in other, nonorphan

  9. Analysis of risk factors and their interactions in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A cross-sectional survey in Guilin, China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Disha; Ye, Yao; Zou, Nina; Yu, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, and is associated with the effects of genetic and environmental factors. The present study aimed to not only analyze the influence of a single factor for type 2 diabetes, but also to investigate the interaction effects between risk factors. A total of 6,660 individuals selected by the method of cluster random sampling accepted a cross-sectional survey (questionnaire investigation, physical measurement, laboratory examination and liver ultrasound examination). The classification tree was used to analyze the risk factors and their interactions in type 2 diabetes. The clinical and metabolic characteristics were compared between type 2 diabetes patients and controls, and the non-conditional logistic regression model was used to quantitatively analyze the interactions. A total of 338 participants were classified as type 2 diabetes (217 men and 121 women), the classification tree model showed three variables with close associations with type 2 diabetes: age, triglycerides (TG) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Type 2 diabetes patients had higher age and incidences of high TG, NAFLD, hypertension, high body mass index, high uric acid, high total cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the following factors had interactions in type2 diabetes: high TG × advanced age (odds ratio 2.499, 95% confidence interval 1.868-3.344, P = 0.000), NAFLD × advanced age (odds ratio 1.250, 95% confidence interval 1.048-1.491, P = 0.013) and NAFLD × high TG (odds ratio 1.349, 95% confidence interval 1.144-1.590, P = 0.000). The present study showed that type 2 diabetes resulted from the interactions of many factors; the interactions among age, TG and NAFLD are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian

  10. Outdoor artificial light at night, obesity, and sleep health: Cross-sectional analysis in the KoGES study.

    PubMed

    Koo, Yong Seo; Song, Jin-Young; Joo, Eun-Yeon; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Sang-kun; Jung, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a common disorder with many complications. Although chronodisruption plays a role in obesity, few epidemiological studies have investigated the association between artificial light at night (ALAN) and obesity. Since sleep health is related to both obesity and ALAN, we investigated the association between outdoor ALAN and obesity after adjusting for sleep health. We also investigated the association between outdoor ALAN and sleep health. This cross-sectional survey included 8526 adults, 39-70 years of age, who participated in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study. Outdoor ALAN data were obtained from satellite images provided by the US Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. We obtained individual data regarding outdoor ALAN; body mass index; depression; and sleep health including sleep duration, mid-sleep time, and insomnia; and other demographic data including age, sex, educational level, type of residential building, monthly household income, alcohol consumption, smoking status and consumption of caffeine or alcohol before sleep. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between outdoor ALAN and obesity. The prevalence of obesity differed significantly according to sex (women 47% versus men 39%, p < 0.001) and outdoor ALAN (high 55% versus low 40%, p < 0.001). Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between high outdoor ALAN and obesity (odds ratio [OR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-1.35, p < 0.001). Furthermore, multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that high outdoor ALAN was significantly associated with obesity after adjusting for age and sex (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14-1.37, p < 0.001) and even after controlling for various other confounding factors including age, sex, educational level, type of residential building, monthly household income, alcohol consumption, smoking, consumption of caffeine or alcohol before sleep, delayed sleep pattern, short sleep duration and

  11. Access to healthcare for men and women with disabilities in the UK: secondary analysis of cross-sectional data.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Dikaios; Rotarou, Elena S

    2017-09-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in access to healthcare between people with and without disabilities in the UK. The hypotheses were that: (1) people with disabilities would be more likely to have unmet healthcare needs and (2) there would be gender differences, with women more likely to report unmet needs. We performed secondary analysis, using logistic regressions, of deidentified cross-sectional data from the European Health Interview Survey, Wave 2. The sample included 12 840 community-dwelling people over the age of 16 from across the UK, 5 236 of whom had a disability. The survey method involved face-to-face and telephone interviews. Unmet need for healthcare due to long waiting lists or distance or transportation problems; not being able to afford medical examination, treatment, mental healthcare or prescribed medicines. All measures were self-reported. Adjusting for age, sex and other factors, people with a severe disability had higher odds of facing unmet needs. The largest gap was in 'unmet need for mental healthcare due to cost', where people with a severe disability were 4.5 times (CI 95% 2.2 to 9.2) more likely to face a problem, as well as in 'unmet need due to cost of prescribed medicine', where people with a mild disability had 3.6 (CI 95% 2.2 to 5.9) higher odds of facing a difficulty. Women with a disability were 7.2 times (CI 95% 2.7 to 19.4) more likely to have unmet needs due to cost of care or medication, compared with men with no disability. People with disabilities reported worse access to healthcare, with transportation, cost and long waiting lists being the main barriers. These findings are worrying as they illustrate that a section of the population, who may have higher healthcare needs, faces increased barriers in accessing services. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  12. Reporting of euthanasia in medical practice in Flanders, Belgium: cross sectional analysis of reported and unreported cases.

    PubMed

    Smets, Tinne; Bilsen, Johan; Cohen, Joachim; Rurup, Mette L; Mortier, Freddy; Deliens, Luc

    2010-10-05

    To estimate the rate of reporting of euthanasia cases to the Federal Control and Evaluation Committee and to compare the characteristics of reported and unreported cases of euthanasia. Design Cross sectional analysis. Setting Flanders, Belgium. A stratified at random sample was drawn of people who died between 1 June 2007 and 30 November 2007. The certifying physician of each death was sent a questionnaire on end of life decision making in the death concerned. The rate of euthanasia cases reported to the Federal Control and Evaluation Committee; physicians' reasons for not reporting cases of euthanasia; the relation between reporting and non-reporting and the characteristics of the physician and patient; the time by which life was shortened according to the physician; the labelling of the end of life decision by the physician involved; and differences in characteristics of due care between reported and unreported euthanasia cases. The survey response rate was 58.4% (3623/6202 eligible cases). The estimated total number of cases of euthanasia in Flanders in 2007 was 1040 (95% CI 970 to 1109), thus the incidence of euthanasia was estimated as 1.9% of all deaths (95% CI 1.6% to 2.3%). Approximately half (549/1040 (52.8%, 95% CI 43.9% to 60.5%)) of all estimated cases of euthanasia were reported to the Federal Control and Evaluation Committee. Physicians who perceived their case as euthanasia reported it in 93.1% (67/72) of cases. Cases of euthanasia were reported less often when the time by which life was shortened was less than one week compared with when the perceived life shortening was greater (37.3% v 74.1%; P<0.001). Unreported cases were generally dealt with less carefully than reported cases: a written request for euthanasia was more often absent (87.7% v 17.6% verbal request only; P<0.001), other physicians and caregivers specialised in palliative care were consulted less often (54.6% v 97.5%; 33.0% v 63.9%; P<0.001 for both), the life ending act was more

  13. A Real-World Analysis of Migraine: A Cross-Sectional Study of Disease Burden and Treatment Patterns.

    PubMed

    Ford, Janet H; Jackson, James; Milligan, Gary; Cotton, Sarah; Ahl, Jonna; Aurora, Sheena K

    2017-10-06

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the sociodemographics, disease burden, and treatment patterns of patients with episodic and chronic migraine in the United States. Migraine is a disabling neurological disease that places an enormous burden on patients. Data were drawn from the Adelphi Migraine United States Disease Specific Programme (index period: January to March 2014). Physicians (N = 150) completed a patient report form on 10 consulting patients with migraine. Episodic migraineurs had ≤14 headache days per month (HDM) and those with chronic migraine had ≥15. Headache-related disability was assessed with the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire. Disability was also compared across subgroups based on the number of HDM (≤3, 4-7, 8-14, and ≥15). A total of 1487 patient report forms were completed. Over 70% of the patients were female, 90.8% (n = 1350) were episodic migraineurs, and 9.2% (n = 137) were chronic migraineurs. Acute treatment was prescribed for >90% of the patients, and >50% had a current prescription for preventive treatment. Despite taking acute and/or preventive treatment, 29.2% of episodic migraineurs (including some patients with ≤3 headache days/month) and 73.2% of chronic migraineurs had moderate-to-severe headache-related disability (MIDAS total score ≥11). Preventive treatment was discontinued/switched at least once by 26.4% of episodic migraineurs and by 53.3% of chronic migraineurs. Of those patients (n = 382) who gave collective reasons for discontinuation/switching preventive treatment, over 70% selected lack of efficacy and tolerability/safety. This real-world analysis provides additional support for the unmet medical need for efficacious therapies that reduce migraine frequency and severity, headache-related disability, and have better tolerability for patients with migraine. In addition, further research is needed to better understand the burden of illness among patients

  14. Gender Roles and Physical Function in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional Analysis of the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tamer; Vafaei, Afshin; Auais, Mohammad; Guralnik, Jack; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationships between physical function and gender-stereotyped traits and whether these relationships are modified by sex or social context. Methods A total of 1995 community-dwelling older adults from the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS) aged 65 to 74 years were recruited in Natal (Brazil), Manizales (Colombia), Tirana (Albania), Kingston (Ontario, Canada), and Saint-Hyacinthe (Quebec, Canada). We performed a cross-sectional analysis. Study outcomes were mobility disability, defined as having difficulty in walking 400 meters without assistance or climbing a flight of stairs without resting, and low physical performance, defined as a score < 8 on the Short Physical Performance Battery. The 12-item Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) was used to classify participants into four gender roles (Masculine, Feminine, Androgynous, and Undifferentiated) using site-specific medians of femininity and masculinity as cut-off points. Poisson regression models were used to estimate prevalence rate ratios (PRR) of mobility disability and poor physical performance according to gender roles. Results In models adjusted for sex, marital status, education, income, and research site, when comparing to the androgynous role, we found higher prevalence of mobility disability and poor physical performance among participants endorsing the feminine role (PRR = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–1.39 and PRR = 1.37, CI 1.01–1.88, respectively) or the undifferentiated role (PRR = 1.23, 95% CI 1.07–1.42 and PRR = 1.58, CI 1.18–2.12, respectively). Participants classified as masculine did not differ from androgynous participants in prevalence rates of mobility disability or low physical performance. None of the multiplicative interactions by sex and research site were significant. Conclusion Feminine and undifferentiated gender roles are independent risk factors for mobility disability and low physical performance in older adults. Longitudinal

  15. Identifying and characterizing COPD patients in US managed care. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of administrative claims data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death among US adults and is projected to be the third by 2020. In anticipation of the increasing burden imposed on healthcare systems and payers by patients with COPD, a means of identifying COPD patients who incur higher healthcare utilization and costs is needed. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of US managed care administrative claims data describes a practical way to identify COPD patients. We analyze 7.79 million members for potential inclusion in the COPD cohort, who were continuously eligible during a 1-year study period. A younger commercial population (7.7 million) is compared with an older Medicare population (0.115 million). We outline a novel approach to stratifying COPD patients using "complexity" of illness, based on occurrence of claims for given comorbid conditions. Additionally, a unique algorithm was developed to identify and stratify COPD exacerbations using claims data. Results A total of 42,565 commercial (median age 56 years; 51.4% female) and 8507 Medicare patients (median 75 years; 53.1% female) were identified as having COPD. Important differences were observed in comorbidities between the younger commercial versus the older Medicare population. Stratifying by complexity, 45.0%, 33.6%, and 21.4% of commercial patients and 36.6%, 35.8%, and 27.6% of older patients were low, moderate, and high, respectively. A higher proportion of patients with high complexity disease experienced multiple (≥2) exacerbations (61.7% commercial; 49.0% Medicare) than patients with moderate- (56.9%; 41.6%), or low-complexity disease (33.4%; 20.5%). Utilization of healthcare services also increased with an increase in complexity. Conclusion In patients with COPD identified from Medicare or commercial claims data, there is a relationship between complexity as determined by pulmonary and non-pulmonary comorbid conditions and the prevalence of exacerbations

  16. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Late HAART Initiation in Latin America and the Caribbean: Late Testers and Late Presenters

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Wehbe, Firas; Cesar, Carina; Cortés, Claudia; Padgett, Denis; Koenig, Serena; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Cahn, Pedro; McGowan, Catherine; Masys, Daniel; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Starting HAART in a very advanced stage of disease is assumed to be the most prevalent form of initiation in HIV-infected subjects in developing countries. Data from Latin America and the Caribbean is still lacking. Our main objective was to determine the frequency, risk factors and trends in time for being late HAART initiator (LHI) in this region. Methodology Cross-sectional analysis from 9817 HIV-infected treatment-naïve patients initiating HAART at 6 sites (Argentina, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Peru and Mexico) from October 1999 to July 2010. LHI had CD4+ count ≤200cells/mm3 prior to HAART. Late testers (LT) were those LHI who initiated HAART within 6 months of HIV diagnosis. Late presenters (LP) initiated after 6 months of diagnosis. Prevalence, risk factors and trends over time were analyzed. Principal Findings Among subjects starting HAART (n = 9817) who had baseline CD4+ available (n = 8515), 76% were LHI: Argentina (56%[95%CI:52–59]), Chile (80%[95%CI:77–82]), Haiti (76%[95%CI:74–77]), Honduras (91%[95%CI:87–94]), Mexico (79%[95%CI:75–83]), Peru (86%[95%CI:84–88]). The proportion of LHI statistically changed over time (except in Honduras) (p≤0.02; Honduras p = 0.7), with a tendency towards lower rates in recent years. Males had increased risk of LHI in Chile, Haiti, Peru, and in the combined site analyses (CSA). Older patients were more likely LHI in Argentina and Peru (OR 1.21 per +10-year of age, 95%CI:1.02–1.45; OR 1.20, 95%CI:1.02–1.43; respectively), but not in CSA (OR 1.07, 95%CI:0.94–1.21). Higher education was associated with decreased risk for LHI in Chile (OR 0.92 per +1-year of education, 95%CI:0.87–0.98) (similar trends in Mexico, Peru, and CSA). LHI with date of HIV-diagnosis available, 55% were LT and 45% LP. Conclusion LHI was highly prevalent in CCASAnet sites, mostly due to LT; the main risk factors associated were being male and older age. Earlier HIV-diagnosis and earlier treatment initiation

  17. Prescription Drug Use and Polypharmacy Among Medicaid-Enrolled Adults with Autism: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Rini; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; StPeter, Claire; Poe, Susannah; Dwibedi, Nilanjana; Ajmera, Mayank

    2016-12-01

    A lack of gold standard treatment for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), no clear ASD management guidelines, and lack of evidence-based pharmacological interventions other than aripiprazole and risperidone elevate the risk of off-label prescribing and adverse effects among individuals with ASD, more so among adults. The aim of this study was to identify and compare the types of prescription drug use, rates of polypharmacy, and characteristics associated with polypharmacy among adults with and without ASD in a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of a three-state Medicaid Analytic eXtract database (2000-2008). Adults aged 22-64 years with ASD (ICD9-CM code: 299.xx) were propensity score-matched to 'no ASD' controls by age, sex, and race. General polypharmacy (≥6 unique classes of prescription drugs in a year) and psychotropic polypharmacy (≥3 unique prescription drug classes of psychotropic medications within a 90-day period) were the main study outcomes. Chi-square tests for rates, t tests for mean number of claims, and multivariate logistic regressions for likelihood of prescription drug use and polypharmacy were run. Annually, almost 75% of adults with ASD had >20 prescription drug claims compared with 33% of adults without ASD. Around 85% of adults with ASD used at least one psychotropic drug class compared with 42% of adults without ASD. Highly common psychotropics were antipsychotics (66%ASD vs 20%noASD), anticonvulsants (59%ASD vs 20%noASD), and anxiolytics/hypnotics/sedatives (21%ASD vs 11%noASD). Other than psychotropics, many adults with ASD used medical prescription drugs such as antimicrobials (47%), dermatologic agents (48%), respiratory agents (38%), gastrointestinal agents (31%), alternative medications (25%), antiparkinsonian agents (22.6%), antihyperlipidemics/statins (7.3%), and immunologics (2.0%). Rates of general (48%ASD vs 32%noASD) and psychotropic polypharmacy (19%ASD vs 6%noASD) were significantly higher in the ASD group. Prescription

  18. Tobacco use in 3 billion individuals from 16 countries: an analysis of nationally representative cross-sectional household surveys.

    PubMed

    Giovino, Gary A; Mirza, Sara A; Samet, Jonathan M; Gupta, Prakash C; Jarvis, Martin J; Bhala, Neeraj; Peto, Richard; Zatonski, Witold; Hsia, Jason; Morton, Jeremy; Palipudi, Krishna M; Asma, Samira

    2012-08-18

    Despite the high global burden of diseases caused by tobacco, valid and comparable prevalence data for patterns of adult tobacco use and factors influencing use are absent for many low-income and middle-income countries. We assess these patterns through analysis of data from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS). Between Oct 1, 2008, and March 15, 2010, GATS used nationally representative household surveys with comparable methods to obtain relevant information from individuals aged 15 years or older in 14 low-income and middle-income countries (Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Mexico, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, and Vietnam). We compared weighted point estimates and 95% CIs of tobacco use between these 14 countries and with data from the 2008 UK General Lifestyle Survey and the 2006-07 US Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey. All these surveys had cross-sectional study designs. In countries participating in GATS, 48·6% (95% CI 47·6-49·6) of men and 11·3% (10·7-12·0) of women were tobacco users. 40·7% of men (ranging from 21·6% in Brazil to 60·2% in Russia) and 5·0% of women (0·5% in Egypt to 24·4% in Poland) in GATS countries smoked a tobacco product. Manufactured cigarettes were favoured by most smokers (82%) overall, but smokeless tobacco and bidis were commonly used in India and Bangladesh. For individuals who had ever smoked daily, women aged 55-64 years at the time of the survey began smoking at an older age than did equivalently aged men in most GATS countries. However, those individuals who had ever smoked daily and were aged 25-34-years when surveyed started to do so at much the same age in both sexes. Quit ratios were very low (<20% overall) in China, India, Russia, Egypt, and Bangladesh. The first wave of GATS showed high rates of smoking in men, early initiation of smoking in women, and low quit ratios, reinforcing the view that efforts to prevent initiation and promote

  19. Drinking water source and human Toxoplasma gondii infection in the United States: a cross-sectional analysis of NHANES data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    .0%). Conclusions Data suggests that T. gondii infections continue to decline in the United States, but the overall infection rate remains substantial at nearly 7%. Despite the limitations in the Continuous NHANES cross-sectional survey, the association between well water use and T. gondii infection warrants further research. PMID:25012250

  20. Influence of apolipoproteins on the association between lipids and insulin sensitivity: a cross-sectional analysis of the RISC Study.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Simona; Bonnet, Fabrice; Laville, Martine; Morgantini, Cecilia; Monti, Lucilla; Hojlund, Kurt; Ferrannini, Ele; Natali, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated whether the association of insulin sensitivity with HDL cholesterol (HDL) and triglycerides is influenced by major plasma apolipoproteins, as suggested by recent experimental evidence. This study included a cross-sectional analysis of the RISC Study, a multicenter European clinical investigation in 1,017 healthy volunteers balanced in sex (women 54%) and age strata (range 30-60 years). Insulin sensitivity (M/I in µmol ⋅ min(-1) ⋅ kgFFM(-1) ⋅ nM(-1)) was measured by the clamp technique and apolipoproteins (ApoB, -C3, -A1, and -E) by Multiplex Technology. The center-, sex-, and age-adjusted standardized regression coefficients (STDβ) with M/I were similar for HDL and triglycerides (+19.9 ± 1.9 vs. -20.0 ± 2.0, P < 0.0001). Further adjustment for triglycerides (or HDL), BMI, and adiponectin (or nonesterified fatty acid) attenuated the strength of the association of M/I with both HDL (STDβ +6.4 ± 2.3, P < 0.01) and triglycerides (-9.5 ± 2.1, P < 0.001). Neither ApoA1 nor ApoE and ApoB showed any association with M/I independent from plasma HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. ApoC3, in contrast, in both men and women, was positively associated with M/I independently of plasma lipids. A relative enrichment of plasma lipids with ApoC3 is associated with lower body fat percentage and lower plasma alanine amino transferase. Our results suggest that HDL cholesterol modulates insulin sensitivity through a mechanism that is partially mediated by BMI and adiponectin but not by ApoA1. Similarly, the influence of triglycerides on insulin sensitivity is in part mediated by BMI and is unrelated to ApoE or ApoB, but it is significantly modulated by ApoC3, which appears to protect from the negative effect of plasma lipids.

  1. Physical activity, diet and BMI in children aged 6-8 years: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Basterfield, Laura; Jones, Angela R; Parkinson, Kathryn N; Reilly, Jessica; Pearce, Mark S; Reilly, John J; Adamson, Ashley J

    2014-06-05

    To assess relationships between current physical activity (PA), dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) in English children. Longitudinal birth cohort study in northeast England, cross-sectional analysis. 425 children (41% of the original cohort) aged 6-8 years (49% boys). PA over 7 days was measured objectively by an accelerometer; three categories of PA were created: 'active' ≥60 min/day moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA); 'moderately active' 30-59 min/day MVPA; 'inactive' <30 min/day MVPA. Dietary intake over 4 days was measured using a prospective dietary assessment tool which incorporated elements of the food diary and food frequency methods. Three diet categories were created: 'healthy', 'unhealthy' and 'mixed', according to the number of portions of different foods consumed. Adherence to the '5-a-day' recommendations for portions of fruit and vegetables was also assessed. Children were classified as 'healthy weight' or 'overweight or obese' (OW/OB) according to International Obesity Taskforce cutpoints for BMI. Associations between weight status and PA/diet categories were analysed using logistic regression. Few children met the UK-recommended guidelines for either MVPA or fruit and vegetable intake, with just 7% meeting the recommended amount of MVPA of 60 min/day, and 3% meeting the 5-a-day fruit and vegetable recommendation. Higher PA was associated with a lower OR for OW/OB in boys only (0.20, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.88). There was no association detected between dietary intake and OW/OB in either sex. Increasing MVPA may help to reduce OW/OB in boys; however, more research is required to examine this relationship in girls. Children are not meeting the UK guidelines for diet and PA, and more needs to be done to improve this situation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Cross-sectional associations between air pollution and chronic bronchitis: an ESCAPE meta-analysis across five cohorts.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yutong; Schikowski, Tamara; Adam, Martin; Buschka, Anna; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Marcon, Alessandro; Sanchez, Margaux; Vierkötter, Andrea; Al-Kanaani, Zaina; Beelen, Rob; Birk, Matthias; Brunekreef, Bert; Cirach, Marta; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Declercq, Christophe; de Hoogh, Kees; de Nazelle, Audrey; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Valeria Ferretti, Virginia; Forsberg, Bertil; Gerbase, Margaret W; Hardy, Rebecca; Heinrich, Joachim; Hoek, Gerard; Jarvis, Debbie; Keidel, Dirk; Kuh, Diana; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Ragettli, Martina S; Ranzi, Andrea; Rochat, Thierry; Schindler, Christian; Sugiri, Dorothea; Temam, Sofia; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Kauffmann, Francine; Krämer, Ursula; Sunyer, Jordi; Künzli, Nino; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Hansell, Anna L

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to assess associations of outdoor air pollution on prevalence of chronic bronchitis symptoms in adults in five cohort studies (Asthma-E3N, ECRHS, NSHD, SALIA, SAPALDIA) participating in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) project. Annual average particulate matter (PM(10), PM(2.5), PM(absorbance), PM(coarse)), NO(2), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and road traffic measures modelled from ESCAPE measurement campaigns 2008-2011 were assigned to home address at most recent assessments (1998-2011). Symptoms examined were chronic bronchitis (cough and phlegm for ≥3 months of the year for ≥2 years), chronic cough (with/without phlegm) and chronic phlegm (with/without cough). Cohort-specific cross-sectional multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted using common confounder sets (age, sex, smoking, interview season, education), followed by meta-analysis. 15 279 and 10 537 participants respectively were included in the main NO(2) and PM analyses at assessments in 1998-2011. Overall, there were no statistically significant associations with any air pollutant or traffic exposure. Sensitivity analyses including in asthmatics only, females only or using back-extrapolated NO(2) and PM10 for assessments in 1985-2002 (ECRHS, NSHD, SALIA, SAPALDIA) did not alter conclusions. In never-smokers, all associations were positive, but reached statistical significance only for chronic phlegm with PM(coarse) OR 1.31 (1.05 to 1.64) per 5 µg/m(3) increase and PM(10) with similar effect size. Sensitivity analyses of older cohorts showed increased risk of chronic cough with PM(2.5abs) (black carbon) exposures. Results do not show consistent associations between chronic bronchitis symptoms and current traffic-related air pollution in adult European populations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. A cross-sectional analysis of the geographic distribution and causes of maternal mortality in South Africa: 2002-2006.

    PubMed

    Bomela, Nolunkcwe J

    2015-03-19

    Major changes in health policy, health service delivery, specific protocols, guidelines and recommendations for the management of common causes of maternal death have been developed in South Africa since the advent of the current democratic government. However, maternal mortality ratio remains high. The scientific community has conducted numerous studies on maternal mortality in South Africa; save for an analysis of the causes of maternal deaths, stratified by province. This study examines the geographic distribution of maternal causes of death in South Africa. A pooled cross-sectional dataset for the years 2002-2006 retrieved from the vital registration database of Statistics South Africa was used to analyse maternal causes of death. About 8773 maternal deaths between 10-55 years were analysed using frequency tables, cross-tabulations and logistic regression. Maternal mortality ratios (MMR), odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to analyse provincial disparities. MMR was highest in the Free State (286/100,000) and lowest in the Western Cape (87/100,000). Tuberculosis (10.4%) was the leading single indirect cause of maternal deaths while hypertensive disorders (9.1%) were the leading direct cause of death. KwaZulu-Natal women had a significantly higher risk of dying from sepsis (aOR=3.1,95% CI=1.2-7.9). North West women had the lowest risk of dying from hypertensive disorders (aOR=0.4,95% CI=0.2-0.7). The risk of dying from complications of labour was lowest for Gauteng women (aOR=0.4,95% CI=0.1-0.9). The 30-34 years age group had a significantly high risk (aOR=2.5,95% CI=1.6-4.0) of dying from abortion while the 25-29 years age group had a significantly higher risk of dying from maternal infectious diseases (aOR=2.3,95% CI=1.3-3.9). The 40-44 years age group had a significantly higher risk of dying from haemorrhage (aOR=2.3,95% CI=1.3-3.9 and the 45+ age group from other maternal diseases (aOR=3.3,95% CI=1.2-8.5) and miscellaneous direct

  4. Identifying and characterizing COPD patients in US managed care. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of administrative claims data.

    PubMed

    Mapel, Douglas W; Dutro, Michael P; Marton, Jeno P; Woodruff, Kimberly; Make, Barry

    2011-02-23

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death among US adults and is projected to be the third by 2020. In anticipation of the increasing burden imposed on healthcare systems and payers by patients with COPD, a means of identifying COPD patients who incur higher healthcare utilization and costs is needed. This retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of US managed care administrative claims data describes a practical way to identify COPD patients. We analyze 7.79 million members for potential inclusion in the COPD cohort, who were continuously eligible during a 1-year study period. A younger commercial population (7.7 million) is compared with an older Medicare population (0.115 million). We outline a novel approach to stratifying COPD patients using "complexity" of illness, based on occurrence of claims for given comorbid conditions. Additionally, a unique algorithm was developed to identify and stratify COPD exacerbations using claims data. A total of 42,565 commercial (median age 56 years; 51.4% female) and 8507 Medicare patients (median 75 years; 53.1% female) were identified as having COPD. Important differences were observed in comorbidities between the younger commercial versus the older Medicare population. Stratifying by complexity, 45.0%, 33.6%, and 21.4% of commercial patients and 36.6%, 35.8%, and 27.6% of older patients were low, moderate, and high, respectively. A higher proportion of patients with high complexity disease experienced multiple (≥2) exacerbations (61.7% commercial; 49.0% Medicare) than patients with moderate- (56.9%; 41.6%), or low-complexity disease (33.4%; 20.5%). Utilization of healthcare services also increased with an increase in complexity. In patients with COPD identified from Medicare or commercial claims data, there is a relationship between complexity as determined by pulmonary and non-pulmonary comorbid conditions and the prevalence of exacerbations and utilization of healthcare services

  5. Difference between interaction cross sections and reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kohama, Akihisa; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2008-12-15

    We study the validity of the substitution of interaction cross sections for total reaction cross sections for a nucleus incident on a target nucleus at relativistic energies. We show that, for incident stable nuclei, the predicted difference between interaction and total reaction cross sections is large enough to probe the nuclear structure, particularly in a mass region of less than around 40. For analyses of the difference, we construct ''pseudo data'' for the reaction cross sections because empirical data are very limited at high energies. The construction of the pseudo data is based on our assumption that empirically unknown total reaction cross sections are precisely predicted by the phenomenological black-sphere model of nuclei that we developed recently. The comparison with the empirical interaction cross sections suggests a significant difference between the reaction and interaction cross sections for stable projectiles on a carbon target, which is of the order of 0-100 mb.

  6. Measurement and QCD analysis of double-differential inclusive jet cross sections in pp collisions at s=8$$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV and cross section ratios to 2.76 and 7 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-03-01

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of the jet transverse momentum pT and the absolute jet rapidity abs(y) is presented. Data from LHC proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, have been collected with the CMS detector. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-kT clustering algorithm with a size parameter of 0.7 in a phase space region covering jet pT from 74 GeV up to 2.5 TeV and jet absolute rapidity up to abs(y) = 3.0. The low-pT jet range between 21 and 74 GeV ismore » also studied up to abs(y) = 4.7, using a dedicated data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 inverse picobarns. The measured jet cross section is corrected for detector effects and compared with the predictions from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order (NLO) using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDF). Cross section ratios to the corresponding measurements performed at 2.76 and 7 TeV are presented. From the measured double-differential jet cross section, the value of the strong coupling constant evaluated at the Z mass is alpha[S(M[Z]) = 0.1164 +0.0060 -0.0043, where the errors include the PDF, scale, nonperturbative effects and experimental uncertainties, using the CT10 NLO PDFs. Improved constraints on PDFs based on the inclusive jet cross section measurement are presented.« less

  7. Measurement and QCD analysis of double-differential inclusive jet cross sections in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV and cross section ratios to 2.76 and 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Assran, Y.; Elkafrawy, T.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahrous, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Khvedelidze, A.; Lomidze, D.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Kuprash, O.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bahinipati, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Biasotto, M.; Boletti, A.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gulmini, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Torassa, E.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Kim, H.; Lee, A.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Oh, S. B.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Hwang, C.; Kim, D.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Golutvin, I.; Karjavin, V.; Korenkov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Tikhonenko, E.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Chistov, R.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovskii, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. 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B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. 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M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Mesropian, C.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-03-01

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of the jet transverse momentum p T and the absolute jet rapidity | y| is presented. Data from LHC proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1, have been collected with the CMS detector. Jets are reconstructed using the anti- k T clustering algorithm with a size parameter of 0.7 in a phase space region covering jet p T from 74 GeV up to 2.5 TeV and jet absolute rapidity up to | y| = 3.0. The low- p T jet range between 21 and 74 GeV is also studied up to | y| = 4.7, using a dedicated data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 pb-1. The measured jet cross section is corrected for detector effects and compared with the predictions from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order (NLO) using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDF). Cross section ratios to the corresponding measurements performed at 2.76 and 7 TeV are presented. From the measured double-differential jet cross section, the value of the strong coupling constant evaluated at the Z mass is α S( M Z) = 0.1164 - 0.0043 + 0.0060 , where the errors include the PDF, scale, nonperturbative effects and experimental uncertainties, using the CT10 NLO PDFs. Improved constraints on PDFs based on the inclusive jet cross section measurement are presented. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Determination of the interatomic potential from elastic differential cross sections at fixed energy: Functional sensitivity analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.; Rabitz, H.

    1989-02-01

    Elastic differential cross sections in atomic crossed beam experiments contain detailed information about the underlying interatomic potentials. The functional sensitivity density of the cross sections with respect to the potential deltasigma(theta)/deltaV(R) reveals such information and has been implemented in an iterative inversion procedure, analogous to that of the Newton--Raphson technique. The stability of the inversion is achieved with the use of the regularization method of Tikhonov and Miller. It is shown that given a set of well resolved and noise-free differential cross section data within a limited angular range and given a reasonable starting reference potential, the recovered potential accurately resembles the desired one in the important region, i.e., the region to which the scattering data are sensitive. The region of importance depends upon the collision energy relative to the well depth of the potential under study; usually a higher collision energy penetrates deeper into the repulsive part of the potential and thus accordingly yields a more accurate potential in that part. The inversion procedure produces also a quality function indicating the well determined radial region. Moreover, the extracted potential is quite independent of the functional form of the reference potential in contrast to curve fitting approaches. As illustrations, the model inert gas systems He--Ne and Ne--Ar have been considered. For collision energies within an order of magnitude of the associated potential well depth, the attractive part of the potential can be determined to high precision provided that scattering data at small enough angles are available.

  9. Measurement of the differential cross sections of 6Li(d,d0) for Ion Beam Analysis purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntemou, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Axiotis, M.; Foteinou, V.; Kokkoris, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Misaelides, P.; Patronis, N.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.; Provatas, G.; Vlastou, R.

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, the 6Li(d,d0)6Li elastic scattering differential cross sections were measured in the energy range Ed,lab = 940-2000 keV for Elastic Backscattering Spectroscopy (EBS) purposes, using thin lithium targets, made by evaporating isotopically enriched 6LiF powder on self-supporting carbon foils, with an ultra-thin Au layer on top for normalization purposes. The experiment was carried out in deuteron beam energy steps of 20 or 30 keV and for the laboratory scattering angles of 125°, 140°, 150°, 160°, and 170°.

  10. Out-of-pocket Cost Burden in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Cross-sectional Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Aaron T.; Damman, Jennifer L.; Ziring, David A.; Gleghorn, Elizabeth E.; Garcia-Careaga, Manuel G.; Gugig, Roberto R.; Hunter, Anna K.; Burgis, Jennifer C.; Bass, Dorsey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), consisting of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), can result in significant morbidity requiring frequent health care utilization. Although it is known that the overall financial impact of pediatric IBD is significant, the direct out-of-pocket (OOP) cost burden on the parents of children with IBD has not been explored. We hypothesized that affected children with a more relapsing disease course and families in lower income strata, ineligible for need-based assistance programs, disparately absorb ongoing financial stress. Methods: We completed a cross-sectional analysis among parents of children with IBD residing in California using an online HIPAA-secure Qualtrics survey. Multicenter recruitment occurred between December 4, 2013 and September 18, 2014 at the point-of-care from site investigators, informational flyers distributed at regional CCFA conferences, and social media campaigns equally targeting Northern, Central, and Southern California. IBD-, patient-, and family-specific information were collected from the parents of pediatric patients with IBD patients younger than 18 years of age at time of study, carry a confirmed diagnosis of CD or UC, reside in and receive pediatric gastroenterology care in California, and do not have other chronic diseases requiring ongoing medical care. Results: We collected 150 unique surveys from parents of children with IBD (67 CD; 83 UC). The median patient age was 14 years for both CD and UC, with an overall 3.7 years (SD 2.8 yr) difference between survey completion and time of IBD diagnosis. Annually, 63.6%, 28.6%, and 5.3% of families had an OOP cost burden >$500, >$1000, and >5000, respectively. Approximately one-third (36.0%) of patients had emergency department (ED) visits over the past year, with 59.2% of these patients spending >$500 on emergency department copays, including 11.1% who spent >$5000. Although 43.3% contributed <$500 on procedure and test

  11. Out-of-pocket Cost Burden in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Cross-sectional Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sin, Aaron T; Damman, Jennifer L; Ziring, David A; Gleghorn, Elizabeth E; Garcia-Careaga, Manuel G; Gugig, Roberto R; Hunter, Anna K; Burgis, Jennifer C; Bass, Dorsey M; Park, K T

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), consisting of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), can result in significant morbidity requiring frequent health care utilization. Although it is known that the overall financial impact of pediatric IBD is significant, the direct out-of-pocket (OOP) cost burden on the parents of children with IBD has not been explored. We hypothesized that affected children with a more relapsing disease course and families in lower income strata, ineligible for need-based assistance programs, disparately absorb ongoing financial stress. We completed a cross-sectional analysis among parents of children with IBD residing in California using an online HIPAA-secure Qualtrics survey. Multicenter recruitment occurred between December 4, 2013 and September 18, 2014 at the point-of-care from site investigators, informational flyers distributed at regional CCFA conferences, and social media campaigns equally targeting Northern, Central, and Southern California. IBD-, patient-, and family-specific information were collected from the parents of pediatric patients with IBD patients younger than 18 years of age at time of study, carry a confirmed diagnosis of CD or UC, reside in and receive pediatric gastroenterology care in California, and do not have other chronic diseases requiring ongoing medical care. We collected 150 unique surveys from parents of children with IBD (67 CD; 83 UC). The median patient age was 14 years for both CD and UC, with an overall 3.7 years (SD 2.8 yr) difference between survey completion and time of IBD diagnosis. Annually, 63.6%, 28.6%, and 5.3% of families had an OOP cost burden >$500, >$1000, and >5000, respectively. Approximately one-third (36.0%) of patients had emergency department (ED) visits over the past year, with 59.2% of these patients spending >$500 on emergency department copays, including 11.1% who spent >$5000. Although 43.3% contributed <$500 on procedure and test costs, 20.0% spent >$2000 in

  12. Analysis of normalized radar cross section (sigma-O) signature of Amazon rain forest using SEASAT scatterometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, E. M.; Sweet, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) signature of the Amazon rain forest was SEASAT scatterometer data. Statistics of the measured (NRCS) values were determined from multiple orbit passes for three local time periods. Plots of mean normalized radar cross section, dB against incidence angle as a function of beam and polarization show that less than 0.3 dB relative bias exists between all beams over a range of incidence angle from 30 deg to 53 deg. The backscattered measurements analyzed show the Amazon rain forest to be relatively homogeneous, azimuthally isotropic and insensitive to polarization. The return from the rain forest target appears relatively consistent and stable, except for the small diurnal variation (0.75 dB) that occurs at sunrise. Because of the relative stability of the rain forest target and the scatterometer instrument, the response of versus incidence angle was able to detect errors in the estimated yaw altitude angle. Also, small instrument gain biases in some of the processing channels were detected. This led to the development of an improved NRCS algorithm, which uses a more accurate method for estimating the system noise power.

  13. RootAnalyzer: A Cross-Section Image Analysis Tool for Automated Characterization of Root Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Joshua; Laga, Hamid; Huang, Chun Yuan; Heuer, Sigrid; Miklavcic, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of plant root anatomical features is a key factor in effective water and nutrient uptake. Existing techniques for phenotyping root anatomical traits are often based on manual or semi-automatic segmentation and annotation of microscopic images of root cross sections. In this article, we propose a fully automated tool, hereinafter referred to as RootAnalyzer, for efficiently extracting and analyzing anatomical traits from root-cross section images. Using a range of image processing techniques such as local thresholding and nearest neighbor identification, RootAnalyzer segments the plant root from the image’s background, classifies and characterizes the cortex, stele, endodermis and epidermis, and subsequently produces statistics about the morphological properties of the root cells and tissues. We use RootAnalyzer to analyze 15 images of wheat plants and one maize plant image and evaluate its performance against manually-obtained ground truth data. The comparison shows that RootAnalyzer can fully characterize most root tissue regions with over 90% accuracy. PMID:26398501

  14. Reporting of euthanasia in medical practice in Flanders, Belgium: cross sectional analysis of reported and unreported cases

    PubMed Central

    Bilsen, Johan; Cohen, Joachim; Rurup, Mette L; Mortier, Freddy; Deliens, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the rate of reporting of euthanasia cases to the Federal Control and Evaluation Committee and to compare the characteristics of reported and unreported cases of euthanasia. Design Cross sectional analysis. Setting Flanders, Belgium. Participants A stratified at random sample was drawn of people who died between 1 June 2007 and 30 November 2007. The certifying physician of each death was sent a questionnaire on end of life decision making in the death concerned. Main outcome measures The rate of euthanasia cases reported to the Federal Control and Evaluation Committee; physicians’ reasons for not reporting cases of euthanasia; the relation between reporting and non-reporting and the characteristics of the physician and patient; the time by which life was shortened according to the physician; the labelling of the end of life decision by the physician involved; and differences in characteristics of due care between reported and unreported euthanasia cases. Results The survey response rate was 58.4% (3623/6202 eligible cases). The estimated total number of cases of euthanasia in Flanders in 2007 was 1040 (95% CI 970 to 1109), thus the incidence of euthanasia was estimated as 1.9% of all deaths (95% CI 1.6% to 2.3%). Approximately half (549/1040 (52.8%, 95% CI 43.9% to 60.5%)) of all estimated cases of euthanasia were reported to the Federal Control and Evaluation Committee. Physicians who perceived their case as euthanasia reported it in 93.1% (67/72) of cases. Cases of euthanasia were reported less often when the time by which life was shortened was less than one week compared with when the perceived life shortening was greater (37.3% v 74.1%; P<0.001). Unreported cases were generally dealt with less carefully than reported cases: a written request for euthanasia was more often absent (87.7% v 17.6% verbal request only; P<0.001), other physicians and caregivers specialised in palliative care were consulted less often (54.6% v 97.5%; 33.0% v 63

  15. A population health approach to reducing observational intensity bias in health risk adjustment: cross sectional analysis of insurance claims.

    PubMed

    Wennberg, David E; Sharp, Sandra M; Bevan, Gwyn; Skinner, Jonathan S; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Wennberg, John E

    2014-04-10

    To compare the performance of two new approaches to risk adjustment that are free of the influence of observational intensity with methods that depend on diagnoses listed in administrative databases. Administrative data from the US Medicare program for services provided in 2007 among 306 US hospital referral regions. Cross sectional analysis. 20% sample of fee for service Medicare beneficiaries residing in one of 306 hospital referral regions in the United States in 2007 (n = 5,153,877). The effect of health risk adjustment on age, sex, and race adjusted mortality and spending rates among hospital referral regions using four indices: the standard Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services--Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCC) index used by the US Medicare program (calculated from diagnoses listed in Medicare's administrative database); a visit corrected HCC index (to reduce the effects of observational intensity on frequency of diagnoses); a poverty index (based on US census); and a population health index (calculated using data on incidence of hip fractures and strokes, and responses from a population based annual survey of health from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Estimated variation in age, sex, and race adjusted mortality rates across hospital referral regions was reduced using the indices based on population health, poverty, and visit corrected HCC, but increased using the standard HCC index. Most of the residual variation in age, sex, and race adjusted mortality was explained (in terms of weighted R2) by the population health index: R2=0.65. The other indices explained less: R2=0.20 for the visit corrected HCC index; 0.19 for the poverty index, and 0.02 for the standard HCC index. The residual variation in age, sex, race, and price adjusted spending per capita across the 306 hospital referral regions explained by the indices (in terms of weighted R2) were 0.50 for the standard HCC index, 0.21 for the population health index, 0.12 for the

  16. R-matrix analysis of the {sup 240}Pu neutron cross sections in the thermal to 5700 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Bouland, O.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1997-08-01

    Resonance analysis of high resolution neutron transmission data and of fission cross sections were performed in the neutron energy range from the thermal regions to 5,700 eV by using the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY. The experimental data base is described and the method of analysis is given. The experimental data were carefully examined in order to identify more resonances than those found in the current evaluated data files. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters are given. A new set of the average values of the parameters is proposed, which could be used for calculation of the average cross sections in the unresolved resonance region. The resonance parameters are available IN ENDF-6 format at the national or international data centers.

  17. Evaluation of the /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He cross section for ENDF/B-VI and application to uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.G.; Davidson, J.W.; Muir, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A new covariance analysis of n+/sup 7/Li cross section data has been completed for Version VI of ENDF/B. The analysis updates our 1981 work for ENDF/B-V.2 to include new data that has become available since that time and to incorporate cross correlations between different experiments. The bulk of the new measured data consists of some 10 new (or newly revised) tritium-production measurements involving about 70 new data points. The new analysis results in only small changes in the previous evaluation of the tritium-production cross section but significantly reduces the magnitudes of uncertainties due to the more extensive and accurate data base that was used. A two-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the Lithium Blanket Module experiments at the LOTUS facility was performed in order to assess the effects of the new /sup 7/Li cross sections on tritium breeding uncertainty in a realistic system. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. R-matrix analysis of {sup 235}U neutron transmission and cross sections in the energy range 0 to 2.25 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1997-11-01

    This document describes a new R-matrix analysis of {sup 235}U cross section data in the energy range from 0 to 2,250 eV. The analysis was performed with the computer code SAMMY, that has recently been updated to permit, for the first time, inclusion of both differential and integral data within the analysis process. Fourteen differential data sets and six integral quantities were used in this evaluation: two measurements of fission plus capture, one of fission plus absorption, six of fission alone, two of transmission, and one of eta, plus standard values of thermal cross sections for fission, capture, and scattering, and of K1 and the Westcott g-factors for both fission and absorption. An excellent representation was obtained for the high-resolution transmission, fission, and capture cross-section data as well as for the integral quantities. The result is a single set of resonance parameters spanning the entire range up to 2,250 eV, a decided improvement over the present ENDF/VI evaluation, in which eleven discrete resonance parameter sets are required to cover that same energy range. This new evaluation is expected to greatly improve predictability of the criticality safety margins for nuclear systems in which {sup 235}U is present.

  19. R-Matrix Analysis of 238U High Resolution Neutron Transmissions and Capture Cross Sections in the Energy Range 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2009-01-01

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990 and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 to 200 pcm.

  20. Relationships among social support, professional empowerment, and nursing career development of male nurses: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Hwang; Fu, Chou-Mei; Li, Ren-Hau; Lou, Jiunn-Horng; Yu, Hsing-Yi

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships among social support, professional empowerment, and nursing career development and to identify the significant factors that affect nursing career development among male nurses. A cross-sectional survey design was used with 314 male nurses in Taiwan. Social support and professional empowerment were significantly and positively correlated with nursing career development among male nurses. Social support, professional empowerment, salary, type of institution, type of clinical level, and nursing discipline were identified as factors that significantly influenced nursing career development. Together, they accounted for 55.9% of the total variation. Professional empowerment was the most critical predictor of nursing career development and accounted for 47.7% of the variation. Nursing managers should follow male nurses' empowerment with interest and specifically address professional empowerment to promote male nurses' career development.

  1. Monolayer-by-monolayer compositional analysis of InAs/InAsSb superlattices with cross-sectional STM

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M. R.; Kanedy, K.; Lopez, F.; Weimer, M.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Shaner, E. A.; Kim, J. K.

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, we use cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to reconstruct the monolayer-by-monolayer composition profile across a representative subset of MBE-grown InAs/InAsSb superlattice layers and find that antimony segregation frustrates the intended compositional discontinuities across both antimonide-on-arsenide and arsenide-on-antimonide heterojunctions. Graded, rather than abrupt, interfaces are formed in either case. We likewise find that the incorporated antimony per superlattice period varies measurably from beginning to end of the multilayer stack. Finally, although the intended antimony discontinuities predict significant discrepancies with respect to the experimentally observed high-resolution x-ray diffraction spectrum, dynamical simulations based on the STM-derived profiles provide an excellent quantitative match to all important aspects of the x-ray data.

  2. Breadwinner and caregiver: a cross-sectional analysis of children's and emerging adults' visions of their future family roles.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Megan; Coyle, Emily F

    2011-06-01

    Participants were 150 school-age boys and girls, 58 high school students, and 145 university students drawn from communities in the Southeastern United States. In this cross-sectional study, family role attitudes and expectations were examined across development. Parental work traditionality (occupational prestige and traditionality, and employed hours) predicted daughters' social role attitudes and plans for future family roles, such that daughters' envisioned families resembled that of their parents. Sons' and daughters' own attitudes about adult family roles predicted their plans to work or stay home with their future children; however, mothers' work traditionality predicted daughters' future plans over and above daughters' own attitudes. The only exception to this was in the case of university daughters, where university women's attitudes about social roles fully mediated this relationship. It may be that, as young women approach adulthood and the formation of families, they adjust their vision of their future self to match more closely their own attitudes about the caregiving role.

  3. Monolayer-by-monolayer compositional analysis of InAs/InAsSb superlattices with cross-sectional STM

    DOE PAGES

    Wood, M. R.; Kanedy, K.; Lopez, F.; ...

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, we use cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to reconstruct the monolayer-by-monolayer composition profile across a representative subset of MBE-grown InAs/InAsSb superlattice layers and find that antimony segregation frustrates the intended compositional discontinuities across both antimonide-on-arsenide and arsenide-on-antimonide heterojunctions. Graded, rather than abrupt, interfaces are formed in either case. We likewise find that the incorporated antimony per superlattice period varies measurably from beginning to end of the multilayer stack. Finally, although the intended antimony discontinuities predict significant discrepancies with respect to the experimentally observed high-resolution x-ray diffraction spectrum, dynamical simulations based on the STM-derived profiles provide an excellentmore » quantitative match to all important aspects of the x-ray data.« less

  4. Frontal-subcortical circuitry in social attachment and relationships: A cross-sectional fMRI ALE meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shu-Hui; Walker, Zachary M; Hale, James B; Chen, S H Annabel

    2017-02-22

    Researchers have explored the concept of attachment in multiple ways, from animal studies examining imprinting to abnormal attachment in psychopathology. However, until recently, few have considered how neural circuitry develops the effective social bonds that are subsequently replicated in relationships across the lifespan. This current cross-sectional study undertook a fMRI Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analyses to examine the neurocircuitry that governs emotional and behavioural functions critical for building effective social relationships in children and adults. Results suggest that dissociable dorsal cognitive ("cool") and ventral - affective ("hot") frontal-subcortical circuits (FSC) work together to govern social relationships, with repeated social consequences leading to potentially adaptive - or maladaptive - relationships that can become routinized in the cerebellum. Implications for forming stable, functional, social bonds are considered, followed by recommendations for those who struggle with cool and hot FSC functioning that can hinder the development of adaptive prosocial relationships.

  5. X-ray analysis of residual stress gradients in TiN coatings by a Laplace space approach and cross-sectional nanodiffraction: a critical comparison.

    PubMed

    Stefenelli, Mario; Todt, Juraj; Riedl, Angelika; Ecker, Werner; Müller, Thomas; Daniel, Rostislav; Burghammer, Manfred; Keckes, Jozef

    2013-10-01

    Novel scanning synchrotron cross-sectional nanobeam and conventional laboratory as well as synchrotron Laplace X-ray diffraction methods are used to characterize residual stresses in exemplary 11.5 µm-thick TiN coatings. Both real and Laplace space approaches reveal a homogeneous tensile stress state and a very pronounced compressive stress gradient in as-deposited and blasted coatings, respectively. The unique capabilities of the cross-sectional approach operating with a beam size of 100 nm in diameter allow the analysis of stress variation with sub-micrometre resolution at arbitrary depths and the correlation of the stress evolution with the local coating microstructure. Finally, advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are extensively discussed.

  6. High precision neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, A.; Belloni, F.; Borcea, C.; Boromiza, M.; Dessagne, Ph.; Henning, G.; Kerveno, M.; Negret, A.; Nyman, M.; Pirovano, E.; Plompen, A.

    2017-06-01

    High precision neutron inelastic scattering cross section data are very important for the development of the new generation of nuclear reactors (Gen IV). Our experiments, performed using the GELINA neutron source and the GAINS spectrometer of the European Commission Joint Research Center, Geel, produce highly reliable and precise cross section data. We will present the details of the setup and the data analysis technique allowing production of such unique results, and we will show examples of two experimental results.

  7. Reaction cross sections of unstable nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira

    2006-11-02

    Experimental studies on reaction cross sections are reviewed. The recent developments of radioactive nuclear beams have enabled us to measure reaction cross-sections for unstable nuclei. Using Glauber-model analysis, effective nuclear matter density distributions of unstable nuclei can be studied. Recent measurements in RIBLL at IMP and RIPS at RIKEN are introduced. The effective matter density distributions for 14-18C are also mentioned.

  8. Radar cross section of insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. R.

    1985-02-01

    X-band measurements of radar cross section as a function of the angle between insect body axis and the plane of polarization are presented. A finding of particular interest is that in larger insects, maximum cross section occurs when the E-vector is perpendicular to the body axis. A new range of measurements on small insects (aphids, and planthoppers) is also described, and a comprehensive summary of insect cross-section data at X-band is given.

  9. The 235U(n,2n(gamma)) Yrast Partial Gamma-Ray Cross Sections: A Report on the 1998 -- 1999 GEANIE Data and Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garret, P E; McGrath, C A; McNabb, D P; Nelson, R O; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Johns, G D

    2000-09-01

    Measurements of partial {sup 235}U(n,2n{gamma}) {gamma}-ray cross sections have been carried out as a function of incident neutron energy using the GEANIE spectrometer at LANSCE/WNR. The yields of {gamma} rays resulting from the population of discrete levels in the residual nucleus {sup 234}U have been measured at incident neutron energies in the 1-20-MeV range. These data provide, with the aid of nuclear reaction modeling, a measurement of the {sup 235}U(n,2n) reaction cross section and serve as a proof of principle of the y-ray technique for the parallel 23gPu(n,2n) measurement [l]. This paper presents the analysis of the {gamma}-ray data and the extraction of partial {gamma}-ray cross sections as a function of incident neutron energy. Uncertainties associated with the spectroscopic analysis of the data and validation of the results are discussed in detail.

  10. Z-dependence analysis of M x-ray production cross sections for heavy elements with 60≤Z≤90 by protons impact

    SciTech Connect

    Deghfel, B.; Kahoul, A.; Nekkab, M.

    2015-03-30

    Motivated by the large deviation between the experiment and the predictions of the most often used model of ionization process by a charged particle, namely ECPSSR model, a large database of experimental M-shell X-ray production cross-sections by protons energies varying from 0.1 to 4.0 MeV for elements with atomic number 60 ≤ Z ≤ 90, is collected from various sources published from 1980 till 2009 to deduce an empirical M x-ray production cross section. This latter is then deduced from the available experimental data as a function of the scaled velocity parameter by using the whole range of elements (collective analysis) or by introducing the dependence of these cross sections on the atomic number of the target, noted as “Z-dependence analysis” in addition to the collective one. The corresponding results and their deviation from the experimental data are presented for selected elements. Also, a comparison is made for selected elements between our results and other theoretical as well as experimental works.

  11. Two-photon absorption cross section determination for fluorene derivatives: analysis of the methodology and elucidation of the origin of the absorption processes.

    PubMed

    Belfield, Kevin D; Bondar, Mykhailo V; Hernandez, Florencio E; Przhonska, Olga V; Yao, Sheng

    2007-11-08

    A comprehensive analysis of the well-known open aperture Z-scan method, using a modified equation for the change in transmittance, is presented and accounts for discrepancies in two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections between picosecond and femtosecond excitation. This new approach takes into account excited-state absorption and stimulated emission of the molecules studied. The two-photon absorption cross-section spectra of a series of six fluorene-based derivatives, determined using picosecond pulses, over a broad spectral range (500-900 nm), and this approach using a modified fitting procedure in the open aperture Z-scan is reported. We demonstrate that the fluorene derivatives exhibit two-photon absorption cross-section values between 700 and 5000 GM, when excited into the two-photon allowed electronic state. Excitation anisotropy spectra, measured to investigate the nature of the observed linear and nonlinear absorption bands, are presented and provide insight into the 2PA process.

  12. International Evaluation of Neutron Cross Section Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, A. D.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Smith, D. L.; Larson, N. M.; Chen, Zhenpeng; Hale, G. M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Gai, E. V.; Oh, Soo-Youl; Badikov, S. A.; Kawano, T.; Hofmann, H. M.; Vonach, H.; Tagesen, S.

    2009-12-01

    Neutron cross section standards are the basis for the determination of most neutron cross sections. They are used for both measurements and evaluations of neutron cross sections. Not many cross sections can be obtained absolutely - most cross sections are measured relative to the cross section standards and converted using evaluations of the standards. The previous complete evaluation of the neutron cross section standards was finished in 1987 and disseminated as the NEANDC/INDC and ENDF/B-VI standards. R-matrix model fits for the light elements and non-model least-squares fits for all the cross sections in the evaluation were the basis of the combined fits for all of the data. Some important reactions and constants are not standards, but they assist greatly in the determination of the standard cross sections and reduce their uncertainties - these data were also included in the combined fits. The largest experimental database used in the evaluation was prepared by Poenitz and included about 400 sets of experimental data with covariance matrices of uncertainties that account for all cross-energy, cross-reaction and cross-material correlations. For the evaluation GMA, a least-squares code developed by Poenitz, was used to fit all types of cross sections (absolute and shape), their ratios, spectrum-averaged cross sections and thermal constants in one full analysis. But, the uncertainties derived in this manner, and especially those obtained in the R-matrix model fits, have been judged to be too low and unrealistic. These uncertainties were substantially increased prior to their release in the recommended data files of 1987. Modified percentage uncertainties were reassigned by the United States Cross Section Evaluation Working Group's Standards Subcommittee for a wide range of energies, and no covariance (or correlation) matrices were supplied at that time. The need to re-evaluate the cross section standards is based on the appearance of a significant amount of precise

  13. Female political representation and child health: Evidence from a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Quamruzzaman, Amm; Lange, Matthew

    2016-10-24

    This article explores the impact of female political representation in national parliaments on child health through a multilevel analysis. Using available Demographic and Health Surveys, we employ both cross-sectional data for 51 low- and middle-income countries and longitudinal data for 20 countries with multiple surveys. For both the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, female representation is negatively related to infant mortality and positively related to measles vaccination status. To explore potential mechanisms, we control for state spending on health and analyze whether the impact of female representation depends on a critical mass of female representatives. The analysis offers evidence that state spending accounts for some of the mediation effect and that the impact of female representation on infant death depends on a critical mass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  15. The Relationship of Sugar to Population-Level Diabetes Prevalence: An Econometric Analysis of Repeated Cross-Sectional Data

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanjay; Yoffe, Paula; Hills, Nancy; Lustig, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    While experimental and observational studies suggest that sugar intake is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes, independent of its role in obesity, it is unclear whether alterations in sugar intake can account for differences in diabetes prevalence among overall populations. Using econometric models of repeated cross-sectional data on diabetes and nutritional components of food from 175 countries, we found that every 150 kcal/person/day increase in sugar availability (about one can of soda/day) was associated with increased diabetes prevalence by 1.1% (p <0.001) after testing for potential selection biases and controlling for other food types (including fibers, meats, fruits, oils, cereals), total calories, overweight and obesity, period-effects, and several socioeconomic variables such as aging, urbanization and income. No other food types yielded significant individual associations with diabetes prevalence after controlling for obesity and other confounders. The impact of sugar on diabetes was independent of sedentary behavior and alcohol use, and the effect was modified but not confounded by obesity or overweight. Duration and degree of sugar exposure correlated significantly with diabetes prevalence in a dose-dependent manner, while declines in sugar exposure correlated with significant subsequent declines in diabetes rates independently of other socioeconomic, dietary and obesity prevalence changes. Differences in sugar availability statistically explain variations in diabetes prevalence rates at a population level that are not explained by physical activity, overweight or obesity. PMID:23460912

  16. Parenting stress: a cross-sectional analysis of associations with childhood obesity, physical activity, and TV viewing.

    PubMed

    Walton, Kathryn; Simpson, Janis Randall; Darlington, Gerarda; Haines, Jess

    2014-10-01

    Parents influence their children's obesity risk through feeding behaviours and modeling of weight-related behaviours. Little is known about how the general home environment, including parental stress, may influence children's weight. The objective of this study was to explore the association between parenting stress and child body mass index (BMI) as well as obesity risk factors, physical activity and television (TV) viewing. We used cross-sectional data from 110 parent-child dyads participating in a community-based parenting intervention. Child heights and weights were measured by trained research assistants. Parents (93% mothers) reported level of parenting stress via the Parenting Stress Index- Short Form (PSI-3-SF) as well as children's activity behaviours and TV viewing. This was an ethnically diverse (55% Hispanic/Latino, 22% Black), low-income (64% earning < $45,000/year) sample. Level of parenting stress was not associated with children's risk of being overweight/obese. Children with highly stressed parents were less likely to meet physical activity guidelines on weekdays than children with normally stressed parents (OR = 0.33, 95% CI, 0.12-0.95). Parents experiencing high stress were less likely to set limits on the amount of TV their children watched (OR = 0.32, 95% CI, 0.11, 0.93). Results suggest stress specific to parenting may not be associated with increased obesity risk among children. However, future interventions may need to address stress as a possible underlying factor associated with unhealthful behaviours among preschoolers.

  17. Evaluation of dipstick analysis among elderly residents to detect bacteriuria: a cross-sectional study in 32 nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Sundvall, Pär-Daniel; Gunnarsson, Ronny K

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated dipstick urinalysis for elderly and practically none present confidence intervals. Furthermore, most previous studies combine all bacteria species in a "positive culture". Thus, their evaluation may be inappropriate due to Yule-Simpson's paradox. The aim of this study was to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of dipstick urinalysis for the elderly in nursing homes. Methods In this cross-sectional study voided urine specimens were collected from 651 elderly individuals in nursing homes. Dipstick urinalysis for nitrite, leukocyte esterase and urine culture were performed. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Visual readings were compared to readings with a urine chemistry analyzer. Results 207/651 (32%) of urine cultures showed growth of a potentially pathogenic bacterium. Combining the two dipsticks improved test characteristics slightly compared to using only one of the dipsticks. When both dipsticks are negative, presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria can be ruled out with a negative predictive value of 88 (84–92)%. Visual and analyzer readings had acceptable agreement. Conclusion When investigating for bacteriuria in elderly people at nursing homes we suggest nitrite and leukocyte esterase dipstick be combined. There are no clinically relevant differences between visual and analyzer dipstick readings. When dipstick urinalysis for nitrite and leukocyte esterase are both negative it is unlikely that the urine culture will show growth of potentially pathogenic bacteria and in a patient with an uncomplicated illness further testing is unnecessary. PMID:19635163

  18. Immunity status against poliomyelitis in childbearing women in a province of northern Italy. A cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, L; Affanni, P; Verrotti di Pianella, C; Colucci, M E; Tanzi, M L

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional seroprevalence study was carried out in 2007 to estimate the immunological status associated with poliomyelitis among fertile women , according to demographic changes. We consecutively enrolled 493 healthy mothers at the time of delivery in order to assess immunity against poliomyelitis by a neutralisation inhibition test. Despite the lack of seronegative subjects, our investigation showed low GMTs, which confirmed a reduction in the "booster effect". The GMTs against poliovirus 1, poliovirus 2 and poliovirus 3 were 25.20, 14.79 and 8.80, respectively. The data that emerged from our survey showed that GMTs have decreased significantly since 1983 and reached low-to-medium values over the past 25 years. The serum prevalence studies, together with the vaccination coverage estimates, are useful and are strongly recommended in order to highlight and identify the possible scenarios in which susceptible subject groups may be present simultaneously as well the possibility of the reintroduction of wild virus in an area that was previously free of polio.

  19. Cross sectional analysis of the association between mode of school transportation and physical fitness in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, Lars; Kolle, Elin; Steene-Johannessen, Jostein; Anderssen, Sigmund A; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2013-07-17

    To investigate the associations between body composition, cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness in relation to travel mode to school in children and adolescents. Children and adolescents from 40 elementary schools and 23 high schools representing all regions in Norway were invited to participate in the study. Anthropometry, cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness were tested at the school location. Questionnaires were used in order to register mode of transport to school, age, gender and levels of leisure time physical activity. A total of 1694 (i.e. 60% of all invited participants) children and adolescents at a mean age of 9.6 and 15.6 respectively (SD = 0.4 for both groups) were analyzed for associations with physical fitness variables. Males cycling to school had lower sum of skin folds than adolescents walking to school. Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescents and male cyclists compared to walkers and passive commuters were observed. Among children, cycling and walking to school, higher isometric muscle endurance in the back extensors compared to passive commuters was observed. Based on this national representative cross-sectional examination of randomly selected children and adolescents there is evidence that active commuting, especially cycling, is associated with a favourable body composition and better cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness as compared to passive commuting.

  20. Actinide neutron induced cross-sections; analysis of the OSMOSE LWR-UO{sub 2} experiment in MINERVE

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.; Litaize, O.; Santamarina, A.; Antony, M.; Hudelot, J. P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the interpretation of the first phase of the OSMOSE experimental program. The OSMOSE experiment began in 2005 in the MINERVE French facility and will continue until 2008. It consists in reactivity worth measurements of separated actinides by an oscillation technique. First results are obtained in a standard LWR neutron spectrum (UO{sub 2} lattice). The present study focuses on the following isotopes: {sup 234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239,242}Pu. The comparison between APOLLO2 accurate deterministic calculations and experiments shows the reliability of the latest JEFF-3.1 European nuclear data library for all oscillated isotopes, except {sup 237}Np. The obtained (C/E-1){+-}({delta}E/E) values are the following: {sup 234}U: -5%{+-}2% {sup 237}Np: -11%{+-}2% {sup 239}Pu: +1%{+-}2% {sup 242}Pu: +2%{+-}2% An energetic decomposition of the reactivity worth is carried out using Standard Perturbation Theory that underlines the underestimation of the {sup 237}Np(n, {gamma}) thermal and resonant capture cross-section. (authors)

  1. Analysis of Electron Evolution in Air using Updated Cross Section Data (LA-UR-14-25207)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Elise; Morris, Heidi; Ji, Wei

    2014-10-01

    For the purpose of modeling the time evolution of electron temperature in an Electromagnetic Pulse, a swarm model has been developed. This code uses an adaptive time step and solves a system of coupled differential equations for the electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Our comparisons with microwave and DC breakdown measurements have revealed that, for high values of E/p, the swarm model underestimates the equilibrium temperature that is achieved in experiments. Our initial work used energy and momentum transfer collision frequencies that were reported in Higgins, Longmire, and O'Dell (1973). We have updated the electron-air cross sections using those reported in the LXcat database as a part of the Plasma Data Exchange Project. New momentum and energy transfer collision frequencies, defined over a broader energy range, have been calculated using a two-term Boltzmann Equation solver, BOLSIG +. We report on the use of these updated collision frequencies in the swarm code and show the improvement in our calculation by comparing the results with experimental data.

  2. Predicting children’s media use in the USA: Differences in cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Jung; Bartolic, Silvia; Vandewater, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictors of children’s media use in the USA, comparing cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Data come from Waves 1 and 2 of the Child Development Supplement (CDS-I; CDS-II), a nationally representative sample of American children aged 0–12 in 1997 and 5–18 in 2002. Twenty-four hour time use diaries are used to assess children’s time spent with media (television, video games, computers, and reading). Predictors examined include socio-demographics, neighbourhood quality, family factors, and other media use. Ordinary least square (OLS) multiple regressions were performed by three age groups (preschoolers, early school age, and preadolescence). The findings suggest that neighbourhood quality, parental limits and family conflict are significant predictors of children’s media use within time or over time, but the significance depends on the type of media and child’s developmental stage. In addition, children’s television viewing and reading habits are formed early in life and reinforced over time. This study is among the first to provide empirical evidence for the effect of early contextual factors on the life course of children’s media use from a developmental perspective. PMID:19829761

  3. Descriptions and interpretations of the ACCORD-Lipid trial in the news and biomedical literature: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Downing, Nicholas S; Cheng, Theresa; Krumholz, Harlan M; Shah, Nilay D; Ross, Joseph S

    2014-07-01

    The lipid component of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD-Lipid) trial was a landmark, publicly funded study demonstrating that fenofibrate, when added to statin therapy, was not associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes among patients with diabetes mellitus. We performed a cross-sectional study of all articles describing the results of ACCORD-Lipid in the news and biomedical literature in the 15 months following its publication. For articles published in biomedical journals, we determined whether there was an association between authors' conflicts of interest and trial interpretation. We identified 67 news articles and 141 biomedical journal articles discussing ACCORD-Lipid. Approximately 30% of news and biomedical journal articles described fenofibrate as ineffective, whereas nearly 20% concluded it was effective. Among articles making a recommendation, approximately 50% of news and 67% of biomedical journal articles supported continued fibrate use. Authors with conflicts of interest were more likely to describe fenofibrate as effective (27.1% vs 8.9%; relative risk, 3.03; 95% CI, 1.22-7.50; P = .008) and support continued fibrate use (77.4% vs 45.8%; 1.69; 1.07-2.67; P = .006). The ACCORD-Lipid trial was described inconsistently in news and biomedical journal articles, possibly creating uncertainty among patients and physicians. In addition, conflicts of interest were associated with more favorable trial interpretation.

  4. A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Late-Life Cardiovascular Factors and Their Relation to Clinically Defined Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dugger, Brittany N; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Monsell, Sarah E; Kukull, Walter A; Woodruff, Bryan K; Reiman, Eric M; Beach, Thomas G; Wilson, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated associations between cardiovascular factors and Alzheimer disease (AD) with minimal focus on other neurodegenerative diseases. Utilizing cross-sectional data from 17,532 individuals in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center, Uniform Data Set, we compared the presence of cardiovascular factors [body mass index (BMI), atrial fibrillation, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes] in individuals carrying a diagnosis of Probable AD (ProbAD), Possible AD, vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, or corticobasal degeneration, with that of normals. Generalized linear mixed models were fitted with age at visit, gender, and cardiovascular factors as fixed effects and Alzheimer's Disease Centers as random effects. In late life, only BMI of ProbAD and DLB patients was statistically significantly lower than that in normals (P-values <0.001). When accounting for colinearity within cardiovascular factors, a low BMI was a comorbidity of certain dementia etiologies as compared with normals. These data support a concept of disease-specific associations with certain cardiovascular factors.

  5. Association between cannabis use and schizotypal dimensions--a meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies.

    PubMed

    Szoke, Andrei; Galliot, Anne-Marie; Richard, Jean-Romain; Ferchiou, Aziz; Baudin, Grégoire; Leboyer, Marion; Schürhoff, Franck

    2014-09-30

    Cannabis consumption can cause abuse and dependence and increase risk of developing psychiatric and somatic disorders. Several literature reviews explored the link between cannabis consumption and schizophrenia but none summarized the rich literature on cannabis and psychometric schizotypy. The aim of our review is to synthesize data from studies that explored the association between cannabis consumption and schizoptypal dimensions. A systematic review of the literature and, when needed, contact with the authors, allowed us to gather data from 29 cross-sectional studies. We compared schizotypy scores between subjects that never used cannabis and subjects that used it at least once ("never vs. ever") and between current users and subjects that do not use cannabis currently ("current vs. other"). We conducted separate analyses for total schizotypy score and each of the three classical schizotypal dimensions (positive, negative, disorganized). For all eight comparisons, the cannabis group ("ever" or "current") had higher schizotypy scores. Differences were in the small or medium range and, with the exception of the negative score in the current vs. other comparison, statistically significant. Cannabis consumption is associated with increased schizotypal traits. More research, using different approaches (e.g. longitudinal studies) is needed to explore the cause of this association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) among arsenic victims: a cross-sectional study on health economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Molla, A A; Anwar, K S; Hamid, S A; Hoque, M E; Haq, A K M Z

    2004-08-01

    Arsenic contamination of ground water is a major public health problem in Bangladesh. It is estimated that more than 20 million people are potentially exposed to arsenic poisoning. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Haziganj Upazila under Chandpur district between September to December, 2001 with the objectives to assess the socioeconomic consequences and disease burden in terms of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). A total of 168 subjects suffering from arsenicosis were studied. Both age and disability weights were considered to calculate DALYs. Agricultural labour and housewives suffered more from the disease. A strong relationship (p<0.005) was found between duration of suffering and occupation of the subjects. Also, there was a strong relationship between age of onset and education of the study subjects (p<0.006). No deaths directly from arsenicosis were reported. It may be noticed that 47% of the patients would be living with disability for more than 51 years. A strong relationship exists (p<0.002) between educational level and Years Lived with Disability (YLDs). A total of 7930 YLDs were lost due to arsenicosis, which accounts for 1908 DALYs.

  7. Male migration/mobility and HIV among married couples: cross-sectional analysis of nationally representative data from India.

    PubMed

    Saggurti, Niranjan; Nair, Saritha; Malviya, Alankar; Decker, Michele R; Silverman, Jay G; Raj, Anita

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines the associations between male migration and mobility with HIV among married couples in India. Cross-sectional analyses of a nationally representative household survey conducted across all 29 states of India from 2005 to 2006 via the National Family Health Survey-3 (NFHS-3) included a subsample of 27,771 married couples who were tested for HIV as a part of their participation. Both bi-variate and multi-variate analyses were conducted. About 0.5% of the total married couples in the current study included an HIV-infected partner; 0.11% were HIV concordant and 0.38% were HIV serodiscordant couples. Adjusted logistic regression analyses demonstrated that HIV infection in couples (seroconcordant or serodiscordant) was significantly more likely among those couples where the man was migrant but not mobile and those couples where the man was migrant as well as mobile, relative to those couples where the man was neither migrant nor mobile. Male migration increases the risk for HIV among married couples in India, largely in the form of serodiscordance in which men are HIV infected. These findings document the need for not only primary prevention efforts to reduce HIV acquisition among migrant male workers, particularly more mobile migrants, but also efforts are needed to reduce subsequent transmission to their wives.

  8. Risk factors and pre-travel healthcare of international travellers attending a Dutch travel clinic: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Wieten, Rosanne W; van der Schalie, Maurice; Visser, Benjamin J; Grobusch, Martin P; van Vugt, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The number of international travellers is currently estimated to exceed one billion annually. To address travel related health risks and facilitate risk reduction strategies, detailed knowledge of travellers' characteristics is important. In this cross-sectional study, data of a 20% sample of travellers visiting the Academic Medical Center (AMC) travel clinic Amsterdam from July 2011 to July 2012 was collected. Itineraries and protection versus exposure rates of preventable infectious diseases were mapped and reported according to STROBE guidelines. 1749 travellers were included. South-Eastern Asia, South-America and West-Africa were most frequently visited. 26.2% of the population had pre-existing medical conditions (often cardiovascular). Young and VFR travellers had a longer median travel time (28 and 30 days) compared to the overall population (21 days). Young adult travellers were relatively often vaccinated against hepatitis B (43.9% vs. 20.5%, p < .001) and rabies (16.6% vs. 4.3%, p < .001). VFRs were less often vaccinated against hepatitis B (11.6% vs. 30.6%, p < .001) and rabies (1.3% vs. 9.0%, p .012) compared to non-VFR travellers. Pre-travel guidelines were well adhered to. Young adult travellers had high-risk itineraries but were adequately protected. Improvement of hepatitis B and rabies protection would be desirable, specifically for VFRs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Childhood exposure to emotional abuse and later life stress among Kenyan women: a mediation analysis of cross-sectional data.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael L; Gutarra, Claudia; Billingsley, Katherine M; Keiser, Philip H; Gitari, Stanley

    2017-07-01

    We explore whether perceived stress among Kenyan mothers is predicted by childhood exposure to emotional abuse - both witnessed among parents and experienced directly. Further, we explore whether this association is mediated by social support, family functioning and polygynous marriage. We used cross-sectional data from a systematic random sample (n = 1974) of mothers in semi-rural Kenya. Data were collected using validated scales and trained interviewers. Analyses were conducted using bootstrapped structural equation models and fixed-effects linear regression models, controlling for age and household wealth. Reported experience of emotional abuse - both directly experienced and observed among household adults - was high in the present population (72.5% and 69%, respectively). Perceived stress among women was significantly higher if they were exposed to more emotional abuse during childhood (p < .001). Lower social support, worse family functioning and higher rates of polygynous marriage mediated pathways between emotional abuse exposure during childhood and adult perceived stress. Future research should investigate whether social integration, identity formation and self-esteem underlie observed dynamics in sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts to promote social integration and support should target children currently experiencing emotional abuse, and may include child-targeted high quality television programing and adult-targeted media and celebrity campaigns.

  10. Poor adherence to folic acid and iodine supplement recommendations in preconception and pregnancy: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Malek, Lenka; Umberger, Wendy; Makrides, Maria; Zhou, Shao J

    2016-10-01

    To determine pregnant women's knowledge of and adherence to the recommendations for periconceptional folic acid supplementation (PFS) and iodine supplementation (IS). Secondary objectives include determining predictors of adherence, and identifying influential nutrition information sources. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 857 pregnant women, including a national cohort (n=455) recruited using an online panel provider and a South Australian cohort (n=402) recruited from a public maternity hospital. Adherence to PFS and IS recommendations was 27% and 23%, respectively. Planning pregnancy and awareness of the correct timing of recommendations were predictors of adherence for both recommendations. Not consuming any alcohol during pregnancy and living in metropolitan areas also predicted adherence to the IS recommendation. Awareness of the recommendation was greater for folic acid (more than 90%) than iodine (56-69%). Knowledge of the importance of folic acid and iodine was greater than knowledge regarding the recommended dose and timing of supplementation. Main healthcare providers were considered the most influential nutrition information sources. Knowledge of and adherence to supplement recommendations for preconception and pregnancy needs improvement. While main healthcare providers may play an important role, further research is needed to explore strategies for increasing adoption of recommendations. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  11. The relationship of sugar to population-level diabetes prevalence: an econometric analysis of repeated cross-sectional data.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Yoffe, Paula; Hills, Nancy; Lustig, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    While experimental and observational studies suggest that sugar intake is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes, independent of its role in obesity, it is unclear whether alterations in sugar intake can account for differences in diabetes prevalence among overall populations. Using econometric models of repeated cross-sectional data on diabetes and nutritional components of food from 175 countries, we found that every 150 kcal/person/day increase in sugar availability (about one can of soda/day) was associated with increased diabetes prevalence by 1.1% (p <0.001) after testing for potential selection biases and controlling for other food types (including fibers, meats, fruits, oils, cereals), total calories, overweight and obesity, period-effects, and several socioeconomic variables such as aging, urbanization and income. No other food types yielded significant individual associations with diabetes prevalence after controlling for obesity and other confounders. The impact of sugar on diabetes was independent of sedentary behavior and alcohol use, and the effect was modified but not confounded by obesity or overweight. Duration and degree of sugar exposure correlated significantly with diabetes prevalence in a dose-dependent manner, while declines in sugar exposure correlated with significant subsequent declines in diabetes rates independently of other socioeconomic, dietary and obesity prevalence changes. Differences in sugar availability statistically explain variations in diabetes prevalence rates at a population level that are not explained by physical activity, overweight or obesity.

  12. Single-Level and Multilevel Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofighi, Davood; Thoemmes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a statistical approach used to examine how the effect of an independent variable on an outcome is transmitted through an intervening variable (mediator). In this article, we provide a gentle introduction to single-level and multilevel mediation analyses. Using single-level data, we demonstrate an application of structural…

  13. Single-Level and Multilevel Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofighi, Davood; Thoemmes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a statistical approach used to examine how the effect of an independent variable on an outcome is transmitted through an intervening variable (mediator). In this article, we provide a gentle introduction to single-level and multilevel mediation analyses. Using single-level data, we demonstrate an application of structural…

  14. Staff working in hospital units with greater social capital experience less work-home conflict: Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, Anika; Kuntz, Ludwig; Miedaner, Felix

    2017-07-31

    When the interplay between work and private life does not function correctly (work-home conflict), this constitutes a well-known risk factor for poorer health, increased absenteeism and lower work performance. Information about influencing factors of work-home conflict is therefore indispensable in order to avoid it. In this study, we analyse whether a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity' (organizational social capital) can reduce an employee's conflict between work and private life. This study investigates the link between organizational social capital and work-home conflict in health professionals. This issue was investigated using a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. Data from questionnaires completed by physicians and nurses (n=1733) were linked with structural data from 66 neonatal intensive care units in Germany. Using multi-level analyses, we investigated associations between organizational social capital at the ward level and work-home conflict at the level of individual employees, taking into account additional structural and individual characteristics. Employees on wards with greater social capital reported significantly less work-home conflict. Our results support the hypothesis that organizational social capital is an important collective resource. As such, more attention should be given to establishing a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity', and this should be encouraged in a targeted fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The influence of the built environment on outcomes from a “walking school bus study”: a cross-sectional analysis using geographical information systems

    PubMed Central

    Oreskovic, Nicolas M.; Blossom, Jeff; Robinson, Alyssa I.; Chen, Minghua L.; Uscanga, Doris K.; Mendoza, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Active commuting to school increases children’s daily physical activity. The built environment is associated with children’s physical activity levels in cross-sectional studies. This study examined the role of the built environment on the outcomes of a “walking school bus” study. Geographical information systems was used to map out and compare the built environments around schools participating in a pilot walking school bus randomised controlled trial, as well as along school routes. Multi-level modelling was used to determine the built environment attributes associated with the outcomes of active commuting to school and accelerometer-determined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MPVA). There were no differences in the surrounding built environments of control (n = 4) and intervention (n = 4) schools participating in the walking school bus study. Among school walking routes, park space was inversely associated with active commuting to school (β = −0.008, SE = 0.004, P = 0.03), while mixed-land use was positively associated with daily MPVA (β = 60.0, SE = 24.3, P = 0.02). There was effect modification such that high traffic volume and high street connectivity were associated with greater moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The results of this study suggest that the built environment may play a role in active school commuting outcomes and daily physical activity. PMID:25545924

  16. Family Structure, Mother-Child Communication, Father-Child Communication, and Adolescent Life Satisfaction: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Kate A.; Currie, Candace

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between mother-child and father-child communication and children's life satisfaction, and the moderating effect of communication with stepparents. Design/methodology/approach: Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland…

  17. Family Structure, Mother-Child Communication, Father-Child Communication, and Adolescent Life Satisfaction: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Kate A.; Currie, Candace

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between mother-child and father-child communication and children's life satisfaction, and the moderating effect of communication with stepparents. Design/methodology/approach: Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland…

  18. Job Satisfaction and Subjective Well-Being Among Midwives: Analysis of a Multinational Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Jarosova, Darja; Gurkova, Elena; Ziakova, Katarina; Nedvedova, Daniela; Palese, Alvisa; Godeas, Gloria; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Song, Mi Sook; Lee, Jongwon; Cordeiro, Raul; Babiarczyk, Beata; Fras, Malgorzata

    2017-03-01

    There is a considerable amount of empirical evidence to indicate a positive association between an employee's subjective well-being and workplace performance and job satisfaction. Compared with nursing research, there is a relative lack of consistent scientific evidence concerning midwives' subjective well-being and its determinants related to domains of job satisfaction. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between the domains of job satisfaction and components of subjective well-being in hospital midwives. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved 1190 hospital midwives from 7 countries. Job satisfaction was measured by the McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale. Subjective well-being was conceptualized in the study by the 2 components (the affective and the cognitive component). The affective component of subjective well-being (ie, emotional well-being) was assessed by the Positive and the Negative Affect Scale. The cognitive component of subjective well-being (ie, life satisfaction) was measured by the Personal Well-Being Index. Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses were used to determine associations between variables. Findings from correlation and regression analyses indicated an overall weak association between the domains of job satisfaction and components of subjective well-being. Satisfaction with extrinsic rewards, coworkers, and interaction opportunities accounted for only 13% of variance in the cognitive component (life satisfaction). The affective component (emotional well-being) was weakly associated with satisfaction with control and responsibility. The low amount of variance suggests that neither component of subjective well-being is influenced by the domains of job satisfaction. Further studies should focus on identifying other predictors of subjective well-being among midwives. A better understanding of how specific job facets are related to the subjective well-being of midwives might assist employers in the

  19. Potassium urinary excretion and dietary intake: a cross-sectional analysis in 8-10 year-old children.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Catarina; Padrão, Patrícia; Moreira, André; Pinto, Mariana; Neto, Mafalda; Santos, Tânia; Madureira, Joana; Fernandes, Eduardo de Oliveira; Graça, Pedro; Breda, João; Moreira, Pedro

    2015-05-17

    Data from studies assessing the intake of potassium, and the concomitant sodium-to-potassium ratio are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate potassium and sodium-to-potassium ratio intake in 8-10 year-old children. A cross-sectional survey was carried out from January to June 2014 and data from 163 children (81 boys) were included. Potassium intake was estimated by 24-h urine collection and coefficient of creatinine was used to validate completeness of urine collections. Urinary sodium and sodium-to-potassium ratio were also analysed. A 24-h dietary recall was used to provide information on dietary sources of potassium. Height and weight were measured according to international standards. The mean urinary potassium excretion was 1701 ± 594 mg/day in boys, and 1682 ± 541 mg/day in girls (p = 0.835); 8.0% of children met the WHO recommendations for potassium intake. The mean sodium excretion was 2935 ± 1075 mg/day in boys and 2381 ± 1045 mg/day in girls (p <0.001) and urinary sodium-to-potassium ratio was 3.2 ± 1.4 in boys, and 2.5 ± 1.1 in girls (p = 0.002). The mean fruit and vegetable intake was 353.1 ± 232.5 g/day in boys, and 290.8 ± 213.1 g/day in girls (p = 0.101). This study reported a low compliance of potassium intake recommendations in 8-10 year-old children. Health promotion interventions are needed in order to broaden public awareness of potassium inadequacy and to increase potassium intake.

  20. The Association between Dietary Quality and Dietary Guideline Adherence with Mental Health Outcomes in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meegan, Amy P.; Perry, Ivan J.; Phillips, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of adverse mental health outcomes in adults is increasing. Although beneficial effects of selected micronutrients and foods on mental health have been reported, they do not reflect the impact of the habitual diet on mental health. Therefore, our objective is to examine potential associations between dietary quality, dietary composition and compliance with food pyramid recommendations with depressive symptoms, anxiety and well-being (assessed using CES-D, HADS-A and WHO-5 screening tools) in a cross-sectional sample of 2047 middle-aged adults. Diet was assessed using a self-completed FFQ. Chi-square tests, t-tests and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between dietary components and mental health outcomes. Dietary quality, but not dietary composition or guideline adherence, was associated with well-being. Those with high dietary quality were more likely to report well-being (OR =1.67, 95% CI 1.15–2.44, p = 0.007) relative to those with low dietary quality. This remained significant among females (OR = 1.92, (95% CI 1.14–3.23, p = 0.014) and non-obese individuals (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.28–3.20, p = 0.003). No associations between any dietary measures with anxiety or depressive symptoms were observed. These novel results highlight the importance of dietary quality in maintaining optimal psychological well-being. Better understanding of the relationship between dietary quality and mental health may provide insight into potential therapeutic or intervention strategies to improve mental health and well-being. PMID:28273871

  1. Risk factors for premature births: a cross-sectional analysis of hospital records in a Cameroonian health facility.

    PubMed

    Chiabi, Andreas; Mah, Evelyn M; Mvondo, Nicole; Nguefack, Seraphin; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Kamga, Karen K; Zhang, Shiyuan; Mboudou, Emile; Tchokoteu, Pierre F; Mbond, Elie

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for preterm births in the Yaounde Gynaeco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital in Cameroon, and to describe their outcomes. We conducted a cross-sectional analytical study of hospital records over eight years. The incidence of prematurity was 26.5 % of admissions over a period of 7 years 7 months. After controlling for confounding factors, we identified attending antenatal care visits in a health centre (Odds ratio [OR] 6.19; 95% Confidence interval [CI] 1.15 - 33.22; p = 0.033), having a urinary tract infection (OR 39.04; 95% CI 17.19 - 88.62; p < 0.001), multiple gestation (OR 3.82; 95% CI 2.68 - 5.43; p <0.001) and congenital malformations (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.24 - 6.22; p = 0.013) increased the odds of preterm birth. On the other hand being a student mother (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.20 - 0.98; p = 0.047), being married (OR 0.40 95% CI 0.19 - 0.84; p = 0.016) and more antenatal visits (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.15 - 0.35; p <0.001) reduced the odds of preterm birth Neonatal mortality in these preterm neonates was 36.6%, in which 69% occurred in the early neonatal period. The main causes of death were neonatal infections (27.6%), neonatal asphyxia (11.9%) and congenital malformations (10.3%). We recommend enhanced prenatal care and management of pathologies which arise during pregnancy.

  2. Parental determinants of metabolic syndrome among adolescent Asian Indians: A cross-sectional analysis of parent-offspring trios.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Rahul; Vasan, Senthil K; Hansdak, Samuel; Samuel, Prasanna; Jeyaseelan, Visali; Geethanjali, Finney S; Murray, Ruth R; Venkatesan, Padmanaban; Thomas, Nihal

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between parental metabolic syndrome (MS) and the risk of MS and associated abnormalities in adolescent offspring. This cross-sectional study was performed on 304 adolescents (12-16 years; 236 children with at least one parent and 124 father-mother-child trios) recruited from four schools representing different socioeconomic strata from Vellore, India. Anthropometric data was collected and blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipids were measured. The prevalence of MS in adolescent offspring, fathers, and mothers was 3.3%, 52.5%, and 48.7% respectively. The most commonly observed metabolic abnormality among adolescents was lower high-density lipoprotein. Maternal waist circumference (WC) was strongly correlated with adolescent body mass index (P = 0.007), WC (P < 0.001), serum triglycerides (P = 0.02), and systolic (P = 0.005) and diastolic (P = 0.01) blood pressure. Maternal MS status was significantly associated with a greater risk of central obesity (WC odds ratio [OR] 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-3.17) in offspring. Both parents having MS conferred a significant effect on the child's WC (OR 1.21; 95% CI 1.72-2.07) and increased risk of MS (OR 6.19; 95% CI 1.64-23.26). This study highlights the possible heritable parental components that may contribute to the MS phenotype in offspring: MS in adolescent offspring is related to parental MS status, and maternal traits reflect offspring adiposity and metabolic traits more strongly than paternal factors. Therefore, adolescent children of parents with MS should be targets for primordial prevention of cardiometabolic disease. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Welfare generosity and population health among Canadian provinces: a time-series cross-sectional analysis, 1989-2009.

    PubMed

    Ng, Edwin; Muntaner, Carles

    2015-10-01

    Recent work in comparative social epidemiology uses an expenditures approach to examine the link between welfare states and population health. More work is needed that examines the impact of disaggregated expenditures within nations. This study takes advantage of provincial differences within Canada to examine the effects of subnational expenditures and a provincial welfare generosity index on population health. Time-series cross-sectional data are retrieved from the Canadian Socio-Economic Information Management System II Tables for 1989-2009 (10 provinces and 21 years=210 cases). Expenditures are measured using 20 disaggregated indicators, total expenditures and a provincial welfare generosity index, a ombined measure of significant predictors. Health is measured as total, male and female age-standardised mortality rates per 1000 deaths. Estimation techniques include the Prais-Winsten regressions with panel-corrected SEs, a first-order autocorrelation correction model, and fixed-unit effects, adjusted for alternative factors. Analyses reveal that four expenditures effectively reduce mortality rates: medical care, preventive care, other social services and postsecondary education. The provincial welfare generosity index has even larger effects. For an SD increase in the provincial welfare generosity index, total mortality rates are expected to decline by 0.44 SDs. Standardised effects are larger for women (β=-0.57, z(19)=-5.70, p<0.01) than for men (β=-0.38, z(19)=-5.59, p<0.01). Findings show that the expenditures approach can be effectively applied within the context of Canadian provinces, and that targeted spending on health, social services and education has salutary effects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Diet quality of Australian breast cancer survivors: a cross-sectional analysis from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Potter, J L; Collins, C E; Brown, L J; Hure, A J

    2014-12-01

    Evidence supports strong associations between healthful eating patterns and maintaining a healthy weight with favourable health outcomes for breast cancer survivors (BCS). The present study aimed to evaluate the diet quality of Australian BCS and to determine whether diet quality differed between BCS and age-matched healthy controls (HC) or by geographical location. This cross-sectional study included 281 BCS and 4069 HC from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health mid-aged cohort completing Survey 3 in 2001. Data from the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies food frequency questionnaire were used to calculate the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS), a validated summary estimate of diet quality based on adherence to the Australian dietary guidelines. The mean (SD) ARFS of the BCS group was 33.2 (9.4) out of a maximum of 74. Mean (SD) total ARFS and component scores of BCS did not differ from the HC group [32.9 (8.7)] and no differences were found in ARFS between urban and rural BCS. This is the first study dedicated exclusively to describing the diet quality of Australian BCS. Although no difference was found when comparisons were made with a HC group, there is considerable room for improvement in the diet quality of Australian BCS. Given research suggesting higher risk of chronic conditions such as obesity amongst BCS, and the recognition of optimising diet quality as a key factor in health promotion for all population groups, data from the present study suggest the need for research targeting the feasibility and impact of improving diet quality of Australian BCS. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. Job strain, bullying and violence at work and asthma in Peruvian cleaners-a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Radon, Katja; Llanqui, Uriel; Arce, Andrés; Herrera, Ronald; Herbig, Britta; Nowak, Dennis; Parra, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    An increased asthma prevalence was found in cleaners. Many of them work in precarious employment conditions, potentially leading to stress, a known risk factor for asthma. We aimed to analyze whether asthma in cleaners might partly be explained by psychosocial working conditions. The study population of this cross-sectional study included 199 cleaners employed at regional public health services in Puno Province (Peru). They were compared to 79 unexposed workers from Lima, Peru (response 83%). Both groups answered the short version of the European Working Condition Survey and a modified version of the European Community Respiratory Health screening questionnaire. After multiple imputation, the association between psychosocial working conditions and asthma (wheeze without cold or use of asthma medication) was assessed. The 12-months prevalence of asthma was 22% among cleaners versus 5% among unexposed workers (pChi(2) = .001). Cleaners were more likely than unexposed workers to work with temporary or sub-contracts, have a high employment insecurity, high strain working conditions and low social support (all pChi(2) < .05). Twenty-six percent vs. 10% reported a high bullying score; 39% vs. 8% had experienced violence at work (both pChi(2) < .001). High bullying score (adjusted Odds Ratio 5.6; 95% Confidence Interval 1.5-21.4) and violence (2.4; 1.1-5.4) were the main predictors of asthma. Taking these factors into account, being a cleaner was not statistically significantly associated with the outcome (3.5; 0.9-13.8). Poor psychosocial working conditions of cleaners may partly explain the high prevalence of asthma. The underlying mechanism might be a stress-induced inflammatory immune response.

  6. The Association between Dietary Quality and Dietary Guideline Adherence with Mental Health Outcomes in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Meegan, Amy P; Perry, Ivan J; Phillips, Catherine M

    2017-03-05

    The prevalence of adverse mental health outcomes in adults is increasing. Although beneficial effects of selected micronutrients and foods on mental health have been reported, they do not reflect the impact of the habitual diet on mental health. Therefore, our objective is to examine potential associations between dietary quality, dietary composition and compliance with food pyramid recommendations with depressive symptoms, anxiety and well-being (assessed using CES-D, HADS-A and WHO-5 screening tools) in a cross-sectional sample of 2047 middle-aged adults. Diet was assessed using a self-completed FFQ. Chi-square tests, t-tests and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between dietary components and mental health outcomes. Dietary quality, but not dietary composition or guideline adherence, was associated with well-being. Those with high dietary quality were more likely to report well-being (OR =1.67, 95% CI 1.15-2.44, p = 0.007) relative to those with low dietary quality. This remained significant among females (OR = 1.92, (95% CI 1.14-3.23, p = 0.014) and non-obese individuals (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.28-3.20, p = 0.003). No associations between any dietary measures with anxiety or depressive symptoms were observed. These novel results highlight the importance of dietary quality in maintaining optimal psychological well-being. Better understanding of the relationship between dietary quality and mental health may provide insight into potential therapeutic or intervention strategies to improve mental health and well-being.

  7. Association of occupation with prevalent hypertension in an elderly East German population: an exploratory cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Barbara; Seidler, Andreas; Kluttig, Alexander; Werdan, Karl; Haerting, Johannes; Greiser, Karin Halina

    2011-04-01

    Hypertension is one of the most relevant risk factors for cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about differences in hypertension by occupation. The aim of this study was to explore the association between occupational group and prevalent hypertension. Cross-sectional data of the CARLA study were used, a representative sample of an East German population aged 45-83. Job titles of the current or last held occupation of 967 men and 808 women were coded using the German classification of occupation. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure of ≥140 mmHg (systolic), ≥90 mmHg (diastolic) or use of antihypertensives. Sex-stratified, age-adjusted prevalence risk ratios (PR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for 31 occupational groups. Hypertension was prevalent in 79% of the population. In men, highest age-adjusted prevalence ratios were observed in metal-processing workers, carpenters/painters, and electricians with PRs of 1.31 (CI 1.04-1.65), 1.28 (CI 1.00-1.64), and 1.21 (0.95-1.53), respectively, compared to office clerks. In women, highest PRs were found in technicians/forewomen, scrutinisers/storekeepers, and food-processing occupations with PR 1.28 (1.09-1.49), 1.23 (0.99-1.51), and 1.22 (1.01-1.48), respectively. Adjustment for education, smoking, body mass index, and current work hours did not fully explain occupational differences. Excluding currently non-working subjects lead to decreased PRs in men and to increased PR in women. Differences in the prevalences of hypertension by occupational group were only partly explained by conventional risk factors and may require workplace interventions targeted at high-risk occupations. Longitudinal data with large cohorts and work-related exposure assessment are needed to confirm a temporal relationship between occupation and incident hypertension.

  8. Cross-sectional analysis of a large cohort with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1).

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Francis B; Laura, Matilde; Rossor, Alexander M; Pisciotta, Chiara; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Burns, Joshua; Li, Jun; Yum, Sabrina W; Lewis, Richard A; Day, John; Horvath, Rita; Herrmann, David N; Shy, Michael E; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Scherer, Steven S

    2017-08-29

    To extend the phenotypic description of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) and to draw new genotype-phenotype relationships. Mutations in GJB1 cause the main X-linked form of CMTX (CMTX1). We report cross-sectional data from 160 patients (from 120 different families, with 89 different mutations) seen at the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium centers. We evaluated 87 males who had a mean age of 41 years (range 10-78 years) and 73 females who had a mean age of 46 years (range 15-84 years). Sensory-motor polyneuropathy affects both sexes, more severely in males than in females, and there was a strong correlation between age and disease burden in males but not in females. Compared with females, males had more severe reduction in motor and sensory neurophysiology parameters. In contrast to females, the radial nerve sensory response in older males tended to be more severely affected compared with younger males. Median and ulnar nerve motor amplitudes were also more severely affected in older males, whereas ulnar nerve motor potentials tended to be more affected in older females. Conversely, there were no statistical differences between the sexes in other features of the disease, such as problems with balance and hand dexterity. In the absence of a phenotypic correlation with specific GJB1 mutations, sex-specific distinctions and clinically relevant attributes need to be incorporated into the measurements for clinical trials in people with CMTX1. NCT01193075. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Cross-sectional analysis of a large cohort with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1)

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Matilde; Rossor, Alexander M.; Pisciotta, Chiara; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Burns, Joshua; Li, Jun; Yum, Sabrina W.; Lewis, Richard A.; Day, John; Horvath, Rita; Herrmann, David N.; Shy, Michael E.; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To extend the phenotypic description of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) and to draw new genotype-phenotype relationships. Methods: Mutations in GJB1 cause the main X-linked form of CMTX (CMTX1). We report cross-sectional data from 160 patients (from 120 different families, with 89 different mutations) seen at the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium centers. Results: We evaluated 87 males who had a mean age of 41 years (range 10–78 years) and 73 females who had a mean age of 46 years (range 15–84 years). Sensory-motor polyneuropathy affects both sexes, more severely in males than in females, and there was a strong correlation between age and disease burden in males but not in females. Compared with females, males had more severe reduction in motor and sensory neurophysiology parameters. In contrast to females, the radial nerve sensory response in older males tended to be more severely affected compared with younger males. Median and ulnar nerve motor amplitudes were also more severely affected in older males, whereas ulnar nerve motor potentials tended to be more affected in older females. Conversely, there were no statistical differences between the sexes in other features of the disease, such as problems with balance and hand dexterity. Conclusions: In the absence of a phenotypic correlation with specific GJB1 mutations, sex-specific distinctions and clinically relevant attributes need to be incorporated into the measurements for clinical trials in people with CMTX1. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01193075. PMID:28768847

  10. Measuring the Performance of Vaccination Programs Using Cross-Sectional Surveys: A Likelihood Framework and Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lessler, Justin; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Grais, Rebecca F.; Luquero, Francisco J.; Cummings, Derek A. T.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2011-01-01

    Background The performance of routine and supplemental immunization activities is usually measured by the administrative method: dividing the number of doses distributed by the size of the target population. This method leads to coverage estimates that are sometimes impossible (e.g., vaccination of 102% of the target population), and are generally inconsistent with the proportion found to be vaccinated in Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). We describe a method that estimates the fraction of the population accessible to vaccination activities, as well as within-campaign inefficiencies, thus providing a consistent estimate of vaccination coverage. Methods and Findings We developed a likelihood framework for estimating the effective coverage of vaccination programs using cross-sectional surveys of vaccine coverage combined with administrative data. We applied our method to measles vaccination in three African countries: Ghana, Madagascar, and Sierra Leone, using data from each country's most recent DHS survey and administrative coverage data reported to the World Health Organization. We estimate that 93% (95% CI: 91, 94) of the population in Ghana was ever covered by any measles vaccination activity, 77% (95% CI: 78, 81) in Madagascar, and 69% (95% CI: 67, 70) in Sierra Leone. “Within-activity” inefficiencies were estimated to be low in Ghana, and higher in Sierra Leone and Madagascar. Our model successfully fits age-specific vaccination coverage levels seen in DHS data, which differ markedly from those predicted by naïve extrapolation from country-reported and World Health Organization–adjusted vaccination coverage. Conclusions Combining