Science.gov

Sample records for cross-species platform optimizing

  1. Transcript profiling of two alfalfa genotypes with contrasting cell wall composition in stems using a cross-species platform: optimizing analysis by masking biased probes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array, developed for Medicago truncatula, is a suitable platform for transcript profiling in tetraploid alfalfa [Medicago sativa (L.) subsp. sativa]. However, previous research involving cross-species hybridization (CSH) has shown that sequence variation between two species can bias transcript profiling by decreasing sensitivity (number of expressed genes detected) and the accuracy of measuring fold-differences in gene expression. Results Transcript profiling using the Medicago GeneChip® was conducted with elongating stem (ES) and post-elongation stem (PES) internodes from alfalfa genotypes 252 and 1283 that differ in stem cell wall concentrations of cellulose and lignin. A protocol was developed that masked probes targeting inter-species variable (ISV) regions of alfalfa transcripts. A probe signal intensity threshold was selected that optimized both sensitivity and accuracy. After masking for both ISV regions and previously identified single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs), the number of differentially expressed genes between the two genotypes in both ES and PES internodes was approximately 2-fold greater than the number detected prior to masking. Regulatory genes, including transcription factor and receptor kinase genes that may play a role in development of secondary xylem, were significantly over-represented among genes up-regulated in 252 PES internodes compared to 1283 PES internodes. Several cell wall-related genes were also up-regulated in genotype 252 PES internodes. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR of differentially expressed regulatory and cell wall-related genes demonstrated increased sensitivity and accuracy after masking for both ISV regions and SFPs. Over 1,000 genes that were differentially expressed in ES and PES internodes of genotypes 252 and 1283 were mapped onto putative orthologous loci on M. truncatula chromosomes. Clustering simulation analysis of the differentially expressed genes suggested co

  2. CROPPER: a metagene creator resource for cross-platform and cross-species compendium studies

    PubMed Central

    Paananen, Jussi; Storvik, Markus; Wong, Garry

    2006-01-01

    Background Current genomic research methods provide researchers with enormous amounts of data. Combining data from different high-throughput research technologies commonly available in biological databases can lead to novel findings and increase research efficiency. However, combining data from different heterogeneous sources is often a very arduous task. These sources can be different microarray technology platforms, genomic databases, or experiments performed on various species. Our aim was to develop a software program that could facilitate the combining of data from heterogeneous sources, and thus allow researchers to perform genomic cross-platform/cross-species studies and to use existing experimental data for compendium studies. Results We have developed a web-based software resource, called CROPPER that uses the latest genomic information concerning different data identifiers and orthologous genes from the Ensembl database. CROPPER can be used to combine genomic data from different heterogeneous sources, allowing researchers to perform cross-platform/cross-species compendium studies without the need for complex computational tools or the requirement of setting up one's own in-house database. We also present an example of a simple cross-platform/cross-species compendium study based on publicly available Parkinson's disease data derived from different sources. Conclusion CROPPER is a user-friendly and freely available web-based software resource that can be successfully used for cross-species/cross-platform compendium studies. PMID:16995941

  3. Large-scale cross-species chemogenomic platform proposes a new drug discovery strategy of veterinary drug from herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Yang, Yang; Chen, Xuetong; Wang, Chao; Li, Yan; Zheng, Chunli; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    Veterinary Herbal Medicine (VHM) is a comprehensive, current, and informative discipline on the utilization of herbs in veterinary practice. Driven by chemistry but progressively directed by pharmacology and the clinical sciences, drug research has contributed more to address the needs for innovative veterinary medicine for curing animal diseases. However, research into veterinary medicine of vegetal origin in the pharmaceutical industry has reduced, owing to questions such as the short of compatibility of traditional natural-product extract libraries with high-throughput screening. Here, we present a cross-species chemogenomic screening platform to dissect the genetic basis of multifactorial diseases and to determine the most suitable points of attack for future veterinary medicines, thereby increasing the number of treatment options. First, based on critically examined pharmacology and text mining, we build a cross-species drug-likeness evaluation approach to screen the lead compounds in veterinary medicines. Second, a specific cross-species target prediction model is developed to infer drug-target connections, with the purpose of understanding how drugs work on the specific targets. Third, we focus on exploring the multiple targets interference effects of veterinary medicines by heterogeneous network convergence and modularization analysis. Finally, we manually integrate a disease pathway to test whether the cross-species chemogenomic platform could uncover the active mechanism of veterinary medicine, which is exemplified by a specific network module. We believe the proposed cross-species chemogenomic platform allows for the systematization of current and traditional knowledge of veterinary medicine and, importantly, for the application of this emerging body of knowledge to the development of new drugs for animal diseases.

  4. Controlled vocabularies for plant anatomical parts optimized for use in data analysis tools and for cross-species studies.

    PubMed

    Meskauskiene, Rasa; Laule, Oliver; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Martin, Florian; Wyss, Markus; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Zimmermann, Philip

    2013-08-06

    It is generally accepted that controlled vocabularies are necessary to systematically integrate data from various sources. During the last decade, several plant ontologies have been developed, some of which are community specific or were developed for a particular purpose. In most cases, the practical application of these ontologies has been limited to systematically storing experimental data. Due to technical constraints, complex data structures and term redundancies, it has been difficult to apply them directly into analysis tools. Here, we describe a simplified and cross-species compatible set of controlled vocabularies for plant anatomy, focussing mainly on monocotypledonous and dicotyledonous crop and model plants. Their content was designed primarily for their direct use in graphical visualization tools. Specifically, we created annotation vocabularies that can be understood by non-specialists, are minimally redundant, simply structured, have low tree depth, and we tested them practically in the frame of Genevestigator. The application of the proposed ontologies enabled the aggregation of data from hundreds of experiments to visualize gene expression across tissue types. It also facilitated the comparison of expression across species. The described controlled vocabularies are maintained by a dedicated curation team and are available upon request.

  5. Microfluidic platform for optimization of crystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuheng; Gerard, Charline J. J.; Ikni, Aziza; Ferry, Gilles; Vuillard, Laurent M.; Boutin, Jean A.; Ferte, Nathalie; Grossier, Romain; Candoni, Nadine; Veesler, Stéphane

    2017-08-01

    We describe a universal, high-throughput droplet-based microfluidic platform for crystallization. It is suitable for a multitude of applications, due to its flexibility, ease of use, compatibility with all solvents and low cost. The platform offers four modular functions: droplet formation, on-line characterization, incubation and observation. We use it to generate droplet arrays with a concentration gradient in continuous long tubing, without using surfactant. We control droplet properties (size, frequency and spacing) in long tubing by using hydrodynamic empirical relations. We measure droplet chemical composition using both an off-line and a real-time on-line method. Applying this platform to a complicated chemical environment, membrane proteins, we successfully handle crystallization, suggesting that the platform is likely to perform well in other circumstances. We validate the platform for fine-gradient screening and optimization of crystallization conditions. Additional on-line detection methods may well be integrated into this platform in the future, for instance, an on-line diffraction technique. We believe this method could find applications in fields such as fluid interaction engineering, live cell study and enzyme kinetics.

  6. Autonomic care platform for optimizing query performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As the amount of information in electronic health care systems increases, data operations get more complicated and time-consuming. Intensive Care platforms require a timely processing of data retrievals to guarantee the continuous display of recent data of patients. Physicians and nurses rely on this data for their decision making. Manual optimization of query executions has become difficult to handle due to the increased amount of queries across multiple sources. Hence, a more automated management is necessary to increase the performance of database queries. The autonomic computing paradigm promises an approach in which the system adapts itself and acts as self-managing entity, thereby limiting human interventions and taking actions. Despite the usage of autonomic control loops in network and software systems, this approach has not been applied so far for health information systems. Methods We extend the COSARA architecture, an infection surveillance and antibiotic management service platform for the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), with self-managed components to increase the performance of data retrievals. We used real-life ICU COSARA queries to analyse slow performance and measure the impact of optimizations. Each day more than 2 million COSARA queries are executed. Three control loops, which monitor the executions and take action, have been proposed: reactive, deliberative and reflective control loops. We focus on improvements of the execution time of microbiology queries directly related to the visual displays of patients’ data on the bedside screens. Results The results show that autonomic control loops are beneficial for the optimizations in the data executions in the ICU. The application of reactive control loop results in a reduction of 8.61% of the average execution time of microbiology results. The combined application of the reactive and deliberative control loop results in an average query time reduction of 10.92% and the combination of

  7. Optimal platform strength in the presence of moving ice

    SciTech Connect

    Enns, E.G.; Smith, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The design of a moveable platform which is to operate in an environment which includes moving ice depends on a number of ice dependent variables. The optimal strength based on minimum cost objectives is obtained and illustrated by an example.

  8. REopt: A Platform for Energy System Integration and Optimization: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, T.; Cutler, D.; Anderson, K.; Olis, D.; Elgqvist, E.; Callahan, M.; Walker, A.

    2014-08-01

    REopt is NREL's energy planning platform offering concurrent, multi-technology integration and optimization capabilities to help clients meet their cost savings and energy performance goals. The REopt platform provides techno-economic decision-support analysis throughout the energy planning process, from agency-level screening and macro planning to project development to energy asset operation. REopt employs an integrated approach to optimizing a site?s energy costs by considering electricity and thermal consumption, resource availability, complex tariff structures including time-of-use, demand and sell-back rates, incentives, net-metering, and interconnection limits. Formulated as a mixed integer linear program, REopt recommends an optimally-sized mix of conventional and renewable energy, and energy storage technologies; estimates the net present value associated with implementing those technologies; and provides the cost-optimal dispatch strategy for operating them at maximum economic efficiency. The REopt platform can be customized to address a variety of energy optimization scenarios including policy, microgrid, and operational energy applications. This paper presents the REopt techno-economic model along with two examples of recently completed analysis projects.

  9. Cross-species transmission of CWD prions.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Timothy D; Sigurdson, Christina J

    2016-01-01

    Prions cause fatal neurodegenerative diseases in humans and animals and can be transmitted zoonotically. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a highly transmissible prion disease of wild deer and elk that affects cervids over extensive regions of the United States and Canada. The risk of cross-species CWD transmission has been experimentally evaluated in a wide array of mammals, including non-human primates and mouse models expressing human cellular prion protein. Here we review the determinants of cross-species CWD transmission, and propose a model that may explain a structural barrier for CWD transmission to humans.

  10. Optimization of the hybrid silicon photonic integrated circuit platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Martijn J. R.; Davenport, Michael L.; Srinivasan, Sudharsanan; Hulme, Jared; Bowers, John E.

    2013-03-01

    In the hybrid silicon platform, active III/V based components are integrated on a silicon-on-insulator photonic integrated circuit by means of wafer bonding. This is done in a self-aligned back-end process at low temperatures, making it compatible with CMOS-based silicon processing. This approach allows for low cost, high volume, high quality and reproducible chip fabrication. Such features make the hybrid silicon platform an attractive technology for applications like optical interconnects, microwave photonics and sensors operating at wavelengths around 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm. For these applications energy efficient operation is a key parameter. In this paper we present our efforts to bring the III/V components in the hybrid silicon platform, such as lasers and optical amplifiers, on par with the far more mature monolithic InP-based integration technology. We present our development work to increase hybrid silicon laser and amplifier wall-plug efficiency. This is done by careful optimization of III/V mesa geometry and guiding silicon waveguide width. We also discuss current injection efficiency and thermal performance. Furthermore we show the characterization of the low-loss and low-reflection mode converters that couple the hybrid III/V components to silicon waveguides. Reflections below -41 dB and passive loss of 0.3 dB per converter were obtained.

  11. OPTIMED Platform: Curriculum Harmonisation System for Medical and Healthcare Education.

    PubMed

    Komenda, Martin; Schwarz, Daniel; Vaitsis, Christos; Zary, Nabil; Štěrba, Jaroslav; Dušek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    This contribution introduces a new web-based OPTIMED platform for an effective harmonisation of medical and healthcare curriculum. Behind the engineering background stays an original methodology covering planning model based on formal parameterisation of curriculum, which fully support the outcome-based approach to education. With the use of developed system curriculum, designers and senior guarantors can provide a clear and transparent composition of compulsory and optional courses, and easily identify potential duplicities and overlaps across a domain of medical and healthcare education. For students, it means an absolutely new way of how to understand what is really taught during a learning period, including all necessary meta information. All members across the academic community are able to search and consequently display in detail the most important domains related to the particular year, term, course, medical discipline or topic. The presented solution significantly enhances the transparency and continuity of the environment in which the authors of the teaching materials as well as their consumers work daily. Suggestions for future improvements of the OPTIMED platform are discussed.

  12. Optimization of image processing algorithms on mobile platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Pramod; Shirvaikar, Mukul

    2011-03-01

    This work presents a technique to optimize popular image processing algorithms on mobile platforms such as cell phones, net-books and personal digital assistants (PDAs). The increasing demand for video applications like context-aware computing on mobile embedded systems requires the use of computationally intensive image processing algorithms. The system engineer has a mandate to optimize them so as to meet real-time deadlines. A methodology to take advantage of the asymmetric dual-core processor, which includes an ARM and a DSP core supported by shared memory, is presented with implementation details. The target platform chosen is the popular OMAP 3530 processor for embedded media systems. It has an asymmetric dual-core architecture with an ARM Cortex-A8 and a TMS320C64x Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The development platform was the BeagleBoard with 256 MB of NAND RAM and 256 MB SDRAM memory. The basic image correlation algorithm is chosen for benchmarking as it finds widespread application for various template matching tasks such as face-recognition. The basic algorithm prototypes conform to OpenCV, a popular computer vision library. OpenCV algorithms can be easily ported to the ARM core which runs a popular operating system such as Linux or Windows CE. However, the DSP is architecturally more efficient at handling DFT algorithms. The algorithms are tested on a variety of images and performance results are presented measuring the speedup obtained due to dual-core implementation. A major advantage of this approach is that it allows the ARM processor to perform important real-time tasks, while the DSP addresses performance-hungry algorithms.

  13. Natural frequency of uniform and optimized tetrahedral truss platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Lake, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative estimates for the fundamental frequency of uniform and optimized tetrahedral truss platforms are determined. A semiempirical equation is developed for the frequency of free-free uniform trusses as a function of member material properties, truss dimensions, and parasitic (nonstructural) mass fraction Mp/Mt. Optimized trusses with frequencies approximately two times those of uniform trusses are determined by varying the cross-sectional areas of member groups. Trusses with 3 to 8 rings, no parasitic mass, and member areas up to 25 times the minimum area are optimized. Frequencies computed for ranges of both Mp/Mt and the ratio of maximum area to minimum area are normalized to the frequency of a uniform truss with no parasitic mass. The normalized frequency increases with the number of rings, and both frequency and the ratio of maximum area to minimum area decrease with increasing Mp/Mt. Frequency improvements that are achievable with a limited number of member areas are estimated for a 3-ring truss by using Taguchi methods. Joint stiffness knockdown effects are also considered. Comparison of optimized and baseline uniform truss frequencies indicates that tailoring can significantly increase structural frequency; maximum gains occur for trusses with low values of Mp/Mt. This study examines frequency trends for ranges of structural parameters and may be used as a preliminary design guide.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation Optimization on Leading Multicore Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine

    2008-02-01

    We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of search-based performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD) that historically has made poor use of scalar microprocessors due to its complex data structures and memory access patterns. We explore one of the broadest sets of multicore architectures in the HPC literature, including the Intel Clovertown, AMD Opteron X2, Sun Niagara2, STI Cell, as well as the single core Intel Itanium2. Rather than hand-tuning LBMHD for each system, we develop a code generator that allows us identify a highly optimized version for each platform, while amortizing the human programming effort. Results show that our auto-tuned LBMHD application achieves up to a 14x improvement compared with the original code. Additionally, we present detailed analysis of each optimization, which reveal surprising hardware bottlenecks and software challenges for future multicore systems and applications.

  15. Platform-dependent optimization considerations for mHealth applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaghyan, Sahak; Akopian, David; Sarukhanyan, Hakob

    2015-03-01

    Modern mobile devices contain integrated sensors that enable multitude of applications in such fields as mobile health (mHealth), entertainment, sports, etc. Human physical activity monitoring is one of such the emerging applications. There exists a range of challenges that relate to activity monitoring tasks, and, particularly, exploiting optimal solutions and architectures for respective mobile software application development. This work addresses mobile computations related to integrated inertial sensors for activity monitoring, such as accelerometers, gyroscopes, integrated global positioning system (GPS) and WLAN-based positioning, that can be used for activity monitoring. Some of the aspects will be discussed in this paper. Each of the sensing data sources has its own characteristics such as specific data formats, data rates, signal acquisition durations etc., and these specifications affect energy consumption. Energy consumption significantly varies as sensor data acquisition is followed by data analysis including various transformations and signal processing algorithms. This paper will address several aspects of more optimal activity monitoring implementations exploiting state-of-the-art capabilities of modern platforms.

  16. Energy efficiency analysis and optimization for mobile platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metri, Grace Camille

    The introduction of mobile devices changed the landscape of computing. Gradually, these devices are replacing traditional personal computer (PCs) to become the devices of choice for entertainment, connectivity, and productivity. There are currently at least 45.5 million people in the United States who own a mobile device, and that number is expected to increase to 1.5 billion by 2015. Users of mobile devices expect and mandate that their mobile devices have maximized performance while consuming minimal possible power. However, due to the battery size constraints, the amount of energy stored in these devices is limited and is only growing by 5% annually. As a result, we focused in this dissertation on energy efficiency analysis and optimization for mobile platforms. We specifically developed SoftPowerMon, a tool that can power profile Android platforms in order to expose the power consumption behavior of the CPU. We also performed an extensive set of case studies in order to determine energy inefficiencies of mobile applications. Through our case studies, we were able to propose optimization techniques in order to increase the energy efficiency of mobile devices and proposed guidelines for energy-efficient application development. In addition, we developed BatteryExtender, an adaptive user-guided tool for power management of mobile devices. The tool enables users to extend battery life on demand for a specific duration until a particular task is completed. Moreover, we examined the power consumption of System-on-Chips (SoCs) and observed the impact on the energy efficiency in the event of offloading tasks from the CPU to the specialized custom engines. Based on our case studies, we were able to demonstrate that current software-based power profiling techniques for SoCs can have an error rate close to 12%, which needs to be addressed in order to be able to optimize the energy consumption of the SoC. Finally, we summarize our contributions and outline possible

  17. A QFD-based optimization method for a scalable product platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xinggang; Tang, Jiafu; Kwong, C. K.

    2010-02-01

    In order to incorporate the customer into the early phase of the product development cycle and to better satisfy customers' requirements, this article adopts quality function deployment (QFD) for optimal design of a scalable product platform. A five-step QFD-based method is proposed to determine the optimal values for platform engineering characteristics (ECs) and non-platform ECs of the products within a product family. First of all, the houses of quality (HoQs) for all product variants are developed and a QFD-based optimization approach is used to determine the optimal ECs for each product variant. Sensitivity analysis is performed for each EC with respect to overall customer satisfaction (OCS). Based on the obtained sensitivity indices of ECs, a mathematical model is established to simultaneously optimize the values of the platform and the non-platform ECs. Finally, by comparing and analysing the optimal solutions with different number of platform ECs, the ECs with which the worst OCS loss can be avoided are selected as platform ECs. An illustrative example is used to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. A comparison between the proposed method and a two-step approach is conducted on the example. The comparison shows that, as a kind of single-stage approach, the proposed method yields better average degree of customer satisfaction due to the simultaneous optimization of platform and non-platform ECs.

  18. "Clickable", polymerized liposomes as a versatile and stable platform for rapid optimization of their peripheral compositions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Erasquin, Uriel J; Qin, Guoting; Li, King; Cai, Chengzhi

    2010-08-21

    A versatile and stable liposomal platform is developed for rapid optimization of its peripheral composition. The platform is based on polydiacetylene lipids terminated with alkynyl groups. Conditions for copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (a "click" reaction) are optimized for rapid attachment of azides with controlled composition onto the liposomes.

  19. Cross- species communication in bacterial world.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sarangam; Pal, Sukla

    2017-02-20

    Biofilms are the compact association of micro organisms and the communication processes in these biofilms are always a wonder. Electrical and chemical signaling mechanism are the key to understand the bacterial communication network. Quorum sensing so far has been able to explain the coordinated motion of bacteria through its chemical signaling mechanism. Bacteria residing within biofilm communities are trivial to communicate. But the recent observation in 2017 by Humphries et al. has revealed that the ion channels enabled electrical signaling mechanism can be as powerful as to attract the distant cells i.e., this signaling mechanism are capable of holding a long range behavior. As a result long range cross species communication in the bacterial world have been possible. This substantial outcome has brought this field into a new paradigm to investigate the complex co-existence of biofilm communities and distant cells with a possible scope of application in synthetic biology. In this present article, we briefly describe this new signaling mechanism and how it gives rise to a long range communication ability in bacterial communities.

  20. Selection and optimization of mooring cables on floating platform for special purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guang-ying; Yao, Yun-long; Zhao, Chen-yao

    2017-08-01

    This paper studied a new type of assembled marine floating platform for special purposes. The selection and optimization of mooring cables on the floating platform are studied. By using ANSYS AQWA software, the hydrodynamic model of the platform was established to calculate the time history response of the platform motion under complex water environments, such as wind, wave, current and mooring. On this basis, motion response and cable tension were calculated with different cable mooring states under the designed environmental load. Finally, the best mooring scheme to meet the cable strength requirements was proposed, which can lower the motion amplitude of the platform effectively.

  1. Comparison of Interlaboratory Variation in Absolute T-Cell Counts by Single-Platform and Optimized Dual-Platform Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hultin, Lance E.; Chow, Marianne; Jamieson, Beth D.; O’Gorman, Maurice R. G.; Menendez, Frederick A.; Borowski, Luann; Denny, Thomas N.; Margolick, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    dual-platform methods. This result may be at least partly explained by the lower interlaboratory variation with the optimized dual-platform method in this study relative to the previous reports. PMID:19813263

  2. Optimizing Flight Control Software With an Application Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Irene Skupniewicz; Shi, Nija; Webster, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Flight controllers in NASA s mission control centers work day and night to ensure that missions succeed and crews are safe. The IT goals of NASA mission control centers are similar to those of most businesses: to evolve IT infrastructure from basic to dynamic. This paper describes Mission Control Technologies (MCT), an application platform that is powering mission control today and is designed to meet the needs of future NASA control centers. MCT is an extensible platform that provides GUI components and a runtime environment. The platform enables NASA s IT goals through its use of lightweight interfaces and configurable components, which promote standardization and incorporate useful solution patterns. The MCT architecture positions mission control centers to reach the goal of dynamic IT, leading to lower cost of ownership, and treating software as a strategic investment.

  3. The Platform Switching Approach to Optimize Split Crest Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sammartino, G.; Cerone, V.; Gasparro, R.; Riccitiello, F.; Trosino, O.

    2014-01-01

    The split crest technique is a reliable procedure used simultaneously in the implant positioning. In the literature some authors describe a secondary bone resorption as postoperative complication. The authors show how platform switching can be able to avoid secondary resorption as complication of split crest technique. PMID:25165586

  4. Selecting Observation Platforms for Optimized Anomaly Detectability under Unreliable Partial Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto E. Garcia; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2011-06-01

    Diagnosers for keeping track on the occurrences of special events in the framework of unreliable partially observed discrete-event dynamical systems were developed in previous work. This paper considers observation platforms consisting of sensors that provide partial and unreliable observations and of diagnosers that analyze them. Diagnosers in observation platforms typically perform better as sensors providing the observations become more costly or increase in number. This paper proposes a methodology for finding an observation platform that achieves an optimal balance between cost and performance, while satisfying given observability requirements and constraints. Since this problem is generally computational hard in the framework considered, an observation platform optimization algorithm is utilized that uses two greedy heuristics, one myopic and another based on projected performances. These heuristics are sequentially executed in order to find best observation platforms. The developed algorithm is then applied to an observation platform optimization problem for a multi-unit-operation system. Results show that improved observation platforms can be found that may significantly reduce the observation platform cost but still yield acceptable performance for correctly inferring the occurrences of special events.

  5. Traffic Patrol Service Platform Scheduling and Containment Optimization Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiane; Niu, Taiyang; Wan, Baocheng; Li, Jian

    This article is based on the traffic and patrol police service platform settings and scheduling, in order to achieve the main purpose of rapid containment for the suspect in an emergency event. Proposing new boundary definition based on graph theory, using 0-1 programming, Dijkstra algorithm, the shortest path tree (SPT) and some of the related knowledge establish a containment model. Finally, making a combination with a city-specific data and using this model obtain the best containment plan.

  6. Towards bipedal behavior on a quadrupedal platform using optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, T. Turner; Vasilopoulos, Vasileios; De, Avik; Koditschek, Daniel E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper explores the applicability of a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) controller design to the problem of bipedal stance on the Minitaur [1] quadrupedal robot. Restricted to the sagittal plane, this behavior exposes a three degree of freedom (DOF) double inverted pendulum with extensible length that can be projected onto the familiar underactuated revolute-revolute "Acrobot" model by assuming a locked prismatic DOF, and a pinned toe. While previous work has documented the successful use of local LQR control to stabilize a physical Acrobot, simulations reveal that a design very similar to those discussed in the past literature cannot achieve an empirically viable controller for our physical plant. Experiments with a series of increasingly close physical facsimiles leading to the actual Minitaur platform itself corroborate and underscore the physical Minitaur platform corroborate and underscore the implications of the simulation study. We conclude that local LQR-based linearized controller designs are too fragile to stabilize the physical Minitaur platform around its vertically erect equilibrium and end with a brief assessment of a variety of more sophisticated nonlinear control approaches whose pursuit is now in progress.

  7. Contingency Contractor Optimization Phase 3 Sustainment Platform Requirements - Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, Justin David; Frazier, Christopher Rawls; Bandlow, Alisa; Gearhart, Jared Lee; Jones, Katherine A.

    2016-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is in Phase 3 Sustainment of development of a prototype tool, currently referred to as the Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype (CCOTP), under the direction of OSD Program Support. CCOT-P is intended to help provide senior Department of Defense (DoD) leaders with comprehensive insight into the global availability, readiness and capabilities of the Total Force Mix. The CCOT-P will allow senior decision makers to quickly and accurately assess the impacts, risks and mitigating strategies for proposed changes to force/capabilities assignments, apportionments and allocations options, focusing specifically on contingency contractor planning. During Phase 2 of the program, conducted during fiscal year 2012, Sandia developed an electronic storyboard prototype of the Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool that can be used for communication with senior decision makers and other Operational Contract Support (OCS) stakeholders. Phase 3 used feedback from demonstrations of the electronic storyboard prototype to develop an engineering prototype for planners to evaluate. Sandia worked with the DoD and Joint Chiefs of Staff strategic planning community to get feedback and input to ensure that the engineering prototype was developed to closely align with future planning needs. The intended deployment environment was also a key consideration as this prototype was developed. Initial release of the engineering prototype was done on servers at Sandia in the middle of Phase 3. In 2013, the tool was installed on a production pilot server managed by the OUSD(AT&L) eBusiness Center. The purpose of this document is to specify the CCOT-P engineering prototype platform requirements as of May 2016. Sandia developed the CCOT-P engineering prototype using common technologies to minimize the likelihood of deployment issues. CCOT-P engineering prototype was architected and designed to be as independent as possible of the major deployment

  8. GENOMIC APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPOLATION IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest tools for investigating stress in organisms, genomic technologies provide great insight into how different organisms respond to environmental conditions. However, their usefulness needs testing, verification, and codification. Genomic Approaches for Cross-Species Extra...

  9. GENOMIC APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPOLATION IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest tools for investigating stress in organisms, genomic technologies provide great insight into how different organisms respond to environmental conditions. However, their usefulness needs testing, verification, and codification. Genomic Approaches for Cross-Species Extra...

  10. A technique of optimization of microfiltration using a tunable platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2015-08-01

    The optimum efficiency of size-based filtration in microfluidic devices is highly dependent on characteristics of design, deformability of microparticles/cells, and fluid flow. The effects of filter pores and flow rate, which are the two major determining and related factors of characterization in the separation of particles and cells are investigated in this work. An elastomeric microfluidic device consisting of parallel arrays of pillars with mechanically tunable spacings is employed as an adjustable microfiltration platform. The tunable filtration system is used for finding the best conditions of separation of solid microbeads or deformable blood cells in a crossflow pillar-based method. It is demonstrated that increasing flow rate in the range of 1.0-80.0 µl min-1 has an adverse effect on the device performance in terms of decreased separation efficiency of deformable blood cells. However, by tuning the gap size in the range of 2.5-7.5 µm, the selectivity of the separation is controlled from about 5.0 to 95.0% for white blood cells (WBCs) and 40.0 to 95.0% for red blood cells (RBCs). Finally, the best range of trapping and passing efficiencies of ~70-80.0% simultaneously for WBCs and RBCs in whole blood sample is achieved at optimum gap size of ~3.5-4.0 µm.

  11. Optimizing Computing Platforms for Climate-Driven Ecological Forecasting Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, S. S.; Williams, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Species distribution models are widely used, climate-driven ecological forecasting tools that use machine-learning techniques to predict species range shifts and ecological responses to 21st century climate change. As high-resolution modern and fossil biodiversity data becomes increasingly available and statistical learning methods become more computationally intensive, choosing the correct computing configuration on which to run these models becomes more important. With a variety of low-cost cloud and desktop computing options available, users of forecasting models must balance performance gains achieved by provisioning more powerful hardware with the cost of using these resources. We present a framework for estimating the optimal computing solution for a given modeling activity. We argue that this framework is capable of identifying the optimal computing solution - the one that maximizes model accuracy while minimizing resource cost and computing time. Our framework is built on constituent models of algorithm execution time, predictive skill, and computing cost. We demonstrate the results of the framework using four leading species distribution models: multivariate adaptive regression splines, generalized additive models, support vector machines, and boosted regression trees. The constituent models themselves are shown to have high predictive accuracy, and can be used independently to estimate the effects of using larger input datasets, such as those that incorporate data from the fossil record. When used together, our framework shows highly significant predictive ability, and is designed to be used by researchers to inform future computing provisioning strategies.

  12. Optimization of atmospheric transport models on HPC platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Raúl; Folch, Arnau; Farré, Pau; Cabezas, Javier; Navarro, Nacho; Cela, José María

    2016-12-01

    The performance and scalability of atmospheric transport models on high performance computing environments is often far from optimal for multiple reasons including, for example, sequential input and output, synchronous communications, work unbalance, memory access latency or lack of task overlapping. We investigate how different software optimizations and porting to non general-purpose hardware architectures improve code scalability and execution times considering, as an example, the FALL3D volcanic ash transport model. To this purpose, we implement the FALL3D model equations in the WARIS framework, a software designed from scratch to solve in a parallel and efficient way different geoscience problems on a wide variety of architectures. In addition, we consider further improvements in WARIS such as hybrid MPI-OMP parallelization, spatial blocking, auto-tuning and thread affinity. Considering all these aspects together, the FALL3D execution times for a realistic test case running on general-purpose cluster architectures (Intel Sandy Bridge) decrease by a factor between 7 and 40 depending on the grid resolution. Finally, we port the application to Intel Xeon Phi (MIC) and NVIDIA GPUs (CUDA) accelerator-based architectures and compare performance, cost and power consumption on all the architectures. Implications on time-constrained operational model configurations are discussed.

  13. Cross-species queries of large gene expression databases

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hai-Son; Oltvai, Zoltán N.; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Expression databases, including the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress, have experienced significant growth over the past decade and now hold hundreds of thousands of arrays from multiple species. Since most drugs are initially tested on model organisms, the ability to compare expression experiments across species may help identify pathways that are activated in a similar way in humans and other organisms. However, while several methods exist for finding co-expressed genes in the same species as a query gene, looking at co-expression of homologs or arbitrary genes in other species is challenging. Unlike sequence, which is static, expression is dynamic and changes between tissues, conditions and time. Thus, to carry out cross-species analysis using these databases, we need methods that can match experiments in one species with experiments in another species. Results: To facilitate queries in large databases, we developed a new method for comparing expression experiments from different species. We define a distance metric between the ranking of orthologous genes in the two species. We show how to solve an optimization problem for learning the parameters of this function using a training dataset of known similar expression experiments pairs. The function we learn outperforms previous methods and simpler rank comparison methods that have been used in the past for single species analysis. We used our method to compare millions of array pairs from mouse and human expression experiments. The resulting matches can be used to find functionally related genes, to hypothesize about biological response mechanisms and to highlight conditions and diseases that are activating similar pathways in both species. Availability: Supporting methods, results and a Matlab implementation are available from http://sb.cs.cmu.edu/ExpQ/ Contact: zivbj@cs.cmu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20702396

  14. Cross-species cloning: influence of cytoplasmic factors on development.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Hua; Zhu, Zuo-Yan

    2014-06-01

    It is widely accepted that the crosstalk between naive nucleus and maternal factors deposited in the egg cytoplasm before zygotic genome activation is crucial for early development. This crosstalk may also exert some influence on later development. It is interesting to clarify the relative roles of the zygotic genome and the cytoplasmic factors in development. Cross-species nuclear transfer (NT) between two distantly related species provides a unique system to study the relative role and crosstalk between egg cytoplasm and zygotic nucleus in development. In this review, we will summarize the recent progress of cross-species NT, with emphasis on the cross-species NT in fish and the influence of cytoplasmic factors on development. Finally, we conclude that the developmental process and its evolution should be interpreted in a systemic way, rather than in a way that solely focuses on the role of the nuclear genome. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  15. Optimal design and experimental analyses of a new micro-vibration control payload-platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoqing; Yang, Bintang; Zhao, Long; Sun, Xiaofen

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new payload-platform, for precision devices, which possesses the capability of isolating the complex space micro-vibration in low frequency range below 5 Hz. The novel payload-platform equipped with smart material actuators is investigated and designed through optimization strategy based on the minimum energy loss rate, for the aim of achieving high drive efficiency and reducing the effect of the magnetic circuit nonlinearity. Then, the dynamic model of the driving element is established by using the Lagrange method and the performance of the designed payload-platform is further discussed through the combination of the controlled auto regressive moving average (CARMA) model with modified generalized prediction control (MGPC) algorithm. Finally, an experimental prototype is developed and tested. The experimental results demonstrate that the payload-platform has an impressive potential of micro-vibration isolation.

  16. MIDAS intelligent platform for medical services, support for decision optimization in virtual medical communities.

    PubMed

    Arotăriţei, D; Toma, C M; Turnea, M; Toma, Vasilica

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the implementation of a open multifunctional platform--MIDAS--for heterogeneous medical data management--support for optimization of clinical decision in virtual medical communities. The objectives of this intelligent environment are: diagnostic easier by access to heterogeneous medical data, a virtual support for medical personal in order to reduce medical errors, fast access to resources for education and improvement of medical education for physicians and students. The structure of the platform is based on a core module and a number of dedicated modules that give an important advantage as re-configurable platform depending on necessities. The core module tries to be as general is possible in order to be used in the future as core model in a platform focused on dentistry cases.

  17. Radiation Dose Reduction during Uterine Fibroid Embolization Using an Optimized Imaging Platform.

    PubMed

    Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Kolli, K Pallav; Taylor, Andrew G; Kohi, Maureen P; Lehrman, Evan D; Fidelman, Nicholas; Conrad, Miles; LaBerge, Jeanne M; Kerlan, Robert K; Gould, Robert

    2017-08-01

    To assess radiation dose reduction during uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) using an optimized angiographic processing and acquisition platform. Radiation dose data for 70 women (mean age, 46 y; range, 34-67 y) who underwent UFE were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-one patients underwent UFE using the baseline fluoroscopic and angiographic image acquisition platform, and 49 underwent UFE after implementing an optimized imaging platform in otherwise identical angiography suites. Cumulative kerma-area product (CKAP), cumulative air kerma (CAK), total fluoroscopy time, and image exposure number were collected for each procedure. Image quality was assessed by 3 interventional radiologists blinded to the platform used for image acquisition and processing. Patients undergoing UFE using the new x-ray fluoroscopy platform had significantly lower CKAP and CAK indicators than patients for whom baseline settings were used. Mean CKAP decreased by 60% from 438.5 Gy · cm(2) (range, 180.3-1,081.1 Gy · cm(2)) to 175.2 Gy · cm(2) (range, 47.1-757.0 Gy · cm(2); P < .0001). Mean CAK decreased by 45% from 2,034.2 mGy (range, 699.3-5,056.0 mGy) to 1,109.8 mGy (range, 256.6-4,513.6 mGy; P = .001). No degradation of image quality was identified through qualitative evaluation. Significant reduction in patient radiation dose indicators can be achieved with use of an optimized image acquisition and processing platform. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cross-Species PTM Mapping from Phosphoproteomic Data.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) are crucial for signal transduction in cells. In order to understand key cell signaling events, identification of functionally important PTMs, which are more likely to be evolutionarily conserved, is necessary. In recent times, high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS) has made quantitative datasets in diverse species readily available, which has led to a growing need for tools to facilitate cross-species comparison of PTM data. Cross-species comparison of PTM sites is difficult since they often lie in structurally disordered protein domains. Current tools that address this can only map known PTMs between species based on previously annotated orthologous phosphosites and do not enable cross-species mapping of newly identified modification sites. Here, we describe an automated web-based tool, PhosphOrtholog, that accurately maps annotated and novel orthologous PTM sites from high-throughput MS-based experimental data obtained from different species without relying on existing PTM databases. Identification of conserved PTMs across species from large-scale experimental data increases our knowledgebase of evolutionarily conserved and functional PTM sites that influence most biological processes. In this Chapter, we illustrate with examples how to use PhosphOrtholog to map novel PTM sites from cross-species MS-based phosphoproteomics data.

  19. CROSS-SPECIES DOSE EXTRAPOLATION FOR DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models for cross-species (rat to human) dose extrapolation of diesel emission were evaluated for purposes of establishing guidelines for human exposure to diesel emissions (DE) based on DE toxicological data obtained in rats. Ideally, a model for this extrapolation would provide...

  20. CROSS-SPECIES DOSE EXTRAPOLATION FOR DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models for cross-species (rat to human) dose extrapolation of diesel emission were evaluated for purposes of establishing guidelines for human exposure to diesel emissions (DE) based on DE toxicological data obtained in rats. Ideally, a model for this extrapolation would provide...

  1. MULTIPLE SOLVENT EXPOSURE IN HUMANS: CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple Solvent Exposures in Humans:
    Cross-Species Extrapolations
    (Future Research Plan)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    A few solvents can be safely studied in acute experiments in human subjects. Data exist in rats f...

  2. eIMRT: a web platform for the verification and optimization of radiation treatment plans.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, Diego M; Pena, Javier; Gómez, Faustino; Gago-Arias, Araceli; González-Castaño, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Silva, Daniel A; Gómez, Andrés; Mouriño, Carlos; Pombar, Miguel; Sánchez, Manuel

    2009-07-21

    The eIMRT platform is a remote distributed computing tool that provides users with Internet access to three different services: Monte Carlo optimization of treatment plans, CRT & IMRT treatment optimization, and a database of relevant radiation treatments/clinical cases. These services are accessible through a user-friendly and platform independent web page. Its flexible and scalable design focuses on providing the final users with services rather than a collection of software pieces. All input and output data (CT, contours, treatment plans and dose distributions) are handled using the DICOM format. The design, implementation, and support of the verification and optimization algorithms are hidden to the user. This allows a unified, robust handling of the software and hardware that enables these computation-intensive services. The eIMRT platform is currently hosted by the Galician Supercomputing Center (CESGA) and may be accessible upon request (there is a demo version at http://eimrt.cesga.es:8080/eIMRT2/demo; request access in http://eimrt.cesga.es/signup.html). This paper describes all aspects of the eIMRT algorithms in depth, its user interface, and its services. Due to the flexible design of the platform, it has numerous applications including the intercenter comparison of treatment planning, the quality assurance of radiation treatments, the design and implementation of new approaches to certain types of treatments, and the sharing of information on radiation treatment techniques. In addition, the web platform and software tools developed for treatment verification and optimization have a modular design that allows the user to extend them with new algorithms. This software is not a commercial product. It is the result of the collaborative effort of different public research institutions and is planned to be distributed as an open source project. In this way, it will be available to any user; new releases will be generated with the new implemented codes or

  3. Structural optimization for heat detection of DNA thermosequencing platform using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Esfandyarpour, Hesaam; Zheng, Bo; Pease, R. Fabian W.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2008-01-01

    For the past three decades, Sanger’s method has been the primary DNA sequencing technology; however, inherent limitations in cost and complexity have limited its usage in personalized medicine and ecological studies. A new technology called “thermosequencing” can potentially reduce both the cost and complexity of DNA sequencing by using a microfluidic platform [Esfandyarpour, Pease, and Davis, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B26, 661 (2008)]. To optimize the efficiency of the technology, finite element analysis was used to model the thermosequencing system by simulating the DNA incorporation reaction series and the resulting product concentration and heat production. Different models of the thermosequencing platform were created to simulate the effects of the materials surrounding the system, to optimize the geometry of the system, and to concentrate reaction heat into specific regions for detection in the real system. The resulting concentrations of reaction products were used to calibrate the reaction speed and to design the heat sensors in the thermosequencing technology. We recommend a modified gated structure for the microfluidic detection platform by using control valves and show how this new platform could dramatically improve the detection efficiency. PMID:19693405

  4. Drug regimens identified and optimized by output-driven platform markedly reduce tuberculosis treatment time.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Clemens, Daniel L; Silva, Aleidy; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Nava, Susana; Ding, Xianting; Ho, Chih-Ming; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2017-01-24

    The current drug regimens for treating tuberculosis are lengthy and onerous, and hence complicated by poor adherence leading to drug resistance and disease relapse. Previously, using an output-driven optimization platform and an in vitro macrophage model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, we identified several experimental drug regimens among billions of possible drug-dose combinations that outperform the current standard regimen. Here we use this platform to optimize the in vivo drug doses of two of these regimens in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. The experimental regimens kill M. tuberculosis much more rapidly than the standard regimen and reduce treatment time to relapse-free cure by 75%. Thus, these regimens have the potential to provide a markedly shorter course of treatment for tuberculosis in humans. As these regimens omit isoniazid, rifampicin, fluoroquinolones and injectable aminoglycosides, they would be suitable for treating many cases of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  5. Drug regimens identified and optimized by output-driven platform markedly reduce tuberculosis treatment time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Clemens, Daniel L.; Silva, Aleidy; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Nava, Susana; Ding, Xianting; Ho, Chih-Ming; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2017-01-01

    The current drug regimens for treating tuberculosis are lengthy and onerous, and hence complicated by poor adherence leading to drug resistance and disease relapse. Previously, using an output-driven optimization platform and an in vitro macrophage model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, we identified several experimental drug regimens among billions of possible drug-dose combinations that outperform the current standard regimen. Here we use this platform to optimize the in vivo drug doses of two of these regimens in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. The experimental regimens kill M. tuberculosis much more rapidly than the standard regimen and reduce treatment time to relapse-free cure by 75%. Thus, these regimens have the potential to provide a markedly shorter course of treatment for tuberculosis in humans. As these regimens omit isoniazid, rifampicin, fluoroquinolones and injectable aminoglycosides, they would be suitable for treating many cases of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:28117835

  6. Receptor recognition and cross-species infections of SARS coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Receptor recognition is a major determinant of the host range, cross-species infections, and pathogenesis of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). A defined receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the SARS-CoV spike protein specifically recognizes its host receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This article reviews the latest knowledge about how RBDs from different SARS-CoV strains interact with ACE2 from several animal species. Detailed research on these RBD/ACE2 interactions has established important principles on host receptor adaptations, cross-species infections, and future evolution of SARS-CoV. These principles may apply to other emerging animal viruses, including the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on “From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses.” PMID:23994189

  7. Microsatellites Cross-Species Amplification across Some African Cichlids.

    PubMed

    Bezault, Etienne; Rognon, Xavier; Gharbi, Karim; Baroiller, Jean-Francois; Chevassus, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of the genomic resources developed in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, to other Tilapiines sensu lato and African cichlid would provide new possibilities to study this amazing group from genetics, ecology, evolution, aquaculture, and conservation point of view. We tested the cross-species amplification of 32 O. niloticus microsatellite markers in a panel of 15 species from 5 different African cichlid tribes: Oreochromines (Oreochromis, Sarotherodon), Boreotilapiines (Tilapia), Chromidotilapines, Hemichromines, and Haplochromines. Amplification was successfully observed for 29 markers (91%), with a frequency of polymorphic (P(95)) loci per species around 70%. The mean number of alleles per locus and species was 3.2 but varied from 3.7 within Oreochromis species to 1.6 within the nontilapia species. The high level of cross-species amplification and polymorphism of the microsatellite markers tested in this study provides powerful tools for a wide range of molecular genetic studies within tilapia species as well as for other African cichlids.

  8. A cross-species bi-clustering approach to identifying conserved co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangwen; Jiang, Zongliang; Tian, Xiuchun; Bi, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A growing number of studies have explored the process of pre-implantation embryonic development of multiple mammalian species. However, the conservation and variation among different species in their developmental programming are poorly defined due to the lack of effective computational methods for detecting co-regularized genes that are conserved across species. The most sophisticated method to date for identifying conserved co-regulated genes is a two-step approach. This approach first identifies gene clusters for each species by a cluster analysis of gene expression data, and subsequently computes the overlaps of clusters identified from different species to reveal common subgroups. This approach is ineffective to deal with the noise in the expression data introduced by the complicated procedures in quantifying gene expression. Furthermore, due to the sequential nature of the approach, the gene clusters identified in the first step may have little overlap among different species in the second step, thus difficult to detect conserved co-regulated genes. Results: We propose a cross-species bi-clustering approach which first denoises the gene expression data of each species into a data matrix. The rows of the data matrices of different species represent the same set of genes that are characterized by their expression patterns over the developmental stages of each species as columns. A novel bi-clustering method is then developed to cluster genes into subgroups by a joint sparse rank-one factorization of all the data matrices. This method decomposes a data matrix into a product of a column vector and a row vector where the column vector is a consistent indicator across the matrices (species) to identify the same gene cluster and the row vector specifies for each species the developmental stages that the clustered genes co-regulate. Efficient optimization algorithm has been developed with convergence analysis. This approach was first validated on

  9. Microfluidic platform for combinatorial synthesis and optimization of targeted nanoparticles for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Pedro M; Pridgen, Eric M; Rhee, Minsoung; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-12-23

    Taking a nanoparticle (NP) from discovery to clinical translation has been slow compared to small molecules, in part by the lack of systems that enable their precise engineering and rapid optimization. In this work we have developed a microfluidic platform for the rapid, combinatorial synthesis and optimization of NPs. The system takes in a number of NP precursors from which a library of NPs with varying size, surface charge, target ligand density, and drug load is produced in a reproducible manner. We rapidly synthesized 45 different formulations of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) NPs of different size and surface composition and screened and ranked the NPs for their ability to evade macrophage uptake in vitro. Comparison of the results to pharmacokinetic studies in vivo in mice revealed a correlation between in vitro screen and in vivo behavior. Next, we selected NP synthesis parameters that resulted in longer blood half-life and used the microfluidic platform to synthesize targeted NPs with varying targeting ligand density (using a model targeting ligand against cancer cells). We screened NPs in vitro against prostate cancer cells as well as macrophages, identifying one formulation that exhibited high uptake by cancer cells yet similar macrophage uptake compared to nontargeted NPs. In vivo, the selected targeted NPs showed a 3.5-fold increase in tumor accumulation in mice compared to nontargeted NPs. The developed microfluidic platform in this work represents a tool that could potentially accelerate the discovery and clinical translation of NPs.

  10. Synthesis and Optimization of Surface Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Bioconjugation Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Anand Srinath

    A large amount of emphasis has been dedicated in recent years to introduce nanoparticles as a viable candidate for targeted therapies. In comparison to other candidates, mesoporous silica nanoparticles have the advantages of being biocompatible, easy to produce, and have the ability to prove to be a theranostic platform. To better study the specific targeting of diseased cells, adhesion studies of drug carrying bioconjugation constructs in fluid environments is required. The goal of this project was to develop a platform based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles that will be used for future multivalent adhesion studies. Specifically, mesoporous silica nanoparticles were synthesized with various sizes and aspect ratios, containing fluorescent dye to enable tracking studies, and with surface treatments that optimized stability and introduced primary-amine functional groups to facilitate attachment with targeted proteins and biomarkers. The effects of various parameters such as solvents, washing methods, secondary modifications and difference in concentrations of the starting materials for the synthesis mixture on the nanoparticles were studied in detail in this thesis. A portion of the study is also dedicated to optimizing a washing procedure to stabilize the particles in an aqueous medium in order to facilitate further modifications. The results of the work in this project can be utilized to provide a platform for further assays in flow chambers after bioconjugation with targeting proteins through orthogonal chemistries to study the adhesion properties in much greater detail.

  11. Collective Framework and Performance Optimizations to Open MPI for Cray XT Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, Joshua S; Gorentla Venkata, Manjunath; Shamis, Pavel; Graham, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The performance and scalability of collective operations plays a key role in the performance and scalability of many scientific applications. Within the Open MPI code base we have developed a general purpose hierarchical collective operations framework called Cheetah, and applied it at large scale on the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Jaguar (OLCF) platform, obtaining better performance and scalability than the native MPI implementation. This paper discuss Cheetah's design and implementation, and optimizations to the framework for Cray XT 5 platforms. Our results show that the Cheetah's Broadcast and Barrier perform better than the native MPI implementation. For medium data, the Cheetah's Broadcast outperforms the native MPI implementation by 93% for 49,152 processes problem size. For small and large data, it out performs the native MPI implementation by 10% and 9%, respectively, at 24,576 processes problem size. The Cheetah's Barrier performs 10% better than the native MPI implementation for 12,288 processes problem size.

  12. Credentialing features: a platform to benchmark and optimize untargeted metabolomic methods.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Nathaniel Guy; Huang, Xiaojing; Chen, Ying-Jr; Patti, Gary J

    2014-10-07

    The aim of untargeted metabolomics is to profile as many metabolites as possible, yet a major challenge is comparing experimental method performance on the basis of metabolome coverage. To date, most published approaches have compared experimental methods by counting the total number of features detected. Due to artifactual interference, however, this number is highly variable and therefore is a poor metric for comparing metabolomic methods. Here we introduce an alternative approach to benchmarking metabolome coverage which relies on mixed Escherichia coli extracts from cells cultured in regular and (13)C-enriched media. After mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analysis of these extracts, we "credential" features arising from E. coli metabolites on the basis of isotope spacing and intensity. This credentialing platform enables us to accurately compare the number of nonartifactual features yielded by different experimental approaches. We highlight the value of our platform by reoptimizing a published untargeted metabolomic method for XCMS data processing. Compared to the published parameters, the new XCMS parameters decrease the total number of features by 15% (a reduction in noise features) while increasing the number of true metabolites detected and grouped by 20%. Our credentialing platform relies on easily generated E. coli samples and a simple software algorithm that is freely available on our laboratory Web site (http://pattilab.wustl.edu/software/credential/). We have validated the credentialing platform with reversed-phase and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography as well as Agilent, Thermo Scientific, AB SCIEX, and LECO mass spectrometers. Thus, the credentialing platform can readily be applied by any laboratory to optimize their untargeted metabolomic pipeline for metabolite extraction, chromatographic separation, mass spectrometric detection, and bioinformatic processing.

  13. Optimization and automation of the semi-submersible platforms mooring design

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, J.A. Jr.; Morooka, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    There are a few calculation programs around the world used for determining the main aspects of the Mooring Design of Semi-Submersible Platforms . These programs bold a worldwide acknowledgement and their results are actually reliable. But they require many runs to get a solution that comply with the Classification Society requirements. This paper presents some procedures in order to optimize the semi-submersible mooring design as well as to make it automatic. Regarding the optimization philosophies, the following aspects are treated: (1) the optimization of the platform heading and the mooring pattern based on the spreading of the environmental forces; (2) the searching for the optimum mooring line composition in an automatic mode. Basically, the paper`s main goal is to introduce some methods to find the lowest cost solution for the mooring system in a short time. All of these methods were computationally implemented creating the intelligent system named PROANC, which deals with the semi-submersible mooring design in a quasi-static and deterministic approach. It should be noted that the proposed system exerts a strong appeal as a design tool for feasibility studies of a given oil field and its quasi-static results can be directly applied to a mooring program capable of performing dynamic analysis. Finally some simulations are executed for different water depths and its final results, including the expended time to run, are presented in order to prove the PROANC system wide potential as a design tool.

  14. Development of a Platform for Simulating and Optimizing Thermoelectric Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuder, John J.

    Thermoelectrics are solid state devices that can convert thermal energy directly into electrical energy. They have historically been used only in niche applications because of their relatively low efficiencies. With the advent of nanotechnology and improved manufacturing processes thermoelectric materials have become less costly and more efficient As next generation thermoelectric materials become available there is a need for industries to quickly and cost effectively seek out feasible applications for thermoelectric heat recovery platforms. Determining the technical and economic feasibility of such systems requires a model that predicts performance at the system level. Current models focus on specific system applications or neglect the rest of the system altogether, focusing on only module design and not an entire energy system. To assist in screening and optimizing entire energy systems using thermoelectrics, a novel software tool, Thermoelectric Power System Simulator (TEPSS), is developed for system level simulation and optimization of heat recovery systems. The platform is designed for use with a generic energy system so that most types of thermoelectric heat recovery applications can be modeled. TEPSS is based on object-oriented programming in MATLABRTM. A modular, shell based architecture is developed to carry out concept generation, system simulation and optimization. Systems are defined according to the components and interconnectivity specified by the user. An iterative solution process based on Newton's Method is employed to determine the system's steady state so that an objective function representing the cost of the system can be evaluated at the operating point. An optimization algorithm from MATLAB's Optimization Toolbox uses sequential quadratic programming to minimize this objective function with respect to a set of user specified design variables and constraints. During this iterative process many independent system simulations are executed and

  15. Supercontinuum optimization for dual-soliton based light sources using genetic algorithms in a grid platform.

    PubMed

    Arteaga-Sierra, F R; Milián, C; Torres-Gómez, I; Torres-Cisneros, M; Moltó, G; Ferrando, A

    2014-09-22

    We present a numerical strategy to design fiber based dual pulse light sources exhibiting two predefined spectral peaks in the anomalous group velocity dispersion regime. The frequency conversion is based on the soliton fission and soliton self-frequency shift occurring during supercontinuum generation. The optimization process is carried out by a genetic algorithm that provides the optimum input pulse parameters: wavelength, temporal width and peak power. This algorithm is implemented in a Grid platform in order to take advantage of distributed computing. These results are useful for optical coherence tomography applications where bell-shaped pulses located in the second near-infrared window are needed.

  16. Temporary road transport route optimization based on ArcGIS platform conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoliang, Zhang; Dahua, Li; Xianfeng, Shao

    2017-04-01

    Based on the ArcGIS software platform, the method of digital elevation model (DEM) is established by using the irregular triangulation (TIN) of the “three links and one leveling” project of the Guquan converter station. The calculation principle and the realization steps are discussed. In the clear fill area, site formation and earth temporary transport route design applications. Research shows that the simulation of ground simulation through ArcGIS can be more rapid and efficient land leveling, design optimization route.

  17. Optimal platform skewing for Space Shuttle inertial measurement unit redundancy management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    Constraints are applied to a general quaternion which describes the skewing between platforms of the Space Shuttle IMU. Once a skewing is derived, the use of the failure magnitude to threshold ratio makes possible predictions of the identification sensitivities for various failure modes. This in turn simplifies analyses and identifies portions of the flight envelope where second failure coverage is lacking. The square root of 6 and square root of 2 skewings have been baselined for use during nominal entry; the realignment software will be used on orbit to reskew the IMUs to the optimal configuration.

  18. Receptor recognition and cross-species infections of SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang

    2013-10-01

    Receptor recognition is a major determinant of the host range, cross-species infections, and pathogenesis of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). A defined receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the SARS-CoV spike protein specifically recognizes its host receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This article reviews the latest knowledge about how RBDs from different SARS-CoV strains interact with ACE2 from several animal species. Detailed research on these RBD/ACE2 interactions has established important principles on host receptor adaptations, cross-species infections, and future evolution of SARS-CoV. These principles may apply to other emerging animal viruses, including the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microsatellites Cross-Species Amplification across Some African Cichlids

    PubMed Central

    Bezault, Etienne; Rognon, Xavier; Gharbi, Karim; Baroiller, Jean-Francois; Chevassus, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of the genomic resources developed in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, to other Tilapiines sensu lato and African cichlid would provide new possibilities to study this amazing group from genetics, ecology, evolution, aquaculture, and conservation point of view. We tested the cross-species amplification of 32 O. niloticus microsatellite markers in a panel of 15 species from 5 different African cichlid tribes: Oreochromines (Oreochromis, Sarotherodon), Boreotilapiines (Tilapia), Chromidotilapines, Hemichromines, and Haplochromines. Amplification was successfully observed for 29 markers (91%), with a frequency of polymorphic (P95) loci per species around 70%. The mean number of alleles per locus and species was 3.2 but varied from 3.7 within Oreochromis species to 1.6 within the nontilapia species. The high level of cross-species amplification and polymorphism of the microsatellite markers tested in this study provides powerful tools for a wide range of molecular genetic studies within tilapia species as well as for other African cichlids. PMID:22701809

  20. Use of chemometrics to optimize a glucose assay on a paper microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Avoundjian, Ani; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Gomez, Frank A

    2017-04-01

    We describe the use of a chemometrics-based computational platform to optimize a glucose assay on a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD). Glucose is colorimetrically detected in the presence of glucose oxidase (GOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and potassium iodide (KI). Using a Y-shaped paper microfluidic chip, the concentration of glucose, volume of reagents, and the length and width of the microfluidic channel were examined. The responses of the microfluidic chips were analyzed at the halfway point of the channel length. Variables affecting the response were screened by using a 2(4) factorial design, and among them, volume and concentration of the glucose were optimized by applying a rotatable central composite design (CCD). The optimum and experimental responses are 151.58 and 149.80, respectively, with an absolute error of 1.2%.

  1. An automated workflow for enhancing microbial bioprocess optimization on a novel microbioreactor platform

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-throughput methods are widely-used for strain screening effectively resulting in binary information regarding high or low productivity. Nevertheless achieving quantitative and scalable parameters for fast bioprocess development is much more challenging, especially for heterologous protein production. Here, the nature of the foreign protein makes it impossible to predict the, e.g. best expression construct, secretion signal peptide, inductor concentration, induction time, temperature and substrate feed rate in fed-batch operation to name only a few. Therefore, a high number of systematic experiments are necessary to elucidate the best conditions for heterologous expression of each new protein of interest. Results To increase the throughput in bioprocess development, we used a microtiter plate based cultivation system (Biolector) which was fully integrated into a liquid-handling platform enclosed in laminar airflow housing. This automated cultivation platform was used for optimization of the secretory production of a cutinase from Fusarium solani pisi with Corynebacterium glutamicum. The online monitoring of biomass, dissolved oxygen and pH in each of the microtiter plate wells enables to trigger sampling or dosing events with the pipetting robot used for a reliable selection of best performing cutinase producers. In addition to this, further automated methods like media optimization and induction profiling were developed and validated. All biological and bioprocess parameters were exclusively optimized at microtiter plate scale and showed perfect scalable results to 1 L and 20 L stirred tank bioreactor scale. Conclusions The optimization of heterologous protein expression in microbial systems currently requires extensive testing of biological and bioprocess engineering parameters. This can be efficiently boosted by using a microtiter plate cultivation setup embedded into a liquid-handling system, providing more throughput by parallelization and

  2. CAROTID - a web-based platform for optimal personalized management of atherosclerotic patients.

    PubMed

    Gastounioti, Aimilia; Kolias, Vasileios; Golemati, Spyretta; Tsiaparas, Nikolaos N; Matsakou, Aikaterini; Stoitsis, John S; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Gkekas, Christos; Kakisis, John D; Liapis, Christos D; Karakitsos, Petros; Sarafis, Ioannis; Angelidis, Pantelis; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2014-04-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is the main cause of fatal cerebral ischemic events, thereby posing a major burden for public health and state economies. We propose a web-based platform named CAROTID to address the need for optimal management of patients with carotid atherosclerosis in a twofold sense: (a) objective selection of patients who need carotid-revascularization (i.e., high-risk patients), using a multifaceted description of the disease consisting of ultrasound imaging, biochemical and clinical markers, and (b) effective storage and retrieval of patient data to facilitate frequent follow-ups and direct comparisons with related cases. These two services are achieved by two interconnected modules, namely the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool and the intelligent archival system, in a unified, remotely accessible system. We present the design of the platform and we describe three main usage scenarios to demonstrate the CAROTID utilization in clinical practice. Additionally, the platform was evaluated in a real clinical environment in terms of CAD performance, end-user satisfaction and time spent on different functionalities. CAROTID classification of high- and low-risk cases was 87%; the corresponding stenosis-degree-based classification would have been 61%. Questionnaire-based user satisfaction showed encouraging results in terms of ease-of-use, clinical usefulness and patient data protection. Times for different CAROTID functionalities were generally short; as an example, the time spent for generating the diagnostic decision was 5min in case of 4-s ultrasound video. Large datasets and future evaluation sessions in multiple medical institutions are still necessary to reveal with confidence the full potential of the platform.

  3. Integrated platform for optimized solar PV system design and engineering plan set generation

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemo, Samuel

    2015-12-30

    The Aurora team has developed software that allows users to quickly generate a three-dimensional model for a building, with a corresponding irradiance map, from any two-dimensional image with associated geo-coordinates. The purpose of this project is to build upon that technology by developing and distributing to solar installers a software platform that automatically retrieves engineering, financial and geographic data for a specific site, and quickly generates an optimal customer proposal and corresponding engineering plans for that site. At the end of the project, Aurora’s optimization platform would have been used to make at least one thousand proposals from at least ten unique solar installation companies, two of whom would sign economically viable contracts to use the software. Furthermore, Aurora’s algorithms would be tested to show that in at least seventy percent of cases, Aurora automatically generated a design equivalent to or better than what a human could have done manually. A ‘better’ design is one that generates more energy for the same cost, or that generates a higher return on investment, while complying with all site-specific aesthetic, electrical and spatial requirements.

  4. Microfluidic Platform for Combinatorial Synthesis and Optimization of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Pedro M.; Pridgen, Eric M.; Rhee, Minsoung; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Karnik, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Taking a nanoparticle (NP) from discovery to clinical translation has been slow compared to small molecules, in part by the lack of systems that enable their precise engineering and rapid optimization. In this work we have developed a microfluidic platform for the rapid, combinatorial synthesis and optimization of NPs. The system takes in a number of NP precursors from which a library of NPs with varying size, surface charge, target ligand density, and drug load is produced in a reproducible manner. We rapidly synthesized 45 different formulations of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) NPs of different size and surface composition, and screened and ranked the NPs for their ability to evade macrophage uptake in vitro. Comparison of the results to pharmacokinetic studies in vivo in mice revealed a correlation between in vitro screen and in vivo behavior. Next, we selected NP synthesis parameters that resulted in longer blood half-life and used the microfluidic platform to synthesize targeted NPs with varying targeting ligand density (using a model targeting ligand against cancer cells). We screened NPs in vitro against prostate cancer cells as well as macrophages, identifying one formulation that exhibited high uptake by cancer cells yet similar macrophage uptake compared to non-targeted NPs. In vivo, the selected targeted NPs showed a 3.5-fold increase in tumor accumulation in mice compared to non-targeted NPs. The developed microfluidic platform in this work represents a tool that could potentially accelerate the discovery and clinical translation of NPs. PMID:24215426

  5. Optimization of a Lattice Boltzmann Computation on State-of-the-Art Multicore Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine

    2009-04-10

    We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of search-based performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD) that historically has made poor use of scalar microprocessors due to its complex data structures and memory access patterns. We explore one of the broadest sets of multicore architectures in the HPC literature, including the Intel Xeon E5345 (Clovertown), AMD Opteron 2214 (Santa Rosa), AMD Opteron 2356 (Barcelona), Sun T5140 T2+ (Victoria Falls), as well as a QS20 IBM Cell Blade. Rather than hand-tuning LBMHD for each system, we develop a code generator that allows us to identify a highly optimized version for each platform, while amortizing the human programming effort. Results show that our auto-tuned LBMHD application achieves up to a 15x improvement compared with the original code at a given concurrency. Additionally, we present detailed analysis of each optimization, which reveal surprising hardware bottlenecks and software challenges for future multicore systems and applications.

  6. Across scanner platform optimization to enable EUV lithography at the 10-nm logic node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkens, Jan; Karssenberg, Jaap; Wei, Hannah; Beckers, Marcel; Verstappen, Leon; Hsu, Stephen; Chen, Guangqin

    2014-04-01

    EUV lithography is expected to be introduced in volume manufacturing at the 10-nm and 7-nm node. Especially in these first EUV nodes, critical layer patterning will be balanced with the use of ArF immersion. As a consequence a good overlay and placement matching between both lithography methods becomes an enabling factor for EUV. In this paper we present an integral method to optimize critical layer patterning across the EUV and ArF scanner platform, such that good overlay and device pattern placement is achieved. It is discussed that besides classical overlay control methods, also the optimization of the ArF and EUV imaging steps is needed. Best matching is achieved by applying high-order field-to-field overlay corrections for both imaging and overlay. The lithography architecture we build for these higher order corrections connects the dynamic scanner actuators with the angle resolved scatterometer via a separate computational application server. Improvements of CD uniformity are based on source mask optimization for EUV combined with CD optimization using freeform intra-field dose actuator in the immersion scanner.

  7. Toward a cross-species understanding of empathy

    PubMed Central

    Panksepp, Jaak; Panksepp, Jules B.

    2013-01-01

    Although signs of empathy have now been well documented in non-human primates, only during the past few years have systematic observations suggested that a primal form of empathy exists in rodents. Thus, the study of empathy in animals has started in earnest. Here we review recent studies indicating that rodents are able to share states of fear, and highlight how affective neuroscience approaches to the study of primary-process emotional systems can help to delineate how primal empathy is constituted in mammalian brains. Cross-species evolutionary approaches to understanding the neural circuitry of emotional ‘contagion’ or ‘resonance’ between nearby animals, together with the underlying neurochemistries, may help to clarify the origins of human empathy. PMID:23746460

  8. Cross-Species Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Infection of Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bimber, Benjamin N.; Reed, Jason S.; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Bhusari, Amruta; Hammond, Katherine B.; Klug, Alex; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMV) are highly species-specific due to millennia of co-evolution and adaptation to their host, with no successful experimental cross-species infection in primates reported to date. Accordingly, full genome phylogenetic analysis of multiple new CMV field isolates derived from two closely related nonhuman primate species, Indian-origin rhesus macaques (RM) and Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (MCM), revealed distinct and tight lineage clustering according to the species of origin, with MCM CMV isolates mirroring the limited genetic diversity of their primate host that underwent a population bottleneck 400 years ago. Despite the ability of Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) laboratory strain 68–1 to replicate efficiently in MCM fibroblasts and potently inhibit antigen presentation to MCM T cells in vitro, RhCMV 68–1 failed to productively infect MCM in vivo, even in the absence of host CD8+ T and NK cells. In contrast, RhCMV clone 68–1.2, genetically repaired to express the homologues of the HCMV anti-apoptosis gene UL36 and epithelial cell tropism genes UL128 and UL130 absent in 68–1, efficiently infected MCM as evidenced by the induction of transgene-specific T cells and virus shedding. Recombinant variants of RhCMV 68–1 and 68–1.2 revealed that expression of either UL36 or UL128 together with UL130 enabled productive MCM infection, indicating that multiple layers of cross-species restriction operate even between closely related hosts. Cumulatively, these results implicate cell tropism and evasion of apoptosis as critical determinants of CMV transmission across primate species barriers, and extend the macaque model of human CMV infection and immunology to MCM, a nonhuman primate species with uniquely simplified host immunogenetics. PMID:27829026

  9. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS)

    PubMed Central

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S.; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-01-01

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm3. PMID:26875817

  10. An optimized microfabricated platform for the optical generation and detection of hyperpolarized 129Xe

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Daniel J.; Seltzer, Scott J.; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Ring, Hattie L.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Knappe, Svenja; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Pines, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Low thermal-equilibrium nuclear spin polarizations and the need for sophisticated instrumentation render conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) incompatible with small-scale microfluidic devices. Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has found use in the study of many materials but has required very large and expensive instrumentation. Recently a microfabricated device with modest instrumentation demonstrated all-optical hyperpolarization and detection of 129Xe gas. This device was limited by 129Xe polarizations less than 1%, 129Xe NMR signals smaller than 20 nT, and transport of hyperpolarized 129Xe over millimeter lengths. Higher polarizations, versatile detection schemes, and flow of 129Xe over larger distances are desirable for wider applications. Here we demonstrate an ultra-sensitive microfabricated platform that achieves 129Xe polarizations reaching 7%, NMR signals exceeding 1 μT, lifetimes up to 6 s, and simultaneous two-mode detection, consisting of a high-sensitivity in situ channel with signal-to-noise of 105 and a lower-sensitivity ex situ detection channel which may be useful in a wider variety of conditions. 129Xe is hyperpolarized and detected in locations more than 1 cm apart. Our versatile device is an optimal platform for microfluidic magnetic resonance in particular, but equally attractive for wider nuclear spin applications benefitting from ultra-sensitive detection, long coherences, and simple instrumentation. PMID:28266629

  11. An optimized microfabricated platform for the optical generation and detection of hyperpolarized 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel J.; Seltzer, Scott J.; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Ring, Hattie L.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Knappe, Svenja; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Pines, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Low thermal-equilibrium nuclear spin polarizations and the need for sophisticated instrumentation render conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) incompatible with small-scale microfluidic devices. Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has found use in the study of many materials but has required very large and expensive instrumentation. Recently a microfabricated device with modest instrumentation demonstrated all-optical hyperpolarization and detection of 129Xe gas. This device was limited by 129Xe polarizations less than 1%, 129Xe NMR signals smaller than 20 nT, and transport of hyperpolarized 129Xe over millimeter lengths. Higher polarizations, versatile detection schemes, and flow of 129Xe over larger distances are desirable for wider applications. Here we demonstrate an ultra-sensitive microfabricated platform that achieves 129Xe polarizations reaching 7%, NMR signals exceeding 1 μT, lifetimes up to 6 s, and simultaneous two-mode detection, consisting of a high-sensitivity in situ channel with signal-to-noise of 105 and a lower-sensitivity ex situ detection channel which may be useful in a wider variety of conditions. 129Xe is hyperpolarized and detected in locations more than 1 cm apart. Our versatile device is an optimal platform for microfluidic magnetic resonance in particular, but equally attractive for wider nuclear spin applications benefitting from ultra-sensitive detection, long coherences, and simple instrumentation.

  12. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS).

    PubMed

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-02-15

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm(3).

  13. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S.; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-02-01

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm3.

  14. In search for significant cognitive features in Klinefelter syndrome through cross-species comparison of a supernumerary X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Bruining, H; Swaab, H; de Sonneville, L M J; van Rijn, S; van Engeland, H; Kas, M J H

    2011-08-01

    The behavioral characterization of animals that carry genetic disorder abnormalities in a controlled genetic and environmental background may be used to identify human deficits that are significant to understand underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Here, we studied whether previously reported object recognition impairments in mice with a supernumerary X chromosome relate to specific cognitive deficits in Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY). We aimed to optimize face validity by studying temporal object recognition in human cognitive assays. Thirty-four boys with Klinefelter syndrome (mean age 12.01) were compared with 90 age-matched normal controls, on a broad range of visual object memory tasks, including tests for pattern and temporal order discrimination. The results indicate that subjects with Klinefelter syndrome have difficulty in the processing of visual object and pattern information. Visual object patterns seem difficult to discriminate especially when temporal information needs to be processed and reproduced. On the basis of cross-species comparison, we propose that impaired temporal processing of object pattern information is an important deficit in Klinefelter syndrome. The current study shows how cross-species behavioral characterization may be used as a starting point to understand the neurobiology of syndromal phenotypic expression. The features of this study may serve as markers for interventions in Klinefelter syndrome. Similar cross-species evaluations of standard mouse behavioral paradigms in different genetic contexts may be powerful tools to optimize genotype-phenotype relationships.

  15. Optimization of sparse matrix-vector multiplication on emerging multicore platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S; Oliker, L; Vuduc, R; Shalf, J; Yelick, K; Demmel, J

    2007-04-16

    We are witnessing a dramatic change in computer architecture due to the multicore paradigm shift, as every electronic device from cell phones to supercomputers confronts parallelism of unprecedented scale. To fully unleash the potential of these systems, the HPC community must develop multicore specific optimization methodologies for important scientific computations. In this work, we examine sparse matrix-vector multiply (SpMV)--one of the most heavily used kernels in scientific computing--across a broad spectrum of multicore designs. Our experimental platform includes the homogeneous AMD dual-core and Intel quad-core designs, as well as the highly multithreaded Sun Niagara and heterogeneous STI Cell. We present several optimization strategies especially effective for the multicore environment, and demonstrate significant performance improvements compared to existing state-of-the-art serial and parallel SpMV implementations. Additionally, we present key insights into the architectural tradeoffs of leading multicore design strategies, in the context of demanding memory-bound numerical algorithms.

  16. Optimization of Sparse Matrix-Vector Multiplication on Emerging Multicore Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel; Oliker, Leonid; Vuduc, Richard; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine; Demmel, James

    2008-10-16

    We are witnessing a dramatic change in computer architecture due to the multicore paradigm shift, as every electronic device from cell phones to supercomputers confronts parallelism of unprecedented scale. To fully unleash the potential of these systems, the HPC community must develop multicore specific-optimization methodologies for important scientific computations. In this work, we examine sparse matrix-vector multiply (SpMV) - one of the most heavily used kernels in scientific computing - across a broad spectrum of multicore designs. Our experimental platform includes the homogeneous AMD quad-core, AMD dual-core, and Intel quad-core designs, the heterogeneous STI Cell, as well as one of the first scientific studies of the highly multithreaded Sun Victoria Falls (a Niagara2 SMP). We present several optimization strategies especially effective for the multicore environment, and demonstrate significant performance improvements compared to existing state-of-the-art serial and parallel SpMV implementations. Additionally, we present key insights into the architectural trade-offs of leading multicore design strategies, in the context of demanding memory-bound numerical algorithms.

  17. FIV cross-species transmission: an evolutionary prospective

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; VandeWoude, Sue; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; McIntosh, Carl; Franklin, Sam; Antunes, Agostinho; Johnson, Warren; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Feline and primate immunodeficiency viruses (FIVs, SIVs, and HIV) are transmitted via direct contact (e.g. fighting, sexual contact, and mother-offspring transmission). This dynamic likely poses a behavioral barrier to cross-species transmission in the wild. Recently, several host intracellular anti-viral proteins that contribute to species-specificity of primate lentiviruses have been identified revealing adaptive mechanisms that further limit spread of lentiviruses between species. Consistent with these inter-species transmission barriers, phylogenetic evidence supports the prediction that FIV transmission is an exceedingly rare event between free-ranging cat species, though it has occurred occasionally in captive settings. Recently we documented that puma and bobcats in Southern California share an FIV strain, providing an opportunity to evaluate evolution of both viral strains and host intracellular restriction proteins. These studies are facilitated by the availability of the 2X cat genome sequence annotation. In addition, concurrent viral and host genetic analyses have been used to track patterns of migration of the host species and barriers to transmission of the virus within the African lion. These studies illustrate the utility of FIV as a model to discover the variables necessary for establishment and control of lentiviral infections in new species. PMID:18299153

  18. A Plea for Cross-species Social Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the question of how our brain makes us sensitive to the state of conspecifics and how that affects our behaviour has undergone a profound change. Twenty years ago what would now be called social neuroscience was focused on the visual processing of facial expressions and body movements in temporal lobe structures of primates (Puce and Perrett 2003). With the discovery of mirror neurons, this changed rapidly towards the modern field of social neuroscience, in which high-level vision is but one of many focuses of interest. In this essay, we will argue that for the further progress of the field, the integration of animal neuroscience and human neuroscience is paramount. We will do so, by focusing on the field of embodied social cognition. We will first show how the combination of animal and human neuroscience was critical in how the discovery of mirror neurons placed the motor system on the map of social cognition. We will then argue why an integrated cross-species approach will be pivotal to our understanding of the neural basis of emotional empathy and its link to prosocial behaviour.

  19. Optimal prediction of human postural response under anterior-posterior platform tilting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, D.; Miripour Fard, B.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that human beings movements can be related to the problem of cost function minimization. But at the present time it is not clear that which objective function(s) and constraints are used by central nervous system (CNS) to produce optimal reactions under perturbations. Present study has been done experimentally and by numerical simulations to explore the stability constraints which should be used in combination with energy based cost function (weighted minimum torque) to estimate the motor planning criterion is used by CNS for disturbance rejections. The influence of three stability criterions (ZMP, extrapolated center of mass and a vertical force criterion) in combination with minimum torque model on the optimal trajectory formation is investigated. First, the response of 10 male healthy persons to platform oscillation was recorded by motion analysis system and the hip, knee and ankle angular trajectories were derived from recorded data. Second, the dynamic simulation of a four-segment, three actuated degrees of freedom mechanical model of the human body was performed using predictive dynamic method which leads to an optimization problem. The simulated trajectories were then compared to the experimental data. With comparison between experimental results, the weighting coefficients of the objective function were found to achieve best estimation. It was seen that the minimum torque objective function with weighting coefficients gives trajectories that are mostly matched with experimental observation. Moreover, the results showed that between stability criterions, the ZMP predictions are near to experimental results. Although by using vertical force criterion some nearness to experimental results are lost (in comparison with ZMP criterion) but a secured flat-foot posture for the model is obtained which this posture is more applicable than others in humanoid implementations.

  20. A brief history of cross-species organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cross-species transplantation (xenotransplantation) offers the prospect of an unlimited supply of organs and cells for clinical transplantation, thus resolving the critical shortage of human tissues that currently prohibits a majority of patients on the waiting list from receiving transplants. Between the 17th and 20th centuries, blood was transfused from various animal species into patients with a variety of pathological conditions. Skin grafts were carried out in the 19th century from a variety of animals, with frogs being the most popular. In the 1920s, Voronoff advocated the transplantation of slices of chimpanzee testis into aged men whose “zest for life” was deteriorating, believing that the hormones produced by the testis would rejuvenate his patients. Following the pioneering surgical work of Carrel, who developed the technique of blood vessel anastomosis, numerous attempts at nonhuman primate organ transplantation in patients were carried out in the 20th century. In 1963–1964, when human organs were not available and chronic dialysis was not yet in use, Reemtsma transplanted chimpanzee kidneys into 13 patients, one of whom returned to work for almost 9 months before suddenly dying from what was believed to be an electrolyte disturbance. The first heart transplant in a human ever performed was by Hardy in 1964, using a chimpanzee heart, but the patient died within 2 hours. Starzl carried out the first chimpanzee-to-human liver transplantation in 1966; in 1992, he obtained patient survival for 70 days following a baboon liver transplant. With the advent of genetic engineering and cloning technologies, pigs are currently available with a number of different manipulations that protect their tissues from the human immune response, resulting in increasing pig graft survival in nonhuman primate models. Genetically modified pigs offer hope of a limitless supply of organs and cells for those in need of a transplant. PMID:22275786

  1. Cross-Species Functionality of Pararetroviral Elements Driving Ribosome Shunting

    PubMed Central

    Pooggin, Mikhail M.; Fütterer, Johannes; Hohn, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) belong to distinct genera of pararetroviruses infecting dicot and monocot plants, respectively. In both viruses, polycistronic translation of pregenomic (pg) RNA is initiated by shunting ribosomes that bypass a large region of the pgRNA leader with several short (s)ORFs and a stable stem-loop structure. The shunt requires translation of a 5′-proximal sORF terminating near the stem. In CaMV, mutations knocking out this sORF nearly abolish shunting and virus viability. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that two distant regions of the CaMV leader that form a minimal shunt configuration comprising the sORF, a bottom part of the stem, and a shunt landing sequence can be replaced by heterologous sequences that form a structurally similar configuration in RTBV without any dramatic effect on shunt-mediated translation and CaMV infectivity. The CaMV-RTBV chimeric leader sequence was largely stable over five viral passages in turnip plants: a few alterations that did eventually occur in the virus progenies are indicative of fine tuning of the chimeric sequence during adaptation to a new host. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate cross-species functionality of pararetroviral cis-elements driving ribosome shunting and evolutionary conservation of the shunt mechanism. We are grateful to Matthias Müller and Sandra Pauli for technical assistance. This work was initiated at Friedrich Miescher Institute (Basel, Switzerland). We thank Prof. Thomas Boller for hosting the group at the Institute of Botany. PMID:18286203

  2. Asparagine and glutamine ladders promote cross-species prion conversion.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Timothy D; Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Jiang, Lin; Rodriguez, José A; Alderson, Nazilla; Eisenberg, David S; Sigurdson, Christina J

    2017-09-20

    Prion transmission between species is governed in part by primary sequence similarity between the infectious prion aggregate, PrP(Sc), and the cellular prion protein of the host, PrP(C) A puzzling feature of prion formation is that certain PrP(C) sequences, such as that of bank vole, can be converted by a remarkably broad array of different mammalian prions, whereas others, such as rabbit, show robust resistance to cross-species prion conversion. To examine the structural determinants that confer susceptibility or resistance to prion conversion, we systematically tested over 40 PrP(C) variants of susceptible and resistant PrP(C) sequences in a prion conversion assay. Five key residue positions markedly impacted prion conversion, four of which were in steric zipper segments where side chains from amino acids tightly interdigitate in a dry interface. Strikingly, all 5 residue substitutions modulating prion conversion involved the gain or loss of an asparagine or glutamine residue. For 2 of 4 positions, N and Q residues were not interchangeable, revealing a strict requirement for either an N or Q residue. Bank voles have a high number of N and Q residues and a high N:Q ratio. These findings suggest that a high number of N and Q residues at specific positions may stabilize β-sheets and lower the energy barrier for crossspecies prion transmission, potentially due to hydrogen bond networks from side chain amides forming extended N/Q ladders. These data also suggest that multiple PrP(C) segments containing N/Q residues may act in concert along a replicative interface to promote prion conversion. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. An automated microscale platform for evaluation and optimization of oxidative bioconversion processes.

    PubMed

    Baboo, Jasmin Z; Galman, James L; Lye, Gary J; Ward, John M; Hailes, Helen C; Micheletti, Martina

    2012-01-01

    In this work an integrated robotic platform has been used for the development of a fully automated microscale process sequence comprising fermentation and bioconversion using E. coli TOP10 [pQR210] expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO). Ninety six-Deep Square Well (96-DSW) microtiter plates were used for microbial culture and enzyme-catalyzed conversion, where plate preparation, reagent addition, and sampling were all carried out without manual intervention. The adoption of automated robotic procedures has enabled the rapid collection of kinetic data for whole process optimization at the microscale. This high-throughput approach enabled a range of amino acid sources for media formulation and well fill volumes to be investigated highlighting when nutritional limitation and oxygen limitations took place. The automated process sequence has been applied to test six CHMO substrates including norcamphor and cycloheptanone all of which to the best of our knowledge have yet to be tested with E. coli TOP10 [pQR210]. Substrate specificity and product selectivity were effectively demonstrated and compared to both the natural substrate cyclohexanone and the model substrate bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one used to demonstrate asymmetric synthesis. The results obtained using the developed process sequence could be reproduced at 75 L scale when a matched oxygen transfer coefficient k(L) a approach was used. The study demonstrates how automated microscale processing enables the rapid collection of kinetic quantitative data in a robust manner with clear implications for accelerating bioprocess development, optimization, and scale-up. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  4. The development of optimal control laws for orbiting tethered platform systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model of the open and closed loop in orbit plane dynamics of a space platform-tethered-subsatellite system is developed. The system consists of a rigid platform from which an (assumed massless) tether is deploying (retrieving) a subsatellite from an attachment point which is, in general, offset from the platform's mass center. A Langrangian formulation yields equations describing platform pitch, subsatellite tetherline swing, and varying tether length motions. These equations are linearized about the nominal station keeping motion. Control can be provided by both modulation of the tether tension level and by a momentum type platform-mounted device; system controllability depends on the presence of both control inputs. Stability criteria are developed in terms of the control law gains, the platform inertia ratio, and tether offset parameter. Control law gains are obtained based on linear quadratic regulator techniques. Typical transient responses of both the state and required control effort are presented.

  5. The development of optimal control laws for orbiting tethered platform systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Woodard, S.; Juang, J.-N.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model of the open and closed loop in-orbit plane dynamics of a space platform-tethered-subsatellite system is developed. The system consists of a rigid platform from which an (assumed massless) tether is deploying (retrieving) a subsatellite from an attachment point which is, in general, offset from the platform's mass center. A Lagrangian formulation yields equations describing platform pitch, subsatellite tether-line swing, and varying tether length motions. These equations are linearized about the nominal station keeping motion. Control can be provided by both modulation of the tether tension level and by a momentum type platform-mounted device; system controllability depends on the presence of both control inputs. Stability criteria are developed in terms of the control law gains, the platform inertia ratio, and tether offset parameter. Control law gains are obtained based on linear quadratic regulator techniques. Typical transient responses of both the state and required control effort are presented.

  6. Clinical optimization of antigen specific modulation of type 1 diabetes with the plasmid DNA platform.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Peter; Utz, Paul J; Robinson, William; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-12-01

    Some clinical trials in humans have aimed at modulation of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via alteration of the immune response to putative islet cell antigens, particularly proinsulin and insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase and the peptide, DiaPep 277, derived from heat shock protein 60. The focus here is on development of a specially engineered DNA plasmid encoding proinsulin to treat T1D. The plasmid is engineered to turn off adaptive immunity to proinsulin. This approach yielded exciting results in a randomized placebo controlled trial in 80 adult patients with T1D. The implications of this trial are explored in regards to the potential for sparing inflammation in islets and thus allowing the functioning beta cells to recover and produce more insulin. Strategies to further strengthen the effects seen thus far with the tolerizing DNA plasmid to proinsulin will be elucidated. The DNA platform affords an opportunity for easy modifications. In addition standard exploration of dose levels, route of administration and frequency of dose are practical. Optimization of the effects seen to date on C-peptide and on depletion of proinsulin specific CD8 T cells are feasible, with expected concomitant improvement in other parameters like hemoglobin A1c and reduction in insulin usage. T1D is one of the few autoimmune conditions where antigen specific therapy can be achieved, provided the approach is tested intelligently. Tolerizing DNA vaccines to proinsulin and other islet cell autoantigens is a worthy pursuit to potentially treat, prevent and to perhaps even 'cure' or 'prevent' type 1 diabetes.

  7. Robust Optimization in Operational Risk: A Study of the Joint Platform Allocation Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202–4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704...ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The Joint Platform Allocation Tool (JPAT) is a tool currently used to inform Army decision makers on resource management ...ABSTRACT The Joint Platform Allocation Tool (JPAT) is a tool currently used to inform Army deci- sion makers on resource management , procurement, and

  8. Optimization of beam angles for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning using genetic algorithm on a distributed computing platform.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Daryl P; Brunner, Stephen; Jones, Matthew D; Malhotra, Harish K; Bakhtiari, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    Planning intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment involves selection of several angle parameters as well as specification of structures and constraints employed in the optimization process. Including these parameters in the combinatorial search space vastly increases the computational burden, and therefore the parameter selection is normally performed manually by a clinician, based on clinical experience. We have investigated the use of a genetic algorithm (GA) and distributed-computing platform to optimize the gantry angle parameters and provide insight into additional structures, which may be necessary, in the dose optimization process to produce optimal IMRT treatment plans. For an IMRT prostate patient, we produced the first generation of 40 samples, each of five gantry angles, by selecting from a uniform random distribution, subject to certain adjacency and opposition constraints. Dose optimization was performed by distributing the 40-plan workload over several machines running a commercial treatment planning system. A score was assigned to each resulting plan, based on how well it satisfied clinically-relevant constraints. The second generation of 40 samples was produced by combining the highest-scoring samples using techniques of crossover and mutation. The process was repeated until the sixth generation, and the results compared with a clinical (equally-spaced) gantry angle configuration. In the sixth generation, 34 of the 40 GA samples achieved better scores than the clinical plan, with the best plan showing an improvement of 84%. Moreover, the resulting configuration of beam angles tended to cluster toward the patient's sides, indicating where the inclusion of additional structures in the dose optimization process may avoid dose hot spots. Additional parameter selection in IMRT leads to a large-scale computational problem. We have demonstrated that the GA combined with a distributed-computing platform can be applied to optimize gantry angle

  9. Ultra-deep sequencing of intra-host rabies virus populations during cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Borucki, Monica K; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Lao, Victoria; Vanier, Gilda; Wadford, Debra A; Messenger, Sharon; Allen, Jonathan E

    2013-11-01

    One of the hurdles to understanding the role of viral quasispecies in RNA virus cross-species transmission (CST) events is the need to analyze a densely sampled outbreak using deep sequencing in order to measure the amount of mutation occurring on a small time scale. In 2009, the California Department of Public Health reported a dramatic increase (350) in the number of gray foxes infected with a rabies virus variant for which striped skunks serve as a reservoir host in Humboldt County. To better understand the evolution of rabies, deep-sequencing was applied to 40 unpassaged rabies virus samples from the Humboldt outbreak. For each sample, approximately 11 kb of the 12 kb genome was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Average coverage was 17,448 and this allowed characterization of the rabies virus population present in each sample at unprecedented depths. Phylogenetic analysis of the consensus sequence data demonstrated that samples clustered according to date (1995 vs. 2009) and geographic location (northern vs. southern). A single amino acid change in the G protein distinguished a subset of northern foxes from a haplotype present in both foxes and skunks, suggesting this mutation may have played a role in the observed increased transmission among foxes in this region. Deep-sequencing data indicated that many genetic changes associated with the CST event occurred prior to 2009 since several nonsynonymous mutations that were present in the consensus sequences of skunk and fox rabies samples obtained from 20032010 were present at the sub-consensus level (as rare variants in the viral population) in skunk and fox samples from 1995. These results suggest that analysis of rare variants within a viral population may yield clues to ancestral genomes and identify rare variants that have the potential to be selected for if environment conditions change.

  10. Cross-species transcriptomic approach reveals genes in hamster implantation sites.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Herington, Jennifer; Galindo, Cristi L; Ding, Tianbing; Brown, Naoko; Reese, Jeff; Paria, Bibhash C

    2014-12-01

    The mouse model has greatly contributed to understanding molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of progesterone (P4) plus estrogen (E)-dependent blastocyst implantation process. However, little is known about contributory molecular mechanisms of the P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation process that occurs in species such as hamsters, guineapigs, rabbits, pigs, rhesus monkeys, and perhaps humans. We used the hamster as a model of P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation and carried out cross-species microarray (CSM) analyses to reveal differentially expressed genes at the blastocyst implantation site (BIS), in order to advance the understanding of molecular mechanisms of implantation. Upregulation of 112 genes and downregulation of 77 genes at the BIS were identified using a mouse microarray platform, while use of the human microarray revealed 62 up- and 38 down-regulated genes at the BIS. Excitingly, a sizable number of genes (30 up- and 11 down-regulated genes) were identified as a shared pool by both CSMs. Real-time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization validated the expression patterns of several up- and down-regulated genes identified by both CSMs at the hamster and mouse BIS to demonstrate the merit of CSM findings across species, in addition to revealing genes specific to hamsters. Functional annotation analysis found that genes involved in the spliceosome, proteasome, and ubiquination pathways are enriched at the hamster BIS, while genes associated with tight junction, SAPK/JNK signaling, and PPARα/RXRα signalings are repressed at the BIS. Overall, this study provides a pool of genes and evidence of their participation in up- and down-regulated cellular functions/pathways at the hamster BIS. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  11. Dynamic control of a moving platform using the CAREN system to optimize walking in virtual reality environments.

    PubMed

    Makssoud, Hassan El; Richards, Carol L; Comeau, François

    2009-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology offers the opportunity to expose patients to complex physical environments without physical danger and thus provides a wide range of opportunities for locomotor training or the study of human postural and walking behavior. A VR-based locomotor training system has been developed for gait rehabilitation post-stroke. A clinical study has shown that persons after stroke are able to adapt and benefit from this novel system wherein they walk into virtual environments (VEs) on a self-paced treadmill mounted on a platform with 6 degrees of freedom. This platform is programmed to mimic changes in the terrain encountered in the VEs. While engaging in these VEs, excessive trunk movements and speed alterations have been observed, especially during the pitch perturbations accompanying uphill or downhill terrain changes. An in-depth study of the subject's behavior in relation to the platform movements revealed that the platform rotational axes need to be modified, as previously shown by Barton et al, and in addition did not consider the subject's position on the treadmill. The aim of this study was to determine an optimal solution to simulate walking in real life when engaging in VEs.

  12. Codon Optimization OnLine (COOL): a web-based multi-objective optimization platform for synthetic gene design.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ju Xin; Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2014-08-01

    Codon optimization has been widely used for designing synthetic genes to improve their expression in heterologous host organisms. However, most of the existing codon optimization tools consider a single design criterion and/or implement a rather rigid user interface to yield only one optimal sequence, which may not be the best solution. Hence, we have developed Codon Optimization OnLine (COOL), which is the first web tool that provides the multi-objective codon optimization functionality to aid systematic synthetic gene design. COOL supports a simple and flexible interface for customizing various codon optimization parameters such as codon adaptation index, individual codon usage and codon pairing. In addition, users can visualize and compare the optimal synthetic sequences with respect to various fitness measures. User-defined DNA sequences can also be compared against the COOL optimized sequences to show the extent by which the user's sequences can be further improved. COOL is free to academic and non-commercial users and licensed to others for a fee by the National University of Singapore. Accessible at http://bioinfo.bti.a-star.edu.sg/COOL/ CONTACT: cheld@nus.edu.sg Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Arsenic removal from contaminated groundwater by membrane-integrated hybrid plant: optimization and control using Visual Basic platform.

    PubMed

    Chakrabortty, S; Sen, M; Pal, P

    2014-03-01

    A simulation software (ARRPA) has been developed in Microsoft Visual Basic platform for optimization and control of a novel membrane-integrated arsenic separation plant in the backdrop of absence of such software. The user-friendly, menu-driven software is based on a dynamic linearized mathematical model, developed for the hybrid treatment scheme. The model captures the chemical kinetics in the pre-treating chemical reactor and the separation and transport phenomena involved in nanofiltration. The software has been validated through extensive experimental investigations. The agreement between the outputs from computer simulation program and the experimental findings are excellent and consistent under varying operating conditions reflecting high degree of accuracy and reliability of the software. High values of the overall correlation coefficient (R (2) = 0.989) and Willmott d-index (0.989) are indicators of the capability of the software in analyzing performance of the plant. The software permits pre-analysis, manipulation of input data, helps in optimization and exhibits performance of an integrated plant visually on a graphical platform. Performance analysis of the whole system as well as the individual units is possible using the tool. The software first of its kind in its domain and in the well-known Microsoft Excel environment is likely to be very useful in successful design, optimization and operation of an advanced hybrid treatment plant for removal of arsenic from contaminated groundwater.

  14. High content analysis platform for optimization of lipid mediated CRISPR-Cas9 delivery strategies in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Steyer, Benjamin; Carlson-Stevermer, Jared; Angenent-Mari, Nicolas; Khalil, Andrew; Harkness, Ty; Saha, Krishanu

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral gene-editing of human cells using the CRISPR-Cas9 system requires optimized delivery of multiple components. Both the Cas9 endonuclease and a single guide RNA, that defines the genomic target, need to be present and co-localized within the nucleus for efficient gene-editing to occur. This work describes a new high-throughput screening platform for the optimization of CRISPR-Cas9 delivery strategies. By exploiting high content image analysis and microcontact printed plates, multi-parametric gene-editing outcome data from hundreds to thousands of isolated cell populations can be screened simultaneously. Employing this platform, we systematically screened four commercially available cationic lipid transfection materials with a range of RNAs encoding the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Analysis of Cas9 expression and editing of a fluorescent mCherry reporter transgene within human embryonic kidney cells was monitored over several days after transfection. Design of experiments analysis enabled rigorous evaluation of delivery materials and RNA concentration conditions. The results of this analysis indicated that the concentration and identity of transfection material have significantly greater effect on gene-editing than ratio or total amount of RNA. Cell subpopulation analysis on microcontact printed plates, further revealed that low cell number and high Cas9 expression, 24 hours after CRISPR-Cas9 delivery, were strong predictors of gene-editing outcomes. These results suggest design principles for the development of materials and transfection strategies with lipid-based materials. This platform could be applied to rapidly optimize materials for gene-editing in a variety of cell/tissue types in order to advance genomic medicine, regenerative biology and drug discovery. PMID:26747759

  15. Use of nonlinear design optimization techniques in the comparison of battery discharger topologies for the space platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sable, Dan M.; Cho, Bo H.; Lee, Fred C.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed comparison of a boost converter, a voltage-fed, autotransformer converter, and a multimodule boost converter, designed specifically for the space platform battery discharger, is performed. Computer-based nonlinear optimization techniques are used to facilitate an objective comparison. The multimodule boost converter is shown to be the optimum topology at all efficiencies. The margin is greatest at 97 percent efficiency. The multimodule, multiphase boost converter combines the advantages of high efficiency, light weight, and ample margin on the component stresses, thus ensuring high reliability.

  16. Use of nonlinear design optimization techniques in the comparison of battery discharger topologies for the space platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sable, Dan M.; Cho, Bo H.; Lee, Fred C.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed comparison of a boost converter, a voltage-fed, autotransformer converter, and a multimodule boost converter, designed specifically for the space platform battery discharger, is performed. Computer-based nonlinear optimization techniques are used to facilitate an objective comparison. The multimodule boost converter is shown to be the optimum topology at all efficiencies. The margin is greatest at 97 percent efficiency. The multimodule, multiphase boost converter combines the advantages of high efficiency, light weight, and ample margin on the component stresses, thus ensuring high reliability.

  17. Optimal control/structure integrated design of a flexible space platform with articulated appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Alberts, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A complete set of closed form symbolic equations are developed for a 2-D model of a system comprised of a flexible platform with articulated appendages. The system considered has a flexible two link manipulator, with joint compliance, at one end of the flexible platform and an articulated antenna on the other end. The model is formulated using a Lagrangian approach which incorporates homogeneous transformation matrices, similar to those typically seen in the robotics literature, for the kinematic representation. The integrated control/structure design strategy considered emphasizes rapid system response and minimal structural weight. Constraints are included to keep antenna pointing error to a minimum, and at the same time achieve accurate end point positioning of the manipulator with minimal oscillations.

  18. Discovery and bio-optimization of human antibody therapeutics using the XenoMouse® transgenic mouse platform.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Ian N; Gunasekaran, Kannan; King, Chadwick T

    2016-03-01

    Since the late 1990s, the use of transgenic animal platforms has transformed the discovery of fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. The first approved therapy derived from a transgenic platform--the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist panitumumab to treat advanced colorectal cancer--was developed using XenoMouse(®) technology. Since its approval in 2006, the science of discovering and developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies derived from the XenoMouse(®) platform has advanced considerably. The emerging array of antibody therapeutics developed using transgenic technologies is expected to include antibodies and antibody fragments with novel mechanisms of action and extreme potencies. In addition to these impressive functional properties, these antibodies will be designed to have superior biophysical properties that enable highly efficient large-scale manufacturing methods. Achieving these new heights in antibody drug discovery will ultimately bring better medicines to patients. Here, we review best practices for the discovery and bio-optimization of monoclonal antibodies that fit functional design goals and meet high manufacturing standards.

  19. Simultaneously reconstructing viral cross-species transmission history and identifying the underlying constraints

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; Suchard, Marc A.; Rambaut, Andrew; Streicker, Daniel G.; Lemey, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The factors that determine the origin and fate of cross-species transmission events remain unclear for the majority of human pathogens, despite being central for the development of predictive models and assessing the efficacy of prevention strategies. Here, we describe a flexible Bayesian statistical framework to reconstruct virus transmission between different host species based on viral gene sequences, while simultaneously testing and estimating the contribution of several potential predictors of cross-species transmission. Specifically, we use a generalized linear model extension of phylogenetic diffusion to perform Bayesian model averaging over candidate predictors. By further extending this model with branch partitioning, we allow for distinct host transition processes on external and internal branches, thus discriminating between recent cross-species transmissions, many of which are likely to result in dead-end infections, and host shifts that reflect successful onwards transmission in the new host species. Our approach corroborates genetic distance between hosts as a key determinant of both host shifts and cross-species transmissions of rabies virus in North American bats. Furthermore, our results indicate that geographical range overlap is a modest predictor for cross-species transmission, but not for host shifts. Although our evolutionary framework focused on the multi-host reservoir dynamics of bat rabies virus, it is applicable to other pathogens and to other discrete state transition processes. PMID:23382420

  20. Cross-species microarray analysis with the OSCAR system suggests an INSR->Pax6->NQO1 neuro-protective pathway in aging and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue; He, Xin; Zhong, Sheng

    2007-01-01

    OSCAR is a web platform for cluster and cross-species analysis of microarray data. It provides a comprehensive but friendly environment to both users and algorithm developers. For users, OSCAR provides cluster tools for both single and multiple species data, together with interactive analysis features. For single species data, OSCAR currently provides Hierarchical Clustering, K-means, partition around medoids (PAM), Self-Organizing Map (SOM), Tight Clustering and a novel algorithm called ‘Consensus Tight-clustering’. The new Consensus Tight-clustering algorithm delivers robust gene clusters and its result is more resistant to false positives than other state-of-the-art algorithms. For cross-species data analysis, OSCAR provides two novel computational tools: ‘coherentCluster’, ‘coherentSubset’ and a novel visualization tool: ‘comparative heatmap’. Applying the coherentCluster algorithm to human and fly aging data, we identified several coherent clusters of genes, which share co-regulation patterns that are highly correlated with the aging process in both of the two species. One coherent cluster suggests insulin receptor (INSR) may regulate Pax6 in both species and across different tissues. Further analysis with human brain expression and pathological data suggests an INSR->Pax6->quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)->detoxification neuro-protective pathway might be present in aging or diseased brain. For algorithm developers, OSCAR is a plug-and-play platform. With little effort, developers can plug their own algorithms into the OSCAR server without revealing the source codes, which will equip their command line executables with user-friendly interface and interactive analysis capability. In summary, OSCAR initiates an open platform for development and application of clustering and cross-species analysis programs. OSCAR stands for an open system for cluster analysis of microarray data. It is available at: http://biocomp.bioen.uiuc.edu/oscar PMID:17545194

  1. GENPLAT: an Automated Platform for Biomass Enzyme Discovery and Cocktail Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Jonathan; Banerjee, Goutami; Car, Suzana

    2011-01-01

    The high cost of enzymes for biomass deconstruction is a major impediment to the economic conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to liquid transportation fuels such as ethanol. We have developed an integrated high throughput platform, called GENPLAT, for the discovery and development of novel enzymes and enzyme cocktails for the release of sugars from diverse pretreatment/biomass combinations. GENPLAT comprises four elements: individual pure enzymes, statistical design of experiments, robotic pipeting of biomass slurries and enzymes, and automated colorimeteric determination of released Glc and Xyl. Individual enzymes are produced by expression in Pichia pastoris or Trichoderma reesei, or by chromatographic purification from commercial cocktails or from extracts of novel microorganisms. Simplex lattice (fractional factorial) mixture models are designed using commercial Design of Experiment statistical software. Enzyme mixtures of high complexity are constructed using robotic pipeting into a 96-well format. The measurement of released Glc and Xyl is automated using enzyme-linked colorimetric assays. Optimized enzyme mixtures containing as many as 16 components have been tested on a variety of feedstock and pretreatment combinations. GENPLAT is adaptable to mixtures of pure enzymes, mixtures of commercial products (e.g., Accellerase 1000 and Novozyme 188), extracts of novel microbes, or combinations thereof. To make and test mixtures of ˜10 pure enzymes requires less than 100 μg of each protein and fewer than 100 total reactions, when operated at a final total loading of 15 mg protein/g glucan. We use enzymes from several sources. Enzymes can be purified from natural sources such as fungal cultures (e.g., Aspergillus niger, Cochliobolus carbonum, and Galerina marginata), or they can be made by expression of the encoding genes (obtained from the increasing number of microbial genome sequences) in hosts such as E. coli, Pichia pastoris, or a filamentous fungus such

  2. Comparison and optimization of two MALDI-TOF MS platforms for the identification of medically relevant yeast species.

    PubMed

    Pence, M A; McElvania TeKippe, E; Wallace, M A; Burnham, C-A D

    2014-10-01

    The rapid identification of yeast is essential for the optimization of antifungal therapy. The objective of our study was to evaluate two matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) platforms, the bioMérieux VITEK MS (IVD Knowledgebase v.2.0) and Bruker Biotyper (software version 3.1), for the rapid identification of medically relevant yeast. One hundred and seventeen isolates, representing six genera and 18 species, were analyzed using multiple direct smear methods to optimize identification. Sequence analysis was the gold standard for comparison. Isolates were analyzed with VITEK MS using the direct smear method +/- a 25 % formic acid on-plate extraction. For Biotyper, isolates were analyzed using direct smear without formic acid, and with 25 % and 100 % formic acid on-plate extractions. When all methods were included, VITEK MS correctly identified 113 (96.6 %) isolates after 24 h with one misidentification, and Biotyper correctly identified 77 (65.8 %) isolates using a threshold of ≥2.0 with no misidentifications. Using a revised threshold of ≥1.7, Biotyper correctly identified 103 (88.0 %) isolates, with 3 (2.6 %) misidentifications. For both platforms, the number of identifications was significantly increased using a formic acid overlay (VITEK MS, p < 0.01; Biotyper, p < 0.001), and reducing the Biotyper threshold from ≥2.0 to ≥1.7 significantly increased the rate of identification (p < 0.001). The data in this study demonstrate that the direct smear method with on-plate formic acid extraction can be used for yeast identification on both MS platforms, and more isolates are identified using the VITEK MS system (p < 0.01).

  3. High content analysis platform for optimization of lipid mediated CRISPR-Cas9 delivery strategies in human cells.

    PubMed

    Steyer, Benjamin; Carlson-Stevermer, Jared; Angenent-Mari, Nicolas; Khalil, Andrew; Harkness, Ty; Saha, Krishanu

    2016-04-01

    Non-viral gene-editing of human cells using the CRISPR-Cas9 system requires optimized delivery of multiple components. Both the Cas9 endonuclease and a single guide RNA, that defines the genomic target, need to be present and co-localized within the nucleus for efficient gene-editing to occur. This work describes a new high-throughput screening platform for the optimization of CRISPR-Cas9 delivery strategies. By exploiting high content image analysis and microcontact printed plates, multi-parametric gene-editing outcome data from hundreds to thousands of isolated cell populations can be screened simultaneously. Employing this platform, we systematically screened four commercially available cationic lipid transfection materials with a range of RNAs encoding the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Analysis of Cas9 expression and editing of a fluorescent mCherry reporter transgene within human embryonic kidney cells was monitored over several days after transfection. Design of experiments analysis enabled rigorous evaluation of delivery materials and RNA concentration conditions. The results of this analysis indicated that the concentration and identity of transfection material have significantly greater effect on gene-editing than ratio or total amount of RNA. Cell subpopulation analysis on microcontact printed plates, further revealed that low cell number and high Cas9 expression, 24h after CRISPR-Cas9 delivery, were strong predictors of gene-editing outcomes. These results suggest design principles for the development of materials and transfection strategies with lipid-based materials. This platform could be applied to rapidly optimize materials for gene-editing in a variety of cell/tissue types in order to advance genomic medicine, regenerative biology and drug discovery. CRISPR-Cas9 is a new gene-editing technology for "genome surgery" that is anticipated to treat genetic diseases. This technology uses multiple components of the Cas9 system to cut out disease-causing mutations

  4. Host phylogeny constrains cross-species emergence and establishment of rabies virus in bats.

    PubMed

    Streicker, Daniel G; Turmelle, Amy S; Vonhof, Maarten J; Kuzmin, Ivan V; McCracken, Gary F; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2010-08-06

    For RNA viruses, rapid viral evolution and the biological similarity of closely related host species have been proposed as key determinants of the occurrence and long-term outcome of cross-species transmission. Using a data set of hundreds of rabies viruses sampled from 23 North American bat species, we present a general framework to quantify per capita rates of cross-species transmission and reconstruct historical patterns of viral establishment in new host species using molecular sequence data. These estimates demonstrate diminishing frequencies of both cross-species transmission and host shifts with increasing phylogenetic distance between bat species. Evolutionary constraints on viral host range indicate that host species barriers may trump the intrinsic mutability of RNA viruses in determining the fate of emerging host-virus interactions.

  5. Harnessing cross-species alignment to discover SNPs and generate a draft genome sequence of a bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis).

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua M; Moore, Stephen S; Stothard, Paul; Liao, Xiaoping; Coltman, David W

    2015-05-20

    Whole genome sequences (WGS) have proliferated as sequencing technology continues to improve and costs decline. While many WGS of model or domestic organisms have been produced, a growing number of non-model species are also being sequenced. In the absence of a reference, construction of a genome sequence necessitates de novo assembly which may be beyond the ability of many labs due to the large volumes of raw sequence data and extensive bioinformatics required. In contrast, the presence of a reference WGS allows for alignment which is more tractable than assembly. Recent work has highlighted that the reference need not come from the same species, potentially enabling a wide array of species WGS to be constructed using cross-species alignment. Here we report on the creation a draft WGS from a single bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) using alignment to the closely related domestic sheep (Ovis aries). Two sequencing libraries on SOLiD platforms yielded over 865 million reads, and combined alignment to the domestic sheep reference resulted in a nearly complete sequence (95% coverage of the reference) at an average of 12x read depth (104 SD). From this we discovered over 15 million variants and annotated them relative to the domestic sheep reference. We then conducted an enrichment analysis of those SNPs showing fixed differences between the reference and sequenced individual and found significant differences in a number of gene ontology (GO) terms, including those associated with reproduction, muscle properties, and bone deposition. Our results demonstrate that cross-species alignment enables the creation of novel WGS for non-model organisms. The bighorn sheep WGS will provide a resource for future resequencing studies or comparative genomics.

  6. Simplified Dynamics and Mobility Factors for Multi-Disciplinary Optimization of an Occupant Centric Platform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Registration No. -Technical Report- U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development , and Engineering Center Detroit Arsenal Warren, Michigan 48397...U.S. Army Tank- automotive and Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) Detroit Arsenal ATTN: RDTA-RS/MS157 6501 East 11...is "the art of finding the best compromise". It is also known as multidisciplinary optimization and multidisciplinary system design optimization

  7. Characterization and optimization of the glucan particle-based vaccine platform.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haibin; Ostroff, Gary R; Lee, Chrono K; Specht, Charles A; Levitz, Stuart M

    2013-10-01

    Glucan particles (GPs) are hollow porous Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell walls that are treated so that they are composed primarily of β-1,3-d-glucans. Our previous studies showed that GPs can serve as an effective vaccine platform. Here, we characterize CD4(+) T-cell and antibody responses in immunized mice as a function of antigen (ovalbumin) encapsulation, antigen dose, particle numbers, time, immunization schedule, and trapping methods. Although we found that GPs served as an effective adjuvant when admixed with free antigens for IgG1 antibody production, stronger CD4(+) T-cell and IgG2c antibody responses were stimulated when antigens were encapsulated inside GPs, suggesting that the GP platform acts as both an adjuvant and a delivery system. Vigorous T-cell and antibody responses were stimulated even at submicrogram antigen doses, as long as the number of GPs was kept at 5 × 10(7) particles per immunization. One prime and one boost were sufficient to elicit robust immune responses. In addition, strong antigen-specific antibody and T-cell responses prevailed up to 20 months following the last immunization, including those of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin 17A (IL-17A), and dual IFN-γ/IL-17A-secreting CD4(+) T cells. Finally, robust immune responses were observed using generally recognized as safe (GRAS) materials (alginate and calcium, with or without chitosan) to trap antigens within GPs. Thus, these studies demonstrate that antigens encapsulated into GPs make an effective vaccine platform that combines adjuvanticity and antigen delivery to elicit strong durable immune responses at relatively low antigen doses using translationally relevant formulations.

  8. A neuron-based screening platform for optimizing genetically-encoded calcium indicators.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Trevor J; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Schreiter, Eric R; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Fosque, Benjamin F; Behnam, Reza; Shields, Brenda C; Ramirez, Melissa; Kimmel, Bruce E; Kerr, Rex A; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein-based sensors for detecting neuronal activity have been developed largely based on non-neuronal screening systems. However, the dynamics of neuronal state variables (e.g., voltage, calcium, etc.) are typically very rapid compared to those of non-excitable cells. We developed an electrical stimulation and fluorescence imaging platform based on dissociated rat primary neuronal cultures. We describe its use in testing genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). Efficient neuronal GECI expression was achieved using lentiviruses containing a neuronal-selective gene promoter. Action potentials (APs) and thus neuronal calcium levels were quantitatively controlled by electrical field stimulation, and fluorescence images were recorded. Images were segmented to extract fluorescence signals corresponding to individual GECI-expressing neurons, which improved sensitivity over full-field measurements. We demonstrate the superiority of screening GECIs in neurons compared with solution measurements. Neuronal screening was useful for efficient identification of variants with both improved response kinetics and high signal amplitudes. This platform can be used to screen many types of sensors with cellular resolution under realistic conditions where neuronal state variables are in relevant ranges with respect to timing and amplitude.

  9. A Neuron-Based Screening Platform for Optimizing Genetically-Encoded Calcium Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Eric R.; Hasseman, Jeremy P.; Tsegaye, Getahun; Fosque, Benjamin F.; Behnam, Reza; Shields, Brenda C.; Ramirez, Melissa; Kimmel, Bruce E.; Kerr, Rex A.; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L.; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein-based sensors for detecting neuronal activity have been developed largely based on non-neuronal screening systems. However, the dynamics of neuronal state variables (e.g., voltage, calcium, etc.) are typically very rapid compared to those of non-excitable cells. We developed an electrical stimulation and fluorescence imaging platform based on dissociated rat primary neuronal cultures. We describe its use in testing genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). Efficient neuronal GECI expression was achieved using lentiviruses containing a neuronal-selective gene promoter. Action potentials (APs) and thus neuronal calcium levels were quantitatively controlled by electrical field stimulation, and fluorescence images were recorded. Images were segmented to extract fluorescence signals corresponding to individual GECI-expressing neurons, which improved sensitivity over full-field measurements. We demonstrate the superiority of screening GECIs in neurons compared with solution measurements. Neuronal screening was useful for efficient identification of variants with both improved response kinetics and high signal amplitudes. This platform can be used to screen many types of sensors with cellular resolution under realistic conditions where neuronal state variables are in relevant ranges with respect to timing and amplitude. PMID:24155972

  10. Optimal Defaults in the Prevention of Pediatric Obesity: From Platform to Practice

    PubMed Central

    Radnitz, Cynthia; Loeb, Katharine L; DiMatteo, Julie; Keller, Kathleen L.; Zucker, Nancy; Schwartz, Marlene B.

    2014-01-01

    The term “optimal defaults” refers to imparting pre-selected choices which are designed to produce a desired behavior change. The concept is attractive to policymakers because it steers people toward desirable behaviors while preserving free choice through the ability to opt out. It has been found to be a powerful behavioral determinant in areas such as pension plan enrollment, organ donation, and green energy utilization. We discuss how optimal defaults can be applied to pediatric obesity prevention in several domains including public policy, institutional, private sector, and home environment. Although there are obstacles to overcome in implementing optimal defaults, it is a promising component to incorporate in a multi-level strategy for preventing pediatric obesity. PMID:25328903

  11. Optimization of flow assisted entrapment of pollen grains in a microfluidic platform for tip growth analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanati Nezhad, Amir; Ghanbari, Mahmood; Agudelo, Carlos G; Naghavi, Mahsa; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Bhat, Rama B; Geitmann, Anja

    2014-02-01

    A biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) biomicrofluidic platform is designed, fabricated and tested to study protuberance growth of single plant cells in a micro-vitro environment. The design consists of an inlet to introduce the cell suspension into the chip, three outlets to conduct the medium or cells out of the chip, a main distribution chamber and eight microchannels connected to the main chamber to guide the growth of tip growing plant cells. The test cells used here were pollen grains which produce cylindrical protrusions called pollen tubes. The goal was to adjust the design of the microfluidic network with the aim to enhance the uniformly distributed positioning of pollen grains at the entrances of the microchannels and to provide identical fluid flow conditions for growing pollen tubes along each microchannel. Computational fluid analysis and experimental testing were carried out to estimate the trapping efficiencies of the different designs.

  12. Next-generation simulation and optimization platform for forest management and analysis

    Treesearch

    Antti Makinen; Jouni Kalliovirta; Jussi Rasinmaki

    2009-01-01

    Late developments in the objectives and the data collection methods of forestry create new challenges and possibilities in forest management planning. Tools in forest management and forest planning systems must be able to make good use of novel data sources, use new models, and solve complex forest planning tasks at different scales. The SIMulation and Optimization (...

  13. Computational and experimental platform for understanding and optimizing water flux and salt rejection in nanoporous membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan B.

    2010-09-01

    Affordable clean water is both a global and a national security issue as lack of it can cause death, disease, and international tension. Furthermore, efficient water filtration reduces the demand for energy, another national issue. The best current solution to clean water lies in reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that remove salts from water with applied pressure, but widely used polymeric membrane technology is energy intensive and produces water depleted in useful electrolytes. Furthermore incremental improvements, based on engineering solutions rather than new materials, have yielded only modest gains in performance over the last 25 years. We have pursued a creative and innovative new approach to membrane design and development for cheap desalination membranes by approaching the problem at the molecular level of pore design. Our inspiration comes from natural biological channels, which permit faster water transport than current reverse osmosis membranes and selectively pass healthy ions. Aiming for an order-of-magnitude improvement over mature polymer technology carries significant inherent risks. The success of our fundamental research effort lies in our exploiting, extending, and integrating recent advances by our team in theory, modeling, nano-fabrication and platform development. A combined theoretical and experimental platform has been developed to understand the interplay between water flux and ion rejection in precisely-defined nano-channels. Our innovative functionalization of solid state nanoporous membranes with organic protein-mimetic polymers achieves 3-fold improvement in water flux over commercial RO membranes and has yielded a pending patent and industrial interest. Our success has generated useful contributions to energy storage, nanoscience, and membrane technology research and development important for national health and prosperity.

  14. A computer simulation platform for the optimization of a breast tomosynthesis system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Wei

    2007-03-01

    In breast tomosynthesis there is a compromise between resolution, noise, and acquisition speed for a given glandular dose. The purpose of the present work is to develop a simulation platform to investigate the potential imaging performance for the many possible tomosynthesis system configurations. The simulation platform was used to investigate the dependence of image blur and signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) for several different tomosynthesis acquisition configurations. Simulated projections of a slanted thin tungsten wire placed in different object planes were modified according to the detector's modulation transfer function (MTF), with or without pixel binning. In addition, the focal spot blur (FSB), which depends on the location of the wire, the system geometry, the source-detector movement speed, and the exposure time, was also incorporated into the projections. Both expectation maximization (EM) and filtered back projection (FBP) based algorithms were used for 3D image reconstruction. The in-plane MTF was calculated from the reconstructed image of the wire. To evaluate the noise performance, simulated noiseless projections of calcification and tumor in uniform breast tissue were modified with the noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from a cascaded linear system model for the detector for a given x-ray dose. The SDNR of the reconstructed images was calculated with different tomosynthesis configurations, e.g., pixel binning, view number, and angular range. Our results showed that for a source-to-imager distance (SID) of 66 cm, pixel binning (2 x 2) caused more degradation to the in-plane MTF than the blur caused by the moving focal spot and reconstruction. The in-depth resolution can be improved by increasing the angular range.

  15. A computer simulation platform for the optimization of a breast tomosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jun; Zhao Bo; Zhao Wei

    2007-03-15

    In breast tomosynthesis there is a compromise between resolution, noise, and acquisition speed for a given glandular dose. The purpose of the present work is to develop a simulation platform to investigate the potential imaging performance for the many possible tomosynthesis system configurations. The simulation platform was used to investigate the dependence of image blur and signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) for several different tomosynthesis acquisition configurations. Simulated projections of a slanted thin tungsten wire placed in different object planes were modified according to the detector's modulation transfer function (MTF), with or without pixel binning. In addition, the focal spot blur (FSB), which depends on the location of the wire, the system geometry, the source-detector movement speed, and the exposure time, was also incorporated into the projections. Both expectation maximization (EM) and filtered back projection (FBP) based algorithms were used for 3D image reconstruction. The in-plane MTF was calculated from the reconstructed image of the wire. To evaluate the noise performance, simulated noiseless projections of calcification and tumor in uniform breast tissue were modified with the noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from a cascaded linear system model for the detector for a given x-ray dose. The SDNR of the reconstructed images was calculated with different tomosynthesis configurations, e.g., pixel binning, view number, and angular range. Our results showed that for a source-to-imager distance (SID) of 66 cm, pixel binning (2x2) caused more degradation to the in-plane MTF than the blur caused by the moving focal spot and reconstruction. The in-depth resolution can be improved by increasing the angular range.

  16. Implementation of a genetically tuned neural platform in optimizing fluorescence from receptor-ligand binding interactions on microchips.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Judith; Hanrahan, Grady; Nguyen, Huong T H; Gomez, Frank A

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the use of a genetically tuned neural network platform to optimize the fluorescence realized upon binding 5-carboxyfluorescein-D-Ala-D-Ala-D-Ala (5-FAM-(D-Ala)(3) ) (1) to the antibiotic teicoplanin from Actinoplanes teichomyceticus electrostatically attached to a microfluidic channel originally modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Here, three parameters: (i) the length of time teicoplanin was in the microchannel; (ii) the length of time 1 was in the microchannel, thereby, in equilibrium with teicoplanin, and; (iii) the amount of time buffer was flushed through the microchannel to wash out any unbound 1 remaining in the channel, are examined at a constant concentration of 1, with neural network methodology applied to optimize fluorescence. Optimal neural structure provided a best fit model, both for the training set (r(2) = 0.985) and testing set (r(2) = 0.967) data. Simulated results were experimentally validated demonstrating efficiency of the neural network approach and proved superior to the use of multiple linear regression and neural networks using standard back propagation.

  17. Ecological dynamics of influenza A viruses: cross-species transmission and global migration

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongguang; Jin, Yuan; Hu, Mingda; Zhou, Jing; Song, Ting; Huang, Zhisong; Li, Beiping; Li, Kaiwu; Zhou, Wei; Dai, Hongmei; Shi, Weifeng; Yue, Junjie; Liang, Long

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive study of cross-species transmission and inter-regional migration would provide insights into the global ecology of influenza A viruses (IAVs). To this end, we assembled 17,241 non-redundant IAV whole-genome sequences with complete epidemiological information. We hierarchically divided the movements of IAVs into the cross-species transmission in each region and the inter-regional migration driven by each host species. We then systematically identified the potential cross-species transmission and inter-regional migration events. Cross-species transmission networks were obtained for each gene segment of the IAVs. Waterfowl, domestic birds and swine showed higher degrees of connection than did other species in all of the transmission networks. East Asia and Southeast Asia were hot regions for avian-mammal transmissions. Swine and migratory birds were the dominant species for global virus delivery. The importance of swine was reemphasized because it has not only provided an environment for adaptive evolution during the avian-human transmission of IAVs (as incubators) but also served as a key species for the global dissemination of the viruses (as carriers). Therefore, monitoring the global live trade of swine and survey of migratory birds along flyways would be beneficial for the prevention and control of IAVs. PMID:27827462

  18. Cross-species gene-family fluctuations reveal the dynamics of horizontal transfers.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Jacopo; Romano, Mariacristina; Bassetti, Federico; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Prokaryotes vary their protein repertoire mainly through horizontal transfer and gene loss. To elucidate the links between these processes and the cross-species gene-family statistics, we perform a large-scale data analysis of the cross-species variability of gene-family abundance (the number of members of the family found on a given genome). We find that abundance fluctuations are related to the rate of horizontal transfers. This is rationalized by a minimal theoretical model, which predicts this link. The families that are not captured by the model show abundance profiles that are markedly peaked around a mean value, possibly because of specific abundance selection. Based on these results, we define an abundance variability index that captures a family's evolutionary behavior (and thus some of its relevant functional properties) purely based on its cross-species abundance fluctuations. Analysis and model, combined, show a quantitative link between cross-species family abundance statistics and horizontal transfer dynamics, which can be used to analyze genome 'flux'. Groups of families with different values of the abundance variability index correspond to genome sub-parts having different plasticity in terms of the level of horizontal exchange allowed by natural selection. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Cross-species gene-family fluctuations reveal the dynamics of horizontal transfers

    PubMed Central

    Grilli, Jacopo; Romano, Mariacristina; Bassetti, Federico; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotes vary their protein repertoire mainly through horizontal transfer and gene loss. To elucidate the links between these processes and the cross-species gene-family statistics, we perform a large-scale data analysis of the cross-species variability of gene-family abundance (the number of members of the family found on a given genome). We find that abundance fluctuations are related to the rate of horizontal transfers. This is rationalized by a minimal theoretical model, which predicts this link. The families that are not captured by the model show abundance profiles that are markedly peaked around a mean value, possibly because of specific abundance selection. Based on these results, we define an abundance variability index that captures a family's evolutionary behavior (and thus some of its relevant functional properties) purely based on its cross-species abundance fluctuations. Analysis and model, combined, show a quantitative link between cross-species family abundance statistics and horizontal transfer dynamics, which can be used to analyze genome ‘flux’. Groups of families with different values of the abundance variability index correspond to genome sub-parts having different plasticity in terms of the level of horizontal exchange allowed by natural selection. PMID:24829449

  20. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  1. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  2. Identification of Simple Sequence Repeat Biomarkers through Cross-Species Comparison in a Tag Cloud Representation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are not only applied as genetic markers in evolutionary studies but they also play an important role in gene regulatory activities. Efficient identification of conserved and exclusive SSRs through cross-species comparison is helpful for understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and associations between specific gene groups and SSR motifs. In this paper, we developed an online cross-species comparative system and integrated it with a tag cloud visualization technique for identifying potential SSR biomarkers within fourteen frequently used model species. Ultraconserved or exclusive SSRs among cross-species orthologous genes could be effectively retrieved and displayed through a friendly interface design. Four different types of testing cases were applied to demonstrate and verify the retrieved SSR biomarker candidates. Through statistical analysis and enhanced tag cloud representation on defined functional related genes and cross-species clusters, the proposed system can correctly represent the patterns, loci, colors, and sizes of identified SSRs in accordance with gene functions, pattern qualities, and conserved characteristics among species. PMID:24800246

  3. Cross-species amplification and optimization of microsatellite markers for use in six Neotropical parrots.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Kara J; Waits, Lisette P

    2008-07-01

    Short amplicon primers were redesigned for 17 microsatellite loci developed in St. Vincent's Amazon and six loci developed in blue-and-yellow macaw and tested using six species of Neotropical parrot. Polymorphism was observed at 12 loci in blue-and-yellow macaw, 10 in red-and-green macaw, 11 in scarlet macaw, 10 in chestnut-fronted macaw, 11 in red-bellied macaw and 16 in mealy parrot. Number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 23 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.05 to 0.95. The resulting multiplexed loci will be useful in evaluating genetic diversity, genetic structure and mating system in Neotropical parrots.

  4. The stentable in vitro artery: an instrumented platform for endovascular device development and optimization.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Elizabeth E; Cornat, François P; Barakat, Abdul I

    2016-12-01

    Although vascular disease is a leading cause of mortality, in vitro tools for controlled, quantitative studies of vascular biological processes in an environment that reflects physiological complexity remain limited. We developed a novel in vitro artery that exhibits a number of unique features distinguishing it from tissue-engineered or organ-on-a-chip constructs, most notably that it allows deployment of endovascular devices including stents, quantitative real-time tracking of cellular responses and detailed measurement of flow velocity and lumenal shear stress using particle image velocimetry. The wall of the stentable in vitro artery consists of an annular collagen hydrogel containing smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and whose lumenal surface is lined with a monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs). The system has in vivo dimensions and physiological flow conditions and allows automated high-resolution live imaging of both SMCs and ECs. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, we imaged and quantified EC wound healing, SMC motility and altered shear stresses on the endothelium after deployment of a coronary stent. The stentable in vitro artery provides a unique platform suited for a broad array of research applications. Wide-scale adoption of this system promises to enhance our understanding of important biological events affecting endovascular device performance and to reduce dependence on animal studies. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Clinical significance of EpCAM mRNA-positive circulating tumor cells in hepatocellular carcinoma by an optimized negative enrichment and qRT-PCR-based platform.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Yang, Xin-Rong; Sun, Yun-Fan; Shen, Min-Na; Ma, Xiao-Lu; Wu, Jiong; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yang; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia

    2014-09-15

    This study aimed to construct a novel platform for the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to investigate the clinical significance of epithelial cell adhesion molecule mRNA-positive (EpCAM(mRNA+)) CTCs using this platform. An optimized platform for CTC detection was constructed by evaluating different negative enrichment, mRNA isolation, and cDNA synthesis procedures and compared with the CellSearch system. A total of 299 patients with HCC were recruited into this prospective study; of these, 157 who received curative resection, 76 who received transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), and 66 who received radiotherapy were tested using our platform. The diagnostic value of EpCAM(mRNA+) CTCs was investigated in 122 patients with HCC who underwent resection and 120 control subjects. The optimized negative enrichment and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based CTC detection platform had high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility and a low sample volume requirement. This platform showed a potential diagnostic value in patients with HCC and exhibited 76.7% consistency with the CellSearch system (r = 0.54, P < 0.050). Pretreatment CTC level showed prognostic significance in patients with HCC treated with resection, TACE, and radiotherapy (all P < 0.050). Most of the patients showed a decrease in CTC levels after treatment that reflected tumor response. In contrast, patients with an increased CTC level showed disease progression after treatment. We established an optimized platform based on negative enrichment and qRT-PCR for highly sensitive, specific, and reproducible CTC detection. This platform might be clinically useful in auxiliary diagnosis, treatment response assessment, and early decision-making to tailor the most effective antitumor strategies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Optimization of techniques for multiple platform testing in small, precious samples such as human chorionic villus sampling.

    PubMed

    Pisarska, Margareta D; Akhlaghpour, Marzieh; Lee, Bora; Barlow, Gillian M; Xu, Ning; Wang, Erica T; Mackey, Aaron J; Farber, Charles R; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-der I; Goodarzi, Mark O; Guller, Seth; Williams, John

    2016-11-01

    Multiple testing to understand global changes in gene expression based on genetic and epigenetic modifications is evolving. Chorionic villi, obtained for prenatal testing, is limited, but can be used to understand ongoing human pregnancies. However, optimal storage, processing and utilization of CVS for multiple platform testing have not been established. Leftover CVS samples were flash-frozen or preserved in RNAlater. Modifications to standard isolation kits were performed to isolate quality DNA and RNA from samples as small as 2-5 mg. RNAlater samples had significantly higher RNA yields and quality and were successfully used in microarray and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq libraries generated using 200 versus 800-ng RNA showed similar biological coefficients of variation. RNAlater samples had lower DNA yields and quality, which improved by heating the elution buffer to 70 °C. Purification of DNA was not necessary for bisulfite-conversion and genome-wide methylation profiling. CVS cells were propagated and continue to express genes found in freshly isolated chorionic villi. CVS samples preserved in RNAlater are superior. Our optimized techniques provide specimens for genetic, epigenetic and gene expression studies from a single small sample which can be used to develop diagnostics and treatments using a systems biology approach in the prenatal period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. An optimized five-gene multi-platform predictor of hormone receptor negative and triple negative breast cancer metastatic risk.

    PubMed

    Yau, Christina; Sninsky, John; Kwok, Shirley; Wang, Alice; Degnim, Amy; Ingle, James N; Gillett, Cheryl; Tutt, Andrew; Waldman, Fred; Moore, Dan; Esserman, Laura; Benz, Christopher C

    2013-01-01

    Outcome predictors in use today are prognostic only for hormone receptor-positive (HRpos) breast cancer. Although microarray-derived multigene predictors of hormone receptor-negative (HRneg) and/or triple negative (Tneg) breast cancer recurrence risk are emerging, to date none have been transferred to clinically suitable assay platforms (for example, RT-PCR) or validated against formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) HRneg/Tneg samples. Multiplexed RT-PCR was used to assay two microarray-derived HRneg/Tneg prognostic signatures IR-7 and Buck-4) in a pooled FFPE collection of 139 chemotherapy-naïve HRneg breast cancers. The prognostic value of the RTPCR measured gene signatures were evaluated as continuous and dichotomous variables, and in conditional risk models incorporating clinical parameters. An optimized five-gene index was derived by evaluating gene combinations from both signatures. RT-PCR measured IR-7 and Buck-4 signatures proved prognostic as continuous variables; and conditional risk modeling chose nodal status, the IR-7 signature, and tumor grade as significant predictors of distant recurrence (DR). From the Buck-4 and IR-7 signatures, an optimized five-gene (TNFRSF17, CLIC5, HLA-F, CXCL13, XCL2) predictor was generated, referred to as the Integrated Cytokine Score (ICS) based on its functional pathway linkage through interferon-γ and IL-10. Across all FFPE cases, the ICS was prognostic as either a continuous or dichotomous variable, and conditional risk modeling selected nodal status and ICS as DR predictors. Further dichotomization of node-negative/ICS-low FFPE cases identified a subset of low-grade HRneg tumors with <10% 5-year DR risk. The prognostic value of ICS was reaffirmed in two previously studied microarray assayed cohorts containing 274 node-negative and chemotherapy naive HRneg breast cancers, including 95 Tneg cases where it proved prognostically independent of Tneg molecular subtyping. In additional HRneg/Tneg microarray assayed

  8. Implementation and optimization of sub-pixel motion estimation on BWDSP platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shangzhu; Lang, Wenhui; Zeng, Feiyang; Liu, Yufu

    2017-08-01

    Sub-pixel Motion estimation algorithm is a key technology in video coding inter-frame prediction algorithm, which has important influence on video coding performance. In the latest video coding standard H.265/HEVC, interpolation filters based on DCT are used to Sub-pixel motion estimation, but it has very high computation complexity. In order to ensure the real-time performance of hardware coding, we combine the characteristics of BWDSP architecture, using code level optimization techniques to realize the sub-pixel motion estimation algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate that In the BWDSP simulation environment, the proposed method significantly decreases the running clock cycle and thus improves the performance of the encoder.

  9. Drug Target Optimization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Using Innovative Computational Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ryan; Hall, Benjamin A.; Benque, David; Cook, Byron; Ishtiaq, Samin; Piterman, Nir; Taylor, Alex; Vardi, Moshe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Gottgens, Berthold; Fisher, Jasmin

    2015-02-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) represents a paradigm for the wider cancer field. Despite the fact that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have established targeted molecular therapy in CML, patients often face the risk of developing drug resistance, caused by mutations and/or activation of alternative cellular pathways. To optimize drug development, one needs to systematically test all possible combinations of drug targets within the genetic network that regulates the disease. The BioModelAnalyzer (BMA) is a user-friendly computational tool that allows us to do exactly that. We used BMA to build a CML network-model composed of 54 nodes linked by 104 interactions that encapsulates experimental data collected from 160 publications. While previous studies were limited by their focus on a single pathway or cellular process, our executable model allowed us to probe dynamic interactions between multiple pathways and cellular outcomes, suggest new combinatorial therapeutic targets, and highlight previously unexplored sensitivities to Interleukin-3.

  10. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Cross-Species Transmission: Implications for Emergence of New Lentiviral Infections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin; Malmberg, Jennifer L; Wood, Britta A; Hladky, Sahaja; Troyer, Ryan; Roelke, Melody; Cunningham, Mark; McBride, Roy; Vickers, Winston; Boyce, Walter; Boydston, Erin; Serieys, Laurel; Riley, Seth; Crooks, Kevin; VandeWoude, Sue

    2017-03-01

    Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emergence following human exposures to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an understanding of processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) for a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study, we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- versus intraspecies transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analyses of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrate that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to that in bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but we did not detect selection among 20 PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support the hypothesis that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals that intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers (Puma concolor coryi) in Florida following the initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to the emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates.IMPORTANCE Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine which outcome

  11. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Cross-Species Transmission: Implications for Emergence of New Lentiviral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Malmberg, Jennifer L.; Wood, Britta A.; Hladky, Sahaja; Troyer, Ryan; Roelke, Melody; Cunningham, Mark; McBride, Roy; Vickers, Winston; Boyce, Walter; Boydston, Erin; Serieys, Laurel; Riley, Seth; Crooks, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emergence following human exposures to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an understanding of processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) for a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study, we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- versus intraspecies transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analyses of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrate that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to that in bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but we did not detect selection among 20 PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support the hypothesis that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals that intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers (Puma concolor coryi) in Florida following the initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to the emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates. IMPORTANCE Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine

  12. Feline immunodeficiency virus cross-species transmission: Implications for emergence of new lentiviral infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Justin; Malmberg, Jennifer L.; Wood, Britta A.; Hladky, Sahaja; Troyer, Ryan; Roelke, Melody; Cunningham, Mark W.; McBride, Roy; Vickers, Winston; Boyce, Walter; Boydston, Erin E.; Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Riley, Seth P D; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of HIV emergence following human exposures to SIV, understanding processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We have previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- vs. intra-species transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analysis of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrates that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but did not detect selection among twenty PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus, which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers (Puma concolor coryi) in Florida following initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates.IMPORTANCE Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine which outcome will occur are complex, and the risk of new virus emergence is therefore difficult to predict. Here

  13. Lyophilized phytosomal nanocarriers as platforms for enhanced diosmin delivery: optimization and ex vivo permeation

    PubMed Central

    Freag, May S; Elnaggar, Yosra SR; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2013-01-01

    Diosmin (DSN) is an outstanding phlebotonic flavonoid with a tolerable potential for the treatment of colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. Being highly insoluble, DSN bioavailability suffers from high inter-subject variation due to variable degrees of permeation. This work endeavored to develop novel DSN loaded phytosomes in order to improve drug dissolution and intestinal permeability. Three preparation methods (solvent evaporation, salting out, and lyophilization) were compared. Nanocarrier optimization encompassed different soybean phospholipid (SPC) types, different solvents, and different DSN:SPC molar ratios (1:1, 1:2, and 1:4). In vitro appraisal encompassed differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, transmission electron microscopy, drug content, and in vitro stability. Comparative dissolution studies were performed under sink versus non-sink conditions. Ex vivo intestinal permeation studies were performed on rats utilizing noneverted sac technique and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The results revealed lyophilization as the optimum preparation technique using SPC and solvent mixture (Dimethyl sulphoxide:t-butylalchol) in a 1:2 ratio. Complex formation was contended by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared data. Optimal lyophilized phytosomal nanocarriers (LPNs) exhibited the lowest particle size (316 nm), adequate zeta-potential (−27 mV), and good in vitro stability. Well formed, discrete vesicles were revealed by transmission electron microscopy, drug content, and in vitro stability. Comparative dissolution studies were performed. LPNs demonstrated significant enhancement in DSN dissolution compared to crude drug, physical mixture, and generic and brand DSN products. Permeation studies revealed 80% DSN permeated from LPNs via oxygenated rat intestine compared to non-detectable amounts from suspension. In this study, LPNs (99% drug loading) could be successfully

  14. Engineering of a novel optimized platform for sublingual delivery with novel characterization tools: in vitro evaluation and in vivo pharmacokinetics study in human.

    PubMed

    Morsi, Nadia M; Abdelbary, Ghada A; Elshafeey, Ahmed H; Ahmed, M Abdallah

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a novel and more efficient platform for sublingual drug delivery using mosapride citrate (MSP) as a model drug. The engineering of this delivery system had two stages, the first stage was tuning of MSP physicochemical properties by complexation with pure phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylinositol enriched soybean lecithin to form MSP-phospholipid complex (MSP-PLCP). Changes in physicochemical properties were assessed and the optimum MSP-PLCP formula was then used for formulation into a flushing resistant platform using two mucoadhesive polymers; sodium alginates and sodium carboxymethylcellulose at different concentrations. Design of experiment approach was used to characterize and optimize the formulated flushing resistant platform. The optimized formulation was then used in a comparative pharmacokinetics study with the market formulation in human volunteers. Results showed a marked change in MSP physicochemical properties of MSP-PLCP compared to MSP. Addition of mucoadhesive polymers to flushing resistant platform at an optimum concentration balanced between desired mucoadhesive properties and a reasonable drug release rate. The optimized formulation showed significantly a superior bioavailability in humans when compared to the market sublingual product. Finally, the novel developed sublingual flushing resistant platform offers a very promising and efficient tool to extend the use of sublingual route and widen its applications.

  15. Cross-Species Comparison of the Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei Quorum-Sensing Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Matthew C.; Bunt, Richard; Hayden, Hillary S.; Bydalek, Ryland

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei (the Bptm group) are close relatives with very different lifestyles: B. pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen, B. thailandensis is a nonpathogenic saprophyte, and B. mallei is a host-restricted pathogen. The acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing (QS) systems of these three species show a high level of conservation. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to define the quorum-sensing regulon in each species, and we performed a cross-species analysis of the QS-controlled orthologs. Our analysis revealed a core set of QS-regulated genes in all three species, as well as QS-controlled factors shared by only two species or unique to a given species. This global survey of the QS regulons of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and B. mallei serves as a platform for predicting which QS-controlled processes might be important in different bacterial niches and contribute to the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. PMID:25182491

  16. Optimization of multiplexed PCR on an integrated microfluidic forensic platform for rapid DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Estes, Matthew D; Yang, Jianing; Duane, Brett; Smith, Stan; Brooks, Carla; Nordquist, Alan; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2012-12-07

    This study reports the design, prototyping, and assay development of multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a plastic microfluidic device. Amplification of 17 DNA loci is carried out directly on-chip as part of a system for continuous workflow processing from sample preparation (SP) to capillary electrophoresis (CE). For enhanced performance of on-chip PCR amplification, improved control systems have been developed making use of customized Peltier assemblies, valve actuators, software, and amplification chemistry protocols. Multiple enhancements to the microfluidic chip design have been enacted to improve the reliability of sample delivery through the various on-chip modules. This work has been enabled by the encapsulation of PCR reagents into a solid phase material through an optimized Solid Phase Encapsulating Assay Mix (SPEAM) bead-based hydrogel fabrication process. SPEAM bead technology is reliably coupled with precise microfluidic metering and dispensing for efficient amplification and subsequent DNA short tandem repeat (STR) fragment analysis. This provides a means of on-chip reagent storage suitable for microfluidic automation, with the long shelf-life necessary for point-of-care (POC) or field deployable applications. This paper reports the first high quality 17-plex forensic STR amplification from a reference sample in a microfluidic chip with preloaded solid phase reagents, that is designed for integration with up and downstream processing.

  17. A modular and adaptive mass spectrometry-based platform for support of bioprocess development toward optimal host cell protein clearance.

    PubMed

    Walker, Donald E; Yang, Feng; Carver, Joseph; Joe, Koman; Michels, David A; Yu, X Christopher

    2017-03-27

    A modular and adaptive mass spectrometry (MS)-based platform was developed to provide fast, robust and sensitive host cell protein (HCP) analytics to support process development. This platform relies on one-dimensional ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (1D UHPLC) combined with several different MS data acquisition strategies to meet the needs of purification process development. The workflow was designed to allow HCP composition and quantitation for up to 20 samples per day, a throughput considered essential for real time bioprocess development support. With data-dependent acquisition (DDA), the 1D UHPLC-MS/MS method had excellent speed and demonstrated robustness in detecting unknown HCPs at ≥ 50 ng/mg (ppm) level. Combining 1D UHPLC with sequential window acquisition of all theoretical spectra (SWATH) MS enabled simultaneous detection and quantitation of all HCPs in single-digit ng/mg range within 1 hour, demonstrating for the first time the benefit of SWATH MS as a technique for HCP analysis. As another alternative, a targeted MS approach can be used to track the clearance of specific known HCP under various process conditions. This study highlights the importance of designing a robust LC-MS/MS workflow that not only allows HCP discovery, but also affords greatly improved process knowledge and capability in HCP removal. As an orthogonal and complementary detection approach to traditional HCP analysis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the reported LC-MS/MS workflow supports the development of bioprocesses with optimal HCP clearance and the production of safe and high quality therapeutic biopharmaceuticals.

  18. "Controlled, cross-species dataset for exploring biases in genome annotation and modification profiles".

    PubMed

    McAfee, Alison; Michaud, Sarah; Foster, Leonard J

    2015-12-01

    Since the sequencing of the honey bee genome, proteomics by mass spectrometry has become increasingly popular for biological analyses of this insect; but we have observed that the number of honey bee protein identifications is consistently low compared to other organisms [1]. In this dataset, we use nanoelectrospray ionization-coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) to systematically investigate the root cause of low honey bee proteome coverage. To this end, we present here data from three key experiments: a controlled, cross-species analyses of samples from Apis mellifera, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens; a proteomic analysis of an individual honey bee whose genome was also sequenced; and a cross-tissue honey bee proteome comparison. The cross-species dataset was interrogated to determine relative proteome coverages between species, and the other two datasets were used to search for polymorphic sequences and to compare protein cleavage profiles, respectively.

  19. Cross-species hybridization of microarrays for studying tumor transcriptome of brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Sung; Kim, Sun Jin; Kim, Seung Wook; Yoon, Se-Lyun; Leem, Sun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Bae; Kim, Soo Mi; Park, Yun-Yong; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Woo, Hyun Goo; Mills, Gordon B; Fidler, Isaiah J; Lee, Ju-Seog

    2011-10-18

    Although the importance of the cellular microenvironment (soil) during invasion and metastasis of cancer cells (seed) has been well-recognized, technical challenges have limited the ability to assess the influence of the microenvironment on cancer cells at the molecular level. Here, we show that an experimental strategy, competitive cross-species hybridization of microarray experiments, can characterize the influence of different microenvironments on cancer cells by independently extracting gene expression data of cancer and host cells when human cancer cells were xenografted into different organ sites of immunocompromised mice. Surprisingly, the analysis of gene expression data showed that the brain microenvironment induces complete reprogramming of metastasized cancer cells, resulting in a gain of neuronal cell characteristics and mimicking neurogenesis during development. We also show that epigenetic changes coincide with transcriptional reprogramming in cancer cells. These observations provide proof of principle for competitive cross-species hybridization of microarray experiments to characterize the effect of the microenvironment on tumor cell behavior.

  20. Vocal learning in Grey parrots: A brief review of perception, production, and cross-species comparisons.

    PubMed

    Pepperberg, Irene M

    2010-10-01

    This chapter briefly reviews what is known-and what remains to be understood-about Grey parrot vocal learning. I review Greys' physical capacities-issues of auditory perception and production-then discuss how these capacities are used in vocal learning and can be recruited for referential communication with humans. I discuss cross-species comparisons where applicable and conclude with a description of recent research that integrates issues of reference, production and perception.

  1. Approaching the Functional Annotation of Fungal Virulence Factors Using Cross-Species Genetic Interaction Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica C. S.; Madhani, Hiten D.

    2012-01-01

    In many human fungal pathogens, genes required for disease remain largely unannotated, limiting the impact of virulence gene discovery efforts. We tested the utility of a cross-species genetic interaction profiling approach to obtain clues to the molecular function of unannotated pathogenicity factors in the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. This approach involves expression of C. neoformans genes of interest in each member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion library, quantification of their impact on growth, and calculation of the cross-species genetic interaction profiles. To develop functional predictions, we computed and analyzed the correlations of these profiles with existing genetic interaction profiles of S. cerevisiae deletion mutants. For C. neoformans LIV7, which has no S. cerevisiae ortholog, this profiling approach predicted an unanticipated role in the Golgi apparatus. Validation studies in C. neoformans demonstrated that Liv7 is a functional Golgi factor where it promotes the suppression of the exposure of a specific immunostimulatory molecule, mannose, on the cell surface, thereby inhibiting phagocytosis. The genetic interaction profile of another pathogenicity gene that lacks an S. cerevisiae ortholog, LIV6, strongly predicted a role in endosome function. This prediction was also supported by studies of the corresponding C. neoformans null mutant. Our results demonstrate the utility of quantitative cross-species genetic interaction profiling for the functional annotation of fungal pathogenicity proteins of unknown function including, surprisingly, those that are not conserved in sequence across fungi. PMID:23300468

  2. Approaching the functional annotation of fungal virulence factors using cross-species genetic interaction profiling.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica C S; Madhani, Hiten D

    2012-01-01

    In many human fungal pathogens, genes required for disease remain largely unannotated, limiting the impact of virulence gene discovery efforts. We tested the utility of a cross-species genetic interaction profiling approach to obtain clues to the molecular function of unannotated pathogenicity factors in the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. This approach involves expression of C. neoformans genes of interest in each member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion library, quantification of their impact on growth, and calculation of the cross-species genetic interaction profiles. To develop functional predictions, we computed and analyzed the correlations of these profiles with existing genetic interaction profiles of S. cerevisiae deletion mutants. For C. neoformans LIV7, which has no S. cerevisiae ortholog, this profiling approach predicted an unanticipated role in the Golgi apparatus. Validation studies in C. neoformans demonstrated that Liv7 is a functional Golgi factor where it promotes the suppression of the exposure of a specific immunostimulatory molecule, mannose, on the cell surface, thereby inhibiting phagocytosis. The genetic interaction profile of another pathogenicity gene that lacks an S. cerevisiae ortholog, LIV6, strongly predicted a role in endosome function. This prediction was also supported by studies of the corresponding C. neoformans null mutant. Our results demonstrate the utility of quantitative cross-species genetic interaction profiling for the functional annotation of fungal pathogenicity proteins of unknown function including, surprisingly, those that are not conserved in sequence across fungi.

  3. Cross-Species Network Analysis Uncovers Conserved Nitrogen-Regulated Network Modules in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Obertello, Mariana; Shrivastava, Stuti; Katari, Manpreet S.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used a cross-species network approach to uncover nitrogen (N)-regulated network modules conserved across a model and a crop species. By translating gene network knowledge from the data-rich model Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to a crop, rice (Oryza sativa), we identified evolutionarily conserved N-regulatory modules as targets for translational studies to improve N use efficiency in transgenic plants. To uncover such conserved N-regulatory network modules, we first generated an N-regulatory network based solely on rice transcriptome and gene interaction data. Next, we enhanced the network knowledge in the rice N-regulatory network using transcriptome and gene interaction data from Arabidopsis and new data from Arabidopsis and rice plants exposed to the same N treatment conditions. This cross-species network analysis uncovered a set of N-regulated transcription factors (TFs) predicted to target the same genes and network modules in both species. Supernode analysis of the TFs and their targets in these conserved network modules uncovered genes directly related to N use (e.g. N assimilation) and to other shared biological processes indirectly related to N. This cross-species network approach was validated with members of two TF families in the supernode network, BASIC-LEUCINE ZIPPER TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1-TGA and HYPERSENSITIVITY TO LOW PI-ELICITED PRIMARY ROOT SHORTENING1 (HRS1)/HRS1 Homolog family, which have recently been experimentally validated to mediate the N response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26045464

  4. Identification of cross-species shared transcriptional networks of diabetic nephropathy in human and mouse glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Nair, Viji; Zhang, Hongyu; Randolph, Ann; Harris, Raymond C; Nelson, Robert G; Weil, E Jennifer; Cavalcoli, James D; Patel, Jignesh M; Brosius, Frank C; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Murine models are valuable instruments in defining the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), but they only partially recapitulate disease manifestations of human DN, limiting their utility. To define the molecular similarities and differences between human and murine DN, we performed a cross-species comparison of glomerular transcriptional networks. Glomerular gene expression was profiled in patients with early type 2 DN and in three mouse models (streptozotocin DBA/2, C57BLKS db/db, and eNOS-deficient C57BLKS db/db mice). Species-specific transcriptional networks were generated and compared with a novel network-matching algorithm. Three shared human-mouse cross-species glomerular transcriptional networks containing 143 (Human-DBA STZ), 97 (Human-BKS db/db), and 162 (Human-BKS eNOS(-/-) db/db) gene nodes were generated. Shared nodes across all networks reflected established pathogenic mechanisms of diabetes complications, such as elements of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) signaling pathways. In addition, novel pathways not previously associated with DN and cross-species gene nodes and pathways unique to each of the human-mouse networks were discovered. The human-mouse shared glomerular transcriptional networks will assist DN researchers in selecting mouse models most relevant to the human disease process of interest. Moreover, they will allow identification of new pathways shared between mice and humans.

  5. A portable expression resource for engineering cross-species genetic circuits and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Manish; Salis, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic circuits and metabolic pathways can be reengineered to allow organisms to process signals and manufacture useful chemicals. However, their functions currently rely on organism-specific regulatory parts, fragmenting synthetic biology and metabolic engineering into host-specific domains. To unify efforts, here we have engineered a cross-species expression resource that enables circuits and pathways to reuse the same genetic parts, while functioning similarly across diverse organisms. Our engineered system combines mixed feedback control loops and cross-species translation signals to autonomously self-regulate expression of an orthogonal polymerase without host-specific promoters, achieving nontoxic and tuneable gene expression in diverse Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Combining 50 characterized system variants with mechanistic modelling, we show how the cross-species expression resource's dynamics, capacity and toxicity are controlled by the control loops' architecture and feedback strengths. We also demonstrate one application of the resource by reusing the same genetic parts to express a biosynthesis pathway in both model and non-model hosts. PMID:26184393

  6. Initial description of a quantitative, cross-species (chimpanzee-human) social responsiveness measure

    PubMed Central

    Marrus, Natasha; Faughn, Carley; Shuman, Jeremy; Petersen, Steve; Constantino, John; Povinelli, Daniel; Pruett, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Comparative studies of social responsiveness, an ability that is impaired in autistic spectrum disorders, can inform our understanding of both autism and the cognitive architecture of social behavior. Because there is no existing quantitative measure of social responsiveness in chimpanzees, we generated a quantitative, cross-species (human-chimpanzee) social responsiveness measure. Method We translated the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), an instrument that quantifies human social responsiveness, into an analogous instrument for chimpanzees. We then retranslated this "Chimp SRS" into a human "Cross-Species SRS" (XSRS). We evaluated three groups of chimpanzees (n=29) with the Chimp SRS and typical and autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) human children (n=20) with the XSRS. Results The Chimp SRS demonstrated strong inter-rater reliability at the three sites (ranges for individual ICCs: .534–.866 and mean ICCs: .851–.970). As has been observed in humans, exploratory principal components analysis of Chimp SRS scores supports a single factor underlying chimpanzee social responsiveness. Human subjects' XSRS scores were fully concordant with their SRS scores (r=.976, p=.001) and distinguished appropriately between typical and ASD subjects. One chimpanzee known for inappropriate social behavior displayed a significantly higher score than all other chimpanzees at its site, demonstrating the scale's ability to detect impaired social responsiveness in chimpanzees. Conclusion Our initial cross-species social responsiveness scale proved reliable and discriminated differences in social responsiveness across (in a relative sense) and within (in a more objectively quantifiable manner) humans and chimpanzees. PMID:21515200

  7. Enzyme sequence similarity improves the reaction alignment method for cross-species pathway comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Ovacik, Meric A.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2013-09-15

    Pathway-based information has become an important source of information for both establishing evolutionary relationships and understanding the mode of action of a chemical or pharmaceutical among species. Cross-species comparison of pathways can address two broad questions: comparison in order to inform evolutionary relationships and to extrapolate species differences used in a number of different applications including drug and toxicity testing. Cross-species comparison of metabolic pathways is complex as there are multiple features of a pathway that can be modeled and compared. Among the various methods that have been proposed, reaction alignment has emerged as the most successful at predicting phylogenetic relationships based on NCBI taxonomy. We propose an improvement of the reaction alignment method by accounting for sequence similarity in addition to reaction alignment method. Using nine species, including human and some model organisms and test species, we evaluate the standard and improved comparison methods by analyzing glycolysis and citrate cycle pathways conservation. In addition, we demonstrate how organism comparison can be conducted by accounting for the cumulative information retrieved from nine pathways in central metabolism as well as a more complete study involving 36 pathways common in all nine species. Our results indicate that reaction alignment with enzyme sequence similarity results in a more accurate representation of pathway specific cross-species similarities and differences based on NCBI taxonomy.

  8. Flavones as Quorum Sensing Inhibitors Identified by a Newly Optimized Screening Platform Using Chromobacterium violaceum as Reporter Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Skogman, Malena E; Kanerva, Sonja; Manner, Suvi; Vuorela, Pia M; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-09-10

    Quorum sensing (QS) is the process by which bacteria produce and detect signal molecules to coordinate their collective behavior. This intercellular communication is a relevant target for anti-biofilm therapies. Here we have optimized a screening-applicable assay to search for new quorum sensing inhibitors from natural compound libraries. In this system, QS is correlated with the production of violacein, which is directly controlled by the LuxI/LuxR system in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 31532. The parallel use of C. violaceum Tn5-mutant CV026, which depends on auto-inducer addition, allows simultaneous discrimination of compounds that act as quenchers of the AHL signal (quorum quenchers). The incorporation of a redox stain into the platform allowed further distinction between QS inhibitors, quorum quenchers and antibacterial compounds. A pilot screening was performed with 465 natural and synthetic flavonoids. All the most active compounds were flavones and they displayed potencies (IC50) in the range of 3.69 to 23.35 μM. These leads were particularly promising as they inhibited the transition from microcolonies into mature biofilms from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. This approach can be very effective in identifying new antimicrobials posing lesser risks of resistance.

  9. In search of the optimal platform for Post-Allogeneic SCT immunotherapy in relapsed multiple myeloma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Oostvogels, R; Uniken Venema, S M; de Witte, M; Raymakers, R; Kuball, J; Kröger, N; Minnema, M C

    2017-09-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Currently, allo-SCT is primarily performed in high-risk MM patients, most often in the setting of early relapse after first-line therapy with autologous SCT. However, the implementation of allo-SCT for MM is jeopardized by high treatment-related mortality (TRM) rates as well as high relapse rates. In this systematic review, we aimed to identify a safe allo-SCT strategy that has optimal 1-year results regarding mortality, relapse and severe GvHD, creating opportunities for post-transplantation strategies to maintain remissions in the high-risk group of relapsed MM patients. Eleven studies were included. Median PFS ranged from 5.2 to 36.8 months and OS was 13.0 to 63.0 months. The relapse related mortality at 1 year varied between 0 and 50% and TRM between 8 and 40%. Lowest GvHD incidences were reported for conditioning regimens with T-cell depletion using ATG or graft CD34+ selection. Similar strategies could lay the foundation for a post-transplant immune platform, this should be further evaluated in prospective clinical trials.

  10. HEK293 cell culture media study towards bioprocess optimization: Animal derived component free and animal derived component containing platforms.

    PubMed

    Liste-Calleja, Leticia; Lecina, Martí; Cairó, Jordi Joan

    2014-04-01

    The increasing demand for biopharmaceuticals produced in mammalian cells has lead industries to enhance bioprocess volumetric productivity through different strategies. Among those strategies, cell culture media development is of major interest. In the present work, several commercially available culture media for Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293) were evaluated in terms of maximal specific growth rate and maximal viable cell concentration supported. The main objective was to provide different cell culture platforms which are suitable for a wide range of applications depending on the type and the final use of the product obtained. Performing simple media supplementations with and without animal derived components, an enhancement of cell concentration from 2 × 10(6) cell/mL to 17 × 10(6) cell/mL was achieved in batch mode operation. Additionally, the media were evaluated for adenovirus production as a specific application case of HEK293 cells. None of the supplements interfered significantly with the adenovirus infection although some differences were encountered in viral productivity. To the best of our knowledge, the high cell density achieved in the work presented has never been reported before in HEK293 batch cell cultures and thus, our results are greatly promising to further study cell culture strategies in bioreactor towards bioprocess optimization. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform to Assist Earth Science Model Development and Optimization on High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameda, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Development and optimization of computational science models, particularly on high performance computers, and with the advent of ubiquitous multicore processor systems, practically on every system, has been accomplished with basic software tools, typically, command-line based compilers, debuggers, performance tools that have not changed substantially from the days of serial and early vector computers. However, model complexity, including the complexity added by modern message passing libraries such as MPI, and the need for hybrid code models (such as openMP and MPI) to be able to take full advantage of high performance computers with an increasing core count per shared memory node, has made development and optimization of such codes an increasingly arduous task. Additional architectural developments, such as many-core processors, only complicate the situation further. In this paper, we describe how our NSF-funded project, "SI2-SSI: A Productive and Accessible Development Workbench for HPC Applications Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform" (WHPC) seeks to improve the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform, an environment designed to support scientific code development targeted at a diverse set of high performance computing systems. Our WHPC project to improve Eclipse PTP takes an application-centric view to improve PTP. We are using a set of scientific applications, each with a variety of challenges, and using PTP to drive further improvements to both the scientific application, as well as to understand shortcomings in Eclipse PTP from an application developer perspective, to drive our list of improvements we seek to make. We are also partnering with performance tool providers, to drive higher quality performance tool integration. We have partnered with the Cactus group at Louisiana State University to improve Eclipse's ability to work with computational frameworks and extremely complex build systems, as well as to develop educational materials to incorporate into

  12. Dissection of a Ciona regulatory element reveals complexity of cross-species enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Pauls, Stefan; Bacha, Jamil; Elgar, Greg; Loose, Matthew; Shimeld, Sebastian M.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate genomes share numerous conserved non-coding elements, many of which function as enhancer elements and are hypothesised to be under evolutionary constraint due to a need to be bound by combinations of sequence-specific transcription factors. In contrast, few such conserved elements can be detected between vertebrates and their closest invertebrate relatives. Despite this lack of sequence identity, cross-species transgenesis has identified some cases where non-coding DNA from invertebrates drives reporter gene expression in transgenic vertebrates in patterns reminiscent of the expression of vertebrate orthologues. Such instances are presumed to reflect the presence of conserved suites of binding sites in the regulatory regions of invertebrate and vertebrate orthologues, such that both regulatory elements can correctly interpret the trans-activating environment. Shuffling of binding sites has been suggested to lie behind loss of sequence conservation; however this has not been experimentally tested. Here we examine the underlying basis of enhancer activity for the Ciona intestinalis βγ-crystallin gene, which drives expression in the lens of transgenic vertebrates despite the Ciona lineage predating the evolution of the lens. We construct an interactive gene regulatory network (GRN) for vertebrate lens development, allowing network interactions to be robustly catalogued and conserved network components and features to be identified. We show that a small number of binding motifs are necessary for Ciona βγ-crystallin expression, and narrow down the likely factors that bind to these motifs. Several of these overlap with the conserved core of the vertebrate lens GRN, implicating these sites in cross species function. However when we test these motifs in a transgenic vertebrate they prove to be dispensable for reporter expression in the lens. These results show that current models depicting cross species enhancer function as dependent on conserved binding

  13. Experimental Cross-Species Infection of Common Marmosets by Titi Monkey Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eunice C.; Liu, Maria; Brasky, Kathleen M.; Lanford, Robert E.; Kelly, Kristi R.; Bales, Karen L.; Schnurr, David P.; Canfield, Don R.; Patterson, Jean L.; Chiu, Charles Y.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV), as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses. PMID:23894316

  14. XGSA: A statistical method for cross-species gene set analysis.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Djordje; Kusumi, Kenro; Ho, Joshua W K

    2016-09-01

    Gene set analysis is a powerful tool for determining whether an experimentally derived set of genes is statistically significantly enriched for genes in other pre-defined gene sets, such as known pathways, gene ontology terms, or other experimentally derived gene sets. Current gene set analysis methods do not facilitate comparing gene sets across different organisms as they do not explicitly deal with homology mapping between species. There lacks a systematic investigation about the effect of complex gene homology on cross-species gene set analysis. In this study, we show that not accounting for the complex homology structure when comparing gene sets in two species can lead to false positive discoveries, especially when comparing gene sets that have complex gene homology relationships. To overcome this bias, we propose a straightforward statistical approach, called XGSA, that explicitly takes the cross-species homology mapping into consideration when doing gene set analysis. Simulation experiments confirm that XGSA can avoid false positive discoveries, while maintaining good statistical power compared to other ad hoc approaches for cross-species gene set analysis. We further demonstrate the effectiveness of XGSA with two real-life case studies that aim to discover conserved or species-specific molecular pathways involved in social challenge and vertebrate appendage regeneration. The R source code for XGSA is available under a GNU General Public License at http://github.com/VCCRI/XGSA CONTACT: jho@victorchang.edu.au. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Initial description of a quantitative, cross-species (chimpanzee-human) social responsiveness measure.

    PubMed

    Marrus, Natasha; Faughn, Carley; Shuman, Jeremy; Petersen, Steve E; Constantino, John N; Povinelli, Daniel J; Pruett, John R

    2011-05-01

    Comparative studies of social responsiveness, an ability that is impaired in autism spectrum disorders, can inform our understanding of both autism and the cognitive architecture of social behavior. Because there is no existing quantitative measure of social responsiveness in chimpanzees, we generated a quantitative, cross-species (human-chimpanzee) social responsiveness measure. We translated the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), an instrument that quantifies human social responsiveness, into an analogous instrument for chimpanzees. We then retranslated this "Chimpanzee SRS" into a human "Cross-Species SRS" (XSRS). We evaluated three groups of chimpanzees (n = 29) with the Chimpanzee SRS and typical and human children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; n = 20) with the XSRS. The Chimpanzee SRS demonstrated strong interrater reliability at the three sites (ranges for individual ICCs: 0.534 to 0.866; mean ICCs: 0.851 to 0.970). As has been observed in human beings, exploratory principal components analysis of Chimpanzee SRS scores supports a single factor underlying chimpanzee social responsiveness. Human subjects' XSRS scores were fully concordant with their SRS scores (r = 0.976, p = .001) and distinguished appropriately between typical and ASD subjects. One chimpanzee known for inappropriate social behavior displayed a significantly higher score than all other chimpanzees at its site, demonstrating the scale's ability to detect impaired social responsiveness in chimpanzees. Our initial cross-species social responsiveness scale proved reliable and discriminated differences in social responsiveness across (in a relative sense) and within (in a more objectively quantifiable manner) human beings and chimpanzees. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequent Cross-Species Transmission of Parvoviruses among Diverse Carnivore Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Kohler, Dennis J.; Fox, Karen A.; Brown, Justin D.; Gerhold, Richard W.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    Although parvoviruses are commonly described in domestic carnivores, little is known about their biodiversity in nondomestic species. A phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene sequences from puma, coyote, gray wolf, bobcat, raccoon, and striped skunk revealed two major groups related to either feline panleukopenia virus (“FPV-like”) or canine parvovirus (“CPV-like”). Cross-species transmission was commonplace, with multiple introductions into each host species but, with the exception of raccoons, relatively little evidence for onward transmission in nondomestic species. PMID:23221559

  17. Frequent cross-species transmission of parvoviruses among diverse carnivore hosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allison, Andrew B.; Kohler, Dennis J.; Fox, Karen A.; Brown, Justin D.; Gerhold, Richard W.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Although parvoviruses are commonly described in domestic carnivores, little is known about their biodiversity in nondomestic species. A phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene sequences from puma, coyote, gray wolf, bobcat, raccoon, and striped skunk revealed two major groups related to either feline panleukopenia virus (“FPV-like”) or canine parvovirus (“CPV-like”). Cross-species transmission was commonplace, with multiple introductions into each host species but, with the exception of raccoons, relatively little evidence for onward transmission in nondomestic species.

  18. BioWires: Conductive DNA Nanowires in a Computationally-Optimized, Synthetic Biological Platform for Nanoelectronic Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vecchioni, Simon; Toomey, Emily; Capece, Mark C.; Rothschild, Lynn; Wind, Shalom

    2017-01-01

    DNA is an ideal template for a biological nanowire-it has a linear structure several atoms thick; it possesses addressable nucleobase geometry that can be precisely defined; and it is massively scalable into branched networks. Until now, the drawback of DNA as a conducting nanowire been, simply put, its low conductance. To address this deficiency, we extensively characterize a chemical variant of canonical DNA that exploits the affinity of natural cytosine bases for silver ions. We successfully construct chains of single silver ions inside double-stranded DNA, confirm the basic dC-Ag+-dC bond geometry and kinetics, and show length-tunability dependent on mismatch distribution, ion availability and enzyme activity. An analysis of the absorbance spectra of natural DNA and silver-binding, poly-cytosine DNA demonstrates the heightened thermostability of the ion chain and its resistance to aqueous stresses such as precipitation, dialysis and forced reduction. These chemically critical traits lend themselves to an increase in electrical conductivity of over an order of magnitude for 11-base silver-paired duplexes over natural strands when assayed by STM break junction. We further construct and implement a genetic pathway in the E. coli bacterium for the biosynthesis of highly ionizable DNA sequences. Toward future circuits, we construct a model of transcription network architectures to determine the most efficient and robust connectivity for cell-based fabrication, and we perform sequence optimization with a genetic algorithm to identify oligonucleotides robust to changes in the base-pairing energy landscape. We propose that this system will serve as a synthetic biological fabrication platform for more complex DNA nanotechnology and nanoelectronics with applications to deep space and low resource environments.

  19. User preferences and usability of iVitality: optimizing an innovative online research platform for home-based health monitoring

    PubMed Central

    van Osch, Mara; Rövekamp, AJM; Bergman-Agteres, Stephanie N; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Ooms, Sharon J; Mooijaart, Simon P; Vermeulen, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background The iVitality online research platform has been developed to gain insight into the relationship between early risk factors (ie, poorly controlled hypertension, physical or mental inactivity) and onset and possibly prevention of dementia. iVitality consists of a website, a smartphone application, and sensors that can monitor these indicators at home. Before iVitality can be implemented, it should fit the needs and preferences of users, ie, offspring of patients with dementia. This study aimed to explore users’ motivation to participate in home-based health monitoring research, to formulate requirements based on users’ preferences to optimize iVitality, and to test usability of the smartphone application of iVitality. Methods We recruited 13 participants (aged 42–64 years, 85% female), who were offspring of patients with dementia. A user-centered methodology consisting of four iterative phases was used. Three semistructured interviews provided insight into motivation and acceptance of using iVitality (phase 1). A focus group with six participants elaborated on expectations and preferences regarding iVitality (phase 2). Findings from phase 1 and 2 were triangulated by two semistructured interviews (phase 3). Four participants assessed the usability of the smartphone application (phase 4) using a think aloud procedure and a questionnaire measuring ease and efficiency of use (scale 1–7; higher scores indicated better usability). Results All participants were highly motivated to contribute to dementia research. However, the frequency of home-based health monitoring should not be too high. Participants preferred to receive feedback about their measurements and information regarding the relationship between these measurements and dementia. Despite minor technical errors, iVitality was considered easy and efficient to use (mean score 5.50, standard deviation 1.71). Conclusion Offspring of patients with dementia are motivated to contribute to home

  20. Cross-species gene expression analysis identifies a novel set of genes implicated in human insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Khoo, Poh Sim; Tonks, Katherine; Junutula, Jagath R; Kolumam, Ganesh; Modrusan, Zora; Samocha-Bonet, Dorit; Meoli, Christopher C; Hocking, Samantha; Fazakerley, Daniel J; Stöckli, Jacqueline; Hoehn, Kyle L; Greenfield, Jerry R; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa; James, David E

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the earliest predictors of type 2 diabetes. However, diagnosis of IR is limited. High fat fed mouse models provide key insights into IR. We hypothesized that early features of IR are associated with persistent changes in gene expression (GE) and endeavored to (a) develop novel methods for improving signal:noise in analysis of human GE using mouse models; (b) identify a GE motif that accurately diagnoses IR in humans; and (c) identify novel biology associated with IR in humans. We integrated human muscle GE data with longitudinal mouse GE data and developed an unbiased three-level cross-species analysis platform (single gene, gene set, and networks) to generate a gene expression motif (GEM) indicative of IR. A logistic regression classification model validated GEM in three independent human data sets (n=115). This GEM of 93 genes substantially improved diagnosis of IR compared with routine clinical measures across multiple independent data sets. Individuals misclassified by GEM possessed other metabolic features raising the possibility that they represent a separate metabolic subclass. The GEM was enriched in pathways previously implicated in insulin action and revealed novel associations between β-catenin and Jak1 and IR. Functional analyses using small molecule inhibitors showed an important role for these proteins in insulin action. This study shows that systems approaches for identifying molecular signatures provides a powerful way to stratify individuals into discrete metabolic groups. Moreover, we speculate that the β-catenin pathway may represent a novel biomarker for IR in humans that warrant future investigation.

  1. Cross-Species Protection Mediated by a Bordetella bronchiseptica Strain Lacking Antigenic Homologs Present in Acellular Pertussis Vaccines▿

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Neelima; Sloan, Gina Parise; Conover, Matt S.; Love, Cheraton F.; Mattoo, Seema; Kock, Nancy D.; Deora, Rajendar

    2010-01-01

    The Bordetella species are Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that are characterized by long-term colonization of the mammalian respiratory tract and are causative agents of respiratory diseases in humans and animals. Despite widespread and efficient vaccination, there has been a world-wide resurgence of pertussis, which remains the leading cause of vaccine-preventable death in developed countries. It has been proposed that current acellular vaccines (Pa) composed of only a few bacterial proteins may be less efficacious because of vaccine-induced antigenic shifts and adaptations. To gain insight into the development of a newer generation of vaccines, we constructed a Bordetella bronchiseptica strain (LPaV) that does not express the antigenic homologs included in any of the Pa vaccines currently in use. This strain also lacks adenylate cyclase toxin, an essential virulence factor, and BipA, a surface protein. While LPaV colonized the mouse nose as efficiently as the wild-type strain, it was highly deficient in colonization of the lower respiratory tract and was attenuated in induction of inflammation and injury to the lungs. Strikingly, to our surprise, we found that in an intranasal murine challenge model, LPaV elicited cross-species protection against both B. bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis. Our data suggest the presence of immunogenic protective components other than those included in the pertussis vaccine. Combined with the whole-genome sequences of many Bordetella spp. that are available, the results of this study should serve as a platform for strategic development of the next generation of acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:20176797

  2. A cross-species socio-emotional behaviour development revealed by a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Mamiko; Senoo, Aya; Mimura, Koki; Shirakawa, Yuka; Karino, Genta; Obara, Saya; Ozawa, Shinpei; Sekihara, Hitomi; Fukushima, Yuta; Ueda, Toyotoshi; Kishino, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Yui, Kunio; Nakamura, Shun

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in affective neuroscience and social neurobiology has been propelled by neuro-imaging technology and epigenetic approach in neurobiology of animal behaviour. However, quantitative measurements of socio-emotional development remains lacking, though sensory-motor development has been extensively studied in terms of digitised imaging analysis. Here, we developed a method for socio-emotional behaviour measurement that is based on the video recordings under well-defined social context using animal models with variously social sensory interaction during development. The behaviour features digitized from the video recordings were visualised in a multivariate statistic space using principal component analysis. The clustering of the behaviour parameters suggested the existence of species- and stage-specific as well as cross-species behaviour modules. These modules were used to characterise the behaviour of children with or without autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We found that socio-emotional behaviour is highly dependent on social context and the cross-species behaviour modules may predict neurobiological basis of ASDs.

  3. Cross-species identification of genomic drivers of squamous cell carcinoma development across preneoplastic intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Coarfa, Cristian; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Nguyen, Tri; Joseph, Aaron; Chilukuri, Suneel; Charpiot, Elizabeth; Adelmann, Charles H.; Ching, Grace; Nguyen, Tran N.; Nicholas, Courtney; Thomas, Valencia D.; Migden, Michael; MacFarlane, Deborah; Thompson, Erika; Shen, Jianjun; Takata, Yoko; McNiece, Kayla; Polansky, Maxim A.; Abbas, Hussein A.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Gower, Adam; Spira, Avrum; Covington, Kyle R.; Xiao, Weimin; Gunaratne, Preethi; Pickering, Curtis; Frederick, Mitchell; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Shen, Li; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Rapini, Ronald P.; Wheeler, David A.; Hawk, Ernest T.; Flores, Elsa R.; Tsai, Kenneth Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC) comprises 15–20% of all skin cancers, accounting for over 700,000 cases in USA annually. Most cuSCC arise in association with a distinct precancerous lesion, the actinic keratosis (AK). To identify potential targets for molecularly targeted chemoprevention, here we perform integrated cross-species genomic analysis of cuSCC development through the preneoplastic AK stage using matched human samples and a solar ultraviolet radiation-driven Hairless mouse model. We identify the major transcriptional drivers of this progression sequence, showing that the key genomic changes in cuSCC development occur in the normal skin to AK transition. Our data validate the use of this ultraviolet radiation-driven mouse cuSCC model for cross-species analysis and demonstrate that cuSCC bears deep molecular similarities to multiple carcinogen-driven SCCs from diverse sites, suggesting that cuSCC may serve as an effective, accessible model for multiple SCC types and that common treatment and prevention strategies may be feasible. PMID:27574101

  4. Restrictions to cross-species transmission of lentiviral infection gleaned from studies of FIV.

    PubMed

    VandeWoude, Sue; Troyer, Jennifer; Poss, Mary

    2010-03-15

    More than 40 species of primates and over 20 species of cats harbor antibodies that sero-react to lentiviral antigens. In nearly all cases where viral genetic analysis has been conducted, each host species is infected with a unique lentivirus. Though lentivirus clades within a species can be substantially divergent, they are typically monophyletic within that species. A notable significant departure from this observation is apparent cross-species transmission of FIV between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in Southern California that has occurred at least three times; evidence from one bobcat sequence suggests this cross-over may have also occurred in Florida between bobcats and the endangered Florida panther. Several other isolated reports demonstrate cross-species transmission of FIV isolates among captive animals housed in close proximity, and it is well established that HIV-1 and HIV-2 arose from human contact with SIV-infected non-human primates. Using an experimental model, we have determined that domestic cats (Felis catus) are susceptible to FIVs originating from pumas or lions. While infections are initially replicative, and animals seroconvert, within a relatively short period of time circulating virus is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in a majority of animals. This diminution of viral load is proportional to initial viral peak. Although viral reservoirs can be identified in gastrointestinal tissues, most viral genomes recovered peripherally are highly mutated, suggesting that the non-adapted host successfully inhibits normal viral replication, leading to replication incompetent viral progeny. Mechanisms possible for such restriction of cross-species infections in natural settings include: (1) Lack of contact conducive to lentiviral transmission between infected and shedding animals of different species; (2) Lack of suitable receptor repertoire to allow viral entry to susceptible cells of a new species; (3) Cellular machinery in the

  5. Restrictions to cross species transmission of lentiviral infection gleaned from studies of FIV

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Jennifer; Poss, Mary

    2009-01-01

    More than 40 species of primates and over 20 species of cats harbor antibodies that sero-react to lentiviral antigens. In nearly all cases where viral genetic analysis has been conducted, each host species is infected with a unique lentivirus. Though lentivirus clades within a species can be substantially divergent, they are typically monophyletic within that species. A notable significant departure from this observation is apparent cross-species transmission of FIV between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in southern California that has occurred at least three times; evidence from one bobcat sequence suggests this cross-over may have also occurred in Florida between bobcats and the endangered Florida panther. Several other isolated reports demonstrate cross-species transmission of FIV isolates among captive animals housed in close proximity, and it is well established that HIV-1 and HIV-2 arose from human contact with SIV-infected nonhuman primates. Using an experimental model, we have determined that domestic cats (Felis catus) are susceptible to FIVs originating from pumas or lions. While infections are initially replicative, and animals seroconvert, within a relatively short period of time circulating virus is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in a majority of animals. This diminution of viral load is proportional to initial viral peak. Although viral reservoirs can be identified in gastrointestinal tissues, most viral genomes recovered peripherally are highly mutated, suggesting that the non-adapted host successfully inhibits normal viral replication, leading to replication incompetent viral progeny. Mechanisms possible for such restriction of cross-species infections in natural settings include: 1. Lack of contact conducive to lentiviral transmission between infected and shedding animals of different species; 2. Lack of suitable receptor repertoire to allow viral entry to susceptible cells of a new species; 3. Cellular machinery in the new

  6. Characterization of highly informative cross-species microsatellite panels for the Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) including five novel primers.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Margaret Kellogg; Broderick, Damien; Ovenden, Jennifer R; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Bonde, Robert K; McGuire, Peter M; Lanyon, Janet M

    2010-03-01

    The Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are threatened species of aquatic mammals in the order Sirenia. Sirenian conservation and management actions would benefit from a more complete understanding of genetic diversity and population structure. Generally, species-specific microsatellite markers are employed in conservation genetic studies; however, robust markers can be difficult and costly to isolate. To increase the number of available markers, dugong and manatee microsatellite primers were evaluated for cross-species amplification. Furthermore, one manatee and four dugong novel primers are reported. After polymerase chain reaction optimization, 23 (92%) manatee primers successfully amplified dugong DNA, of which 11 (48%) were polymorphic. Of the 32 dugong primers tested, 27 (84%) yielded product in the manatee, of which 17 (63%) were polymorphic. Dugong and manatee primers were compared and the most informative markers were selected to create robust and informative marker-panels for each species. These cross-species microsatellite marker-panels can be employed to assess other sirenian populations and can provide beneficial information for the protection and management of these unique mammals.

  7. Hepatitis B virus lineages in mammalian hosts: Potential for bidirectional cross-species transmission

    PubMed Central

    Bonvicino, Cibele R; Moreira, Miguel A; Soares, Marcelo A

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a cosmopolitan infectious agent currently affecting over 350 million people worldwide, presently accounting for more than two billion infections. In addition to man, other hepatitis virus strains infect species of several mammalian families of the Primates, Rodentia and Chiroptera orders, in addition to birds. The mounting evidence of HBV infection in African, Asian and neotropical primates draws attention to the potential cross-species, zoonotic transmission of these viruses to man. Moreover, recent evidence also suggests the humans may also function as a source of viral infection to other mammals, particularly to domestic animals like poultry and swine. In this review, we list all evidence of HBV and HBV-like infection of nonhuman mammals and discuss their potential roles as donors or recipients of these viruses to humans and to other closely-related species. PMID:24976704

  8. Serologic survey for cross-species pathogens in urban coyotes (Canis latrans), Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Malmlov, Ashley; Breck, Stewart; Fry, Tricia; Duncan, Colleen

    2014-10-01

    Abstract As coyotes (Canis latrans) adapt to living in urban environments, the opportunity for cross-species transmission of pathogens may increase. We investigated the prevalence of antibodies to pathogens that are either zoonotic or affect multiple animal species in urban coyotes in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado, USA, in 2012. We assayed for antibodies to canine parvovirus-2, canine distemper virus, rabies virus, Toxoplasma gondii, Yersinia pestis, and serotypes of Leptospira interrogans. Overall, 84% of the animals had antibodies to canine parvovirus-2, 44% for canine distemper virus, 20% for T. gondii (IgG), 28% for Y. pestis, and 4% for L. interrogans serotype Grippotyphosa. No neutralizing antibodies were detected to rabies virus, T. gondii (IgM), or L. interrogans serotypes other than Grippotyphosa. With 88% of animals exposed to at least one pathogen, our results suggest that coyotes may serve as important reservoirs and sentinels for etiologic agents.

  9. COLOMBOS v3.0: leveraging gene expression compendia for cross-species analyses

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Marco; Sonego, Paolo; Dierckxsens, Nicolas; Brilli, Matteo; Bianco, Luca; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Galardini, Marco; Romualdi, Chiara; Laukens, Kris; Collado-Vides, Julio; Meysman, Pieter; Engelen, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    COLOMBOS is a database that integrates publicly available transcriptomics data for several prokaryotic model organisms. Compared to the previous version it has more than doubled in size, both in terms of species and data available. The manually curated condition annotation has been overhauled as well, giving more complete information about samples’ experimental conditions and their differences. Functionality-wise cross-species analyses now enable users to analyse expression data for all species simultaneously, and identify candidate genes with evolutionary conserved expression behaviour. All the expression-based query tools have undergone a substantial improvement, overcoming the limit of enforced co-expression data retrieval and instead enabling the return of more complex patterns of expression behaviour. COLOMBOS is freely available through a web application at http://colombos.net/. The complete database is also accessible via REST API or downloadable as tab-delimited text files. PMID:26586805

  10. Cross-species transmission and emergence of novel viruses from birds.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Chen, Honglin; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-02-01

    Birds, the only living member of the Dinosauria clade, are flying warm-blooded vertebrates displaying high species biodiversity, roosting and migratory behavior, and a unique adaptive immune system. Birds provide the natural reservoir for numerous viral species and therefore gene source for evolution, emergence and dissemination of novel viruses. The intrusions of human into natural habitats of wild birds, the domestication of wild birds as pets or racing birds, and the increasing poultry consumption by human have facilitated avian viruses to cross species barriers to cause zoonosis. Recently, a novel adenovirus was exclusively found in birds causing an outbreak of Chlamydophila psittaci infection among birds and humans. Instead of being the primary cause of an outbreak by jumping directly from bird to human, a novel avian virus can be an augmenter of another zoonotic agent causing the outbreak. A comprehensive avian virome will improve our understanding of birds' evolutionary dynamics.

  11. Human adenovirus type 12: crossing species barriers to immortalize the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Walter

    2007-01-01

    When viruses cross species barriers, they often change their biological and pathogenetic properties. In the author's laboratory the nonproductive interaction of Syrian hamster cells with human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) has been studied. Ad12 induces undifferentiated tumors in newborn hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) at high frequency. Ad12 inefficiently enters hamster (BHK21) cells, and only small amounts of viral DNA reach the nucleus. Viral DNA replication and late transcription are blocked. In Ad12-induced tumor cells, multiple copies of viral DNA are chromosomally integrated. The integrated viral DNA becomes de novo methylated. Cellular DNA methylation and transcription patterns in Ad12-transformed cells and in Ad12-induced tumor cells are altered. These changes may be related to the oncogenic potential of Ad12 in hamsters. In this chapter, concepts and techniques for the study of the Ad12-hamster cell system are summarized.

  12. Cross Species Genomic Analysis Identifies a Mouse Model as Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma/Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Jeffrey K.; Riedel, Richard F.; Dodd, Leslie; Lahat, Guy; Lazar, Alexander J.; Dodd, Rebecca D.; Stangenberg, Lars; Eward, William C.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Yoon, Sam S.; Brigman, Brian E.; Jacks, Tyler; Lev, Dina; Mukherjee, Sayan; Kirsch, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma/Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma (MFH) is one of the most common subtypes of human soft tissue sarcoma. Using cross species genomic analysis, we define a geneset from the LSL-KrasG12D; Trp53Flox/Flox mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma that is highly enriched in human MFH. With this mouse geneset as a filter, we identify expression of the RAS target FOXM1 in human MFH. Expression of Foxm1 is elevated in mouse sarcomas that metastasize to the lung and tissue microarray analysis of human MFH correlates overexpression of FOXM1 with metastasis. These results suggest that genomic alterations present in human MFH are conserved in the LSL-KrasG12D; p53Flox/Flox mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma and demonstrate the utility of this pre-clinical model. PMID:19956606

  13. Cross-species infection of hepatitis E virus in a zoo-like location, including birds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Shen, Q; Mou, J; Yang, Z B; Yuan, C L; Cui, L; Zhu, J G; Hua, X G; Xu, C M; Hu, J

    2008-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic pathogen of which several species of animals are considered to be reservoirs. Thirty-eight faecal samples, obtained from 22 species of animals including birds in a wildlife first-aid centre in Eastern China, were tested for HEV RNA. Our survey revealed that in total 28.9% (95% confidence interval 14.5-43.4) of the faecal samples from various mammals and birds were HEV RNA positive. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the 11 isolates demonstrated that all sequences clustered in genotype 4 with 96-100% identity to each other. In addition, serum samples from seven animal handlers have shown that five (71.4%) were seropositive. The findings imply that cross-species infection of HEV had probably occurred in this zoo-like location, and moreover, birds can be infected naturally with mammalian HEV.

  14. Microsatellite loci in the tiger shark and cross-species amplification using pyrosequencing technology

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Natália J.; Cruz, Vanessa P.; Ashikaga, Fernando Y.; Camargo, Sâmia M.; Oliveira, Claudio; Piercy, Andrew N.; Burgess, George H.; Coelho, Rui; Santos, Miguel N.; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) has a global distribution in tropical and warm temperate seas, and it is caught in numerous fisheries worldwide, mainly as bycatch. It is currently assessed as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. In this study, we identified nine microsatellite loci through next generation sequencing (454 pyrosequencing) using 29 samples from the western Atlantic. The genetic diversity of these loci were assessed and revealed a total of 48 alleles ranging from 3 to 7 alleles per locus (average of 5.3 alleles). Cross-species amplification was successful at most loci for other species such as Carcharhinus longimanus, C. acronotus and Alopias superciliosus. Given the potential applicability of genetic markers for biological conservation, these data may contribute to the population assessment of this and other species of sharks worldwide. PMID:27635306

  15. Cross-species transferability of microsatellite markers in the genus Lippia.

    PubMed

    Santos, C P; Rocha, D S; Bajay, M M; Santos, F R C; Campos, J B; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Silva-Mann, R; Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Blank, A F

    2014-11-27

    The cross-species transferability of 20 microsatellite markers was tested in the genus Lippia. Eleven markers were polymorphic after screening 19 accessions of Lippia sidoides and Lippia gracilis maintained in the Active Germplasm Bank (AGB) from Universidade Federal de Sergipe. Additionally, 40 accessions of Lippia spp were collected in Sergipe to increase the germplasm bank. A total of 23, 22, and 36 alleles were identified, with an average of 2.3, 2.2, and 3.27 alleles per locus, respectively, for each group. The markers that were used were efficient tools to access genetic diversity in the germplasm bank and will be useful for further research aiming at the conservation and management of these important aromatic species.

  16. Rhodopseudomonas palustris Regulons Detected by Cross-Species Analysis of Alphaproteobacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, Sean; Lawrence, Charles; McCue, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris, an α-proteobacterium, carries out three of the chemical reactions that support life on this planet: the conversion of sunlight to chemical-potential energy; the absorption of carbon dioxide, which it converts to cellular material; and the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia. Insight into the transcription-regulatory network that coordinates these processes is fundamental to understanding the biology of this versatile bacterium. With this goal in mind, we predicted regulatory signals genomewide, using a two-step phylogenetic-footprinting and clustering process that we had developed previously. In the first step, 4,963 putative transcription factor binding sites, upstream of 2,044 genes and operons, were identified using cross-species Gibbs sampling. Bayesian motif clustering was then employed to group the cross-species motifs into regulons. We have identified 101 putative regulons in R. palustris, including 8 that are of particular interest: a photosynthetic regulon, a flagellar regulon, an organic hydroperoxide resistance regulon, the LexA regulon, and four regulons related to nitrogen metabolism (FixK2, NnrR, NtrC, and σ54). In some cases, clustering allowed us to assign functions to proteins that previously had been annotated with only putative functions; we have identified RPA0828 as the organic hydroperoxide resistance regulator and RPA1026 as a cell cycle methylase. In addition to predicting regulons, we identified a novel inverted repeat that likely forms a highly conserved stem-loop and that occurs downstream of over 100 genes. PMID:16269786

  17. Evolutionary factors affecting the cross-species utility of newly developed microsatellite markers in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Yoshan; Masello, Juan F; Cole, Theresa L; Calderon, Luciano; Munimanda, Gopi K; Thali, Marco R; Alderman, Rachael; Cuthbert, Richard J; Marin, Manuel; Massaro, Melanie; Navarro, Joan; Phillips, Richard A; Ryan, Peter G; Suazo, Cristián G; Cherel, Yves; Weimerskirch, Henri; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Microsatellite loci are ideal for testing hypotheses relating to genetic segregation at fine spatio-temporal scales. They are also conserved among closely related species, making them potentially useful for clarifying interspecific relationships between recently diverged taxa. However, mutations at primer binding sites may lead to increased nonamplification, or disruptions that may result in decreased polymorphism in nontarget species. Furthermore, high mutation rates and constraints on allele size may also with evolutionary time, promote an increase in convergently evolved allele size classes, biasing measures of interspecific genetic differentiation. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to develop microsatellite markers from a shotgun genome sequence of the sub-Antarctic seabird, the thin-billed prion (Pachyptila belcheri), that we tested for cross-species amplification in other Pachyptila and related sub-Antarctic species. We found that heterozygosity decreased and the proportion of nonamplifying loci increased with phylogenetic distance from the target species. Surprisingly, we found that species trees estimated from interspecific FST provided better approximations of mtDNA relationships among the studied species than those estimated using DC , even though FST was more affected by null alleles. We observed a significantly nonlinear second order polynomial relationship between microsatellite and mtDNA distances. We propose that the loss of linearity with increasing mtDNA distance stems from an increasing proportion of homoplastic allele size classes that are identical in state, but not identical by descent. Therefore, despite high cross-species amplification success and high polymorphism among the closely related Pachyptila species, we caution against the use of microsatellites in phylogenetic inference among distantly related taxa.

  18. Identification, validation and cross-species transferability of novel Lavandula EST-SSRs.

    PubMed

    Adal, Ayelign M; Demissie, Zerihun A; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2015-04-01

    We identified and characterized EST-SSRs with strong discrimination power against Lavandula angustifolia and Lavandula x intermedia . The markers also showed considerable cross-species transferability rate into six related Lavandula species. Lavenders (Lavandula) are important economical crops grown around the globe for essential oil production. In an attempt to develop genetic markers for these plants, we analyzed over 13,000 unigenes developed from L. angustifolia and L. x intermedia EST databases, and identified 3,459 simple sequence repeats (SSR), which were dominated by trinucleotides (41.2 %) and dinucleotides (31.45 %). Approximately, 19 % of the unigenes contained at least one SSR marker, over 60 % of which were localized in the UTRs. Only 252 EST-SSRs were 18 bp or longer from which 31 loci were validated, and 24 amplified discrete fragments with 85 % polymorphism in L. x intermedia and L. angustifolia. The average number of alleles in L. x intermedia and L. angustifolia were 3.42 and 3.71 per marker with average PIC values of 0.47 and 0.52, respectively. These values suggest a moderate to strong level of informativeness for the markers, with some loci producing unique fingerprints. The cross-species transferability rate of the markers ranges 50-100 % across eight species. The utility of these markers was assessed in eight Lavandula species and 15 L. angustifolia and L. x intermedia cultivars, and the dendrogram deduced from their similarity indexes successfully delineated the species into their respective sections and the cultivars into their respective species. These markers have potential for application in fingerprinting, diversity studies and marker-assisted breeding of Lavandula.

  19. Ketamine Suppresses the Ventral Striatal Response to Reward Anticipation: A Cross-Species Translational Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Francois, Jennifer; Grimm, Oliver; Schwarz, Adam J; Schweiger, Janina; Haller, Leila; Risterucci, Celine; Böhringer, Andreas; Zang, Zhenxiang; Tost, Heike; Gilmour, Gary; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evidence implicates regional neural responses to reward anticipation in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, where blunted ventral striatal responses to positive reward are observed in patients and at-risk populations. In vivo oxygen amperometry measurements in the ventral striatum in awake, behaving rats reveal reward-related tissue oxygen changes that closely parallel blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes observed in human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), suggesting that a cross-species approach targeting this mechanism might be feasible in psychopharmacology. The present study explored modulatory effects of acute, subanaesthetic doses of ketamine—a pharmacological model widely used in psychopharmacological research, both preclinically and clinically—on ventral striatum activity during performance of a reward anticipation task in both species, using fMRI in humans and in vivo oxygen amperometry in rats. In a region-of-interest analysis conducted following a cross-over placebo and ketamine study in human subjects, an attenuated ventral striatal response during reward anticipation was observed following ketamine relative to placebo during performance of a monetary incentive delay task. In rats, a comparable attenuation of ventral striatal signal was found after ketamine challenge, relative to vehicle, in response to a conditioned stimulus that predicted delivery of reward. This study provides the first data in both species demonstrating an attenuating effect of acute ketamine on reward-related ventral striatal (O2) and fMRI signals. These findings may help elucidate a deeper mechanistic understanding of the potential role of ketamine as a model for psychosis, show that cross-species pharmacological experiments targeting reward signaling are feasible, and suggest this phenotype as a promising translational biomarker for the development of novel compounds, assessment of disease status, and

  20. Differentially expressed genes identified by cross-species microarray in the blind cavefish Astyanax.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Allen G; Jeffery, William R

    2009-03-01

    Changes in gene expression were examined by microarray analysis during development of the eyed surface dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus De Filippi, 1853. The cross-species microarray used surface and cavefish RNA hybridized to a DNA chip prepared from a closely related species, the zebrafish Danio rerio Hamilton, 1822. We identified a total of 67 differentially expressed probe sets at three days post-fertilization: six upregulated and 61 downregulated in cavefish relative to surface fish. Many of these genes function either in eye development and/or maintenance, or in programmed cell death. The upregulated probe set showing the highest mean fold change was similar to the human ubiquitin specific protease 53 gene. The downregulated probe sets showing some of the highest fold changes corresponded to genes with roles in eye development, including those encoding gamma crystallins, the guanine nucleotide binding proteins Gnat1 and Gant2, a BarH-like homeodomain transcription factor, and rhodopsin. Downregulation of gamma-crystallin and rhodopsin was confirmed by in situ hybridization and immunostaining with specific antibodies. Additional downregulated genes encode molecules that inhibit or activate programmed cell death. The results suggest that cross-species microarray can be used for identifying differentially expressed genes in cavefish, that many of these genes might be involved in eye degeneration via apoptotic processes, and that more genes are downregulated than upregulated in cavefish, consistent with the predominance of morphological losses over gains during regressive evolution. © 2009 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  1. Alternative splicing in teleost fish genomes: same-species and cross-species analysis and comparisons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianguo; Peatman, Eric; Wang, Wenqi; Yang, Qing; Abernathy, Jason; Wang, Shaolin; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2010-06-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a mechanism by which the coding diversity of the genome can be greatly increased. Rates of AS are known to vary according to the complexity of eukaryotic species potentially explaining the tremendous phenotypic diversity among species with similar numbers of coding genes. Little is known, however, about the nature or rate of AS in teleost fish. Here, we report the characteristics of AS in teleost fish and classification and frequency of five canonical AS types. We conducted both same-species and cross-species analysis utilizing the Genome Mapping and Alignment Program (GMAP) and an AS pipeline (ASpipe) to study AS in four genome-enabled species (Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Gasterosteus aculeatus, and Takifugu rubripes) and one species lacking a complete genome sequence, Ictalurus punctatus. AS frequency was lowest in the highly duplicated genome of zebrafish (17% of mapped genes). The compact genome of the pufferfish showed the highest occurrence of AS (approximately 43% of mapped genes). An inverse correlation between AS frequency and genome size was consistent across all analyzed species. Cross-species comparisons utilizing zebrafish as the reference genome allowed the identification of additional putative AS genes not revealed by zebrafish transcripts. Approximately, 50% of AS genes identified by same-species comparisons were shared among two or more species. A searchable website, the Teleost Alternative Splicing Database, was created to allow easy identification and visualization of AS transcripts in the studied teleost genomes. Our results and associated database should further our understanding of alternative splicing as an important functional and evolutionary mechanism in the genomes of teleost fish.

  2. Shield optimization program: Part 4, Effects of neutron and gamma-ray radiations from nuclear weapons on SDI weapon platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.S.; Johsnon, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.; Santoro, R.T.

    1989-03-01

    Initial studies have been completed to estimate the radiation induced damage in silicon based electronic components onboard a representative Space Based Interceptor (SBI) weapon platform. The SBI weapon platform model used in the studies represents the author's concept of such a system. The analysis was completed for neutrons and gamma rays emanating from a nuclear weapon detonation in space. Results indicate dose levels to the sensitive components within the SBI weapon platform may exceed design limits if the weapon is detonated within a critical radius. For example, a 1962 Starfish detonation at a distance of 91.4 km from the SBI weapon platform generates a total dose in the central instrument bay of 964 rads(Si). The dose rate, /dot /gamma//, assuming a 40 nsec deposition time, is 1 /times/ 10/sup 10/ rads(Si)/sec. All of the calculations were carried out for an unshielded SBI weapon platform to determine the radiation levels for which shielding must be designed to ensure survivability of the electronic systems. 10 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. Cross-Species Gene Expression Analysis of Species Specific Differences in the Preclinical Assessment of Pharmaceutical Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Okyere, John; Oppon, Ekow; Dzidzienyo, Daniel; Sharma, Lav; Ball, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Animals are frequently used as model systems for determination of safety and efficacy in pharmaceutical research and development. However, significant quantitative and qualitative differences exist between humans and the animal models used in research. This is as a result of genetic variation between human and the laboratory animal. Therefore the development of a system that would allow the assessment of all molecular differences between species after drug exposure would have a significant impact on drug evaluation for toxicity and efficacy. Here we describe a cross-species microarray methodology that identifies and selects orthologous probes after cross-species sequence comparison to develop an orthologous cross-species gene expression analysis tool. The assumptions made by the use of this orthologous gene expression strategy for cross-species extrapolation is that; conserved changes in gene expression equate to conserved pharmacodynamic endpoints. This assumption is supported by the fact that evolution and selection have maintained the structure and function of many biochemical pathways over time, resulting in the conservation of many important processes. We demonstrate this cross-species methodology by investigating species specific differences of the peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR) α response in rat and human. PMID:24823806

  4. SU-D-206-01: Employing a Novel Consensus Optimization Strategy to Achieve Iterative Cone Beam CT Reconstruction On a Multi-GPU Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: While compressed sensing-based cone-beam CT (CBCT) iterative reconstruction techniques have demonstrated tremendous capability of reconstructing high-quality images from undersampled noisy data, its long computation time still hinders wide application in routine clinic. The purpose of this study is to develop a reconstruction framework that employs modern consensus optimization techniques to achieve CBCT reconstruction on a multi-GPU platform for improved computational efficiency. Methods: Total projection data were evenly distributed to multiple GPUs. Each GPU performed reconstruction using its own projection data with a conventional total variation regularization approach to ensure image quality. In addition, the solutions from GPUs were subject to a consistency constraint that they should be identical. We solved the optimization problem with all the constraints considered rigorously using an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) algorithm. The reconstruction framework was implemented using OpenCL on a platform with two Nvidia GTX590 GPU cards, each with two GPUs. We studied the performance of our method and demonstrated its advantages through a simulation case with a NCAT phantom and an experimental case with a Catphan phantom. Result: Compared with the CBCT images reconstructed using conventional FDK method with full projection datasets, our proposed method achieved comparable image quality with about one third projection numbers. The computation time on the multi-GPU platform was ∼55 s and ∼ 35 s in the two cases respectively, achieving a speedup factor of ∼ 3.0 compared with single GPU reconstruction. Conclusion: We have developed a consensus ADMM-based CBCT reconstruction method which enabled performing reconstruction on a multi-GPU platform. The achieved efficiency made this method clinically attractive.

  5. Preclinical optimization of a broad-spectrum anti-bladder cancer tri-drug regimen via the Feedback System Control (FSC) platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Cheng; Ding, Xianting; Deng, Hui; Zhang, Daming; Cui, Wei; Xu, Hongwei; Wang, Yingwei; Xu, Wanhai; Lv, Lei; Zhang, Hongyu; He, Yinghua; Wu, Qiong; Szyf, Moshe; Ho, Chih-Ming; Zhu, Jingde

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic outcomes of combination chemotherapy have not significantly advanced during the past decades. This has been attributed to the formidable challenges of optimizing drug combinations. Testing a matrix of all possible combinations of doses and agents in a single cell line is unfeasible due to the virtually infinite number of possibilities. We utilized the Feedback System Control (FSC) platform, a phenotype oriented approach to test 100 options among 15,625 possible combinations in four rounds of assaying to identify an optimal tri-drug combination in eight distinct chemoresistant bladder cancer cell lines. This combination killed between 82.86% and 99.52% of BCa cells, but only 47.47% of the immortalized benign bladder epithelial cells. Preclinical in vivo verification revealed its markedly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy as compared to its bi- or mono-drug components in cell line-derived tumor xenografts. The collective response of these pathways to component drugs was both cell type- and drug type specific. However, the entire spectrum of pathways triggered by the tri-drug regimen was similar in all four cancer cell lines, explaining its broad spectrum killing of BCa lines, which did not occur with its component drugs. Our findings here suggest that the FSC platform holdspromise for optimization of anti-cancer combination chemotherapy.

  6. A Method to Detect Differential Gene Expression in Cross-Species Hybridization Experiments at Gene and Probe Level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wu, Rebekah; Felton, James; Rocke, David M.; Chakicherla, Anu

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Whole genome microarrays are increasingly becoming the method of choice to study responses in model organisms to disease, stressors or other stimuli. However, whole genome sequences are available for only some model organisms, and there are still many species whose genome sequences are not yet available. Cross-species studies, where arrays developed for one species are used to study gene expression in a closely related species, have been used to address this gap, with some promising results. Current analytical methods have included filtration of some probes or genes that showed low hybridization activities. But consensus filtration schemes are still not available. Results A novel masking procedure is proposed based on currently available target species sequences to filter out probes and study a cross-species data set using this masking procedure and gene-set analysis. Gene-set analysis evaluates the association of some priori defined gene groups with a phenotype of interest. Two methods, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Test of Test Statistics (ToTS) were investigated. The results showed that masking procedure together with ToTS method worked well in our data set. The results from an alternative way to study cross-species hybridization experiments without masking are also presented. We hypothesize that the multi-probes structure of Affymetrix microarrays makes it possible to aggregate the effects of both well-hybridized and poorly-hybridized probes to study a group of genes. The principles of gene-set analysis were applied to the probe-level data instead of gene-level data. The results showed that ToTS can give valuable information and thus can be used as a powerful technique for analyzing cross-species hybridization experiments. Availability Software in the form of R code is available at http://anson.ucdavis.edu/~ychen/cross-species.html Supplementary Data Supplementary data are available at http://anson.ucdavis.edu/~ychen/cross-species.html PMID

  7. Investigation of Cross-Species Translatability of Pharmacological MRI in Awake Nonhuman Primate - A Buprenorphine Challenge Study

    PubMed Central

    Seah, Stephanie; Asad, Abu Bakar Ali; Baumgartner, Richard; Feng, Dai; Williams, Donald S.; Manigbas, Elaine; Beaver, John D.; Reese, Torsten; Henry, Brian; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L.; Chin, Chih-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacological MRI (phMRI) is a neuroimaging technique where drug-induced hemodynamic responses can represent a pharmacodynamic biomarker to delineate underlying biological consequences of drug actions. In most preclinical studies, animals are anesthetized during image acquisition to minimize movement. However, it has been demonstrated anesthesia could attenuate basal neuronal activity, which can confound interpretation of drug-induced brain activation patterns. Significant efforts have been made to establish awake imaging in rodents and nonhuman primates (NHP). Whilst various platforms have been developed for imaging awake NHP, comparison and validation of phMRI data as translational biomarkers across species remain to be explored. Methodology We have established an awake NHP imaging model that encompasses comprehensive acclimation procedures with a dedicated animal restrainer. Using a cerebral blood volume (CBV)-based phMRI approach, we have determined differential responses of brain activation elicited by the systemic administration of buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg i.v.), a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist, in the same animal under awake and anesthetized conditions. Additionally, region-of-interest analyses were performed to determine regional drug-induced CBV time-course data and corresponding area-under-curve (AUC) values from brain areas with high density of µ-opioid receptors. Principal Findings In awake NHPs, group-level analyses revealed buprenorphine significantly activated brain regions including, thalamus, striatum, frontal and cingulate cortices (paired t-test, versus saline vehicle, p<0.05, n = 4). This observation is strikingly consistent with µ-opioid receptor distribution depicted by [6-O-[11C]methyl]buprenorphine ([11C]BPN) positron emission tomography imaging study in baboons. Furthermore, our findings are consistent with previous buprenorphine phMRI studies in humans and conscious rats which collectively demonstrate the cross-species

  8. Ion Channel Function and Cross-Species Determinants in Viral Assembly of Nonprimate Hepacivirus p7

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stephanie; Bollenbach, Alexander; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Pfaender, Stephanie; Brown, Richard J. P.; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Scott, Claire; Foster, Richard; Kumar, Abhinav; Zitzmann, Nicole; Griffin, Stephen; Penin, François; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nonprimate hepacivirus (NPHV), the closest homolog of hepatitis C virus (HCV) described to date, has recently been discovered in horses. Even though the two viruses share a similar genomic organization, conservation of the encoded hepaciviral proteins remains undetermined. The HCV p7 protein is localized within endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes and is important for the production of infectious particles. In this study, we analyzed the structural and functional features of NPHV p7 in addition to its role during virus assembly. Three-dimensional homology models for NPHV p7 using various nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) structures were generated, highlighting the conserved residues important for ion channel function. By applying a liposome permeability assay, we observed that NPHV p7 exhibited liposome permeability features similar to those of HCV p7, indicative of similar ion channel activity. Next, we characterized the viral protein using a p7-based trans-complementation approach. A similar subcellular localization pattern at the ER membrane was observed, although production of infectious particles was likely hindered by genetic incompatibilities with HCV proteins. To further characterize these cross-species constraints, chimeric viruses were constructed by substituting different regions of HCV p7 with NPHV p7. The N terminus and transmembrane domains were nonexchangeable and therefore constitute a cross-species barrier in hepaciviral assembly. In contrast, the basic loop and the C terminus of NPHV p7 were readily exchangeable, allowing production of infectious trans-complemented viral particles. In conclusion, comparison of NPHV and HCV p7 revealed structural and functional homology of these proteins, including liposome permeability, and broadly acting determinants that modulate hepaciviral virion assembly and contribute to the host-species barrier were identified. IMPORTANCE The recent discovery of new relatives of hepatitis C virus (HCV

  9. Isolation and characterization of microsatellites in the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae), and cross-species amplification within the family Coccinellidae.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Anne; Malausa, Thibaut; Lombaert, Eric; Martin, Jean-François; Estoup, Arnaud

    2009-05-01

    A total of 18 microsatellite DNA loci were isolated and characterized from the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We optimized a multiplex panel consisting of two polymerase chain reactions, allowing the genotyping of all loci. The number of alleles and heterozygosity observed at each locus ranged from 1 to 12 and from 0 to 100%, respectively. After Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, none of the loci deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and there was no indication of significant linkage disequilibrium among pairs of loci. Successful cross-species amplification was obtained for only three of the seven tested species of Coccinellidae. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Cross-Species Giardia duodenalis Transmission in Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Amanda R.; Gillespie, Thomas R.; Rwego, Innocent B.; Tranby McLachlan, Traci L.; Kent, Angela D.; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Giardia duodenalis is prevalent in tropical settings where diverse opportunities exist for transmission between people and animals. We conducted a cross-sectional study of G. duodenalis in people, livestock, and wild primates near Kibale National Park, Uganda, where human-livestock-wildlife interaction is high due to habitat disturbance. Our goal was to infer the cross-species transmission potential of G. duodenalis using molecular methods and to investigate clinical consequences of infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Real-time PCR on DNA extracted from fecal samples revealed a combined prevalence of G. duodenalis in people from three villages of 44/108 (40.7%), with prevalence reaching 67.5% in one village. Prevalence rates in livestock and primates were 12.4% and 11.1%, respectively. Age was associated with G. duodenalis infection in people (higher prevalence in individuals ≤15 years) and livestock (higher prevalence in subadult versus adult animals), but other potential risk factors in people (gender, contact with domestic animals, working in fields, working in forests, source of drinking water, and medication use) were not. G. duodenalis infection was not associated with gastrointestinal symptoms in people, nor was clinical disease noted in livestock or primates. Sequence analysis of four G. duodenalis genes identified assemblage AII in humans, assemblage BIV in humans and endangered red colobus monkeys, and assemblage E in livestock and red colobus, representing the first documentation of assemblage E in a non-human primate. In addition, genetic relationships within the BIV assemblage revealed sub-clades of identical G. duodenalis sequences from humans and red colobus. Conclusions/Significance Our finding of G. duodenalis in people and primates (assemblage BIV) and livestock and primates (assemblage E) underscores that cross-species transmission of multiple G. duodenalis assemblages may occur in locations such as western Uganda where people

  11. A farm platform approach to optimizing temperate grazing-livestock systems: metrics for trade-off assessments and future innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Paul; Takahashi, Taro; Blackwell, Martin; Cardenas, Laura; Collins, Adrian; Dungait, Jennifer; Eisler, Mark; Hawkins, Jane; Misselbrook, Tom; Mcauliffe, Graham; Mcfadzean, Jamie; Murray, Phil; Orr, Robert; Jordana Rivero, M.; Wu, Lianhai; Lee, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Global agriculture is at a critical juncture when competing requirements for maximal production and minimal pollution have led to the concept of sustainable intensification. Livestock production, especially ruminant livestock is central to this debate. Ruminants make an important contribution to global food security by converting feed that is unsuitable for human consumption to high value protein, demand for which is currently increasing at an unprecedented rate. Sustainable intensification of ruminant livestock production may be applied to pastoral grazing, mixed-cropping, feedlot and housed production systems. All these systems have associated environmental risks such as water and air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions and soil degradation, as well as issues affecting production efficiency, product quality and consumer acceptability, such as reduced animal fertility, health and welfare, reflected in the development of agricultural sustainability policies. Further, in many societies livestock represent a resource far greater than just food, e.g. fibre, draught, fertiliser, fuel, bank and social. These challenges necessitate multidisciplinary solutions that can only be properly researched, implemented and tested in real-world production systems which are suited to their geographical and climatic production practice, e.g. temperate grassland. The North Wyke Farm Platform (http://www.rothamsted.ac.uk/farmplatform) was established during 2010 as a UK national capability for collaborative research, training and knowledge exchange in agro-environmental sciences. Its remit is to research agricultural productivity and ecosystem responses to different management practices for beef and sheep production in lowland temperate grasslands. Following construction, a typical beef and sheep system based on permanent pasture receiving chemical fertilisers on first grade pasture (>60% perennial ryegrass) was implemented across the 67.2 ha farm platform in order to obtain baseline

  12. Optimizing the Army’s Aerial Reconnaissance and Surveillance Asset Mix via the Joint Platform Allocation Tool (JPAT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    OF FIGURES Figure 1. Three example systems composed of platforms P1, P2, and P3, and sensors SN1, SN2 , SN3, and SN4...sensors SN1, SN2 , SN3, and SN4. 4 Figure 2. An example configuration consisting of equipment derived from multiple systems. At times, it may be...of assets considered by JPAT will expand to include assets other than those with a program of record, or those that are quick reaction capabilities

  13. Bioelectronic platforms for optimal bio-anode of bio-electrochemical systems: From nano- to macro scopes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bongkyu; An, Junyeong; Fapyane, Deby; Chang, In Seop

    2015-11-01

    The current trend of bio-electrochemical systems is to improve strategies related to their applicability and potential for scaling-up. To date, literature has suggested strategies, but the proposal of correlations between each research field remains insufficient. This review paper provides a correlation based on platform techniques, referred to as bio-electronics platforms (BEPs). These BEPs consist of three platforms divided by scope scale: nano-, micro-, and macro-BEPs. In the nano-BEP, several types of electron transfer mechanisms used by electrochemically active bacteria are discussed. In the micro-BEP, factors affecting the formation of conductive biofilms and transport of electrons in the conductive biofilm are investigated. In the macro-BEP, electrodes and separators in bio-anode are debated in terms of real applications, and a scale-up strategy is discussed. Overall, the challenges of each BEP are highlighted, and potential solutions are suggested. In addition, future research directions are provided and research ideas proposed to develop research interest.

  14. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy.

  15. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:27481537

  16. Multidirectional cross-species painting illuminates the history of karyotypic evolution in Perissodactyla.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Vladimir A; Stanyon, Roscoe; Nesterenko, Anastasia I; Fu, Beiyuan; Perelman, Polina L; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Stone, Gary; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Houck, Marlys L; Robinson, Terence J; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Dobigny, Gauthier; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2008-01-01

    The order Perissodactyla, the group of odd-toed ungulates, includes three extant families: Equidae, Tapiridae, and Rhinocerotidae. The extremely rapid karyotypic diversification in perissodactyls has so far prevented the establishment of genome-wide homology maps between these three families by traditional cytogenetic approaches. Here we report the first genome-wide comparative chromosome maps of African rhinoceroses, four tapir species, four equine species, and humans. These maps were established by multidirectional chromosome painting, with paint probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Equus grevyi, Tapirus indicus, and Ceratotherium simum as well as painting probes from horse and human. The Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), Baird's tapir (T. bairdii), mountain tapir (T. pinchaque), lowland tapir (T. terrestris), and onager (E. hemionus onager), were studied by cross-species chromosome painting for the first time. Our results, when integrated with previously published comparative chromosome maps of the other perissodactyl species, have enabled the reconstruction of perissodactyl, ceratomorph, and equid ancestral karyotypes, and the identification of the defining evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements along each lineage. Our results allow a more reliable estimate of the mode and tempo of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements, revealing a striking switch between the slowly evolving ceratomorphs and extremely rapidly evolving equids.

  17. COLOMBOS v3.0: leveraging gene expression compendia for cross-species analyses.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Marco; Sonego, Paolo; Dierckxsens, Nicolas; Brilli, Matteo; Bianco, Luca; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Galardini, Marco; Romualdi, Chiara; Laukens, Kris; Collado-Vides, Julio; Meysman, Pieter; Engelen, Kristof

    2016-01-04

    COLOMBOS is a database that integrates publicly available transcriptomics data for several prokaryotic model organisms. Compared to the previous version it has more than doubled in size, both in terms of species and data available. The manually curated condition annotation has been overhauled as well, giving more complete information about samples' experimental conditions and their differences. Functionality-wise cross-species analyses now enable users to analyse expression data for all species simultaneously, and identify candidate genes with evolutionary conserved expression behaviour. All the expression-based query tools have undergone a substantial improvement, overcoming the limit of enforced co-expression data retrieval and instead enabling the return of more complex patterns of expression behaviour. COLOMBOS is freely available through a web application at http://colombos.net/. The complete database is also accessible via REST API or downloadable as tab-delimited text files. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Cross-Species Functional Genomic Analysis Identifies Resistance Genes of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Forthun, Rakel Brendsdal; SenGupta, Tanima; Skjeldam, Hanne Kim; Lindvall, Jessica Margareta; McCormack, Emmet; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Nilsen, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of successful epigenetic reprogramming in cancer are not well characterized as they involve coordinated removal of repressive marks and deposition of activating marks by a large number of histone and DNA modification enzymes. Here, we have used a cross-species functional genomic approach to identify conserved genetic interactions to improve therapeutic effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) valproic acid, which increases survival in more than 20% of patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using a bidirectional synthetic lethality screen revealing genes that increased or decreased VPA sensitivity in C. elegans, we identified novel conserved sensitizers and synthetic lethal interactors of VPA. One sensitizer identified as a conserved determinant of therapeutic success of HDACi was UTX (KDM6A), which demonstrates a functional relationship between protein acetylation and lysine-specific methylation. The synthetic lethal screen identified resistance programs that compensated for the HDACi-induced global hyper-acetylation, and confirmed MAPKAPK2, HSP90AA1, HSP90AB1 and ACTB as conserved hubs in a resistance program for HDACi that are drugable in human AML cell lines. Hence, these resistance hubs represent promising novel targets for refinement of combinatorial epigenetic anti-cancer therapy. PMID:23155442

  19. Cross-species Transcriptomic Comparison of In Vitro and In Vivo Mammalian Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    LoVerso, Peter R.; Wachter, Christopher M.; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian brain is characterized by distinct classes of cells that differ in morphology, structure, signaling, and function. Dysregulation of gene expression in these cell populations leads to various neurological disorders. Neural cells often need to be acutely purified from animal brains for research, which requires complicated procedure and specific expertise. Primary culture of these cells in vitro is a viable alternative, but the differences in gene expression of cells grown in vitro and in vivo remain unclear. Here, we cultured three major neural cell classes of rat brain (ie, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells [OPCs]) obtained from commercial sources. We measured transcript abundance of these cell types by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and compared with their counterparts acutely purified from mouse brains. Cross-species RNA-seq data analysis revealed hundreds of genes that are differentially expressed between the cultured and acutely purified cells. Astrocytes have more such genes compared to neurons and OPCs, indicating that signaling pathways are greatly perturbed in cultured astrocytes. This dataset provides a powerful resource to demonstrate the similarities and differences of biological processes in mammalian neural cells grown in vitro and in vivo at the molecular level. PMID:26640375

  20. Human prion protein sequence elements impede cross-species chronic wasting disease transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Timothy D.; Jiang, Lin; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Bett, Cyrus; Liu, Jun; Yang, Tom; Spraker, Terry R.; Castilla, Joaquín; Eisenberg, David; Kong, Qingzhong; Sigurdson, Christina J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of North American deer and elk and poses an unclear risk for transmission to humans. Human exposure to CWD occurs through hunting activities and consumption of venison from prion-infected animals. Although the amino acid residues of the prion protein (PrP) that prevent or permit human CWD infection are unknown, NMR-based structural studies suggest that the β2-α2 loop (residues 165–175) may impact species barriers. Here we sought to define PrP sequence determinants that affect CWD transmission to humans. We engineered transgenic mice that express human PrP with four amino acid substitutions that result in expression of PrP with a β2-α2 loop (residues 165–175) that exactly matches that of elk PrP. Compared with transgenic mice expressing unaltered human PrP, mice expressing the human-elk chimeric PrP were highly susceptible to elk and deer CWD prions but were concurrently less susceptible to human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions. A systematic in vitro survey of amino acid differences between humans and cervids identified two additional residues that impacted CWD conversion of human PrP. This work identifies amino acids that constitute a substantial structural barrier for CWD transmission to humans and helps illuminate the molecular requirements for cross-species prion transmission. PMID:25705888

  1. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Models for Predicting Lead Transfer from Soil to Wheat Grain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lv, Jialong; Dai, Yunchao; Zhang, Hong; Cao, Yingfei

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of Pb from the soil to crops is a serious food hygiene security problem in China because of industrial, agricultural, and historical contamination. In this study, the characteristics of exogenous Pb transfer from 17 Chinese soils to a popular wheat variety (Xiaoyan 22) were investigated. In addition, bioaccumulation prediction models of Pb in grain were obtained based on soil properties. The results of the analysis showed that pH and OC were the most important factors contributing to Pb uptake by wheat grain. Using a cross-species extrapolation approach, the Pb uptake prediction models for cultivar Xiaoyan 22 in different soil Pb levels were satisfactorily applied to six additional non-modeled wheat varieties to develop a prediction model for each variety. Normalization of the bioaccumulation factor (BAF) to specific soil physico-chemistry is essential, because doing so could significantly reduce the intra-species variation of different wheat cultivars in predicted Pb transfer and eliminate the influence of soil properties on ecotoxicity parameters for organisms of interest. Finally, the prediction models were successfully verified against published data (including other wheat varieties and crops) and used to evaluate the ecological risk of Pb for wheat in contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:27518712

  2. Characterization of microsatellites in Bambusa arundinacea and cross species amplification in other bamboos.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sumitra; Rout, Gyana Ranjan

    2005-01-01

    Microsatellites, tandem repeats of short nucleotide (1-6 bp) sequences, are the DNA marker of choice because of their highly polymorphic, ubiquitous distribution within genome, ease of genotyping through polymerase chain reaction (PCR), selectively neutral, co-dominant and multi allelic nature. Six microsatellites, three polymorphic and three monomorphic, have been characterized for the first time in a bamboo species, Bambusa arudinacea belonging to the family Poaceae. The number of alleles per locus ranges form 2 to 13. Allelic diversity ranges from 0.041 to 0.870. Polymorphic information content (PIC) values for two loci were > 0.3, an indicator of polymorphic allele. Cross species amplification has been tested in other 18 bamboo species. Monomorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have been found to be cross amplified in most of the tested species while polymorphic ones in only three to four species. The utility of the SSR loci in genetic diversity study of B. arundinacea and other cross amplified bamboo species have been discussed.

  3. Cross-species 3D virtual reality toolbox for visual and cognitive experiments.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Guillaume; Gulli, Roberto A; Martinez-Trujillo, Julio C

    2016-06-15

    Although simplified visual stimuli, such as dots or gratings presented on homogeneous backgrounds, provide strict control over the stimulus parameters during visual experiments, they fail to approximate visual stimulation in natural conditions. Adoption of virtual reality (VR) in neuroscience research has been proposed to circumvent this problem, by combining strict control of experimental variables and behavioral monitoring within complex and realistic environments. We have created a VR toolbox that maximizes experimental flexibility while minimizing implementation costs. A free VR engine (Unreal 3) has been customized to interface with any control software via text commands, allowing seamless introduction into pre-existing laboratory data acquisition frameworks. Furthermore, control functions are provided for the two most common programming languages used in visual neuroscience: Matlab and Python. The toolbox offers milliseconds time resolution necessary for electrophysiological recordings and is flexible enough to support cross-species usage across a wide range of paradigms. Unlike previously proposed VR solutions whose implementation is complex and time-consuming, our toolbox requires minimal customization or technical expertise to interface with pre-existing data acquisition frameworks as it relies on already familiar programming environments. Moreover, as it is compatible with a variety of display and input devices, identical VR testing paradigms can be used across species, from rodents to humans. This toolbox facilitates the addition of VR capabilities to any laboratory without perturbing pre-existing data acquisition frameworks, or requiring any major hardware changes. Copyright © 2016 Z. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel and highly informative Capsicum SSR markers and their cross-species transferability.

    PubMed

    Buso, G S C; Reis, A M M; Amaral, Z P S; Ferreira, M E

    2016-09-23

    This study was undertaken primarily to develop new simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for Capsicum. As part of this project aimed at broadening the use of molecular tools in Capsicum breeding, two genomic libraries enriched for AG/TC repeat sequences were constructed for Capsicum annuum. A total of 475 DNA clones were sequenced from both libraries and 144 SSR markers were tested on cultivated and wild species of Capsicum. Forty-five SSR markers were randomly selected to genotype a panel of 48 accessions of the Capsicum germplasm bank. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 11, with an average of 6 alleles. The polymorphism information content was on average 0.60, ranging from 0.20 to 0.83. The cross-species transferability to seven cultivated and wild Capsicum species was tested with a set of 91 SSR markers. We found that a high proportion of the loci produced amplicons in all species tested. C. frutescens had the highest number of transferable markers, whereas the wild species had the lowest. Our results indicate that the new markers can be readily used in genetic analyses of Capsicum.

  5. Cross-species assessments of motor and exploratory behavior related to bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brook L; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W; Paulus, Martin P; Geyer, Mark A; Perry, William

    2010-07-01

    Alterations in exploratory behavior are a fundamental feature of bipolar mania, typically characterized as motor hyperactivity and increased goal-directed behavior in response to environmental cues. In contrast, abnormal exploration associated with schizophrenia and depression can manifest as prominent withdrawal, limited motor activity, and inattention to the environment. While motor abnormalities are cited frequently as clinical manifestations of these disorders, relatively few empirical studies have quantified human exploratory behavior. This article reviews the literature characterizing motor and exploratory behavior associated with bipolar disorder and genetic and pharmacological animal models of the illness. Despite sophisticated assessment of exploratory behavior in rodents, objective quantification of human motor activity has been limited primarily to actigraphy studies with poor cross-species translational value. Furthermore, symptoms that reflect the cardinal features of bipolar disorder have proven difficult to establish in putative animal models of this illness. Recently, however, novel tools such as the human behavioral pattern monitor provide multivariate translational measures of motor and exploratory activity, enabling improved understanding of the neurobiology underlying psychiatric disorders.

  6. Development of polymorphic SSR markers in the razor clam (Sinonovacula constricta) and cross-species amplification.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y H; Yao, H H; Sun, C S; Lv, D M; Li, M Q; Lin, Z H

    2016-01-26

    Next-generation sequencing provides large-scale sequencing data with relative ease and at a reasonable cost, making it possible to identify a large amount of SSR markers in a timely and cost-effective manner. On the basis of the transcriptome database of Sinonovacula constricta obtained by Illumina/Solexa pyrosequencing, 60 polymorphic SSR markers were developed and characterized in 30 individuals. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 3.75 alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.050 to 1.000 and from 0.050 to 0.836, respectively. Nineteen loci significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.01) after Bonferroni's correction for multiple tests. In addition, interspecific transferability revealed that 20 polymorphic loci in Solen linearis were first characterized in this study. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest number of SSRs in S. constricta and the first report of cross-species amplification. These novel polymorphic SSR markers will be particularly useful for conservation genetics, evolutionary studies, genetic trait mapping, and marker assisted selection in the species.

  7. Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides bacteriophages: Genomics and cross-species host ranges.

    PubMed

    Pujato, Silvina A; Guglielmotti, Daniela M; Martínez-García, Manuel; Quiberoni, Andrea; Mojica, Francisco J M

    2017-09-18

    Unveiling virus-host interactions are relevant for understanding the biology and evolution of microbes globally, but in particular, it has also a paramount impact on the manufacture of fermented dairy products. In this study, we aim at characterizing phages infecting the commonly used heterofermentative Leuconostoc spp. on the basis of host range patterns and genome analysis. Host range of six Leuconostoc phages was investigated using three methods (efficiency of plaquing, spot and turbidity tests) against Ln. mesenteroides and Ln. pseudomesenteroides strains. Complete genome sequencing from four out of the six studied Leuconostoc phages were obtained in this work, while the remaining two have been sequenced previously. According to our results, cross-species host specificity was demonstrated, as all phages tested were capable of infecting both Ln. pseudomesenteroides and Ln. mesenteroides strains, although with different efficiency of plaquing (EOP). Phage adsorption rates and ability of low-EOP host strains to propagate phages by crossing the Leuconostoc species' barrier confirm results. At the genome level, phages CHA, CHB, Ln-7, Ln-8 and Ln-9 revealed high similarity with previously characterized phages infecting mostly Ln. mesenteroides strains, while phage LDG was highly similar to phages infecting Ln. pseudomesenteroides. Additionally, correlation between receptor binding protein (RBP) and host range patterns allowed us to unveil a finer clustering of Leuconostoc phages studied into four groups. This is the first report of overlapped phage host ranges between Leuconostoc species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anxiety genetics – findings from cross-species genome-wide approaches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are complex diseases, which often occur in combination with major depression, alcohol use disorder, or general medical conditions. Anxiety disorders were the most common mental disorders within the EU states in 2010 with 14% prevalence. Anxiety disorders are triggered by environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals, and therefore genetic research offers a great route to unravel molecular basis of these diseases. As anxiety is an evolutionarily conserved response, mouse models can be used to carry out genome-wide searches for specific genes in a setting that controls for the environmental factors. In this review, we discuss translational approaches that aim to bridge results from unbiased genome-wide screens using mouse models to anxiety disorders in humans. Several methods, such as quantitative trait locus mapping, gene expression profiling, and proteomics, have been used in various mouse models of anxiety to identify genes that regulate anxiety or play a role in maintaining pathological anxiety. We first discuss briefly the evolutionary background of anxiety, which justifies cross-species approaches. We then describe how several genes have been identified through genome-wide methods in mouse models and subsequently investigated in human anxiety disorder samples as candidate genes. These studies have led to the identification of completely novel biological pathways that regulate anxiety in mice and humans, and that can be further investigated as targets for therapy. PMID:23659354

  9. Role of multiple hosts in the cross-species transmission and emergence of a pandemic parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Allison, Andrew B; Harbison, Carole E; Pagan, Israel; Stucker, Karla M; Kaelber, Jason T; Brown, Justin D; Ruder, Mark G; Keel, M Kevin; Dubovi, Edward J; Holmes, Edward C; Parrish, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cross-species virus transmission is critical to anticipating emerging infectious diseases. Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) emerged as a variant of a feline parvovirus when it acquired mutations that allowed binding to the canine transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR). However, CPV-2 was soon replaced by a variant virus (CPV-2a) that differed in antigenicity and receptor binding. Here we show that the emergence of CPV involved an additional host range variant virus that has circulated undetected in raccoons for at least 24 years, with transfers to and from dogs. Raccoon virus capsids showed little binding to the canine TfR, showed little infection of canine cells, and had altered antigenic structures. Remarkably, in capsid protein (VP2) phylogenies, most raccoon viruses fell as evolutionary intermediates between the CPV-2 and CPV-2a strains, suggesting that passage through raccoons assisted in the evolution of CPV-2a. This highlights the potential role of alternative hosts in viral emergence.

  10. Novel Microsatellite Markers of Meretrix petechialis and Cross-species Amplification in Related Taxa (Bivalvia: Veneroida)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kim, Byeng-Hak; Park, Jung-Youn; Lee, Jung-Mi; Jeong, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jun-Sang; Ko, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Yong-Seok

    2012-01-01

    The Asian hard clam, Meretrix petechialis, is an economically important bivalve, but its catch and population sizes are decreasing rapidly, owing to many factors, including large-scale reclamation of its natural habitat on the western coast of the Korean peninsula. Attempts to restore the resources and production of this species require genetic structure and diversity information. In this study, we developed 15 microsatellite markers from a partial genomic library enriched in GT repeats. Nine of these markers were polymorphic, with an average allele number of six, and six were monomorphic in 95 tested individuals. No linkage disequilibrium was found between any pair of loci (p > 0.05), and deviations from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) test showing excess of heterozygotes was observed in only one of nine loci. In addition, no null alleles or genetic differentiation between two tested populations were detected. A cross-species amplification in 12 species of four families resulted in two M. petechialis-specific loci and three possible universal markers. This information will be useful in the future development of high-quality artificial seedlings and sustainable resource management. PMID:23443103

  11. Evolution of genome organizations of squirrels (Sciuridae) revealed by cross-species chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Biltueva, Larisa; Fu, Beiyuan; Wang, Jinhuan; Nie, Wenhui; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2004-01-01

    With complete sets of chromosome-specific painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of human and grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), the whole genome homologies between human and representatives of tree squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis, Callosciurus erythraeus), flying squirrels (Petaurista albiventer) and chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus) have been defined by cross-species chromosome painting. The results show that, unlike the highly rearranged karyotypes of mouse and rat, the karyotypes of squirrels are highly conserved. Two methods have been used to reconstruct the genome phylogeny of squirrels with the laboratory rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as the out-group: (1) phylogenetic analysis by parsimony using chromosomal characters identified by comparative cytogenetic approaches; (2) mapping the genome rearrangements onto recently published sequence-based molecular trees. Our chromosome painting results, in combination with molecular data, show that flying squirrels are phylogenetically close to New World tree squirrels. Chromosome painting and G-banding comparisons place chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus ), with a derived karyotype, outside the clade comprising tree and flying squirrels. The superorder Glires (orde Rodentia + order Lagomorpha) is firmly supported by two conserved syntenic associations between human chromosomes 1 and 10p homologues, and between 9 and 11 homologues.

  12. Aleutian mink disease virus in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis): evidence for cross-species spillover.

    PubMed

    Nituch, Larissa A; Bowman, Jeff; Wilson, Paul J; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2015-04-01

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes a parvovirus infection, initially characterized in American mink (Neovison vison), that may have harmful effects on wild populations of susceptible animals. In North America, where American mink are native, the origin, host range, and prevalence of AMDV in wild species is not clear. We studied striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) and raccoons (Procyon lotor) to determine whether species sympatric with mink are potential reservoirs in the transmission of AMDV to wild mink and mink farms. Antibodies to AMDV were detected in 41% of skunk serum samples (143/347) and AMDV nucleic acids were detected in 32% (14/40) of skunk spleen samples by PCR, indicating that AMDV exposure and infection were frequent in skunks. We detected no AMDV antibodies in 144 raccoon blood samples. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a newly identified AMDV haplogroup consisting of isolates from Ontario skunks and a free-ranging domestic mink from Ontario. Our findings of frequent AMDV infection in skunks, close genetic similarity between skunk and mink AMDV isolates, and evidence of AMDV transmission from skunks to mink support the hypothesis that skunks may be acting as alternative hosts and reservoirs of AMDV to wild mink through cross-species virus spillover.

  13. Role of Multiple Hosts in the Cross-Species Transmission and Emergence of a Pandemic Parvovirus

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Harbison, Carole E.; Pagan, Israel; Stucker, Karla M.; Kaelber, Jason T.; Brown, Justin D.; Ruder, Mark G.; Keel, M. Kevin; Dubovi, Edward J.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cross-species virus transmission is critical to anticipating emerging infectious diseases. Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) emerged as a variant of a feline parvovirus when it acquired mutations that allowed binding to the canine transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR). However, CPV-2 was soon replaced by a variant virus (CPV-2a) that differed in antigenicity and receptor binding. Here we show that the emergence of CPV involved an additional host range variant virus that has circulated undetected in raccoons for at least 24 years, with transfers to and from dogs. Raccoon virus capsids showed little binding to the canine TfR, showed little infection of canine cells, and had altered antigenic structures. Remarkably, in capsid protein (VP2) phylogenies, most raccoon viruses fell as evolutionary intermediates between the CPV-2 and CPV-2a strains, suggesting that passage through raccoons assisted in the evolution of CPV-2a. This highlights the potential role of alternative hosts in viral emergence. PMID:22072763

  14. Cross species selection scans identify components of C4 photosynthesis in the grasses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Studer, Anthony J; Schnable, James C; Kellogg, Elizabeth A; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is perhaps one of the best examples of convergent adaptive evolution with over 25 independent origins in the grasses (Poaceae) alone. The availability of high quality grass genome sequences presents new opportunities to explore the mechanisms underlying this complex trait using evolutionary biology-based approaches. In this study, we performed genome-wide cross-species selection scans in C4 lineages to facilitate discovery of C4 genes. The study was enabled by the well conserved collinearity of grass genomes and the recently sequenced genome of a C3 panicoid grass, Dichanthelium oligosanthes This method, in contrast to previous studies, does not rely on any a priori knowledge of the genes that contribute to biochemical or anatomical innovations associated with C4 photosynthesis. We identified a list of 88 candidate genes that include both known and potentially novel components of the C4 pathway. This set includes the carbon shuttle enzymes pyruvate, phosphate dikinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and NADP malic enzyme as well as several predicted transporter proteins that likely play an essential role in promoting the flux of metabolites between the bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. Importantly, this approach demonstrates the application of fundamental molecular evolution principles to dissect the genetic basis of a complex photosynthetic adaptation in plants. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the output of the selection scans can be combined with expression data to provide additional power to prioritize candidate gene lists and suggest novel opportunities for pathway engineering.

  15. Cross-Species Transmission in the Speciation of the Currently Known Murinae-Associated Hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xian-Dan; Wang, Wen; Guo, Wen-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-He; Xing, Jian-Guang; Chen, Sheng-Ze; Li, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yi; Xu, Jianguo; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    To gain more insight into the phylogeny of Dabieshan virus (DBSV), carried by Niviventer confucianus and other Murinae-associated hantaviruses, genome sequences of novel variants of DBSV were recovered from Niviventer rats trapped in the mountainous areas of Wenzhou, China. Genetic analyses show that all known genetic variants of DBSV, including the ones identified in this study, are distinct from other Murinae-associated hantaviruses. DBSV variants show geographic clustering and high intraspecies diversity. The data suggest that DBSV is a distinct species in the genus Hantavirus. Interestingly, DBSV shows the highest sequence identity to Hantaan virus (HTNV), with a >7% difference in the sequences of the N, GPC, and L proteins, while N. confucianus is more closely related to Rattus norvegicus (the host of Seoul virus [SEOV]) than to Apodemus agrarius (the host of HTNV and Saaremaa virus [SAAV]). Further genetic analyses of all known Murinae-associated hantaviruses (both established and tentative species) show that many of them, including DBSV, may have originated from host switching. The estimation of evolutionary rates and divergence time supports the role of cross-species transmission in the evolution of Murinae-associated hantaviruses. The detection of positive selection suggests that genetic drift may contribute to the speciation of Murinae-associated hantaviruses and that adaptation has a role as well. PMID:22855492

  16. Cross-species assessments of Motor and Exploratory Behavior related to Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brook L.; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W.; Paulus, Martin P.; Geyer, Mark A.; Perry, William

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in exploratory behavior are a fundamental feature of bipolar mania, typically characterized as motor hyperactivity and increased goal-directed behavior in response to environmental cues. In contrast, abnormal exploration associated with schizophrenia and depression can manifest as prominent withdrawal, limited motor activity, and inattention to the environment. While motor abnormalities are cited frequently as clinical manifestations of these disorders, relatively few empirical studies have quantified human exploratory behavior. This article reviews the literature characterizing motor and exploratory behavior associated with bipolar disorder and genetic and pharmacological animal models of the illness. Despite sophisticated assessment of exploratory behavior in rodents, objective quantification of human motor activity has been limited primarily to actigraphy studies with poor cross-species translational value. Furthermore, symptoms that reflect the cardinal features of bipolar disorder have proven difficult to establish in putative animal models of this illness. Recently, however, novel tools such as the Human Behavioral Pattern Monitor provide multivariate translational measures of motor and exploratory activity, enabling improved understanding of the neurobiology underlying psychiatric disorders. PMID:20398694

  17. Molecular signatures of longevity: Insights from cross-species comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Siming; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2017-10-01

    Much of the current research on longevity focuses on the aging process within a single species. Several molecular players (e.g. IGF1 and MTOR), pharmacological compounds (e.g. rapamycin and metformin), and dietary approaches (e.g. calorie restriction and methionine restriction) have been shown to be important in regulating and modestly extending lifespan in model organisms. On the other hand, natural lifespan varies much more significantly across species. Within mammals alone, maximum lifespan differs more than 100 fold, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent comparative studies are beginning to shed light on the molecular signatures associated with exceptional longevity. These include genome sequencing of microbats, naked mole rat, blind mole rat, bowhead whale and African turquoise killifish, and comparative analyses of gene expression, metabolites, lipids and ions across multiple mammalian species. Together, they point towards several putative strategies for lifespan regulation and cancer resistance, as well as the pathways and metabolites associated with longevity variation. In particular, longevity may be achieved by both lineage-specific adaptations and common mechanisms that apply across the species. Comparing the resulting cross-species molecular signatures with the within-species lifespan extension strategies will improve our understanding of mechanisms of longevity control and provide a starting point for novel and effective interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cross-species microarray hybridization to identify developmentally regulated genes in the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Nowrousian, Minou; Ringelberg, Carol; Dunlap, Jay C; Loros, Jennifer J; Kück, Ulrich

    2005-04-01

    The filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora forms complex three-dimensional fruiting bodies that protect the developing ascospores and ensure their proper discharge. Several regulatory genes essential for fruiting body development were previously isolated by complementation of the sterile mutants pro1, pro11 and pro22. To establish the genetic relationships between these genes and to identify downstream targets, we have conducted cross-species microarray hybridizations using cDNA arrays derived from the closely related fungus Neurospora crassa and RNA probes prepared from wild-type S. macrospora and the three developmental mutants. Of the 1,420 genes which gave a signal with the probes from all the strains used, 172 (12%) were regulated differently in at least one of the three mutants compared to the wild type, and 17 (1.2%) were regulated differently in all three mutant strains. Microarray data were verified by Northern analysis or quantitative real time PCR. Among the genes that are up- or down-regulated in the mutant strains are genes encoding the pheromone precursors, enzymes involved in melanin biosynthesis and a lectin-like protein. Analysis of gene expression in double mutants revealed a complex network of interaction between the pro gene products.

  19. Cross-species association of quail invariant chain with chicken and mouse MHC II molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Wu, Chao; Pan, Ling; Xu, Fazhi; Liu, Xuelan; Yu, Weiyi

    2013-05-01

    There are different degrees of similarity among vertebrate invariant chains (Ii). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quail and other vertebrate Ii MHC class II molecules. The two quail Ii isoforms (qIi-1, qIi-2) were cloned by RACE, and qRT-PCR analysis of different organs showed that their expression levels were positively correlated with MHC II gene (B-LB) transcription levels. Confocal microscopy indicated that quail full-length Ii co-localized with MHC II of quail, chicken or mouse in 293FT cells co-transfected with both genes. Immunoprecipitation and western blotting further indicated that these aggregates corresponded to polymers of Ii and MHC class II molecules. This cross-species molecular association of quail Ii with chicken and mouse MHC II suggests that Ii molecules have a high structural and functional similarity and may thereby be used as potential immune carriers across species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis defines shared inflammatory responses in murine and human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Celine C; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Nair, Viji; Ramanujam, Meera; Zhang, Weijia; Bottinger, Erwin P; Segerer, Stephan; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Cohen, Clemens D; Davidson, Anne; Kretzler, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Therapeutic studies in mouse LN models do not always predict outcomes of human therapeutic trials, raising concerns about the human relevance of these preclinical models. In this study, we used an unbiased transcriptional network approach to define, in molecular terms, similarities and differences among three lupus models and human LN. Genome-wide gene-expression networks were generated using natural language processing and automated promoter analysis and compared across species via suboptimal graph matching. The three murine models and human LN share both common and unique features. The 20 commonly shared network nodes reflect the key pathologic processes of immune cell infiltration/activation, endothelial cell activation/injury, and tissue remodeling/fibrosis, with macrophage/dendritic cell activation as a dominant cross-species shared transcriptional pathway. The unique nodes reflect differences in numbers and types of infiltrating cells and degree of remodeling among the three mouse strains. To define mononuclear phagocyte-derived pathways in human LN, gene sets activated in isolated NZB/W renal mononuclear cells were compared with human LN kidney profiles. A tissue compartment-specific macrophage-activation pattern was seen, with NF-κB1 and PPARγ as major regulatory nodes in the tubulointerstitial and glomerular networks, respectively. Our study defines which pathologic processes in murine models of LN recapitulate the key transcriptional processes active in human LN and suggests that there are functional differences between mononuclear phagocytes infiltrating different renal microenvironments.

  1. CO2 exposure as translational cross-species experimental model for panic

    PubMed Central

    Leibold, N K; van den Hove, D L A; Viechtbauer, W; Buchanan, G F; Goossens, L; Lange, I; Knuts, I; Lesch, K P; Steinbusch, H W M; Schruers, K R J

    2016-01-01

    The current diagnostic criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are being challenged by the heterogeneity and the symptom overlap of psychiatric disorders. Therefore, a framework toward a more etiology-based classification has been initiated by the US National Institute of Mental Health, the research domain criteria project. The basic neurobiology of human psychiatric disorders is often studied in rodent models. However, the differences in outcome measurements hamper the translation of knowledge. Here, we aimed to present a translational panic model by using the same stimulus and by quantitatively comparing the same outcome measurements in rodents, healthy human subjects and panic disorder patients within one large project. We measured the behavioral–emotional and bodily response to CO2 exposure in all three samples, allowing for a reliable cross-species comparison. We show that CO2 exposure causes a robust fear response in terms of behavior in mice and panic symptom ratings in healthy volunteers and panic disorder patients. To improve comparability, we next assessed the respiratory and cardiovascular response to CO2, demonstrating corresponding respiratory and cardiovascular effects across both species. This project bridges the gap between basic and human research to improve the translation of knowledge between these disciplines. This will allow significant progress in unraveling the etiological basis of panic disorder and will be highly beneficial for refining the diagnostic categories as well as treatment strategies. PMID:27598969

  2. Polymorphic microsatellite loci identified through development and cross-species amplification within shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, I.; Guzzetti, B.M.; Gust, Judy R.; Sage, G.K.; Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed microsatellite loci for demographic assessments of shorebirds, a group with limited markers. First, we isolated five dinucleotide repeat microsatellite loci from the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopodidae: Haematopus bachmani), and three from the Bristle-thighed Curlew (Scolopacidae: Numenius tahitiensis); both species are of conservation concern. All eight loci were polymorphic in their respective target species. Hbaμ loci were characterized by two to three alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.07 to 0.33, and two to nine alleles were detected for Nut loci with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. No linkage disequilibrium or departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. The eight loci were also tested for cross-species amplification in 12 other species within Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, and the results demonstrated transferability across several genera. We further tested all 14 species at 12 additional microsatellite markers developed for other shorebirds: Dunlin (Calidris alpina; four loci) and Ruff (Philomachus pugnax; eight loci). Two markers (Hbaμ4 and Ruff6) were polymorphic in 13 species, while two (Calp6 and Ruff9) were monomorphic. The remaining eight markers revealed polymorphism in one to nine species each. Our results provide further evidence that locus Ruff10 is sex-linked, contrary to the initial description. These markers can be used to enhance our understanding of shorebird biology by, for example, helping to determine migratory connectivity among breeding and wintering populations and detecting relatedness among individuals.

  3. Measurement of lentiviral vector titre and copy number by cross-species duplex quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, I; Patsali, P; Stephanou, C; Antoniou, M; Kleanthous, M; Lederer, C W

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses are the vectors of choice for many preclinical studies and clinical applications of gene therapy. Accurate measurement of biological vector titre before treatment is a prerequisite for vector dosing, and the calculation of vector integration sites per cell after treatment is as critical to the characterisation of modified cell products as it is to long-term follow-up and the assessment of risk and therapeutic efficiency in patients. These analyses are typically based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but as yet compromise accuracy and comparability between laboratories and experimental systems, the former by using separate simplex reactions for the detection of endogene and lentiviral sequences and the latter by designing different PCR assays for analyses in human cells and animal disease models. In this study, we validate in human and murine cells a qPCR system for the single-tube assessment of lentiviral vector copy numbers that is suitable for analyses in at least 33 different mammalian species, including human and other primates, mouse, pig, cat and domestic ruminants. The established assay combines the accuracy of single-tube quantitation by duplex qPCR with the convenience of one-off assay optimisation for cross-species analyses and with the direct comparability of lentiviral transduction efficiencies in different species.

  4. Human prion protein sequence elements impede cross-species chronic wasting disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Timothy D; Jiang, Lin; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Bett, Cyrus; Liu, Jun; Yang, Tom; Spraker, Terry R; Castilla, Joaquín; Eisenberg, David; Kong, Qingzhong; Sigurdson, Christina J

    2015-04-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of North American deer and elk and poses an unclear risk for transmission to humans. Human exposure to CWD occurs through hunting activities and consumption of venison from prion-infected animals. Although the amino acid residues of the prion protein (PrP) that prevent or permit human CWD infection are unknown, NMR-based structural studies suggest that the β2-α2 loop (residues 165-175) may impact species barriers. Here we sought to define PrP sequence determinants that affect CWD transmission to humans. We engineered transgenic mice that express human PrP with four amino acid substitutions that result in expression of PrP with a β2-α2 loop (residues 165-175) that exactly matches that of elk PrP. Compared with transgenic mice expressing unaltered human PrP, mice expressing the human-elk chimeric PrP were highly susceptible to elk and deer CWD prions but were concurrently less susceptible to human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions. A systematic in vitro survey of amino acid differences between humans and cervids identified two additional residues that impacted CWD conversion of human PrP. This work identifies amino acids that constitute a substantial structural barrier for CWD transmission to humans and helps illuminate the molecular requirements for cross-species prion transmission.

  5. Control Parameters Optimization Based on Co-Simulation of a Mechatronic System for an UA-Based Two-Axis Inertially Stabilized Platform

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Zhao, Beilei; Gong, Guohao

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method based on co-simulation of a mechatronic system to optimize the control parameters of a two-axis inertially stabilized platform system (ISP) applied in an unmanned airship (UA), by which high control performance and reliability of the ISP system are achieved. First, a three-dimensional structural model of the ISP is built by using the three-dimensional parametric CAD software SOLIDWORKS®; then, to analyze the system’s kinematic and dynamic characteristics under operating conditions, dynamics modeling is conducted by using the multi-body dynamics software ADAMS™, thus the main dynamic parameters such as displacement, velocity, acceleration and reaction curve are obtained, respectively, through simulation analysis. Then, those dynamic parameters were input into the established MATLAB® SIMULINK® controller to simulate and test the performance of the control system. By these means, the ISP control parameters are optimized. To verify the methods, experiments were carried out by applying the optimized parameters to the control system of a two-axis ISP. The results show that the co-simulation by using virtual prototyping (VP) is effective to obtain optimized ISP control parameters, eventually leading to high ISP control performance. PMID:26287210

  6. Control Parameters Optimization Based on Co-Simulation of a Mechatronic System for an UA-Based Two-Axis Inertially Stabilized Platform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Zhao, Beilei; Gong, Guohao

    2015-08-14

    This paper presents a method based on co-simulation of a mechatronic system to optimize the control parameters of a two-axis inertially stabilized platform system (ISP) applied in an unmanned airship (UA), by which high control performance and reliability of the ISP system are achieved. First, a three-dimensional structural model of the ISP is built by using the three-dimensional parametric CAD software SOLIDWORKS(®); then, to analyze the system's kinematic and dynamic characteristics under operating conditions, dynamics modeling is conducted by using the multi-body dynamics software ADAMS™, thus the main dynamic parameters such as displacement, velocity, acceleration and reaction curve are obtained, respectively, through simulation analysis. Then, those dynamic parameters were input into the established MATLAB(®) SIMULINK(®) controller to simulate and test the performance of the control system. By these means, the ISP control parameters are optimized. To verify the methods, experiments were carried out by applying the optimized parameters to the control system of a two-axis ISP. The results show that the co-simulation by using virtual prototyping (VP) is effective to obtain optimized ISP control parameters, eventually leading to high ISP control performance.

  7. A Method to Detect Differential Gene expression in Cross-Species Hybridization Experiments at Gene and Probe Level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wu, Rebekah; Felton, James; Rocke, David M.; Chakicherla, Anu

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Whole genome microarrays are increasingly becoming the method of choice to study responses in model organisms to disease, stressors or other stimuli. However, whole genome sequences are available for only some model organisms, and there are still many species whose genome sequences are not yet available. Cross-species studies, where arrays developed for one species are used to study gene expression in a closely related species, have been used to address this gap, with some promising results. Current analytical methods have included filtration of some probes or genes that showed low hybridization activities. But consensus filtration schemes are still not available. Results A novel masking procedure is proposed based on currently available target species sequences to filter out probes and study a cross-species data set using this masking procedure and gene-set analysis. Gene-set analysis evaluates the association of some priori defined gene groups with a phenotype of interest. Two methods, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Test of Test Statistics (ToTS) were investigated. The results showed that masking procedure together with ToTS method worked well in our data set. The results from an alternative way to study cross-species hybridization experiments without masking are also presented. We hypothesize that the multi-probes structure of Affymetrix microarrays makes it possible to aggregate the effects of both well-hybridized and poorly-hybridized probes to study a group of genes. The principles of gene-set analysis were applied to the probe-level data instead of gene-level data. The results showed that ToTS can give valuable information and thus can be used as a powerful technique for analyzing cross-species hybridization experiments. Availability Software in the form of R code is available at http://anson.ucdavis.edu/~ychen/cross-species.html PMID:20798791

  8. Modeling neurodevelopmental cognitive deficits in tasks with cross-species translational validity.

    PubMed

    Cope, Z A; Powell, S B; Young, J W

    2016-01-01

    Numerous psychiatric disorders whose cognitive dysfunction links to functional outcome have neurodevelopmental origins including schizophrenia, autism and bipolar disorder. Treatments are needed for these cognitive deficits, which require development using animal models. Models of neurodevelopmental disorders are as varied and diverse as the disorders themselves, recreating some but not all aspects of the disorder. This variety may in part underlie why purported procognitive treatments translated from these models have failed to restore functioning in the targeted patient populations. Further complications arise from environmental factors used in these models that can contribute to numerous disorders, perhaps only impacting specific domains, while diagnostic boundaries define individual disorders, limiting translational efficacy. The Research Domain Criteria project seeks to 'develop new ways to classify mental disorders based on behavioral dimensions and neurobiological measures' in hopes of facilitating translational research by remaining agnostic toward diagnostic borders derived from clinical presentation in humans. Models could therefore recreate biosignatures of cognitive dysfunction irrespective of disease state. This review highlights work within the field of neurodevelopmental models of psychiatric disorders tested in cross-species translational cognitive paradigms that directly inform this newly developing research strategy. By expounding on this approach, the hopes are that a fuller understanding of each model may be attainable in terms of the cognitive profile elicited by each manipulation. Hence, conclusions may begin to be drawn on the nature of cognitive neuropathology on neurodevelopmental and other disorders, increasing the chances of procognitive treatment development for individuals affected in specific cognitive domains. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  9. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Prediction Models for Cadmium Transfer from Soil to Corn Grain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Li, Zhaojun; Lu, Lu; Long, Jian; Liang, Yongchao

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a highly toxic heavy metal for both plants and animals. The presence of Cd in agricultural soils is of great concern regarding its transfer in the soil-plant system. This study investigated the transfer of Cd (exogenous salts) from a wide range of Chinese soils to corn grain (Zhengdan 958). Through multiple stepwise regressions, prediction models were developed, with the combination of Cd bioconcentration factor (BCF) of Zhengdan 958 and soil pH, organic matter (OM) content, and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Moreover, these prediction models from Zhengdan 958 were applied to other non-model corn species through cross-species extrapolation approach. The results showed that the pH of the soil was the most important factor that controlled Cd uptake and lower pH was more favorable for Cd bioaccumulation in corn grain. There was no significant difference among three prediction models in the different Cd levels. When the prediction models were applied to other non-model corn species, the ratio ranges between the predicted BCF values and the measured BCF values were within an interval of 2 folds and close to the solid line of 1∶1 relationship. Furthermore, these prediction models also reduced the measured BCF intra-species variability for all non-model corn species. Therefore, the prediction models established in this study can be applied to other non-model corn species and be useful for predicting the Cd bioconcentration in corn grain and assessing the ecological risk of Cd in different soils. PMID:24324636

  10. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts.

  11. Cross-species genomics matches driver mutations and cell compartments to model ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert A; Wright, Karen D; Poppleton, Helen; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Finkelstein, David; Pounds, Stanley B; Rand, Vikki; Leary, Sarah E S; White, Elsie; Eden, Christopher; Hogg, Twala; Northcott, Paul; Mack, Stephen; Neale, Geoffrey; Wang, Yong-Dong; Coyle, Beth; Atkinson, Jennifer; DeWire, Mariko; Kranenburg, Tanya A; Gillespie, Yancey; Allen, Jeffrey C; Merchant, Thomas; Boop, Fredrick A; Sanford, Robert A; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W; Taylor, Michael D; Grundy, Richard G; Gilbertson, Richard J

    2010-07-29

    Understanding the biology that underlies histologically similar but molecularly distinct subgroups of cancer has proven difficult because their defining genetic alterations are often numerous, and the cellular origins of most cancers remain unknown. We sought to decipher this heterogeneity by integrating matched genetic alterations and candidate cells of origin to generate accurate disease models. First, we identified subgroups of human ependymoma, a form of neural tumour that arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Subgroup-specific alterations included amplifications and homozygous deletions of genes not yet implicated in ependymoma. To select cellular compartments most likely to give rise to subgroups of ependymoma, we matched the transcriptomes of human tumours to those of mouse neural stem cells (NSCs), isolated from different regions of the CNS at different developmental stages, with an intact or deleted Ink4a/Arf locus (that encodes Cdkn2a and b). The transcriptome of human supratentorial ependymomas with amplified EPHB2 and deleted INK4A/ARF matched only that of embryonic cerebral Ink4a/Arf(-/-) NSCs. Notably, activation of Ephb2 signalling in these, but not other, NSCs generated the first mouse model of ependymoma, which is highly penetrant and accurately models the histology and transcriptome of one subgroup of human supratentorial tumour. Further, comparative analysis of matched mouse and human tumours revealed selective deregulation in the expression and copy number of genes that control synaptogenesis, pinpointing disruption of this pathway as a critical event in the production of this ependymoma subgroup. Our data demonstrate the power of cross-species genomics to meticulously match subgroup-specific driver mutations with cellular compartments to model and interrogate cancer subgroups.

  12. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13–25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts. PMID

  13. Anthrax Vaccine Induced Antibodies Provide Cross-Species Prediction of Survival to Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michael P.; Follmann, Dean A.; Lynn, Freyja; Schiffer, Jarad M.; Stark, Greg; Kohberge, Robert; Quinn, Conrad P.; Nuzum, Edwin O.

    2013-01-01

    Because clinical trials to assess the efficacy of vaccines against anthrax are not ethical or feasible, licensure for new anthrax vaccines will likely involve the Food and Drug Administration’s “Animal Rule,” a set of regulations that allow approval of products based on efficacy data only in animals combined with immunogenicity and safety data in animals and humans. US government sponsored animal studies have shown anthrax vaccine efficacy in a variety of settings. We examined data from 21 of those studies to determine if an immunological bridge based on lethal toxin neutralization activity assay (TNA) can predict survival against an inhalation anthrax challenge within and across species and genera. The 21 studies were classified into 11 different settings, each of which had the same animal species, vaccine type and formulation, vaccination schedule, time of TNA measurement, and challenge time. Logistic regression models determined the contribution of vaccine dilution dose and TNA on prediction of survival. For most settings, logistic models using only TNA explained more than 75% of the survival effect of the models with dose additionally included. Cross species survival predictions using TNA were compared to the actual survival and shown to have good agreement (Cohen’s κ ranged from 0.55 to 0.78). In one study design, cynomolgus macaque data predicted 78.6% survival in rhesus macaques (actual survival 83.0%) and 72.6% in rabbits (actual survival, 64.6%). These data add support for the use of TNA as an immunological bridge between species to extrapolate data in animals to predict anthrax vaccine effectiveness in humans. PMID:22972844

  14. Identifying candidate oocyte reprogramming factors using cross-species global transcriptional analysis.

    PubMed

    Awe, Jason P; Byrne, James A

    2013-04-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that the epigenetic reprogramming capacity of the oocyte is superior to that of the current factor-based reprogramming approaches and that some factor-reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) retain a degree of epigenetic memory that can influence differentiation capacity and may be linked to the observed expression of immunogenicity genes in iPSC derivatives. One hypothesis for this differential reprogramming capacity is the "chromatin loosening/enhanced reprogramming" concept, as previously described by John Gurdon and Ian Wilmut, as well as others, which postulates that the oocyte possesses factors that loosen the somatic cell chromatin structure, providing the epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory factors more ready access to repressed genes and thereby significantly increasing epigenetic reprogramming. However, to empirically test this hypothesis a list of candidate oocyte reprogramming factors (CORFs) must be ascertained that are significantly expressed in metaphase II oocytes. Previous studies have focused on intraspecies or cross-species transcriptional analysis of up to two different species of oocytes. In this study, we have identified eight CORFs (ARID2, ASF1A, ASF1B, DPPA3, ING3, MSL3, H1FOO, and KDM6B) based on unbiased global transcriptional analysis of oocytes from three different species (human, rhesus monkey, and mouse) that both demonstrate significant (p<0.05, FC>3) expression in oocytes of all three species and have well-established roles in loosening/opening up chromatin structure. We also identified an additional 15 CORFs that fit within our proposed "chromatin opening/fate transformative" (COFT) model. These CORFs may be able to augment Shinya Yamanaka's previously identified reprogramming factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC) and potentially facilitate the removal of epigenetic memory in iPSCs and/or reduce the expression of immunogenicity genes in iPSC derivatives, and may have

  15. Oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3 are cross-species markers of sleep debt.

    PubMed

    Weljie, Aalim M; Meerlo, Peter; Goel, Namni; Sengupta, Arjun; Kayser, Matthew S; Abel, Ted; Birnbaum, Morris J; Dinges, David F; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-02-24

    Sleep is an essential biological process that is thought to have a critical role in metabolic regulation. In humans, reduced sleep duration has been associated with risk for metabolic disorders, including weight gain, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of sleep loss is only in its nascent stages. In this study we used rat and human models to simulate modern-day conditions of restricted sleep and addressed cross-species consequences via comprehensive metabolite profiling. Serum from sleep-restricted rats was analyzed using polar and nonpolar methods in two independent datasets (n = 10 per study, 3,380 measured features, 407 identified). A total of 38 features were changed across independent experiments, with the majority classified as lipids (18 from 28 identified). In a parallel human study, 92 metabolites were identified as potentially significant, with the majority also classified as lipids (32 of 37 identified). Intriguingly, two metabolites, oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3, were robustly and quantitatively reduced in both species following sleep restriction, and recovered to near baseline levels after sleep restriction (P < 0.05, false-discovery rate < 0.2). Elevated phospholipids were also noted after sleep restriction in both species, as well as metabolites associated with an oxidizing environment. In addition, polar metabolites reflective of neurotransmitters, vitamin B3, and gut metabolism were elevated in sleep-restricted humans. These results are consistent with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and disruptions of the circadian clock. The findings provide a potential link between known pathologies of reduced sleep duration and metabolic dysfunction, and potential biomarkers for sleep loss.

  16. Cross-species pharmacological characterization of the allylglycine seizure model in mice and larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Karine; Afrikanova, Tatiana; Langlois, Melanie; De Prins, An; Buenafe, Olivia E; Rospo, Chiara C; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; de Witte, Peter A M; Crawford, Alexander D; Smolders, Ilse; Esguerra, Camila V; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2015-04-01

    Treatment-resistant seizures affect about a third of patients suffering from epilepsy. To fulfill the need for new medications targeting treatment-resistant seizures, a number of rodent models offer the opportunity to assess a variety of potential treatment approaches. The use of such models, however, has proven to be time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, we performed pharmacological characterization of the allylglycine (AG) seizure model, a simple in vivo model for which we demonstrated a high level of treatment resistance. (d,l)-Allylglycine inhibits glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) - the key enzyme in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) biosynthesis - leading to GABA depletion, seizures, and neuronal damage. We performed a side-by-side comparison of mouse and zebrafish acute AG treatments including biochemical, electrographic, and behavioral assessments. Interestingly, seizure progression rate and GABA depletion kinetics were comparable in both species. Five mechanistically diverse antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were used. Three out of the five AEDs (levetiracetam, phenytoin, and topiramate) showed only a limited protective effect (mainly mortality delay) at doses close to the TD50 (dose inducing motor impairment in 50% of animals) in mice. The two remaining AEDs (diazepam and sodium valproate) displayed protective activity against AG-induced seizures. Experiments performed in zebrafish larvae revealed behavioral AED activity profiles highly analogous to those obtained in mice. Having demonstrated cross-species similarities and limited efficacy of tested AEDs, we propose the use of AG in zebrafish as a convenient and high-throughput model of treatment-resistant seizures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cross-species comparison of genes related to nutrient sensing mechanisms expressed along the intestine.

    PubMed

    van der Wielen, Nikkie; van Avesaat, Mark; de Wit, Nicole J W; Vogels, Jack T W E; Troost, Freddy; Masclee, Ad; Koopmans, Sietse-Jan; van der Meulen, Jan; Boekschoten, Mark V; Müller, Michael; Hendriks, Henk F J; Witkamp, Renger F; Meijerink, Jocelijn

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal chemosensory receptors and transporters are able to detect food-derived molecules and are involved in the modulation of gut hormone release. Gut hormones play an important role in the regulation of food intake and the control of gastrointestinal functioning. This mechanism is often referred to as "nutrient sensing". Knowledge of the distribution of chemosensors along the intestinal tract is important to gain insight in nutrient detection and sensing, both pivotal processes for the regulation of food intake. However, most knowledge is derived from rodents, whereas studies in man and pig are limited, and cross-species comparisons are lacking. To characterize and compare intestinal expression patterns of genes related to nutrient sensing in mice, pigs and humans. Mucosal biopsy samples taken at six locations in human intestine (n = 40) were analyzed by qPCR. Intestinal scrapings from 14 locations in pigs (n = 6) and from 10 locations in mice (n = 4) were analyzed by qPCR and microarray, respectively. The gene expression of glucagon, cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor, taste receptor T1R3, sodium/glucose cotransporter, peptide transporter-1, GPR120, taste receptor T1R1, GPR119 and GPR93 was investigated. Partial least squares (PLS) modeling was used to compare the intestinal expression pattern between the three species. The studied genes were found to display specific expression patterns along the intestinal tract. PLS analysis showed a high similarity between human, pig and mouse in the expression of genes related to nutrient sensing in the distal ileum, and between human and pig in the colon. The gene expression pattern was most deviating between the species in the proximal intestine. Our results give new insights in interspecies similarities and provide new leads for translational research and models aiming to modulate food intake processes in man.

  18. Population genetics of Cryptosporidium meleagridis in humans and birds: evidence for cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfei; Yang, Wenli; Cama, Vitaliano; Wang, Lin; Cabrera, Lilia; Ortega, Ynes; Bern, Caryn; Feng, Yaoyu; Gilman, Robert; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-07-01

    Population genetic studies have been used to understand the transmission of pathogens in humans and animals, especially the role of zoonotic infections and evolution and dispersal of virulent subtypes. In this study, we analysed the genetic diversity and population structure of Cryptosporidium meleagridis, the only known Cryptosporidium species that infects both avian and mammalian hosts and is responsible for approximately 10% of human cryptosporidiosis in some areas. A total of 62 C. meleagridis specimens from children, AIDS patients, and birds in Lima, Peru were characterised by sequence analysis of the ssrRNA gene and five minisatellite, microsatellite and polymorphic markers in chromosome 6, including the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60), 47 kDa glycoprotein (CP47), a serine repeat antigen (MSC6-5), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) and thrombospondin protein 8 (TSP8). The multilocus sequence analysis identified concurrent infections with Cryptosporidium hominis in four AIDS patients and three children. Unique subtypes of C. meleagridis ranged from eight at the gp60 locus (gene diversity -Hd=0.651), three at the RPGR (Hd=0.556), three at the MSC6-5 locus (Hd=0.242), two at TSP8 (Hd=0.198), to one at CP47 (monomorphic), much lower than that of C. hominis in the same area. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium was strong and complete at all gene loci. Intergenic linkage disequilibrium was highly significant (P<0.001) for all pairs of polymorphic loci. Two major groups of subtypes were seen, with most subtypes belonging to group 1. Within group 1, there was no clear population segregation, and two of the 14 multilocus subtypes of C. meleagridis were found in both AIDS patients and birds. We believe that these results provide the first evidence of a clonal population structure of C. meleagridis and the likely occurrence of cross-species transmission of C. meleagridis between birds and humans. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. A Guideline to Family-Wide Comparative State-of-the-Art Quantitative RT-PCR Analysis Exemplified with a Brassicaceae Cross-Species Seed Germination Case Study[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Graeber, Kai; Linkies, Ada; Wood, Andrew T.A.; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Comparative biology includes the comparison of transcriptome and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) data sets in a range of species to detect evolutionarily conserved and divergent processes. Transcript abundance analysis of target genes by qRT-PCR requires a highly accurate and robust workflow. This includes reference genes with high expression stability (i.e., low intersample transcript abundance variation) for correct target gene normalization. Cross-species qRT-PCR for proper comparative transcript quantification requires reference genes suitable for different species. We addressed this issue using tissue-specific transcriptome data sets of germinating Lepidium sativum seeds to identify new candidate reference genes. We investigated their expression stability in germinating seeds of L. sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana by qRT-PCR, combined with in silico analysis of Arabidopsis and Brassica napus microarray data sets. This revealed that reference gene expression stability is higher for a given developmental process between distinct species than for distinct developmental processes within a given single species. The identified superior cross-species reference genes may be used for family-wide comparative qRT-PCR analysis of Brassicaceae seed germination. Furthermore, using germinating seeds, we exemplify optimization of the qRT-PCR workflow for challenging tissues regarding RNA quality, transcript stability, and tissue abundance. Our work therefore can serve as a guideline for moving beyond Arabidopsis by establishing high-quality cross-species qRT-PCR. PMID:21666000

  20. SU-E-T-256: Optimizing the Combination of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Agents Using a Multi-Scale Patient-Specific Monte Carlo Dosimetry Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Besemer, A; Bednarz, B; Titz, B; Grudzinski, J; Weichert, J; Hall, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Combination targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is appealing because it can potentially exploit different mechanisms of action from multiple radionuclides as well as the variable dose rates due to the different radionuclide half-lives. The work describes the development of a multiobjective optimization algorithm to calculate the optimal ratio of radionuclide injection activities for delivery of combination TRT. Methods: The ‘diapeutic’ (diagnostic and therapeutic) agent, CLR1404, was used as a proof-of-principle compound in this work. Isosteric iodine substitution in CLR1404 creates a molecular imaging agent when labeled with I-124 or a targeted radiotherapeutic agent when labeled with I-125 or I-131. PET/CT images of high grade glioma patients were acquired at 4.5, 24, and 48 hours post injection of 124I-CLR1404. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 and 125ICLR1404 absorbed dose (AD) and biological effective dose (BED) were calculated for each patient using a patient-specific Monte Carlo dosimetry platform. The optimal ratio of injection activities for each radionuclide was calculated with a multi-objective optimization algorithm using the weighted sum method. Objective functions such as the tumor dose heterogeneity and the ratio of the normal tissue to tumor doses were minimized and the relative importance weights of each optimization function were varied. Results: For each optimization function, the program outputs a Pareto surface map representing all possible combinations of radionuclide injection activities so that values that minimize the objective function can be visualized. A Pareto surface map of the weighted sum given a set of user-specified importance weights is also displayed. Additionally, the ratio of optimal injection activities as a function of the all possible importance weights is generated so that the user can select the optimal ratio based on the desired weights. Conclusion: Multi-objective optimization of radionuclide injection activities

  1. Microsatellite cross-species amplification and utility in southern African elasmobranchs: A valuable resource for fisheries management and conservation.

    PubMed

    Maduna, Simo N; Rossouw, Charné; Roodt-Wilding, Rouvay; Bester-van der Merwe, Aletta E

    2014-06-10

    Similarly to the rest of the world, southern Africa's diverse chondrichthyan fauna is currently experiencing high fishing pressures from direct and non-direct fisheries to satisfy market demands for shark products such as fins and meat. In this study, the development of microsatellite markers through cross-species amplification of primer sets previously developed for closely related species is reported as an alternative approach to de novo marker development. This included the design of four microsatellite multiplex assays and their cross-species utility in genetic diversity analysis of southern African elasmobranchs. As this study forms part of a larger project on the development of genetic resources for commercially important and endemic southern African species, Mustelus mustelus was used as a candidate species for testing these multiplex assays in down-stream applications. Thirty five microsatellite primer sets previously developed for five elasmobranch species were selected from literature for testing cross-species amplification in 16 elasmobranch species occurring in southern Africa. Cross-species amplification success rates ranged from 28.6%-71.4%. From the successfully amplified microsatellites, 22 loci were selected and evaluated for levels of polymorphism, and four multiplex assays comprising of the 22 microsatellites were successfully constructed, optimised and characterised in a panel of 87 Mustelus mustelus individuals. A total of 125 alleles were observed across all loci, with the number of alleles ranging from 3-12 alleles. Cross-species amplification of the four optimised multiplex assays was further tested on 11 commercially important and endemic southern African elasmobranch species. Percentage of polymorphism ranged from 31.8%-95.5% in these species with polymorphic information content decreasing exponentially with evolutionary distance from the source species. Cross-species amplification of the 35 microsatellites proved to be a time- and cost

  2. Microsatellite cross-species amplification and utility in southern African elasmobranchs: A valuable resource for fisheries management and conservation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Similarly to the rest of the world, southern Africa’s diverse chondrichthyan fauna is currently experiencing high fishing pressures from direct and non-direct fisheries to satisfy market demands for shark products such as fins and meat. In this study, the development of microsatellite markers through cross-species amplification of primer sets previously developed for closely related species is reported as an alternative approach to de novo marker development. This included the design of four microsatellite multiplex assays and their cross-species utility in genetic diversity analysis of southern African elasmobranchs. As this study forms part of a larger project on the development of genetic resources for commercially important and endemic southern African species, Mustelus mustelus was used as a candidate species for testing these multiplex assays in down-stream applications. Results Thirty five microsatellite primer sets previously developed for five elasmobranch species were selected from literature for testing cross-species amplification in 16 elasmobranch species occurring in southern Africa. Cross-species amplification success rates ranged from 28.6%-71.4%. From the successfully amplified microsatellites, 22 loci were selected and evaluated for levels of polymorphism, and four multiplex assays comprising of the 22 microsatellites were successfully constructed, optimised and characterised in a panel of 87 Mustelus mustelus individuals. A total of 125 alleles were observed across all loci, with the number of alleles ranging from 3–12 alleles. Cross-species amplification of the four optimised multiplex assays was further tested on 11 commercially important and endemic southern African elasmobranch species. Percentage of polymorphism ranged from 31.8%-95.5% in these species with polymorphic information content decreasing exponentially with evolutionary distance from the source species. Conclusions Cross-species amplification of the 35

  3. Orbitofrontal Neuroadaptations and Cross-Species Synaptic Biomarkers in Heavy-Drinking Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D.; Woodward, John J.; Randall, Patrick K.; Ball, Lauren E.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairments, uncontrolled drinking, and neuropathological cortical changes characterize alcohol use disorder. Dysfunction of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a critical cortical subregion that controls learning, decision-making, and prediction of reward outcomes, contributes to executive cognitive function deficits in alcoholic individuals. Electrophysiological and quantitative synaptomics techniques were used to test the hypothesis that heavy drinking produces neuroadaptations in the macaque OFC. Integrative bioinformatics and reverse genetic approaches were used to identify and validate synaptic proteins with novel links to heavy drinking in BXD mice. In drinking monkeys, evoked firing of OFC pyramidal neurons was reduced, whereas the amplitude and frequency of postsynaptic currents were enhanced compared with controls. Bath application of alcohol reduced evoked firing in neurons from control monkeys, but not drinking monkeys. Profiling of the OFC synaptome identified alcohol-sensitive proteins that control glutamate release (e.g., SV2A, synaptogyrin-1) and postsynaptic signaling (e.g., GluA1, PRRT2) with no changes in synaptic GABAergic proteins. Western blot analysis confirmed the increase in GluA1 expression in drinking monkeys. An exploratory analysis of the OFC synaptome found cross-species genetic links to alcohol intake in discrete proteins (e.g., C2CD2L, DIRAS2) that discriminated between low- and heavy-drinking monkeys. Validation studies revealed that BXD mouse strains with the D allele at the C2cd2l interval drank less alcohol than B allele strains. Thus, by profiling of the OFC synaptome, we identified changes in proteins controlling glutamate release and postsynaptic signaling and discovered several proteins related to heavy drinking that have potential as novel targets for treating alcohol use disorder. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Clinical research identified cognitive deficits in alcoholic individuals as a risk factor for relapse, and alcoholic

  4. Wildlife-livestock interactions and risk areas for cross-species spread of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Natascha V; Sebulime, Peregrine; White, Richard G; Kock, Richard

    2017-01-23

    The transmission of diseases between livestock and wildlife can be a hindrance to effective disease control. Maintenance hosts and contact rates should be explored to further understand the transmission dynamics at the wildlife-livestock interface. Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) has been shown to have wildlife maintenance hosts and has been confirmed as present in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) in Uganda since the 1960s. The first aim of this study was to explore the spatio-temporal spread of cattle illegally grazing within the QENP recorded by the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) rangers in a wildlife crime database. Secondly, we aimed to quantify wildlife-livestock interactions and cattle movements, on the border of QENP, using a longitudinal questionnaire completed by 30 livestock owners. From this database, 426 cattle sightings were recorded within QENP in 8 years. Thirteen (3.1%) of these came within a 300 m-4 week space-time window of a buffalo herd, using the recorded GPS data. Livestock owners reported an average of 1.04 (95% CI 0.97-1.11) sightings of Uganda kob, waterbuck, buffalo or warthog per day over a 3-month period, with a rate of 0.22 (95% CI 0.20-0.25) sightings of buffalo per farmer per day. Reports placed 85.3% of the ungulate sightings and 88.0% of the buffalo sightings as further than 50 m away. Ungulate sightings were more likely to be closer to cattle at the homestead (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6) compared with the grazing area. Each cattle herd mixed with an average of five other cattle herds at both the communal grazing and watering points on a daily basis. Although wildlife and cattle regularly shared grazing and watering areas, they seldom came into contact close enough for aerosol transmission. Between species infection transmission is therefore likely to be by indirect or non-respiratory routes, which is suspected to be an infrequent mechanism of transmission of BTB. Occasional cross-species

  5. Preclinical QT safety assessment: cross-species comparisons and human translation from an industry consortium.

    PubMed

    Holzgrefe, Henry; Ferber, Georg; Champeroux, Pascal; Gill, Michael; Honda, Masaki; Greiter-Wilke, Andrea; Baird, Theodore; Meyer, Olivier; Saulnier, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    In vivo models have been required to demonstrate relative cardiac safety, but model sensitivity has not been systematically investigated. Cross-species and human translation of repolarization delay, assessed as QT/QTc prolongation, has not been compared employing common methodologies across multiple species and sites. Therefore, the accurate translation of repolarization results within and between preclinical species, and to man, remains problematic. Six pharmaceutical companies entered into an informal consortium designed to collect high-resolution telemetered data in multiple species (dog; n=34, cynomolgus; n=37, minipig; n=12, marmoset; n=14, guinea pig; n=5, and man; n=57). All animals received vehicle and varying doses of moxifloxacin (3-100 mg/kg, p.o.) with telemetered ECGs (≥500 Hz) obtained for 20-24h post-dose. Individual probabilistic QT-RR relationships were derived for each subject. The rate-correction efficacies of the individual (QTca) and generic correction formulae (Bazett, Fridericia, and Van de Water) were objectively assessed as the mean squared slopes of the QTc-RR relationships. Normalized moxifloxacin QTca responses (Veh Δ%/μM) were derived for 1h centered on the moxifloxacin Tmax. All QT-RR ranges demonstrated probabilistic uncertainty; slopes varied distinctly by species where dog and human exhibited the lowest QT rate-dependence, which was much steeper in the cynomolgus and guinea pig. Incorporating probabilistic uncertainty, the normalized QTca-moxifloxacin responses were similarly conserved across all species, including man. The current results provide the first unambiguous evidence that all preclinical in vivo repolarization assays, when accurately modeled and evaluated, yield results that are consistent with the conservation of moxifloxacin-induced QT prolongation across all common preclinical species. Furthermore, these outcomes are directly transferable across all species including man. The consortium results indicate that the

  6. A cross-modal, cross-species comparison of connectivity measures in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Reid, Andrew T; Lewis, John; Bezgin, Gleb; Khundrakpam, Budhachandra; Eickhoff, Simon B; McIntosh, Anthony R; Bellec, Pierre; Evans, Alan C

    2016-01-15

    In systems neuroscience, the term "connectivity" has been defined in numerous ways, according to the particular empirical modality from which it is derived. Due to large differences in the phenomena measured by these modalities, the assumptions necessary to make inferences about axonal connections, and the limitations accompanying each, brain connectivity remains an elusive concept. Despite this, only a handful of studies have directly compared connectivity as inferred from multiple modalities, and there remains much ambiguity over what the term is actually referring to as a biological construct. Here, we perform a direct comparison based on the high-resolution and high-contrast Enhanced Nathan Klein Institute (NKI) Rockland Sample neuroimaging data set, and the CoCoMac database of tract tracing studies. We compare four types of commonly-used primate connectivity analyses: tract tracing experiments, compiled in CoCoMac; group-wise correlation of cortical thickness; tractographic networks computed from diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI); and correlational networks obtained from resting-state BOLD (fMRI). We find generally poor correspondence between all four modalities, in terms of correlated edge weights, binarized comparisons of thresholded networks, and clustering patterns. fMRI and DWI had the best agreement, followed by DWI and CoCoMac, while other comparisons showed striking divergence. Networks had the best correspondence for local ipsilateral and homotopic contralateral connections, and the worst correspondence for long-range and heterotopic contralateral connections. k-Means clustering highlighted the lowest cross-modal and cross-species consensus in lateral and medial temporal lobes, anterior cingulate, and the temporoparietal junction. Comparing the NKI results to those of the lower resolution/contrast International Consortium for Brain Imaging (ICBM) dataset, we find that the relative pattern of intermodal relationships is preserved, but the correspondence

  7. Comparative analysis estimates the relative frequencies of co-divergence and cross-species transmission within viral families

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, Jemma L.

    2017-01-01

    The cross-species transmission of viruses from one host species to another is responsible for the majority of emerging infections. However, it is unclear whether some virus families have a greater propensity to jump host species than others. If related viruses have an evolutionary history of co-divergence with their hosts there should be evidence of topological similarities between the virus and host phylogenetic trees, whereas host jumping generates incongruent tree topologies. By analyzing co-phylogenetic processes in 19 virus families and their eukaryotic hosts we provide a quantitative and comparative estimate of the relative frequency of virus-host co-divergence versus cross-species transmission among virus families. Notably, our analysis reveals that cross-species transmission is a near universal feature of the viruses analyzed here, with virus-host co-divergence occurring less frequently and always on a subset of viruses. Despite the overall high topological incongruence among virus and host phylogenies, the Hepadnaviridae, Polyomaviridae, Poxviridae, Papillomaviridae and Adenoviridae, all of which possess double-stranded DNA genomes, exhibited more frequent co-divergence than the other virus families studied here. At the other extreme, the virus and host trees for all the RNA viruses studied here, particularly the Rhabdoviridae and the Picornaviridae, displayed high levels of topological incongruence, indicative of frequent host switching. Overall, we show that cross-species transmission plays a major role in virus evolution, with all the virus families studied here having the potential to jump host species, and that increased sampling will likely reveal more instances of host jumping. PMID:28178344

  8. Short Communication Microsatellite loci in the tetraploid spined loach, Cobitis biwae, and cross-species amplification in four related species.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, O; Marín, A; Kowalewska, K; Fujimoto, T; Arai, K

    2016-09-23

    Fifteen microsatellite loci were identified in the tetraploid spined loach, Cobitis biwae (Teleostei: Cobitidae). Among these, 14 were polymorphic (5-31 alleles) and showed moderate to high cross-species amplification transferability in four related species, Cobitis matsubarai, Cobitis taenia, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, and Misgurnus fossilis. The loci, described herein, will be useful for population genetics, phylogeny, parentage analysis, and detection of hybridization among Cobitis species.

  9. Overview of the commercial OPAL LiDAR optimized for rotorcraft platforms operating in degraded visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Philip; Borribanbunpotkat, Kiatchai; Trickey, Evan; Iles, Peter; Sekerka, Mike

    2014-06-01

    Neptec has developed a family of obscurant-penetrating 3D laser scanners called OPAL 2.0 that are being adapted for rotorcraft platforms. Neptec and Boeing have been working on an integrated system utilizing the OPAL LiDAR to support operations in degraded visual environments. OPAL scanners incorporate Neptec's patented obscurantpenetrating LiDAR technology which was extensively tested in controlled dust environments and helicopters for brownout mitigation. The OPAL uses a scanning mechanism based on the Risley prism pair. Data acquisition rates can go as high as 200kHz for ranges within 200m and 25kHz for ranges exceeding 200m. The scan patterns are created by the rotation of two prisms under independent motor control. The geometry and material properties of the prisms will define the conical field-of-view of the sensor, which can be set up to 120 degrees. Through detailed simulations and analysis of mission profiles, the system can be tailored for applications to rotorcrafts. Examples of scan patterns and control schemes based on these simulations will be provided along with data density predictions versus acquisition time for applicable DVE scenarios. Preliminary 3D data acquired in clear and obscurant conditions will be presented.

  10. When humans are the exception: cross-species databases at the interface of biological and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Leonelli, Sabina

    2012-04-01

    Cross-species comparison has long been regarded as a stepping-stone for medical research, enabling the discovery and testing of prospective treatments before they undergo clinical trial on humans. Post-genomic medicine has made cross-species comparison crucial in another respect: the 'community databases' developed to collect and disseminate data on model organisms are now often used as a template for the dissemination of data on humans and as a tool for comparing results of medical significance across the human-animal boundary. This paper identifies and discusses four key problems encountered by database curators when integrating human and non-human data within the same database: (1) picking criteria for what counts as reliable evidence, (2) selecting metadata, (3) standardising and describing research materials and (4) choosing nomenclature to classify data. An analysis of these hurdles reveals epistemic disagreement and controversies underlying cross-species comparisons, which in turn highlight important differences in the experimental cultures of biologists and clinicians trying to make sense of these data. By considering database development through the eyes of curators, this study casts new light on the complex conjunctions of biological and clinical practice, model organisms and human subjects, and material and virtual sources of evidence--thus emphasizing the fragmented, localized and inherently translational nature of biomedicine.

  11. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis reveals conservation and variation in response to metal stress in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As one of the most dominant bacterial groups on Earth, cyanobacteria play a pivotal role in the global carbon cycling and the Earth atmosphere composition. Understanding their molecular responses to environmental perturbations has important scientific and environmental values. Since important biological processes or networks are often evolutionarily conserved, the cross-species transcriptional network analysis offers a useful strategy to decipher conserved and species-specific transcriptional mechanisms that cells utilize to deal with various biotic and abiotic disturbances, and it will eventually lead to a better understanding of associated adaptation and regulatory networks. Results In this study, the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) approach was used to establish transcriptional networks for four important cyanobacteria species under metal stress, including iron depletion and high copper conditions. Cross-species network comparison led to discovery of several core response modules and genes possibly essential to metal stress, as well as species-specific hub genes for metal stresses in different cyanobacteria species, shedding light on survival strategies of cyanobacteria responding to different environmental perturbations. Conclusions The WGCNA analysis demonstrated that the application of cross-species transcriptional network analysis will lead to novel insights to molecular response to environmental changes which will otherwise not be achieved by analyzing data from a single species. PMID:23421563

  12. Noninvasive individual and species identification of jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor) and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in Belize, Central America using cross-species microsatellites and faecal DNA.

    PubMed

    Wultsch, Claudia; Waits, Lisette P; Kelly, Marcella J

    2014-11-01

    There is a great need to develop efficient, noninvasive genetic sampling methods to study wild populations of multiple, co-occurring, threatened felids. This is especially important for molecular scatology studies occurring in challenging tropical environments where DNA degrades quickly and the quality of faecal samples varies greatly. We optimized 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci for jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor) and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) and assessed their utility for cross-species amplification. Additionally, we tested their reliability for species and individual identification using DNA from faeces of wild felids detected by a scat detector dog across Belize in Central America. All microsatellite loci were successfully amplified in the three target species, were polymorphic with average expected heterozygosities of HE = 0.60 ± 0.18 (SD) for jaguars, HE = 0.65 ± 0.21 (SD) for pumas and HE = 0.70 ± 0.13 (SD) for ocelots and had an overall PCR amplification success of 61%. We used this nuclear DNA primer set to successfully identify species and individuals from 49% of 1053 field-collected scat samples. This set of optimized microsatellite multiplexes represents a powerful tool for future efforts to conduct noninvasive studies on multiple, wild Neotropical felids.

  13. Assessment and Optimization of the GeneXpert Diagnostic Platform for Detection of Ebola Virus RNA in Seminal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, James; Higgs, Elizabeth; Fallah, Mosoka; Nason, Martha; Stavale, Eric; Marchand, Jonathan; Reilly, Cavan; Jensen, Kenneth; Dighero-Kemp, Bonnie; Tuznik, Kaylie; Logue, James; Bolay, Fatorma; Hensley, Lisa

    2017-02-15

    Recent studies have suggested that Ebola virus (EBOV) ribonucleic acid (RNA) potentially present in the semen of a large number of survivors of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in Western Africa may contribute to sexual transmission of EVD and generate new clusters of cases in regions previously declared EVD-free. These findings drive the immediate need for a reliable, rapid, user-friendly assay for detection of EBOV RNA in semen that is deployable to multiple sites across Western Africa. In this study, we optimized the Xpert EBOV assay for semen samples by adding dithiothreitol. Compared to the assays currently in use in Liberia (including Ebola Zaire Target 1, major groove binder real-time-polymerase chain reaction assays, and original Xpert EBOV assay), the modified Xpert EBOV assay demonstrated greater sensitivity than the comparator assays. Thus, the modified Xpert EBOV assay is optimal for large-scale monitoring of EBOV RNA persistence in male survivors. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Parallelizing ATLAS Reconstruction and Simulation: Issues and Optimization Solutions for Scaling on Multi- and Many-CPU Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, C.; Binet, S.; Jackson, K.; Levinthal, D.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Yao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal limitations have forced CPU manufacturers to shift from simply increasing clock speeds to improve processor performance, to producing chip designs with multi- and many-core architectures. Further the cores themselves can run multiple threads as a zero overhead context switch allowing low level resource sharing (Intel Hyperthreading). To maximize bandwidth and minimize memory latency, memory access has become non uniform (NUMA). As manufacturers add more cores to each chip, a careful understanding of the underlying architecture is required in order to fully utilize the available resources. We present AthenaMP and the Atlas event loop manager, the driver of the simulation and reconstruction engines, which have been rewritten to make use of multiple cores, by means of event based parallelism, and final stage I/O synchronization. However, initial studies on 8 andl6 core Intel architectures have shown marked non-linearities as parallel process counts increase, with as much as 30% reductions in event throughput in some scenarios. Since the Intel Nehalem architecture (both Gainestown and Westmere) will be the most common choice for the next round of hardware procurements, an understanding of these scaling issues is essential. Using hardware based event counters and Intel's Performance Tuning Utility, we have studied the performance bottlenecks at the hardware level, and discovered optimization schemes to maximize processor throughput. We have also produced optimization mechanisms, common to all large experiments, that address the extreme nature of today's HEP code, which due to it's size, places huge burdens on the memory infrastructure of today's processors.

  15. Design of an enzyme cocktail consisting of different fungal platforms for efficient hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse: Optimization and synergism studies.

    PubMed

    Méndez Arias, Johanna; Modesto, Luiz Felipe Amarante; Polikarpov, Igor; Pereira, Nei

    2016-09-01

    Lignocellulosic materials represent a very important and promising source of renewable biomass. In order to turn them into fermentable sugars, synergism among the different enzymes that carry out bioconversion of these materials is one of the main factors that should be considered. Experimental mixture design was performed to optimize the proportion of enzymes produced by native strains of Trichoderma harzianum IOC 3844, Penicillium funiculosum ATCC 11797, and Aspergillus niger ATCC 1004, resulting in a proportion of 15, 50, and 35%, respectively. This mixture was able to hydrolyze 25 g/L of pretreated sugarcane bagasse with 91% of yield after 48 h of enzymatic reaction. Synergism along the hydrolysis process, besides the influence of lignin, hemicellulose, and solids loading, were also studied. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on Central Composite Rotatable Design was used to optimize solids and protein loadings to increase glucose release and enzymatic hydrolysis yield. The optimum solid and protein loadings established with RSM were 196 g/L and 24 mg/g cellulose, respectively, and under these conditions (94.1 ± 8) g/L of glucose were obtained, corresponding to a hydrolysis yield of 64%. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1222-1229, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Development of a mobile device optimized cross platform-compatible oral pathology and radiology spaced repetition system for dental education.

    PubMed

    Al-Rawi, Wisam; Easterling, Lauren; Edwards, Paul C

    2015-04-01

    Combining active recall testing with spaced repetition increases memory retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare students' perception and utilization of an electronic spaced repetition oral pathology-radiology system in dental hygiene education and predoctoral dental education. The study employed an open-source suite of applications to create electronic "flashcards" that can be individually adjusted for frequency of repetition, depending on a user's assessment of difficulty. Accessible across multiple platforms (iOS, Android, Linux, OSX, Windows) as well as via any web-based browser, this framework was used to develop an oral radiology-oral pathology database of case-based questions. This system was introduced in two courses: sophomore oral pathology for dental students and sophomore radiology for dental hygiene students. Students were provided free software and/or mobile tablet devices as well as a database of 300 electronic question cards. Study participants were surveyed on frequency and extent of use. Perception-based surveys were used to evaluate their attitudes towards this technology. Of the eligible students, 12 of 22 (54.5%) dental hygiene and 49 of 107 (45.8%) dental students responded to the surveys. Adoption rates and student feedback were compared between the two groups. Among the respondents, acceptance of this technology with respect to educational usefulness was similar for the dental and dental hygiene students (median=5 on a five-point scale; dental hygiene interquartile range (IQR)=0; dental IQR=1). Only a minority of the survey respondents (25% dental, 33% dental hygiene) took advantage of one of the main benefits of this technology: automated spaced repetition.

  17. PhosphOrtholog: a web-based tool for cross-species mapping of orthologous protein post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Sadrieh, Arash; Hoffman, Nolan J; Parker, Benjamin L; Humphrey, Sean J; Stöckli, Jacqueline; Hill, Adam P; James, David E; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa

    2015-08-19

    Most biological processes are influenced by protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). Identifying novel PTM sites in different organisms, including humans and model organisms, has expedited our understanding of key signal transduction mechanisms. However, with increasing availability of deep, quantitative datasets in diverse species, there is a growing need for tools to facilitate cross-species comparison of PTM data. This is particularly important because functionally important modification sites are more likely to be evolutionarily conserved; yet cross-species comparison of PTMs is difficult since they often lie in structurally disordered protein domains. Current tools that address this can only map known PTMs between species based on known orthologous phosphosites, and do not enable the cross-species mapping of newly identified modification sites. Here, we addressed this by developing a web-based software tool, PhosphOrtholog ( www.phosphortholog.com ) that accurately maps protein modification sites between different species. This facilitates the comparison of datasets derived from multiple species, and should be a valuable tool for the proteomics community. Here we describe PhosphOrtholog, a web-based application for mapping known and novel orthologous PTM sites from experimental data obtained from different species. PhosphOrtholog is the only generic and automated tool that enables cross-species comparison of large-scale PTM datasets without relying on existing PTM databases. This is achieved through pairwise sequence alignment of orthologous protein residues. To demonstrate its utility we apply it to two sets of human and rat muscle phosphoproteomes generated following insulin and exercise stimulation, respectively, and one publicly available mouse phosphoproteome following cellular stress revealing high mapping and coverage efficiency. Although coverage statistics are dataset dependent, PhosphOrtholog increased the number of cross-species mapped sites

  18. A unified optimization platform comparison of three radiosurgery techniques: Gamma Knife, BrainLAB micro-MLC, and NOMOS MIMiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheek, Dennis Allen

    The objective of this research is to build a unified optimization treatment planning system in order to accurately compare the three modalities unburdened by underlying assumptions that could alter the outcome of the comparison. The hypothesis for the dissertation is: Three photon radiosurgery delivery mechanisms are utilized for the delivery of necrotic radiation doses to a cranial lesion: the Gamma Knife, micro-MLC intensity modulated radiosurgery, and MIMiC based intensity modulated radiosurgery. Each modality has its own strength and weaknesses in their ability to deliver radiosurgery treatments. We hypothesize the MIMiC based intensity modulated radiosurgery will allow improvements to radiosurgery treatments compared to the conventional Gamma Knife and micro-MLC, as quantified by the following metrics: isodose line display, dose volume histograms, Ian Paddick conformality index, homogeneity index, and objective function score. The specific aims for the dissertation are: (1) Develop a radiosurgery treatment planning software platform to import image and structure data and to offer evaluation tools. The evaluation tools will include isodose line display, dose volume histogram, Ian Paddick conformality index, homogeneity index, and objective function score. (2) Develop a simulated annealing optimization routine, with an associated objective function, that will determine the optimal treatment plan for the defined solution space. The objective, or cost function will be based on Ian Paddick conformality index. (3) Perform multiple repeat optimizations of each modality for a given lesion in order to gather statistical information about the minimum solution found. This test will quantify the ability of the optimization routine to arrive at a similar local minimum and therefore quantify the reliability of the comparison performed in specific aim five. (4) Investigate the affect of the Gamma Knife's shot limitation on the resulting dose distribution for a given lesion

  19. Gyrase ATPase domain as an antitubercular drug discovery platform: structure-based design and lead optimization of nitrothiazolyl carboxamide analogues.

    PubMed

    Jeankumar, Variam Ullas; Renuka, Janupally; Kotagiri, Sonali; Saxena, Shalini; Kakan, Shruti Singh; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda Padma; Yellanki, Swapna; Kulkarni, Pushkar; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we explored the pharmaceutically underexploited mycobacterial gyrase ATPase (GyrB) domain as a template for a structure-based virtual screening of our in-house (BITS Pilani) compound collection to discover new inhibitors targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb.) The hit identified was further customized by using a combination of molecular docking and medicinal chemistry strategies to obtain an optimized analogue displaying considerable in vitro enzyme efficacy and bactericidal properties against the M.tb. H37 Rv strain. The binding affinity of the ligand toward the GyrB domain was reascertained by differential scanning fluorimetry experiments. Further evaluation of the hERG toxicity (a major limitation among the previously reported N-linked aminopiperidine analogues) indicated these molecules to be completely devoid of cardiotoxicity, a significant achievement within this class. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. An Eddy Current Testing Platform System for Pipe Defect Inspection Based on an Optimized Eddy Current Technique Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Razali, Ramdan; Ali, Kharudin; Faraj, Moneer A.

    2017-01-01

    The use of the eddy current technique (ECT) for the non-destructive testing of conducting materials has become increasingly important in the past few years. The use of the non-destructive ECT plays a key role in the ensuring the safety and integrity of the large industrial structures such as oil and gas pipelines. This paper introduce a novel ECT probe design integrated with the distributed ECT inspection system (DSECT) use for crack inspection on inner ferromagnetic pipes. The system consists of an array of giant magneto-resistive (GMR) sensors, a pneumatic system, a rotating magnetic field excitation source and a host PC acting as the data analysis center. Probe design parameters, namely probe diameter, an excitation coil and the number of GMR sensors in the array sensor is optimized using numerical optimization based on the desirability approach. The main benefits of DSECT can be seen in terms of its modularity and flexibility for the use of different types of magnetic transducers/sensors, and signals of a different nature with either digital or analog outputs, making it suited for the ECT probe design using an array of GMR magnetic sensors. A real-time application of the DSECT distributed system for ECT inspection can be exploited for the inspection of 70 mm carbon steel pipe. In order to predict the axial and circumference defect detection, a mathematical model is developed based on the technique known as response surface methodology (RSM). The inspection results of a carbon steel pipe sample with artificial defects indicate that the system design is highly efficient. PMID:28335399

  1. An Eddy Current Testing Platform System for Pipe Defect Inspection Based on an Optimized Eddy Current Technique Probe Design.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N; Razali, Ramdan; Ali, Kharudin; Faraj, Moneer A

    2017-03-13

    The use of the eddy current technique (ECT) for the non-destructive testing of conducting materials has become increasingly important in the past few years. The use of the non-destructive ECT plays a key role in the ensuring the safety and integrity of the large industrial structures such as oil and gas pipelines. This paper introduce a novel ECT probe design integrated with the distributed ECT inspection system (DSECT) use for crack inspection on inner ferromagnetic pipes. The system consists of an array of giant magneto-resistive (GMR) sensors, a pneumatic system, a rotating magnetic field excitation source and a host PC acting as the data analysis center. Probe design parameters, namely probe diameter, an excitation coil and the number of GMR sensors in the array sensor is optimized using numerical optimization based on the desirability approach. The main benefits of DSECT can be seen in terms of its modularity and flexibility for the use of different types of magnetic transducers/sensors, and signals of a different nature with either digital or analog outputs, making it suited for the ECT probe design using an array of GMR magnetic sensors. A real-time application of the DSECT distributed system for ECT inspection can be exploited for the inspection of 70 mm carbon steel pipe. In order to predict the axial and circumference defect detection, a mathematical model is developed based on the technique known as response surface methodology (RSM). The inspection results of a carbon steel pipe sample with artificial defects indicate that the system design is highly efficient.

  2. Mapping complementary features of cross-species structural connectivity to construct realistic "Virtual Brains".

    PubMed

    Bezgin, Gleb; Solodkin, Ana; Bakker, Rembrandt; Ritter, Petra; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2017-04-01

    Modern systems neuroscience increasingly leans on large-scale multi-lab neuroinformatics initiatives to provide necessary capacity for biologically realistic modeling of primate whole-brain activity. Here, we present a framework to assemble primate brain's biologically plausible anatomical backbone for such modeling initiatives. In this framework, structural connectivity is determined by adding complementary information from invasive macaque axonal tract tracing and non-invasive human diffusion tensor imaging. Both modalities are combined by means of available interspecies registration tools and a newly developed Bayesian probabilistic modeling approach to extract common connectivity evidence. We demonstrate how this novel framework is embedded in the whole-brain simulation platform called The Virtual Brain (TVB). Hum Brain Mapp 38:2080-2093, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Detection of Genotype 4 Swine Hepatitis E Virus in Systemic Tissues in Cross-Species Infected Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiaoxing; An, Junqing; She, Ruiping; Shi, Ruihan; Hao, Wenzhuo; Soomro, MajidHussain; Yuan, Xuerui; Yang, Jinling; Wang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be transmitted across species. According to previous reports, swine HEV has two genotypes, genotype 3 and 4, and both can infect humans by the fecal-oral route. Thus, it is crucial for the control of HEV zoonotic transmission to evaluate the dynamics of viral shedding and distribution in different tissues during cross-species infection by HEV. In this study, rabbits were infected with genotype 4 swine HEV by the intraperitoneal route. The results showed that HEV RNA not only shed in the feces but also in the saliva of some rabbits during infection with swine HEV. Viremia appeared late after infection, and anti-HEV IgG was not obvious until the appearance of high viremia levels. After the rabbits were euthanized, a histopathological examination showed that the livers developed overt hepatitis accompanied by an elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). Furthermore, HEV RNA was detected in various tissues, especially in the salivary glands and tonsils. Subsequently, negative-stranded HEV RNA was practiced in tissues with positive HEV RNA, which demonstrated that HEV replicated in the tissues. Next, we harvested additional tissues from the liver, salivary gland, tonsil, spleen, thymus gland, lymph node and intestine, which are known as replication sites of swine HEV. Additionally, we also observed the HEV antigen distributed in the organs above through immunohistochemical staining. These results demonstrate that rabbits could be used as an animal model for researching cross-species infection of genotype 4 HEV. It is also noteworthy that HEV can shed in the saliva and presents the risk of droplet transmission. These new data provide valuable information for understanding cross-species infection by HEV. PMID:28129390

  4. Global patterns of apparent copy number variation in birds revealed by cross-species comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Al Mutery, Abdullah; Smith, Deborah; Völker, Martin; Hojjat, Nilofour; Raja, Sannaa; Trim, Steven; Houde, Peter; Boecklen, William J; Griffin, Darren K

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing interest in copy number variation (CNV) and the recognition of its importance in phenotype, disease, adaptation and speciation. CNV data is usually ascertained by array-CGH within-species, but similar inter-species comparisons have also been made in primates, mice and domestic mammals. Here, we conducted a broad appraisal of putative cross-species CNVs in birds, 16 species in all, using the standard array-CGH approach. Using a chicken oligonucleotide microarray, we detected 790 apparent CNVs within 135 unique regions and developed a bioinformatic tool 'CNV Analyser' for analysing and visualising cross-species data sets. We successfully addressed four hypotheses as follows: (a) Cross-species CNVs (compared to chicken) are, as suggested from preliminary evidence, smaller and fewer in number than in mammals; this 'dogma' was rejected in the light of the new evidence. (b) CNVs in birds are likely to have a functional effect through an association with genes; a large proportion of detected regions (70 %) were indeed associated with genes (suggesting functional significance), however, not necessarily more so than in mammals. (c) There are more CNVs in birds with more rearranged karyotypes; this hypothesis was rejected. Indeed, Falco species contained fewer than most with relatively standard (chicken-like) karyotypes. (d) There are more CNVs per megabase on micro-chromosomes than macrochromosomes; this hypothesis was accepted. Indeed, in species with rearranged karyotypes characterised by chromosomal fusions, the fused former microchromosomes still 'behaved' as though they were their microchromosomal ancestors. Gene ontology analysis of CNVRs revealed enrichment in immune response and antigen presentation genes and five CNVRs were perfectly correlated with the unique loss of sexual dichromatism in one Galliformes species.

  5. Design factors that influence PCR amplification success of cross-species primers among 1147 mammalian primer pairs

    PubMed Central

    Housley, Donna JE; Zalewski, Zachary A; Beckett, Stephanie E; Venta, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Background Cross-species primers have been used with moderate success to address a variety of questions concerning genome structure, evolution, and gene function. However, the factors affecting their success have never been adequately addressed, particularly with respect to producing a consistent method to achieve high throughput. Using 1,147 mammalian cross-species primer pairs (1089 not previously reported), we tested several factors to determine their influence on the probability that a given target will amplify in a given species under a single amplification condition. These factors included: number of mismatches between the two species (the index species) used to identify conserved regions to which the primers were designed, GC-content of the gene and amplified region, CpG dinucleotides in the primer region, degree of encoded protein conservation, length of the primers, and the degree of evolutionary distance between the target species and the two index species. Results The amplification success rate for the cross-species primers was significantly influenced by the number of mismatches between the two index species (6–8% decrease per mismatch in a primer pair), the GC-content within the amplified region (for the dog, GC ≥ 50%, 56.9% amplified; GC<50%, 74.2% amplified), the degree of protein conservation (R2 = 0.14) and the relatedness of the target species to the index species. For the dog, 598 products of 930 primer pairs (64.3%) (excluding primers in which dog was an index species) were sequenced and shown to be the expected product, with an additional three percent producing the incorrect sequence. When hamster DNA was used with the single amplification condition in a microtiter plate-based format, 510 of 1087 primer pairs (46.9%) produced amplified products. The primer pairs are spaced at an average distance of 2.3 Mb in the human genome and may be used to produce up to several hundred thousand bp of species-specific sequence. Conclusion The most

  6. Design factors that influence PCR amplification success of cross-species primers among 1147 mammalian primer pairs.

    PubMed

    Housley, Donna J E; Zalewski, Zachary A; Beckett, Stephanie E; Venta, Patrick J

    2006-10-09

    Cross-species primers have been used with moderate success to address a variety of questions concerning genome structure, evolution, and gene function. However, the factors affecting their success have never been adequately addressed, particularly with respect to producing a consistent method to achieve high throughput. Using 1,147 mammalian cross-species primer pairs (1089 not previously reported), we tested several factors to determine their influence on the probability that a given target will amplify in a given species under a single amplification condition. These factors included: number of mismatches between the two species (the index species) used to identify conserved regions to which the primers were designed, GC-content of the gene and amplified region, CpG dinucleotides in the primer region, degree of encoded protein conservation, length of the primers, and the degree of evolutionary distance between the target species and the two index species. The amplification success rate for the cross-species primers was significantly influenced by the number of mismatches between the two index species (6-8% decrease per mismatch in a primer pair), the GC-content within the amplified region (for the dog, GC > or = 50%, 56.9% amplified; GC<50%, 74.2% amplified), the degree of protein conservation (R2 = 0.14) and the relatedness of the target species to the index species. For the dog, 598 products of 930 primer pairs (64.3%) (excluding primers in which dog was an index species) were sequenced and shown to be the expected product, with an additional three percent producing the incorrect sequence. When hamster DNA was used with the single amplification condition in a microtiter plate-based format, 510 of 1087 primer pairs (46.9%) produced amplified products. The primer pairs are spaced at an average distance of 2.3 Mb in the human genome and may be used to produce up to several hundred thousand bp of species-specific sequence. The most important factors influencing the

  7. Intrastriatal transplantation of cross-species fetal striatal cells reduces abnormal movements in a primate model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hantraye, P; Riche, D; Maziere, M; Isacson, O

    1992-01-01

    Huntington disease is a neurological movement disorder involving massive neuronal death in the caudate-putamen region of the brain. Neither preventive nor curative therapy exists for this disease. The implantation of cross-species striatal neural precursor cells into the lesioned striatum of nonhuman primates (baboons) reduced the abnormal movements seen in the disease model. These abnormal movements reappeared after immunological rejection of the implanted striatal cells and were not modified by transplantation with nonstriatal cells. These findings encourage further experimentation toward the use of cell sources other than human fetal cells in a potential clinical application to Huntington disease. Images PMID:1533285

  8. Detection of RHDV strains in the Iberian hare (Lepus granatensis): earliest evidence of rabbit lagovirus cross-species infection.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana M; Marques, Sara; Silva, Eliane; Magalhães, Maria J; Pinheiro, Ana; Alves, Paulo C; Le Pendu, Jacques; Esteves, Pedro J; Thompson, Gertrude; Abrantes, Joana

    2014-09-24

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a highly lethal Lagovirus, family Caliciviridae, that threatens European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Although a related virus severely affects hares, cross-species infection was only recently described for new variant RHDV in Cape hares (Lepus capensis mediterraneus). We sequenced two strains from dead Iberian hares (Lepus granatensis) collected in the 1990s in Portugal. Clinical signs were compatible with a Lagovirus infection. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete capsid gene positioned them in the RHDV genogroup that circulated on the Iberian Peninsula at that time. This is the earliest evidence of RHDV affecting a species other than European rabbits.

  9. Characterization of highly informative cross-species microsatellite panels for the Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) including five novel primers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret Kellogg; Broderick, Damien; Ovenden, Jennifer R.; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Bonde, Robert K.; McGuire, Peter M.; Lanyon, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    The Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are threatened species of aquatic mammals in the order Sirenia. Sirenian conservation and management actions would benefit from a more complete understanding of genetic diversity and population structure. Generally, species-specific microsatellite markers are employed in conservation genetic studies; however, robust markers can be difficult and costly to isolate. To increase the number of available markers, dugong and manatee microsatellite primers were evaluated for cross-species amplification. Furthermore, one manatee and four dugong novel primers are reported. After polymerase chain reaction optimization, 23 (92%) manatee primers successfully amplified dugong DNA, of which 11 (48%) were polymorphic. Of the 32 dugong primers tested, 27 (84%) yielded product in the manatee, of which 17 (63%) were polymorphic. Dugong and manatee primers were compared and the most informative markers were selected to create robust and informative marker-panels for each species. These crossspecies microsatellite marker-panels can be employed to assess other sirenian populations and can provide beneficial information for the protection and management of these unique mammals.

  10. CROSS-SPECIES COMPARISON OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDE METABOLITES USING RAT AND RAINBOW TROUT (ONCHLORHYNCHUS MYKISS) HEPATIC MICROSOMES AND PURIFIED HUMAN CYP 3A4

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risk assessment frequently relies on cross-species extrapolation to predict acute toxicity from chemical exposures. A major concern for environmental risk characterization is the degree of uncertainty in assessing xenobiotic biotansformation processes. Although inheren...

  11. CROSS-SPECIES COMPARISON OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDE METABOLITES USING RAT AND RAINBOW TROUT (ONCHLORHYNCHUS MYKISS) HEPATIC MICROSOMES AND PURIFIED HUMAN CYP 3A4

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risk assessment frequently relies on cross-species extrapolation to predict acute toxicity from chemical exposures. A major concern for environmental risk characterization is the degree of uncertainty in assessing xenobiotic biotansformation processes. Although inheren...

  12. Systematic engineering of TCA cycle for optimal production of a four-carbon platform chemical 4-hydroxybutyric acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sol; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-11-01

    To address climate change and environmental problems, it is becoming increasingly important to establish biorefineries for the production of chemicals from renewable non-food biomass. Here we report the development of Escherichia coli strains capable of overproducing a four-carbon platform chemical 4-hybroxybutyric acid (4-HB). Because 4-HB production is significantly affected by aeration level, genome-scale metabolic model-based engineering strategies were designed under aerobic and microaerobic conditions with emphasis on oxidative/reductive TCA branches and glyoxylate shunt. Several different metabolic engineering strategies were employed to develop strains suitable for fermentation both under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. It was found that microaerobic condition was more efficient than aerobic condition in achieving higher titer and productivity of 4-HB. The final engineered strain produced 103.4g/L of 4-HB by microaerobic fed-batch fermentation using glycerol. The aeration-dependent optimization strategy of TCA cycle will be useful for developing microbial strains producing other reduced derivative chemicals of TCA cycle intermediates.

  13. Optimized inducible shRNA and CRISPR/Cas9 platforms for in vitro studies of human development using hPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Bertero, Alessandro; Pawlowski, Matthias; Ortmann, Daniel; Snijders, Kirsten; Yiangou, Loukia; Cardoso de Brito, Miguel; Brown, Stephanie; Bernard, William G.; Cooper, James D.; Giacomelli, Elisa; Gambardella, Laure; Hannan, Nicholas R. F.; Iyer, Dharini; Sampaziotis, Fotios; Serrano, Felipe; Zonneveld, Mariëlle C. F.; Sinha, Sanjay; Kotter, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Inducible loss of gene function experiments are necessary to uncover mechanisms underlying development, physiology and disease. However, current methods are complex, lack robustness and do not work in multiple cell types. Here we address these limitations by developing single-step optimized inducible gene knockdown or knockout (sOPTiKD or sOPTiKO) platforms. These are based on genetic engineering of human genomic safe harbors combined with an improved tetracycline-inducible system and CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We exemplify the efficacy of these methods in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), and show that generation of sOPTiKD/KO hPSCs is simple, rapid and allows tightly controlled individual or multiplexed gene knockdown or knockout in hPSCs and in a wide variety of differentiated cells. Finally, we illustrate the general applicability of this approach by investigating the function of transcription factors (OCT4 and T), cell cycle regulators (cyclin D family members) and epigenetic modifiers (DPY30). Overall, sOPTiKD and sOPTiKO provide a unique opportunity for functional analyses in multiple cell types relevant for the study of human development. PMID:27899508

  14. Searching ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to inform systematic reviews: what are the optimal search approaches?

    PubMed

    Glanville, Julie M; Duffy, Steven; McCool, Rachael; Varley, Danielle

    2014-07-01

    Since 2005, International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) member journals have required that clinical trials be registered in publicly available trials registers before they are considered for publication. The research explores whether it is adequate, when searching to inform systematic reviews, to search for relevant clinical trials using only public trials registers and to identify the optimal search approaches in trials registers. A search was conducted in ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for research studies that had been included in eight systematic reviews. Four search approaches (highly sensitive, sensitive, precise, and highly precise) were performed using the basic and advanced interfaces in both resources. On average, 84% of studies were not listed in either resource. The largest number of included studies was retrieved in ClinicalTrials.gov and ICTRP when a sensitive search approach was used in the basic interface. The use of the advanced interface maintained or improved sensitivity in 16 of 19 strategies for Clinicaltrials.gov and 8 of 18 for ICTRP. No single search approach was sensitive enough to identify all studies included in the 6 reviews. Trials registers cannot yet be relied upon as the sole means to locate trials for systematic reviews. Trials registers lag behind the major bibliographic databases in terms of their search interfaces. For systematic reviews, trials registers and major bibliographic databases should be searched. Trials registers should be searched using sensitive approaches, and both the registers consulted in this study should be searched.

  15. New-generation multicistronic expression platform: pTRIDENT vectors containing size-optimized IRES elements enable homing endonuclease-based cistron swapping into lentiviral expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Fux, Cornelia; Langer, Dominik; Kelm, Jens M; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2004-04-20

    Capitalizing on a proven multicistronic expression vector platform we have designed novel pTRIDENT vectors which (1). enable coordinated expression of three desired transgenes, (2). are size-optimized, (3). take advantage of small highly efficient internal ribosome entry sites of the GTX or Rbm3 type, (4). harbor various sites specific for homing endonucleases facilitating promoter/multicistronic expression unit/polyadenylation site swapping as well as (5). straightforward integration into human HIV-l-based lentiviral expression vectors tailored to contain compatible homing endonucleases. Multicistronic expression profiles of novel pTRIDENT vectors engineered for different tricistronic expression configurations encoding human low-molecular-weight urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA(LMW)) or Bacillus stearothermophilus-derived alpha-amylase (SAMY), human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF), and human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) have been quantified in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1), mouse fibroblasts (NIH/3T3), and/or human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells. In addition, a pTRIDENT-derived SAMY-VEGF-SEAP expression cassette transferred into a compatible lentiviral expression vector enabled simultaneous high-level transgene expression following transduction of transgenic lentiviral particles into primary human chondrocytes. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cross-Species Integrative Functional Genomics in GeneWeaver Reveals a Role for Pafah1b1 in Altered Response to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Bubier, Jason A.; Wilcox, Troy D.; Jay, Jeremy J.; Langston, Michael A.; Baker, Erich J.; Chesler, Elissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the biological substrates of complex neurobehavioral traits such as alcohol dependency pose a tremendous challenge given the diverse model systems and phenotypic assessments used. To address this problem we have developed a platform for integrated analysis of high-throughput or genome-wide functional genomics studies. A wealth of such data exists, but it is often found in disparate, non-computable forms. Our interactive web-based software system, Gene Weaver (http://www.geneweaver.org), couples curated results from genomic studies to graph-theoretical tools for combinatorial analysis. Using this system we identified a gene underlying multiple alcohol-related phenotypes in four species. A search of over 60,000 gene sets in GeneWeaver's database revealed alcohol-related experimental results including genes identified in mouse genetic mapping studies, alcohol selected Drosophila lines, Rattus differential expression, and human alcoholic brains. We identified highly connected genes and compared these to genes currently annotated to alcohol-related behaviors and processes. The most highly connected gene not annotated to alcohol was Pafah1b1. Experimental validation using a Pafah1b1 conditional knock-out mouse confirmed that this gene is associated with an increased preference for alcohol and an altered thermoregulatory response to alcohol. Although this gene has not been previously implicated in alcohol-related behaviors, its function in various neural mechanisms makes a role in alcohol-related phenomena plausible. By making diverse cross-species functional genomics data readily computable, we were able to identify and confirm a novel alcohol-related gene that may have implications for alcohol use disorders and other effects of alcohol. PMID:26834590

  17. Cross-species amplification of microsatellite markers in Mycteria leucocephala Pennant 1769: molted feathers as successful DNA source.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bharat Bhushan; Mustafa, Mohd; Sharma, Tusha; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Urfi, Abdul Jamil

    2014-10-01

    DNA from molted feathers is being increasingly used for genetic studies on birds. However, the DNA obtained from such non-invasive sources is often not of enough quantity and quality for isolation of new microsatellite markers. The present study examined the potential of shed feathers of near threatened Painted Stork as a source of its DNA for cross-species amplification of microsatellites. Thirty-one shed feathers of varying conditions ('good' and 'deteriorated') and sizes ('large', 'intermediate' and 'small') collected in a north Indian population were used to isolate DNA by a standard isopropanol method and 11 microsatellite markers already developed in the Wood Stork were screened for amplification. Nine plucked feathers from two dead Painted Storks were also used to compare the DNA yield and amplification success. The DNA yield of feathers varied significantly in relation to the calamus size and condition. Among molted feathers, 'good' and 'large' samples provided more DNA than 'deteriorated' and 'small' ones, respectively. 'Large' plucked feathers yielded more DNA than 'large' molted feathers. DNA was almost degraded in all the samples and ratio of absorbance at 260/280 nm varied from 1.0 to 1.8, indicating impurity in many samples. Independent of DNA yields, all microsatellites were cross-amplified in all kinds of feathers, with > 80% success in different feather categories. It is concluded that the shed feathers can be successfully used to isolate DNA in the Painted Stork and for cross-species amplification of microsatellites.

  18. Construction and accessibility of a cross-species phenotype ontology along with gene annotations for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C; Ruef, Barbara J; Bauer, Sebastian; Washington, Nicole; Westerfield, Monte; Gkoutos, George; Schofield, Paul; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E; Robinson, Peter N; Mungall, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Phenotype analyses, e.g. investigating metabolic processes, tissue formation, or organism behavior, are an important element of most biological and medical research activities. Biomedical researchers are making increased use of ontological standards and methods to capture the results of such analyses, with one focus being the comparison and analysis of phenotype information between species. We have generated a cross-species phenotype ontology for human, mouse and zebrafish that contains classes from the Human Phenotype Ontology, Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, and generated classes for zebrafish phenotypes. We also provide up-to-date annotation data connecting human genes to phenotype classes from the generated ontology. We have included the data generation pipeline into our continuous integration system ensuring stable and up-to-date releases. This article describes the data generation process and is intended to help interested researchers access both the phenotype annotation data and the associated cross-species phenotype ontology. The resource described here can be used in sophisticated semantic similarity and gene set enrichment analyses for phenotype data across species. The stable releases of this resource can be obtained from http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/hp/uberpheno/.

  19. Identification of broadly conserved cross-species protective Leishmania antigen and its responding CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zhirong; Li, Jintao; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Hamana, Hiroshi; Ezzati, Peyman; Hu, Chuanmin; Yi, Weijing; Liu, Dong; Khadem, Forough; Okwor, Ifeoma; Jia, Ping; Shitaoka, Kiyomi; Wang, Shufeng; Ndao, Momar; Petersen, Christine; Chen, Jianping; Rafati, Sima; Louzir, Hechmi; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Wilkins, John A; Uzonna, Jude E

    2015-10-21

    There is currently no clinically effective vaccine against leishmaniasis because of poor understanding of the antigens that elicit dominant T cell immunity. Using proteomics and cellular immunology, we identified a dominant naturally processed peptide (PEPCK335-351) derived from Leishmania glycosomal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). PEPCK was conserved in all pathogenic Leishmania, expressed in glycosomes of promastigotes and amastigotes, and elicited strong CD4(+) T cell responses in infected mice and humans. I-A(b)-PEPCK335-351 tetramer identified protective Leishmania-specific CD4(+) T cells at a clonal level, which comprised ~20% of all Leishmania-reactive CD4(+) T cells at the peak of infection. PEPCK335-351-specific CD4(+) T cells were oligoclonal in their T cell receptor usage, produced polyfunctional cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor), and underwent expansion, effector activities, contraction, and stable maintenance after lesion resolution. Vaccination with PEPCK peptide, DNA expressing full-length PEPCK, or rPEPCK induced strong durable cross-species protection in both resistant and susceptible mice. The effectiveness and durability of protection in vaccinated mice support the development of a broadly cross-species protective vaccine against different forms of leishmaniasis by targeting PEPCK. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. HTLV-3/4 and simian foamy retroviruses in humans: discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology.

    PubMed

    Gessain, Antoine; Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Turpin, Jocelyn; Mahieux, Renaud

    2013-01-05

    Non-human primates are considered to be likely sources of viruses that can infect humans and thus pose a significant threat to human population. This is well illustrated by some retroviruses, as the simian immunodeficiency viruses and the simian T lymphotropic viruses, which have the ability to cross-species, adapt to a new host and sometimes spread. This leads to a pandemic situation for HIV-1 or an endemic one for HTLV-1. Here, we present the available data on the discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology of the recently discovered HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 deltaretroviruses, as well as the simian foamy retroviruses present in different human populations at risk, especially in central African hunters. We discuss also the natural history in humans of these retroviruses of zoonotic origin (magnitude and geographical distribution, possible inter-human transmission). In Central Africa, the increase of the bushmeat trade during the last decades has opened new possibilities for retroviral emergence in humans, especially in immuno-compromised persons.

  1. A Computational Pipeline for Cross-Species Analysis of RNA-seq Data Using R and Bioconductor

    PubMed Central

    LoVerso, Peter R.; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized transcriptome analysis through profiling the expression of thousands of genes at the same time. Systematic analysis of orthologous transcripts across species is critical for understanding the evolution of gene expression and uncovering important information in animal models of human diseases. Several computational methods have been published for analyzing gene expression between species, but they often lack crucial details and therefore cannot serve as a practical guide. Here, we present the first step-by-step protocol for cross-species RNA-seq analysis with a concise workflow that is largely based on the free open-source R language and Bioconductor packages. This protocol covers the entire process from short-read mapping, gene expression quantification, differential expression analysis to pathway enrichment. Many useful utilities for data visualization are included. This complete and easy-to-follow protocol provides hands-on guidance for users who are new to cross-species gene expression analysis. PMID:26692761

  2. Distribution of baboon endogenous virus among species of African monkeys suggests multiple ancient cross-species transmissions in shared habitats.

    PubMed Central

    van der Kuyl, A C; Dekker, J T; Goudsmit, J

    1995-01-01

    PCR amplification of baboon endogenous virus (BaEV) long terminal repeat, reverse transcriptase gene, and env fragments from 24 different species of African monkeys indicates that BaEV is less widespread than was formerly thought. Instead of being present in every species of African primates, BaEV can be found only in baboons, geladas, and mangabeys (all belonging to the Papionini tribe) and in African green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops)subspecies. BaEV, which can be activated from baboon and gelada tissues, was most likely introduced in the germ line only recently (less than a few million years ago) and has not been inherited from a common ancestor of all extant African monkeys. Neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood analyses of the sequences obtained showed that two distinct virus clusters can be distinguished: the first containing baboon, gelada, and African green monkey BaEV sequences and the second consisting of mandrill and mangabey BaEV sequences. This viral evolutionary tree does not follow host phylogeny, indicating the cross-species transmissions and multiple germ line fixations of the virus must have occurred in the past. BaEV sequences are found in monkeys inhabiting savannas (baboons, geladas, and African green monkeys) as well as forests (managabeys and mandrills) and cluster according to the habitats of their hosts, providing evidence for cross-species transmission in shared habitats. PMID:7494300

  3. Optimization of simultaneous screening of the main mutations involved in non-syndromic deafness using the TaqMan® OpenArray™ Genotyping Platform

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans, affecting approximately 10% of the global population. In developed countries, one in every 500 individuals suffers from severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. For those up to 5 years old, the proportion is higher, at 2.7 in 1000 individuals, and for adolescents the average is 3.5 in 1000. Among the causes of hearing loss, more than 50% are related to genetic factors. To date, nearly 150 loci and 64 genes have been associated with hearing loss. Mutations in the GJB2 gene, which encodes connexin 26, constitute the main genetic cause. So far, more than 300 variations have been described in this gene. As a response to the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of hearing loss and the importance of correct molecular diagnosis of individuals with hereditary hearing loss, this study worked in the optimization for a diagnostic protocol employing a high-throughput genotyping technology. Methods For this work, was used the TaqMan® OpenArray™ Genotyping platform. This is a high performance, high-throughput technology based on real-time PCR, which enables the evaluation of up to 3072 SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms), point mutations, small deletions, and insertions, using a single genotyping plate. For the study, were selected the layout allowing to analyze 32 alterations in 96 individuals simultaneously. In the end, the generated results were validated by conventional techniques, as direct sequencing, Multiplex PCR and RFLP-PCR. Results A total of 376 individuals were analyzed, of which 94 were healthy controls, totaling 4 plates in duplicate. All 31 of the changes analyzed were present in the nuclear genes GJB2, GJB6, CRYL1, TMC1, SLC26A4, miR-96, and OTOF, and in the mitochondrial genes MT-RNR1 and MT-TS1. The reactions were subsequently validated by established techniques (direct sequencing, multiplex PCR, and RFLP-PCR) that had previously been used to perform molecular screening

  4. Development and cross-species testing of western bluebird (Sialia mexicana) microsatellite primers.

    PubMed

    Ferree, Elise D; Dickinson, Janis L; Kleiber, Danika; Stern, Caitlin A; Haydock, Joey; Stanback, Mark T; Schmidt, Victoria; Eisenberg, Liz; Stolzenburg, Carolyn

    2008-11-01

    Western and eastern bluebirds (Sialia mexicana and S. sialis) are socially monogamous passerines that engage in extra-pair copulations. We obtained microsatellites from S. mexicana and optimized and characterized 15 microsatellite DNA loci in 60 individuals of this species. Primer pairs yielded an average of 13 alleles per locus in western bluebirds (range 3-35 alleles) with an average observed heterozygosity of 0.68 (range 0.27-0.88). All 15 loci also successfully amplified in S. sialis (n = 24), with an average of 11.5 alleles per locus (range 4-26) and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.59 (range 0.22-0.90). © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  6. Electronic Attack Platform Placement Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Unclassified 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...GB DDR3) Display 10.1” (IPS, 1366 X 768) Multi-touch HD display Operating System Windows 8 Storage 256 GB SSD (SATA-III) Network Intel WLAN ...programming the GPU: 1) security and 2) determining when the GPU is advantageous. Security is a problem applicable to all software development. With the

  7. Analysis of neural crest migration and differentiation by cross-species transplantation.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Shannon L; Lwigale, Peter Y

    2012-02-07

    Avian embryos provide a unique platform for studying many vertebrate developmental processes, due to the easy access of the embryos within the egg. Chimeric avian embryos, in which quail donor tissue is transplanted into a chick embryo in ovo, combine the power of indelible genetic labeling of cell populations with the ease of manipulation presented by the avian embryo. Quail-chick chimeras are a classical tool for tracing migratory neural crest cells (NCCs). NCCs are a transient migratory population of cells in the embryo, which originate in the dorsal region of the developing neural tube. They undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition and subsequently migrate to other regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various cell types including cartilage, melanocytes, neurons and glia. NCCs are multipotent, and their ultimate fate is influenced by 1) the region of the neural tube in which they originate along the rostro-caudal axis of the embryo, 2) signals from neighboring cells as they migrate, and 3) the microenvironment of their ultimate destination within the embryo. Tracing these cells from their point of origin at the neural tube, to their final position and fate within the embryo, provides important insight into the developmental processes that regulate patterning and organogenesis. Transplantation of complementary regions of donor neural tube (homotopic grafting) or different regions of donor neural tube (heterotopic grafting) can reveal differences in pre-specification of NCCs along the rostro-caudal axis. This technique can be further adapted to transplant a unilateral compartment of the neural tube, such that one side is derived from donor tissue, and the contralateral side remains unperturbed in the host embryo, yielding an internal control within the same sample. It can also be adapted for transplantation of brain segments in later embryos, after HH10, when the anterior neural tube has closed. Here we report techniques for generating quail

  8. Optimization of transplastomic production of hemicellulases in tobacco: effects of expression cassette configuration and tobacco cultivar used as production platform on recombinant protein yields

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chloroplast transformation in tobacco has been used extensively to produce recombinant proteins and enzymes. Chloroplast expression cassettes can be designed with different configurations of the cis-acting elements that govern foreign gene expression. With the aim to optimize production of recombinant hemicellulases in transplastomic tobacco, we developed a set of cassettes that incorporate elements known to facilitate protein expression in chloroplasts and examined expression and accumulation of a bacterial xylanase XynA. Biomass production is another important factor in achieving sustainable and high-volume production of cellulolytic enzymes. Therefore, we compared productivity of two tobacco cultivars – a low-alkaloid and a high-biomass - as transplastomic expression platforms. Results Four different cassettes expressing XynA produced various mutant phenotypes of the transplastomic plants, affected their growth rate and resulted in different accumulation levels of the XynA enzyme. The most productive cassette was identified and used further to express XynA and two additional fungal xylanases, Xyn10A and Xyn11B, in a high-biomass tobacco cultivar. The high biomass cultivar allowed for a 60% increase in XynA production per plant. Accumulation of the fungal enzymes reached more than 10-fold higher levels than the bacterial enzyme, constituting up to 6% of the total soluble protein in the leaf tissue. Use of a well-characterized translational enhancer with the selected expression cassette revealed inconsistent effects on accumulation of the recombinant xylanases. Additionally, differences in the enzymatic activity of crude plant extracts measured in leaves of different age suggest presence of a specific xylanase inhibitor in the green leaf tissue. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the pivotal importance of the expression cassette design and appropriate tobacco cultivar for high-level transplastomic production of recombinant proteins. PMID:23642171

  9. Impact of enrichment conditions on cross-species capture of fresh and degraded DNA.

    PubMed

    Paijmans, Johanna L A; Fickel, Joerns; Courtiol, Alexandre; Hofreiter, Michael; Förster, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    By combining high-throughput sequencing with target enrichment ('hybridization capture'), researchers are able to obtain molecular data from genomic regions of interest for projects that are otherwise constrained by sample quality (e.g. degraded and contamination-rich samples) or a lack of a priori sequence information (e.g. studies on nonmodel species). Despite the use of hybridization capture in various fields of research for many years, the impact of enrichment conditions on capture success is not yet thoroughly understood. We evaluated the impact of a key parameter--hybridization temperature--on the capture success of mitochondrial genomes across the carnivoran family Felidae. Capture was carried out for a range of sample types (fresh, archival, ancient) with varying levels of sequence divergence between bait and target (i.e. across a range of species) using pools of individually indexed libraries on Agilent SureSelect(™) arrays. Our results suggest that hybridization capture protocols require specific optimization for the sample type that is being investigated. Hybridization temperature affected the proportion of on-target sequences following capture: for degraded samples, we obtained the best results with a hybridization temperature of 65 °C, while a touchdown approach (65 °C down to 50 °C) yielded the best results for fresh samples. Evaluation of capture performance at a regional scale (sliding window approach) revealed no significant improvement in the recovery of DNA fragments with high sequence divergence from the bait at any of the tested hybridization temperatures, suggesting that hybridization temperature may not be the critical parameter for the enrichment of divergent fragments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Development, characterization and cross species amplification of polymorphic microsatellite markers from expressed sequence tags of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    PubMed

    Siju, S; Dhanya, K; Syamkumar, S; Sasikumar, B; Sheeja, T E; Bhat, A I; Parthasarathy, V A

    2010-02-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) were used for the screening of type and frequency of Class I (hypervariable) simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total of 231 microsatellite repeats were detected from 12,593 EST sequences of turmeric after redundancy elimination. The average density of Class I SSRs accounts to one SSR per 17.96 kb of EST. Mononucleotides were the most abundant class of microsatellite repeat in turmeric ESTs followed by trinucleotides. A robust set of 17 polymorphic EST-SSRs were developed and used for evaluating 20 turmeric accessions. The number of alleles detected ranged from 3 to 8 per loci. The developed markers were also evaluated in 13 related species of C. longa confirming high rate (100%) of cross species transferability. The polymorphic microsatellite markers generated from this study could be used for genetic diversity analysis and resolving the taxonomic confusion prevailing in the genus.

  11. Cross-species transmission of gibbon and orangutan hepatitis B virus to uPA/SCID mice with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sa-Nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Sugiyama, Masaya; Murakami, Shuko; Payungporn, Sunchai; Sommanustweechai, Angkana; Mizokami, Masashi; Poovorawan, Yong

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the potential of cross-species transmission of non-human primate HBV to humans, severe combined immunodeficiency mice transgenic for urokinase-type plasminogen activator, in which the mouse liver has been engrafted with human hepatocytes, were inoculated with non-human primate HBV. HBV-DNA positive serum samples from a gibbon or orangutan were inoculated into 6 chimeric mice. HBV-DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and HB core-related antigen in sera and HBV cccDNA in liver were detectable in 2 of 3 mice each from the gibbon and orangutan. Likewise, applying immunofluorescence HBV core protein was only found in human hepatocytes expressing human albumin. The HBV sequences from mouse sera were identical to those from orangutan and gibbon sera determined prior to inoculation. In conclusion, human hepatocytes have been infected with gibbon/orangutan HBV.

  12. Cross-species transferability of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) nuclear microsatellite markers to five Mexican white pines.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Arámbula, A R; Pérez de la Rosa, J A; Arias, A; Rajora, O P

    2014-09-12

    We examined cross-species transferability and usefulness of six nuclear microsatellite markers developed in consubgeneric eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) with regard to ecologically and commercially important Mexican white pine species of conservation genetics concern: Pinus chiapensis (Mart.) Andresen, P. flexilis James, P. strobiformis Engelm., P. ayacahuite Ehrenb. Ex Schltdl, and P. ayacahuite var. veitchii (Roezl) G.R. Shaw. Four to six microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic in different species, with moderate to high informativeness in a relatively small number of samples (PIC/HE=0.25-0.93). This successful transfer sidesteps the time- and resource-consuming development of species-specific microsatellite markers, and will facilitate population and conservation genetic studies and genetic resource management of the less studied Mexican white pines.

  13. Quantitative Cross-Species Extrapolation between Humans and Fish: The Case of the Anti-Depressant Fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Owen, Stewart F.; Cumming, Rob I.; de Polo, Anna; Winter, Matthew J.; Panter, Grace H.; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; Sumpter, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Fish are an important model for the pharmacological and toxicological characterization of human pharmaceuticals in drug discovery, drug safety assessment and environmental toxicology. However, do fish respond to pharmaceuticals as humans do? To address this question, we provide a novel quantitative cross-species extrapolation approach (qCSE) based on the hypothesis that similar plasma concentrations of pharmaceuticals cause comparable target-mediated effects in both humans and fish at similar level of biological organization (Read-Across Hypothesis). To validate this hypothesis, the behavioural effects of the anti-depressant drug fluoxetine on the fish model fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were used as test case. Fish were exposed for 28 days to a range of measured water concentrations of fluoxetine (0.1, 1.0, 8.0, 16, 32, 64 µg/L) to produce plasma concentrations below, equal and above the range of Human Therapeutic Plasma Concentrations (HTPCs). Fluoxetine and its metabolite, norfluoxetine, were quantified in the plasma of individual fish and linked to behavioural anxiety-related endpoints. The minimum drug plasma concentrations that elicited anxiolytic responses in fish were above the upper value of the HTPC range, whereas no effects were observed at plasma concentrations below the HTPCs. In vivo metabolism of fluoxetine in humans and fish was similar, and displayed bi-phasic concentration-dependent kinetics driven by the auto-inhibitory dynamics and saturation of the enzymes that convert fluoxetine into norfluoxetine. The sensitivity of fish to fluoxetine was not so dissimilar from that of patients affected by general anxiety disorders. These results represent the first direct evidence of measured internal dose response effect of a pharmaceutical in fish, hence validating the Read-Across hypothesis applied to fluoxetine. Overall, this study demonstrates that the qCSE approach, anchored to internal drug concentrations, is a powerful tool to guide the

  14. Lysimeter Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Gernot; Murer, Erwin; Plieschnegger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The existing European Lysimeter Platform (www.lysimeter.at/HP_EuLP) provides an overview of lysimeter types used in Europe and show details on equipment, research results and future perspectives of lysimeter facilities. However, this platform is not user-editable and has not been updated since 2008. Thus, the Lysimeter Research Group (www.lysimeter.at) intends to serve a new database based website called Lysimeter Platform, where existing information of the former European Lysimeter Platform will be transferred to the new Lysimeter Platform and, furthermore, registered users are able to create and edit sites where lysimeters, soil water samplers and soil hydrologic measuring profiles are operated. The Lysimeter Research Group is a scientific association and, therefore, the membership is free of charge. The new Lysimeter Platform contains general information of lysimeter sites worldwide (e.g., what is measured at which site) in a standardized form to get a quick but informative overview of the sites and can be linked to more detailed, already existing information provided by the site operators. Due to the standardized information in the database the Lysimeter Platform serves also as search-engine for soil water measurements and helps to find sites of interest and corresponding contact information worldwide. The Session "Estimation of soil-atmosphere and vadose zone water fluxes by use of precision lysimeter measurements" at the EGU General Assembly 2014 would be an excellent chance to present the idea and the concept of this new Lysimeter Platform to international site operators and scientists.

  15. Cross-species conservation of endocrine pathways: a critical analysis of tier 1 fish and rat screening assays with 12 model chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ankley, Gerald T; Gray, L Earl

    2013-04-01

    Many structural and functional aspects of the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are known to be highly conserved, but the significance of this from a toxicological perspective has received comparatively little attention. High-quality data generated through development and validation of Tier 1 tests for the U.S. Environmenal Protection Agency Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) offer a unique opportunity to compare responses of mammals versus fish to chemicals that may affect shared pathways within the HPG axis. The present study focuses on data generated with model chemicals that act (primarily) as estrogen receptor agonists (17α-ethynylestradiol, methoxychlor, bisphenol A), androgen receptor agonists (methyltestosterone, 17β-trenbolone), androgen receptor antagonists (flutamide, vincolozolin, p,p'-DDE), or inhibitors of different steroidogenic enzymes (ketoconazole, fadrozole, fenarimol, prochloraz). All 12 chemicals had been tested in the EDSP fish short-term (21 d) reproduction assay and in one or more of the four in vivo Tier 1 screens with rats (uterotrophic, Hershberger, male and female pubertal assays). There was a high concordance between the fish and rat assays with respect to identifying chemicals that impacted specific endocrine pathways of concern. Although most chemicals were detected as positive in both rat and fish assays, eliminating data from one class of vertebrate or the other would weaken the battery. For example, the effects of competitive inhibitors of steroid hormone synthesis were far more obvious in the fish assay, whereas the activity of androgen receptor antagonists was clearer in mammalian assays. The observations are significant both to the cross-species extrapolation of toxicity of HPG-active substances and the optimization of screening and testing frameworks for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  16. Mining online genomic resources in Anolis carolinensis facilitates rapid and inexpensive development of cross-species microsatellite markers for the Anolis lizard genus.

    PubMed

    Wordley, Claire; Slate, Jon; Stapley, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Online sequence databases can provide valuable resources for the development of cross-species genetic markers. In particular, mining expressed tag sequences (EST) for microsatellites and developing conserved cross-species microsatellite markers can provide a rapid and relatively inexpensive method to develop new markers for a range of species. Here, we adopt this approach to develop cross-species microsatellite markers in Anolis lizards, which is a model genus in evolutionary biology and ecology. Using EST sequences from Anolis carolinensis, we identified 127 microsatellites that satisfied our criteria, and tested 49 of these in five species of Anolis (carolinensis, distichus, apletophallus, porcatus and sagrei). We identified between 8 and 25 new variable genetic markers for five Anolis species. These markers will be a valuable resource for studies of population genetics, comparative mapping, mating systems, behavioural ecology and adaptive radiations in this diverse lineage.

  17. [Lens platform].

    PubMed

    Łukaszewska-Smyk, Agnieszka; Kałuzny, Józef

    2010-01-01

    The lens platform defines lens structure and lens material. Evolution of lens comprises change in their shape, angulation of haptens and transition of three-piece lens into one-piece lens. The lens fall into two categories: rigid (PMMA) and soft (siliconic, acrylic, colameric). The main lens maaterials are polymers (hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The lens platform has an effect on biocompatibility, bioadhesion, stability of lens in capsule, degree of PCO evolution and sensitiveness to laser damages.

  18. Cross-species protein sequence and gene structure prediction with fine-tuned Webscipio 2.0 and Scipio

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obtaining transcripts of homologs of closely related organisms and retrieving the reconstructed exon-intron patterns of the genes is a very important process during the analysis of the evolution of a protein family and the comparative analysis of the exon-intron structure of a certain gene from different species. Due to the ever-increasing speed of genome sequencing, the gap to genome annotation is growing. Thus, tools for the correct prediction and reconstruction of genes in related organisms become more and more important. The tool Scipio, which can also be used via the graphical interface WebScipio, performs significant hit processing of the output of the Blat program to account for sequencing errors, missing sequence, and fragmented genome assemblies. However, Scipio has so far been limited to high sequence similarity and unable to reconstruct short exons. Results Scipio and WebScipio have fundamentally been extended to better reconstruct very short exons and intron splice sites and to be better suited for cross-species gene structure predictions. The Needleman-Wunsch algorithm has been implemented for the search for short parts of the query sequence that were not recognized by Blat. Those regions might either be short exons, divergent sequence at intron splice sites, or very divergent exons. We have shown the benefit and use of new parameters with several protein examples from completely different protein families in searches against species from several kingdoms of the eukaryotes. The performance of the new Scipio version has been tested in comparison with several similar tools. Conclusions With the new version of Scipio very short exons, terminal and internal, of even just one amino acid can correctly be reconstructed. Scipio is also able to correctly predict almost all genes in cross-species searches even if the ancestors of the species separated more than 100 Myr ago and if the protein sequence identity is below 80%. For our test cases Scipio

  19. Developing Human Radiation Biodosimetry Models: Testing Cross-Species Conversion Approaches Using an Ex Vivo Model System.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin G; Paul, Sunirmal; Briones, Natalia; Zeng, Jia; Gillis, Kristin; Wallstrom, Garrick; LaBaer, Joshua; Amundson, Sally A

    2017-06-01

    In the event of a large-scale radiation exposure, accurate and quick assessment of radiation dose received would be critical for triage and medical treatment of large numbers of potentially exposed individuals. Current methods of biodosimetry, such as the dicentric chromosome assay, are time consuming and require sophisticated equipment and highly trained personnel. Therefore, scalable biodosimetry approaches, including gene expression profiles in peripheral blood cells, are being investigated. Due to the limited availability of appropriate human samples, biodosimetry development has relied heavily on mouse models, which are not directly applicable to human response. Therefore, to explore the feasibility of using non-human primate (NHP) models to build and test a biodosimetry algorithm for use in humans, we irradiated ex vivo peripheral blood samples from both humans and rhesus macaques with doses of 0, 2, 5, 6 and 7 Gy, and compared the gene expression profiles 24 h later using Agilent human microarrays. Among the dose-responsive genes in human and using non-human primate, 52 genes showed highly correlated expression patterns between the species, and were enriched in p53/DNA damage response, apoptosis and cell cycle-related genes. When these interspecies-correlated genes were used to build biodosimetry models with using NHP data, the mean prediction accuracy on non-human primate samples was about 90% within 1 Gy of delivered dose in leave-one-out cross-validation. However, tests on human samples suggested that human gene expression values may need to be adjusted prior to application of the NHP model. A "multi-gene" approach utilizing all gene values for cross-species conversion and applying the converted values on the NHP biodosimetry models, gave a leave-one-out cross-validation prediction accuracy for human samples highly comparable (up to 94%) to that for non-human primates. Overall, this study demonstrates that a robust NHP biodosimetry model can be built

  20. Cross-species amplification of human microsatellite markers using noninvasive samples from white-handed gibbons (Hylobates lar).

    PubMed

    Chambers, Karen E; Reichard, Ulrich H; Möller, Asja; Nowak, Katrin; Vigilant, Linda

    2004-09-01

    Analysis of the population genetic structure and reproductive strategies of various primate species has been facilitated by cross-species amplification (i.e., the use of microsatellite markers developed in one species for analysis of another). In this study we screened 47 human-derived markers to assess their utility in the white-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar). Only eight produced accurate, reliable results, and exhibited levels of polymorphism that were adequate for individual identification. This low success rate was surprising given that human microsatellite markers typically work well in species (such as macaques) that are evolutionarily more distant from humans than are gibbons. In addition, we experienced limited success in using a set of microsatellite markers that have been reported to be useful in the closely-related H. muelleri, and applying our set of microsatellite markers to samples obtained from one H. pileatus individual. Our results emphasize the importance of extensively screening potential markers in representatives of the population of interest.

  1. Annotated genes and nonannotated genomes: cross-species use of Gene Ontology in ecology and evolution research.

    PubMed

    Primmer, C R; Papakostas, S; Leder, E H; Davis, M J; Ragan, M A

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in molecular technologies have opened up unprecedented opportunities for molecular ecologists to better understand the molecular basis of traits of ecological and evolutionary importance in almost any organism. Nevertheless, reliable and systematic inference of functionally relevant information from these masses of data remains challenging. The aim of this review is to highlight how the Gene Ontology (GO) database can be of use in resolving this challenge. The GO provides a largely species-neutral source of information on the molecular function, biological role and cellular location of tens of thousands of gene products. As it is designed to be species-neutral, the GO is well suited for cross-species use, meaning that, functional annotation derived from model organisms can be transferred to inferred orthologues in newly sequenced species. In other words, the GO can provide gene annotation information for species with nonannotated genomes. In this review, we describe the GO database, how functional information is linked with genes/gene products in model organisms, and how molecular ecologists can utilize this information to annotate their own data. Then, we outline various applications of GO for enhancing the understanding of molecular basis of traits in ecologically relevant species. We also highlight potential pitfalls, provide step-by-step recommendations for conducting a sound study in nonmodel organisms, suggest avenues for future research and outline a strategy for maximizing the benefits of a more ecological and evolutionary genomics-oriented ontology by ensuring its compatibility with the GO. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cross-species chromosome painting tracks the independent origin of multiple sex chromosomes in two cofamiliar Erythrinidae fishes.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Marcelo B; Sánchez, Antonio; Marchal, Juan A; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Trifonov, Vladimir; Bertollo, Luiz Ac

    2011-06-30

    The Erythrinidae fish family is characterized by a large variation with respect to diploid chromosome numbers and sex-determining systems among its species, including two multiple X1X2Y sex systems in Hoplias malabaricus and Erythrinus erythrinus. At first, the occurrence of a same sex chromosome system within a family suggests that the sex chromosomes are correlated and originated from ancestral XY chromosomes that were either homomorphic or at an early stage of differentiation. To identify the origin and evolution of these X1X2Y sex chromosomes, we performed reciprocal cross-species FISH experiments with two sex-chromosome-specific probes designed from microdissected X1 and Y chromosomes of H. malabaricus and E. erythrinus, respectively. Our results yield valuable information regarding the origin and evolution of these sex chromosome systems. Our data indicate that these sex chromosomes evolved independently in these two closed related Erythrinidae species. Different autosomes were first converted into a poorly differentiated XY sex pair in each species, and additional chromosomal rearrangements produced both X1X2Y sex systems that are currently present. Our data provide new insights into the origin and evolution of sex chromosomes, which increases our knowledge about fish sex chromosome evolution.

  3. Limitations to estimating bacterial cross-species transmission using genetic and genomic markers: inferences from simulation modeling

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Julio A; Cross, Paul C; Luikart, Gordon; Creel, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cross-species transmission (CST) of bacterial pathogens has major implications for human health, livestock, and wildlife management because it determines whether control actions in one species may have subsequent effects on other potential host species. The study of bacterial transmission has benefitted from methods measuring two types of genetic variation: variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, it is unclear whether these data can distinguish between different epidemiological scenarios. We used a simulation model with two host species and known transmission rates (within and between species) to evaluate the utility of these markers for inferring CST. We found that CST estimates are biased for a wide range of parameters when based on VNTRs and a most parsimonious reconstructed phylogeny. However, estimations of CST rates lower than 5% can be achieved with relatively low bias using as low as 250 SNPs. CST estimates are sensitive to several parameters, including the number of mutations accumulated since introduction, stochasticity, the genetic difference of strains introduced, and the sampling effort. Our results suggest that, even with whole-genome sequences, unbiased estimates of CST will be difficult when sampling is limited, mutation rates are low, or for pathogens that were recently introduced. PMID:25469159

  4. Limitations to estimating bacterial cross-species transmission using genetic and genomic markers: inferences from simulation modeling.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Julio A; Cross, Paul C; Luikart, Gordon; Creel, Scott

    2014-08-01

    Cross-species transmission (CST) of bacterial pathogens has major implications for human health, livestock, and wildlife management because it determines whether control actions in one species may have subsequent effects on other potential host species. The study of bacterial transmission has benefitted from methods measuring two types of genetic variation: variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, it is unclear whether these data can distinguish between different epidemiological scenarios. We used a simulation model with two host species and known transmission rates (within and between species) to evaluate the utility of these markers for inferring CST. We found that CST estimates are biased for a wide range of parameters when based on VNTRs and a most parsimonious reconstructed phylogeny. However, estimations of CST rates lower than 5% can be achieved with relatively low bias using as low as 250 SNPs. CST estimates are sensitive to several parameters, including the number of mutations accumulated since introduction, stochasticity, the genetic difference of strains introduced, and the sampling effort. Our results suggest that, even with whole-genome sequences, unbiased estimates of CST will be difficult when sampling is limited, mutation rates are low, or for pathogens that were recently introduced.

  5. Exposure to early adversity: Points of cross-species translation that can lead to improved understanding of depression

    PubMed Central

    ANDERSEN, SUSAN L.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between developmental exposure to adversity and affective disorders is reviewed. Adversity discussed herein includes physical and sexual abuse, neglect, or loss of a caregiver in humans. While these stressors can occur at any point during development, the unique temporal relationship to specific depressive symptoms was the focus of discussion. Further influences of stress exposure during sensitive periods can vary by gender and duration of abuse as well. Data from animal studies are presented to provide greater translational and causal understanding of how sensitive periods, different types of psychosocial stressors, and sex interact to produce depressive-like behaviors. Findings from maternal separation, isolation rearing, chronic variable stress, and peer–peer rearing paradigms clarify interpretation about how various depressive behaviors are influenced by age of exposure. Depressive behaviors are broken down into the following categories: mood and affect, anhedonia, energy, working memory, sleep–wake, appetite changes, suicide, and general malaise. Cross-species evidence from humans, nonhuman primates, rats, and mice within each of these categories is discussed. In conclusion, sensitive periods for affective-related behaviors (anxiety, mood, and controllability) occur earlier in life, while other aspects of depression are associated with adversity later during adolescence. PMID:25997766

  6. Cross-Species Withdrawal of MCL1 Facilitates Postpartum Uterine Involution in Both the Mouse and Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara; Marks, Jason; Nye, Kennedy; Lao, Belinda; Albrecht, Eugene D.; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam

    2013-01-01

    A successful postpartum involution permits the postnatal uterus to rapidly regain its prepregnancy function and size to ultimately facilitate an ensuing blastocyst implantation. This study investigates the molecular mechanisms that govern the initiation of the involution process by examining the signaling events that occur as the uterus transitions from the pregnant to postnatal state. Using mouse and baboon uteri, we found a remarkable cross-species conservation at the signal transduction level as the pregnant uterus initiates and progresses through the involution process. This study originated with the observation of elevated levels of caspase-3 activation in both the laboring mouse and baboon uterus, which we found to be apoptotic in nature as evidenced by the concurrent appearance of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We previously defined a nonapoptotic and potential tocolytic role for uterine caspase-3 during pregnancy regulated by increased antiapoptotic signaling mediated by myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis. In contrast, this study determined that diminished antiapoptotic signaling in the postpartum uterus allowed for both endometrial apoptotic and myometrial autophagic episodes, which we speculate are responsible for the rapid reduction in size of the postpartum uterus. Using our human telomerase immortalized myometrial cell line and the Simian virus-40 immortalized endometrial cell line (12Z), we demonstrated that the withdrawal of antiapoptotic signaling was also an upstream event for both the autophagic and apoptotic processes in the human uterine myocyte and endometrial epithelial cell. PMID:24140717

  7. Cross-species amplification from crop soybean Glycine max provides informative microsatellite markers for the study of inbreeding wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Hempel, K; Peakall, R

    2003-06-01

    The development of microsatellite markers through transfer of primers from related species (cross-species amplification) remains a little-explored alternative to the de novo method in plants. In this study of 100 microsatellite loci from Glycine max, we examined two aspects of primer transfer. First, we tested if source locus properties can predict primer transfer and polymorphism in Glycine cyrtoloba and Glycine clandestina. We transferred 23 primers to G. cyrtoloba and 42 to G. clandestina, with 19 loci polymorphic within G. clandestina. However, we could not predict transfer or polymorphism from the source locus properties. Second, we evaluated the subset of 11 polymorphic loci for study in G. clandestina populations representing two local morphotypes. All loci were informative within populations (population mean He +/- SE = 0.58 +/- 0.04). We directly sequenced 28 alleles at 4 representative loci. The allelic patterns and sequencing results established that 8 of 11 loci were typical microsatellites, confirming the utility of primer transfer as an alternative to de novo development. Additionally, we found that morphotypic differentiation between populations was paralleled by changes in polymorphism level at six loci and size homoplasy at one locus. We interpret these patterns as being a product of selfing in G. clandestina. Our results demonstrate the value of allele sequence knowledge for the most effective use of microsatellites.

  8. Using cross-species comparisons and a neurobiological framework to understand early social deprivation effects on behavioral development

    PubMed Central

    BRETT, ZOË H.; HUMPHREYS, KATHRYN L.; FLEMING, ALISON S.; KRAEMER, GARY W.; DRURY, STACY S.

    2017-01-01

    Building upon the transactional model of brain development, we explore the impact of early maternal deprivation on neural development and plasticity in three neural systems: hyperactivity/impulsivity, executive function, and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis functioning across rodent, nonhuman primate, and human studies. Recognizing the complexity of early maternal–infant interactions, we limit our cross-species comparisons to data from rodent models of artificial rearing, nonhuman primate studies of peer rearing, and the relations between these two experimental approaches and human studies of children exposed to the early severe psychosocial deprivation associated with institutional care. In addition to discussing the strengths and limitations of these paradigms, we present the current state of research on the neurobiological impact of early maternal deprivation and the evidence of sensitive periods, noting methodological challenges. Integrating data across preclinical animal models and human studies, we speculate about the underlying biological mechanisms; the differential impact of deprivation due to temporal factors including onset, offset, and duration of the exposure; and the possibility and consequences of reopening of sensitive periods during adolescence. PMID:25997759

  9. Development of novel microsatellite markers for the Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) and their utility in cross-species amplification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haughey, Christy; Sage, George K.; Degange, Gabriel; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Talbot, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) is a large forest raptor with a Holarctic distribution and, in some portions of its range, a species of conservation concern. To augment previously reported genetic markers, 13 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed to establish individual identification and familial relationships, to assess levels of genetic diversity, and to identify diagnostic markers. Of the 22 loci tested, 13 were polymorphic, seven were monomorphic, and two failed to amplify. This suite of microsatellite loci yielded a combined probability of parental exclusion of 98%; a single individual sampled from a North American population can be reliably identified using a combination of seven of the 13 polymorphic loci. Cross-species screening in Cooper's Hawks (A. cooperii) and Sharp-shinned Hawks (A. striatus) of the 20 loci that successfully amplified in Northern Goshawks identified 13 loci as polymorphic in each species. Six of these loci (Age1303, Age1308, Age1309, Age1312, and Age1314) appeared to be useful in distinguishing between Accipiter species. These markers will be useful to researchers investigating populations of North American accipiters.

  10. Identifying a Network of Brain Regions Involved in Aversion-Related Processing: A Cross-Species Translational Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Dave J.; Northoff, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The ability to detect and respond appropriately to aversive stimuli is essential for all organisms, from fruit flies to humans. This suggests the existence of a core neural network which mediates aversion-related processing. Human imaging studies on aversion have highlighted the involvement of various cortical regions, such as the prefrontal cortex, while animal studies have focused largely on subcortical regions like the periaqueductal gray and hypothalamus. However, whether and how these regions form a core neural network of aversion remains unclear. To help determine this, a translational cross-species investigation in humans (i.e., meta-analysis) and other animals (i.e., systematic review of functional neuroanatomy) was performed. Our results highlighted the recruitment of the anterior cingulate cortex, the anterior insula, and the amygdala as well as other subcortical (e.g., thalamus, midbrain) and cortical (e.g., orbitofrontal) regions in both animals and humans. Importantly, involvement of these regions remained independent of sensory modality. This study provides evidence for a core neural network mediating aversion in both animals and humans. This not only contributes to our understanding of the trans-species neural correlates of aversion but may also carry important implications for psychiatric disorders where abnormal aversive behavior can often be observed. PMID:22102836

  11. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  12. Network Modules of the Cross-Species Genotype-Phenotype Map Reflect the Clinical Severity of Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Inhae; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing techniques have improved our understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship between genetic variants and human diseases. However, genetic variations uncovered from patient populations do not provide enough information to understand the mechanisms underlying the progression and clinical severity of human diseases. Moreover, building a high-resolution genotype-phenotype map is difficult due to the diverse genetic backgrounds of the human population. We built a cross-species genotype-phenotype map to explain the clinical severity of human genetic diseases. We developed a data-integrative framework to investigate network modules composed of human diseases mapped with gene essentiality measured from a model organism. Essential and nonessential genes connect diseases of different types which form clusters in the human disease network. In a large patient population study, we found that disease classes enriched with essential genes tended to show a higher mortality rate than disease classes enriched with nonessential genes. Moreover, high disease mortality rates are explained by the multiple comorbid relationships and the high pleiotropy of disease genes found in the essential gene-enriched diseases. Our results reveal that the genotype-phenotype map of a model organism can facilitate the identification of human disease-gene associations and predict human disease progression. PMID:26301634

  13. Exposure to early adversity: Points of cross-species translation that can lead to improved understanding of depression.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Susan L

    2015-05-01

    The relationship between developmental exposure to adversity and affective disorders is reviewed. Adversity discussed herein includes physical and sexual abuse, neglect, or loss of a caregiver in humans. While these stressors can occur at any point during development, the unique temporal relationship to specific depressive symptoms was the focus of discussion. Further influences of stress exposure during sensitive periods can vary by gender and duration of abuse as well. Data from animal studies are presented to provide greater translational and causal understanding of how sensitive periods, different types of psychosocial stressors, and sex interact to produce depressive-like behaviors. Findings from maternal separation, isolation rearing, chronic variable stress, and peer-peer rearing paradigms clarify interpretation about how various depressive behaviors are influenced by age of exposure. Depressive behaviors are broken down into the following categories: mood and affect, anhedonia, energy, working memory, sleep-wake, appetite changes, suicide, and general malaise. Cross-species evidence from humans, nonhuman primates, rats, and mice within each of these categories is discussed. In conclusion, sensitive periods for affective-related behaviors (anxiety, mood, and controllability) occur earlier in life, while other aspects of depression are associated with adversity later during adolescence.

  14. Isolation and characterization of 45 Polymorphie microsatellite loci of turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus) and cross-species amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shiying; Ma, Aijun; Wang, Xin'an; Huang, Zhihui; Xue, Baogui; Yang, Zhi; Qu, Jiangbo

    2011-03-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus) is a flatfish species commercially important for aquaculture. In this study, we generated a microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library for Scophthalmus maximus, and then isolated and characterized 45 microsatellite loci by genotyping 30 individuals. The observed number of alleles ranged from 2 to 19 with an average of 6.24, while the effective number of alleles ranged from 1.30 to 11.11 with an average of 3.66. The expected heterozygosities varied from 0.235 to 0.925 4 and Polymorphie information content ranged from 0.2044 to 0.903 3, with an average of 0.622. Twelve loci deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed between any pair of loci after Bonferroni correction. In cross-species amplification, five flatfish species ( Paralichthys lethostigma, Verasper moseri, platichthys stellatus, Hippoglossoides dubius and Cynoglossus semilaevis) showed at least one Polymorphie locus. These Polymorphie microsatellite loci should prove useful for Population analysis of turbot and other related species.

  15. SRLVs: a genetic continuum of lentiviral species in sheep and goats with cumulative evidence of cross species transmission.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Caroline; Cruz, Juliano Cezar Minardi; Mornex, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Lentiviruses from distinct animal species have in common their genomic organization, the induction of slowly progressive diseases over months or years, the large spectrum of induced symptoms and concerned organs, the frequent inapparent infection without any detectable clinical signs, their ability to persist into their hosts despite an often strong and mature immune response. Lentiviruses are also characterized by their genomic plasticity and the rapid evolution of the viral species. SRLVs infecting goats and sheep follow a genomic evolution pattern similar to that observed in HIV or in other lentiviruses. Based on limited number of complete sequences, they have been initially described as two distinct genetic groups evolving independently in sheep or goats, the ovine strains being closely related to each other and distinct from the caprine ones. Over the last 2 decades, the description of many partial or complete sequences of caprine and ovine field isolates from various geographical regions and their phylogenetic studies clearly evidenced the existence of a genetic continuum with viruses that did not simply clustered according to the animal species they were isolated from. Three classifications have been successively proposed and allowed to refine the SRLV phylogeny over time. Phylogenetic reconstructions support the existence of SRLV cross-species transmission in domestic and wild small ruminants.

  16. Cross-species extrapolation of prediction model for lead transfer from soil to corn grain under stress of exogenous lead.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaojun; Yang, Hua; Li, Yupeng; Long, Jian; Liang, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing concern in recent years regarding lead (Pb) transfer in the soil-plant system. In this study the transfer of Pb (exogenous salts) was investigated from a wide range of Chinese soils to corn grain (Zhengdan 958). Prediction models were developed with combination of the Pb bioconcentration factor (BCF) of Zhengdan 958, and soil pH, organic matter (OM) content, and cation exchange capacity (CEC) through multiple stepwise regressions. Moreover, these prediction models from Zhengdan 958 were applied to other non-model corn species through cross-species extrapolation approach. The results showed that the soil pH and OM were the major factors that controlled Pb transfer from soil to corn grain. The lower pH and OM could improve the bioaccumulation of Pb in corn grain. No significant differences were found between two prediction models derived from the different exogenous Pb contents. When the prediction models were applied to other non-model corn species, the ratio ranges between the predicted BCF values and the measured BCF values were within an interval of 2-fold and close to the solid line of 1∶1 relationship. Moreover, the prediction model i.e. Log[BCF] = -0.098 pH-0.150 log[OM] -1.894 at the treatment of high Pb can effectively reduce the measured BCF intra-species variability for all non-model corn species. These suggested that this prediction model derived from the high Pb content was more adaptable to be applied to other non-model corn species to predict the Pb bioconcentration in corn grain and assess the ecological risk of Pb in different agricultural soils.

  17. Cross-species chromosome painting in bats from Madagascar: the contribution of Myzopodidae to revealing ancestral syntenies in Chiroptera.

    PubMed

    Richards, Leigh R; Rambau, Ramugondo V; Lamb, Jennifer M; Taylor, Peter J; Yang, Fengtang; Schoeman, M Corrie; Goodman, Steven M

    2010-09-01

    The chiropteran fauna of Madagascar comprises eight of the 19 recognized families of bats, including the endemic Myzopodidae. While recent systematic studies of Malagasy bats have contributed to our understanding of the morphological and genetic diversity of the island's fauna, little is known about their cytosystematics. Here we investigate karyotypic relationships among four species, representing four families of Chiroptera endemic to the Malagasy region using cross-species chromosome painting with painting probes of Myotis myotis: Myzopodidae (Myzopoda aurita, 2n = 26), Molossidae (Mormopterus jugularis, 2n = 48), Miniopteridae (Miniopterus griveaudi, 2n = 46), and Vespertilionidae (Myotis goudoti, 2n = 44). This study represents the first time a member of the family Myzopodidae has been investigated using chromosome painting. Painting probes of M. myotis were used to delimit 29, 24, 23, and 22 homologous chromosomal segments in the genomes of M. aurita, M. jugularis, M. griveaudi, and M. goudoti, respectively. Comparison of GTG-banded homologous chromosomes/chromosomal segments among the four species revealed the genome of M. aurita has been structured through 14 fusions of chromosomes and chromosomal segments of M. myotis chromosomes leading to a karyotype consisting solely of bi-armed chromosomes. In addition, chromosome painting revealed a novel X-autosome translocation in M. aurita. Comparison of our results with published chromosome maps provided further evidence for karyotypic conservatism within the genera Mormopterus, Miniopterus, and Myotis. Mapping of chromosomal rearrangements onto a molecular consensus phylogeny revealed ancestral syntenies shared between Myzopoda and other bat species of the infraorders Pteropodiformes and Vespertilioniformes. Our study provides further evidence for the involvement of Robertsonian (Rb) translocations and fusions/fissions in chromosomal evolution within Chiroptera.

  18. Hebephilia as mental disorder? A historical, cross-cultural, sociological, cross-species, non-clinical empirical, and evolutionary review.

    PubMed

    Rind, Bruce; Yuill, Richard

    2012-08-01

    Blanchard et al. (2009) demonstrated that hebephilia is a genuine sexual preference, but then proposed, without argument or evidence, that it should be designated as a mental disorder in the DSM-5. A series of Letters-to-the-Editor criticized this proposal as a non sequitur. Blanchard (2009), in rebuttal, reaffirmed his position, but without adequately addressing some central criticisms. In this article, we examine hebephilia-as-disorder in full detail. Unlike Blanchard et al., we discuss definitions of mental disorder, examine extensive evidence from a broad range of sources, and consider alternative (i.e., non-pathological) explanations for hebephilia. We employed Wakefield's (1992b) harmful dysfunction approach to disorder, which holds that a condition only counts as a disorder when it is a failure of a naturally selected mechanism to function as designed, which is harmful to the individual in the current environment. We also considered a harmful-for-others approach to disorder (Brülde, 2007). Examination of historical, cross-cultural, sociological, cross-species, non-clinical empirical, and evolutionary evidence and perspectives indicated that hebephilic interest is an evolved capacity and hebephilic preference an expectable distributional variant, both of which were adaptively neutral or functional, not dysfunctional, in earlier human environments. Hebephilia's conflict with modern society makes it an evolutionary mismatch, not a genuine disorder. Though it should not be classified as a disorder, it could be entered in the DSM's V-code [corrected] section, used for non-disordered conditions that create significant problems in present-day society.

  19. Cross-species comparison of orthologous gene expression in human bladder cancer and carcinogen-induced rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Liu, Pengyuan; Wen, Weidong; Grubbs, Clinton J; Townsend, Reid R; Malone, James P; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Genes differentially expressed by tumor cells represent promising drug targets for anti-cancer therapy. Such candidate genes need to be validated in appropriate animal models. This study examined the suitability of rodent models of bladder cancer in B6D2F1 mice and Fischer-344 rats to model clinical bladder cancer specimens in humans. Using a global gene expression approach cross-species analysis showed that 13-34% of total genes in the genome were differentially expressed between tumor and normal tissues in each of five datasets from humans, rats, and mice. About 20% of these differentially expressed genes overlapped among species, corresponding to 2.6 to 4.8% of total genes in the genome. Several genes were consistently dysregulated in bladder tumors in both humans and rodents. Notably, CNN1, MYL9, PDLIM3, ITIH5, MYH11, PCP4 and FM05 were found to commonly down-regulated; while T0P2A, CCNB2, KIF20A and RRM2 were up-regulated. These genes are likely to have conserved functions contributing to bladder carcinogenesis. Gene set enrichment analysis detected a number of molecular pathways commonly activated in both humans and rodent bladder cancer. These pathways affect the cell cycle, HIF-1 and MYC expression, and regulation of apoptosis. We also compared expression changes at mRNA and protein levels in the rat model and identified several genes/proteins exhibiting concordant changes in bladder tumors, including ANXA1, ANXA2, CA2, KRT14, LDHA, LGALS4, SERPINA1, KRT18 and LDHB. In general, rodent models of bladder cancer represent the clinical disease to an extent that will allow successful mining of target genes and permit studies on the molecular mechanisms of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:21139803

  20. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Prediction Model for Lead Transfer from Soil to Corn Grain under Stress of Exogenous Lead

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaojun; Yang, Hua; Li, Yupeng; Long, Jian; Liang, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing concern in recent years regarding lead (Pb) transfer in the soil-plant system. In this study the transfer of Pb (exogenous salts) was investigated from a wide range of Chinese soils to corn grain (Zhengdan 958). Prediction models were developed with combination of the Pb bioconcentration factor (BCF) of Zhengdan 958, and soil pH, organic matter (OM) content, and cation exchange capacity (CEC) through multiple stepwise regressions. Moreover, these prediction models from Zhengdan 958 were applied to other non-model corn species through cross-species extrapolation approach. The results showed that the soil pH and OM were the major factors that controlled Pb transfer from soil to corn grain. The lower pH and OM could improve the bioaccumulation of Pb in corn grain. No significant differences were found between two prediction models derived from the different exogenous Pb contents. When the prediction models were applied to other non-model corn species, the ratio ranges between the predicted BCF values and the measured BCF values were within an interval of 2-fold and close to the solid line of 1∶1 relationship. Moreover, the prediction model i.e. Log[BCF] = −0.098 pH-0.150 log[OM] −1.894 at the treatment of high Pb can effectively reduce the measured BCF intra-species variability for all non-model corn species. These suggested that this prediction model derived from the high Pb content was more adaptable to be applied to other non-model corn species to predict the Pb bioconcentration in corn grain and assess the ecological risk of Pb in different agricultural soils. PMID:24416440

  1. Efficient cross-species capture hybridization and next-generation sequencing of mitochondrial genomes from noninvasively sampled museum specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Victor C.; Li, Gang; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Murphy, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to uncover the phylogenetic history of recently extinct species and other species known only from archived museum material has rapidly improved due to the reduced cost and increased sequence capacity of next-generation sequencing technologies. One limitation of these approaches is the difficulty of isolating and sequencing large, orthologous DNA regions across multiple divergent species, which is exacerbated for museum specimens, where DNA quality varies greatly between samples and contamination levels are often high. Here we describe the use of cross-species DNA capture hybridization techniques and next-generation sequencing to selectively isolate and sequence partial to full-length mitochondrial DNA genomes from the degraded DNA of museum specimens, using probes generated from the DNA of a single extant species. We demonstrate our approach on specimens from an enigmatic gliding mammal, the Sunda colugo, which is widely distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We isolated DNA from 13 colugo specimens collected 47–170 years ago, and successfully captured and sequenced mitochondrial DNA from every specimen, frequently recovering fragments with 10%–13% sequence divergence from the capture probe sequence. Phylogenetic results reveal deep genetic divergence among colugos, both within and between the islands of Borneo and Java, as well as between the Malay Peninsula and different Sundaic islands. Our method is based on noninvasive sampling of minute amounts of soft tissue material from museum specimens, leaving the original specimen essentially undamaged. This approach represents a paradigm shift away from standard PCR-based approaches for accessing population genetic and phylogenomic information from poorly known and difficult-to-study species. PMID:21880778

  2. Tamoxifen-elicited uterotrophy: cross-species and cross-ligand analysis of the gene expression program

    PubMed Central

    Kwekel, Joshua C; Forgacs, Agnes L; Burgoon, Lyle D; Williams, Kurt J; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    Background Tamoxifen (TAM) is a well characterized breast cancer drug and selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) which also has been associated with a small increase in risk for uterine cancers. TAM's partial agonist activation of estrogen receptor has been characterized for specific gene promoters but not at the genomic level in vivo.Furthermore, reducing uncertainties associated with cross-species extrapolations of pharmaco- and toxicogenomic data remains a formidable challenge. Results A comparative ligand and species analysis approach was conducted to systematically assess the physiological, morphological and uterine gene expression alterations elicited across time by TAM and ethynylestradiol (EE) in immature ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice. Differential gene expression was evaluated using custom cDNA microarrays, and the data was compared to identify conserved and divergent responses. 902 genes were differentially regulated in all four studies, 398 of which exhibit identical temporal expression patterns. Conclusion Comparative analysis of EE and TAM differentially expressed gene lists suggest TAM regulates no unique uterine genes that are conserved in the rat and mouse. This demonstrates that the partial agonist activities of TAM extend to molecular targets in regulating only a subset of EE-responsive genes. Ligand-conserved, species-divergent expression of carbonic anhydrase 2 was observed in the microarray data and confirmed by real time PCR. The identification of comparable temporal phenotypic responses linked to related gene expression profiles demonstrates that systematic comparative genomic assessments can elucidate important conserved and divergent mechanisms in rodent estrogen signalling during uterine proliferation. PMID:19400957

  3. Development of Genomic Microsatellite Markers in Carthamus tinctorius L. (Safflower) Using Next Generation Sequencing and Assessment of Their Cross-Species Transferability and Utility for Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Variath, Murali Tottekkad; Joshi, Gopal; Bali, Sapinder; Agarwal, Manu; Kumar, Amar; Jagannath, Arun; Goel, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), an Asteraceae member, yields high quality edible oil rich in unsaturated fatty acids and is resilient to dry conditions. The crop holds tremendous potential for improvement through concerted molecular breeding programs due to the availability of significant genetic and phenotypic diversity. Genomic resources that could facilitate such breeding programs remain largely underdeveloped in the crop. The present study was initiated to develop a large set of novel microsatellite markers for safflower using next generation sequencing. Principal Findings Low throughput genome sequencing of safflower was performed using Illumina paired end technology providing ~3.5X coverage of the genome. Analysis of sequencing data allowed identification of 23,067 regions harboring perfect microsatellite loci. The safflower genome was found to be rich in dinucleotide repeats followed by tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotides. Primer pairs were designed for 5,716 novel microsatellite sequences with repeat length ≥ 20 bases and optimal flanking regions. A subset of 325 microsatellite loci was tested for amplification, of which 294 loci produced robust amplification. The validated primers were used for assessment of 23 safflower accessions belonging to diverse agro-climatic zones of the world leading to identification of 93 polymorphic primers (31.6%). The numbers of observed alleles at each locus ranged from two to four and mean polymorphism information content was found to be 0.3075. The polymorphic primers were tested for cross-species transferability on nine wild relatives of cultivated safflower. All primers except one showed amplification in at least two wild species while 25 primers amplified across all the nine species. The UPGMA dendrogram clustered C. tinctorius accessions and wild species separately into two major groups. The proposed progenitor species of safflower, C. oxyacantha and C. palaestinus were genetically closer to

  4. Development of Genomic Microsatellite Markers in Carthamus tinctorius L. (Safflower) Using Next Generation Sequencing and Assessment of Their Cross-Species Transferability and Utility for Diversity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ambreen, Heena; Kumar, Shivendra; Variath, Murali Tottekkad; Joshi, Gopal; Bali, Sapinder; Agarwal, Manu; Kumar, Amar; Jagannath, Arun; Goel, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), an Asteraceae member, yields high quality edible oil rich in unsaturated fatty acids and is resilient to dry conditions. The crop holds tremendous potential for improvement through concerted molecular breeding programs due to the availability of significant genetic and phenotypic diversity. Genomic resources that could facilitate such breeding programs remain largely underdeveloped in the crop. The present study was initiated to develop a large set of novel microsatellite markers for safflower using next generation sequencing. Low throughput genome sequencing of safflower was performed using Illumina paired end technology providing ~3.5X coverage of the genome. Analysis of sequencing data allowed identification of 23,067 regions harboring perfect microsatellite loci. The safflower genome was found to be rich in dinucleotide repeats followed by tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotides. Primer pairs were designed for 5,716 novel microsatellite sequences with repeat length ≥ 20 bases and optimal flanking regions. A subset of 325 microsatellite loci was tested for amplification, of which 294 loci produced robust amplification. The validated primers were used for assessment of 23 safflower accessions belonging to diverse agro-climatic zones of the world leading to identification of 93 polymorphic primers (31.6%). The numbers of observed alleles at each locus ranged from two to four and mean polymorphism information content was found to be 0.3075. The polymorphic primers were tested for cross-species transferability on nine wild relatives of cultivated safflower. All primers except one showed amplification in at least two wild species while 25 primers amplified across all the nine species. The UPGMA dendrogram clustered C. tinctorius accessions and wild species separately into two major groups. The proposed progenitor species of safflower, C. oxyacantha and C. palaestinus were genetically closer to cultivated safflower and formed a

  5. Expression profiling and cross-species RNA interference (RNAi) of desiccation-induced transcripts in the anhydrobiotic nematode Aphelenchus avenae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Some organisms can survive extreme desiccation by entering a state of suspended animation known as anhydrobiosis. The free-living mycophagous nematode Aphelenchus avenae can be induced to enter anhydrobiosis by pre-exposure to moderate reductions in relative humidity (RH) prior to extreme desiccation. This preconditioning phase is thought to allow modification of the transcriptome by activation of genes required for desiccation tolerance. Results To identify such genes, a panel of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) enriched for sequences upregulated in A. avenae during preconditioning was created. A subset of 30 genes with significant matches in databases, together with a number of apparently novel sequences, were chosen for further study. Several of the recognisable genes are associated with water stress, encoding, for example, two new hydrophilic proteins related to the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. Expression studies confirmed EST panel members to be upregulated by evaporative water loss, and the majority of genes was also induced by osmotic stress and cold, but rather fewer by heat. We attempted to use RNA interference (RNAi) to demonstrate the importance of this gene set for anhydrobiosis, but found A. avenae to be recalcitrant with the techniques used. Instead, therefore, we developed a cross-species RNAi procedure using A. avenae sequences in another anhydrobiotic nematode, Panagrolaimus superbus, which is amenable to gene silencing. Of 20 A. avenae ESTs screened, a significant reduction in survival of desiccation in treated P. superbus populations was observed with two sequences, one of which was novel, while the other encoded a glutathione peroxidase. To confirm a role for glutathione peroxidases in anhydrobiosis, RNAi with cognate sequences from P. superbus was performed and was also shown to reduce desiccation tolerance in this species. Conclusions This study has identified and characterised the expression profiles of members

  6. Optimized design of a nanostructured SPCE-based multipurpose biosensing platform formed by ferrocene-tethered electrochemically-deposited cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Argoubi, Wicem; Saadaoui, Maroua

    2015-01-01

    Summary The demand for on-site nanodevices is constantly increasing. The technology development for the design of such devices is highly regarded. In this work, we report the design of a disposable platform that is structured with cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles (cfAuNPs) and we show its applications in immunosensing and enzyme-based detection. The electrochemical reduction of Au(III) allows for the electrodeposition of highly dispersed cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles on the surface of screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). The nanostructures were functionalized using ferrocenylmethyl lipoic acid ester which allowed for the tethering of the ferrocene group to gold, which serves as an electrochemical transducer/mediator. The bioconjugation of the surface with anti-human IgG antibody (α-hIgG) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme yields biosensors, which have been applied for the selective electrochemical detection of human IgG (hIgG) or H2O2 as model analytes, respectively. Parameters such as the number of sweeps, amount of charge generated from the oxidation of the electrodeposited gold, time of incubation and concentration of the ferrocene derivatives have been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Selectivity and specificity tests have been also performed in the presence of potentially interfering substances to either hIgG or H2O2. Results showed that the devised immunosensor is endowed with good selectivity and specificity in the presence of several folds of competitive analytes. The enzyme-based platform showed a good catalytic activity towards H2O2 oxidation which predestined it to potential applications pertaining to enzymatic kinetics studies. The levels of hIgG in human serum and H2O2 in honey were successfully determined and served as assessment tools of the applicability of the platforms for real samples analysis. PMID:26425435

  7. A Novel Endogenous Betaretrovirus in the Common Vampire Bat (Desmodus rotundus) Suggests Multiple Independent Infection and Cross-Species Transmission Events

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, M. Lisandra Zepeda; Heeger, Felix; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L.; Taboada, Blanca; Mazzoni, Camila J.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    The Desmodus rotundus endogenous betaretrovirus (DrERV) is fixed in the vampire bat D. rotundus population and in other phyllostomid bats but is not present in all species from this family. DrERV is not phylogenetically related to Old World bat betaretroviruses but to betaretroviruses from rodents and New World primates, suggesting recent cross-species transmission. A recent integration age estimation of the provirus in some taxa indicates that an exogenous counterpart might have been in recent circulation. PMID:25717107

  8. Right Place, Wrong Species: A 20-Year Review of Rabies Virus Cross Species Transmission among Terrestrial Mammals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ryan M.; Gilbert, Amy; Slate, Dennis; Chipman, Richard; Singh, Amber; Cassie Wedd; Blanton, Jesse D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the continental US, four terrestrial mammalian species are reservoirs for seven antigenic rabies virus variants. Cross species transmission (CST) occurs when a rabies virus variant causes disease in non-reservoir species. Methods This study analyzed national surveillance data for rabies in terrestrial mammals. The CST rate was defined as: number of rabid non-reservoir animals/number of rabid reservoir animals. CST rates were analyzed for trend. Clusters of high CST rate counties were evaluated using space-time scanning statistics. Results The number of counties reporting a raccoon variant CST rate >1.0 increased from 75 in 1992 to 187 in 2011; counties with skunk variant CST rates >1.0 remained unchanged during the same period. As of 2011, for every rabid raccoon reported within the raccoon variant region, there were 0.73 cases of this variant reported in non-reservoir animals. Skunks were the most common non-reservoir animal reported with the raccoon rabies variant. Domestic animals were the most common non-reservoir animal diagnosed with a skunk rabies virus variant (n = 1,601). Cross species transmission rates increased fastest among domestic animals. Conclusions Cross species transmission of rabies virus variants into non-reservoir animals increases the risk of human exposures and threatens current advances toward rabies control. Cross species transmission in raccoon rabies enzootic regions increased dramatically during the study period. Pet owners should vaccinate their dogs and cats to ensure against CST, particularly in regions with active foci of rabies circulation. Clusters of high CST activity represent areas for further study to better understand interspecies disease transmission dynamics. Each CST event has the potential to result in a rabies virus adapted for sustained transmission in a new species; therefore further understanding of the dynamics of CST may help in early detection or prevention of the emergence of new terrestrial

  9. Functional interaction of nuclear domain 10 and its components with cytomegalovirus after infections: cross-species host cells versus native cells.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Ruth Cruz; Martínez, Francisco Puerta; Tang, Qiyi

    2011-04-28

    Species-specificity is one of the major characteristics of cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) and is the primary reason for the lack of a mouse model for the direct infection of human CMV (HCMV). It has been determined that CMV cross-species infections are blocked at the post-entry level by intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms, but few details are known. It is important to explore how CMVs interact with the subnuclear structure of the cross-species host cell. In our present study, we discovered that nuclear domain 10 (ND10) of human cells was not disrupted by murine CMV (MCMV) and that the ND10 of mouse cells was not disrupted by HCMV, although the ND10-disrupting protein, immediate-early protein 1 (IE1), also colocalized with ND10 in cross-species infections. In addition, we found that the UL131-repaired HCMV strain AD169 (vDW215-BADrUL131) can infect mouse cells to produce immediate-early (IE) and early (E) proteins but that neither DNA replication nor viral particles were detectable in mouse cells. Unrepaired AD169 can express IE1 only in mouse cells. In both HCMV-infected mouse cells and MCMV-infected human cells, the knocking-down of ND10 components (PML, Daxx, and SP100) resulted in significantly increased viral-protein production. Our observations provide evidence to support our hypothesis that ND10 and ND10 components might be important defensive factors against the CMV cross-species infection.

  10. A novel endogenous betaretrovirus in the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) suggests multiple independent infection and cross-species transmission events.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Mendoza, M Lisandra Zepeda; Heeger, Felix; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L; Taboada, Blanca; Mazzoni, Camila J; Arias, Carlos F; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-05-01

    The Desmodus rotundus endogenous betaretrovirus (DrERV) is fixed in the vampire bat D. rotundus population and in other phyllostomid bats but is not present in all species from this family. DrERV is not phylogenetically related to Old World bat betaretroviruses but to betaretroviruses from rodents and New World primates, suggesting recent cross-species transmission. A recent integration age estimation of the provirus in some taxa indicates that an exogenous counterpart might have been in recent circulation.

  11. Analysis of the long control region of bovine papillomavirus type 1 associated with sarcoids in equine hosts indicates multiple cross-species transmission events and phylogeographical structure.

    PubMed

    Trewby, Hannah; Ayele, Gizachew; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Brandt, Sabine; Campo, M Saveria; Del Fava, Claudia; Marais, Johan; Leonardi, Leonardo; Vanselow, Barbara; Biek, Roman; Nasir, Lubna

    2014-12-01

    Papillomaviruses are a family of slowly evolving DNA viruses and their evolution is commonly linked to that of their host species. However, whilst bovine papillomavirus-1 (BPV-1) primarily causes warts in its natural host, the cow, it can also cause locally aggressive and invasive skin tumours in equids, known as sarcoids, and thus provides a rare contemporary example of cross-species transmission of a papillomavirus. Here, we describe the first phylogenetic analysis of BPV-1 in equine sarcoids to our knowledge, allowing us to explore the evolutionary history of BPV-1 and investigate its cross-species association with equids. A phylogenetic analysis of the BPV-1 transcriptional promoter region (the long control region or LCR) was conducted on 15 bovine and 116 equine samples from four continents. Incorporating previous estimates for evolutionary rates in papillomavirus implied that the genetic diversity in the LCR variants was ancient and predated domestication of both equids and cattle. The phylogeny demonstrated geographical segregation into an ancestral group (African, South American and Australian samples), and a more recently derived, largely European clade. Whilst our data are consistent with BPV-1 originating in cattle, we found evidence of multiple, probably relatively recent, cross-species transmission events into horses. We also demonstrated the high prevalence of one particular sequence variant (variant 20), and suggest this may indicate that this variant shows a fitness advantage in equids. Although strong host specificity remains the norm in papillomaviruses, our results demonstrate that exceptions to this rule exist and can become epidemiologically relevant.

  12. Optimizing the Presentation of Mental Health Information in Social Media: The Effects of Health Testimonials and Platform on Source Perceptions, Message Processing, and Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Quintero Johnson, Jessie M; Yilmaz, Gamze; Najarian, Kristy

    2017-09-01

    Using social media for the purpose of disseminating mental health information is a critical area of scientific inquiry for health communication professionals. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the presence of a first-person testimonial in educational mental health information placed in Facebook and Twitter messages influenced college students' (N = 257) source perceptions, information processing, cognitive elaboration, health information recall, beliefs, and behavioral intentions. Results show that exposure to social media messages that featured mental health information embedded with a testimonial predicted less source homophily and more critical thoughts about the social media source, less systematic message processing, and less cognitive elaboration. Health information recall was significantly impacted by both the social media platform and message content such that participants in the testimonial condition on Facebook were more likely to recall the health facts in those messages whereas participants who viewed the testimonial in Twitter were less likely to recall the facts in those tweets. Compared to those who read Facebook messages, participants who read Twitter messages reported higher levels of systematic message processing. These findings suggest that the integration of health testimonials into social media messages might inadvertently provoke psychological resistance to mental health information, thereby reducing the persuasive impact of those messages.

  13. Metabolic engineering of industrial platform microorganisms for biorefinery applications--optimization of substrate spectrum and process robustness by rational and evolutive strategies.

    PubMed

    Buschke, Nele; Schäfer, Rudolf; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    Bio-based production promises a sustainable route to myriads of chemicals, materials and fuels. With regard to eco-efficiency, its future success strongly depends on a next level of bio-processes using raw materials beyond glucose. Such renewables, i.e., polymers, complex substrate mixtures and diluted waste streams, often cannot be metabolized naturally by the producing organisms. This particularly holds for well-known microorganisms from the traditional sugar-based biotechnology, including Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae which have been engineered successfully to produce a broad range of products from glucose. In order to make full use of their production potential within the bio-refinery value chain, they have to be adapted to various feed-stocks of interest. This review focuses on the strategies to be applied for this purpose which combine rational and evolutive approaches. Hereby, the three industrial platform microorganisms, E. coli, C. glutamicum and S. cerevisiae are highlighted due to their particular importance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. APOBEC3G polymorphism as a selective barrier to cross-species transmission and emergence of pathogenic SIV and AIDS in a primate host.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Annabel; McCarthy, Kevin R; Ooms, Marcel; Letko, Michael; Morgan, Jennifer S; Simon, Viviana; Johnson, Welkin E

    2013-01-01

    Cellular restriction factors, which render cells intrinsically resistant to viruses, potentially impose genetic barriers to cross-species transmission and emergence of viral pathogens in nature. One such factor is APOBEC3G. To overcome APOBEC3G-mediated restriction, many lentiviruses encode Vif, a protein that targets APOBEC3G for degradation. As with many restriction factor genes, primate APOBEC3G displays strong signatures of positive selection. This is interpreted as evidence that the primate APOBEC3G locus reflects a long-term evolutionary "arms-race" between retroviruses and their primate hosts. Here, we provide direct evidence that APOBEC3G has functioned as a barrier to cross-species transmission, selecting for viral resistance during emergence of the AIDS-causing pathogen SIVmac in captive colonies of Asian macaques in the 1970s. Specifically, we found that rhesus macaques have multiple, functionally distinct APOBEC3G alleles, and that emergence of SIVmac and simian AIDS required adaptation of the virus to evade APOBEC3G-mediated restriction. Our evidence includes the first comparative analysis of APOBEC3G polymorphism and function in both a reservoir and recipient host species (sooty mangabeys and rhesus macaques, respectively), and identification of adaptations unique to Vif proteins of the SIVmac lineage that specifically antagonize rhesus APOBEC3G alleles. By demonstrating that interspecies variation in a known restriction factor selected for viral counter-adaptations in the context of a documented case of cross-species transmission, our results lend strong support to the evolutionary "arms-race" hypothesis. Importantly, our study confirms that APOBEC3G divergence can be a critical determinant of interspecies transmission and emergence of primate lentiviruses, including viruses with the potential to infect and spread in human populations.

  15. Cross-species transfer of viruses: implications for the use of viral vectors in biomedical research, gene therapy and as live-virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2005-10-01

    All living organisms are continuously exposed to a plethora of viruses. In general, viruses tend to be restricted to the natural host species which they infect. From time to time viruses cross the host-range barrier expanding their host range. However, in very rare cases cross-species transfer is followed by the establishment and persistence of a virus in the new host species, which may result in disease. Recent examples of viruses that have crossed the species barrier from animal reservoirs to humans are hantavirus, haemorrhagic fever viruses, arboviruses, Nipah and Hendra viruses, avian influenza virus (AI), monkeypox virus, and the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The opportunities for cross-species transfer of mammalian viruses have increased in recent years due to increased contact between humans and animal reservoirs. However, it is difficult to predict when such events will take place since the viral adaptation that is needed to accomplish this is multifactorial and stochastic. Against this background the intensified use of viruses and their genetically modified variants as viral gene transfer vectors for biomedical research, experimental gene therapy and for live-vector vaccines is a cause for concern. This review addresses a number of potential risk factors and their implications for activities with viral vectors from the perspective of cross-species transfer of viruses in nature, with emphasis on the occurrence of host-range mutants resulting from either cell culture or tropism engineering. The issues are raised with the intention to assist in risk assessments for activities with vector viruses.

  16. The Center for Optimized Structural Studies (COSS) platform for automation in cloning, expression, and purification of single proteins and protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Mlynek, Georg; Lehner, Anita; Neuhold, Jana; Leeb, Sarah; Kostan, Julius; Charnagalov, Alexej; Stolt-Bergner, Peggy; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Pinotsis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    Expression in Escherichia coli represents the simplest and most cost effective means for the production of recombinant proteins. This is a routine task in structural biology and biochemistry where milligrams of the target protein are required in high purity and monodispersity. To achieve these criteria, the user often needs to screen several constructs in different expression and purification conditions in parallel. We describe a pipeline, implemented in the Center for Optimized Structural Studies, that enables the systematic screening of expression and purification conditions for recombinant proteins and relies on a series of logical decisions. We first use bioinformatics tools to design a series of protein fragments, which we clone in parallel, and subsequently screen in small scale for optimal expression and purification conditions. Based on a scoring system that assesses soluble expression, we then select the top ranking targets for large-scale purification. In the establishment of our pipeline, emphasis was put on streamlining the processes such that it can be easily but not necessarily automatized. In a typical run of about 2 weeks, we are able to prepare and perform small-scale expression screens for 20-100 different constructs followed by large-scale purification of at least 4-6 proteins. The major advantage of our approach is its flexibility, which allows for easy adoption, either partially or entirely, by any average hypothesis driven laboratory in a manual or robot-assisted manner.

  17. Path Planning of AN Autonomous Mobile Multi-Sensor Platform in a 3d Environment Using Newtonian Imperialist Competitive Optimization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, A. A.; Afghan-Toloee, A.; Abbaspour, R. A.

    2013-09-01

    This paper addresses an innovative evolutionary computation approach to 3D path planning of autonomous UAVs in real environment. To solve this Np-hard problem, Newtonian imperialist competitive algorithm (NICA) was developed and extended for path planning problem. This paper is related to optimal trajectory-designing before UAV missions. NICA planner provides 3D optimal paths for UAV planning in real topography of north Tehran environment. To simulate UAV path planning, a real DTM is used to algorithm. For real-world applications, final generated paths should be smooth and also physical flyable that made the path planning problems complex and more constrained. The planner progressively presents a smooth 3D path from first position to mission target location. The objective function contains distinctive measures of the problem. Our main goal is minimization of the total mission time. For evaluating of NICA efficiency, it is compared with other three well-known methods, i.e. ICA, GA, and PSO. Then path planning of UAV will done. Finally simulations proved the high capabilities of proposed methodology.

  18. Development of nine new microsatellite loci for the American beaver, Castor canadensis (Rodentia: Castoridae), and cross-species amplification in the European beaver, Castor fiber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelz-Serrano, K.; Munguia-Vega, A.; Piaggio, A.J.; Neubaum, M.; Munclinger, P.; PArtl, A.; van Riper, Charles; Culver, M.

    2009-01-01

    We developed nine new nuclear dinucleotide microsatellite loci for Castor canadensis. All loci were polymorphic, except for one. The number of alleles ranged from two to four and from five to 12 in populations from Arizona and Wisconsin, respectively. Average heterozygosity ranged from 0.13 to 0.86 per locus. Since cross-species amplification in Castor fiber was successful only in four loci, we tested also nine recently published C. canadensis loci in the Eurasian species. Eight of the published loci amplified; however, three were monomorphic. The number of alleles was lower in C. fiber than in C. canadensis at all loci tested. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Development of a biodegradable nanoparticle platform for sildenafil: formulation optimization by factorial design analysis combined with application of charge-modified branched polyesters.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Schmehl, Thomas; Gessler, Tobias; Seeger, Werner; Kissel, Thomas

    2012-02-10

    Biodegradable nanoparticles have gained tremendous attraction as carriers for controlled drug delivery to the lung. Despite numerous advances in the field, e.g. development of suitable methods for pulmonary administration of polymeric nanoparticles, a sufficient association of the therapeutic agent with the carrier system as well as drug release in a controlled fashion remain considerable challenges. Hence, this study examines the optimization of biodegradable sildenafil-loaded nanoparticle formulations intended for aerosol treatment of pulmonary hypertension. A factorial design analysis was employed to identify the important experimental factors involved in the preparation of nanoparticles by the solvent evaporation technique. The effect of tailored charge-modified branched polyesters on drug loading and in vitro drug release from nanoparticles was also evaluated. Moreover, colloidal stability of obtained nanoparticles was assessed, and stabilization of nanoparticles by lyophilization was accomplished without additional excipients. Essential experimental factors were identified and optimized to allow the preparation of nanoparticles composed of linear polyesters with a sildenafil content of ~5 wt.%. The in vitro drug release profile from these nanoparticles demonstrated a sustained release of sildenafil over ~90 min. Application of charge-modified branched polyesters enhanced the drug content in nanoparticles and drug release profile, according to the charge-density present in the employed polymer. Accordingly an increase in drug loading by a factor of ~1.4, a prolonged drug release profile from nanoparticles over ~240 min was achieved. Sildenafil release from nanoparticles made of linear and charge-modified branched polyesters was governed by a diffusion process. The obtained drug diffusion coefficients were decreased as the charge-density present in the applied polymer was increased, which promotes the strategy to improve drug loading and release rates by

  20. In Vitro Optimization of EtNBS-PDT against Hypoxic Tumor Environments with a Tiered, High-Content, 3D Model Optical Screening Platform

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Oliver J.; Bhayana, Brijesh; Park, Yong Jin; Evans, Conor L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia and acidosis are widely recognized as major contributors to the development of treatment resistant cancer. For patients with disseminated metastatic lesions, such as most women with ovarian cancer (OvCa), the progression to treatment resistant disease is almost always fatal. Numerous therapeutic approaches have been developed to eliminate treatment resistant carcinoma, including novel biologic, chemo, radiation, and photodynamic therapy (PDT) regimens. Recently, PDT using the cationic photosensitizer EtNBS was found to be highly effective against therapeutically unresponsive hypoxic and acidic OvCa cellular populations in vitro. To optimize this treatment regimen, we developed a tiered, high-content, image-based screening approach utilizing a biologically relevant OvCa 3D culture model to investigate a small library of side-chain modified EtNBS derivatives. The uptake, localization, and photocytotoxicity of these compounds on both the cellular and nodular levels were observed to be largely mediated by their respective ethyl side chain chemical alterations. In particular, EtNBS and its hydroxyl-terminated derivative (EtNBS-OH) were found to have similar pharmacological parameters, such as their nodular localization patterns and uptake kinetics. Interestingly, these two molecules were found to induce dramatically different therapeutic outcomes: EtNBS was found to be more effective in killing the hypoxic, nodule core cells with superior selectivity, while EtNBS-OH was observed to trigger widespread structural degradation of nodules. This breakdown of the tumor architecture can improve the therapeutic outcome and is known to synergistically enhance the antitumor effects of front-line chemotherapeutic regimens. These results, which would not have been predicted or observed using traditional monolayer or in vivo animal screening techniques, demonstrate the powerful capabilities of 3D in vitro screening approaches for the selection and optimization of therapeutic

  1. Further evidence for Clock△19 mice as a model for bipolar disorder mania using cross-species tests of exploration and sensorimotor gating

    PubMed Central

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a pervasive neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by episodes of mania and depression. The switch between mania and depression may reflect seasonal changes and certainly can be affected by alterations in sleep and circadian control. The circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) protein is a key component of the cellular circadian clock. Mutation of the Clock gene encoding this protein in Clock△19 mutant mice leads to behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of BD mania. To date, however, these mice have not been assessed in behavioral paradigms that have cross-species translational validity. In the present studies of Clock△19 and wildtype (WT) littermate mice, we quantified exploratory behavior and sensorimotor gating, which are abnormal in BD manic patients. We also examined the saccharin preference of these mice and their circadian control in different photoperiods. Clock△19 mice exhibited behavioral alterations that are consistent with BD manic patients tested in comparable tasks, including hyperactivity, increased specific exploration, and reduced sensorimotor gating. Moreover, compared to WT mice, Clock△19 mice exhibited a greater preference for sweetened solutions and greater sensitivity to altered photoperiod. In contrast with BD manic patients however, Clock△19 mice exhibited more circumscribed movements during exploration. Future studies will extend the characterization of these mice in measures with cross-species translational relevance to human testing. PMID:23623885

  2. Induction of ebolavirus cross-species immunity using retrovirus-like particles bearing the Ebola virus glycoprotein lacking the mucin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Ou, Wu; Delisle, Josie; Jacques, Jerome; Shih, Joanna; Price, Graeme; Kuhn, Jens H; Wang, Vivian; Verthelyi, Daniela; Kaplan, Gerardo; Wilson, Carolyn A

    2012-01-25

    The genus Ebolavirus includes five distinct viruses. Four of these viruses cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. Currently there are no licensed vaccines for any of them; however, several vaccines are under development. Ebola virus envelope glycoprotein (GP1,2) is highly immunogenic, but antibodies frequently arise against its least conserved mucin-like domain (MLD). We hypothesized that immunization with MLD-deleted GP1,2 (GPΔMLD) would induce cross-species immunity by making more conserved regions accessible to the immune system. To test this hypothesis, mice were immunized with retrovirus-like particles (retroVLPs) bearing Ebola virus GPΔMLD, DNA plasmids (plasmo-retroVLP) that can produce such retroVLPs in vivo, or plasmo-retroVLP followed by retroVLPs. Cross-species neutralizing antibody and GP1,2-specific cellular immune responses were successfully induced. Our findings suggest that GPΔMLD presented through retroVLPs may provide a strategy for development of a vaccine against multiple ebolaviruses. Similar vaccination strategies may be adopted for other viruses whose envelope proteins contain highly variable regions that may mask more conserved domains from the immune system.

  3. Feline lentivirus evolution in cross-species infection reveals extensive G-to-A mutation and selection on key residues in the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Poss, Mary; Ross, Howard A; Painter, Sally L; Holley, David C; Terwee, Julie A; Vandewoude, Sue; Rodrigo, Allen

    2006-03-01

    Factors that restrict a virus from establishing productive infection in a new host species are important to understand because cross-species transmission events are often associated with emergent viral diseases. To determine the evolutionary pressures on viruses in new host species, we evaluated the molecular evolution of a feline immunodeficiency virus derived from a wild cougar, Puma concolor, during infection of domestic cats. Analyses were based on the coding portion of genome sequences recovered at intervals over 37 weeks of infection of six cats inoculated by either intravenous or oral-nasal routes. All cats inoculated intravenously, but only one inoculated orally-nasally, became persistently viremic. There were notable accumulations of lethal errors and predominance of G-to-A alterations throughout the genome, which were marked in the viral polymerase gene, pol. Viral structural (env and gag) and accessory (vif and orfA) genes evolved neutrally or were under purifying selection. However, sites under positive selection were identified in reverse transcriptase that involved residues in the nucleotide binding pocket or those contacting the RNA-DNA duplex. The findings of extensive G-to-A alterations in this cross-species infection are consistent with the recently described editing of host cytidine deaminase on lentivirus genomes. Additionally, we demonstrate that the primary site of hypermutation is the viral pol gene and the dominant selective force acting on this feline immunodeficiency virus as it replicates in a new host species is on key residues of the virus polymerase.

  4. Exploring the Role of 5-HT1A Receptors in the Regulation of Prepulse Inhibition in Mice: Implications for Cross-Species Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is a model of sensorimotor gating, a sensory filtering mechanism which is disrupted in schizophrenia. Here, investigation of the role of the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor in the regulation of PPI in two mouse strains, C57Bl/6 and Balb/c, was used to address findings in the PPI literature on species and mouse strain differences that question the usefulness of PPI as a cross-species preclinical test. Although the full 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, induced markedly different strain-specific responses in PPI, other selective 5-HT1A receptor ligands with partial agonist or antagonist activity elicited similar effects across strains. Pretreatment with the serotonin precursor, 5-HTP, to increase serotonergic activity in the brain, unmasked a decrease in PPI caused by 8-OH-DPAT in C57Bl/6 mice. Pretreatment with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor, PCPA, to decrease serotonergic activity in the brain, unmasked an 8-OH-DPAT-induced increase in PPI in this strain. These studies show that the strain-dependent involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in PPI can be modulated by the type of 5-HT1A ligand used, or increasing or decreasing serotonin levels in the brain. These results help to clarify some of the mouse strain and species differences in PPI regulation and strengthen its usefulness as a cross-species measure of sensorimotor gating. PMID:23336054

  5. Cross-species coherence in effects and modes of action in support of causality determinations in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Science Assessment for Lead.

    PubMed

    Lassiter, Meredith Gooding; Owens, Elizabeth Oesterling; Patel, Molini M; Kirrane, Ellen; Madden, Meagan; Richmond-Bryant, Jennifer; Hines, Erin Pias; Davis, J Allen; Vinikoor-Imler, Lisa; Dubois, Jean-Jacques

    2015-04-01

    The peer-reviewed literature on the health and ecological effects of lead (Pb) indicates common effects and underlying modes of action across multiple organisms for several endpoints. Based on such observations, the United States (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) applied a cross-species approach in the 2013 Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Lead for evaluating the causality of relationships between Pb exposure and specific endpoints that are shared by humans, laboratory animals, and ecological receptors (i.e., hematological effects, reproductive and developmental effects, and nervous system effects). Other effects of Pb (i.e., cardiovascular, renal, and inflammatory responses) are less commonly assessed in aquatic and terrestrial wildlife limiting the application of cross-species comparisons. Determinations of causality in ISAs are guided by a framework for classifying the weight of evidence across scientific disciplines and across related effects by considering aspects such as biological plausibility and coherence. As illustrated for effects of Pb where evidence across species exists, the integration of coherent effects and common underlying modes of action can serve as a means to substantiate conclusions regarding the causal nature of the health and ecological effects of environmental toxicants.

  6. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Uptake and Disposition of Neutral Organic Chemicals in Fish Using a Multispecies Physiologically-Based Toxicokinetic Model Framework.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Markus; Schlechtriem, Christian; Reininghaus, Mathias; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Hollert, Henner; Preuss, Thomas G

    2016-02-16

    The potential to bioconcentrate is generally considered to be an unwanted property of a substance. Consequently, chemical legislation, including the European REACH regulations, requires the chemical industry to provide bioconcentration data for chemicals that are produced or imported at volumes exceeding 100 tons per annum or if there is a concern that a substance is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic. For the filling of the existing data gap for chemicals produced or imported at levels that are below this stipulated volume, without the need for additional animal experiments, physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models can be used to predict whole-body and tissue concentrations of neutral organic chemicals in fish. PBTK models have been developed for many different fish species with promising results. In this study, we developed PBTK models for zebrafish (Danio rerio) and roach (Rutilus rutilus) and combined them with existing models for rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). The resulting multispecies model framework allows for cross-species extrapolation of the bioaccumulative potential of neutral organic compounds. Predictions were compared with experimental data and were accurate for most substances. Our model can be used for probabilistic risk assessment of chemical bioaccumulation, with particular emphasis on cross-species evaluations.

  7. Further evidence for ClockΔ19 mice as a model for bipolar disorder mania using cross-species tests of exploration and sensorimotor gating.

    PubMed

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W

    2013-07-15

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a pervasive neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by episodes of mania and depression. The switch between mania and depression may reflect seasonal changes and certainly can be affected by alterations in sleep and circadian control. The circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) protein is a key component of the cellular circadian clock. Mutation of the Clock gene encoding this protein in ClockΔ19 mutant mice leads to behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of BD mania. To date, however, these mice have not been assessed in behavioral paradigms that have cross-species translational validity. In the present studies of ClockΔ19 and wildtype (WT) littermate mice, we quantified exploratory behavior and sensorimotor gating, which are abnormal in BD manic patients. We also examined the saccharin preference of these mice and their circadian control in different photoperiods. ClockΔ19 mice exhibited behavioral alterations that are consistent with BD manic patients tested in comparable tasks, including hyperactivity, increased specific exploration, and reduced sensorimotor gating. Moreover, compared to WT mice, ClockΔ19 mice exhibited a greater preference for sweetened solutions and greater sensitivity to altered photoperiod. In contrast with BD manic patients however, ClockΔ19 mice exhibited more circumscribed movements during exploration. Future studies will extend the characterization of these mice in measures with cross-species translational relevance to human testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cross-species transmission potential between wild pigs, livestock, poultry, wildlife, and humans: implications for disease risk management in North America.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan S; Sweeney, Steven J; Slootmaker, Chris; Grear, Daniel A; Di Salvo, Paul A; Kiser, Deborah; Shwiff, Stephanie A

    2017-08-10

    Cross-species disease transmission between wildlife, domestic animals and humans is an increasing threat to public and veterinary health. Wild pigs are increasingly a potential veterinary and public health threat. Here we investigate 84 pathogens and the host species most at risk for transmission with wild pigs using a network approach. We assess the risk to agricultural and human health by evaluating the status of these pathogens and the co-occurrence of wild pigs, agriculture and humans. We identified 34 (87%) OIE listed swine pathogens that cause clinical disease in livestock, poultry, wildlife, and humans. On average 73% of bacterial, 39% of viral, and 63% of parasitic pathogens caused clinical disease in other species. Non-porcine livestock in the family Bovidae shared the most pathogens with swine (82%). Only 49% of currently listed OIE domestic swine diseases had published wild pig surveillance studies. The co-occurrence of wild pigs and farms increased annually at a rate of 1.2% with as much as 57% of all farms and 77% of all agricultural animals co-occurring with wild pigs. The increasing co-occurrence of wild pigs with livestock and humans along with the large number of pathogens shared is a growing risk for cross-species transmission.

  9. Cross-species transmission potential between wild pigs, livestock, poultry, wildlife, and humans: Implications for disease risk management in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Ryan S.; Sweeney, Steven J; Slootmaker, Chris; Grear, Daniel; DiSalvo, Paul A.; Kiser, Deborah; Shwiff, Stephanie A.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-species disease transmission between wildlife, domestic animals and humans is an increasing threat to public and veterinary health. Wild pigs are increasingly a potential veterinary and public health threat. Here we investigate 84 pathogens and the host species most at risk for transmission with wild pigs using a network approach. We assess the risk to agricultural and human health by evaluating the status of these pathogens and the co-occurrence of wild pigs, agriculture and humans. We identified 34 (87%) OIE listed swine pathogens that cause clinical disease in livestock, poultry, wildlife, and humans. On average 73% of bacterial, 39% of viral, and 63% of parasitic pathogens caused clinical disease in other species. Non-porcine livestock in the family Bovidae shared the most pathogens with swine (82%). Only 49% of currently listed OIE domestic swine diseases had published wild pig surveillance studies. The co-occurrence of wild pigs and farms increased annually at a rate of 1.2% with as much as 57% of all farms and 77% of all agricultural animals co-occurring with wild pigs. The increasing co-occurrence of wild pigs with livestock and humans along with the large number of pathogens shared is a growing risk for cross-species transmission.

  10. Genetic differences accounting for evolution and pathogenicity of simian immunodeficiency virus from a sooty mangabey monkey after cross-species transmission to a pig-tailed macaque.

    PubMed Central

    Courgnaud, V; Lauré, F; Fultz, P N; Montagnier, L; Bréchot, C; Sonigo, P

    1992-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequences of two related isolates of simian immunodeficiency virus from the sooty mangabey monkey (SIVsmm) that exhibit dramatic differences in virulence. These isolates are separated by one experimental cross-species transmission, from sooty mangabey to pig-tailed macaque. The parental virus (SIVsmm9), nonpathogenic in the original host (sooty mangabeys), causes a chronic AIDS-like disease in macaques. In contrast, the variant virus (SIVsmmPBj14) induces an acute lethal disease in various macaque species and is also pathogenic for sooty mangabeys. The combination of necessary and sufficient mutations that determined the acutely lethal phenotype on the SIVsmm9 genetic background is included within a maximal set of 57 point mutations, plus two insertions located in the long terminal repeat (22 bp spanning an NF-kappa B-like enhancer element) and in the surface envelope glycoprotein (5 amino acids). Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions in the genome of SIVsmm indicated that selective pressures, probably due to the host immune response, favored amino acid changes in the envelope. This immunoevolutionary mechanism could explain the increase in diversity and the apparition of new virulent phenotypes after cross-species transmission. PMID:1727495

  11. Assessment of reward responsiveness in the response bias probabilistic reward task in rats: implications for cross-species translational research

    PubMed Central

    Der-Avakian, A; D'Souza, M S; Pizzagalli, D A; Markou, A

    2013-01-01

    Mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder, are characterized by abnormal reward responsiveness. The Response Bias Probabilistic Reward Task (hereafter referred to as probabilistic reward task (PRT)) quantifies reward responsiveness in human subjects, and an equivalent animal assessment is needed to facilitate preclinical translational research. Thus, the goals of the present studies were to develop, validate and characterize a rat analog of the PRT. Adult male Wistar and Long–Evans rats were trained in operant testing chambers to discriminate between two tone stimuli that varied in duration (0.5 and 2 s). During a subsequent test session consisting of 100 trials, the two tones were made ambiguous (0.9 and 1.6 s) and correct identification of one tone was reinforced with a food pellet three times more frequently than the other tone. In subsequent experiments, Wistar rats were administered either a low dose of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist pramipexole (0.1 mg kg−1, subcutaneous) or the psychostimulant amphetamine (0.5 mg kg−1, intraperitoneal) before the test session. Similar to human subjects, both rat strains developed a response bias toward the more frequently reinforced stimulus, reflecting robust reward responsiveness. Mirroring prior findings in humans, a low dose of pramipexole blunted response bias. Moreover, in rats, amphetamine potentiated response bias. These results indicate that in rats, reward responsiveness can be quantified and bidirectionally modulated by pharmacological manipulations that alter striatal dopamine transmission. Thus, this new procedure in rats, which is conceptually and procedurally analogous to the one used in humans, provides a reverse translational platform to investigate abnormal reward responsiveness across species. PMID:23982629

  12. Validation of a rapid DNA process with the RapidHIT(®) ID system using GlobalFiler(®) Express chemistry, a platform optimized for decentralized testing environments.

    PubMed

    Salceda, Susana; Barican, Arnaldo; Buscaino, Jacklyn; Goldman, Bruce; Klevenberg, Jim; Kuhn, Melissa; Lehto, Dennis; Lin, Frank; Nguyen, Phong; Park, Charles; Pearson, Francesca; Pittaro, Rick; Salodkar, Sayali; Schueren, Robert; Smith, Corey; Troup, Charles; Tsou, Dean; Vangbo, Mattias; Wunderle, Justus; King, David

    2017-05-01

    The RapidHIT(®) ID is a fully automated sample-to-answer system for short tandem repeat (STR)-based human identification. The RapidHIT ID has been optimized for use in decentralized environments and processes presumed single source DNA samples, generating Combined DNA Index System (CODIS)-compatible DNA profiles in less than 90min. The system is easy to use, requiring less than one minute of hands-on time. Profiles are reviewed using centralized linking software, RapidLINK™ (IntegenX, Pleasanton, CA), a software tool designed to collate DNA profiles from single or multiple RapidHIT ID systems at different geographic locations. The RapidHIT ID has been designed to employ GlobalFiler(®) Express and AmpFLSTR(®) NGMSElect™, Thermo Fisher Scientific (Waltham, MA) STR chemistries. The Developmental Validation studies were performed using GlobalFiler(®) Express with single source reference samples according to Scientific Working Group for DNA Analysis Methods guidelines. These results show that multiple RapidHIT ID systems networked with RapidLINK software form a highly reliable system for wide-scale deployment in locations such as police booking stations and border crossings enabling real-time testing of arrestees, potential human trafficking victims, and other instances where rapid turnaround is essential.

  13. Ufasomes nano-vesicles-based lyophilized platforms for intranasal delivery of cinnarizine: preparation, optimization, ex-vivo histopathological safety assessment and mucosal confocal imaging.

    PubMed

    Salama, Alaa Hamed; Aburahma, Mona Hassan

    2016-09-01

    To circumvent the low and erratic absorption of orally administrated cinnarizine (CN), intranasal lyophilized gels containing unsaturated fatty acid liposomes (ufasomes) and encapsulating CN were prepared from oleic acid using a simple assembling strategy. The effects of varying drug concentration and cholesterol percentage on ufasomes size, polydispersity index and entrapment efficiency were investigated using 3(1)4(1) full factorial design. The optimized ufasomes that contained 14% cholesterol relative to oleic acid displayed spherical morphology with average size of 788 nm and entrapment efficiency of 80.49%. To overcome the colloidal instability of CN-loaded ufasomes dispersions and their short residence time in the nasal cavity, the ufasomes were incorporated into mucoadhesive hydrogels that were lyophilized into unit dosage forms for accurate dosing. Scanning electron micrographs of the lyophilized gel revealed that the included ufasomes were intact, non-aggregating and maintained their spherical morphology. Rheological characterization of reconstituted ufasomal lyophilized gel ensured ease of application. Furthermore, the gel induced minor histopathological alterations in sheeps' nasal mucosa. Ex-vivo confocal laser imaging confirmed the ability of ufasomes to penetrate deep through nasal mucosa layers. The results highlighted in the current work confirm the feasibility of using CN-loaded ufasomal gels for intranasal drug delivery.

  14. Patient-derived xenograft platform of OSCC: a renewable human bio-bank for preclinical cancer research and a new co-clinical model for treatment optimization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2016-03-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics have begun to reveal the complex genetic landscape in human cancer genomes, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Sophisticated preclinical models that fully represent intra- and inter-tumoral heterogeneity are required to understand the molecular diversity of cancer and achieve the goal of personalized therapies. Over the last decade, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models generated from human tumor samples that can retain the histological and genetic features of their donor tumors have been shown to be the preferred preclinical tool in translational cancer research compared with other conventional preclinical models. Specifically, genetically well-defined PDX models can be applied to accelerate targeted antitumor drug development and biomarker discovery. Recently, we have successfully established and characterized an OSCC PDX panel as part of our tumor bio-bank for translational cancer research. In this paper, we discuss the establishment, characterization, and preclinical applications of the PDX models. In particular, we focus on the classification and applications of the PDX models based on validated annotations, including clinicopathological features, genomic profiles, and pharmacological testing information. We also explore the translational value of this well-annotated PDX panel in the development of co-clinical trials for patient stratification and treatment optimization in the near future. Although various limitations still exist, this preclinical approach should be further tested and improved.

  15. Ortho2ExpressMatrix—a web server that interprets cross-species gene expression data by gene family information

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The study of gene families is pivotal for the understanding of gene evolution across different organisms and such phylogenetic background is often used to infer biochemical functions of genes. Modern high-throughput experiments offer the possibility to analyze the entire transcriptome of an organism; however, it is often difficult to deduct functional information from that data. Results To improve functional interpretation of gene expression we introduce Ortho2ExpressMatrix, a novel tool that integrates complex gene family information, computed from sequence similarity, with comparative gene expression profiles of two pre-selected biological objects: gene families are displayed with two-dimensional matrices. Parameters of the tool are object type (two organisms, two individuals, two tissues, etc.), type of computational gene family inference, experimental meta-data, microarray platform, gene annotation level and genome build. Family information in Ortho2ExpressMatrix bases on computationally different protein family approaches such as EnsemblCompara, InParanoid, SYSTERS and Ensembl Family. Currently, respective all-against-all associations are available for five species: human, mouse, worm, fruit fly and yeast. Additionally, microRNA expression can be examined with respect to miRBase or TargetScan families. The visualization, which is typical for Ortho2ExpressMatrix, is performed as matrix view that displays functional traits of genes (differential expression) as well as sequence similarity of protein family members (BLAST e-values) in colour codes. Such translations are intended to facilitate the user's perception of the research object. Conclusions Ortho2ExpressMatrix integrates gene family information with genome-wide expression data in order to enhance functional interpretation of high-throughput analyses on diseases, environmental factors, or genetic modification or compound treatment experiments. The tool explores differential gene expression in

  16. Age-Specific Gene Expression Signatures for Breast Tumors and Cross-Species Conserved Potential Cancer Progression Markers in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Dilek; Nofal, Asmaa; AlBakheet, AlBandary; Nirmal, Maimoona; Jeprel, Hatim; Eldali, Abdelmoneim; AL-Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Ajarim, Dahish; Malik, Osama Al; Kaya, Namik; Park, Ben H.; Bin Amer, Suad M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive with a poorer prognosis and overall survival compared to older women diagnosed with the disease. Despite recent research, the underlying biology and molecular alterations that drive the aggressive nature of breast tumors associated with breast cancer in young women have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we performed transcriptomic profile and network analyses of breast tumors arising in Middle Eastern women to identify age-specific gene signatures. Moreover, we studied molecular alterations associated with cancer progression in young women using cross-species comparative genomics approach coupled with copy number alterations (CNA) associated with breast cancers from independent studies. We identified 63 genes specific to tumors in young women that showed alterations distinct from two age cohorts of older women. The network analyses revealed potential critical regulatory roles for Myc, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and IL-1 in disease characteristics of breast tumors arising in young women. Cross-species comparative genomics analysis of progression from pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) revealed 16 genes with concomitant genomic alterations, CCNB2, UBE2C, TOP2A, CEP55, TPX2, BIRC5, KIAA0101, SHCBP1, UBE2T, PTTG1, NUSAP1, DEPDC1, HELLS, CCNB1, KIF4A, and RRM2, that may be involved in tumorigenesis and in the processes of invasion and progression of disease. Array findings were validated using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and extensive in silico analyses of independently performed microarray datasets. To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive genomic analysis of breast cancer in Middle Eastern women in age-specific cohorts and potential markers for cancer progression in young women. Our data demonstrate that cancer appearing in young women contain distinct biological characteristics and deregulated signaling pathways. Moreover, our integrative genomic and cross-species

  17. Age-specific gene expression signatures for breast tumors and cross-species conserved potential cancer progression markers in young women.

    PubMed

    Colak, Dilek; Nofal, Asmaa; Albakheet, Albandary; Nirmal, Maimoona; Jeprel, Hatim; Eldali, Abdelmoneim; Al-Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Ajarim, Dahish; Malik, Osama Al; Inan, Mehmet S; Kaya, Namik; Park, Ben H; Bin Amer, Suad M

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive with a poorer prognosis and overall survival compared to older women diagnosed with the disease. Despite recent research, the underlying biology and molecular alterations that drive the aggressive nature of breast tumors associated with breast cancer in young women have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we performed transcriptomic profile and network analyses of breast tumors arising in Middle Eastern women to identify age-specific gene signatures. Moreover, we studied molecular alterations associated with cancer progression in young women using cross-species comparative genomics approach coupled with copy number alterations (CNA) associated with breast cancers from independent studies. We identified 63 genes specific to tumors in young women that showed alterations distinct from two age cohorts of older women. The network analyses revealed potential critical regulatory roles for Myc, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and IL-1 in disease characteristics of breast tumors arising in young women. Cross-species comparative genomics analysis of progression from pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) revealed 16 genes with concomitant genomic alterations, CCNB2, UBE2C, TOP2A, CEP55, TPX2, BIRC5, KIAA0101, SHCBP1, UBE2T, PTTG1, NUSAP1, DEPDC1, HELLS, CCNB1, KIF4A, and RRM2, that may be involved in tumorigenesis and in the processes of invasion and progression of disease. Array findings were validated using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and extensive in silico analyses of independently performed microarray datasets. To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive genomic analysis of breast cancer in Middle Eastern women in age-specific cohorts and potential markers for cancer progression in young women. Our data demonstrate that cancer appearing in young women contain distinct biological characteristics and deregulated signaling pathways. Moreover, our integrative genomic and cross-species

  18. Detection of superficial zone protein in human and animal body fluids by cross-species monoclonal antibodies specific to superficial zone protein.

    PubMed

    Su, J L; Schumacher, B L; Lindley, K M; Soloveychik, V; Burkhart, W; Triantafillou, J A; Kuettner, K; Schmid, T

    2001-06-01

    In this report we describe the purification of human superficial zone protein (SZP), the generation of cross-species monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and the detection of this protein in human and animal body fluids. Human SZPs, used as immunizing antigens, were purified either from culture media of human cartilage organ cultures or from human synovial fluids. The immunizing antigens were mixed with RIBI adjuvant in one of three forms: nonmodified SZP, superficial zone protein-keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate (SZP-KLH), or a mixture of superficial zone protein and hyaluronic acid (SZP-HA). A panel of MAbs including GW4.23, S6.79, S13.52, S13.233, and S17.109 were generated and characterized. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) S6.79, an IgG2b with K(D) 3.14 x 10(-9) M from SZP-KLH immunization, is of particular interest. It reacts strongly to a large molecular weight form of SZP in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. It stains the most superficial layer of articular cartilage in immunohistochemistry, whereas the middle and deep zones of cartilage are not stained. When MAb S6.79 was applied to Western blots of human body fluids, a strong 345-kDa band was detected in samples of synovial fluid and weaker bands of similar size were detected in samples of plasma and serum. MAb S6.79 also showed cross-species immunoreactivity with SZP in samples of synovial fluids harvested from bovine, dog, guinea pig, and rabbit, as demonstrated by Western blotting and antibody absorption experiments. This cross-species MAb will be a useful tool in human and animal model studies for monitoring SZP levels and tissue distribution. It may help define the roles of SZP in normal articular joints and may be of diagnostic or prognostic value for the measurement of SZP in pathological conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis.

  19. ConBind: motif-aware cross-species alignment for the identification of functional transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, Stefan H; Schütte, Judith; Dijkstra, Maurits J J; Bawono, Punto; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold; Heringa, Jaap; Bonzanni, Nicola

    2016-05-05

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors (TFs) binding to promoter as well as distal enhancers. TFs recognize short, but specific binding sites (TFBSs) that are located within the promoter and enhancer regions. Functionally relevant TFBSs are often highly conserved during evolution leaving a strong phylogenetic signal. While multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a potent tool to detect the phylogenetic signal, the current MSA implementations are optimized to align the maximum number of identical nucleotides. This approach might result in the omission of conserved motifs that contain interchangeable nucleotides such as the ETS motif (IUPAC code: GGAW). Here, we introduce ConBind, a novel method to enhance alignment of short motifs, even if their mutual sequence similarity is only partial. ConBind improves the identification of conserved TFBSs by improving the alignment accuracy of TFBS families within orthologous DNA sequences. Functional validation of the Gfi1b + 13 enhancer reveals that ConBind identifies additional functionally important ETS binding sites that were missed by all other tested alignment tools. In addition to the analysis of known regulatory regions, our web tool is useful for the analysis of TFBSs on so far unknown DNA regions identified through ChIP-sequencing. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. ConBind: motif-aware cross-species alignment for the identification of functional transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Schütte, Judith; Dijkstra, Maurits J.J.; Bawono, Punto; Kinston, Sarah J.; Göttgens, Berthold; Heringa, Jaap; Bonzanni, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors (TFs) binding to promoter as well as distal enhancers. TFs recognize short, but specific binding sites (TFBSs) that are located within the promoter and enhancer regions. Functionally relevant TFBSs are often highly conserved during evolution leaving a strong phylogenetic signal. While multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a potent tool to detect the phylogenetic signal, the current MSA implementations are optimized to align the maximum number of identical nucleotides. This approach might result in the omission of conserved motifs that contain interchangeable nucleotides such as the ETS motif (IUPAC code: GGAW). Here, we introduce ConBind, a novel method to enhance alignment of short motifs, even if their mutual sequence similarity is only partial. ConBind improves the identification of conserved TFBSs by improving the alignment accuracy of TFBS families within orthologous DNA sequences. Functional validation of the Gfi1b + 13 enhancer reveals that ConBind identifies additional functionally important ETS binding sites that were missed by all other tested alignment tools. In addition to the analysis of known regulatory regions, our web tool is useful for the analysis of TFBSs on so far unknown DNA regions identified through ChIP-sequencing. PMID:26721389

  1. Development of nine new microsatellite loci for the American beaver, Castor canadensis (Rodentia: Castoridae), and cross-species amplification in the European beaver, Castor fiber.

    PubMed

    Pelz-Serrano, Karla; Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Piaggio, Antoinette J; Neubaum, Melissa; Munclinger, Pavel; Pártl, Adam; VAN Riper Iii, Charles; Culver, Melanie

    2009-03-01

    We developed nine new nuclear dinucleotide microsatellite loci for Castor canadensis. All loci were polymorphic, except for one. The number of alleles ranged from two to four and from five to 12 in populations from Arizona and Wisconsin, respectively. Average heterozygosity ranged from 0.13 to 0.86 per locus. Since cross-species amplification in Castor fiber was successful only in four loci, we tested also nine recently published C. canadensis loci in the Eurasian species. Eight of the published loci amplified; however, three were monomorphic. The number of alleles was lower in C. fiber than in C. canadensis at all loci tested. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Cross-Species, Amplifiable Microsatellite Markers for Neoverrucid Barnacles from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents Developed Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yuichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Khalturina, Mariia; Watanabe, Hiromi; Inagaki, Fumio; Satoh, Nori; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Barnacles of the genus Neoverruca are abundant near deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and are useful for understanding processes of population formation and maintenance of deep-sea vent faunas. Using next-generation sequencing, we isolated 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci from Neoverruca sp., collected in the Okinawa Trough. These microsatellite loci revealed 2–19 alleles per locus. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.286 to 1.000 and 0.349 to 0.935, respectively. Cross-species amplification showed that 9 of the 12 loci were successfully amplified for Neoverruca brachylepadoformis in the Mariana Trough. A pairwise FST value calculated using nine loci showed significant genetic differentiation between the two species. Consequently, the microsatellite markers we developed will be useful for further population genetic studies to elucidate genetic diversity, differentiation, classification, and evolutionary processes in the genus Neoverruca. PMID:25196437

  3. Assessment of cross-species transmission of hepatitis C virus-related non-primate hepacivirus in a population of humans at high risk of exposure.

    PubMed

    Pfaender, Stephanie; Walter, Stephanie; Todt, Daniel; Behrendt, Patrick; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Wölk, Benno; Engelmann, Michael; Gravemann, Ute; Seltsam, Axel; Steinmann, Joerg; Burbelo, Peter D; Klawonn, Frank; Feige, Karsten; Pietschmann, Thomas; Cavalleri, Jessika-M V; Steinmann, Eike

    2015-09-01

    The recent discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related viruses in different animal species has raised new speculations regarding the origin of HCV and the possibility of a zoonotic source responsible for the endemic HCV transmission. As a consequence, these new findings prompt questions regarding the potential for cross-species transmissions of hepaciviruses. The closest relatives to HCV discovered to date are the non-primate hepaciviruses (NPHVs), which have been described to infect horses. To evaluate the risk of a potential zoonotic transmission, we analysed NPHV RNA and antibodies in humans with occupational exposure to horses in comparison with a low-risk group. Both groups were negative for NPHV RNA, even though low seroreactivities against various NPHV antigens could be detected irrespective of the group. In conclusion, we did not observe evidence of NPHV transmission between horses and humans.

  4. Cross-species induction and enhancement of antimicrobial activity produced by epibiotic bacteria from marine algae and invertebrates, after exposure to terrestrial bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mearns-Spragg, A; Bregu, M; Boyd, K G; Burgess, J G

    1998-09-01

    Antibiotic producing marine bacteria isolated from surfaces of the marine alga Fucus vesiculosus and the nudibranch Archidoris pseudoargus were exposed to live cells of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and heat-killed cells of Staph. aureus. Twelve out of the 16 marine strains tested showed enhanced antimicrobial activity towards Staph. aureus, E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa following this exposure. Three out of seven strains tested showed enhanced antimicrobial activity when exposed to Ps. aeruginosa and three out of seven strains showed enhanced antimicrobial activity when exposed to E. coli. These results suggest that production of antimicrobial compounds by marine bacteria can be induced by the presence of terrestrial bacteria. This appears to be the first example of cross-species induction and enhancement of antimicrobial activity in marine bacteria and has important implications for the design of antibiotic screening assays and for an understanding of microbial competition in the environment.

  5. Cross-species, amplifiable microsatellite markers for neoverrucid barnacles from deep-sea hydrothermal vents developed using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Khalturina, Mariia; Watanabe, Hiromi; Inagaki, Fumio; Satoh, Nori; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2014-08-18

    Barnacles of the genus Neoverruca are abundant near deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and are useful for understanding processes of population formation and maintenance of deep-sea vent faunas. Using next-generation sequencing, we isolated 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci from Neoverruca sp., collected in the Okinawa Trough. These microsatellite loci revealed 2-19 alleles per locus. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.286 to 1.000 and 0.349 to 0.935, respectively. Cross-species amplification showed that 9 of the 12 loci were successfully amplified for Neoverruca brachylepadoformis in the Mariana Trough. A pairwise FST value calculated using nine loci showed significant genetic differentiation between the two species. Consequently, the microsatellite markers we developed will be useful for further population genetic studies to elucidate genetic diversity, differentiation, classification, and evolutionary processes in the genus Neoverruca.

  6. Rabbit hepatitis E virus is an opportunistic pathogen in specific-pathogen-free rabbits with the capability of cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyuan; Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Chen, Yiyang; Wang, Xinjie; Huang, Baicheng; Li, Huixia; Nan, Yuchen; Xiao, Shuqi; Zhang, Gaiping; Hiscox, Julian A; Zhou, En-Min; Zhao, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been detected in rabbits, a recently identified natural reservoir. In this study, anti-HEV antibodies and viral RNA were detected in rabbits sourced from a specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rabbit vendor in Shaanxi Province, China. BLAST results of partial HEV ORF2 genes cloned here indicated that two viral strains circulated in the rabbits. Sequence determination of the complete genome (7302bp) of one strain and a partial ORF1 gene (1537bp) of the other strain showed that they shared 90% identity with one another and 78%-94% identity with other known rabbit HEVs. In addition, inoculation with rabbit HEV from SPF rabbits studied here resulted in infection of SPF pigs; this cross-species transmission was evidenced by seroconversion, viremia and faecal virus shedding. These results suggest that to prevent spread of this zoonotic pathogen, rabbits should be tested routinely for HEV RNA in SPF vendor facilities.

  7. Assessment of cross-species transmission of hepatitis C virus-related non-primate hepacivirus in a population of humans at high risk of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfaender, Stephanie; Walter, Stephanie; Todt, Daniel; Behrendt, Patrick; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Wölk, Benno; Engelmann, Michael; Gravemann, Ute; Seltsam, Axel; Steinmann, Joerg; Burbelo, Peter D.; Klawonn, Frank; Feige, Karsten; Pietschmann, Thomas; Cavalleri, Jessika-M. V.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related viruses in different animal species has raised new speculations regarding the origin of HCV and the possibility of a zoonotic source responsible for the endemic HCV transmission. As a consequence, these new findings prompt questions regarding the potential for cross-species transmissions of hepaciviruses. The closest relatives to HCV discovered to date are the non-primate hepaciviruses (NPHVs), which have been described to infect horses. To evaluate the risk of a potential zoonotic transmission, we analysed NPHV RNA and antibodies in humans with occupational exposure to horses in comparison with a low-risk group. Both groups were negative for NPHV RNA, even though low seroreactivities against various NPHV antigens could be detected irrespective of the group. In conclusion, we did not observe evidence of NPHV transmission between horses and humans. PMID:26041875

  8. Microsatellite DNA primers for the candy darter, Etheostoma osburni and variegate darter, Etheostoma variatum, and cross-species amplification in other darters (Percidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, J.F.; Welsh, S.A.; King, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate a potential hybrid zone between the candy darter, Etheostoma osburni, and variegate darter, Etheostoma variatum, and examine population variation within E. osburni, a suite of primers for 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed. The average number of alleles per locus was 5.5 in E. osburni and 7.6 in E. variatum, and the average observed heterozygosities were 62.5% and 71.4%, respectively. There were no deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no observed linkage disequilibrium after Bonferroni correction. The utility of these primers was also tested in 11 species of darters representing all four genera of darters. Success of cross-species amplification was largely consistent with phylogenetic relationships of darters. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  9. Insights into gene expression changes impacting B-cell transformation: cross-species microarray analysis of bovine leukemia virus tax-responsive genes in ovine B cells.

    PubMed

    Klener, Pavel; Szynal, Maud; Cleuter, Yvette; Merimi, Makram; Duvillier, Hugues; Lallemand, Françoise; Bagnis, Claude; Griebel, Philip; Sotiriou, Christos; Burny, Arsène; Martiat, Philippe; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2006-02-01

    Large-animal models for leukemia have the potential to aid in the understanding of networks that contribute to oncogenesis. Infection of cattle and sheep with bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a complex retrovirus related to human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is associated with the development of B-cell leukemia. Whereas the natural disease in cattle is characterized by a low tumor incidence, experimental infection of sheep leads to overt leukemia in the majority of infected animals, providing a model for studying the pathogenesis associated with BLV and HTLV-1. Tax(BLV), the major oncoprotein, initiates a cascade of events leading toward malignancy, although the basis of transformation is not fully understood. We have taken a cross-species ovine-to-human microarray approach to identify Tax(BLV)-responsive transcriptional changes in two sets of cultured ovine B cells following retroviral vector-mediated delivery of Tax(BLV). Using cDNA-spotted microarrays comprising 10,336 human genes/expressed sequence tags, we identified a cohort of differentially expressed genes, including genes related to apoptosis, DNA transcription, and repair; proto-oncogenes; cell cycle regulators; transcription factors; small Rho GTPases/GTPase-binding proteins; and previously reported Tax(HTLV-1)-responsive genes. Interestingly, genes known to be associated with human neoplasia, especially B-cell malignancies, were extensively represented. Others were novel or unexpected. The results suggest that Tax(BLV) deregulates a broad network of interrelated pathways rather than a single B-lineage-specific regulatory process. Although cross-species approaches do not permit a comprehensive analysis of gene expression patterns, they can provide initial clues for the functional roles of genes that participate in B-cell transformation and pinpoint molecular targets not identified using other methods in animal models.

  10. Genetic diversity and differentiation in reef-building Millepora species, as revealed by cross-species amplification of fifteen novel microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Caroline E; Planes, Serge; Zhou, Yuxiang; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Boissin, Emilie

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the genetic diversity in natural populations is crucial to address ecological and evolutionary questions. Despite recent advances in whole-genome sequencing, microsatellite markers have remained one of the most powerful tools for a myriad of population genetic approaches. Here, we used the 454 sequencing technique to develop microsatellite loci in the fire coral Millepora platyphylla, an important reef-builder of Indo-Pacific reefs. We tested the cross-species amplification of these loci in five other species of the genus Millepora and analysed its success in correlation with the genetic distances between species using mitochondrial 16S sequences. We succeeded in discovering fifteen microsatellite loci in our target species M. platyphylla, among which twelve were polymorphic with 2-13 alleles and a mean observed heterozygosity of 0.411. Cross-species amplification in the five other Millepora species revealed a high probability of amplification success (71%) and polymorphism (59%) of the loci. Our results show no evidence of decreased heterozygosity with increasing genetic distance. However, only one locus enabled measures of genetic diversity in the Caribbean species M. complanata due to high proportions of null alleles for most of the microsatellites. This result indicates that our novel markers may only be useful for the Indo-Pacific species of Millepora. Measures of genetic diversity revealed significant linkage disequilibrium, moderate levels of observed heterozygosity (0.323-0.496) and heterozygote deficiencies for the Indo-Pacific species. The accessibility to new polymorphic microsatellite markers for hydrozoan Millepora species creates new opportunities for future research on processes driving the complexity of their colonisation success on many Indo-Pacific reefs.

  11. INVESTIGATING THE IMPORTANCE OF ANATOMICAL HOMOLOGY FOR CROSS-SPECIES PHENOTYPE COMPARISONS USING SEMANTIC SIMILARITY. Accepted at Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing, 2016.

    PubMed

    Manda, Prashanti; Mungall, Christopher J; Balhoff, James P; Lapp, Hilmar; Vision, Todd J

    2016-01-01

    There is growing use of ontologies for the measurement of cross-species phenotype similarity. Such similarity measurements contribute to diverse applications, such as identifying genetic models for human diseases, transferring knowledge among model organisms, and studying the genetic basis of evolutionary innovations. Two organismal features, whether genes, anatomical parts, or any other inherited feature, are considered to be homologous when they are evolutionarily derived from a single feature in a common ancestor. A classic example is the homology between the paired fins of fishes and vertebrate limbs. Anatomical ontologies that model the structural relations among parts may fail to include some known anatomical homologies unless they are deliberately added as separate axioms. The consequences of neglecting known homologies for applications that rely on such ontologies has not been well studied. Here, we examine how semantic similarity is affected when external homology knowledge is included. We measure phenotypic similarity between orthologous and non-orthologous gene pairs between humans and either mouse or zebrafish, and compare the inclusion of real with faux homology axioms. Semantic similarity was preferentially increased for orthologs when using real homology axioms, but only in the more divergent of the two species comparisons (human to zebrafish, not human to mouse), and the relative increase was less than 1% to non-orthologs. By contrast, inclusion of both real and faux random homology axioms preferentially increased similarities between genes that were initially more dissimilar in the other comparisons. Biologically meaningful increases in semantic similarity were seen for a select subset of gene pairs. Overall, the effect of including homology axioms on cross-species semantic similarity was modest at the levels of divergence examined here, but our results hint that it may be greater for more distant species comparisons.

  12. Multi-linear regression analysis, preliminary biotic ligand modeling, and cross species comparison of the effects of water chemistry on chronic lead toxicity in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Esbaugh, A J; Brix, K V; Mager, E M; De Schamphelaere, K; Grosell, M

    2012-03-01

    The current study examined the chronic toxicity of lead (Pb) to three invertebrate species: the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, the snail Lymnaea stagnalis and the rotifer Philodina rapida. The test media consisted of natural waters from across North America, varying in pertinent water chemistry parameters including dissolved organic carbon (DOC), calcium, pH and total CO(2). Chronic toxicity was assessed using reproductive endpoints for C. dubia and P. rapida while growth was assessed for L. stagnalis, with chronic toxicity varying markedly according to water chemistry. A multi-linear regression (MLR) approach was used to identify the relative importance of individual water chemistry components in predicting chronic Pb toxicity for each species. DOC was an integral component of MLR models for C. dubia and L. stagnalis, but surprisingly had no predictive impact on chronic Pb toxicity for P. rapida. Furthermore, sodium and total CO(2) were also identified as important factors affecting C. dubia toxicity; no other factors were predictive for L. stagnalis. The Pb toxicity of P. rapida was predicted by calcium and pH. The predictive power of the C. dubia and L. stagnalis MLR models was generally similar to that of the current C. dubia BLM, with R(2) values of 0.55 and 0.82 for the respective MLR models, compared to 0.45 and 0.79 for the respective BLMs. In contrast the BLM poorly predicted P. rapida toxicity (R(2)=0.19), as compared to the MLR (R(2)=0.92). The cross species variability in the effects of water chemistry, especially with respect to rotifers, suggests that cross species modeling of invertebrate chronic Pb toxicity using a C. dubia model may not always be appropriate.

  13. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers from tropical forage Stylosanthes species and analysis of genetic variability and cross-species transferability.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amaresh; Tiwari, K K; Nagaich, D; Dubey, N; Kumar, S; Roy, A K

    2011-12-01

    A limited number of functional molecular markers has slowed the desired genetic improvement of Stylosanthes species. Hence, in an attempt to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, genomic libraries from Stylosanthes seabrana B.L. Maass & 't Mannetje (2n=2x=20) using 5' anchored degenerate microsatellite primers were constructed. Of the 76 new microsatellites, 21 functional primer pairs were designed. Because of the small number of primer pairs designed, 428 expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from seven Stylosanthes species were also examined for SSR detection. Approximately 10% of sequences delivered functional primer pairs, and after redundancy elimination, 57 microsatellite repeats were selected. Tetranucleotides followed by trinucleotides were the major repeated sequences in Stylosanthes ESTs. In total, a robust set of 21 genomic-SSR (gSSR) and 20 EST-SSR (eSSR) markers were developed. These markers were analyzed for intraspecific diversity within 20 S. seabrana accessions and for their cross-species transferability. Mean expected (He) and observed (Ho) heterozygosity values with gSSR markers were 0.64 and 0.372, respectively, whereas with eSSR markers these were 0.297 and 0.214, respectively. Dendrograms having moderate bootstrap value (23%-94%) were able to distinguish all accessions of S. seabrana with gSSR markers, whereas eSSR markers showed 100% similarities between few accessions. The set of 21 gSSRs, from S. seabrana, and 20 eSSRs, from selected Stylosanthes species, with their high cross-species transferability (45% with gSSRs, 86% with eSSRs) will facilitate genetic improvement of Stylosanthes species globally.

  14. Genetic diversity and differentiation in reef-building Millepora species, as revealed by cross-species amplification of fifteen novel microsatellite loci

    PubMed Central

    Planes, Serge; Zhou, Yuxiang; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Boissin, Emilie

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the genetic diversity in natural populations is crucial to address ecological and evolutionary questions. Despite recent advances in whole-genome sequencing, microsatellite markers have remained one of the most powerful tools for a myriad of population genetic approaches. Here, we used the 454 sequencing technique to develop microsatellite loci in the fire coral Millepora platyphylla, an important reef-builder of Indo-Pacific reefs. We tested the cross-species amplification of these loci in five other species of the genus Millepora and analysed its success in correlation with the genetic distances between species using mitochondrial 16S sequences. We succeeded in discovering fifteen microsatellite loci in our target species M. platyphylla, among which twelve were polymorphic with 2–13 alleles and a mean observed heterozygosity of 0.411. Cross-species amplification in the five other Millepora species revealed a high probability of amplification success (71%) and polymorphism (59%) of the loci. Our results show no evidence of decreased heterozygosity with increasing genetic distance. However, only one locus enabled measures of genetic diversity in the Caribbean species M. complanata due to high proportions of null alleles for most of the microsatellites. This result indicates that our novel markers may only be useful for the Indo-Pacific species of Millepora. Measures of genetic diversity revealed significant linkage disequilibrium, moderate levels of observed heterozygosity (0.323–0.496) and heterozygote deficiencies for the Indo-Pacific species. The accessibility to new polymorphic microsatellite markers for hydrozoan Millepora species creates new opportunities for future research on processes driving the complexity of their colonisation success on many Indo-Pacific reefs. PMID:28243525

  15. A surprising cross-species conservation in the genomic landscape of mouse and human oral cancer identifies a transcriptional signature predicting metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Michael D.; Winkler, Ashley E.; Kanchi, Krishna-Latha; Chalivendra, Varun; Law, Jonathan H.; Rickert, Charles G.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Judd, Nancy P.; Dunn, Gavin P.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Lewis, James S.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Uppaluri, Ravindra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Improved understanding of the molecular basis underlying oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) aggressive growth has significant clinical implications. Herein, cross-species genomic comparison of carcinogen-induced murine and human OSCCs with indolent or metastatic growth yielded results with surprising translational relevance. Experimental Design Murine OSCC cell lines were subjected to next-generation sequencing (NGS) to define their mutational landscape, to define novel candidate cancer genes and to assess for parallels with known drivers in human OSCC. Expression arrays identified a mouse metastasis signature and we assessed its representation in 4 independent human datasets comprising 324 patients using weighted voting and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to stratify outcomes. A qRT-PCR assay based on the mouse signature coupled to a machine-learning algorithm was developed and used to stratify an independent set of 31 patients with respect to metastatic lymphadenopathy. Results NGS revealed conservation of human driver pathway mutations in mouse OSCC including in Trp53, MAPK, PI3K, NOTCH, JAK/STAT and FAT1–4. Moreover, comparative analysis between The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and mouse samples defined AKAP9, MED12L and MYH6 as novel putative cancer genes. Expression analysis identified a transcriptional signature predicting aggressiveness and clinical outcomes, which were validated in 4 independent human OSCC datasets. Finally, we harnessed the translational potential of this signature by creating a clinically feasible assay that stratified OSCC patients with a 93.5% accuracy. Conclusions These data demonstrate surprising cross-species genomic conservation that has translational relevance for human oral squamous cell cancer. PMID:24668645

  16. A hybrid CFD-PBPK model for naphthalene in rat and human with IVIVE for nasal tissue metabolism and cross-species dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jerry L; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J

    2014-05-01

    A PBPK model for naphthalene in the rat and human that incorporates a hybrid CFD-PBPK description of the upper respiratory tract was developed to support cross-species dosimetry comparisons of naphthalene concentrations and tissue normalized rate of metabolism in the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium, lung and liver. In vitro measurements of metabolic rates from microsomal incubations published for rat and monkey (surrogate for human) were scaled to the specific tissue based on the tissue microsomal content and volume of tissue. The model reproduces time courses for naphthalene blood concentrations from intravenous and inhalation exposures in rats and upper respiratory tract extraction data in both naïve rats and rats pre-treated to inhibit nasal metabolism. This naphthalene model was applied to estimate human equivalent inhalation concentrations (HECs) corresponding to several NOAELs or LOAELs for the non-cancer effects of naphthalene in rats. Two approaches for cross-species extrapolation were compared: (1) equivalence based on tissue naphthalene concentration and (2) equivalence based on amount metabolized per minute (normalized to tissue volume). At the NOAEL of 0.1 ppm, the regional gas dosimetry ratio (RGDR) based on naphthalene concentration was 0.18 for the dorsal olfactory region; however, the RGDR rises to 5.4 when based on the normalized amount metabolized due to the lower of expression of CYP isozymes in the nasal epithelium of primates and humans. The resulting HEC is 0.12 ppm (0.63 mg/m(3)) continuous exposure at the rat NOAEL of 0.1 ppm (6 h/day, 5 days/week).

  17. Stabilized floating platforms

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, David G.

    1976-01-01

    The subject invention is directed to a floating platform for supporting nuclear reactors and the like at selected offshore sites. The platform is provided with a stabilizer mechanism which significantly reduces the effects of wave action upon the platform and which comprises a pair of relatively small floats attached by rigid booms to the platform at locations spaced therefrom for reducing wave pitch, acceleration, and the resonance period of the wave.

  18. The Hibernia platform

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, G.C.; Johnson, R.C.; Luther, D.C.; Woodhead, H.R.; Abel, W.

    1994-12-31

    The Hibernia offshore oil platform is the first major platform for the development of hydrocarbon reserves on the Grand Banks off the East Coast of Canada. The platform, a concrete gravity base structure supporting 60,000 tons of topsides, will be in 80 m of water and is designed to resist iceberg collisions. The paper describes the platform, environment and iceberg loads, geotechnical considerations and the structural analysis being performed. The platform is current under construction (Winter 1993) and will be completed in 1996.

  19. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-29

    A heavy load transport truck has arrived at the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the F-level work platforms for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. Delivery of this platform brings the total to 10 platforms, or half of the work platforms delivered to Kennedy,

  20. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-29

    A heavy load transport truck proceeds along the road toward the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the F-level work platforms for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. Delivery of this platform brings the total to 10 platforms, or half of the work platforms delivered to Kennedy.

  1. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-29

    A heavy load transport truck proceeds along the road to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the F-level work platforms for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. Delivery of this platform brings the total to 10 platforms, or half of the work platforms delivered to Kennedy.

  2. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-29

    With its image reflected in the water, a heavy load transport truck proceeds along the road to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the F-level work platforms for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. Delivery of this platform brings the total to 10 platforms, or half of the work platforms delivered to Kennedy,

  3. Platform E South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-26

    A heavy-lift crane lowers the first half of the E-level work platforms, E south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into position for installation in High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Large Tandemloc bars have been attached to the platform to keep it level during lifting and installation. In view are five levels of platforms previously installed. The E platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3, about 246 feet above the floor. The E platforms are the sixth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  4. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-29

    A heavy load transport truck passes through the north entrance gate at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the F-level work platforms for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The platform will be delivered to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. Delivery of this platform brings the total to 10 platforms, or half of the work platforms delivered to Kennedy.

  5. Platform A North Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    Workers prepare to unload the second half of the A-level work platforms, A north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, from a heavy load transport truck near the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is the final platform delivered to Kennedy. The platform will be offloaded in a staging area near the VAB. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the VAB. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  6. Platform A North Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    A heavy load transport truck from Tillett Heavy Hauling in Titusville, Florida, arrives at the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the A-level work platforms, A north, for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. This is the final platform delivered to Kennedy. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  7. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-29

    A heavy load transport truck arrives at the north entrance gate at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the F-level work platforms for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The platform will be delivered to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. Delivery of this platform brings the total to 10 platforms, or half of the work platforms delivered to Kennedy.

  8. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-29

    A heavy load transport truck arrives at the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the F-level work platforms for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. Delivery of this platform brings the total to 10 platforms, or half of the work platforms delivered to Kennedy.

  9. Platform A North Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    Blue sky and fluffy clouds serve as the backdrop for the arrival of the second half of the A-level work platforms, A north, for the NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket near the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Workers prepare to offload the platform from a heavy load transport truck from Tillett Heavy Hauling in Titusville, Florida, to a staging area near the VAB. This is the final platform delivered to Kennedy. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  10. Platform A North Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    Workers fold an American flag that was on the back of a heavy load transport truck from Tillett Heavy Hauling in Titusville, Florida. The truck arrived at the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the A-level work platforms, A north, for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. This is the final platform delivered to Kennedy. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  11. Platform A North Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    A heavy load transport truck from Tillett Heavy Hauling in Titusville, Florida, arrives in a staging area near the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the A-level work platforms, A north, for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. This is the final platform delivered to Kennedy. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  12. Platform C North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the second half of the C-level work platforms, C north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up from the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The C platform will be moved into High Bay 3 for installation on the north side of High Bay 3. The C platforms are the eighth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. In view below Platform C are several of the previously installed platforms. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  13. Platform A North Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    The American flag is in view on the back of a heavy load transport truck from Tillett Heavy Hauling in Titusville, Florida, as it arrives at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The truck is carrying the second half of the A-level work platforms, A north, for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. This is the final platform delivered to Kennedy. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  14. Platform A North Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    A heavy load transport truck from Tillett Heavy Hauling in Titusville, Florida, arrives at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the second half of the A-level work platforms, A north, for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. This is the final platform delivered to Kennedy. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  15. Diversity of the G3 genes of human rotaviruses in isolates from Spain from 2004 to 2006: cross-species transmission and inter-genotype recombination generates alleles.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Román, Angela; Rodriguez, Miriam; Cervera, Isabel; Head, Jacqueline; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Picazo, Juan J

    2009-04-01

    Rotavirus evolves by using multiple genetic mechanisms which are an accumulation of spontaneous point mutations and reassortment events. Other mechanisms, such as cross-species transmission and inter-genotype recombination, may be also involved. One of the most interesting genotypes in the accumulation of these events is the G3 genotype. In this work, six new Spanish G3 sequences belonging to 0-2-year-old patients from Madrid were analysed and compared with 160 others of the same genotype obtained from humans and other host species to establish the evolutionary pathways of the G3 genotype. The following results were obtained: (i) there are four different lineages of the G3 genotype which have evolved in different species; (ii) Spanish G3 rotavirus sequences are most similar to the described sequences that belong to lineage I; (iii) several G3 genotype alleles were reassigned as other G genotypes; and (iv) inter-genotype recombination events in G3 viruses involving G1 and G2 were described. These findings strongly suggest multiple inter-species transmission events between different non-human mammalian species and humans.

  16. Simian foamy virus in non-human primates and cross-species transmission to humans in Gabon: an emerging zoonotic disease in central Africa?

    PubMed

    Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2013-06-19

    It is now known that all human retroviruses have a non-human primate counterpart. It has been reported that the presence of these retroviruses in humans is the result of interspecies transmission. Several authors have described the passage of a simian retrovirus, simian foamy virus (SFV), from primates to humans. To better understand this retroviral "zoonosis" in natural settings, we evaluated the presence of SFV in both captive and wild non-human primates and in humans at high risk, such as hunters and people bitten by a non-human primate, in Gabon, central Africa. A high prevalence of SFV was found in blood samples from non-human primates and in bush meat collected across the country. Mandrills were found to be highly infected with two distinct strains of SFV, depending on their geographical location. Furthermore, samples collected from hunters and non-human primate laboratory workers showed clear, extensive cross-species transmission of SFV. People who had been bitten by mandrills, gorillas and chimpanzees had persistent SFV infection with low genetic drift. Thus, SFV is presumed to be transmitted from non-human primates mainly through severe bites, involving contact between infected saliva and blood. In this review, we summarize and discuss our five-year observations on the prevalence and dissemination of SFV in humans and non-human primates in Gabon.

  17. Development and cross-species transferability of unigene-derived microsatellite markers in an edible oil woody plant, Camellia oleifera (Theaceae).

    PubMed

    Jia, B G; Lin, Q; Feng, Y Z; Hu, X Y; Tan, X F; Shao, F G; Zhang, L

    2015-06-18

    Camellia oleifera is an important edible oil woody plant in China. Lack of useful molecular markers hinders current genetic research on this tree species. Transcriptome sequencing of developing C. oleifera seeds generated 69,798 unigenes. A total of 6949 putative microsatellites were discovered among 6042 SSR-containing unigenes. Then, 150 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were evaluated in 20 varieties of C. oleifera. Of these, 52 SSRs revealed polymorphism, with the number of alleles per locus ranging from 2 to 15 and expected heterozygosity values from 0.269 to 0.888. The polymorphic information content varied from 0.32 to 0.897. Cross-species transferability rates in Camellia chekangoleosa and Camellia japonica were 90.4 and 78.8%, respectively. The 52 polymorphic unigene-derived SSR markers serve to enrich existing microsatellite marker resources for C. oleifera and offer potential for applications in genetic diversity evaluation, molecular fingerprinting, and genetic mapping in C. oleifera, C. chekangoleosa, and C. japonica.

  18. Efficient identification of proteins from ovaries and hepatopancreas of the unsequenced edible crab, Cancer pagurus, by mass spectrometry and homology-based, cross-species searching.

    PubMed

    Ward, Deborah A; Sefton, Elaine M; Prescott, Mark C; Webster, Simon G; Wainwright, Geoff; Rees, Huw H; Fisher, Michael J

    2010-11-10

    Proteome maps of hepatopancreas (midgut gland) and ovarian tissues of the crustacean, Cancer pagurus (Decapoda; edible crab) have been produced by 2D-PAGE and identification of proteins, following trypsin proteolysis, by electrospray MS/MS and database searching. Owing to the lack of sequence information on proteins and fully sequenced genomes amongst the decapod crustaceans and given the evolutionary distance to the nearest full genome database (Daphnia), it was necessary to adopt a non-conventional identification approach. Thus, a strategy was developed for effective identification of decapod proteins by sequence similarity, homology-based cross-species database searching, using various algorithms and a combination of NCBI Crustacea and Arthropoda databases, together with the Arthropoda PartiGene database (Blaxter, University of Edinburgh). In both hepatopancreas and ovary tissues, the largest group of proteins identified were a variety of enzymes, followed by a smaller number of storage/transport proteins [including vitellogenin (yolk protein), several subunits of hemocyanin, cryptocyanin, ferritin and calreticulin], with fewer structural proteins (actin, tubulin) and heat-shock proteins, in addition to a number of proteins of miscellaneous functions. Such protein identifications allow the development of tools, such as antibodies and RNA/DNA probes, to investigate the functions of the proteins in specific tissues during development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of Putative Ortholog Gene Blocks Involved in Gestant and Lactating Mammary Gland Development: A Rodent Cross-Species Microarray Transcriptomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.; Hernández-Stengele, Gabriel; Sánchez, Raúl; Salazar, Emmanuel; Sanchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio; Ramírez-Salcedo, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland (MG) undergoes functional and metabolic changes during the transition from pregnancy to lactation, possibly by regulation of conserved genes. The objective was to elucidate orthologous genes, chromosome clusters and putative conserved transcriptional modules during MG development. We analyzed expression of 22,000 transcripts using murine microarrays and RNA samples of MG from virgin, pregnant, and lactating rats by cross-species hybridization. We identified 521 transcripts differentially expressed; upregulated in early (78%) and midpregnancy (89%) and early lactation (64%), but downregulated in mid-lactation (61%). Putative orthologous genes were identified. We mapped the altered genes to orthologous chromosomal locations in human and mouse. Eighteen sets of conserved genes associated with key cellular functions were revealed and conserved transcription factor binding site search entailed possible coregulation among all eight block sets of genes. This study demonstrates that the use of heterologous array hybridization for screening of orthologous gene expression from rat revealed sets of conserved genes arranged in chromosomal order implicated in signaling pathways and functional ontology. Results demonstrate the utilization power of comparative genomics and prove the feasibility of using rodent microarrays to identification of putative coexpressed orthologous genes involved in the control of human mammary gland development. PMID:24288657

  20. Increased prevalence of carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae in hospital setting due to cross-species transmission of the bla NDM-1 element and clonal spread of progenitor resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Chen, Gongxiang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Liangping; Cai, Jiachang; Chan, Edward W; Chen, Sheng; Zhang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the transmission characteristics of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) strains collected from a hospital setting in China, in which consistent emergence of CRE strains were observable during the period of May 2013 to February 2014. Among the 45 CRE isolates tested, 21 (47%) strains were found to harbor the bla NDM-1 element, and the rest of 24 CRE strains were all positive for bla KPC-2. The 21 bla NDM-1-borne strains were found to comprise multiple Enterobacteriaceae species including nine Enterobacter cloacae, three Escherichia coli, three Citrobacter freundii, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, two Klebsiella oxytoca, and two Morganella morganii strains, indicating that cross-species transmission of bla NDM-1 is a common event. Genetic analyses by PFGE and MLST showed that, with the exception of E. coli and E. cloacae, strains belonging to the same species were often genetically unrelated. In addition to bla NDM-1, several CRE strains were also found to harbor the bla KPC-2, bla VIM-1, and bla IMP-4 elements. Conjugations experiments confirmed that the majority of carbapenem resistance determinants were transferable. Taken together, our findings suggest that transmission of mobile resistance elements among members of Enterobacteriaceae and clonal spread of CRE strains may contribute synergistically to a rapid increase in the population of CRE in clinical settings, prompting a need to implement more rigorous infection control measures to arrest such vicious transmission cycle in CRE-prevalent areas.

  1. The Challenge of Cancer Genomics in Rare Nervous System Neoplasms: Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors as a Paradigm for Cross-Species Comparative Oncogenomics.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Steven L

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive genomic analyses of common nervous system cancers provide new insights into their pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. Although analogous studies of rare nervous system tumors are needed, there are major barriers to performing such studies. Cross-species comparative oncogenomics, identifying driver mutations in mouse cancer models and validating them in human tumors, is a promising alternative. Although still in its infancy, this approach is being applied to malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), rare Schwann cell-derived malignancies that occur sporadically, after radiotherapy, and in neurofibromatosis type 1. Studies of human neurofibromatosis type 1-associated tumors suggest that NF1 tumor suppressor loss in Schwann cells triggers cell-autonomous and intercellular changes, resulting in development of benign neurofibromas; subsequent neurofibroma-MPNST progression is caused by aberrant growth factor signaling and mutations affecting the p16(INK4A)-cyclin D1-CDK4-Rb and p19(ARF)-Mdm2-p53 cell cycle pathways. Mice with Nf1, Trp53, and/or Cdkn2a mutations that overexpress the Schwann cell mitogen neuregulin-1 or overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor validate observations in human tumors and, to various degrees, model human tumorigenesis. Genomic analyses of MPNSTs arising in neuregulin-1 and epidermal growth factor receptor-overexpressing mice and forward genetic screens with Sleeping Beauty transposons implicate additional signaling cascades in MPNST pathogenesis. These studies confirm the utility of mouse models for MPNST driver gene discovery and provide new insights into the complexity of MPNST pathogenesis.

  2. Development of the first polymorphic microsatellite markers for the Roman snail Helix pomatia L., 1758 (Helicidae) and cross-species amplification within the genus Helix.

    PubMed

    Krapal, A M; Popa, O P; Iorgu, E I; Cojocaru, L B; Popa, A F; Popa, L O

    2016-09-19

    The terrestrial snail Helix pomatia (Gastropoda: Stylommatophora: Helicidae) is one of the largest gastropod species in Europe. This species is strictly protected in some European Union countries; however, at the same time, it is also farmed and commercialized for human consumption. Here, we describe 11 microsatellite markers that are very useful in population genetic studies for assessing the status of both wild and farmed populations of this species of community interest. The microsatellites were isolated using 454 pyrosequencing technologies and 11 primer pairs were selected and used for genotyping an H. pomatia population and also checked for cross-species amplification on H. lucorum and H. lutescens specimens. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 13 and observed heterozygosity was between 0.458 and 0.917. Seven of these loci were polymorphic in H. lucorum, and four in H. lutescens. This set of nuclear markers provides a powerful tool for population genetic studies of this species of community interest, and also for closely related species. The described microsatellite markers should also facilitate the identification of populations of conservation concern.

  3. Eimeria tenella and E. acervulina: differences in ability to elicit cross-species protection as compared with the turkey coccidium, E. adenoeides.

    PubMed

    Augustine, P C; Danforth, H D

    1995-01-01

    Repeated oral inoculation of turkey poults with large doses (1 x 10(6) oocysts) of the chicken coccidia, Eimeria tenella or E. acervulina, failed to prevent weight loss, poor feed conversion, and intestinal pathology in turkeys challenged with the turkey coccidium, E. adenoeides. Invasion by E. tenella in turkeys was significantly greater than invasion by E. adenoeides in chickens; by 24 hr postinoculation (PI), the numbers of E. tenella and E. adenoeides sporozoites in the ceca had decreased markedly as compared with the numbers that initially invaded, and they did not differ significantly from each other. At 24 hr PI, however, transfer of cecal scrapings from chickens or turkeys inoculated with E. adenoeides produced infection in 53% of the recipient turkeys, but transfer of scrapings from either chickens or turkeys inoculated with E. tenella failed to produce infection in 20 attempts with recipient chickens. Cultured chicken peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) that were inoculated with E. adenoeides sporozoites contained numerous vesicles that were recognized by the refractile body-specific monoclonal antibody 1209; the number of vesicles was markedly decreased in PBM cultures inoculated with gamma-irradiated E. adenoeides sporozoites. Very few vesicles were detected in the cytoplasm of turkey PBMs that contained E. tenella sporozoites, and none were detected in turkey PBMs containing E. adenoeides sporozoites. The survival of infective sporozoites, along with the secretion of refractile body antigen, may be more critical to the development of cross-species immunity than the number of sporozoites that initially invade the foreign host.

  4. Development of novel microsatellite markers for Holothurian scabra (Holothuriidae), Apostichopus japonicas (Stichopodidae) and cross-species testing in other sea cucumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Jingbo; Li, Zhongbao

    2017-06-01

    Thirty-five new microsatellite loci from the sea cucumbers Holothurian scabra (Jaeger, 1833) and Apostichopus japonicas (Selenka, 1867) were screened and characterized using the method of magnetic bead enrichment. Of the twenty-four polymorphic loci tested, eighteen were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after a modified false discovery rate (B-Y FDR) correction, whereas six showed statistically significant deviations (CHS2 and CHS11: P <0.014790; FCS1, FCS6, FCS8 and FCS14: P <0.015377). Furthermore, four species of plesiomorphous and related sea cucumbers (Holothurian scabra, Holothuria leucospilota, Stichopus horrens and Apostichopus japonicas) were tested for mutual cross-amplification using a total of ninety microsatellite loci. Although transferability and universality of all loci were generally low, the results of the cross-species study showed that the markers can be applied to identify individuals to species according to the presence or absence of specific microsatellite alleles. The microsatellite markers reported here will contribute to the study of genetic diversity, assisted breeding, and population conservation in sea cucumbers, as well as allow for the identification of individuals to closely related species.

  5. Floor Plans Engine Removal Platform, Hold Down Arm Platform, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans - Engine Removal Platform, Hold Down Arm Platform, Hydraulic Equipment Platforms, Isometric Cutaway of Engine Removal Platform, Isometric Cutaway of Hold Down Arm Platform, Isometric Cutaway of Hydraulic Platforms and Engine Support System Access - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V S-IC Static Test Facility, West Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  6. High-Performance Reaction Wheel Optimization for Fine-Pointing Space Platforms: Minimizing Induced Vibration Effects on Jitter Performance plus Lessons Learned from Hubble Space Telescope for Current and Future Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasha, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) applies large-diameter optics (2.5-m primary mirror) for diffraction-limited resolution spanning an extended wavelength range (approx. 100-2500 nm). Its Pointing Control System (PCS) Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWAs), in the Support Systems Module (SSM), acquired an unprecedented set of high-sensitivity Induced Vibration (IV) data for 5 flight-certified RWAs: dwelling at set rotation rates. Focused on 4 key ratios, force and moment harmonic values (in 3 local principal directions) are extracted in the RWA operating range (0-3000 RPM). The IV test data, obtained under ambient lab conditions, are investigated in detail, evaluated, compiled, and curve-fitted; variational trends, core causes, and unforeseen anomalies are addressed. In aggregate, these values constitute a statistically-valid basis to quantify ground test-to-test variations and facilitate extrapolations to on-orbit conditions. Accumulated knowledge of bearing-rotor vibrational sources, corresponding harmonic contributions, and salient elements of IV key variability factors are discussed. An evolved methodology is presented for absolute assessments and relative comparisons of macro-level IV signal magnitude due to micro-level construction-assembly geometric details/imperfections stemming from both electrical drive and primary bearing design parameters. Based upon studies of same-size/similar-design momentum wheels' IV changes, upper estimates due to transitions from ground tests to orbital conditions are derived. Recommended HST RWA choices are discussed relative to system optimization/tradeoffs of Line-Of-Sight (LOS) vector-pointing focal-plane error driven by higher IV transmissibilities through low-damped structural dynamics that stimulate optical elements. Unique analytical disturbance results for orbital HST accelerations are described applicable to microgravity efforts. Conclusions, lessons learned, historical context/insights, and perspectives on future applications

  7. Platform switching and bone platform switching.

    PubMed

    Carinci, Francesco; Brunelli, Giorgio; Danza, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Bone platform switching involves an inward bone ring in the coronal part of the implant that is in continuity with the alveolar bone crest. Bone platform switching is obtained by using a dental fixture with a reverse conical neck. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional vs reverse conical neck implants. In the period between May 2004 and November 2007, 86 patients (55 females and 31 males; median age, 53 years) were operated and 234 implants were inserted: 40 and 194 were conventional vs reverse conical neck implants, respectively. Kaplan-Meier algorithm and Cox regression were used to detect those variables associated with the clinical outcome. No differences in survival and success rates were detected between conventional vs reverse conical neck implants alone or in combination with any of the studied variables. Although bone platform switching leads to several advantages, no statistical difference in alveolar crest resorption is detected in comparison with reverse conical neck implants. We suppose that the proximity of the implant abutment junction to the alveolar crestal bone gives no protection against the microflora contained in the micrograph. Additional studies on larger series and a combination of platform switching and bone platform switching could lead to improved clinical outcomes.

  8. Platform B South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-02

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the first half of the B-level work platforms, B south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up from the transfer aisle floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Large Tandemloc bars have been attached to the platform to keep it level during lifting and installation. The B platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  9. Platform E South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-26

    A heavy-lift crane lowers the first half of the E-level work platforms, E south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into position for installation in High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Large Tandemloc bars have been attached to the platform to keep it level during lifting and installation. The E platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3, about 246 feet above the floor. The E platforms are the sixth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  10. Platform E South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-26

    A heavy-lift crane lowers the first half of the E-level work platforms, E south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In view are five levels of platforms previously installed. The E platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3, about 246 feet above the floor. The E platforms are the sixth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  11. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    The second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, is lowered by crane for installation on the north side of High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Large Tandemloc bars have been attached to the platform to keep it level during lifting, lowering and installation. In view below are several levels of previously installed platforms. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  12. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    The second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, is lifted up by crane in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The platform will be lowered into High Bay 3 and installed on the north side of the high bay. Construction workers will secure the large bolts that hold the platform in place on the north wall. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  13. Platform A North Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    Workers prepare to unload the second half of the A-level work platforms, A north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, from a heavy load transport truck in a staging area near the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is the final platform delivered to Kennedy. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the VAB. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  14. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    High up in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane lowers the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, for installation in High Bay 3. The B platform will be installed on the north side of high bay. In view below are eight levels of previously installed platforms. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  15. Platform A South Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-28

    A heavy load transport truck from Tillett Heavy Hauling in Titusville, Florida, arrives at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the first half of the A-level work platforms, A south, for the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The A-level platforms are the topmost platforms for High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The platform will be delivered to the VAB staging area in the west parking lot. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing.

  16. Platform D South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    A heavy-lift crane lowers the first half of the D-level work platforms, D south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In view below are the six levels of previously installed platforms. The D platform will be installed on the south side of the high bay. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  17. Platform D South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a heavy-lift crane lifts the first half of the D-level work platforms, D south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high above the floor of the transfer aisle. The platform will be moved into High Bay 3 for installation on the south side of the high bay. Large Tandemloc bars have been attached to the platform to keep it level during lifting and installation. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  18. Platform C North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    A heavy-lift crane lowers the second half of the C-level work platforms, C north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into High Bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The C platform will be installed on the north side of High Bay 3. In view below are several of the previously installed levels of platforms. The C platforms are the eighth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  19. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    High up in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane lowers the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, for installation in High Bay 3. The B platform will be installed on the north side of high bay. In view below are several levels of previously installed platforms. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  20. Omnidirectional holonomic platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Killough, S.M.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the concepts for a new family of wheeled platforms which feature full omnidirectionality with simultaneous and independently controlled rotational and translational motion capabilities. The authors first present the orthogonal-wheels concept and the two major wheel assemblies on which these platforms are based. They then describe how a combination of these assemblies with appropriate control can be used to generate an omnidirectional capability for mobile robot platforms. The design and control of two prototype platforms are then presented and their respective characteristics with respect to rotational and translational motion control are discussed.

  1. Omnidirectional holonomic platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Killough, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the concepts for a new family of wheeled platforms which feature full omnidirectionality with simultaneous and independently controlled rotational and translational motion capabilities. We first present the {open_quotes}orthogonal-wheels{close_quotes} concept and the two major wheel assemblies on which these platforms are based. We then describe how a combination of these assemblies with appropriate control can be used to generate an omnidirectional capability for mobile robot platforms. The design and control of two prototype platforms are then presented and their respective characteristics with respect to rotational and translational motion control are discussed.

  2. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-08

    The first half of the F-level work platforms for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket has arrived at the Vehicle Assembly Building at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. The first three sets of platforms, H, J and K, were delivered to the center last year.

  3. Platform D Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-09

    In High Bay 3 inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction workers assist during installation of the second half of the D-level work platforms, D north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  4. Effect of heating on the stability of amyloid A (AA) fibrils and the intra- and cross-species transmission of AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Saki; Murakami, Tomoaki; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease characterized by extracellular deposition of AA fibrils. AA fibrils are found in several tissues from food animals with AA amyloidosis. For hygienic purposes, heating is widely used to inactivate microbes in food, but it is uncertain whether heating is sufficient to inactivate AA fibrils and prevent intra- or cross-species transmission. We examined the effect of heating (at 60 °C or 100 °C) and autoclaving (at 121 °C or 135 °C) on murine and bovine AA fibrils using Western blot analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and mouse model transmission experiments. TEM revealed that a mixture of AA fibrils and amorphous aggregates appeared after heating at 100 °C, whereas autoclaving at 135 °C produced large amorphous aggregates. AA fibrils retained antigen specificity in Western blot analysis when heated at 100 °C or autoclaved at 121 °C, but not when autoclaved at 135 °C. Transmissible pathogenicity of murine and bovine AA fibrils subjected to heating (at 60 °C or 100 °C) was significantly stimulated and resulted in amyloid deposition in mice. Autoclaving of murine AA fibrils at 121 °C or 135 °C significantly decreased amyloid deposition. Moreover, amyloid deposition in mice injected with murine AA fibrils was more severe than that in mice injected with bovine AA fibrils. Bovine AA fibrils autoclaved at 121 °C or 135 °C did not induce amyloid deposition in mice. These results suggest that AA fibrils are relatively heat stable and that similar to prions, autoclaving at 135 °C is required to destroy the pathogenicity of AA fibrils. These findings may contribute to the prevention of AA fibril transmission through food materials to different animals and especially to humans.

  5. MORC1 exhibits cross-species differential methylation in association with early life stress as well as genome-wide association with MDD.

    PubMed

    Nieratschker, V; Massart, R; Gilles, M; Luoni, A; Suderman, M J; Krumm, B; Meier, S; Witt, S H; Nöthen, M M; Suomi, S J; Peus, V; Scharnholz, B; Dukal, H; Hohmeyer, C; Wolf, I A-C; Cirulli, F; Gass, P; Sütterlin, M W; Filsinger, B; Laucht, M; Riva, M A; Rietschel, M; Deuschle, M; Szyf, M

    2014-08-26

    Early life stress (ELS) is associated with increased vulnerability for diseases in later life, including psychiatric disorders. Animal models and human studies suggest that this effect is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. In humans, epigenetic studies to investigate the influence of ELS on psychiatric phenotypes are limited by the inaccessibility of living brain tissue. Due to the tissue-specific nature of epigenetic signatures, it is impossible to determine whether ELS induced epigenetic changes in accessible peripheral cells, for example, blood lymphocytes, reflect epigenetic changes in the brain. To overcome these limitations, we applied a cross-species approach involving: (i) the analysis of CD34+ cells from human cord blood; (ii) the examination of blood-derived CD3+ T cells of newborn and adolescent nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta); and (iii) the investigation of the prefrontal cortex of adult rats. Several regions in MORC1 (MORC family CW-type zinc finger 1; previously known as: microrchidia (mouse) homolog) were differentially methylated in response to ELS in CD34+ cells and CD3+ T cells derived from the blood of human and monkey neonates, as well as in CD3+ T cells derived from the blood of adolescent monkeys and in the prefrontal cortex of adult rats. MORC1 is thus the first identified epigenetic marker of ELS to be present in blood cell progenitors at birth and in the brain in adulthood. Interestingly, a gene-set-based analysis of data from a genome-wide association study of major depressive disorder (MDD) revealed an association of MORC1 with MDD.

  6. Cross-species comparison of conazole fungicide metabolites using rat and rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) hepatic microsomes and purified human CYP 3A4.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Christopher S; Kenneke, John F

    2008-02-01

    Ecological risk assessment frequently relies on cross-species extrapolation to predict acute toxicity from chemical exposures. A major concern for environmental risk characterization is the degree of uncertainty in assessing xenobiotic biotransformation processes. Although inherently complex, metabolite identification is critical to risk assessment since the product(s) formed may pose a greater toxicological threat than the parent molecule. This issue is further complicated by differences observed in metabolic transformation pathways among species. Conazoles represent an important class of azole fungicides that are widely used in both pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. The antifungal property of conazoles occurs via complexation with the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) responsible for mediating fungal cell wall synthesis. This mode of action has cause for concern regarding the potential adverse impact of conazoles on the broad spectrum of CYP-based processes within mammalian and aquatic species. In this study, in vitro metabolic profiles were determined for thirteen conazole fungicides using rat and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver microsomes and purified human CYP 3A4. Results showed that 10 out of the 13 conazoles tested demonstrated identical metabolite profiles among rat and trout microsomes, and these transformations were well conserved via both aromatic and aliphatic hydroxylation and carbonyl reduction processes. Furthermore, nearly all metabolites detected in the rat and trout microsomal assays were detected within the human CYP 3A4 assays. These results indicate a high degree of metabolic conservation among species with an equivalent isozyme activity of human CYP 3A4 being present in both the rat and trout, and provides insight into xenobiotic biotransformations needed for accurate risk assessment.

  7. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-02-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway.

  8. Cross-species transmission of Giardia spp.: inoculation of beavers and muskrats with cysts of human, beaver, mouse, and muskrat origin.

    PubMed Central

    Erlandsen, S L; Sherlock, L A; Januschka, M; Schupp, D G; Schaefer, F W; Jakubowski, W; Bemrick, W J

    1988-01-01

    Giardia cysts isolated from humans, beavers, mice, and muskrats were tested in cross-species transmission experiments for their ability to infect either beavers or muskrats. Giardia cysts, derived from multiple symptomatic human donors and used for inoculation of beavers or muskrats, were shown to be viable by incorporation of fluorogenic dyes, excystation, and their ability to produce infections in the Mongolian gerbil model. Inoculation of beavers with 5 x 10(5) Giardia lamblia cysts resulted in the infection of 75% of the animals (n = 8), as judged by the presence of fecal cysts or intestinal trophozoites at necropsy. The mean prepatent period was 13.1 days. An infective dose experiment, using 5 x 10(1) to 5 x 10(5) viable G. lamblia cysts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, demonstrated that doses of between, less than 50, and less than 500 viable cysts were required to produce infection in beavers. Scanning electron microscopy of beaver small intestine revealed that attachment of G. lamblia trophozoites produced lesions in the microvillous border. Inoculation of muskrats with G. lamblia cysts produced infections when the dose of cysts was equal to or greater than 1.25 x 10(5). The inoculation of beavers with Giardia ondatrae or Giardia muris cysts did not produce any infection; however, the administration to muskrats of Giardia cysts of beaver origin resulted in the infection of 62% of the animals (n = 8), with a prepatent period of 5 days. Our results demonstrated that beavers and muskrats could be infected with Giardia cysts derived from humans, but only by using large numbers of cysts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3063208

  9. Profiling conserved biological pathways in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disorder (ADPKD) to elucidate key transcriptomic alterations regulating cystogenesis: A cross-species meta-analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Shatakshee; Verma, Srikant Prasad; Pandey, Priyanka

    2017-09-05

    Initiation and progression of fluid filled cysts mark Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). Thus, improved therapeutics targeting cystogenesis remains a constant challenge. Microarray studies in single ADPKD animal models species with limited sample sizes tend to provide scattered views on underlying ADPKD pathogenesis. Thus we aim to perform a cross species meta-analysis to profile conserved biological pathways that might be key targets for therapy. Nine ADPKD microarray datasets on rat, mice and human fulfilled our study criteria and were chosen. Intra-species combined analysis was performed after considering removal of batch effect. Significantly enriched GO biological processes and KEGG pathways were computed and their overlap was observed. For the conserved pathways, biological modules and gene regulatory networks were observed. Additionally, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) using Molecular Signature Database (MSigDB) was performed for genes found in conserved pathways. We obtained 28 modules of significantly enriched GO processes and 5 major functional categories from significantly enriched KEGG pathways conserved in human, mice and rats that in turn suggest a global transcriptomic perturbation affecting cyst - formation, growth and progression. Significantly enriched pathways obtained from up-regulated genes such as Genomic instability, Protein localization in ER and Insulin Resistance were found to regulate cyst formation and growth whereas cyst progression due to increased cell adhesion and inflammation was suggested by perturbations in Angiogenesis, TGF-beta, CAMs, and Infection related pathways. Additionally, networks revealed shared genes among pathways e.g. SMAD2 and SMAD7 in Endocytosis and TGF-beta. Our study suggests cyst formation and progression to be an outcome of interplay between a set of several key deregulated pathways. Thus, further translational research is warranted focusing on developing a combinatorial therapeutic

  10. New methods to identify conserved microsatellite loci and develop primer sets of high cross-species utility - as demonstrated for birds.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Küpper, Clemens; Stewart, Ian R K; Ball, Alexander D; Durrant, Kate L; Hansson, Bengt; Bacon, Ida; Bird, Susannah; Klein, Akos; Krupa, Andrew P; Lee, Jin-Won; Martín-Gálvez, David; Simeoni, Michelle; Smith, Gemma; Spurgin, Lewis G; Burke, Terry

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new approach to create microsatellite primer sets that have high utility across a wide range of species. The success of this method was demonstrated using birds. We selected 35 avian EST microsatellite loci that had a high degree of sequence homology between the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata and the chicken Gallus gallus and designed primer sets in which the primer bind sites were identical in both species. For 33 conserved primer sets, on average, 100% of loci amplified in each of 17 passerine species and 99% of loci in five non-passerine species. The genotyping of four individuals per species revealed that 24-76% (mean 48%) of loci were polymorphic in the passerines and 18-26% (mean 21%) in the non-passerines. When at least 17 individuals were genotyped per species for four Fringillidae finch species, 71-85% of loci were polymorphic, observed heterozygosity was above 0.50 for most loci and no locus deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg proportions. This new set of microsatellite markers is of higher cross-species utility than any set previously designed. The loci described are suitable for a range of applications that require polymorphic avian markers, including paternity and population studies. They will facilitate comparisons of bird genome organization, including genome mapping and studies of recombination, and allow comparisons of genetic variability between species whilst avoiding ascertainment bias. The costs and time to develop new loci can now be avoided for many applications in numerous species. Furthermore, our method can be readily used to develop microsatellite markers of high utility across other taxa.

  11. Network analysis and cross species comparison of protein-protein interaction networks of human, mouse and rat cytochrome P450 proteins that degrade xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Bagavathy Shanmugam; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader; Parthasarathy, Subbiah

    2016-06-21

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes that degrade xenobiotics play a critical role in the metabolism and biotransformation of drugs and xenobiotics in humans as well as experimental animal models such as mouse and rat. These proteins function as a network collectively as well as independently. Though there are several reports on the organization, regulation and functionality of various CYP enzymes at the molecular level, the understanding of organization and functionality of these proteins at the holistic level remain unclear. The objective of this study is to understand the organization and functionality of xenobiotic degrading CYP enzymes of human, mouse and rat using network theory approaches and to study species differences that exist among them at the holistic level. For our analysis, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for CYP enzymes of human, mouse and rat was constructed using the STRING database. Topology, centrality, modularity and robustness analyses were performed for our predicted CYP PPI networks that were then validated by comparison with randomly generated network models. Network centrality analyses of CYP PPI networks reveal the central/hub proteins in the network. Modular analysis of the CYP PPI networks of human, mouse and rat resulted in functional clusters. These clusters were subjected to ontology and pathway enrichment analysis. The analyses show that the cluster of the human CYP PPI network is enriched with pathways principally related to xenobiotic/drug metabolism. Endo-xenobiotic crosstalk dominated in mouse and rat CYP PPI networks, and they were highly enriched with endogenous metabolic and signaling pathways. Thus, cross-species comparisons and analyses of human, mouse and rat CYP PPI networks gave insights about species differences that existed at the holistic level. More investigations from both reductionist and holistic perspectives can help understand CYP metabolism and species extrapolation in a much better way.

  12. Cross-species amplification and polymorphism of microsatellite loci in Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazilian cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Leite, N A; Corrêa, A S; Alves-Pereira, A; Campos, J B; Zucchi, M I; Omoto, C

    2016-04-04

    The Old World bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) was recently discovered in Brazil. This species is closely related to the New World bollworm H. zea (Boddie), and mating between these species has already been reported under laboratory conditions. Here, we tested the cross-species amplification of 20 microsatellite (SSR) loci in field populations of H. armigera and H. zea collected from Brazilian cropping systems. Seven SSR loci were successfully amplified and polymorphic in both species except for the locus HaC14, which was monomorphic for H. zea. All SSR loci were in linkage equilibrium, and deviations from Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium were only observed for the locus HarSSR1 in the HaRS-2 population, where null alleles were present. A moderate level of polymorphism was detected in H. armigera and H. zea populations with a mean allele number of 4.14, and 2.24, respectively. Interestingly, most of the populations of the recent invader H. armigera showed higher genetic diversity and inbreeding coefficients than H. zea populations. The genetic identity of each species was recovered using a STRUCTURE analysis, where the populations formed two clusters (K = 2) according to their species. STRUCTURE also suggested the occurrence of potential hybrid offspring between H. armigera and H. zea individuals in natural conditions. These SSR loci will be valuable in characterizing population differentiation, invasion routes, adaptation, reproductive behavior, and intra- and interspecific gene flow in H. armigera and H. zea populations in Brazil, the USA, and other areas where these two pests occur.

  13. Cross-species DNA copy number analyses identifies multiple 1q21-q23 subtype-specific driver genes for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, Grace O; He, Xiaping; Parker, Joel S; Gatza, Michael L; Carey, Lisa A; Hou, Jack P; Moulder, Stacy L; Marcom, Paul K; Ma, Jian; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Perou, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    A large number of DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) exist in human breast cancers, and thus characterizing the most frequent CNAs is key to advancing therapeutics because it is likely that these regions contain breast tumor 'drivers' (i.e., cancer causal genes). This study aims to characterize the genomic landscape of breast cancer CNAs and identify potential subtype-specific drivers using a large set of human breast tumors and genetically engineered mouse (GEM) mammary tumors. Using a novel method called SWITCHplus, we identified subtype-specific DNA CNAs occurring at a 15% or greater frequency, which excluded many well-known breast cancer-related drivers such as amplification of ERBB2, and deletions of TP53 and RB1. A comparison of CNAs between mouse and human breast tumors identified regions with shared subtype-specific CNAs. Additional criteria that included gene expression-to-copy number correlation, a DawnRank network analysis, and RNA interference functional studies highlighted candidate driver genes that fulfilled these multiple criteria. Numerous regions of shared CNAs were observed between human breast tumors and GEM mammary tumor models that shared similar gene expression features. Specifically, we identified chromosome 1q21-23 as a Basal-like subtype-enriched region with multiple potential driver genes including PI4KB, SHC1, and NCSTN. This step-wise computational approach based on a cross-species comparison is applicable to any tumor type for which sufficient human and model system DNA copy number data exist, and in this instance, highlights that a single region of amplification may in fact harbor multiple driver genes.

  14. MORC1 exhibits cross-species differential methylation in association with early life stress as well as genome-wide association with MDD

    PubMed Central

    Nieratschker, V; Massart, R; Gilles, M; Luoni, A; Suderman, M J; Krumm, B; Meier, S; Witt, S H; Nöthen, M M; Suomi, S J; Peus, V; Scharnholz, B; Dukal, H; Hohmeyer, C; Wolf, I A-C; Cirulli, F; Gass, P; Sütterlin, M W; Filsinger, B; Laucht, M; Riva, M A; Rietschel, M; Deuschle, M; Szyf, M

    2014-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is associated with increased vulnerability for diseases in later life, including psychiatric disorders. Animal models and human studies suggest that this effect is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. In humans, epigenetic studies to investigate the influence of ELS on psychiatric phenotypes are limited by the inaccessibility of living brain tissue. Due to the tissue-specific nature of epigenetic signatures, it is impossible to determine whether ELS induced epigenetic changes in accessible peripheral cells, for example, blood lymphocytes, reflect epigenetic changes in the brain. To overcome these limitations, we applied a cross-species approach involving: (i) the analysis of CD34+ cells from human cord blood; (ii) the examination of blood-derived CD3+ T cells of newborn and adolescent nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta); and (iii) the investigation of the prefrontal cortex of adult rats. Several regions in MORC1 (MORC family CW-type zinc finger 1; previously known as: microrchidia (mouse) homolog) were differentially methylated in response to ELS in CD34+ cells and CD3+ T cells derived from the blood of human and monkey neonates, as well as in CD3+ T cells derived from the blood of adolescent monkeys and in the prefrontal cortex of adult rats. MORC1 is thus the first identified epigenetic marker of ELS to be present in blood cell progenitors at birth and in the brain in adulthood. Interestingly, a gene-set-based analysis of data from a genome-wide association study of major depressive disorder (MDD) revealed an association of MORC1 with MDD. PMID:25158004

  15. Platform F Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-08

    At right, the first half of the F-level work platforms for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket has arrived at the Vehicle Assembly Building at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At left, several other work platforms are being readied for future installation in VAB High Bay 3. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to High Bay 3 to support processing of the SLS and Orion spacecraft. A total of 10 levels of new platforms, 20 platform halves altogether, will surround the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft and provide access for testing and processing. The first three sets of platforms, H, J and K, were delivered to the center last year.

  16. Platform E South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-26

    A heavy-lift crane lowers the first half of the E-level work platforms, E south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The E platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3, about 246 feet above the floor. The E platforms are the sixth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  17. Platform E South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-26

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the first half of the E-level work platforms, E south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, up from the floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The E platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3, about 246 feet above the floor. The E platforms are the sixth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  18. Platform E South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-26

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the first half of the E-level work platforms, E south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high above the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The E platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3, about 246 feet above the floor. The E platforms are the sixth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  19. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    Construction workers wearing safety harnesses and tethered lines assist with the installation of the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. They are securing the large bolts that hold the platform securely in place on the north side of High Bay 3. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  20. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    High up in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, has been lowered into place for installation on the north wall of High Bay 3. In view below are several levels of previously installed platforms. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  1. Platform B South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-02

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the first half of the B-level work platforms, B south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up from the transfer aisle floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The B platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  2. Platform B South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-02

    Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a construction worker watches as the first half of the B-level work platforms, B south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket is lowered into place in High Bay 3. Construction workers will secure the large bolts that hold the platform in place on the south wall. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  3. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    A construction worker wearing a safety harness and tethered lines prepares to assist with the installation of the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The B platform will be installed on the north side of High Bay 3. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  4. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    A construction worker wearing a safety harness and tethered lines monitors the progress during the installation of the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The B platform will be installed on the north side of High Bay 3. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  5. Platform D South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the first half of the D-level work platforms, D south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high above the floor of the transfer aisle in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The D platform will be lowered into High Bay 3 for installation on the south side of the high bay. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  6. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    A crane lifts the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The B north platform will lowered into High Bay 3 for installation on the north side of the high bay. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  7. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    A construction worker wearing a safety harness and tethered lines turns a bolt to help secure the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, during installation in High Bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The B platform is being installed on the north side of the high bay. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  8. Platform D Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-09

    A heavy-lift crane lowers the second half of the D-level work platforms, D north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into position for installation in High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The platform will be installed on the north side of the high bay. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  9. Platform C North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the second half of the C-level work platforms, C north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up from the transfer aisle floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The C platform will be moved into High Bay 3 for installation on the north wall. The C platforms are the eighth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  10. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    A construction worker wearing a safety harness and tethered lines assists with the installation of the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The B platform will be installed on the north side of High Bay 3. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  11. Platform B South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-02

    High up in High Bay 3 inside the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the first half of the B-level work platforms, B south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, has been lowered into place. In view below are several levels of previously installed platforms. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  12. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    High up in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane lowers the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, for installation in High Bay 3. The B platform will be installed on the north side of high bay. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  13. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    A construction worker makes adjustments to a section of steel during the installation of the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, in High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Construction workers will secure the large bolts that hold the platform in place on the north wall. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  14. Platform D Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-09

    Construction workers use specialized tools to help secure the second half of the D-level work platforms, D north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into position in High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The D platform is being installed on the north side of the high bay. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  15. Platform C North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the second half of the C-level work platforms, C north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, up from the transfer aisle floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The C platform will be installed on the north side of High Bay 3. The C platforms are the eighth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  16. Platform D Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-09

    Construction workers help to secure the second half of the D-level work platforms, D north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into position in High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The D platform is being installed on the north side of the high bay. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  17. Platform D South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    A construction worker monitors the progress, as a heavy-lift crane lifts the first half of the D-level work platforms, D south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, up from the transfer aisle floor in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The D platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  18. Platform D Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-09

    A heavy-lift crane lowers the second half of the D-level work platforms, D north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into position for installation in High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The platform will be installed on the north side of the high bay. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  19. Platform C North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the second half of the C-level work platforms, C north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up from the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The C platform will be moved into High Bay 3 for installation on the north side of High Bay 3. The C platforms are the eighth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  20. Platform D South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    In this view from above, a heavy-lift crane lowers the first half of the D-level work platforms, D south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The D platform will be installed on the south side of the high bay. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  1. Platform D Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-09

    In this view looking up in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a heavy-lift crane lowers the second half of the D-level work platforms, D north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, into position for installation in High Bay 3. The platform will be installed on the north side of the high bay. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  2. Platform D South Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the first half of the D-level work platforms, D south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, up from the transfer aisle floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The D platform will be installed on the south side of High Bay 3. The D platforms are the seventh of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s journey to Mars.

  3. Platform C North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the second half of the C-level work platforms, C north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, is lowered into position for installation on the north side of High Bay 3. In view below are the seven levels of previously installed platforms. The C platforms are the eighth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  4. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    The second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, is lowered by crane for installation on the north side of High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Construction workers will secure the large bolts that hold the platform in place on the north wall. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  5. Platform B North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-16

    A construction worker solders a section of steel during the installation of the second half of the B-level work platforms, B north, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, in High Bay 3 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Construction workers will secure the large bolts that hold the platform in place on the north wall. The B platforms are the ninth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  6. Platform C North Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    A heavy-lift crane lifts the second half of the C-level work platforms, C north, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, high up from the transfer aisle floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The C platform will be installed on the north side of High Bay 3. The C platforms are the eighth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  7. Platform C Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-19

    Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction workers assist with the installation of the first half of the C-level work platforms, C south, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The large bolts that hold the platform in place on the south wall are being secured. The C platforms are the eighth of 10 levels of work platforms that will surround and provide access to the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission 1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing upgrades and modifications to VAB High Bay 3, including installation of the new work platforms, to prepare for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

  8. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae, and their cross-species amplification in the Tephritidae family

    PubMed Central

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Stratikopoulos, Elias E; Drosopoulou, Eleni; Kakani, Evdoxia G; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D

    2008-01-01

    Background The Tephritidae family of insects includes the most important agricultural pests of fruits and vegetables, belonging mainly to four genera (Bactrocera, Ceratitis, Anastrepha and Rhagoletis). The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major pest of the olive fruit. Currently, its control is based on chemical insecticides. Environmentally friendlier methods have been attempted in the past (Sterile Insect Technique), albeit with limited success. This was mainly attributed to the lack of knowledge on the insect's behaviour, ecology and genetic structure of natural populations. The development of molecular markers could facilitate the access in the genome and contribute to the solution of the aforementioned problems. We chose to focus on microsatellite markers due to their abundance in the genome, high degree of polymorphism and easiness of isolation. Results Fifty-eight microsatellite-containing clones were isolated from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae, bearing a total of sixty-two discrete microsatellite motifs. Forty-two primer pairs were designed on the unique sequences flanking the microsatellite motif and thirty-one of them amplified a PCR product of the expected size. The level of polymorphism was evaluated against wild and laboratory flies and the majority of the markers (93.5%) proved highly polymorphic. Thirteen of them presented a unique position on the olive fly polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization, which can serve as anchors to correlate future genetic and cytological maps of the species, as well as entry points to the genome. Cross-species amplification of these markers to eleven Tephritidae species and sequencing of thirty-one of the amplified products revealed a varying degree of conservation that declines outside the Bactrocera genus. Conclusion Microsatellite markers are very powerful tools for genetic and population analyses, particularly in species deprived of any other means of genetic analysis. The presented set of

  9. Generation and infectivity titration of an infectious stock of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) in chickens and cross-species infection of turkeys with avian HEV.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z F; Larsen, C T; Huang, F F; Billam, P; Pierson, F W; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2004-06-01

    together with the inoculated ones also became infected through direct contact. This is the first demonstration of cross-species infection by avian HEV.

  10. Bioinformatics resource manager v2.3: an integrated software environment for systems biology with microRNA and cross-species analysis tools

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that direct post-transcriptional regulation of protein coding genes. Recent studies have shown miRNAs are important for controlling many biological processes, including nervous system development, and are highly conserved across species. Given their importance, computational tools are necessary for analysis, interpretation and integration of high-throughput (HTP) miRNA data in an increasing number of model species. The Bioinformatics Resource Manager (BRM) v2.3 is a software environment for data management, mining, integration and functional annotation of HTP biological data. In this study, we report recent updates to BRM for miRNA data analysis and cross-species comparisons across datasets. Results BRM v2.3 has the capability to query predicted miRNA targets from multiple databases, retrieve potential regulatory miRNAs for known genes, integrate experimentally derived miRNA and mRNA datasets, perform ortholog mapping across species, and retrieve annotation and cross-reference identifiers for an expanded number of species. Here we use BRM to show that developmental exposure of zebrafish to 30 uM nicotine from 6–48 hours post fertilization (hpf) results in behavioral hyperactivity in larval zebrafish and alteration of putative miRNA gene targets in whole embryos at developmental stages that encompass early neurogenesis. We show typical workflows for using BRM to integrate experimental zebrafish miRNA and mRNA microarray datasets with example retrievals for zebrafish, including pathway annotation and mapping to human ortholog. Functional analysis of differentially regulated (p<0.05) gene targets in BRM indicates that nicotine exposure disrupts genes involved in neurogenesis, possibly through misregulation of nicotine-sensitive miRNAs. Conclusions BRM provides the ability to mine complex data for identification of candidate miRNAs or pathways that drive phenotypic outcome and, therefore, is a useful hypothesis

  11. Cross-tissue and cross-species analysis of gene expression in skeletal muscle and electric organ of African weakly-electric fish (Teleostei; Mormyridae).

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Francesco; Kirschbaum, Frank; Waurick, Isabelle; Dieterich, Christoph; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2015-09-03

    African weakly-electric fishes of the family Mormyridae are able to produce and perceive weak electric signals (typically less than one