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Sample records for crowd mobile phone

  1. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  2. Mobility, Fertility, and Residential Crowding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Earl W.

    1977-01-01

    Regression analyses predicting fertility and mobility in a sample of a metropolitan county in New York State indicate that residential mobility serves to release the negative pressure that residential crowding might exert on fertility behavior. (Author)

  3. Mobile Phone Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, an employee of a real estate firm is contacting his office by means of HICOM, an advanced central terminal for mobile telephones. Developed by the Orlando Division of Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Florida, and manufactured by Harris Corporation's RF Division, Rochester, N.Y., HICOM upgrades service to users, provides better system management to telephone companies, and makes more efficient use of available mobile telephone channels through a computerized central control terminal. The real estate man, for example, was able to dial his office and he could also have direct-dialed a long distance number. Mobile phones in most areas not yet served by HICOM require an operator's assistance for both local and long distance calls. HICOM improves system management by automatically recording information on all calls for accurate billing, running continual performance checks on its own operation, and reporting any malfunctions to a central office.

  4. Addictive personality and problematic mobile phone use.

    PubMed

    Takao, Motoharu; Takahashi, Susumu; Kitamura, Masayoshi

    2009-10-01

    Mobile phone use is banned or regulated in some circumstances. Despite recognized safety concerns and legal regulations, some people do not refrain from using mobile phones. Such problematic mobile phone use can be considered to be an addiction-like behavior. To find the potential predictors, we examined the correlation between problematic mobile phone use and personality traits reported in addiction literature, which indicated that problematic mobile phone use was a function of gender, self-monitoring, and approval motivation but not of loneliness. These findings suggest that the measurements of these addictive personality traits would be helpful in the screening and intervention of potential problematic users of mobile phones.

  5. Mobile phone and my health

    SciTech Connect

    Surducan, Aneta; Dabala, Dana; Neamtu, Camelia Surducan, Vasile Surducan, Emanoil

    2013-11-13

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  6. Mobile phone and my health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, Aneta; Dabala, Dana; Neamtu, Camelia; Surducan, Vasile; Surducan, Emanoil

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  7. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  8. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  9. Mobile Phone Mood Charting for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Mark; Doherty, Gavin; Sharry, John; Fitzpatrick, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Mobile phones may provide a useful and engaging platform for supporting therapeutic services working with adolescents. This paper examines the potential benefits of the mobile phone for self-charting moods in comparison to existing methods in current practice. The paper describes a mobile phone application designed by the authors which allows…

  10. Use of mobile phones and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ayanda, Olushola S; Baba, Alafara A; Ayanda, Omolola T

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phones work by transmitting and receiving radio frequency microwave radiation. The radio frequency (RF) emitted by mobile phones is stronger than FM radio signal which are known to cause cancer. Though research and evidence available on the risk of cancer by mobile phones does not provide a clear and direct support that mobile phones cause cancers. Evidence does not also support an association between exposure to radio frequency and microwave radiation from mobile phones and direct effects on health. It is however clear that lack of available evidence of cancer as regards the use of mobile phone should not be interpreted as proof of absence of cancer risk, so that excessive use of mobile phones should be taken very seriously and with caution to prevent cancer.

  11. Mobile Phone Usage for M-Learning: Comparing Heavy and Light Mobile Phone Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suki, Norbayah Mohd; Suki, Norazah Mohd

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Mobile technologies offer the opportunity to embed learning in a natural environment. The objective of the study is to examine how the usage of mobile phones for m-learning differs between heavy and light mobile phone users. Heavy mobile phone users are hypothesized to have access to/subscribe to one type of mobile content than light…

  12. Mobile phones and sleep - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supe, Sanjay S.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing use of mobile phones has raised concerns regarding the potential health effects of exposure to the radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. An increasing amount research related to mobile phone use has focussed on the possible effects of mobile phone exposure on human brain activity and function. In particular, the use of sleep research has become a more widely used technique for assessing the possible effects of mobile phones on human health and wellbeing especially in the investigation of potential changes in sleep architecture resulting from mobile phone use. Acute exposure to a mobile phone prior to sleep significantly enhances electroencephalogram spectral power in the sleep spindle frequency range. This mobile phone-induced enhancement in spectral power is largely transitory and does not linger throughout the night. Furthermore, a reduction in rapid eye movement sleep latency following mobile phone exposure was also found, although interestingly, neither this change in rapid eye movement sleep latency or the enhancement in spectral power following mobile phone exposure, led to changes in the overall quality of sleep. In conclusion, a short exposure to the radiofrequency electromagnetic fields emitted by a mobile phone handset immediately prior to sleep is sufficient to induce changes in brain activity in the initial part of sleep. The consequences or functional significance of this effect are currently unknown and it would be premature to draw conclusions about possible health consequences.

  13. Quantitative imaging with a mobile phone microscope.

    PubMed

    Skandarajah, Arunan; Reber, Clay D; Switz, Neil A; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone-based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications.

  14. Quantitative imaging with a mobile phone microscope.

    PubMed

    Skandarajah, Arunan; Reber, Clay D; Switz, Neil A; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone-based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications. PMID:24824072

  15. Comparing Internet and Mobile Phone Digital Divides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Ronald E.; Katz, James E.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the digital divide focuses on the Internet and mobile phone digital divide. Analyses of a telephone survey from 2000 considers similarities and differences in three kinds of digital dividers for both the Internet and the mobile phone: users and nonusers, users and dropouts, and recent and veteran users. (Author/LRW)

  16. Reading and Grammar Learning through Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shudong; Smith, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing language-learning project, three years into its development. We examine both the feasibility and the limitations of developing English reading and grammar skills through the interface of mobile phones. Throughout the project, reading and grammar materials were regularly sent to students' mobile phones. Students…

  17. Effectiveness of Vocabulary Learning via Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, M.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas the penetration of mobile phones in Asian countries keeps climbing, little research has explored the application of the short message service (SMS) in second language learning. This study aims to examine the effectiveness of SMS vocabulary lessons of limited lexical information on the small screens of mobile phones. Thirty high school…

  18. Quantitative Imaging with a Mobile Phone Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Skandarajah, Arunan; Reber, Clay D.; Switz, Neil A.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone–based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications. PMID:24824072

  19. Emerging aspects of mobile phone use

    PubMed Central

    Samkange-Zeeb, F; Blettner, M

    2009-01-01

    The mobile phone is a modern-day invention, which has managed to reach many parts of the world enabling telecommunications across areas where it was not possible before. Although these devices have proved to be life saving in certain circumstances (e.g., after accidents) and helped improve the quality of life in some sectors, concerns continue to be raised about potential adverse health impacts associated with their use. These range from cancer and cognitive deficiencies to subjective effects, such as a feeling of warmth around the ear used, headache and fatigue. We provide an overview of the concerns raised and summarise what is known about them. We conducted a literature search in Pubmed/Medline to identify published papers on health effects of mobile phones, and an intensive search on the Internet to collect data on the global use of mobile phones. In the year 2000, there were an estimated 500 million mobile phone users worldwide. Today, there are about 3.3 billion users. The use of mobile phones among young children and adolescents is also increasing. Health-risk research has mainly focused on adults and on a single outcome, brain tumours. No significant relationship has been established between mobile phone use and the incidence or growth of brain tumours. Other research indicates emerging concerns, including hearing problems and self-reported health symptoms, such as tiredness, stress, headache, anxiety, concentration difficulties and sleep disturbances, but results remain inconclusive. Currently, there is little epidemiological evidence indicating that the use of mobile phones causes adverse health effects. PMID:22460286

  20. Audio Frequency Analysis in Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía

    2016-01-01

    A new experiment using mobile phones is proposed in which its audio frequency response is analyzed using the audio port for inputting external signal and getting a measurable output. This experiment shows how the limited audio bandwidth used in mobile telephony is the main cause of the poor speech quality in this service. A brief discussion is…

  1. Mobile phone based SCADA for industrial automation.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Engin; Karacor, Mevlut

    2006-01-01

    SCADA is the acronym for "Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition." SCADA systems are widely used in industry for supervisory control and data acquisition of industrial processes. Conventional SCADA systems use PC, notebook, thin client, and PDA as a client. In this paper, a Java-enabled mobile phone has been used as a client in a sample SCADA application in order to display and supervise the position of a sample prototype crane. The paper presents an actual implementation of the on-line controlling of the prototype crane via mobile phone. The wireless communication between the mobile phone and the SCADA server is performed by means of a base station via general packet radio service (GPRS) and wireless application protocol (WAP). Test results have indicated that the mobile phone based SCADA integration using the GPRS or WAP transfer scheme could enhance the performance of the crane in a day without causing an increase in the response times of SCADA functions. The operator can visualize and modify the plant parameters using his mobile phone, without reaching the site. In this way maintenance costs are reduced and productivity is increased. PMID:16480111

  2. Mobile phone based SCADA for industrial automation.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Engin; Karacor, Mevlut

    2006-01-01

    SCADA is the acronym for "Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition." SCADA systems are widely used in industry for supervisory control and data acquisition of industrial processes. Conventional SCADA systems use PC, notebook, thin client, and PDA as a client. In this paper, a Java-enabled mobile phone has been used as a client in a sample SCADA application in order to display and supervise the position of a sample prototype crane. The paper presents an actual implementation of the on-line controlling of the prototype crane via mobile phone. The wireless communication between the mobile phone and the SCADA server is performed by means of a base station via general packet radio service (GPRS) and wireless application protocol (WAP). Test results have indicated that the mobile phone based SCADA integration using the GPRS or WAP transfer scheme could enhance the performance of the crane in a day without causing an increase in the response times of SCADA functions. The operator can visualize and modify the plant parameters using his mobile phone, without reaching the site. In this way maintenance costs are reduced and productivity is increased.

  3. Flow visualization by mobile phone cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cierpka, Christian; Hain, Rainer; Buchmann, Nicolas A.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile smart phones were completely changing people's communication within the last ten years. However, these devices do not only offer communication through different channels but also devices and applications for fun and recreation. In this respect, mobile phone cameras include now relatively fast (up to 240 Hz) cameras to capture high-speed videos of sport events or other fast processes. The article therefore explores the possibility to make use of this development and the wide spread availability of these cameras in the terms of velocity measurements for industrial or technical applications and fluid dynamics education in high schools and at universities. The requirements for a simplistic PIV (particle image velocimetry) system are discussed. A model experiment of a free water jet was used to prove the concept and shed some light on the achievable quality and determine bottle necks by comparing the results obtained with a mobile phone camera with data taken by a high-speed camera suited for scientific experiments.

  4. Low-cost mobile phone microscopy with a reversed mobile phone camera lens.

    PubMed

    Switz, Neil A; D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    The increasing capabilities and ubiquity of mobile phones and their associated digital cameras offer the possibility of extending low-cost, portable diagnostic microscopy to underserved and low-resource areas. However, mobile phone microscopes created by adding magnifying optics to the phone's camera module have been unable to make use of the full image sensor due to the specialized design of the embedded camera lens, exacerbating the tradeoff between resolution and field of view inherent to optical systems. This tradeoff is acutely felt for diagnostic applications, where the speed and cost of image-based diagnosis is related to the area of the sample that can be viewed at sufficient resolution. Here we present a simple and low-cost approach to mobile phone microscopy that uses a reversed mobile phone camera lens added to an intact mobile phone to enable high quality imaging over a significantly larger field of view than standard microscopy. We demonstrate use of the reversed lens mobile phone microscope to identify red and white blood cells in blood smears and soil-transmitted helminth eggs in stool samples.

  5. Mobile phones and children: is precaution warranted?

    PubMed

    van Rongen, Eric; Roubos, Eric W; van Aernsbergen, Lodewijk M; Brussaard, Gert; Havenaar, Johan; Koops, Frans B J; van Leeuwen, Floor E; Leonhard, Helmut K; van Rhoon, Gerard C; Swaen, Gerard M H; van de Weerdt, Rik H J; Zwamborn, A Peter M

    2004-02-01

    Are there health related arguments to recommend that children limit their use of mobile telephones? The International Expert Group on Mobile Phones from the UK concluded so, but did not come up with convincing scientific data to back this statement. The Health Council of the Netherlands approached the problem by considering whether developmental arguments might be found, i.e., asking if there reason to believe that the heads of children are more susceptible to the electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile telephones than those of adults. It concluded that no major changes in head development occur after the second year of life that might point at a difference in electromagnetic susceptibility between children and adults. The Health Council therefore sees no reason to recommend limiting the use of mobile phones by children.

  6. Audio frequency analysis in mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía Aguilar, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    A new experiment using mobile phones is proposed in which its audio frequency response is analyzed using the audio port for inputting external signal and getting a measurable output. This experiment shows how the limited audio bandwidth used in mobile telephony is the main cause of the poor speech quality in this service. A brief discussion is given about the relationship between voice bandwidth and voice quality.

  7. Using Mobile Phones for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahr-Hojland, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the EGO-TRAP project in which students' visits to the Experimentarium science centre in Copenhagen, Denmark, are structured via their mobile phones. EGO-TRAP, so called because it engages visitors in a personal investigation, has been developed with the aim of creating a structured learning experience for children visiting…

  8. Mobile phones and hearing - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanagowda, Preethi B.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Viswanath, Lokesh; Kunjar, Sathish

    2009-01-01

    Mobile phones are being widely used throughout the world. Although there is no clear evidence of harmful effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation at the levels used by these devices, there is widespread public concern that there may be potential for harm. Of all anatomical structures, the ear is closest to the mobile phone, which may lead to relatively high energy deposition in the ear compared to other parts of the body. Till the year 2000 only a few studies had addressed potential adverse effects of EMFs on the hearing system. The potential adverse effects of mobile phone exposure on the hearing system should be investigated, because mobile phones are usually held close to the ear. Until now, most studies have assessed the influence of RF radiation on the central or peripheral auditory system. However, clear conclusions cannot be drawn from these studies regarding the presence or absence of effects because of the limitations in the audiological and/or dosimetric approaches and limited sample sizes. results. Although the presence of possible effects on hearing threshold levels cannot be dismissed entirely, the evidence available is not sufficiently strong to conclude that there are adverse effects. A replication study with a shift in hearing threshold levels at high frequencies as the a priori hypothesis is desirable to resolve this issue.

  9. Using Mobile Phones to Increase Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Stephanie; Heaney, Rose; Corcoran, Olivia; Henderson-Begg, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the possible benefits of using mobile phones to increase interaction and promote active learning in large classroom settings. First year undergraduate students studying Cellular Processes at the University of East London took part in a trial of a new text-based classroom interaction system and evaluated their experience by…

  10. Mobile phone exposure and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Wiholm, Clairy; Lowden, Arne; Kuster, Niels; Hillert, Lena; Arnetz, Bengt B; Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Moffat, Scott D

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) emission during mobile phone use has been suggested to impair cognitive functions, that is, working memory. This study investigated the effects of a 2 1/2 h RF exposure (884 MHz) on spatial memory and learning, using a double-blind repeated measures design. The exposure was designed to mimic that experienced during a real-life mobile phone conversation. The design maximized the exposure to the left hemisphere. The average exposure was peak spatial specific absorption rate (psSAR10g) of 1.4 W/kg. The primary outcome measure was a "virtual" spatial navigation task modeled after the commonly used and validated Morris Water Maze. The distance traveled on each trial and the amount of improvement across trials (i.e., learning) were used as dependent variables. The participants were daily mobile phone users, with and without symptoms attributed to regular mobile phone use. Results revealed a main effect of RF exposure and a significant RF exposure by group effect on distance traveled during the trials. The symptomatic group improved their performance during RF exposure while there was no such effect in the non-symptomatic group. Until this new finding is further investigated, we can only speculate about the cause.

  11. Making Connections: Using Mobile Phones as a Museum Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manabe, Makoto; Lydens, Lois

    2007-01-01

    Mobile phones have been steadily gaining appreciation among the museum community as a versatile tool. The new generation of mobile phones allows museums to imagine a whole new range of applications, including audiovisual personal tours and live-feed broadcasting. Personal tours using mobile phones are appealing to museum educators since patrons…

  12. Twenty Ideas for Using Mobile Phones in the Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Hayo

    2010-01-01

    These days it seems mobile phones are used everywhere by everyone, which leads to the obvious question: How can mobile phone technology support learning in the second language classroom? The answer is "in a number of ways" because mobile phones come with ever-increasing functions that most students are adept at using. In this article the author…

  13. Scaffolding Java Programming on a Mobile Phone for Novice Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbogo, Chao; Blake, Edwin; Suleman, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of mobile phones provides an opportunity to use them as a resource for construction of programs beyond the classroom. However, limitations of mobile phones impede their use as typical programming environments. This research proposes that programming environments on mobile phones should include scaffolding techniques specifically…

  14. Why does half the world's population have a mobile phone? An examination of consumers' attitudes toward mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Shi, Junqi; Yang, Zizhen

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated consumers' attitudes toward and uses of mobile phones via self-report questionnaires in 3,021 Chinese participants ranging from 15 to 65 years old. Confirmatory factor analysis suggests that consumers' attitudes toward mobile phones are composed of three dimensions: sense of security, sense of self-character extension, and sense of dependence. Correlational analyses found all mobile phone attitudes correlated to mobile phone uses.

  15. Understanding energy consumption of sensor enabled applications on mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Crk, Igor; Albinali, Fahd; Gniady, Chris; Hartman, John

    2009-01-01

    Recent research in ubiquitous and mobile computing uses mobile phones and wearable accelerometers to monitor individuals' physical activities for personalized and proactive health care. The goal of this project is to measure and reduce the energy demand placed on mobile phones that monitor individuals' physical activities for extended periods of time with limited access to battery recharging and mobile phone reception. Many issues must be addressed before mobile phones become a viable platform for remote health monitoring, including: security, reliability, privacy, and, most importantly, energy. Mobile phones are battery-operated, making energy a critical resource that must be carefully managed to ensure the longest running time before the battery is depleted. In a sense, all other issues are secondary, since the mobile phone will simply not function without energy. In this project, we therefore focus on understanding the energy consumption of a mobile phone that runs MIT wockets, physical activity monitoring applications, and consider ways to reduce its energy consumption.

  16. Comparative studies of perceived vibration strength for commercial mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heow Pueh; Lim, Siak Piang

    2014-05-01

    A mobile phone, also known as cell phone or hand phone, is among the most popular electrical devices used by people all over the world. The present study examines the vibration perception of mobile phones by co-relating the relevant design parameters such as excitation frequency, and size and mass of mobile phones to the vibration perception survey by volunteers. Five popular commercially available mobile phone models were tested. The main findings for the perception surveys were that higher vibration frequency and amplitude of the peak acceleration would result in stronger vibration perception of the mobile phones. A larger contact surface area with the palms and figures, higher peak acceleration and the associated larger peak inertia force may be the main factors for the relatively higher vibration perception. The future design for the vibration alert of the mobile phones is likely to follow this trend.

  17. Mobile Phone Radiation: Physiological & Pathophysiologcal Considerations.

    PubMed

    K Sri, Nageswari

    2015-01-01

    It is documented that electromagnetic emissions from mobile phones can interfere with brain's signal processing activity due to their oscillatory similitude to the inherent rhythms of the brain, akin to "electromagnetic interference" observed while using mobile phones in aeroplanes. At high power density levels, thermal effects occur, some of which can be attributed to heat induced stress mechanisms. The less understood non-thermal effects occur at low radio frequency/microwave power density levels and are not accompanied by any body temperature rise. The safety standards set by international agencies are based on thermal effects. For the mobile phones, ICNIRP 1998 guidelines restrict spatial peak of microwave exposure to 2 W/Kg SAR values averaged over 10 g of tissue for 6 minutes. Some of the reported electromagnetic radiation (EMR) induced adverse effects are brain tumours, male infertility and immune dysfunction with increased susceptibility to infections. Pathophysiological mechanisms of interaction of EMR at plasma membrane are calcium efflux from cell membranes, increased expression of stress proteins, influence on channels/gap junctions in cell membrane, overproduction of reactive oxygen species, ornithine decarboxylase activation, reduction in melatonin levels, decrease in protein kinase C activity, damage to DNA and change in gene expression in brain cells and altered blood-brain barrier. There are equal number of conflicting reports in literature regarding EMR exposure and brain tumours. A comprehensive review concludes "overall the studies published to date do not demonstrate an increased risk within approximately 10 years of use for any tumour of the brain or any other head tumour." Another review summarises that there is "enough data to convince that long-term exposure to low intensity EMR below the ICNIRP guidelines can promote cancer development". However the time limit for exposure has been suggested as more than 10 years. For conducting

  18. Mobile Phone Radiation: Physiological & Pathophysiologcal Considerations.

    PubMed

    K Sri, Nageswari

    2015-01-01

    It is documented that electromagnetic emissions from mobile phones can interfere with brain's signal processing activity due to their oscillatory similitude to the inherent rhythms of the brain, akin to "electromagnetic interference" observed while using mobile phones in aeroplanes. At high power density levels, thermal effects occur, some of which can be attributed to heat induced stress mechanisms. The less understood non-thermal effects occur at low radio frequency/microwave power density levels and are not accompanied by any body temperature rise. The safety standards set by international agencies are based on thermal effects. For the mobile phones, ICNIRP 1998 guidelines restrict spatial peak of microwave exposure to 2 W/Kg SAR values averaged over 10 g of tissue for 6 minutes. Some of the reported electromagnetic radiation (EMR) induced adverse effects are brain tumours, male infertility and immune dysfunction with increased susceptibility to infections. Pathophysiological mechanisms of interaction of EMR at plasma membrane are calcium efflux from cell membranes, increased expression of stress proteins, influence on channels/gap junctions in cell membrane, overproduction of reactive oxygen species, ornithine decarboxylase activation, reduction in melatonin levels, decrease in protein kinase C activity, damage to DNA and change in gene expression in brain cells and altered blood-brain barrier. There are equal number of conflicting reports in literature regarding EMR exposure and brain tumours. A comprehensive review concludes "overall the studies published to date do not demonstrate an increased risk within approximately 10 years of use for any tumour of the brain or any other head tumour." Another review summarises that there is "enough data to convince that long-term exposure to low intensity EMR below the ICNIRP guidelines can promote cancer development". However the time limit for exposure has been suggested as more than 10 years. For conducting

  19. Multidimensional Human Dynamics in Mobile Phone Communications

    PubMed Central

    Quadri, Christian; Zignani, Matteo; Capra, Lorenzo; Gaito, Sabrina; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages). Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process. PMID:25068479

  20. Multidimensional human dynamics in mobile phone communications.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Christian; Zignani, Matteo; Capra, Lorenzo; Gaito, Sabrina; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages). Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process. PMID:25068479

  1. Multidimensional human dynamics in mobile phone communications.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Christian; Zignani, Matteo; Capra, Lorenzo; Gaito, Sabrina; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages). Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process.

  2. Communication cliques in mobile phone calling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Xia; Xie, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-11-01

    People in modern societies form different social networks through numerous means of communication. These communication networks reflect different aspects of human's societal structure. The billing records of calls among mobile phone users enable us to construct a directed calling network (DCN) and its Bonferroni network (SVDCN) in which the preferential communications are statistically validated. Here we perform a comparative investigation of the cliques of the original DCN and its SVDCN constructed from the calling records of more than nine million individuals in Shanghai over a period of 110 days. We find that the statistical properties of the cliques of the two calling networks are qualitatively similar and the clique members in the DCN and the SVDCN exhibit idiosyncratic behaviors quantitatively. Members in large cliques are found to be spatially close to each other. Based on the clique degree profile of each mobile phone user, the most active users in the two calling networks can be classified in to several groups. The users in different groups are found to have different calling behaviors. Our study unveils interesting communication behaviors among mobile phone users that are densely connected to each other.

  3. A Web Page Summarization for Mobile Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takaaki; Nishikawa, Hitoshi; Imamura, Kenji; Kikui, Gen'ichiro; Okumur, Manabu

    Recently, web pages for mobile devices are widely spread on the Internet and a lot of people can access web pages through search engines by mobile devices as well as personal computers. A summary of a retrieved web page is important because the people judge whether or not the page would be relevant to their information need according to the summary. In particular, the summary must be not only compact but also grammatical and meaningful when the users retrieve information using a mobile phone with a small screen. Most search engines seem to produce a snippet based on the keyword-in-context (KWIC) method. However, this simple method could not generate a refined summary suitable for mobile phones because of low grammaticality and content overlap with the page title. We propose a more suitable method to generate a snippet for mobile devices using sentence extraction and sentence compression methods. First, sentences are biased based on whether they include the query terms from the users or words that are relevant to the queries, as well as whether they do not overlap with the page title based on maximal marginal relevance (MMR). Second, the selected sentences are compressed based on their phrase coverage, which is measured by the scores of words, and their phrase connection probability measured based on the language model, according to the dependency structure converted from the sentence. The experimental results reveal the proposed method outperformed the KWIC method in terms of relevance judgment, grammaticality, non-redundancy and content coverage.

  4. Interactive asthma learning system utilizing a mobile phone platform.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jeffrey; Yablochnikov, Ilya; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2008-11-06

    We developed an interactive patient learning system for use on mobile phones to inform an asthma patient about this chronic condition and enforce knowledge retention by questioning the user. The system uses a mobile phone's Internet connection to retrieve information from a database and download recorded audio files corresponding to asthma information screens. The mobile application was successfully developed, implemented, and tested on the Motorola i730 mobile phone with Nextel as a service provider.

  5. Mobile Phone Based Participatory Sensing in Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, C.; Fienen, M. N.; Böhlen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Although many observations in the hydrologic sciences are easy to obtain, requiring very little training or equipment, spatial and temporally-distributed data collection is hindered by associated personnel and telemetry costs. Lack of data increases the uncertainty and can limit applications of both field and modeling studies. However, modern society is much more digitally connected than the past, which presents new opportunities to collect real-time hydrologic data through the use of participatory sensing. Participatory sensing in this usage refers to citizens contributing distributed observations of physical phenomena. Real-time data streams are possible as a direct result of the growth of mobile phone networks and high adoption rates of mobile users. In this research, we describe an example of the development, methodology, barriers to entry, data uncertainty, and results of mobile phone based participatory sensing applied to groundwater and surface water characterization. Results are presented from three participatory sensing experiments that focused on stream stage, surface water temperature, and water quality. Results demonstrate variability in the consistency and reliability across the type of data collected and the challenges of collecting research grade data. These studies also point to needed improvements and future developments for widespread use of low cost techniques for participatory sensing.

  6. Tracking employment shocks using mobile phone data

    PubMed Central

    Toole, Jameson L.; Lin, Yu-Ru; Muehlegger, Erich; Shoag, Daniel; González, Marta C.; Lazer, David

    2015-01-01

    Can data from mobile phones be used to observe economic shocks and their consequences at multiple scales? Here we present novel methods to detect mass layoffs, identify individuals affected by them and predict changes in aggregate unemployment rates using call detail records (CDRs) from mobile phones. Using the closure of a large manufacturing plant as a case study, we first describe a structural break model to correctly detect the date of a mass layoff and estimate its size. We then use a Bayesian classification model to identify affected individuals by observing changes in calling behaviour following the plant's closure. For these affected individuals, we observe significant declines in social behaviour and mobility following job loss. Using the features identified at the micro level, we show that the same changes in these calling behaviours, aggregated at the regional level, can improve forecasts of macro unemployment rates. These methods and results highlight promise of new data resources to measure microeconomic behaviour and improve estimates of critical economic indicators. PMID:26018965

  7. Tracking employment shocks using mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Toole, Jameson L; Lin, Yu-Ru; Muehlegger, Erich; Shoag, Daniel; González, Marta C; Lazer, David

    2015-06-01

    Can data from mobile phones be used to observe economic shocks and their consequences at multiple scales? Here we present novel methods to detect mass layoffs, identify individuals affected by them and predict changes in aggregate unemployment rates using call detail records (CDRs) from mobile phones. Using the closure of a large manufacturing plant as a case study, we first describe a structural break model to correctly detect the date of a mass layoff and estimate its size. We then use a Bayesian classification model to identify affected individuals by observing changes in calling behaviour following the plant's closure. For these affected individuals, we observe significant declines in social behaviour and mobility following job loss. Using the features identified at the micro level, we show that the same changes in these calling behaviours, aggregated at the regional level, can improve forecasts of macro unemployment rates. These methods and results highlight promise of new data resources to measure microeconomic behaviour and improve estimates of critical economic indicators.

  8. Tracking employment shocks using mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Toole, Jameson L; Lin, Yu-Ru; Muehlegger, Erich; Shoag, Daniel; González, Marta C; Lazer, David

    2015-06-01

    Can data from mobile phones be used to observe economic shocks and their consequences at multiple scales? Here we present novel methods to detect mass layoffs, identify individuals affected by them and predict changes in aggregate unemployment rates using call detail records (CDRs) from mobile phones. Using the closure of a large manufacturing plant as a case study, we first describe a structural break model to correctly detect the date of a mass layoff and estimate its size. We then use a Bayesian classification model to identify affected individuals by observing changes in calling behaviour following the plant's closure. For these affected individuals, we observe significant declines in social behaviour and mobility following job loss. Using the features identified at the micro level, we show that the same changes in these calling behaviours, aggregated at the regional level, can improve forecasts of macro unemployment rates. These methods and results highlight promise of new data resources to measure microeconomic behaviour and improve estimates of critical economic indicators. PMID:26018965

  9. Does chronic exposure to mobile phones affect cognition?

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Mamta; Khaliq, Farah; Panwar, Aprajita; Vaney, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mobile phones form an integral part of our modern lifestyle. Following the drastic rise in mobile phone use in recent years, it has become important to study its potential public health impact. Amongst the various mobile phone health hazards, the most alarming is the possible effect on the brain. The aim of the present study was to explore whether chronic exposure to mobile phones affects cognition. Ninety subjects aged 17–25 years with normal hearing were recruited for the study and divided into three groups according to their duration of mobile phone use. No significant differences in N100, P200, N200, P300 latencies or N2-P300 amplitude were observed. Our results suggest that chronic mobile phone exposure does not have detrimental effects on cognition. PMID:27027894

  10. Mobile Phones in Education: Challenges and Opportunities for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Schnellert, Gary; Jonas, Denise

    2014-01-01

    The millennials use mobile phones on a daily basis to keep in touch with family and friends (Lenhart 2010). However, the role of mobile phones in education needs to be close examined as educators strive to incorporate mobile leaning devices in the classroom. Consequently, schools will not only need to evaluate their school curriculums but also…

  11. Melanoma detection using a mobile phone app

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Luciano E.; Ennser, K.

    2016-03-01

    Mobile phones have had their processing power greatly increased since their invention a few decades ago. As a direct result of Moore's Law, this improvement has made available several applications that were impossible before. The aim of this project is to develop a mobile phone app, integrated with its camera coupled to an amplifying lens, to help distinguish melanoma. The proposed device has the capability of processing skin mole images and suggesting, using a score system, if it is a case of melanoma or not. This score system is based on the ABCDE signs of melanoma, and takes into account the area, the perimeter and the colors present in the nevus. It was calibrated and tested using images from the PH2 Dermoscopic Image Database from Pedro Hispano Hospital. The results show that the system created can be useful, with an accuracy of up to 100% for malign cases and 80% for benign cases (including common and atypical moles), when used in the test group.

  12. Mobile Phone Use, Emotion Regulation, and Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Hoffner, Cynthia A; Lee, Sangmi

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the use of mobile phones to regulate negative emotions, considering both the role of different aspects of phone use and individual differences in emotion regulation strategies. A total of 287 young adult smartphone users completed an online survey that addressed use of mobile phones for negative emotion regulation. They responded to a phone loss scenario by rating how much they would miss various uses/functions of the phone (which could be involved in emotion regulation). Habitual use of reappraisal to regulate emotion was associated with missing both interpersonal contact and social support, but not access to entertainment/information. In contrast, habitual use of emotion suppression was associated only with missing entertainment/information content. Regulating negative emotions via mobile phone was associated with missing all three uses/functions of the phone, but perception that the phone was effective in remediating negative emotion was associated only with missing social support. Well-being was related to greater use and perceived effectiveness of the mobile phone for emotion regulation. Overall, this study demonstrates that mobile phones can yield psychological benefits, depending on how they are used. Findings suggest that using the phone for social support is most likely to lead to effective remediation of negative emotion. Interpretations and implications of the findings are discussed.

  13. Mobile Phone Use, Emotion Regulation, and Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Hoffner, Cynthia A; Lee, Sangmi

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the use of mobile phones to regulate negative emotions, considering both the role of different aspects of phone use and individual differences in emotion regulation strategies. A total of 287 young adult smartphone users completed an online survey that addressed use of mobile phones for negative emotion regulation. They responded to a phone loss scenario by rating how much they would miss various uses/functions of the phone (which could be involved in emotion regulation). Habitual use of reappraisal to regulate emotion was associated with missing both interpersonal contact and social support, but not access to entertainment/information. In contrast, habitual use of emotion suppression was associated only with missing entertainment/information content. Regulating negative emotions via mobile phone was associated with missing all three uses/functions of the phone, but perception that the phone was effective in remediating negative emotion was associated only with missing social support. Well-being was related to greater use and perceived effectiveness of the mobile phone for emotion regulation. Overall, this study demonstrates that mobile phones can yield psychological benefits, depending on how they are used. Findings suggest that using the phone for social support is most likely to lead to effective remediation of negative emotion. Interpretations and implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:26167841

  14. Chinese Text Spacing on Mobile Phones for Senior Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Sato, Hitomi; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Fujimura, Kaori; Gao, Qin; Asano, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more and more elderly citizens have begun using mobile phones. However, most text presentations on mobile phones are not suitable for those whose vision has declined with age. The objective of this study was to discover how different Chinese text spacing would affect older adults' reading performance (time and error), text…

  15. Mobile Phone Images and Video in Science Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanayake, Sakunthala Yatigammana; Wishart, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article reports a study into how mobile phones could be used to enhance teaching and learning in secondary school science. It describes four lessons devised by groups of Sri Lankan teachers all of which centred on the use of the mobile phone cameras rather than their communication functions. A qualitative methodological approach was used to…

  16. Adolescent Use of Mobile Phones: A Social Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    F, J.; Pullen, Darren; Swabey, Karen

    2014-01-01

    During adolescence (e.g. ages 13-15) communication and connectedness with peers is an essential part of adolescents' self-formation; mobiles phones are a conduit that maintains both communication and connectedness among adolescents whereby social interactions and connectedness are not limited by place, context or time. To study mobile phone usage…

  17. Sexual Assemblages: Mobile Phones/Young People/School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    This paper asks, what more can we think in relation to debates around young people's use of mobile phones at school? Rather than attempting to answer the question of whether mobile phones are "good" or "bad" for young people, this paper recasts the debate's ontological underpinnings. To do this feminist appropriations…

  18. Internet and Mobile Phone Text Messaging Intervention for College Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, William; Obermayer, Jami; Jean-Mary, Jersino

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors developed a smoking cessation program using mobile phone text messaging to provide tailored and stage-specific messages to college smokers. Participants and Methods: The authors recruited 31 daily smokers who desired to quit from a college campus and asked them to use an Internet and mobile phone text messaging program to…

  19. Using Mobile Phones to Prepare for University Lectures: Student's Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rismark, Marit; Solvberg, Astrid M.; Stromme, Alex; Hokstad, Leif Martin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present findings from a study of students' use of mobile phones in a biology course at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). Using a qualitative research approach we focus on how mobile phones can complement and add value to the educational challenge of encouraging university students to obtain some topic…

  20. Infrared thermography based studies on mobile phone induced heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Soumya, C.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2015-07-01

    Here, we report the skin temperature rise due to the absorption of radio frequency (RF) energy from three handheld mobile phones using infrared thermography technique. Experiments are performed under two different conditions, viz. when the mobile phones are placed in soft touch with the skin surface and away from the skin surface. Additionally, the temperature rise of mobile phones during charging, operation and simultaneous charging and talking are monitored under different exposure conditions. It is observed that the temperature of the cheek and ear regions monotonically increased with time during the usage of mobile phones and the magnitude of the temperature rise is higher for the mobile phone with higher specific absorption rate. The increase in skin temperature is higher when the mobile phones are in contact with the skin surface due to the combined effect of absorption of RF electromagnetic power and conductive heat transfer. The increase in the skin temperature in non-contact mode is found to be within the safety limit of 1 °C. The measured temperature rise is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The empirical equation obtained from the temperature rise on the cheek region of the subjects correlates well with the specific absorption rate of the mobile phones. Our study suggests that the use of mobile phones in non-contact mode can significantly lower the skin temperature rise during its use and hence, is safer compared to the contact mode.

  1. Testing the effectiveness of small radiation shields for mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J Patrick; Chou, C K; Balzano, Quirino

    2003-01-01

    Nine small radiation shields made to adhere to the case of mobile phones were tested at 914 and 1880 MHz. Five popular products were tested because advertisements typically claim they are up to 99% effective in blocking radio frequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phones. Also, four other conceptually unusual products were tested because advertisements typically claim they emit oscillations that counteract the RF radiation from mobile phones. Each shield was tested on the same mobile phone, and measurements were made to compare the absorption of RF energy in the head with and without each shield attached to the phone. The phone was positioned against a head model, and an automated measurement process was used to determine specific absorption rate (SAR) in the same way it is used at Motorola to test the compliance of mobile phones with respect to human exposure limits. The location of the peak SAR was not observed to change with any of the shields attached to the phone, and the 1 g, peak spatial average SAR did not change by any statistically significant amount. These results indicate the small shields are ineffective in reducing the exposure of the head to RF energy emitted by a mobile phone. PMID:12483667

  2. Is problematic mobile phone use explained by chronotype and personality?

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Eda; Randler, Christoph; Horzum, Mehmet Barış

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the relationships among problematic mobile phone use, age, gender, personality and chronotype of Turkish university students were examined. The study included 902 university students (73% female, 27% male) and their participation in the study was anonymous and voluntary. Data were collected from each participant by assessing a demographic questionnaire, Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM) as a measure of chronotype, the Big Five Inventory (BIG-5) for personality assessment and Mobile Phone Problem Usage Scale (MPPUS). The most important result was that CSM scores were the best predictor for problematic mobile phone usage, and as a consequence, evening-oriented university students scored higher on the MPPUS. This result remained, even when compared with the most influential personality predictor, conscientiousness. In addition, while extraversion positively predicted, emotional stable and chronotype negatively predicted problematic mobile phone use. Lastly, age and gender were not predictors of problematic mobile phone use. PMID:27128819

  3. Pedestrian injuries due to mobile phone use in public places.

    PubMed

    Nasar, Jack L; Troyer, Derek

    2013-08-01

    Research shows that pedestrians, similar to drivers, experience reduced situation awareness, distracted attention and unsafe behavior when talking or texting on their mobile phones. The present study centered on injuries related to mobile phone use among pedestrians. It used data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission on injuries in hospital emergency rooms from 2004 through 2010. It found that mobile-phone related injuries among pedestrians increased relative to total pedestrian injuries, and paralleled the increase in injuries for drivers, and in 2010 exceeded those for drivers. Pedestrian injuries related to mobile-phone use were higher for males and for people under 31 years old. Using a mobile phone while walking puts pedestrians at risk of accident, injury or death.

  4. Mobile phone collection, reuse and recycling in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ongondo, F.O.; Williams, I.D.

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > We characterized the key features of the voluntary UK mobile phone takeback network via a survey. > We identified 3 flows: information; product (handsets and accessories); and incentives. > There has been a significant rise in the number of UK takeback schemes since 1997. > Most returned handsets are low quality; little data exists on quantities of mobile phones collected. > Takeback schemes increasingly divert EoL mobile phones from landfill and enable reuse/recycling. - Abstract: Mobile phones are the most ubiquitous electronic product on the globe. They have relatively short lifecycles and because of their (perceived) in-built obsolescence, discarded mobile phones represent a significant and growing problem with respect to waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). An emerging and increasingly important issue for industry is the shortage of key metals, especially the types of metals found in mobile phones, and hence the primary aim of this timely study was to assess and evaluate the voluntary mobile phone takeback network in the UK. The study has characterised the information, product and incentives flows in the voluntary UK mobile phone takeback network and reviewed the merits and demerits of the incentives offered. A survey of the activities of the voluntary mobile phone takeback schemes was undertaken in 2008 to: identify and evaluate the takeback schemes operating in the UK; determine the target groups from whom handsets are collected; and assess the collection, promotion and advertising methods used by the schemes. In addition, the survey sought to identify and critically evaluate the incentives offered by the takeback schemes, evaluate their ease and convenience of use; and determine the types, qualities and quantities of mobile phones they collect. The study has established that the UK voluntary mobile phone takeback network can be characterised as three distinctive flows: information flow; product flow (handsets and related

  5. Indoor visual positioning system using LED and mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yingkui; Shi, Zhengfa; Wang, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    An indoor visual positioning system is proposed, which using four or more LED ceiling lamps and a mobile phone. A 4*4 photodiode array is attached to the mobile phone to receive the three-dimensional coordinates of the LED lamps via visible light communication, and the front camera of the mobile phone is used to receive the high resolution image of the LED lamps. The mobile phone's three-dimensional coordinates can be determined by matching the spot information and three-dimensional coordinates of the LED lamps with the image information provided by the mobile phone. An improved collinear equation model is proposed to build the mapping relationship between the three-dimensional coordinates of the LED lamps and the image information acquired by the front camera. A semi-physical simulation has been conducted and analyzed. The positioning scheme is proved to be valid and the positioning accuracy is up to decimeter level.

  6. Is problematic mobile phone use explained by chronotype and personality?

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Eda; Randler, Christoph; Horzum, Mehmet Barış

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the relationships among problematic mobile phone use, age, gender, personality and chronotype of Turkish university students were examined. The study included 902 university students (73% female, 27% male) and their participation in the study was anonymous and voluntary. Data were collected from each participant by assessing a demographic questionnaire, Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM) as a measure of chronotype, the Big Five Inventory (BIG-5) for personality assessment and Mobile Phone Problem Usage Scale (MPPUS). The most important result was that CSM scores were the best predictor for problematic mobile phone usage, and as a consequence, evening-oriented university students scored higher on the MPPUS. This result remained, even when compared with the most influential personality predictor, conscientiousness. In addition, while extraversion positively predicted, emotional stable and chronotype negatively predicted problematic mobile phone use. Lastly, age and gender were not predictors of problematic mobile phone use.

  7. Problematic Mobile Phone Use and Big-Five Personality Domains

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Motoharu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although a mobile phone is useful and attractive as a tool for communication and interpersonal interaction, there exists the risk of its problematic or addictive use. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the correlation between the big-five personality domains and problematic mobile phone use. Materials and Methods: The Mobile Phone Problem Usage Scale and the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) were employed in this study. Survey data were gathered from 504 university students for multiple regression analysis. Results: Problematic mobile phone use is a function of gender, extraversion, neuroticism, openness-to-experience; however, it is not a function of agreeableness or conscientiousness. Conclusions: The measurement of these predictors would enable the screening of and intervening in the potentially problematic behaviors of mobile phone users. PMID:24963228

  8. 77 FR 18860 - Certain Consumer Electronics, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... COMMISSION Certain Consumer Electronics, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain Consumer Electronics, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets, DN 2885; the... importation of certain consumer electronics, including mobile phones and tablets. The complaint names...

  9. 78 FR 38361 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... States after importation of certain portable electronic ] communications devices, including mobile phones... importation of certain portable electronic communications devices, including mobile phones and...

  10. 77 FR 27078 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones... electronic devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof. The complaint...

  11. 77 FR 34063 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... certain electronics devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof...

  12. Prevalence of Mobile Phone Dependence in Secondary School Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Nikhita, Chimatapu Sri; Jadhav, Pradeep R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mobile phones have become an essential part of modern human life. They have many attributes which makes them very attractive to both young and old. There has been an increasing trend of use of mobile phones among students. Data has now started emerging with respect to the negative physical and psychological consequences of excessive use of mobile phones. New research has shown excessive use of mobile phones leading to development of symptoms suggestive of dependence syndrome. Aim To study the prevalence of Mobile Phone Dependence (MPD) in secondary school adolescents. Setting and Design Cross-sectional, observational study conducted in secondary section of English-medium schools at Navi Mumbai (India). Materials and Methods Four hundred and fifteen students studying in 8th, 9th and 10th standards of schools at Navi Mumbai (India) having personal mobile phone were randomly included in the study. Participant information like age, gender, family type, phone type, duration of use per day and years of mobile phone usage was recorded. They were administered an MPD questionnaire based upon the dependence syndrome criteria as per ICD-10. According to their responses, participants who fulfilled three or more of the diagnostic criteria were rated as having MPD. Results Mobile Phone Dependence was found in 31.33% of sample students. It was significantly associated with gender (p=0.003, OR=1.91, CI: 1.23-2.99), family type (p=0.0012), type of mobile phone used (p<0.001, OR=2.6, CI: 1.63-4.35), average time per day spent using mobile phone (p<0.001) and years of mobile phone usage (p =0.004, OR=2.4, CI: 1.31-4.55). Conclusion Mobile Phone Dependence has been found to be an emerging public health problem. There is need to recognize and identify early the growing trends and negative consequences of inappropriate mobile phone use in young users so as to generate awareness, and plan educational and treatment interventions, if need be, so as to prevent a major public

  13. Health hazards of mobile phones: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Kapdi, Mukta; Hoskote, Sumedh S; Joshi, Shashank R

    2008-11-01

    The mobile phone industry has been one of the fastest growing industries in modern history. Today, India has million mobile phone users, and mobile phones account for 88% of all telecommunication users. The rural sector accounts for more than 25% of all wireless phone users and this proportion is bound to grow as affordability of mobile phones continues to increase. In the years ahead, an ever-increasing number exposed for long periods of time to radiation from mobile phones. In 2008, the Telecom Commission (the policy-making body of the Department of Telecommunicatics, Government of India) adopted the emission guidelines prescribed by the International Commission on Non-Protection (ICNIRP). Studies have demonstrated that usage behaviours, such as duration of usage and predominant, one-sided use of mobile phones are some of the chief risks that increase likelihood of hazards resulting from mobile phone use. This article attempts to present the basic biophysics of these devices and explain the health hazards of electromagnetic radiation exposure in terms of thermal and non-thermal effects. We also present some preventive measures that can reduce the risk of these hazards. PMID:19263689

  14. Study Regarding Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure Generated By Mobile Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marica, Lucia; Moraru, Luminita

    2011-12-01

    Number of mobile phone users reached to 5 billion subscribers in 2010 [ABI Research, 2010]. A large number of studies illustrated the public concern about adverse effects of mobile phone radiation and possible health hazards. Position of mobile phone use in close proximity to the head leads the main radiation between the hand and the head. Many investigations studying the possible effects of mobile phone exposure, founded no measurable effects of short-term mobile phone radiation, and there was no evidence for the ability to perceive mobile phone EMF in the general population. In this study, field radiation measurements were performed on different brand and different models of mobile phones in active mode, using an EMF RF Radiation Field Strength Power Meter 1 MHz-8 GHz. The study was effectuated on both the 2G and 3G generations phones connected to the providers operating in the frequency range 450 MHz-1800 MHz. There were recorded values in outgoing call and SMS mode, incoming call and SMS mode. Results were compared with ICNIRP guidelines for exposure to general public.

  15. Study Regarding Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure Generated By Mobile Phone

    SciTech Connect

    Marica, Lucia; Moraru, Luminita

    2011-12-26

    Number of mobile phone users reached to 5 billion subscribers in 2010 [ABI Research, 2010]. A large number of studies illustrated the public concern about adverse effects of mobile phone radiation and possible health hazards. Position of mobile phone use in close proximity to the head leads the main radiation between the hand and the head. Many investigations studying the possible effects of mobile phone exposure, founded no measurable effects of short-term mobile phone radiation, and there was no evidence for the ability to perceive mobile phone EMF in the general population. In this study, field radiation measurements were performed on different brand and different models of mobile phones in active mode, using an EMF RF Radiation Field Strength Power Meter 1 MHz-8 GHz. The study was effectuated on both the 2G and 3G generations phones connected to the providers operating in the frequency range 450 MHz-1800 MHz. There were recorded values in outgoing call and SMS mode, incoming call and SMS mode. Results were compared with ICNIRP guidelines for exposure to general public.

  16. Auditory Brainstem Responses and EMFs Generated by Mobile Phones.

    PubMed

    Khullar, Shilpa; Sood, Archana; Sood, Sanjay

    2013-12-01

    There has been a manifold increase in the number of mobile phone users throughout the world with the current number of users exceeding 2 billion. However this advancement in technology like many others is accompanied by a progressive increase in the frequency and intensity of electromagnetic waves without consideration of the health consequences. The aim of our study was to advance our understanding of the potential adverse effects of GSM mobile phones on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). 60 subjects were selected for the study and divided into three groups of 20 each based on their usage of mobile phones. Their ABRs were recorded and analysed for latency of waves I-V as well as interpeak latencies I-III, I-V and III-V (in ms). Results revealed no significant difference in the ABR parameters between group A (control group) and group B (subjects using mobile phones for maximum 30 min/day for 5 years). However the latency of waves was significantly prolonged in group C (subjects using mobile phones for 10 years for a maximum of 30 min/day) as compared to the control group. Based on our findings we concluded that long term exposure to mobile phones may affect conduction in the peripheral portion of the auditory pathway. However more research needs to be done to study the long term effects of mobile phones particularly of newer technologies like smart phones and 3G.

  17. Heterogeneous mobile phone ownership and usage patterns in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Amy; Eagle, Nathan; Noor, Abdisalan M; Snow, Robert W; Buckee, Caroline O

    2012-01-01

    The rapid adoption of mobile phone technologies in Africa is offering exciting opportunities for engaging with high-risk populations through mHealth programs, and the vast volumes of behavioral data being generated as people use their phones provide valuable data about human behavioral dynamics in these regions. Taking advantage of these opportunities requires an understanding of the penetration of mobile phones and phone usage patterns across the continent, but very little is known about the social and geographical heterogeneities in mobile phone ownership among African populations. Here, we analyze a survey of mobile phone ownership and usage across Kenya in 2009 and show that distinct regional, gender-related, and socioeconomic variations exist, with particularly low ownership among rural communities and poor people. We also examine patterns of phone sharing and highlight the contrasting relationships between ownership and sharing in different parts of the country. This heterogeneous penetration of mobile phones has important implications for the use of mobile technologies as a source of population data and as a public health tool in sub-Saharan Africa.

  18. Modeling the propagation of mobile phone virus under complex network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei; Yao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively.

  19. Incorporating Mobile Phone Technologies to Expand Evidence-Based Care

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah J.; Anton, Margaret; Gonzalez, Michelle; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Forehand, Rex; Parent, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Ownership of mobile phones is on the rise, a trend in uptake that transcends age, region, race, and ethnicity, as well as income. It is precisely the emerging ubiquity of mobile phones that has sparked enthusiasm regarding their capacity to increase the reach and impact of health care, including mental health care. Community-based clinicians charged with transporting evidence-based interventions beyond research and training clinics are in turn, ideally and uniquely situated to capitalize on mobile phone uptake and functionality to bridge the efficacy to effectiveness gap. As such, this article delineates key considerations to guide these frontline clinicians in mobile phone-enhanced clinical practice, including an overview of industry data on the uptake of and evolution in the functionality of mobile phone platforms, conceptual considerations relevant to the integration of mobile phones into practice, representative empirical illustrations of mobile-phone enhanced assessment and treatment, and practical considerations relevant to ensuring the feasibility and sustainability of such an approach. PMID:26213458

  20. Modeling the Propagation of Mobile Phone Virus under Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively. PMID:25133209

  1. Mobile phones: Reservoirs for the transmission of nosocomial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Shekhar; Juyal, Deepak; Adekhandi, Shamanth; Sharma, Munesh; Prakash, Rajat; Sharma, Neelam; Rana, Amit; Parihar, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Global burden of hospital-associated infection (HAI) is on the rise and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of the patients. Mobile phones are indispensible part of communication among doctors and other health care workers (HCWs) in hospitals. Hands of HCWs play an important role in transmission of HAI and mobile phones which are seldom cleaned and often touched during or after the examination of patients without hand washing can act as a reservoir for transmission of potent pathogens. This study aimed to investigate the rate of bacterial contamination of mobile phones among HCWs in our tertiary care hospital and to compare it with personal mobile phones of non-HCWs (control group). Materials and Methods: The mobile phones and dominant hands of 386 participants were sampled from four different groups, hospital doctors and staff (132), college faculty and staff (54), medical students (100) and control group (100). Informed consent and questionnaire was duly signed by all the participants. Samples were processed according to standard guidelines. Results: 316 mobile phones (81.8%) and 309 hand swab samples (80%) showed growth of bacterial pathogens. The most predominant isolates were Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter species, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas species and Enterococcus species. Conclusion: Hundred percent contamination was found in mobile phones and hands of HCWs indicating mobile phones can be the potential source of nosocomial pathogens. Our study results suggest that use of mobile phones in health care setup should be restricted only for emergency calls. Strict adherence to infection control policies such as proper hand hygiene practices should be followed. PMID:26322292

  2. Adolescent Mobile Phone Use and Mobile Phone-Based Health Promotion.

    PubMed

    Harpin, Scott; Ezeanochie, Nnamdi; Bull, Sheana

    2014-12-01

    The past 20 years of mobile technology has shifted the ways in which young people communicate and network with one another. Mobile phone use is prevalent among adolescents and therefore is an ideal form of communication for tailored health care. This is especially so given the dramatic uptake in use of mobile technologies in this age group. Technology developments have also altered how physicians and public health interventionists communicate with adolescents for prevention messages. Rapidly changing technology has made the study of how best to communicate with youth a challenge because research can scarcely keep up with advances in the technology. However, best practices from behavior change and communication theories remain a foundation for future intervention directions and how we might best meet the health promotion needs of adolescents. PMID:27120890

  3. Mobile phone collection, reuse and recycling in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ongondo, F O; Williams, I D

    2011-06-01

    Mobile phones are the most ubiquitous electronic product on the globe. They have relatively short lifecycles and because of their (perceived) in-built obsolescence, discarded mobile phones represent a significant and growing problem with respect to waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). An emerging and increasingly important issue for industry is the shortage of key metals, especially the types of metals found in mobile phones, and hence the primary aim of this timely study was to assess and evaluate the voluntary mobile phone takeback network in the UK. The study has characterised the information, product and incentives flows in the voluntary UK mobile phone takeback network and reviewed the merits and demerits of the incentives offered. A survey of the activities of the voluntary mobile phone takeback schemes was undertaken in 2008 to: identify and evaluate the takeback schemes operating in the UK; determine the target groups from whom handsets are collected; and assess the collection, promotion and advertising methods used by the schemes. In addition, the survey sought to identify and critically evaluate the incentives offered by the takeback schemes, evaluate their ease and convenience of use; and determine the types, qualities and quantities of mobile phones they collect. The study has established that the UK voluntary mobile phone takeback network can be characterised as three distinctive flows: information flow; product flow (handsets and related accessories); and incentives flow. Over 100 voluntary schemes offering online takeback of mobile phone handsets were identified. The schemes are operated by manufacturers, retailers, mobile phone network service operators, charities and by mobile phone reuse, recycling and refurbishing companies. The latter two scheme categories offer the highest level of convenience and ease of use to their customers. Approximately 83% of the schemes are either for-profit/commercial-oriented and/or operate to raise funds

  4. Mobile phone collection, reuse and recycling in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ongondo, F O; Williams, I D

    2011-06-01

    Mobile phones are the most ubiquitous electronic product on the globe. They have relatively short lifecycles and because of their (perceived) in-built obsolescence, discarded mobile phones represent a significant and growing problem with respect to waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). An emerging and increasingly important issue for industry is the shortage of key metals, especially the types of metals found in mobile phones, and hence the primary aim of this timely study was to assess and evaluate the voluntary mobile phone takeback network in the UK. The study has characterised the information, product and incentives flows in the voluntary UK mobile phone takeback network and reviewed the merits and demerits of the incentives offered. A survey of the activities of the voluntary mobile phone takeback schemes was undertaken in 2008 to: identify and evaluate the takeback schemes operating in the UK; determine the target groups from whom handsets are collected; and assess the collection, promotion and advertising methods used by the schemes. In addition, the survey sought to identify and critically evaluate the incentives offered by the takeback schemes, evaluate their ease and convenience of use; and determine the types, qualities and quantities of mobile phones they collect. The study has established that the UK voluntary mobile phone takeback network can be characterised as three distinctive flows: information flow; product flow (handsets and related accessories); and incentives flow. Over 100 voluntary schemes offering online takeback of mobile phone handsets were identified. The schemes are operated by manufacturers, retailers, mobile phone network service operators, charities and by mobile phone reuse, recycling and refurbishing companies. The latter two scheme categories offer the highest level of convenience and ease of use to their customers. Approximately 83% of the schemes are either for-profit/commercial-oriented and/or operate to raise funds

  5. Mobile phone use while driving: a hybrid modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Luis; Cantillo, Víctor; Arellana, Julián

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of the effects that mobile phone use produces while driving is a topic of great interest for the scientific community. There is consensus that using a mobile phone while driving increases the risk of exposure to traffic accidents. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the drivers' behavior when they decide whether or not to use a mobile phone while driving. For that, a hybrid modeling approach that integrates a choice model with the latent variable "risk perception" was used. It was found that workers and individuals with the highest education level are more prone to use a mobile phone while driving than others. Also, "risk perception" is higher among individuals who have been previously fined and people who have been in an accident or almost been in an accident. It was also found that the tendency to use mobile phones while driving increases when the traffic speed reduces, but it decreases when the fine increases. Even though the urgency of the phone call is the most important explanatory variable in the choice model, the cost of the fine is an important attribute in order to control mobile phone use while driving.

  6. Mobile phones: time to rethink and limit usage.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bobby; Saha, Indranil; Kumar, Sanjay; Samim Ferdows, S K; Ghose, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency waves generated from mobile phones cause potential public health problems. Short-term effects like changes in sleep, heart rate, and blood pressure, and long-term effects like carcinoma are well documented. The Government of India's efforts in laying down regulations regarding the safety limits, manufacture, marketing, and mobile use are still in nascent stage. The need for stringent enforcement of laws for prevention of phone usage while driving and guidelines of medical regulatory bodies regarding rules and regulations of phone usage while at class or attending patients is of utmost importance. This should be supplemented by mass media to raise awareness among people regarding the possible health effects of radiofrequency emissions from mobile phones and the guidelines to minimize its exposure. It is the need of the hour to teach young people to be structured, to know when to have the cell phone on, and to avoid becoming the slave of technology instead of its mastery.

  7. Mobile phones: time to rethink and limit usage.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bobby; Saha, Indranil; Kumar, Sanjay; Samim Ferdows, S K; Ghose, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency waves generated from mobile phones cause potential public health problems. Short-term effects like changes in sleep, heart rate, and blood pressure, and long-term effects like carcinoma are well documented. The Government of India's efforts in laying down regulations regarding the safety limits, manufacture, marketing, and mobile use are still in nascent stage. The need for stringent enforcement of laws for prevention of phone usage while driving and guidelines of medical regulatory bodies regarding rules and regulations of phone usage while at class or attending patients is of utmost importance. This should be supplemented by mass media to raise awareness among people regarding the possible health effects of radiofrequency emissions from mobile phones and the guidelines to minimize its exposure. It is the need of the hour to teach young people to be structured, to know when to have the cell phone on, and to avoid becoming the slave of technology instead of its mastery. PMID:25758729

  8. The Westinghouse Series 1000 Mobile Phone: Technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Mobile satellite communications will be popularized by the North American Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the overall system is dependent upon the quality of the mobile units. Westinghouse is designing our unit, the Series 1000 Mobile Phone, with the user in mind. The architecture and technology aim at providing optimum performance at a low per unit cost. The features and functions of the Series 1000 Mobile Phone have been defined by potential MSAT users. The latter portion of this paper deals with who those users may be.

  9. Dynamic population mapping using mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Deville, Pierre; Linard, Catherine; Martin, Samuel; Gilbert, Marius; Stevens, Forrest R; Gaughan, Andrea E; Blondel, Vincent D; Tatem, Andrew J

    2014-11-11

    During the past few decades, technologies such as remote sensing, geographical information systems, and global positioning systems have transformed the way the distribution of human population is studied and modeled in space and time. However, the mapping of populations remains constrained by the logistics of censuses and surveys. Consequently, spatially detailed changes across scales of days, weeks, or months, or even year to year, are difficult to assess and limit the application of human population maps in situations in which timely information is required, such as disasters, conflicts, or epidemics. Mobile phones (MPs) now have an extremely high penetration rate across the globe, and analyzing the spatiotemporal distribution of MP calls geolocated to the tower level may overcome many limitations of census-based approaches, provided that the use of MP data is properly assessed and calibrated. Using datasets of more than 1 billion MP call records from Portugal and France, we show how spatially and temporarily explicit estimations of population densities can be produced at national scales, and how these estimates compare with outputs produced using alternative human population mapping methods. We also demonstrate how maps of human population changes can be produced over multiple timescales while preserving the anonymity of MP users. With similar data being collected every day by MP network providers across the world, the prospect of being able to map contemporary and changing human population distributions over relatively short intervals exists, paving the way for new applications and a near real-time understanding of patterns and processes in human geography.

  10. An update on mobile phones interference with medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Aghajani, Mahdi; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2013-10-01

    Mobile phones' electromagnetic interference with medical devices is an important issue for the medical safety of patients who are using life-supporting medical devices. This review mainly focuses on mobile phones' interference with implanted medical devices and with medical equipment located in critical areas of hospitals. A close look at the findings reveals that mobile phones may adversely affect the functioning of medical devices, and the specific effect and the degree of interference depend on the applied technology and the separation distance. According to the studies' findings and the authors' recommendations, besides mitigating interference, using mobile phones at a reasonable distance from medical devices and developing technology standards can lead to their effective use in hospital communication systems.

  11. Students using mobile phones in the classroom: Can the phones increase content learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, David Lee

    A study was conducted at a high-performing school in Southern California to explore the effects on learning content from students using their own smart phones in and out of the classroom. The study used a Switching Replications design format which allowed two independent analyses of posttest scores between a group using e-flash cards on smart phones and a group using paper flash cards. Quantitative data was collected via two tailed, t-tests and qualitative data was collected through observations and interviews. Results suggest that knowledge level learning may be increased with mobile phone use, but no effect on comprehension level learning was found. Students found the phones to be convenient in accessing flash cards anytime and anywhere. Enthusiasm for using the phones in class while initially high waned over the 1 month study duration. Students perceived the phones to not be a significant source of distraction outside of class.

  12. Microscopic Theory for Negative Differential Mobility in Crowded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénichou, O.; Illien, P.; Oshanin, G.; Sarracino, A.; Voituriez, R.

    2014-12-01

    We study the behavior of the stationary velocity of a driven particle in an environment of mobile hard-core obstacles. Based on a lattice gas model, we demonstrate analytically that the drift velocity can exhibit a nonmonotonic dependence on the applied force, and show quantitatively that such negative differential mobility (NDM), observed in various physical contexts, is controlled by both the density and diffusion time scale of the obstacles. Our study unifies recent numerical and analytical results obtained in specific regimes, and makes it possible to determine analytically the region of the full parameter space where NDM occurs. These results suggest that NDM could be a generic feature of biased (or active) transport in crowded environments.

  13. Mobile Crowd Sensing for Traffic Prediction in Internet of Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiafu; Liu, Jianqi; Shao, Zehui; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.; Imran, Muhammad; Zhou, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    The advances in wireless communication techniques, mobile cloud computing, automotive and intelligent terminal technology are driving the evolution of vehicle ad hoc networks into the Internet of Vehicles (IoV) paradigm. This leads to a change in the vehicle routing problem from a calculation based on static data towards real-time traffic prediction. In this paper, we first address the taxonomy of cloud-assisted IoV from the viewpoint of the service relationship between cloud computing and IoV. Then, we review the traditional traffic prediction approached used by both Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) and Vehicle to Vehicle (V2V) communications. On this basis, we propose a mobile crowd sensing technology to support the creation of dynamic route choices for drivers wishing to avoid congestion. Experiments were carried out to verify the proposed approaches. Finally, we discuss the outlook of reliable traffic prediction. PMID:26761013

  14. Mobile Crowd Sensing for Traffic Prediction in Internet of Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiafu; Liu, Jianqi; Shao, Zehui; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Imran, Muhammad; Zhou, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    The advances in wireless communication techniques, mobile cloud computing, automotive and intelligent terminal technology are driving the evolution of vehicle ad hoc networks into the Internet of Vehicles (IoV) paradigm. This leads to a change in the vehicle routing problem from a calculation based on static data towards real-time traffic prediction. In this paper, we first address the taxonomy of cloud-assisted IoV from the viewpoint of the service relationship between cloud computing and IoV. Then, we review the traditional traffic prediction approached used by both Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) and Vehicle to Vehicle (V2V) communications. On this basis, we propose a mobile crowd sensing technology to support the creation of dynamic route choices for drivers wishing to avoid congestion. Experiments were carried out to verify the proposed approaches. Finally, we discuss the outlook of reliable traffic prediction. PMID:26761013

  15. Mobile Crowd Sensing for Traffic Prediction in Internet of Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiafu; Liu, Jianqi; Shao, Zehui; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Imran, Muhammad; Zhou, Keliang

    2016-01-11

    The advances in wireless communication techniques, mobile cloud computing, automotive and intelligent terminal technology are driving the evolution of vehicle ad hoc networks into the Internet of Vehicles (IoV) paradigm. This leads to a change in the vehicle routing problem from a calculation based on static data towards real-time traffic prediction. In this paper, we first address the taxonomy of cloud-assisted IoV from the viewpoint of the service relationship between cloud computing and IoV. Then, we review the traditional traffic prediction approached used by both Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) and Vehicle to Vehicle (V2V) communications. On this basis, we propose a mobile crowd sensing technology to support the creation of dynamic route choices for drivers wishing to avoid congestion. Experiments were carried out to verify the proposed approaches. Finally, we discuss the outlook of reliable traffic prediction.

  16. ANALYSIS: mobile phones integrated into diabetes management: a logical progression.

    PubMed

    Malasanos, Toree

    2008-01-01

    In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, the intervention described by D. Katz, "Novel Interactive Cell-Phone Technology for Health Enhancement," uses cell phones to provide the rapid communication necessary for the support of intensive management of diabetes. Mobile technology is widely accepted in today's society and can be an effective tool for this cause. There have been numerous interventions using various communication tools, including cell phones, to manage chronic disease, which all propose that improved communication and feedback to patients would improve health status. Dr. Katz has taken the next step by giving semiautomated, real-time, immediate feedback on each data point all transmitted by cell phone.

  17. Research the mobile phone operation interfaces for vision-impairment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yen-Ting; Leung, Cherng-Yee

    2012-01-01

    Due to the vision-impaired users commonly having difficulty with mobile-phone function operations and adaption any manufacturer's user interface design, the goals for this research are established for evaluating how to improve for them the function operation convenience and user interfaces of either mobile phones or electronic appliances in the market currently. After applying collecting back 30 effective questionnaires from 30 vision-impairment, the comments have been concluded from this research include: (1) All mobile phone manufactures commonly ignorant of the vision-impairment difficulty with operating mobile phone user interfaces; (2) The vision-impairment preferential with audio alert signals; (3) The vision-impairment incapable of mobile-phone procurement independently unless with assistance from others; (4) Preferential with adding touch-usage interface design by the vision-impairment; in contrast with the least requirement for such functions as braille, enlarging keystroke size and diversifying-function control panel. With exploring the vision-impairment's necessary improvements and obstacles for mobile phone interface operation, this research is established with goals for offering reference possibly applied in electronic appliance design and . Hopefully, the analysis results of this research could be used as data references for designing electronic and high-tech products and promoting more usage convenience for those vision-impaired.

  18. Mobile phones carry the personal microbiome of their owners.

    PubMed

    Meadow, James F; Altrichter, Adam E; Green, Jessica L

    2014-01-01

    Most people on the planet own mobile phones, and these devices are increasingly being utilized to gather data relevant to our personal health, behavior, and environment. During an educational workshop, we investigated the utility of mobile phones to gather data about the personal microbiome - the collection of microorganisms associated with the personal effects of an individual. We characterized microbial communities on smartphone touchscreens to determine whether there was significant overlap with the skin microbiome sampled directly from their owners. We found that about 22% of the bacterial taxa on participants' fingers were also present on their own phones, as compared to 17% they shared on average with other people's phones. When considered as a group, bacterial communities on men's phones were significantly different from those on their fingers, while women's were not. Yet when considered on an individual level, men and women both shared significantly more of their bacterial communities with their own phones than with anyone else's. In fact, 82% of the OTUs were shared between a person's index and phone when considering the dominant taxa (OTUs with more than 0.1% of the sequences in an individual's dataset). Our results suggest that mobile phones hold untapped potential as personal microbiome sensors.

  19. Mobile phones carry the personal microbiome of their owners

    PubMed Central

    Altrichter, Adam E.; Green, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Most people on the planet own mobile phones, and these devices are increasingly being utilized to gather data relevant to our personal health, behavior, and environment. During an educational workshop, we investigated the utility of mobile phones to gather data about the personal microbiome — the collection of microorganisms associated with the personal effects of an individual. We characterized microbial communities on smartphone touchscreens to determine whether there was significant overlap with the skin microbiome sampled directly from their owners. We found that about 22% of the bacterial taxa on participants’ fingers were also present on their own phones, as compared to 17% they shared on average with other people’s phones. When considered as a group, bacterial communities on men’s phones were significantly different from those on their fingers, while women’s were not. Yet when considered on an individual level, men and women both shared significantly more of their bacterial communities with their own phones than with anyone else’s. In fact, 82% of the OTUs were shared between a person’s index and phone when considering the dominant taxa (OTUs with more than 0.1% of the sequences in an individual’s dataset). Our results suggest that mobile phones hold untapped potential as personal microbiome sensors. PMID:25024916

  20. Ubiquitous Mobility with Mobile Phones: A Cultural Ecology for Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, John; Pachler, Norbert; Bachmair, Ben

    2011-01-01

    This article argues that mobile phones should be viewed as new cultural resources that operate within an individualized, mobile and convergent mass communication; such a recognition facilitates the options for a cultural ecology. A particular challenge here is to find adequate curricular functions in school where the inclusion of these new…

  1. Data upload capability of 3G mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jon K; Barden, Charles M; Wohlers, Erica M

    2009-01-01

    Mobile phones are becoming an important platform to measure free-living energy balance and to support weight management therapies. Sensor data, camera images and user input are needed by clinicians and researchers in close to real time. We assessed upload (reverse link) data transport rates for 2007-2008 model mobile phones on two major US wireless systems. Even the slowest phone (EVDO Rev 0) reliably uploaded 40 MB of data in less than 1 h. More than 95% of file uploads were successful in tests that simulated normal phone use over 3 d. Practical bandwidth and data currency from typical smart phones will likely keep pace with the data needs of energy balance studies and weight management therapy. PMID:19963469

  2. Dynamic population mapping using mobile phone data

    PubMed Central

    Deville, Pierre; Martin, Samuel; Gilbert, Marius; Stevens, Forrest R.; Gaughan, Andrea E.; Blondel, Vincent D.; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    During the past few decades, technologies such as remote sensing, geographical information systems, and global positioning systems have transformed the way the distribution of human population is studied and modeled in space and time. However, the mapping of populations remains constrained by the logistics of censuses and surveys. Consequently, spatially detailed changes across scales of days, weeks, or months, or even year to year, are difficult to assess and limit the application of human population maps in situations in which timely information is required, such as disasters, conflicts, or epidemics. Mobile phones (MPs) now have an extremely high penetration rate across the globe, and analyzing the spatiotemporal distribution of MP calls geolocated to the tower level may overcome many limitations of census-based approaches, provided that the use of MP data is properly assessed and calibrated. Using datasets of more than 1 billion MP call records from Portugal and France, we show how spatially and temporarily explicit estimations of population densities can be produced at national scales, and how these estimates compare with outputs produced using alternative human population mapping methods. We also demonstrate how maps of human population changes can be produced over multiple timescales while preserving the anonymity of MP users. With similar data being collected every day by MP network providers across the world, the prospect of being able to map contemporary and changing human population distributions over relatively short intervals exists, paving the way for new applications and a near real-time understanding of patterns and processes in human geography. PMID:25349388

  3. Youth mental health interventions via mobile phones: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Seko, Yukari; Kidd, Sean; Wiljer, David; McKenzie, Kwame

    2014-09-01

    Mobile phone technologies have been hailed as a promising means for delivering mental health interventions to youth and adolescents, the age group with high cell phone penetration and with the onset of 75% of all lifetime mental disorders. Despite the growing evidence in physical health and adult mental health, however, little information is available about how mobile phones are implemented to deliver mental health services to the younger population. The purpose of this scoping study was to map the current state of knowledge regarding mobile mental health (mMental Health) for young people (age 13-24 years), identify gaps, and consider implications for future research. Seventeen articles that met the inclusion criteria provided evidence for mobile phones as a way to engage youth in therapeutic activities. The flexibility, interactivity, and spontaneous nature of mobile communications were also considered advantageous in encouraging persistent and continual access to care outside clinical settings. Four gaps in current knowledge were identified: the scarcity of studies conducted in low and middle income countries, the absence of information about the real-life feasibility of mobile tools, the need to address the issue of technical and health literacy of both young users and health professionals, and the need for critical discussion regarding diverse ethical issues associated with mobile phone use. We suggest that mMental Health researchers and clinicians should carefully consider the ethical issues related to patient-practitioner relationship, best practices, and the logic of self-surveillance.

  4. Mobile phones and elderly people: a noisy communication.

    PubMed

    Stamato, Cláudia; Moraes, Anamaria de

    2012-01-01

    Knowing the users is capital for building user-friendly digital interfaces. One way to think about the users is considering their familiarity with this technology. This article presents the results of twelve interviews with elderly people residing in the so-called South Zone of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) who have used mobile phones over at least one year. It is part of the Doctor's Thesis "Mobile phones for elderly people - usability for social integration" ("Celulares para idosos - usabilidade a serviço da integração social"), which is targeted at ascertaining if the current mobile phones are user-friendly for elderly people. Through the technique of Guided Interviews, we found usage time, criteria for choice of phones, reasons for changes, preferences, and manners of use. Preliminarily, we have noticed differences in the behavior of the participating users and performed a qualitative analysis according to groups of age and gender.

  5. Real versus Simulated Mobile Phone Exposures in Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether exposures to mobile phone radiation in biological/clinical experiments should be performed with real-life Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) emitted by commercially available mobile phone handsets, instead of simulated EMFs emitted by generators or test phones. Real mobile phone emissions are constantly and unpredictably varying and thus are very different from simulated emissions which employ fixed parameters and no variability. This variability is an important parameter that makes real emissions more bioactive. Living organisms seem to have decreased defense against environmental stressors of high variability. While experimental studies employing simulated EMF-emissions present a strong inconsistency among their results with less than 50% of them reporting effects, studies employing real mobile phone exposures demonstrate an almost 100% consistency in showing adverse effects. This consistency is in agreement with studies showing association with brain tumors, symptoms of unwellness, and declines in animal populations. Average dosimetry in studies with real emissions can be reliable with increased number of field measurements, and variation in experimental outcomes due to exposure variability becomes less significant with increased number of experimental replications. We conclude that, in order for experimental findings to reflect reality, it is crucially important that exposures be performed by commercially available mobile phone handsets.

  6. Real versus Simulated Mobile Phone Exposures in Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J.; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L.

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether exposures to mobile phone radiation in biological/clinical experiments should be performed with real-life Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) emitted by commercially available mobile phone handsets, instead of simulated EMFs emitted by generators or test phones. Real mobile phone emissions are constantly and unpredictably varying and thus are very different from simulated emissions which employ fixed parameters and no variability. This variability is an important parameter that makes real emissions more bioactive. Living organisms seem to have decreased defense against environmental stressors of high variability. While experimental studies employing simulated EMF-emissions present a strong inconsistency among their results with less than 50% of them reporting effects, studies employing real mobile phone exposures demonstrate an almost 100% consistency in showing adverse effects. This consistency is in agreement with studies showing association with brain tumors, symptoms of unwellness, and declines in animal populations. Average dosimetry in studies with real emissions can be reliable with increased number of field measurements, and variation in experimental outcomes due to exposure variability becomes less significant with increased number of experimental replications. We conclude that, in order for experimental findings to reflect reality, it is crucially important that exposures be performed by commercially available mobile phone handsets. PMID:26346766

  7. Real versus Simulated Mobile Phone Exposures in Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether exposures to mobile phone radiation in biological/clinical experiments should be performed with real-life Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) emitted by commercially available mobile phone handsets, instead of simulated EMFs emitted by generators or test phones. Real mobile phone emissions are constantly and unpredictably varying and thus are very different from simulated emissions which employ fixed parameters and no variability. This variability is an important parameter that makes real emissions more bioactive. Living organisms seem to have decreased defense against environmental stressors of high variability. While experimental studies employing simulated EMF-emissions present a strong inconsistency among their results with less than 50% of them reporting effects, studies employing real mobile phone exposures demonstrate an almost 100% consistency in showing adverse effects. This consistency is in agreement with studies showing association with brain tumors, symptoms of unwellness, and declines in animal populations. Average dosimetry in studies with real emissions can be reliable with increased number of field measurements, and variation in experimental outcomes due to exposure variability becomes less significant with increased number of experimental replications. We conclude that, in order for experimental findings to reflect reality, it is crucially important that exposures be performed by commercially available mobile phone handsets. PMID:26346766

  8. [Mobile phones radiate--risk to the health?].

    PubMed

    Jokela, Kari; Auvinen, Anssi; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The mobile phones radiate electromagnetic energy which is partly absorbed into the tissues in the vicinity of the phone. The minor heating, in maximum up to 0.3 degrees C, may cause some alterations in the expression of genes and proteins similar to physiological response to other stimuli. Biophysical studies at the cellular and molecular level have not revealed any well established interaction mechanism, through which mobile phone radiation could induce toxic effects below the thermal effect level. Research results on various biological effects in vitro and in vivo are continuously published but there is no consistent evidence on well established harmful effects. The mobile phone radiation is not carcinogenic for experimental animals or genotoxic for cells. According to epidemiological studies and psychophysiological brain function studies the use of mobile phones does not seem to increase the risk of tumors in the head and brain or disturb the function of central nervous system. However, there is a need for more research on the long-term effects of mobile phone radiation particularly on children.

  9. Mobile Phone Overuse Among Elementary School Students in Korea: Factors Associated With Mobile Phone Use as a Behavior Addiction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ran; Lee, Kwang-Ja; Choi, Yun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to examine the relationships among mobile phone use, anxiety, and parental attitudes toward child-rearing in a convenience sample of 351 Grade 6 elementary school students. There were 157 boys and 194 girls. A mobile phone overuse questionnaire, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Parental Attitude Inventory were used for data collection. The data were analyzed by the t test, analysis of variance, hierarchical regression, and descriptive analysis using SPSS WIN 18.0. Mobile phone use was greater in girls than in boys, and the difference was statistically significant. Mobile phone use was positively correlated with anxiety, and it was negatively correlated with parental child-raising attitudes. Mobile phone use in girls was mainly affected by anxiety, and in boys, it was significantly affected by the maternal child-raising attitude. This research provides basic data for parent education, school policy, and prevention programs about mobile phone overuse that support mental health improvement in the individual, family, and community.

  10. Mobile phones in residential treatment: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Collier, Scott; Gavriel, Mardell

    2015-08-01

    A nonprofit primary care, substance abuse and mental health treatment provider that operates nine separate residential treatment facilities in both northern and southern California began allowing clients to keep their mobile phones while in treatment. From the advent of mobile phone technology and its widespread adoption through early 2013, the organization prohibited clients from having phones while in treatment. Calls to and from clients needed to be made and received at the house phone. After years of enforcing the policy with diminished success as phones became cheaper, smaller, and more prevalent, agency leadership decided to experiment with allowing the clients to keep their phones while in treatment. Elopement data as they relate to the policy are examined along with data from staff interviews about its implementation and impact. Results show that elopements resulting from being caught with a mobile phone were eliminated and some clients were able to be returned to treatment using the devices. All seven (100%) of the interviewees were supportive of the new policy and thought it should be continued. The impact of the policy on clinical disruptions, lost/stolen property liability, and confidentiality issues are discussed.

  11. Perception of mobile phone and base station risks.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Michael; Earle, Timothy C; Gutscher, Heinz; Keller, Carmen

    2005-10-01

    Perceptions of risks associated with mobile phones, base stations, and other sources of electromagnetic fields (EMF) were examined. Data from a telephone survey conducted in the German- and French-speaking parts of Switzerland are presented (N = 1,015). Participants assessed both risks and benefits associated with nine different sources of EMF. Trust in the authorities regulating these hazards was assessed as well. In addition, participants answered a set of questions related to attitudes toward EMF and toward mobile phone base stations. According to respondents' assessments, high-voltage transmission lines are the most risky source of EMF. Mobile phones and mobile phone base stations received lower risk ratings. Results showed that trust in authorities was positively associated with perceived benefits and negatively associated with perceived risks. People who use their mobile phones frequently perceived lower risks and higher benefits than people who use their mobile phones infrequently. People who believed they lived close to a base station did not significantly differ in their level of risks associated with mobile phone base stations from people who did not believe they lived close to a base station. Regarding risk regulation, a majority of participants were in favor of fixing limiting values based on the worst-case scenario. Correlations suggest that belief in paranormal phenomena is related to level of perceived risks associated with EMF. Furthermore, people who believed that most chemical substances cause cancer also worried more about EMF than people who did not believe that chemical substances are that harmful. Practical implications of the results are discussed. PMID:16297229

  12. Development of Adaptive Kanji Learning System for Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mengmeng; Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Liu, Yuqin; Uosaki, Noriko; Yano, Yoneo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive learning system based on mobile phone email to support the study of Japanese Kanji. In this study, the main emphasis is on using the adaptive learning to resolve one common problem of the mobile-based email or SMS language learning systems. To achieve this goal, the authors main efforts focus on three aspects:…

  13. Mobile Phone as Pedagogical Tools: Are Teachers Ready?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Issham; Azizan, Siti Norbaya; Azman, Nizuwan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the teachers' perceptions on the implementation of mobile learning via mobile phone at schools. The sample for this study comprised thirty eight teachers who were teaching Information Technology (IT) subjects from various primary schools in Penang, Malaysia. A quantitative survey was administered to the respondents whereby…

  14. Malaysian University Students' Use of Mobile Phones for Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullen, Darren; J-F; Swabey, Karen; Abadooz, M.; Sing, Termit Kaur Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technology coupled with Internet accessibility has increased not only how we communicate but also how we might engage in learning. The ubiquity of mobile technology, such as smart phones and tablet devices, makes it a valuable tool for accessing learning resources on the Internet. The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology…

  15. Examination of mobile phones in a university forensic lab environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttenberger, Silas; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this article is to show forensic investigation methods for mobile phones to students in a university forensic lab environment. Students have to learn the usefulness of forensic procedures to ensure evidence collection, evidence preservation, forensic analysis, and reporting. Open source tools as well as commercial forensic tools for forensic investigation of modern mobile (smart) phones are used. It is demonstrated how important data stored in the mobile device are investigated. Different scenarios of investigations are presented that are well-suited for forensics lab work in university.

  16. 76 FR 41522 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Mobile Tablets, Portable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... importation of certain mobile phones, mobile tablets, portable music players, and computers. 76 FR 24051 (Apr... Music Players, and Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Commission Decision Not To Review...

  17. Using mobile phones in healthcare management for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Lee, Kye-Hwa; Kim, Hyunah; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-12-01

    The increasing average life expectancy is simultaneously increasing the incidence of chronic diseases and the number of healthy elderly people, consequently leading to an increased demand for healthcare management methods that do not involve hospital visits. The development of health management services involving mobile phones will change the focus of medical services from hospital visits and treatments to managing the health decisions made by individuals in their daily lives. However, the elderly may experience specific difficulties in adapting to constantly evolving services. This study reviews various health-related devices such as mobile phones that are available for providing healthcare to the elderly, and the different ways of using them. As the use of mobile phone increases, it is expected that elderly mobile phone users will also be able to regularly check their health status at any time and place. The issues of an ageing population pertain to the entire society rather than only to the elderly, which make mobile-phone-based medical informatics as a health management service a worthy goal.

  18. Health information: what can mobile phone assessments add?

    PubMed

    Stomberg, Margareta Warrén; Platon, Birgitta; Widén, Annette; Wallner, Ingegerd; Karlsson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    In healthcare, pain assessment is a key factor in effectively treating postoperative pain and reducing the risk of developing chronic pain. The overall aim of this study was to investigate whether a mobile phone support system can be used as a basis to continuously document patients' health information in real time and provide conditions for optimal, individual pain management after cholecystectomy and hysterectomy procedures.In this pilot study, two randomly selected groups of patients provided information about their pain for one week postoperatively. One group responded via cell phones, and the other, a control group, responded using paper-based questionnaires.The mobile phone system was found to provide a fast and safe basis for reporting pain postoperatively in real time. The results indicate that on days 3 and 4 the mobile phone group reported significantly higher levels of pain than the control group, and the cholecystectomy patients reported significantly more pain at movement on days 3 and 4 than the hysterectomy patients.The mobile phone approach is an adaptation to modern technology and the mobility of individuals. This technology is user friendly and requires minimal support. However, as the sample size was small (n = 37), further studies are needed before additional conclusions can be drawn.

  19. Health information: what can mobile phone assessments add?

    PubMed

    Stomberg, Margareta Warrén; Platon, Birgitta; Widén, Annette; Wallner, Ingegerd; Karlsson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    In healthcare, pain assessment is a key factor in effectively treating postoperative pain and reducing the risk of developing chronic pain. The overall aim of this study was to investigate whether a mobile phone support system can be used as a basis to continuously document patients' health information in real time and provide conditions for optimal, individual pain management after cholecystectomy and hysterectomy procedures.In this pilot study, two randomly selected groups of patients provided information about their pain for one week postoperatively. One group responded via cell phones, and the other, a control group, responded using paper-based questionnaires.The mobile phone system was found to provide a fast and safe basis for reporting pain postoperatively in real time. The results indicate that on days 3 and 4 the mobile phone group reported significantly higher levels of pain than the control group, and the cholecystectomy patients reported significantly more pain at movement on days 3 and 4 than the hysterectomy patients.The mobile phone approach is an adaptation to modern technology and the mobility of individuals. This technology is user friendly and requires minimal support. However, as the sample size was small (n = 37), further studies are needed before additional conclusions can be drawn. PMID:23209453

  20. Mobile phones and malaria: modeling human and parasite travel

    PubMed Central

    Buckee, Caroline O.; Wesolowski, Amy; Eagle, Nathan; Hansen, Elsa; Snow, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Human mobility plays an important role in the dissemination of malaria parasites between regions of variable transmission intensity. Asymptomatic individuals can unknowingly carry parasites to regions where mosquito vectors are available, for example, undermining control programs and contributing to transmission when they travel. Understanding how parasites are imported between regions in this way is therefore an important goal for elimination planning and the control of transmission, and would enable control programs to target the principal sources of malaria. Measuring human mobility has traditionally been difficult to do on a population scale, but the widespread adoption of mobile phones in low-income settings presents a unique opportunity to directly measure human movements that are relevant to the spread of malaria. Here, we discuss the opportunities for measuring human mobility using data from mobile phones, as well as some of the issues associated with combining mobility estimates with malaria infection risk maps to meaningfully estimate routes of parasite importation. PMID:23478045

  1. Stereovision Imaging in Smart Mobile Phone Using Add on Prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Magen Numhauser, Jonathan; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-03-01

    In this work we present the use of a prism-based add on component installed on top of a smart phone to achieve stereovision capabilities using iPhone mobile operating system. Through these components and the combination of the appropriate application programming interface and mathematical algorithms the obtained results will permit the analysis of possible enhancements for new uses to such system, in a variety of areas including medicine and communications.

  2. Evaluation of a Mobile Phone for Aircraft GPS Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of spurious emissions from a mobile phone are conducted in a reverberation chamber for the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio frequency band. This phone model was previously determined to have caused interference to several aircraft GPS receivers. Interference path loss (IPL) factors are applied to the emission data, and the outcome compared against GPS receiver susceptibility. The resulting negative safety margins indicate there are risks to aircraft GPS systems. The maximum emission level from the phone is also shown to be comparable with some laptop computer's emissions, implying that laptop computers can provide similar risks to aircraft GPS receivers.

  3. Measures of Human Mobility Using Mobile Phone Records Enhanced with GIS Data.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nathalie E; Thomas, Timothy A; Dunbar, Matthew; Eagle, Nathan; Dobra, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, large scale mobile phone data have become available for the study of human movement patterns. These data hold an immense promise for understanding human behavior on a vast scale, and with a precision and accuracy never before possible with censuses, surveys or other existing data collection techniques. There is already a significant body of literature that has made key inroads into understanding human mobility using this exciting new data source, and there have been several different measures of mobility used. However, existing mobile phone based mobility measures are inconsistent, inaccurate, and confounded with social characteristics of local context. New measures would best be developed immediately as they will influence future studies of mobility using mobile phone data. In this article, we do exactly this. We discuss problems with existing mobile phone based measures of mobility and describe new methods for measuring mobility that address these concerns. Our measures of mobility, which incorporate both mobile phone records and detailed GIS data, are designed to address the spatial nature of human mobility, to remain independent of social characteristics of context, and to be comparable across geographic regions and time. We also contribute a discussion of the variety of uses for these new measures in developing a better understanding of how human mobility influences micro-level human behaviors and well-being, and macro-level social organization and change.

  4. MetroTrack: Predictive Tracking of Mobile Events Using Mobile Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Gahng-Seop; Musolesi, Mirco; Lu, Hong; Olfati-Saber, Reza; Campbell, Andrew T.

    We propose to use mobile phones carried by people in their everyday lives as mobile sensors to track mobile events. We argue that sensor-enabled mobile phones are best suited to deliver sensing services (e.g., tracking in urban areas) than more traditional solutions, such as static sensor networks, which are limited in scale, performance, and cost. There are a number of challenges in developing a mobile event tracking system using mobile phones. First, mobile sensors need to be tasked before sensing can begin, and only those mobile sensors near the target event should be tasked for the system to scale effectively. Second, there is no guarantee of a sufficient density of mobile sensors around any given event of interest because the mobility of people is uncontrolled. This results in time-varying sensor coverage and disruptive tracking of events, i.e., targets will be lost and must be efficiently recovered. To address these challenges, we propose MetroTrack, a mobile-event tracking system based on off-the-shelf mobile phones. MetroTrack is capable of tracking mobile targets through collaboration among local sensing devices that track and predict the future location of a target using a distributed Kalman-Consensus filtering algorithm. We present a proof-of-concept implementation of MetroTrack using Nokia N80 and N95 phones. Large scale simulation results indicate that MetroTrack prolongs the tracking duration in the presence of varying mobile sensor density.

  5. Measures of Human Mobility Using Mobile Phone Records Enhanced with GIS Data

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Timothy A.; Dunbar, Matthew; Eagle, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, large scale mobile phone data have become available for the study of human movement patterns. These data hold an immense promise for understanding human behavior on a vast scale, and with a precision and accuracy never before possible with censuses, surveys or other existing data collection techniques. There is already a significant body of literature that has made key inroads into understanding human mobility using this exciting new data source, and there have been several different measures of mobility used. However, existing mobile phone based mobility measures are inconsistent, inaccurate, and confounded with social characteristics of local context. New measures would best be developed immediately as they will influence future studies of mobility using mobile phone data. In this article, we do exactly this. We discuss problems with existing mobile phone based measures of mobility and describe new methods for measuring mobility that address these concerns. Our measures of mobility, which incorporate both mobile phone records and detailed GIS data, are designed to address the spatial nature of human mobility, to remain independent of social characteristics of context, and to be comparable across geographic regions and time. We also contribute a discussion of the variety of uses for these new measures in developing a better understanding of how human mobility influences micro-level human behaviors and well-being, and macro-level social organization and change. PMID:26192322

  6. Measures of Human Mobility Using Mobile Phone Records Enhanced with GIS Data.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nathalie E; Thomas, Timothy A; Dunbar, Matthew; Eagle, Nathan; Dobra, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, large scale mobile phone data have become available for the study of human movement patterns. These data hold an immense promise for understanding human behavior on a vast scale, and with a precision and accuracy never before possible with censuses, surveys or other existing data collection techniques. There is already a significant body of literature that has made key inroads into understanding human mobility using this exciting new data source, and there have been several different measures of mobility used. However, existing mobile phone based mobility measures are inconsistent, inaccurate, and confounded with social characteristics of local context. New measures would best be developed immediately as they will influence future studies of mobility using mobile phone data. In this article, we do exactly this. We discuss problems with existing mobile phone based measures of mobility and describe new methods for measuring mobility that address these concerns. Our measures of mobility, which incorporate both mobile phone records and detailed GIS data, are designed to address the spatial nature of human mobility, to remain independent of social characteristics of context, and to be comparable across geographic regions and time. We also contribute a discussion of the variety of uses for these new measures in developing a better understanding of how human mobility influences micro-level human behaviors and well-being, and macro-level social organization and change. PMID:26192322

  7. Inferring friendship network structure by using mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Nathan; Pentland, Alex Sandy; Lazer, David

    2009-09-01

    Data collected from mobile phones have the potential to provide insight into the relational dynamics of individuals. This paper compares observational data from mobile phones with standard self-report survey data. We find that the information from these two data sources is overlapping but distinct. For example, self-reports of physical proximity deviate from mobile phone records depending on the recency and salience of the interactions. We also demonstrate that it is possible to accurately infer 95% of friendships based on the observational data alone, where friend dyads demonstrate distinctive temporal and spatial patterns in their physical proximity and calling patterns. These behavioral patterns, in turn, allow the prediction of individual-level outcomes such as job satisfaction.

  8. School Crowding, Year-Round Schooling, and Mobile Classroom Use: Evidence from North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Steven C.; Rouse, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    This study exploits a unique policy environment and a large panel dataset to evaluate the impact of school crowding on student achievement in Wake County, NC. We also estimate the effects of two education policy initiatives that are often used to address crowding: multi-track year-round calendars and mobile classrooms. We estimate a multi-level…

  9. Mobile Phone Dermatitis in Children and Adults: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Clare; Hamann, Dathan; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile phones have been reported to cause allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Methods: A comprehensive online literature review was conducted through the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed MEDLINE) using appropriate medical subject headings and keywords. Results: Thirty-seven cases of mobile phone-related ACD were found. Six studies evaluating allergen release from mobile phones were found. Conclusions: Case reports of mobile phone-associated ACD have risen rapidly in number since 2000. Case reports highlight mobile phone ACD in both pediatric and adult populations in many countries. Metal allergens, notably nickel and chromium, were frequently implicated in mobile phone associated ACD. Nickel release from mobile phones appears to be common and has been reported in both cheap and expensive mobile phones, including phones covered under the EU Nickel Directive. PMID:24963454

  10. Alterations in TSH and Thyroid Hormones following Mobile Phone Use

    PubMed Central

    Mortavazi, Seyed; Habib, Asadollah; Ganj-Karami, Amir; Samimi-Doost, Razieh; Pour-Abedi, Atefe; Babaie, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In recent years, the widespread use of mobile phones has lead to a public debate about possible detrimental effects on human health. In spite of years of research, there is still a great controversy regarding the possibility of induction of any significant physiological effects in humans by microwave radiations emitted by mobile phones. This study aims to investigate the effects of electromagnetic fields induced by the Global System for Mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones on the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormones in humans. Methods 77 healthy university students participated in this study. The levels of T3, T4 and TSH were measured by using appropriate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits (Human, Germany). Results The average levels of T3, T4 and TSH in students who moderately used mobile phones were 1.25±0.27 ng/ml, 7.76±1.73 µg/dl and 4.25±2.12 µu/l respectively. The levels in the students who severely used mobile phones were 1.18±0.30, 7.75±1.14 and 3.75±2.05 respectively. In non-users, the levels were 1.15±0.27, 8.42±2.72 and 2.70±1.75, respectively. The difference among the levels of TSH in these 3 groups was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion As far as the study is concerned, this is the first human study to assess the associations between mobile phone use and alterations in the levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. Based on the findings, a higher than normal TSH level, low mean T4 and normal T3 concentrations in mobile users were observed. It seems that minor degrees of thyroid dysfunction with a compensatory rise in TSH may occur following excessive use of mobile phones. It may be concluded that possible deleterious effects of mobile microwaves on hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis affects the levels of these hormones. PMID:22216380

  11. Miniaturized NIR scanning grating spectrometer for use in mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Grüger, Heinrich

    2016-05-01

    An extremely miniaturized scanning grating spectrometer at the size of a sugar cube has been developed at Fraunhofer IPMS. To meet the requirements for the integration into a mobile phone a new system approach has been pursued. The key component within the system is a silicon-based deflectable diffraction grating with an integrated driving mechanism. A first sample of the new spectrometer was built and characterized. It was found to have a spectral range from 950 nm to 1900 nm at a resolution of 10 nm. The results show that the performance of the new MEMS spectrometer is in good agreement with the requirements for mobile phone integration.

  12. Symptoms Experienced by Long Term Users of Mobil Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucer, Nermin

    2007-04-01

    In this study was investigated the possible effects of long term usage of mobile phone. The studied symptoms are headache, dizziness, extreme irritation, forgetfulness, neuropsychological discomfort, decrease of the reflex, clicking sound in the ears, and increase in carelessness. This survey study, using questionnaire, was conducted among randomly selected 146 university students in Kocaeli, Turkey. There is no effect on neuropsychological discomfort, increase in carelessness, headache, and clicking sound in the ears, but some statistical evidences are found that mobile phone may cause extreme irritation, decrease of the reflex, dizziness, and forgetfulness.

  13. [Mobile phone abuse or addiction. A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pedrero Pérez, Eduardo J; Rodríguez Monje, María Teresa; Ruiz Sánchez De León, José María

    2012-01-01

    The mobile phone is a relatively new technological tool, versatile and accessible, and very attractive, especially for young people, but whose use involves a risk of abuse and addictive behavior. In recent years there has been increasing interest in this problem, especially in view of the fact that it involves an increasingly younger population. The aim of this paper is to review the current state of scientific knowledge about cell phone addiction/abuse. To this end, a search was carried out in international databases, using the descriptors "mobile phone", "cellular telephones", "addiction" and "abuse", and focusing on prevalence studies, diagnostic tests, associations with psychological variables and gender differences. There is a conceptual vagueness about the concepts of abuse and addiction in relation to mobile phones, and wide disparity in the adoption of diagnostic criteria; moreover, there are numerous instruments for the assessment of these concepts. As a result, the estimated prevalence ranges from 0-38%, depending on the scale used and the characteristics of the population studied. Surprisingly, self-attribution of cell phone addiction exceeds the prevalence estimated in the studies themselves. The personality trait most consistently associated with addiction is low self-esteem, though extraversion is associated with more intense use. Women with low self-esteem are the most vulnerable group, and the most commonly associated psychopathological symptom was depression. In short, while the evidence suggests a problem in relation to mobile phone use, the vagueness of the cell phone addiction concept and the poor quality of the studies make it difficult to generalize the results. It is necessary to define and unify criteria with a view to carrying out quality studies that permit appropriate comparisons.

  14. Location Privacy for Mobile Crowd Sensing through Population Mapping †

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Minho; Cornelius, Cory; Kapadia, Apu; Triandopoulos, Nikos; Kotz, David

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic sensing allows applications to “task” mobile devices to measure context in a target region. For example, one could leverage sensor-equipped vehicles to measure traffic or pollution levels on a particular street or users' mobile phones to locate (Bluetooth-enabled) objects in their vicinity. In most proposed applications, context reports include the time and location of the event, putting the privacy of users at increased risk: even if identifying information has been removed from a report, the accompanying time and location can reveal sufficient information to de-anonymize the user whose device sent the report. We propose and evaluate a novel spatiotemporal blurring mechanism based on tessellation and clustering to protect users' privacy against the system while reporting context. Our technique employs a notion of probabilistic k-anonymity; it allows users to perform local blurring of reports efficiently without an online anonymization server before the data are sent to the system. The proposed scheme can control the degree of certainty in location privacy and the quality of reports through a system parameter. We outline the architecture and security properties of our approach and evaluate our tessellation and clustering algorithm against real mobility traces. PMID:26131676

  15. Managing asthma with mobile phones: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Bree; Whitten, Pamela

    2009-11-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease and a growing health problem worldwide. The objective of this pilot study was to test the feasibility and utilization of tracking asthma symptoms through an innovative mobile phone application. The subjects for this research project consisted of 4 individuals who are currently receiving treatment for asthma from a primary care physician in Ingham County, Michigan. Participants took their peak flow reading each day and used the short message service (SMS) function on their phone and sent it to a Web server. If they did not send it by 11 AM, they received a reminder via an automated SMS to their phone. The resulting data suggest that this method of management is feasible. The data also demonstrate participants' satisfaction in monitoring their asthma in this manner. Using mobile phones for asthma management could improve compliance with asthma action plans and reduce adverse asthma events. Future research could further demonstrate that mobile phones are a new and effective method for providing healthcare.

  16. Development of protected endorsement for online banking using mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana, Galla; Venkateswarlu, Tammineni; Kumar, G. S. P.; Padmavathamma, Mokkala; Sreekanth, G.; Delhibabu, K.; Prasad, A. R.

    2013-03-01

    Securing Online Banking transactions for customer is the primary goal of financial institutions that provides Internet banking facility. Mobile phones play an important role in our society as more and more functions having been integrated within mobile phones, such as Internet browsing, mobile banking, and shopping. Mobiles phones can be used to secure ATM card pins by sending to the customer directly rather than in emails or by other means which has a possibility of hacking. In this paper we have proposed method of generating a Private Key Security Token by bank authentication servers which uses IMSI registers and IMEI number of client's mobile registered. The key is generated by implementing RIPE MD160 and Hex Encode Algorithm. Token received is valid only for that client mobile only and can be generated upon request by customer dynamically. The client is given a PIN and a Master Key when registered to the Online Banking Services. If in case a client's mobile is lost, authentication is done using Unique Master Key, else the Private Key Token is used there by making transactions secured and simple without the need of carrying any USB Tokens. The additional functionality provides the client more security on their transactions. Due to this Phishing attacks by the hackers is avoided.

  17. "Mobile Phones and Other Disturbing Objects…"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Torbjörn

    2013-01-01

    The impact of mobile learning on education is dependent not only on educational understanding but also on opinions of the public and policymakers. The debate in media reflects opinions and aims in different levels of the society. In order to enrich the view on what mobile learning has to battle in order to reach its full potentials I have studied…

  18. Mobile multimedia library: an MPEG-7 application with camera-equipped mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oami, Ryoma; Kasutani, Eiji; Yamada, Akio

    2005-08-01

    This paper proposes a Mobile Multimedia Library (MML), a new application of information retrieval using camera-equipped mobile phones. MML allows users to get information of an unknown object anywhere and anytime. A user simply takes a picture of the object by a mobile phone and sends it directly to an MML server on which the picture is analyzed to identify the object. The MML server returns the identification result to the mobile phone and the user can browse information of the object on the display of the mobile phone. This application employs the k-Nearest Neighbor approach using eight MPEG-7 visual features to identify objects. A prototype system for animal identification has been developed to demonstrate effectiveness of the MML framework. It takes about ten seconds on average for the identification in which 63% and 79% queries were correctly identified within first four and first ten candidates, respectively, out of 229 categories.

  19. Injuries of the central nervous system - mobile phone consultations.

    PubMed

    Filip, Michal; Linzer, Petr; Sámal, Filip; Jurek, Patrik; Tesař, Jiří

    2010-10-01

    Transmission of visual documentation between a neurosurgery center and a regional hospital, with a mobile phone, significantly improves consultation on a craniocerebral injury. This is one of the methods of fast consultation on image documentation (CT). We reported on one year of experience (September 2007 to September 2008) of our department with this method of image transmission in 16 patients with craniocerebral injury. The images were exported, via the Internet, from local hospitals through the PACS system [Picture Archiving and Communication System], in DICOM III format, to the server of the Regional Hospital of T. Ba̕a, (KNTB). Browsing of the acquired image documentation at particular stations was possible with the xVision browser. The data were exported to a secure hospital Web server, IIS60, to enable consultation on the images, which were changed to JPEG format. The consulting physician was connected to this server with his/her mobile phone by means of the Internet browser. After establishing the connection, it downloads and gradually displays the images on the screen of the mobile phone. The whole process takes approximately 10 minutes. After comparing the images on the screen of the mobile phone and on the workstation using the xVision browser, we verified that there was no difference in the quality of imaging of the pathological lesions recorded with CT.

  20. Prevalence of problematic mobile phone use in British adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Fernandez, Olatz; Honrubia-Serrano, Luisa; Freixa-Blanxart, Montserrat; Gibson, Will

    2014-02-01

    The problematic use of mobile phones among adolescents has not been widely studied. There are very few instruments for assessing potential technological addiction to mobile phones, or for categorizing different types of users or uses. The most widely used scale is the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS), which is used to study adult populations, and has been applied in various forms in international contexts. The aims of this study were to adapt the Spanish version of this scale (MPPUSA) to British adolescents, and then to estimate the prevalence of possible problematic users. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 1,529 secondary school pupils aged between 11 and 18 years, with 1,026 completed questionnaires being collected. The analysis showed that the factor and construct validity and reliability were comparable to those obtained in previous studies. The prevalence of problematic users among the students was 10%, and the typical problematic user tended to be an adolescent between 11 and 14 years old, studying in a public school, who considered themselves to be an expert user of this technology, who made extensive use of his/her mobile phone, and who attributed the same problem of use among their peers. These users presented notable scores in all the symptoms covered by the scale used to assess problematic use. In conclusion, the adaptation of the MPPUSA as a screening scale for British adolescents presents good sensitivity and specificity for detecting the main addictive symptoms proposed in this validated version.

  1. Building Mathematical Knowledge in an Authentic Mobile Phone Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2010-01-01

    Although many researchers have examined knowledge building in traditional settings and distance learning, few have examined middle school students' building of mathematical knowledge using mobile phones. The present study uses two well-known models of knowledge building to carry out the examination: the interactive analysis model of knowledge…

  2. Learning Mathematics in the Mobile Phone Environment: Students' Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2011-01-01

    Researchers point at the importance of emotions and its study in mathematics education. This research examines middle school students' emotions during learning mathematics outdoors using the mobile phone. The constant comparison method was used to analyze 30 middle school students' emotions while carrying out 15 outdoor activities using the mobile…

  3. Wavefront measurement of plastic lenses for mobile-phone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Ting; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Wang, Chung-Yen; Wang, Pei-Jen

    2016-08-01

    In camera lenses for mobile-phone applications, all lens elements have been designed with aspheric surfaces because of the requirements in minimal total track length of the lenses. Due to the diffraction-limited optics design with precision assembly procedures, element inspection and lens performance measurement have become cumbersome in the production of mobile-phone cameras. Recently, wavefront measurements based on Shack-Hartmann sensors have been successfully implemented on injection-molded plastic lens with aspheric surfaces. However, the applications of wavefront measurement on small-sized plastic lenses have yet to be studied both theoretically and experimentally. In this paper, both an in-house-built and a commercial wavefront measurement system configured on two optics structures have been investigated with measurement of wavefront aberrations on two lens elements from a mobile-phone camera. First, the wet-cell method has been employed for verifications of aberrations due to residual birefringence in an injection-molded lens. Then, two lens elements of a mobile-phone camera with large positive and negative power have been measured with aberrations expressed in Zernike polynomial to illustrate the effectiveness in wavefront measurement for troubleshooting defects in optical performance.

  4. Smartphone and mobile phone security for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Barber, Harry

    2016-08-01

    Smartphones are near ubiquitous and widely used by doctors in discussing patients. In all communication doctors should take steps to protect confidentiality, yet there is a paucity of available information on how clinicians can bolster cyber security and minimize risk when using their mobile phone. PMID:27487057

  5. Biomedical sensor technologies on the platform of mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Liu, Jing

    2011-06-01

    Biomedical sensors have been widely used in various areas of biomedical practices, which play an important role in disease detection, diagnosis, monitoring, treatment, health management, and so on. However, most of them and their related platforms are generally not easily accessible or just too expensive or complicated to be kept at home. As an alternative, new technologies enabled from the mobile phones are gradually changing such situations. As can be freely available to almost everyone, mobile phone offers a unique way to improve the conventional medical care through combining with various biomedical sensors. Moreover, the established systems will be both convenient and low cost. In this paper, we present an overview on the state-of-art biomedical sensors, giving a brief introduction of the fundamental principles and showing several new examples or concepts in the area. The focus was particularly put on interpreting the technical strategies to innovate the biomedical sensor technologies based on the platform of mobile phones. Some challenging issues, including feasibility, usability, security, and effectiveness, were discussed. With the help of electrical and mechanical technologies, it is expected that a full combination between the biomedical sensors and mobile phones will bring a bright future for the coming pervasive medical care.

  6. Older Japanese Adults and Mobile Phones: An Applied Ethnographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachiya, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research investigates the meaning of "keitai" (mobile phones) for older Japanese adults between the ages of 59 and 79. Participants' emails from keitai, handwritten daily logs, and audio and video recordings from meetings and interviews were collected during my stay of nearly seven months in one of the largest cities in Japan.…

  7. High-frequency hearing loss among mobile phone users.

    PubMed

    Velayutham, P; Govindasamy, Gopala Krishnan; Raman, R; Prepageran, N; Ng, K H

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess high frequency hearing (above 8 kHz) loss among prolonged mobile phone users is a tertiary Referral Center. Prospective single blinded study. This is the first study that used high-frequency audiometry. The wide usage of mobile phone is so profound that we were unable to find enough non-users as a control group. Therefore we compared the non-dominant ear to the dominant ear using audiometric measurements. The study was a blinded study wherein the audiologist did not know which was the dominant ear. A total of 100 subjects were studied. Of the subjects studied 53% were males and 47% females. Mean age was 27. The left ear was dominant in 63%, 22% were dominant in the right ear and 15% did not have a preference. This study showed that there is significant loss in the dominant ear compared to the non-dominant ear (P < 0.05). Chronic usage mobile phone revealed high frequency hearing loss in the dominant ear (mobile phone used) compared to the non dominant ear.

  8. Injuries of the central nervous system – mobile phone consultations

    PubMed Central

    Filip, Michal; Linzer, Petr; Šámal, Filip; Jurek, Patrik; Tesař, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Summary Transmission of visual documentation between a neurosurgery center and a regional hospital, with a mobile phone, significantly improves consultation on a craniocerebral injury. This is one of the methods of fast consultation on image documentation (CT). We reported on one year of experience (September 2007 to September 2008) of our department with this method of image transmission in 16 patients with craniocerebral injury. The images were exported, via the Internet, from local hospitals through the PACS system [Picture Archiving and Communication System], in DICOM III format, to the server of the Regional Hospital of T. Ba̕a, (KNTB). Browsing of the acquired image documentation at particular stations was possible with the xVision browser. The data were exported to a secure hospital Web server, IIS60, to enable consultation on the images, which were changed to JPEG format. The consulting physician was connected to this server with his/her mobile phone by means of the Internet browser. After establishing the connection, it downloads and gradually displays the images on the screen of the mobile phone. The whole process takes approximately 10 minutes. After comparing the images on the screen of the mobile phone and on the workstation using the xVision browser, we verified that there was no difference in the quality of imaging of the pathological lesions recorded with CT. PMID:22802801

  9. Using Mobile Phone Diaries to Explore Children's Everyday Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Lydia; Stevenson, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a novel approach to experience sampling as a response to the challenges of researching the everyday lives of young children at home. Parents from 11 families used mobile phones to send the research team combined picture and text messages to provide "experience snapshots" of their child's activities six times on each of three…

  10. Smartphone and mobile phone security for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Barber, Harry

    2016-08-01

    Smartphones are near ubiquitous and widely used by doctors in discussing patients. In all communication doctors should take steps to protect confidentiality, yet there is a paucity of available information on how clinicians can bolster cyber security and minimize risk when using their mobile phone.

  11. Prevalence of problematic mobile phone use in British adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Fernandez, Olatz; Honrubia-Serrano, Luisa; Freixa-Blanxart, Montserrat; Gibson, Will

    2014-02-01

    The problematic use of mobile phones among adolescents has not been widely studied. There are very few instruments for assessing potential technological addiction to mobile phones, or for categorizing different types of users or uses. The most widely used scale is the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS), which is used to study adult populations, and has been applied in various forms in international contexts. The aims of this study were to adapt the Spanish version of this scale (MPPUSA) to British adolescents, and then to estimate the prevalence of possible problematic users. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 1,529 secondary school pupils aged between 11 and 18 years, with 1,026 completed questionnaires being collected. The analysis showed that the factor and construct validity and reliability were comparable to those obtained in previous studies. The prevalence of problematic users among the students was 10%, and the typical problematic user tended to be an adolescent between 11 and 14 years old, studying in a public school, who considered themselves to be an expert user of this technology, who made extensive use of his/her mobile phone, and who attributed the same problem of use among their peers. These users presented notable scores in all the symptoms covered by the scale used to assess problematic use. In conclusion, the adaptation of the MPPUSA as a screening scale for British adolescents presents good sensitivity and specificity for detecting the main addictive symptoms proposed in this validated version. PMID:23981147

  12. Characterization and recovery of polymers from mobile phone scrap.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Angela C; Bernardes, Andréa M; Veit, Hugo M

    2011-07-01

    Electronic scrap is part of a universally wide range of obsolete, defective, or used materials that need to be disposed of or recycled in an ecologically friendly manner. The present study focused on the polymers present in mobile phone scrap. In mobile phones, polymers are found in frames and in printed circuit boards (PCBs). The frames are mainly made of polymers whereas PCBs use a variety of material (polymers, ceramics, and metals) which makes recycling more difficult. As a first step, mobile phones were collected, separated by manufacturer/model, and weighed, and the principal polymer types identified. The frames and PCBs were processed separately. The metals in PCBs were separated out by an electrostatic separation process. The resulting polymeric material was identified and mixed with the polymers of frames to fabricate the samples. Two types of samples were made: one with polymeric frames, and the other with a mixture of frames and polymeric fraction from the PCBs. Both kinds of sample were fabricated by injection moulding. The samples were evaluated by mechanical tests (tensile, impact, and hardness) to verify the feasibility of recycling the polymers present in mobile phone scrap. The results demonstrated the technical viability of recovering polymers using mechanical processing followed by an injection process.

  13. The Role of Mobile Phones in Family Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devitt, Kerry; Roker, Debi

    2009-01-01

    Whilst there is a wealth of research into family communication and family relationships, there is little information about whether (and if so how) mobile phones have impacted on these processes. The authors' study involved individual semi-structured interviews with 60 families, including parents/carers and young people aged 11-17, to investigate…

  14. Reexamining the Effectiveness of Vocabulary Learning via Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Haisen; Song, Wei; Burston, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reexamine the effectiveness of vocabulary learning via mobile phones. Students (N=78) from two intact classes of sophomores at a Chinese university were assigned to two groups: the SMS group (the experimental group) and the paper group (the control group). Then, they were administered a pretest to identify the level…

  15. Understanding the spreading patterns of mobile phone viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; González, Marta C; Hidalgo, César A; Barabási, Albert-László

    2009-05-22

    We modeled the mobility of mobile phone users in order to study the fundamental spreading patterns that characterize a mobile virus outbreak. We find that although Bluetooth viruses can reach all susceptible handsets with time, they spread slowly because of human mobility, offering ample opportunities to deploy antiviral software. In contrast, viruses using multimedia messaging services could infect all users in hours, but currently a phase transition on the underlying call graph limits them to only a small fraction of the susceptible users. These results explain the lack of a major mobile virus breakout so far and predict that once a mobile operating system's market share reaches the phase transition point, viruses will pose a serious threat to mobile communications.

  16. Mobile Phone Application Development for the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P.; Oostra, D.; Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    With smartphone sales currently surpassing laptop sales, it is hard not to think that these devices will have a place in the classroom. More specifically, with little to no monetary investment, classroom-centric mobile applications have the ability to suit the needs of teachers. Previously, programming such an item was a daunting task to the classroom teacher. But now, through the use of online visual tools, anyone has the ability to generate a mobile application to suit individual classroom needs. The "MY NASA DATA" (MND) project has begun work on such an application. Using online tools that are directed at the non-programmer, the team has developed two usable mobile applications ("apps") that fit right into the science classroom. The two apps generated include a cloud dichotomous key for cloud identification in the field, and an atmospheric science glossary to help with standardized testing key vocabulary and classroom assignments. Through the use of free online tools, teachers and students now have the ability to customize mobile applications to meet their individual needs. As an extension of the mobile applications, the MND team is planning web-based application programming interfaces (API's) that will be generated from data that is currently included in the MND Live Access Server. This will allow teachers and students to choose data sets that they want to include in the mobile application without having to populate the API themselves. Through the use of easy to understand online mobile app tutorials and MND data sets, teachers will have the ability to generate unit-specific mobile applications to further engage and empower students in the science classroom.

  17. Mobile Phone Applications in Academic Library Services: A Students' Feedback Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karim, Nor Shahriza Abdul; Darus, Siti Hawa; Hussin, Ramlah

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to explore the utilization of mobile phone services in the educational environment, explore the nature of mobile phone use among university students, and investigate the perception of university students on mobile phone uses in library and information services. Design/methodology/approach: The study used a review of…

  18. 78 FR 47410 - Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets Institution of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets Institution of Investigation AGENCY... within the United States after importation of certain wireless devices, including mobile phones and... wireless devices, including mobile phones and tablets by reason of infringement of one or more of claims...

  19. 78 FR 40171 - Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Notice Of Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Notice Of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets, DN 2964; the Commission is... importation of certain wireless devices, including mobile phones and tablets. The complaint names...

  20. 75 FR 4583 - In the Matter of: Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of: Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and... electronic devices, including mobile phones, portable music players, and computers, by reason of infringement... mobile phones, portable music players, or computers that infringe one or more of claims 1-12 of...

  1. Standing in the Schoolhouse Door: Teacher Perceptions of Mobile Phones in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kevin M.; O'Bannon, Blanche W.; Britt, Virginia G.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of 1,121 teachers in Kentucky and Tennessee to determine their support for the use of mobile phones in the classroom, as well as their perceptions of the mobile phone features that are beneficial for school-related work and the instructional barriers to mobile phone use. The results indicated that slightly more…

  2. Optimizing the Usability of Mobile Phones for Individuals Who Are Deaf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chien-Hsiou; Chiu, Hsiao-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Li, Rong-Kwer

    2010-01-01

    Mobile phones are employed as an assistive platform to improve the living quality of individuals who are deaf. However, deaf individuals experience difficulties using existing functions on mobile phones. This study identifies the functions that are inadequate and insufficient for deaf individuals using existing mobile phones. Analytical results…

  3. 77 FR 24514 - Certain Consumer Electronics, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Institution of Investigation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Consumer Electronics, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Institution of Investigation... consumer electronics, including mobile phones and tablets, by reason of infringement of certain claims of U... mobile phones and tablets, that infringe one or more of claims 13, 15, and 16 of the `893 patent;...

  4. 78 FR 32689 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof..., Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... communications devices, including mobile phones and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents...

  5. The Relationship between Mobile Phone Use, Metacognitive Awareness and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dos, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones are getting smarter and the usage through university students becoming more popular. University students using mobile phones for talking, for texting message, for Internet search, for listening music, watching videos, playing games, using social media etc. Mobile phones are not accessory any more, they are integrated like our…

  6. Mobile Phone Use in a Pennsylvania Public High School: Does Policy Inform Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackara, Susan Tomchak

    2014-01-01

    Though many American educators embrace technology in classrooms, administrators can create policies that inhibit technology such as mobile phone use in classrooms or on district property. These policies range from restrictive with no mobile phone use permitted, to liberal in which unrestricted use of mobile phones is allowed. The purpose of this…

  7. Mobile phone computing for in-situ cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Bang, Magnus; Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Holm, Einar; Nordin, Conny

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for psychological disorders is becoming increasingly popular on the Internet. However, when using this workstation approach, components such as training and learning relaxation skills, problem solving, exposure exercises, and sleep management guidance must be done in the domestic environment. This paper describes design concepts for providing spatially explicit CBT with mobile phones. We reviewed and analyzed a set of treatment manuals to distinguish elements of CBT that can be improved and supported using mobile phone applications. The key advantage of mobile computing support in CBT is that multimedia can be applied to record, scale, and label anxiety-provoking situations where the need arises, which helps the CBT clients formulate and convey their thoughts and feelings to relatives and friends, as well as to therapists at subsequent treatment sessions.

  8. The impact of biases in mobile phone ownership on estimates of human mobility

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Amy; Eagle, Nathan; Noor, Abdisalan M.; Snow, Robert W.; Buckee, Caroline O.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone data are increasingly being used to quantify the movements of human populations for a wide range of social, scientific and public health research. However, making population-level inferences using these data is complicated by differential ownership of phones among different demographic groups that may exhibit variable mobility. Here, we quantify the effects of ownership bias on mobility estimates by coupling two data sources from the same country during the same time frame. We analyse mobility patterns from one of the largest mobile phone datasets studied, representing the daily movements of nearly 15 million individuals in Kenya over the course of a year. We couple this analysis with the results from a survey of socioeconomic status, mobile phone ownership and usage patterns across the country, providing regional estimates of population distributions of income, reported airtime expenditure and actual airtime expenditure across the country. We match the two data sources and show that mobility estimates are surprisingly robust to the substantial biases in phone ownership across different geographical and socioeconomic groups. PMID:23389897

  9. The impact of biases in mobile phone ownership on estimates of human mobility.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Amy; Eagle, Nathan; Noor, Abdisalan M; Snow, Robert W; Buckee, Caroline O

    2013-04-01

    Mobile phone data are increasingly being used to quantify the movements of human populations for a wide range of social, scientific and public health research. However, making population-level inferences using these data is complicated by differential ownership of phones among different demographic groups that may exhibit variable mobility. Here, we quantify the effects of ownership bias on mobility estimates by coupling two data sources from the same country during the same time frame. We analyse mobility patterns from one of the largest mobile phone datasets studied, representing the daily movements of nearly 15 million individuals in Kenya over the course of a year. We couple this analysis with the results from a survey of socioeconomic status, mobile phone ownership and usage patterns across the country, providing regional estimates of population distributions of income, reported airtime expenditure and actual airtime expenditure across the country. We match the two data sources and show that mobility estimates are surprisingly robust to the substantial biases in phone ownership across different geographical and socioeconomic groups.

  10. Understanding the spreading patterns of mobile phone viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pu; Gonzalez, Marta; Hidalgo, Cesar; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2009-03-01

    Mobile viruses are little more than a nuisance today, but given our increased reliance on wireless communication, in the near future they could pose more risk than their PC based counterparts. Despite of the more than three hundred mobile viruses known so far, little is known about their spreading pattern, partly due to a lack of data on the communication and travel patterns of mobile phone users. Starting from the traffic and the communication pattern of six million mobile phone users, we model the vulnerability of mobile communications against potential virus outbreaks. We show that viruses exploiting Bluetooth and multimedia messaging services (MMS) follow markedly different spreading patterns. The Bluetooth virus can reach all susceptible handsets, but spreads relatively slowly, as its spread is driven by human mobility. In contrast, an MMS virus can spread rapidly, but because the underlying social network is fragmented, it can reach only a small fraction of all susceptible users. This difference affects both their spreading rate, the number of infected users, as well as the defense measures one needs to take to protect the system against potential viral outbreak.

  11. Microfungal contaminants on mobile phones of health services vocational school students in Marmaris, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Vedat Kadir; Sülün, Yusuf

    2014-02-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine microfungi on mobile phones. Totally, 50 mobile phones were used belonging to Health Services Vocational School students. The samples were taken by swabbing the screen and keys of mobile phones using moistened sterile swab sticks. A total of 24 different microfungal species were obtained belonging to Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Geotrichum, Penicillium, Phoma, Rhinocladiella, Scopulariopsis, Trichoderma, and Trichophyton genera. The genera of microfungi most abundant in terms of the number of species on the mobile phones were Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium. Numerically, Cladosporium was found as the most abundant on the mobile phones. Cladosporium herbarum colonies were highest in number, followed by Cladosporium sphaerospermum, and Penicillium verrucosum var. cyclopium. When percentages of each species present on the mobile phones were considered, C. herbarum and C. sphaerospermum were the most common. There was a great similarity between the dominant microfungi isolated from mobile phones and dominant microfungi obtained from studies of atmospheric microfungi in Turkey.

  12. Mobile phone-based syndromic surveillance system, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Rosewell, Alexander; Ropa, Berry; Randall, Heather; Dagina, Rosheila; Hurim, Samuel; Bieb, Sibauk; Datta, Siddhartha; Ramamurthy, Sundar; Mola, Glen; Zwi, Anthony B; Ray, Pradeep; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2013-11-01

    The health care system in Papua New Guinea is fragile, and surveillance systems infrequently meet international standards. To strengthen outbreak identification, health authorities piloted a mobile phone-based syndromic surveillance system and used established frameworks to evaluate whether the system was meeting objectives. Stakeholder experience was investigated by using standardized questionnaires and focus groups. Nine sites reported data that included 7 outbreaks and 92 cases of acute watery diarrhea. The new system was more timely (2.4 vs. 84 days), complete (70% vs. 40%), and sensitive (95% vs. 26%) than existing systems. The system was simple, stable, useful, and acceptable; however, feedback and subnational involvement were weak. A simple syndromic surveillance system implemented in a fragile state enabled more timely, complete, and sensitive data reporting for disease risk assessment. Feedback and provincial involvement require improvement. Use of mobile phone technology might improve the timeliness and efficiency of public health surveillance.

  13. A new method for mobile phone image denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lianghai; Jin, Min; Li, Xiang; Xu, Xiangyang

    2015-12-01

    Images captured by mobile phone cameras via pipeline processing usually contain various kinds of noises, especially granular noise with different shapes and sizes in both luminance and chrominance channels. In chrominance channels, noise is closely related to image brightness. To improve image quality, this paper presents a new method to denoise such mobile phone images. The proposed scheme converts the noisy RGB image to luminance and chrominance images, which are then denoised by a common filtering framework. The common filtering framework processes a noisy pixel by first excluding the neighborhood pixels that significantly deviate from the (vector) median and then utilizing the other neighborhood pixels to restore the current pixel. In the framework, the strength of chrominance image denoising is controlled by image brightness. The experimental results show that the proposed method obviously outperforms some other representative denoising methods in terms of both objective measure and visual evaluation.

  14. Peer support groups, mobile phones and refugee women in Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Koh, Lee; Wollersheim, Dennis; Walker, Rae

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we discuss qualitative findings basing on the experiences of refugee women living in Melbourne, Australia, who participated in a peer support training programme and received a free mobile phone. We pay attention to social support as a health enhancing strategy and empowerment that occurred among the participants. Participation in peer support groups and access to a mobile phone were beneficial for the women. Peer support functioned as social support among group members. The programme allowed the women to be connected to their families and the wider communities and assisted them to access health care and other settlement aspects with greater ease. It also increased personal empowerment among the women. Our programme shows that by tapping on community resources to ameliorate personal or resettlement issues, the burden on service providers can be reduced. Our findings also offer a model for future research and programmes regarding refugee people elsewhere.

  15. Sharing Vital Signs between mobile phone applications.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Walter; Dumont, Guy A; Scheffer, Cornie

    2014-01-01

    We propose a communication library, ShareVitalSigns, for the standardized exchange of vital sign information between health applications running on mobile platforms. The library allows an application to request one or multiple vital signs from independent measurement applications on the Android OS. Compatible measurement applications are automatically detected and can be launched from within the requesting application, simplifying the work flow for the user and reducing typing errors. Data is shared between applications using intents, a passive data structure available on Android OS. The library is accompanied by a test application which serves as a demonstrator. The secure exchange of vital sign information using a standardized library like ShareVitalSigns will facilitate the integration of measurement applications into diagnostic and other high level health monitoring applications and reduce errors due to manual entry of information.

  16. Image-Based Localization for Indoor Environment Using Mobile Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhan, K.; Zhao, J.; Gui, P.; Feng, T.

    2015-05-01

    Real-time indoor localization based on supporting infrastructures like wireless devices and QR codes are usually costly and labor intensive to implement. In this study, we explored a cheap alternative approach based on images for indoor localization. A user can localize him/herself by just shooting a photo of the surrounding indoor environment using the mobile phone. No any other equipment is required. This is achieved by employing image-matching and searching techniques with a dataset of pre-captured indoor images. In the beginning, a database of structured images of the indoor environment is constructed by using image matching and the bundle adjustment algorithm. Then each image's relative pose (its position and orientation) is estimated and the semantic locations of images are tagged. A user's location can then be determined by comparing a photo taken by the mobile phone to the database. This is done by combining quick image searching, matching and the relative orientation. This study also try to explore image acquisition plans and the processing capacity of off-the-shell mobile phones. During the whole pipeline, a collection of indoor images with both rich and poor textures are examined. Several feature detectors are used and compared. Pre-processing of complex indoor photo is also implemented on the mobile phone. The preliminary experimental results prove the feasibility of this method. In the future, we are trying to raise the efficiency of matching between indoor images and explore the fast 4G wireless communication to ensure the speed and accuracy of the localization based on a client-server framework.

  17. Mobile Phone Assessment in Egocentric Networks: A Pilot Study on Gay Men and Their Peers

    PubMed Central

    Comulada, W. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone-based data collection encompasses the richness of social network research. Both individual-level and network-level measures can be recorded. For example, health-related behaviors can be reported via mobile assessment. Social interactions can be assessed by phone-log data. Yet the potential of mobile phone data collection has largely been untapped. This is especially true of egocentric studies in public health settings where mobile phones can enhance both data collection and intervention delivery, e.g. mobile users can video chat with counselors. This is due in part to privacy issues and other barriers that are more difficult to address outside of academic settings where most mobile research to date has taken place. In this article, we aim to inform a broader discussion on mobile research. In particular, benefits and challenges to mobile phone-based data collection are highlighted through our mobile phone-based pilot study that was conducted on egocentric networks of 12 gay men (n = 44 total participants). HIV-transmission and general health behaviors were reported through a mobile phone-based daily assessment that was administered through study participants’ own mobile phones. Phone log information was collected from gay men with Android phones. Benefits and challenges to mobile implementation are discussed, along with the application of multi-level models to the type of longitudinal egocentric data that we collected. PMID:25844003

  18. A survey of online activity recognition using mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2015-01-19

    Physical activity recognition using embedded sensors has enabled many context-aware applications in different areas, such as healthcare. Initially, one or more dedicated wearable sensors were used for such applications. However, recently, many researchers started using mobile phones for this purpose, since these ubiquitous devices are equipped with various sensors, ranging from accelerometers to magnetic field sensors. In most of the current studies, sensor data collected for activity recognition are analyzed offline using machine learning tools. However, there is now a trend towards implementing activity recognition systems on these devices in an online manner, since modern mobile phones have become more powerful in terms of available resources, such as CPU, memory and battery. The research on offline activity recognition has been reviewed in several earlier studies in detail. However, work done on online activity recognition is still in its infancy and is yet to be reviewed. In this paper, we review the studies done so far that implement activity recognition systems on mobile phones and use only their on-board sensors. We discuss various aspects of these studies. Moreover, we discuss their limitations and present various recommendations for future research.

  19. Mobile phone waste management and recycling: Views and trends.

    PubMed

    Sarath, P; Bonda, Sateesh; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K

    2015-12-01

    There is an enormous growth in mobile phone consumption worldwide which leads to generation of a large volume of mobile phone waste every year. The aim of this review is to give an insight on the articles on mobile phone waste management and recycling, published in scientific journals, major proceedings and books from 1999 to 2015. The major areas of research have been identified and discussed based on available literature in each research topic. It was observed that most of these articles were published during the recent years, with the number of articles increasing yearly. Material recovery and review on management options of waste are found to be the leading topics in this area. Researchers have proved that economically viable refurbishing or recycling of such waste is possible in an environmentally friendly manner. However, the literatures indicate that without proper consumer awareness, a recycling system cannot perform to its maximum efficiency. The methodologies followed and analytical techniques employed by the researchers to attain their objectives have been discussed. The graphical representations of available literature on current topic with respect to year of publication, topics and location have also been explored.

  20. A Survey of Online Activity Recognition Using Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity recognition using embedded sensors has enabled many context-aware applications in different areas, such as healthcare. Initially, one or more dedicated wearable sensors were used for such applications. However, recently, many researchers started using mobile phones for this purpose, since these ubiquitous devices are equipped with various sensors, ranging from accelerometers to magnetic field sensors. In most of the current studies, sensor data collected for activity recognition are analyzed offline using machine learning tools. However, there is now a trend towards implementing activity recognition systems on these devices in an online manner, since modern mobile phones have become more powerful in terms of available resources, such as CPU, memory and battery. The research on offline activity recognition has been reviewed in several earlier studies in detail. However, work done on online activity recognition is still in its infancy and is yet to be reviewed. In this paper, we review the studies done so far that implement activity recognition systems on mobile phones and use only their on-board sensors. We discuss various aspects of these studies. Moreover, we discuss their limitations and present various recommendations for future research. PMID:25608213

  1. Mobile phone waste management and recycling: Views and trends.

    PubMed

    Sarath, P; Bonda, Sateesh; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K

    2015-12-01

    There is an enormous growth in mobile phone consumption worldwide which leads to generation of a large volume of mobile phone waste every year. The aim of this review is to give an insight on the articles on mobile phone waste management and recycling, published in scientific journals, major proceedings and books from 1999 to 2015. The major areas of research have been identified and discussed based on available literature in each research topic. It was observed that most of these articles were published during the recent years, with the number of articles increasing yearly. Material recovery and review on management options of waste are found to be the leading topics in this area. Researchers have proved that economically viable refurbishing or recycling of such waste is possible in an environmentally friendly manner. However, the literatures indicate that without proper consumer awareness, a recycling system cannot perform to its maximum efficiency. The methodologies followed and analytical techniques employed by the researchers to attain their objectives have been discussed. The graphical representations of available literature on current topic with respect to year of publication, topics and location have also been explored. PMID:26383903

  2. From mobile phone data to the spatial structure of cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louail, Thomas; Lenormand, Maxime; Cantu Ros, Oliva G.; Picornell, Miguel; Herranz, Ricardo; Frias-Martinez, Enrique; Ramasco, José J.; Barthelemy, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Pervasive infrastructures, such as cell phone networks, enable to capture large amounts of human behavioral data but also provide information about the structure of cities and their dynamical properties. In this article, we focus on these last aspects by studying phone data recorded during 55 days in 31 Spanish cities. We first define an urban dilatation index which measures how the average distance between individuals evolves during the day, allowing us to highlight different types of city structure. We then focus on hotspots, the most crowded places in the city. We propose a parameter free method to detect them and to test the robustness of our results. The number of these hotspots scales sublinearly with the population size, a result in agreement with previous theoretical arguments and measures on employment datasets. We study the lifetime of these hotspots and show in particular that the hierarchy of permanent ones, which constitute the `heart' of the city, is very stable whatever the size of the city. The spatial structure of these hotspots is also of interest and allows us to distinguish different categories of cities, from monocentric and ``segregated'' where the spatial distribution is very dependent on land use, to polycentric where the spatial mixing between land uses is much more important. These results point towards the possibility of a new, quantitative classification of cities using high resolution spatio-temporal data.

  3. From mobile phone data to the spatial structure of cities

    PubMed Central

    Louail, Thomas; Lenormand, Maxime; Cantu Ros, Oliva G.; Picornell, Miguel; Herranz, Ricardo; Frias-Martinez, Enrique; Ramasco, José J.; Barthelemy, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive infrastructures, such as cell phone networks, enable to capture large amounts of human behavioral data but also provide information about the structure of cities and their dynamical properties. In this article, we focus on these last aspects by studying phone data recorded during 55 days in 31 Spanish cities. We first define an urban dilatation index which measures how the average distance between individuals evolves during the day, allowing us to highlight different types of city structure. We then focus on hotspots, the most crowded places in the city. We propose a parameter free method to detect them and to test the robustness of our results. The number of these hotspots scales sublinearly with the population size, a result in agreement with previous theoretical arguments and measures on employment datasets. We study the lifetime of these hotspots and show in particular that the hierarchy of permanent ones, which constitute the ‘heart' of the city, is very stable whatever the size of the city. The spatial structure of these hotspots is also of interest and allows us to distinguish different categories of cities, from monocentric and “segregated” where the spatial distribution is very dependent on land use, to polycentric where the spatial mixing between land uses is much more important. These results point towards the possibility of a new, quantitative classification of cities using high resolution spatio-temporal data. PMID:24923248

  4. Mobile phone usage and male infertility in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Behari, Jitendra

    2010-10-01

    A significant decrease in protein kinase C and total sperm count along with increased apoptosis were observed in male Wistar rats exposed to mobile phone frequencies (2 h/day x 35 days at 0.9 W/kg specific absorption rate). The results suggest that a reduction in protein kinase activity may be related to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under microwave field exposure. Decrease in sperm count and an increase in apoptosis may be causative factor due to mobile radiation exposure leading to infertility.

  5. 76 FR 24051 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Mobile Tablets, Portable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Music Players, and Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... tablets, portable music players, and computers, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... importation of certain electronic devices, including mobile phones, mobile tablets, portable music...

  6. New Approaches to Human Mobility: Using Mobile Phones for Demographic Research

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, John R.B.; Espenshade, Thomas J.; Bartumeus, Frederic; Chung, Chang Y.; Ozgencil, Necati Ercan; Li, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This article explores new methods for gathering and analyzing spatially rich demographic data using mobile phones. It describes a pilot study (the Human Mobility Project) in which volunteers around the world were successfully recruited to share GPS and cellular tower information on their trajectories and respond to dynamic, location-based surveys using an open-source Android application. The pilot study illustrates the great potential of mobile phone methodology for moving spatial measures beyond residential census units and investigating a range of important social phenomena, including the heterogeneity of activity spaces, the dynamic nature of spatial segregation, and the contextual dependence of subjective well-being. PMID:23192393

  7. New approaches to human mobility: using mobile phones for demographic research.

    PubMed

    Palmer, John R B; Espenshade, Thomas J; Bartumeus, Frederic; Chung, Chang Y; Ozgencil, Necati Ercan; Li, Kathleen

    2013-06-01

    This article explores new methods for gathering and analyzing spatially rich demographic data using mobile phones. It describes a pilot study (the Human Mobility Project) in which volunteers around the world were successfully recruited to share GPS and cellular tower information on their trajectories and respond to dynamic, location-based surveys using an open-source Android application. The pilot study illustrates the great potential of mobile phone methodology for moving spatial measures beyond residential census units and investigating a range of important social phenomena, including the heterogeneity of activity spaces, the dynamic nature of spatial segregation, and the contextual dependence of subjective well-being.

  8. Mobile Phone Interventions for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Linda G; Beatty, Alexis; Stafford, Zoey; Whooley, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health in the form of text messaging and mobile applications provides an innovative and effective approach to promote prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the magnitude of these effects is unclear. Through a comprehensive search of databases from 2002-2016, we conducted a quantitative systematic review. The selected studies were critically evaluated to extract and summarize pertinent characteristics and outcomes. A large majority of studies (22 of 28, 79%) demonstrated text messaging, mobile applications, and telemonitoring via mobile phones were effective in improving outcomes. Some key factors associated with successful interventions included personalized messages with tailored advice, greater engagement (2-way text messaging, higher frequency of messages), and use of multiple modalities. Overall, text messaging appears more effective than smartphone-based interventions. Incorporating principles of behavioral activation will help promote and sustain healthy lifestyle behaviors in patients with CVD that result in improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27001245

  9. Designing a mobile phone-based intervention to promote adherence to antiretroviral therapy in South India.

    PubMed

    Shet, Anita; Arumugam, Karthika; Rodrigues, Rashmi; Rajagopalan, Nirmala; Shubha, K; Raj, Tony; D'souza, George; De Costa, Ayesha

    2010-06-01

    Integration of mobile phone technology into HIV care holds potential, particularly in resource-constrained settings. Clinic attendees in urban and rural South India were surveyed to ascertain usage of mobile phones and perceptions of their use as an adherence aid. Mobile phone ownership was high at 73%; 26% reported shared ownership. A high proportion (66%) reported using phones to call their healthcare provider. There was interest in weekly telephonic automated voice reminders to facilitate adherence. Loss of privacy was not considered a deterrent. The study presents important considerations in the design of a mobile phone-based adherence intervention in India. PMID:20054634

  10. Mobile Phone Use Behaviors and Postures on Public Transportation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are common in our daily life, but the users’ preferences for postures or screen operating styles have not been studied. This was a cross-sectional and observational study. We randomly sampled passengers who used mobile phones on the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system in metropolitan Taipei. A checklist was used to observe their body postures and screen operating styles while sitting or standing. As a result, 1,230 subjects from 400 trips were observed. Overall, of all the passengers who were sitting, 41% of them were using mobile phones. The majority of the tasks involved browsing (84%) with their phones in a portrait orientation (93%). Different-hand holding/operating was the most commonly used operating style while sitting (46%) and same-hand holding/operating was the most common while standing (46%). The distribution of screen operating styles was significantly different for those sitting than for those standing and for different genders and age groups. The most frequently observed postures while sitting were having one’s trunk against a backrest, feet on the floor and with or without an arm supported (58%). As for the users who were standing, the both- and different-hands groups had a high proportion of arms unsupported, feet on the floor and either their trunk supported or not. In contrast, the same-hand group tended to have their trunk unsupported, were holding a pole or handstrap and had both feet on floor. Further studies are warranted to characterize the ergonomic exposure of these commonly used postures and operating styles, and our results will help guide the selection of experimental conditions for laboratory settings. PMID:26828797

  11. Mobile Phone Use Behaviors and Postures on Public Transportation Systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are common in our daily life, but the users' preferences for postures or screen operating styles have not been studied. This was a cross-sectional and observational study. We randomly sampled passengers who used mobile phones on the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system in metropolitan Taipei. A checklist was used to observe their body postures and screen operating styles while sitting or standing. As a result, 1,230 subjects from 400 trips were observed. Overall, of all the passengers who were sitting, 41% of them were using mobile phones. The majority of the tasks involved browsing (84%) with their phones in a portrait orientation (93%). Different-hand holding/operating was the most commonly used operating style while sitting (46%) and same-hand holding/operating was the most common while standing (46%). The distribution of screen operating styles was significantly different for those sitting than for those standing and for different genders and age groups. The most frequently observed postures while sitting were having one's trunk against a backrest, feet on the floor and with or without an arm supported (58%). As for the users who were standing, the both- and different-hands groups had a high proportion of arms unsupported, feet on the floor and either their trunk supported or not. In contrast, the same-hand group tended to have their trunk unsupported, were holding a pole or handstrap and had both feet on floor. Further studies are warranted to characterize the ergonomic exposure of these commonly used postures and operating styles, and our results will help guide the selection of experimental conditions for laboratory settings.

  12. Mobile Phone Use Behaviors and Postures on Public Transportation Systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are common in our daily life, but the users' preferences for postures or screen operating styles have not been studied. This was a cross-sectional and observational study. We randomly sampled passengers who used mobile phones on the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system in metropolitan Taipei. A checklist was used to observe their body postures and screen operating styles while sitting or standing. As a result, 1,230 subjects from 400 trips were observed. Overall, of all the passengers who were sitting, 41% of them were using mobile phones. The majority of the tasks involved browsing (84%) with their phones in a portrait orientation (93%). Different-hand holding/operating was the most commonly used operating style while sitting (46%) and same-hand holding/operating was the most common while standing (46%). The distribution of screen operating styles was significantly different for those sitting than for those standing and for different genders and age groups. The most frequently observed postures while sitting were having one's trunk against a backrest, feet on the floor and with or without an arm supported (58%). As for the users who were standing, the both- and different-hands groups had a high proportion of arms unsupported, feet on the floor and either their trunk supported or not. In contrast, the same-hand group tended to have their trunk unsupported, were holding a pole or handstrap and had both feet on floor. Further studies are warranted to characterize the ergonomic exposure of these commonly used postures and operating styles, and our results will help guide the selection of experimental conditions for laboratory settings. PMID:26828797

  13. Mobile phones and sex work in South India: the emerging role of mobile phones in condom use by female sex workers in two Indian states.

    PubMed

    Navani-Vazirani, Sonia; Solomon, Davidson; Gopalakrishnan; Heylen, Elsa; Srikrishnan, Aylur Kailasom; Vasudevan, Canjeevaram K; Ekstrand, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine female sex workers' solicitation of clients using mobile phones and the association between this and condom use with clients. Cross-sectional data were utilised to address the study's aim, drawing on data collected from female sex workers in Calicut, Kerala, and Chirala, Andhra Pradesh. Use of mobile phone solicitation was reported by 46.3% (n = 255) of Kerala participants and 78.7% (n = 464) of those in Andhra Pradesh. Kerala participants reporting exclusive solicitation using mobile phones demonstrated 1.67 times higher odds (95% CI: 1.01-2.79) of inconsistent condom use than those reporting non-use of mobile phones for solicitation. However, those reporting exclusive solicitation through mobile phones in Andhra Pradesh reported lower odds of inconsistent condom use (OR: 0.03; 95% CI: 0.01-0.26) than those not using mobile phones for solicitation. Findings indicate that solicitation of clients using mobile phones facilitates or hampers consistency in condom use with clients depending on the context, and how mobile phones are incorporated into solicitation practices. Variations in sex work environments, including economic dependence on sex work or lack thereof may partially account for the different effects found.

  14. Estimation of retired mobile phones generation in China: A comparative study on methodology.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Yang, Jianxin; Lu, Bin; Song, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Due to the rapid development of economy and technology, China has the biggest production and possession of mobile phones around the world. In general, mobile phones have relatively short life time because the majority of users replace their mobile phones frequently. Retired mobile phones represent the most valuable electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) in the main waste stream because of such characteristics as large quantity, high reuse/recovery value and fast replacement frequency. Consequently, the huge amount of retired mobile phones in China calls for a sustainable management system. The generation estimation can provide fundamental information to construct the sustainable management system of retired mobile phones and other waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). However, the reliable estimation result is difficult to get and verify. The priority aim of this paper is to provide proper estimation approach for the generation of retired mobile phones in China, by comparing some relevant methods. The results show that the sales&new method is in the highest priority in estimation of the retired mobile phones. The result of sales&new method shows that there are 47.92 million mobile phones retired in 2002, and it reached to 739.98 million in China in 2012. It presents an increasing tendency with some fluctuations clearly. Furthermore, some discussions on methodology, such as the selection of improper approach and error in the input data, are also conducted in order to improve generation estimation of retired mobile phones and other WEEE.

  15. Epidemiological Characteristics of Mobile Phone Ownership and Use in Korean Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Yoon-Hwan; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Choi, Kyung-Hwa; Burm, Eunae; Choi, Yeyong; Lim, Myung-Ho; Yoo, Seung-Jin; Paik, Ki-Chung; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives As public concern on possible harmful effects of mobile phone in children has been raised, information of epidemiological characteristics of mobile phone use in children and adolescents will be essential for public health policy. Methods Using three databases (n=21,693) collected from 2008 to 2011, we examined characteristics of mobile phone ownership and use, and socioeconomic positions (SEP) in Korean children and adolescents. Results The ownership rate and the amount of mobile phone use were higher in females than males, in higher school grades than lower grades, and at 2011 than 2008. The average age of first mobile phone ownership was shown to decrease from 12.5 years in currently high school students to 8.4 years in currently elementary school students at 2011. More than 90% of children in the 5th grade owned a mobile phone. More children owned a mobile phone in lower SEP communities than in higher SEP. Children with parents educated less than those with parents educated more were more likely to own and use mobile phone. Conclusions Considering the epidemiological characteristics of mobile phone use, precautionary measures to prevent unnecessary exposure to mobile phones are needed in children and adolescents. PMID:24498595

  16. Unveiling Spatial Epidemiology of HIV with Mobile Phone Data

    PubMed Central

    Brdar, Sanja; Gavrić, Katarina; Ćulibrk, Dubravko; Crnojević, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of geo-referenced mobile phone data enables the identification of behavioral patterns, habits and movements of people. With this data, we can extract the knowledge potentially useful for many applications including the one tackled in this study - understanding spatial variation of epidemics. We explored the datasets collected by a cell phone service provider and linked them to spatial HIV prevalence rates estimated from publicly available surveys. For that purpose, 224 features were extracted from mobility and connectivity traces and related to the level of HIV epidemic in 50 Ivory Coast departments. By means of regression models, we evaluated predictive ability of extracted features. Several models predicted HIV prevalence that are highly correlated (>0.7) with actual values. Through contribution analysis we identified key elements that correlate with the rate of infections and could serve as a proxy for epidemic monitoring. Our findings indicate that night connectivity and activity, spatial area covered by users and overall migrations are strongly linked to HIV. By visualizing the communication and mobility flows, we strived to explain the spatial structure of epidemics. We discovered that strong ties and hubs in communication and mobility align with HIV hot spots. PMID:26758042

  17. Unveiling Spatial Epidemiology of HIV with Mobile Phone Data.

    PubMed

    Brdar, Sanja; Gavrić, Katarina; Ćulibrk, Dubravko; Crnojević, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of geo-referenced mobile phone data enables the identification of behavioral patterns, habits and movements of people. With this data, we can extract the knowledge potentially useful for many applications including the one tackled in this study - understanding spatial variation of epidemics. We explored the datasets collected by a cell phone service provider and linked them to spatial HIV prevalence rates estimated from publicly available surveys. For that purpose, 224 features were extracted from mobility and connectivity traces and related to the level of HIV epidemic in 50 Ivory Coast departments. By means of regression models, we evaluated predictive ability of extracted features. Several models predicted HIV prevalence that are highly correlated (>0.7) with actual values. Through contribution analysis we identified key elements that correlate with the rate of infections and could serve as a proxy for epidemic monitoring. Our findings indicate that night connectivity and activity, spatial area covered by users and overall migrations are strongly linked to HIV. By visualizing the communication and mobility flows, we strived to explain the spatial structure of epidemics. We discovered that strong ties and hubs in communication and mobility align with HIV hot spots. PMID:26758042

  18. Unveiling Spatial Epidemiology of HIV with Mobile Phone Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brdar, Sanja; Gavrić, Katarina; Ćulibrk, Dubravko; Crnojević, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of geo-referenced mobile phone data enables the identification of behavioral patterns, habits and movements of people. With this data, we can extract the knowledge potentially useful for many applications including the one tackled in this study - understanding spatial variation of epidemics. We explored the datasets collected by a cell phone service provider and linked them to spatial HIV prevalence rates estimated from publicly available surveys. For that purpose, 224 features were extracted from mobility and connectivity traces and related to the level of HIV epidemic in 50 Ivory Coast departments. By means of regression models, we evaluated predictive ability of extracted features. Several models predicted HIV prevalence that are highly correlated (>0.7) with actual values. Through contribution analysis we identified key elements that correlate with the rate of infections and could serve as a proxy for epidemic monitoring. Our findings indicate that night connectivity and activity, spatial area covered by users and overall migrations are strongly linked to HIV. By visualizing the communication and mobility flows, we strived to explain the spatial structure of epidemics. We discovered that strong ties and hubs in communication and mobility align with HIV hot spots.

  19. Estimation of retired mobile phones generation in China: A comparative study on methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Yang, Jianxin; Lu, Bin; Song, Xiaolong

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The sales data of mobile phones in China was revised by considering the amount of smuggled and counterfeit mobile phones. • The estimation of retired mobile phones in China was made by comparing some relevant methods. • The advanced result of estimation can help improve the policy-making. • The method suggested in this paper can be also used in other countries. • Some discussions on methodology are also conducted in order for the improvement. - Abstract: Due to the rapid development of economy and technology, China has the biggest production and possession of mobile phones around the world. In general, mobile phones have relatively short life time because the majority of users replace their mobile phones frequently. Retired mobile phones represent the most valuable electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) in the main waste stream because of such characteristics as large quantity, high reuse/recovery value and fast replacement frequency. Consequently, the huge amount of retired mobile phones in China calls for a sustainable management system. The generation estimation can provide fundamental information to construct the sustainable management system of retired mobile phones and other waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). However, the reliable estimation result is difficult to get and verify. The priority aim of this paper is to provide proper estimation approach for the generation of retired mobile phones in China, by comparing some relevant methods. The results show that the sales and new method is in the highest priority in estimation of the retired mobile phones. The result of sales and new method shows that there are 47.92 million mobile phones retired in 2002, and it reached to 739.98 million in China in 2012. It presents an increasing tendency with some fluctuations clearly. Furthermore, some discussions on methodology, such as the selection of improper approach and error in the input data, are also conducted in order to

  20. Can mobile phones used in strong motion seismology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers are electromechanical devices able to measure static or dynamic accelerations. In the 1990s MEMS accelerometers revolutionized the automotive-airbag system industry and are currently widely used in laptops, game controllers and mobile phones. Nowadays MEMS accelerometers seems provide adequate sensitivity, noise level and dynamic range to be applicable to earthquake strong motion acquisition. The current use of 3 axes MEMS accelerometers in mobile phone maybe provide a new means to easy increase the number of observations when a strong earthquake occurs. However, before utilize the signals recorded by a mobile phone equipped with a 3 axes MEMS accelerometer for any scientific porpoise, it is fundamental to verify that the signal collected provide reliable records of ground motion. For this reason we have investigated the suitability of the iPhone 5 mobile phone (one of the most popular mobile phone in the world) for strong motion acquisition. It is provided by several MEMS devise like a three-axis gyroscope, a three-axis electronic compass and a the LIS331DLH three-axis accelerometer. The LIS331DLH sensor is a low-cost high performance three axes linear accelerometer, with 16 bit digital output, produced by STMicroelectronics Inc. We have tested the LIS331DLH MEMS accelerometer using a vibrating table and the EpiSensor FBA ES-T as reference sensor. In our experiments the reference sensor was rigidly co-mounted with the LIS331DHL MEMS sensor on the vibrating table. We assessment the MEMS accelerometer in the frequency range 0.2-20 Hz, typical range of interesting in strong motion seismology and earthquake engineering. We generate both constant and damped sine waves with central frequency starting from 0.2 Hz until 20 Hz with step of 0.2 Hz. For each frequency analyzed we generate sine waves with mean amplitude 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1600 mg0. For damped sine waves we generate waveforms with initial amplitude

  1. Long memory in patterns of mobile phone usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarczuk, Marcin

    2012-02-01

    In this article we show that usage of a mobile phone, i.e. daily series of number of calls made by a customer, exhibits long memory. We use a sample of 4502 postpaid users from a Polish mobile operator and study their two-year billing history. We estimate Hurst exponent by nine estimators: aggregated variance method, differencing the variance, absolute values of the aggregated series, Higuchi's method, residuals of regression, the R/S method, periodogram method, modified periodogram method and Whittle estimator. We also analyze empirically relations between estimators. Long memory implies an inertial effect in clients' behavior which may be used by mobile operators to accelerate usage and gain additional profit.

  2. The importance of mobile phones in the possible transmission of bacterial infections in the community.

    PubMed

    Bhoonderowa, A; Gookool, S; Biranjia-Hurdoyal, S D

    2014-10-01

    Mobile phones have become indispensable accessories in today's life. However, they might act as fomites as they have travelled with their owner to places such as toilets, hospitals and kitchens which are loaded with microorganisms. A cross-sectional study was carried out to isolate and identify bacteria from mobile phones of volunteers in the community. A total of 192 mobile phones from 102 males and 90 females were swabbed and cultured. The bacteria were identified by gram staining and conventional biochemical tests. A total of 176 mobile phones (91.7 %) showed bacterial contamination. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus was the most prevalent (69.3 %) followed by Micrococci (51.8 %), Klebsiella (1.5 %) and Pseudomonas (1 %). The mean colony forming units was higher among females than males (p < 0.05; 95 % CI 0.021-0.365) and higher on mobile phones which were kept in bags than in pockets (p < 0.05; 95 % CI 0.019-0.369). Furthermore, the use of phone cover was found to reduce microbial growth (OR 4.2; 95 % CI 1.423-12.39; p < 0.05). Significant associations were also found between bacterial growth and female participants, agricultural workers, mobile phones older than 6 months and sharing of mobile phones (p < 0.05). Mobile phones from the community carry potential pathogens. Cleaning of mobile phones should be encouraged and should be preferably stored in pockets or carry cases.

  3. Effects of Crowder Structure and Salt on DNA Mobility and Conformation in Crowded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyca, Stephanie M.; Robertson-Anderson, Rae M.

    Biological cells are crowded environments in which DNA must move through to perform specific functions. We study how the properties of crowded cell-like environments impact DNA dynamics by tracking individual 115 kbp ring and linear DNA in different crowded environments using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We determine the role of crowder structure and salt on DNA diffusion and conformation by measuring the mean-squared center-of-mass displacements, as well as the conformational shape, size, and fluctuations of each molecule. Previously, we used 10 and 500 kDa dextran as crowders and showed that mobility of both ring and linear DNA decreased exponentially with increased crowding, but rings compact while linear DNA elongate. These effects were dependent solely on the reduction in available volume for DNA rather than size or number of crowders. Here we use crowders of similar molecular weight, but different structure to dextran (10 kDa PEG and 400 kDa Ficoll). We find that DNA mobility reduction is independent of crowder structure and that ring and linear DNA undergo more significant compaction. Finally, we characterize the role of salt on DNA mobility and conformation to determine the relative roles of enthalpic versus entropic effects on crowding-induced DNA dynamics. This research was funded by the AFOSR Young Investigator Program, Grant No. FA95550-12-1-0315 and the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Scholarship Foundation.

  4. GSM mobile phone radiation suppresses brain glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Myoung Soo; Vorobyev, Victor; Kännälä, Sami; Laine, Matti; Rinne, Juha O; Toivonen, Tommi; Johansson, Jarkko; Teräs, Mika; Lindholm, Harri; Alanko, Tommi; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mobile phone radiation on cerebral glucose metabolism using high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) with the 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. A long half-life (109 minutes) of the 18F isotope allowed a long, natural exposure condition outside the PET scanner. Thirteen young right-handed male subjects were exposed to a pulse-modulated 902.4 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications signal for 33 minutes, while performing a simple visual vigilance task. Temperature was also measured in the head region (forehead, eyes, cheeks, ear canals) during exposure. 18F-deoxyglucose PET images acquired after the exposure showed that relative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was significantly reduced in the temporoparietal junction and anterior temporal lobe of the right hemisphere ipsilateral to the exposure. Temperature rise was also observed on the exposed side of the head, but the magnitude was very small. The exposure did not affect task performance (reaction time, error rate). Our results show that short-term mobile phone exposure can locally suppress brain energy metabolism in humans. PMID:21915135

  5. "MXing It up": How African Adolescents May Affect Social Change through Mobile Phone Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napolitano, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter outlines mobile phone use among African (particularly South African) adolescents. With an estimated 350 million active mobile phone subscriptions, improving network infrastructure, low-cost Internet-ready handsets, innovative programs and applications, mobiles in Africa, and their increasingly younger, increasingly poorer, and…

  6. Electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base station - variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Bienkowski, Pawel; Zubrzak, Bartlomiej

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the character of electromagnetic field (EMF) in mobile phone base station (BS) surroundings and its variability in time with an emphasis on the measurement difficulties related to its pulse and multi-frequency nature. Work also presents long-term monitoring measurements performed recently in different locations in Poland - small city with dispersed building development and in major polish city - dense urban area. Authors tried to determine the trends in changing of EMF spectrum analyzing daily changes of measured EMF levels in those locations. Research was performed using selective electromagnetic meters and also EMF meter with spectrum analysis.

  7. Electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base station - variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Bienkowski, Pawel; Zubrzak, Bartlomiej

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the character of electromagnetic field (EMF) in mobile phone base station (BS) surroundings and its variability in time with an emphasis on the measurement difficulties related to its pulse and multi-frequency nature. Work also presents long-term monitoring measurements performed recently in different locations in Poland - small city with dispersed building development and in major polish city - dense urban area. Authors tried to determine the trends in changing of EMF spectrum analyzing daily changes of measured EMF levels in those locations. Research was performed using selective electromagnetic meters and also EMF meter with spectrum analysis. PMID:26444202

  8. Assessment of extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure from GSM mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carolina; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Findlay, Richard; Maslanyj, Myron; Conil, Emmanuelle; Kromhout, Hans; Lee, Ae-kyoung; Sim, Malcolm R; Taki, Masao; Varsier, Nadège; Wiart, Joe; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-04-01

    Although radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones have received much attention, relatively little is known about the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields emitted by phones. This paper summarises ELF magnetic flux density measurements on global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones, conducted as part of the MOBI-KIDS epidemiological study. The main challenge is to identify a small number of generic phone models that can be used to classify the ELF exposure for the different phones reported in the study. Two-dimensional magnetic flux density measurements were performed on 47 GSM mobile phones at a distance of 25 mm. Maximum resultant magnetic flux density values at 217 Hz had a geometric mean of 221 (+198/-104) nT. Taking into account harmonic data, measurements suggest that mobile phones could make a substantial contribution to ELF exposure in the general population. The maximum values and easily available variables were poorly correlated. However, three groups could be defined on the basis of field pattern indicating that manufacturers and shapes of mobile phones may be the important parameters linked to the spatial characteristics of the magnetic field, and the categorization of ELF magnetic field exposure for GSM phones in the MOBI-KIDS study may be achievable on the basis of a small number of representative phones. Such categorization would result in a twofold exposure gradient between high and low exposure based on type of phone used, although there was overlap in the grouping.

  9. The Use of Mobile Phone and Medical Apps among General Practitioners in Hangzhou City, Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Ren, Wen; Qiu, Yan; Liu, Juanjuan; Yin, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile phones and mobile phone apps have expanded new forms of health professionals’ work. There are many studies on the use of mobile phone apps for different specialists. However, there are no studies on the current use of mobile phone apps among general practitioners (GPs). Objective The objective of the study was to investigate the extent to which GPs own smartphones with apps and use them to aid their clinical activities. Methods A questionnaire survey of GPs was undertaken in Hangzhou, Eastern China. Data probing GPs’ current use of medical apps in their clinical activities and factors influencing app use were collected and analyzed Results 125 GPs participated in the survey. 90.4% of GPs owned a mobile phone, with 48.7% owning an iPhone and 47.8% owning an Android phone. Most mobile phone owners had 1-3 medical-related apps, with very few owning more than 4. There was no difference in number of apps between iPhone and Android owners (χ2=1.388, P=0.846). 36% of GPs reported using medical-related apps on a daily basis. The majority of doctors reported using apps to aid clinical activities less than 30 minutes per day. Conclusions A high level of mobile phone ownership and usage among GPs was found in this study, but few people chose medical-related apps to support their clinical practice. PMID:27220417

  10. Effects of a 902 MHz mobile phone on cerebral blood flow in humans: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Haarala, Christian; Aalto, Sargo; Hautzel, Hubertus; Julkunen, Laura; Rinne, Juha O; Laine, Matti; Krause, Bernd; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2003-11-14

    Fourteen healthy right-handed subjects were scanned using PET with a [15O]water tracer during exposure to electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by a mobile phone and a sham-exposure under double-blind conditions. During scanning, the subjects performed a visual working memory task. Exposure to an active mobile phone produced a relative decrease in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) bilaterally in the auditory cortex but no rCBF changes were observed in the area of maximum EMF. It is possible that these remote findings were caused by the EMF emitted by the active mobile phone. A more likely interpretation of the present findings were a result of an auditory signal from the active mobile phone. Therefore, it is not reasoned to attribute this finding to the EMF emitted by the phone. Further study on human rCBF during exposure to EMF of a mobile phone is needed.

  11. ELISA reader does not interfere by mobile phone radiofrequency radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Seyyed Mohammad Javad; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Hamid Reza; Abdi, Mohammad Reza; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Mostafavi, Nayyer Sadat; Mahmoudi, Golshan; Berenjkoub, Nafiseh; Akmali, Zahra; Hossein-Beigi, Fahimeh; Arsang, Vajiheh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increasing number of mobile phones can physically cause electromagnetic interference (EMI) in medical environments; can also cause errors in immunoassays in laboratories. The ELISA readers are widely used as a useful diagnostic tool for Enzymun colorimetric assay in medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the ELISA reader could be interfered by the exposure to the 900 MHz cell phones in the laboratory. Materials and Methods: Human serum samples were collected from 14 healthy donors (9 women and 5 men) and each sample was divided into four aliquots and was placed into four batches for the in-vitro quantitative determination of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). During colorimetric reading of the first, second, and third batches, the ELISA reader (Stat Fax 2100, Awareness Technology, Inc., USA) was exposed to 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 W exposure of 900 MHz radiation, respectively. For the forth batch (control group), no radiation was applied. All experiments were performed comparing ELISA read out results of the I, II, and III batches with the control batch, using the Wilcoxon test with criterion level of P = 0.050. Results: The final scores in the exposed batches I, II, and III were not statistically significant relative to the control batch (P > 0.05). The results showed that 900 MHz radiation exposure did not alter the ELISA measured levels of hCG hormone in I (P = 0.219), II (P = 0.909), and III (P = 0.056) batches compared to the control batch. Conclusion: This study showed that ELISA reader does not interfere by mobile phone RF radiation at a closed contact (less than 5 cm distance). However, we recommend that medical institutions discuss these issues in the context of their specific use of technologies and frame a policy that is clear and straightforward to guide staff, patients, and visitors. PMID:27376040

  12. A Mobile Phone HIV Medication Adherence Intervention: Care4Today™ Mobile Health Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study designed to describe the experience of HIV medication adherence using a mobile phone application. For the purpose of this qualitative study, nine semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted over a three-month period at an AIDS service organization in Central Texas. The data were…

  13. Infrared thermal imaging system on a mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fu-Feng; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jing

    2015-04-30

    A novel concept towards pervasively available low-cost infrared thermal imaging system lunched on a mobile phone (MTIS) was proposed and demonstrated in this article. Through digestion on the evolutional development of milestone technologies in the area, it can be found that the portable and low-cost design would become the main stream of thermal imager for civilian purposes. As a representative trial towards this important goal, a MTIS consisting of a thermal infrared module (TIM) and mobile phone with embedded exclusive software (IRAPP) was presented. The basic strategy for the TIM construction is illustrated, including sensor adoption and optical specification. The user-oriented software was developed in the Android environment by considering its popularity and expandability. Computational algorithms with non-uniformity correction and scene-change detection are established to optimize the imaging quality and efficiency of TIM. The performance experiments and analysis indicated that the currently available detective distance for the MTIS is about 29 m. Furthermore, some family-targeted utilization enabled by MTIS was also outlined, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention, etc. This work suggests a ubiquitous way of significantly extending thermal infrared image into rather wide areas especially health care in the coming time.

  14. Infrared Thermal Imaging System on a Mobile Phone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Fu-Feng; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A novel concept towards pervasively available low-cost infrared thermal imaging system lunched on a mobile phone (MTIS) was proposed and demonstrated in this article. Through digestion on the evolutional development of milestone technologies in the area, it can be found that the portable and low-cost design would become the main stream of thermal imager for civilian purposes. As a representative trial towards this important goal, a MTIS consisting of a thermal infrared module (TIM) and mobile phone with embedded exclusive software (IRAPP) was presented. The basic strategy for the TIM construction is illustrated, including sensor adoption and optical specification. The user-oriented software was developed in the Android environment by considering its popularity and expandability. Computational algorithms with non-uniformity correction and scene-change detection are established to optimize the imaging quality and efficiency of TIM. The performance experiments and analysis indicated that the currently available detective distance for the MTIS is about 29 m. Furthermore, some family-targeted utilization enabled by MTIS was also outlined, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention, etc. This work suggests a ubiquitous way of significantly extending thermal infrared image into rather wide areas especially health care in the coming time. PMID:25942639

  15. Mobile phone camera benchmarking in low light environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2015-01-01

    High noise values and poor signal to noise ratio are traditionally associated to the low light imaging. Still, there are several other camera quality features which may suffer from low light environment. For example, what happens to the color accuracy and resolution or how the camera speed behaves in low light? Furthermore, how low light environments affect to the camera benchmarking and which metrics are the critical ones? The work contains standard based image quality measurements including noise, color, and resolution measurements in three different light environments: 1000, 100, and 30 lux. Moreover, camera speed measurements are done. Detailed measurement results of each quality and speed category are revealed and compared. Also a suitable benchmark algorithm is evaluated and corresponding score is calculated to find an appropriate metric which characterize the camera performance in different environments. The result of this work introduces detailed image quality and camera speed measurements of mobile phone camera systems in three different light environments. The paper concludes how different light environments influence to the metrics and which metrics should be measured in low light environment. Finally, a benchmarking score is calculated using measurement data of each environment and mobile phone cameras are compared correspondingly.

  16. A Study on Iris Localization and Recognition on Mobile Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kang Ryoung; Park, Hyun-Ae; Kang, Byung Jun; Lee, Eui Chul; Jeong, Dae Sik

    2007-12-01

    A new iris recognition method for mobile phones based on corneal specular reflections (SRs) is discussed. We present the following three novelties over previous research. First, in case of user with glasses, many noncorneal SRs may happen on the surface of glasses and it is very difficult to detect genuine SR on the cornea. To overcome such problems, we propose a successive on/off dual illuminator scheme to detect genuine SRs on the corneas of users with glasses. Second, to detect SRs robustly, we estimated the size, shape, and brightness of the SRs based on eye, camera, and illuminator models. Third, the detected eye (iris) region was verified again using the AdaBoost eye detector. Experimental results with 400 face images captured from 100 persons with a mobile phone camera showed that the rate of correct iris detection was 99.5[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] (for images without glasses) and 98.9[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] (for images with glasses or contact lenses). The consequent accuracy of iris authentication was 0.05[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] of the EER (equal error rate) based on detected iris images.

  17. Infrared thermal imaging system on a mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fu-Feng; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A novel concept towards pervasively available low-cost infrared thermal imaging system lunched on a mobile phone (MTIS) was proposed and demonstrated in this article. Through digestion on the evolutional development of milestone technologies in the area, it can be found that the portable and low-cost design would become the main stream of thermal imager for civilian purposes. As a representative trial towards this important goal, a MTIS consisting of a thermal infrared module (TIM) and mobile phone with embedded exclusive software (IRAPP) was presented. The basic strategy for the TIM construction is illustrated, including sensor adoption and optical specification. The user-oriented software was developed in the Android environment by considering its popularity and expandability. Computational algorithms with non-uniformity correction and scene-change detection are established to optimize the imaging quality and efficiency of TIM. The performance experiments and analysis indicated that the currently available detective distance for the MTIS is about 29 m. Furthermore, some family-targeted utilization enabled by MTIS was also outlined, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention, etc. This work suggests a ubiquitous way of significantly extending thermal infrared image into rather wide areas especially health care in the coming time. PMID:25942639

  18. Mobile phone technology in the management of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ryan, D; Cobern, W; Wheeler, J; Price, D; Tarassenko, L

    2005-01-01

    Peak flow monitoring is widely recommended as part of a self-management plan for asthma. We conducted an observational study using electronic peak flow monitoring and mobile phone technology in a UK general practice population over a nine-month period. Patients between 12 and 55 years of age who required treatment with regular inhaled steroids and (as needed) bronchodilators were recruited from nine general practices. Patients were included if their asthma was considered stable (i.e. no exacerbation in the previous three months). No therapeutic intervention was proposed. The primary outcome measure was compliance. In all, 69% of the 46 participants who filled in the post-study questionnaire were 'satisfied' or 'very satisfied' by the study, citing the ease of use and the increased autonomy and understanding of asthma as the main advantages. In total, 74% indicated that the system had helped to improve their ability to manage their symptoms. The most positive features of the telemedicine system were described as follows: increased awareness and information about asthma, improved ability to monitor/manage the condition with the feedback screens on the mobile phone and ease of use.

  19. Symptoms and Cognitive Functions in Adolescents in Relation to Mobile Phone Use during Night.

    PubMed

    Schoeni, Anna; Roser, Katharina; Röösli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents tend to leave their mobile phones turned on during night, accepting that they may be awakened by an incoming text message or call. Using self-reported and objective operator recorded mobile phone use data, we thus aimed to analyze how being awakened during night by mobile phone affects adolescents' perceived health and cognitive functions. In this cross-sectional study, 439 adolescents completed questionnaires about their mobile phone use during night, health related quality of life and possible confounding factors. Standardized computerized cognitive tests were performed to assess memory and concentration capacity. Objective operator recorded mobile phone use data was further collected for 233 study participants. Data were analyzed by multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders including amount of mobile phone use. For adolescents reporting to be awakened by a mobile phone during night at least once a month the odds ratio for daytime tiredness and rapid exhaustibility were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.02-3.39) and 2.28 (95% CI: 0.97-5.34), respectively. Similar results were found when analyzing objective operator recorded mobile phone use data (tiredness: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.94-2.82 and rapid exhaustibility: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01-5.36). The cognitive tests on memory and concentration capacity were not related to mobile phone use during night. Overall, being awakened during night by mobile phone was associated with an increase in health symptom reports such as tiredness, rapid exhaustibility, headache and physical ill-being, but not with memory and concentration capacity. Prevention strategies should focus on helping adolescents set limits for their accessibility by mobile phone, especially during night. PMID:26222312

  20. Symptoms and Cognitive Functions in Adolescents in Relation to Mobile Phone Use during Night.

    PubMed

    Schoeni, Anna; Roser, Katharina; Röösli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents tend to leave their mobile phones turned on during night, accepting that they may be awakened by an incoming text message or call. Using self-reported and objective operator recorded mobile phone use data, we thus aimed to analyze how being awakened during night by mobile phone affects adolescents' perceived health and cognitive functions. In this cross-sectional study, 439 adolescents completed questionnaires about their mobile phone use during night, health related quality of life and possible confounding factors. Standardized computerized cognitive tests were performed to assess memory and concentration capacity. Objective operator recorded mobile phone use data was further collected for 233 study participants. Data were analyzed by multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders including amount of mobile phone use. For adolescents reporting to be awakened by a mobile phone during night at least once a month the odds ratio for daytime tiredness and rapid exhaustibility were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.02-3.39) and 2.28 (95% CI: 0.97-5.34), respectively. Similar results were found when analyzing objective operator recorded mobile phone use data (tiredness: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.94-2.82 and rapid exhaustibility: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01-5.36). The cognitive tests on memory and concentration capacity were not related to mobile phone use during night. Overall, being awakened during night by mobile phone was associated with an increase in health symptom reports such as tiredness, rapid exhaustibility, headache and physical ill-being, but not with memory and concentration capacity. Prevention strategies should focus on helping adolescents set limits for their accessibility by mobile phone, especially during night.

  1. Symptoms and Cognitive Functions in Adolescents in Relation to Mobile Phone Use during Night

    PubMed Central

    Schoeni, Anna; Roser, Katharina; Röösli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents tend to leave their mobile phones turned on during night, accepting that they may be awakened by an incoming text message or call. Using self-reported and objective operator recorded mobile phone use data, we thus aimed to analyze how being awakened during night by mobile phone affects adolescents’ perceived health and cognitive functions. In this cross-sectional study, 439 adolescents completed questionnaires about their mobile phone use during night, health related quality of life and possible confounding factors. Standardized computerized cognitive tests were performed to assess memory and concentration capacity. Objective operator recorded mobile phone use data was further collected for 233 study participants. Data were analyzed by multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders including amount of mobile phone use. For adolescents reporting to be awakened by a mobile phone during night at least once a month the odds ratio for daytime tiredness and rapid exhaustibility were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.02–3.39) and 2.28 (95% CI: 0.97–5.34), respectively. Similar results were found when analyzing objective operator recorded mobile phone use data (tiredness: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.94–2.82 and rapid exhaustibility: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01–5.36). The cognitive tests on memory and concentration capacity were not related to mobile phone use during night. Overall, being awakened during night by mobile phone was associated with an increase in health symptom reports such as tiredness, rapid exhaustibility, headache and physical ill-being, but not with memory and concentration capacity. Prevention strategies should focus on helping adolescents set limits for their accessibility by mobile phone, especially during night. PMID:26222312

  2. User-centric incentive design for participatory mobile phone sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Lu, Haoyang

    2014-05-01

    Mobile phone sensing is a critical underpinning of pervasive mobile computing, and is one of the key factors for improving people's quality of life in modern society via collective utilization of the on-board sensing capabilities of people's smartphones. The increasing demands for sensing services and ambient awareness in mobile environments highlight the necessity of active participation of individual mobile users in sensing tasks. User incentives for such participation have been continuously offered from an application-centric perspective, i.e., as payments from the sensing server, to compensate users' sensing costs. These payments, however, are manipulated to maximize the benefits of the sensing server, ignoring the runtime flexibility and benefits of participating users. This paper presents a novel framework of user-centric incentive design, and develops a universal sensing platform which translates heterogenous sensing tasks to a generic sensing plan specifying the task-independent requirements of sensing performance. We use this sensing plan as input to reduce three categories of sensing costs, which together cover the possible sources hindering users' participation in sensing.

  3. Global localization from monocular SLAM on a mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jonathan; Arth, Clemens; Reitmayr, Gerhard; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2014-04-01

    We propose the combination of a keyframe-based monocular SLAM system and a global localization method. The SLAM system runs locally on a camera-equipped mobile client and provides continuous, relative 6DoF pose estimation as well as keyframe images with computed camera locations. As the local map expands, a server process localizes the keyframes with a pre-made, globally-registered map and returns the global registration correction to the mobile client. The localization result is updated each time a keyframe is added, and observations of global anchor points are added to the client-side bundle adjustment process to further refine the SLAM map registration and limit drift. The end result is a 6DoF tracking and mapping system which provides globally registered tracking in real-time on a mobile device, overcomes the difficulties of localization with a narrow field-of-view mobile phone camera, and is not limited to tracking only in areas covered by the offline reconstruction.

  4. Hybrid virtual reality and telepresence utilizing mobile phone technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Gordon M.; Clark, J.; Fryer, R.; Hardiman, R.; MacGregor, D.; Retik, A.; Retik, N.; Revie, Kenneth

    1998-12-01

    An overview of the design and application of a unique mobile hybrid telepresence and virtual reality system is first provided. This is followed by a description of each of the integrated sub-systems. These include the telepresence and teleoperation sub-system comprising display, control, and communication elements together with camera platforms and a mobile vehicle, a virtual reality module capable of modeling capable of modeling a 4D civil engineering environment, in this case a construction site, and the image compression and decompression techniques which allow the video from the remote site to be transmitted across a very low bandwidth mobile phone network. The mobile telepresence system can be located on a real world construction site to observe work in progress. This video information can be accessed by a user from any remote location and compared with the VR model of planned progress. The user can then guide the vehicle and camera system to any desired viewpoint. Illustrations of the first trials of the full system, comments on problems experienced, and suggestions for further work are provided.

  5. Using technology to promote mobile learning: engaging students with cell phones in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Robb, Meigan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in cell phone technology have impacted every aspect of society. Individuals have instant access to social networks, Web sites, and applications. Faculty need to consider using these mobile devices to enrich the classroom. The authors discuss how they successfully designed and incorporated cell phone learning activities into their classrooms. Teaching-learning strategies using cell phone technology and recommendations for overcoming challenges associated with cell phone use in the classroom are discussed.

  6. Using technology to promote mobile learning: engaging students with cell phones in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Robb, Meigan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in cell phone technology have impacted every aspect of society. Individuals have instant access to social networks, Web sites, and applications. Faculty need to consider using these mobile devices to enrich the classroom. The authors discuss how they successfully designed and incorporated cell phone learning activities into their classrooms. Teaching-learning strategies using cell phone technology and recommendations for overcoming challenges associated with cell phone use in the classroom are discussed. PMID:23086071

  7. Research on phone contacts online status based on mobile cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-jinga; Ge, Weib

    2013-03-01

    Because the limited ability of storage space, CPU processing on mobile phone, it is difficult to realize complex applications on mobile phones, but along with the development of cloud computing, we can place the computing and storage in the clouds, provide users with rich cloud services, helping users complete various function through the browser has become the trend for future mobile communication. This article is taking the mobile phone contacts online status as an example to analysis the development and application of mobile cloud computing.

  8. A conceptual model of public medical service system based-on cell phone mobile platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hongjiao; Zhao, Yue

    In recent years, cell phones have played an increasingly important role in rapidly-developing global telecommunication services. At present, mobile business develops very fast. However, the development in other mobile service fields, such as public service, mobile medical service, etc, is still in its infant stage. Drawing on the experience of the 'doctor workstation project' which is cooperated by Renmin University of China and Norway Fredskorps Corporation, this paper discusses the research and implementation of the Doctor Workstation System based on cell phone mobile platform. From the practice of the Doctor Workstation System, the paper advances a conceptual model of public medical service system based-on cell phone mobile platform.

  9. Greening academia: Use and disposal of mobile phones among university students

    SciTech Connect

    Ongondo, F.O.; Williams, I.D.

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: > Students use/disposal of mobile phones was assessed via a large-scale survey and a takeback trial. > We estimate 3.7 m phones stockpiled by UK students; 29.3 and 28.1 m stockpiled for Europe and USA. > Many students replace phones at least once a year; only a small number have used a takeback service. > Monetary incentives have greatest influence over willingness to utilise takeback services. > Universities should partner with established operators to conduct targeted takeback services. - Abstract: Mobile phones have relatively short lifecycles and are rapidly seen as obsolete by many users within little over a year. However, the reusability of these devices as well as their material composition means that in terms of mass and volume, mobile phones represent the most valuable electronic products that are currently found in large numbers in waste streams. End-of-life mobile phones are a high value (from a reuse and resource perspective), high volume (quantity), low cost (residual monetary value) and transient (short lifecycle) electronic product. There are very large numbers of higher education (mainly university) students in the world - there are >2.4 million in the UK alone, 19 million in Europe and 18.2 million in the USA - and they often replace their mobile phones several times before graduation. Thus, because of the potentially significant environmental and economic impacts, a large scale survey of students at 5 UK universities was conducted to assess the behaviour of students with regard to their use and disposal of mobile phones. Additionally, a small scale trial mobile phone takeback service at one of the universities was carried out. The findings indicate that many students replace their phones at least once a year; replacing broken phones, getting upgrades from network operators, remaining 'fashionable' and a desire to have a handset with a longer battery life are the main reasons for such rapid replacement. Almost 60% of replaced

  10. Weather effects on mobile social interactions: a case study of mobile phone users in Lisbon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Olivier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs) in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy), people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics. PMID:23071523

  11. Weather effects on mobile social interactions: a case study of mobile phone users in Lisbon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Olivier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs) in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy), people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics.

  12. Weather Effects on Mobile Social Interactions: A Case Study of Mobile Phone Users in Lisbon, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W.; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Olivier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs) in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy), people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics. PMID:23071523

  13. Effect of Prolonged Use of Mobile Phone on Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Darshan; Sharma, Rajiv; Arora, Khushdeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Mobile phones are being widely used throughout the world. Electromagnetic waves generated from mobile phones have raised concerns as these may have adverse effects on human auditory system owing to the daily use of mobile phones. The purpose of current study was to evaluate the effects of long term mobile phone usage on auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABR). Materials and Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional, case control study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital. Total 100 healthy subjects aged 18 to 30 years of both the genders were selected, out of which 67 subjects were long-term GSM mobile phone users (using mobile phone for more than 1 year) and 33 were controls who were mobile phone non users. Both the groups were investigated for ABR and changes were studied in both the ears of cases and controls to ascertain the effects of electromagnetic exposure. Results No significant difference (p>0.05) was found in latencies, interpeak latencies and amplitudes of ABR waves between cases and controls. Conclusion Our study shows that long term usage of mobile phones does not affect propagation of electrical stimuli along the auditory nerve to auditory brainstem centres. PMID:26155473

  14. A Simple Demonstration for Exploring the Radio Waves Generated by a Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones. (Contains 5 figures.)

  15. Development of a Cross-Platform Ubiquitous Language Learning Service via Mobile Phone and Interactive Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallahkhair, Sanaz; Pemberton, L.; Griffiths, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development processes for a cross-platform ubiquitous language learning service via interactive television (iTV) and mobile phone. Adapting a learner-centred design methodology, a number of requirements were gathered from multiple sources that were subsequently used in TAMALLE (television and mobile phone assisted language…

  16. Over-Connected? A Qualitative Exploration of the Relationship between Australian Youth and Their Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Shari P.; White, Katherine M.; Young, Ross M.

    2008-01-01

    In Australia, youth are the most prolific users of mobile phones, however, there is little research investigating this phenomenon. This paper reports a qualitative exploration of psychological factors relating to mobile phone use amongst Australian youth. 32 participants, aged between 16 and 24 years, took part in focus group discussions. Thematic…

  17. Essays on the Economic Impacts of Mobile Phones in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstock, Joshua Evan

    2012-01-01

    As mobile phones reach the remote corners of the world, they bring with them a sense of great optimism. Hailed as a technology that "can transform the lives of the people who are able to access them," mobile phones have the potential to play a positive role in the lives of many of the world's poor. Such claims are often reported…

  18. Opinions and Attitudes of Prospective Teachers for the Use of Mobile Phones in Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakir, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the current use of mobile phones in a foreign language teaching context where English is used as the medium of instruction by prospective teachers. To this end, it presents the views of prospective English teachers on utilizing the mobile phone as an instructional tool for foreign language learning purposes in…

  19. Effect of Use of Mobile Phone on Mental Health of Higher Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anboucarassy, B.; Begum, Mumtaz

    2014-01-01

    The world of today is shrinking due to globalization as many scientific and technological development has stepped in all fields. Nowadays, the mobile phone is widely used as a means of communication. Mobile phones are a fully-portable medium of electronic communication which enables the transmission of information in the form of sound, text or…

  20. Usability of Mobile Phones in Physical Activity-Rrelated Research: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Courtney M.; Thompson, Dixie L.; Bassett, David R., Jr.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.; Raynor, Hollie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of mobile phones for physical activity (PA) promotion and assessment represents an attractive research area because this technology is characterized by a widespread reach and dynamic features. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of mobile phone-based approaches for encouraging and assessing PA.…

  1. 78 FR 34132 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... published a notice (78 FR 12892, May 31, 2013) of receipt of complaint entitled Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission...

  2. East vs. West: A Comparison of Mobile Phone Use by Chinese and American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosehfeld, Barbara; O'Connor-Petruso, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones are used around the world, however, there are no definitive rules regarding their appropriate use. In the absence of such codification, the researchers surveyed 225 American and 115 Chinese college students to understand their perceptions of etiquette and appropriate use of mobile phones both in the classroom and in other public…

  3. Using Mobile Phones to Promote Lifelong Learning among Rural Women in Southern India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balasubramanian, K.; Thamizoli, P.; Umar, Abdurrahman; Kanwar, Asha

    2010-01-01

    This article is an attempt to study the role of mobile phones in the non-formal and informal context among rural women from resource poor communities. In particular, it focuses on the women's control over the mobile phone as a learning tool through the domestication of technologies. The distance learning, gender dimensions, and use of technologies…

  4. Are You Still with Us? Managing Mobile Phone Use and Group Interaction in PBL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Gillian; Wiggins, Sally; Anderson, Tony

    2016-01-01

    As mobile phone technology becomes more advanced, so too does its presence in everyday life. Research has shown, for instance, that students are using their mobile phones in classroom settings, a practice that holds both potential advantages and disadvantages. In group work, these interactions may have consequences for group dynamics in that…

  5. Texting Capital: Mobile Phones, Social Transformation, and the Reproduction of Power in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uy-Tioco, Cecilia S.

    2013-01-01

    The mobile phone has arguably become the most ubiquitous information communication technology (ICT) in the world, including in the developing world. Introduced in the Philippines in the early 1990s, mobile phone penetration is expected to reach 100 percent in 2013, an interesting phenomenon since a third of the country lives below the poverty…

  6. Mobile Phones and Social Media Empower the Citizen Seismologist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, J.; Dashti, S.; Reilly, J.; Bayen, A. M.; Glaser, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Emergency responders must "see" the effects of an earthquake clearly and rapidly for effective response. Mobile phone and information technology can be used to measure ground motion intensity parameters and relay that information to emergency responders. However, the phone sensor is an imperfect device and has a limited operational range. Thus, shake table tests were performed to evaluate their reliability as seismic monitoring instruments. Representative handheld devices, either rigidly connected to the table or free to move, measured shaking intensity parameters well. Bias in 5%-damped spectral accelerations measured by phones was less than 0.05 and 0.2 [log(g)] during one-dimensional (1-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) shaking in frequencies ranging from 1 Hz to 10 Hz. They did tend to over-estimate the Arias Intensity, but this error declined for stronger motions with larger signal-to-noise ratios. Additionally, much of the data about infrastructure performance and geotechnical effects of an earthquake are lost soon after an earthquake occurs as efforts move to the recovery phase. A better methodology for reliable and rapid collection of perishable hazards data will enhance scientific inquiry and accelerate the building of disaster-resilient cities. Post-earthquake reconnaissance efforts can be aided through the strategic collection and reuse of social media data and other remote sources of information. This is demonstrated through their use following the NSF-sponsored GEER response to the September 2013 flooding in Colorado. With these ubiquitous measurement devices in the hands of the citizen seismologist, a more accurate and rapid portrayal of the damage distribution during an earthquake may be provided to emergency responders and to the public.

  7. Biomarkers in volunteers exposed to mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Söderqvist, Fredrik; Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2015-06-01

    For some time it has been investigated whether low-intensity non-thermal microwave radiation from mobile phones adversely affects the mammalian blood-brain barrier (BBB). All such studies except one have been either in vitro or experimental animal studies. The one carried out on humans showed a statistically significant increase in serum transthyretin (TTR) 60 min after finishing of a 30-min microwave exposure session. The aim of the present study was to follow up on the finding of the previous one using a better study design. Using biomarkers analyzed in blood serum before and after the exposure this single blinded randomized counterbalanced study, including 24 healthy subjects aged 18-30 years that all underwent three exposure conditions (SAR(10G)=2 W/kg, SAR(10G)=0.2 W/kg, sham), tested whether microwaves from an 890-MHz phone-like signal give acute effects on the integrity of brain-shielding barriers. Over time, statistically significant variations were found for two of the three biomarkers (TTR; β-trace protein); however, no such difference was found between the different exposure conditions nor was there any interaction between exposure condition and time of blood sampling. In conclusion this study failed to show any acute clinically or statistically significant effect of short term microwave exposure on the serum levels of S100β, TTR and β-trace protein with a follow up limited to two hours. The study was hampered by the fact that all study persons were regular wireless phone users and thus not naïve as to microwave exposure. PMID:25839137

  8. Adaptive Activity and Environment Recognition for Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Jussi; Bojja, Jayaprasad; Collin, Jussi; Leppänen, Jussi; Eronen, Antti

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive activity and environment recognition algorithm running on a mobile phone is presented. The algorithm makes inferences based on sensor and radio receiver data provided by the phone. A wide set of features that can be extracted from these data sources were investigated, and a Bayesian maximum a posteriori classifier was used for classifying between several user activities and environments. The accuracy of the method was evaluated on a dataset collected in a real-life trial. In addition, comparison to other state-of-the-art classifiers, namely support vector machines and decision trees, was performed. To make the system adaptive for individual user characteristics, an adaptation algorithm for context model parameters was designed. Moreover, a confidence measure for the classification correctness was designed. The proposed adaptation algorithm and confidence measure were evaluated on a second dataset obtained from another real-life trial, where the users were requested to provide binary feedback on the classification correctness. The results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm is effective at improving the classification accuracy. PMID:25372620

  9. Adaptive activity and environment recognition for mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Jussi; Bojja, Jayaprasad; Collin, Jussi; Leppänen, Jussi; Eronen, Antti

    2014-11-03

    In this paper, an adaptive activity and environment recognition algorithm running on a mobile phone is presented. The algorithm makes inferences based on sensor and radio receiver data provided by the phone. A wide set of features that can be extracted from these data sources were investigated, and a Bayesian maximum a posteriori classifier was used for classifying between several user activities and environments. The accuracy of the method was evaluated on a dataset collected in a real-life trial. In addition, comparison to other state-of-the-art classifiers, namely support vector machines and decision trees, was performed. To make the system adaptive for individual user characteristics, an adaptation algorithm for context model parameters was designed. Moreover, a confidence measure for the classification correctness was designed. The proposed adaptation algorithm and confidence measure were evaluated on a second dataset obtained from another real-life trial, where the users were requested to provide binary feedback on the classification correctness. The results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm is effective at improving the classification accuracy.

  10. Unique in the Crowd: The privacy bounds of human mobility

    PubMed Central

    de Montjoye, Yves-Alexandre; Hidalgo, César A.; Verleysen, Michel; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-01-01

    We study fifteen months of human mobility data for one and a half million individuals and find that human mobility traces are highly unique. In fact, in a dataset where the location of an individual is specified hourly, and with a spatial resolution equal to that given by the carrier's antennas, four spatio-temporal points are enough to uniquely identify 95% of the individuals. We coarsen the data spatially and temporally to find a formula for the uniqueness of human mobility traces given their resolution and the available outside information. This formula shows that the uniqueness of mobility traces decays approximately as the 1/10 power of their resolution. Hence, even coarse datasets provide little anonymity. These findings represent fundamental constraints to an individual's privacy and have important implications for the design of frameworks and institutions dedicated to protect the privacy of individuals. PMID:23524645

  11. Near-Infrared Grating Spectrometer for Mobile Phone Applications.

    PubMed

    Pügner, Tino; Knobbe, Jens; Grüger, Heinrich

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the chemical analysis of organic and inorganic matter. Accordingly, spectroscopic instrumentation of different complexity has been developed and is currently commercially available. However, there are an increasing number of new mobile applications that have come into focus and that cannot be addressed by the existing technology due to size and cost. Therefore, a new miniaturized scanning grating spectrometer for NIR spectroscopy has been developed at Fraunhofer IPMS. It is based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and has been designed to meet the requirements for mobile application, regarding spectral range, resolution, overall size, robustness, and cost. The MEMS spectrometer covers a spectral range from 950 nm to 1900 nm at a resolution of 10 nm. The instrument is extremely small and has a volume of only 2.1 cm(3) Therefore, it is well suited for integration, even into a mobile phone. A first sample of the new spectrometer has been manufactured and put into operation. The results of a series of test measurements are in good agreement with the requirements and specifications.

  12. How Do Mobile Phone Diabetes Programs Drive Behavior Change?

    PubMed Central

    Nundy, Shantanu; Mishra, Anjuli; Hogan, Patrick; Lee, Sang Mee; Solomon, Marla C.; Peek, Monica E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioral effects of a theory-driven, mobile phone–based intervention that combines automated text messaging and remote nursing, using an automated, interactive text messaging system. Methods This was a mixed methods observational cohort study. Study participants were members of the University of Chicago Health Plan (UCHP) who largely reside in a working-class, urban African American community. Surveys were conducted at baseline, 3 months (mid-intervention), and 6 months (postintervention) to test the hypothesis that the intervention would be associated with improvements in self-efficacy, social support, health beliefs, and self-care. In addition, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with 14 participants and then analyzed using the constant comparative method to identify new behavioral constructs affected by the intervention. Results The intervention was associated with improvements in 5 of 6 domains of self-care (medication taking, glucose monitoring, foot care, exercise, and healthy eating) and improvements in 1 or more measures of self-efficacy, social support, and health beliefs (perceived control). Qualitatively, participants reported that knowledge, attitudes, and ownership were also affected by the program. Together these findings were used to construct a new behavioral model. Conclusions This study’s findings challenge the prevailing assumption that mobile phones largely affect behavior change through reminders and support the idea that behaviorally driven mobile health interventions can address multiple behavioral pathways associated with sustained behavior change. PMID:25278512

  13. Near-Infrared Grating Spectrometer for Mobile Phone Applications

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Jens; Grüger, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the chemical analysis of organic and inorganic matter. Accordingly, spectroscopic instrumentation of different complexity has been developed and is currently commercially available. However, there are an increasing number of new mobile applications that have come into focus and that cannot be addressed by the existing technology due to size and cost. Therefore, a new miniaturized scanning grating spectrometer for NIR spectroscopy has been developed at Fraunhofer IPMS. It is based on micro–electro–mechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and has been designed to meet the requirements for mobile application, regarding spectral range, resolution, overall size, robustness, and cost. The MEMS spectrometer covers a spectral range from 950 nm to 1900 nm at a resolution of 10 nm. The instrument is extremely small and has a volume of only 2.1 cm3. Therefore, it is well suited for integration, even into a mobile phone. A first sample of the new spectrometer has been manufactured and put into operation. The results of a series of test measurements are in good agreement with the requirements and specifications. PMID:27170776

  14. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from mobile phones of hospital inpatients.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, B; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Jerah, Ahmed Ali; Hakami, Othman M; Eltigani, Magdeldin; Bidwai, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 mobile phones were found to be contaminated with bacteria. Fifty-two (49.0%) coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 12 (11.3%) Staphylococcus aureus, 7 (6.6%) Enterobacter cloacae, 3 (2.83%) Pseudomonas stutzeri, 3 (2.83%) Sphingomonas paucimobilis, 2 (1.8%) Enterococcus faecalis and 10 (9.4%) aerobic spore bearers were isolated. All the isolated bacteria were found to be resistant to various antibiotics. Hence, regular disinfection of mobile phones of hospital inpatients is advised.

  15. Healthcare in the Pocket: Mapping the Space of Mobile-Phone Health Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Klasnja, Predrag; Pratt, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Mobile phones are becoming an increasingly important platform for the delivery of health interventions. In recent years, researchers have used mobile phones as tools for encouraging physical activity and healthy diets, for symptom monitoring in asthma and heart disease, for sending patients reminders about upcoming appointments, for supporting smoking cessation, and for a range of other health problems. This paper provides an overview of this rapidly growing body of work. We describe the features of mobile phones that make them a particularly promising platform for health interventions, and we identify five basic intervention strategies that have been used in mobile-phone health applications across different health conditions. Finally, we outline the directions for future research that could increase our understanding of functional and design requirements for the development of highly effective mobile-phone health interventions. PMID:21925288

  16. Mobile phone text messaging in the management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Roca, O; Cárdenas, A; Diaz-Cardama, A; Pulido, P

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a trial of mobile phone text messaging (short message service; SMS) for diabetes management. In an eight-month period, 23 diabetic patients used the service. Patients used SMS to transmit data such as blood glucose levels and body weight to a server. The server automatically answered with an SMS acknowledgement message. A monthly calculated glycosylated haemoglobin result was also automatically sent to the patient by SMS. During the trial the patients sent an average of 33 messages per month. Although users showed good acceptance of the SMS diabetes system, they expressed various concerns, such as the inability to enter data from previous days. Nonetheless, the trial results suggest that SMS may provide a simple, fast and efficient adjunct to the management of diabetes. It was particularly useful for elderly persons and teenagers, age groups that are known to have difficulty in controlling their diabetes.

  17. Predicting poverty and wealth from mobile phone metadata.

    PubMed

    Blumenstock, Joshua; Cadamuro, Gabriel; On, Robert

    2015-11-27

    Accurate and timely estimates of population characteristics are a critical input to social and economic research and policy. In industrialized economies, novel sources of data are enabling new approaches to demographic profiling, but in developing countries, fewer sources of big data exist. We show that an individual's past history of mobile phone use can be used to infer his or her socioeconomic status. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the predicted attributes of millions of individuals can, in turn, accurately reconstruct the distribution of wealth of an entire nation or to infer the asset distribution of microregions composed of just a few households. In resource-constrained environments where censuses and household surveys are rare, this approach creates an option for gathering localized and timely information at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods. PMID:26612950

  18. Retrieval of air temperatures from crowd-sourced battery temperatures of cell phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.

    2013-04-01

    Accurate air temperature observations are important for urban meteorology, for example to study the urban heat island and adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. The number of available temperature observations is often relatively limited. A new development is presented to derive temperature information for the urban canopy from an alternative source: cell phones. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. Results are presented for Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree Celsius. This shows that monitoring air temperatures employing an Android application holds great promise. Since 75% of the world's population has a cell phone, 20% of the land surface of the earth has cellular telephone coverage, and 500 million devices use the Android operating system, there is a huge potential for measuring air temperatures employing cell phones. This could eventually lead to real-time world-wide temperature maps.

  19. Recorded Behavior as a Valuable Resource for Diagnostics in Mobile Phone Addiction: Evidence from Psychoinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Montag, Christian; Błaszkiewicz, Konrad; Lachmann, Bernd; Sariyska, Rayna; Andone, Ionut; Trendafilov, Boris; Markowetz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Psychologists and psychiatrists commonly rely on self-reports or interviews to diagnose or treat behavioral addictions. The present study introduces a novel source of data: recordings of the actual problem behavior under investigation. A total of N = 58 participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire measuring problematic mobile phone behavior featuring several questions on weekly phone usage. After filling in the questionnaire, all participants received an application to be installed on their smartphones, which recorded their phone usage for five weeks. The analyses revealed that weekly phone usage in hours was overestimated; in contrast, numbers of call and text message related variables were underestimated. Importantly, several associations between actual usage and being addicted to mobile phones could be derived exclusively from the recorded behavior, but not from self-report variables. The study demonstrates the potential benefit to include methods of psychoinformatics in the diagnosis and treatment of problematic mobile phone use. PMID:26492275

  20. Greening academia: use and disposal of mobile phones among university students.

    PubMed

    Ongondo, F O; Williams, I D

    2011-07-01

    Mobile phones have relatively short lifecycles and are rapidly seen as obsolete by many users within little over a year. However, the reusability of these devices as well as their material composition means that in terms of mass and volume, mobile phones represent the most valuable electronic products that are currently found in large numbers in waste streams. End-of-life mobile phones are a high value (from a reuse and resource perspective), high volume (quantity), low cost (residual monetary value) and transient (short lifecycle) electronic product. There are very large numbers of higher education (mainly university) students in the world--there are>2.4 million in the UK alone, 19 million in Europe and 18.2 million in the USA--and they often replace their mobile phones several times before graduation. Thus, because of the potentially significant environmental and economic impacts, a large scale survey of students at 5 UK universities was conducted to assess the behaviour of students with regard to their use and disposal of mobile phones. Additionally, a small scale trial mobile phone takeback service at one of the universities was carried out. The findings indicate that many students replace their phones at least once a year; replacing broken phones, getting upgrades from network operators, remaining "fashionable" and a desire to have a handset with a longer battery life are the main reasons for such rapid replacement. Almost 60% of replaced phones are not sent to reuse or recycling operations but are stockpiled by students mainly as spare/backup phones. Approximately 61% of students own an extra mobile phone with male students replacing their phones more often than females. In particular, the results highlight the potentially huge stockpile of mobile phones--and consequently valuable supplies of rare metals--being held by the public; we estimate that there are 3.7 million phones stockpiled by students in UK higher education alone (29.3 and 28.1 million

  1. Using a Mobile Phone Tour to Visit the Ueno Zoological Gardens and the National Science Museum in Tokyo, Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arita-Kikutani, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Japanese mobile phones are increasingly being used as multimedia players. In response to this, some museums in Japan have introduced mobile phone audiovisual guides. This paper presents a trial run of a cross-institutional mobile phone audiovisual guide tour at Ueno Zoological Gardens and the National Science Museum in Tokyo, Japan.…

  2. Measuring Problematic Mobile Phone Use: Development and Preliminary Psychometric Properties of the PUMP Scale

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Stone, Amanda M.; Bibbey, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and assess the psychometric properties of an English language measure of problematic mobile phone use. Participants were recruited from a university campus, health science center, and other public locations. The sample included 244 individuals (68.4% female) aged 18–75. Results supported a unidimensional factor structure for the 20-item self-report Problematic Use of Mobile Phones (PUMP) Scale. Internal consistency was excellent (α = 0.94). Strong correlations (r = .76, P < .001) were found between the PUMP Scale and an existing scale of cellular phone dependency that was validated in Asia, as well as items assessing frequency and intensity of mobile phone use. Results provide preliminary support for the use of the PUMP Scale to measure problematic use of mobile phones. PMID:24826371

  3. Universal scaling of crowding-induced DNA mobility is coupled with topology-dependent molecular compaction and elongation.

    PubMed

    Gorczyca, Stephanie M; Chapman, Cole D; Robertson-Anderson, Rae M

    2015-10-21

    Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and particle-tracking techniques, we elucidate the role DNA topology plays in the diffusion and conformational dynamics of crowded DNA molecules. We focus on large (115 kbp), double-stranded ring and linear DNA crowded by varying concentrations (0-40%) of dextran (10, 500 kDa) that mimic cellular conditions. By tracking the center-of-mass and measuring the lengths of the major and minor axes of single DNA molecules, we characterize both DNA mobility reduction as well as crowding-induced conformational changes (from random spherical coils). We reveal novel topology-dependent conformations, with single ring molecules undergoing compaction to ordered spherical configurations ∼20% smaller than dilute random coils, while linear DNA elongates by ∼2-fold. Surprisingly, these highly different conformations result in nearly identical exponential mobility reduction dependent solely on crowder volume fraction Φ, revealing a universal critical crowding concentration of Φc≅ 2.3. Beyond Φc DNA exhibits topology-independent conformational relaxation dynamics despite highly distinct topology-driven conformations. Our collective results reveal that topology-dependent conformational changes, unique to crowded environments, enable DNA to overcome the classically expected mobility reduction that high-viscosity crowded environments impose. Such coupled universal dynamics suggest a mechanism for DNA to maintain sufficient mobility required for wide-ranging biological processes despite severe cellular crowding. PMID:26303877

  4. Universal scaling of crowding-induced DNA mobility is coupled with topology-dependent molecular compaction and elongation.

    PubMed

    Gorczyca, Stephanie M; Chapman, Cole D; Robertson-Anderson, Rae M

    2015-10-21

    Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and particle-tracking techniques, we elucidate the role DNA topology plays in the diffusion and conformational dynamics of crowded DNA molecules. We focus on large (115 kbp), double-stranded ring and linear DNA crowded by varying concentrations (0-40%) of dextran (10, 500 kDa) that mimic cellular conditions. By tracking the center-of-mass and measuring the lengths of the major and minor axes of single DNA molecules, we characterize both DNA mobility reduction as well as crowding-induced conformational changes (from random spherical coils). We reveal novel topology-dependent conformations, with single ring molecules undergoing compaction to ordered spherical configurations ∼20% smaller than dilute random coils, while linear DNA elongates by ∼2-fold. Surprisingly, these highly different conformations result in nearly identical exponential mobility reduction dependent solely on crowder volume fraction Φ, revealing a universal critical crowding concentration of Φc≅ 2.3. Beyond Φc DNA exhibits topology-independent conformational relaxation dynamics despite highly distinct topology-driven conformations. Our collective results reveal that topology-dependent conformational changes, unique to crowded environments, enable DNA to overcome the classically expected mobility reduction that high-viscosity crowded environments impose. Such coupled universal dynamics suggest a mechanism for DNA to maintain sufficient mobility required for wide-ranging biological processes despite severe cellular crowding.

  5. Mobile Phones, in Combination with a Computer Locator System, Improve the Response Times of Emergency Medical Services in Central London

    PubMed Central

    Gossage, JA; Frith, DP; Carrell, TWG; Damiani, M; Terris, J; Burnand, KG

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to determine whether mobile phones and mobile phone locating devices are associated with improved ambulance response times in central London. PATIENTS AND METHODS All calls from the London Ambulance Service database since 1999 were analysed. In addition, 100 consecutive patients completed a questionnaire on mobile phone use whilst attending the St Thomas's Hospital Emergency Department in central London. RESULTS Mobile phone use for emergencies in central London has increased from 4007 (5% of total) calls in January 1999 to 21,585 (29%) in August 2004. Ambulance response times for mobile phone calls were reduced after the introduction of the mobile phone locating system (mean 469 s versus 444 s; P = 0.0195). The proportion of mobile phone calls made from mobile phones for life-threatening emergencies was higher after injury than for medical emergencies (41% versus 16%, P = 0.0063). Of patients transported to the accident and emergency department by ambulance, 44% contacted the ambulance service by mobile phone. Three-quarters of calls made from outside the home or work-place were by mobile phone and 72% of patients indicated that it would have taken longer to contact the emergency services if they had not used a mobile. CONCLUSIONS Since the introduction of the mobile phone locating system, there has been an improvement in ambulance response times. Mobile locating systems in urban areas across the UK may lead to faster response times and, potentially, improved patient outcomes. PMID:18325208

  6. Evaluation of mobile phone addiction level and sleep quality in university students

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Sevil; Ozdemir, Kevser; Unsal, Alaattin; Temiz, Nazen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the mobile phone addiction level in university students, to examine several associated factors and to evaluate the relation between the addiction level and sleep quality. Methods: The study is a cross-sectional research conducted on the students of the Sakarya University between 01 November 2012 and 01 February 2013. The study group included 576 students. The Problematic Mobile Phone Use Scale was used for evaluating the mobile phone addiction level and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index for assessing the sleep quality. Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman’s Correlation Analysis were used for analyzing the data. Results: The study group consisted of 296 (51.4%) females and 208 (48.6%) males. The mean age was 20.83 ± 1.90 years (min:17, max:28). The addiction level was determined to be higher in the second-year students, those with poor family income, those with type A personality, those whose age for first mobile phone is 13 and below and those whose duration of daily mobile phone use is above 5 hours (p < 0.05 for each). The sleep quality worsens with increasing mobile phone addiction level (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The sleep quality worsens with increasing addiction level. It was concluded that referring the students with suspected addiction to advanced healthcare facilities, performing occasional scans for early diagnosis and informing the students about controlled mobile phone use would be useful. PMID:24353658

  7. Accidents and close call situations connected to the use of mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Pääkkönen, Rauno

    2012-03-01

    The aim of our work was to study the accidents and close call situations connected to the use of mobile phones. We have analyzed how the accidents/close call situations are connected to background information, in particular age, gender and self-reported symptoms. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study by posting the questionnaire to 15,000 working-age Finns. The responses (6121) were analyzed using the logistic regression models. Altogether 13.7% of respondents had close call situations and 2.4% had accidents at leisure, in which the mobile phone had a partial effect, and at work the amounts were 4.5% and 0.4% respectively, during the last 12 months. Essentially, we found that: (1) men tend to have more close calls and accidents while on a mobile phone, (2) younger people tend to have more accidents and close calls while on a mobile phone, but it does not appear to be large enough to warrant intervention, (3) employed people tend to have more problems with mobile phone usage and accidents/close calls, and (4) there was a slight increase in mobile-phone-related accidents/close calls if the respondent also reported sleep disturbances and minor aches and pains. In the future, it is important to take into account and study how symptoms can increase the risk of accidents or close call situations in which a mobile phone has a partial effect. PMID:22269487

  8. Assessment of extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure from GSM mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carolina; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Findlay, Richard; Maslanyj, Myron; Conil, Emmanuelle; Kromhout, Hans; Lee, Ae-kyoung; Sim, Malcolm R; Taki, Masao; Varsier, Nadège; Wiart, Joe; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-04-01

    Although radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones have received much attention, relatively little is known about the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields emitted by phones. This paper summarises ELF magnetic flux density measurements on global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones, conducted as part of the MOBI-KIDS epidemiological study. The main challenge is to identify a small number of generic phone models that can be used to classify the ELF exposure for the different phones reported in the study. Two-dimensional magnetic flux density measurements were performed on 47 GSM mobile phones at a distance of 25 mm. Maximum resultant magnetic flux density values at 217 Hz had a geometric mean of 221 (+198/-104) nT. Taking into account harmonic data, measurements suggest that mobile phones could make a substantial contribution to ELF exposure in the general population. The maximum values and easily available variables were poorly correlated. However, three groups could be defined on the basis of field pattern indicating that manufacturers and shapes of mobile phones may be the important parameters linked to the spatial characteristics of the magnetic field, and the categorization of ELF magnetic field exposure for GSM phones in the MOBI-KIDS study may be achievable on the basis of a small number of representative phones. Such categorization would result in a twofold exposure gradient between high and low exposure based on type of phone used, although there was overlap in the grouping. PMID:24203762

  9. GIS Data Collection for Oil Palm (DaCOP) Mobile Application for Smart Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. F.; Muhadi, N. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, smart phone has become a necessity as it offers more than just making a phone call. Smart phone combines the features of cell phone with other mobile devices such as personal digital assistant (PDA) and GPS navigation unit that propel the popularity of smart phones. In recent years, the interest in mobile communication has been increased. Previous research using mobile application has been successfully done in varies areas of study. Areas of study that have been done are health care, education, and traffic monitoring. Besides, mobile application has also been applied in agricultural sector for various purposes such as plant pest risk management. In this study, mobile application for data collection on Ganoderma disease of oil palm has been successfully developed. The application uses several devices in a smart phone such as GPS, Wifi/ GPRS connection and accelerometer devices. The application can be installed in the smart phone and users can use the application while working on-site. The data can be updated immediately through their smart phones to the service. Besides, the application provides offline map so the user can be productive even though their network connectivity is poor or nonexistent. The data can be synced when the users online again. This paper presents an application that allows users to download features from a sync-enabled ArcGIS Feature Service, view and edit the features even when the devices fail to connect with any network connectivity while collecting data on-site.

  10. Mobile Phones as a Potential Vehicle of Infection in a Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Chao Foong, Yi; Green, Mark; Zargari, Ahmad; Siddique, Romana; Tan, Vanessa; Brain, Terry; Ogden, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the potential role of mobile phones as a reservoir for bacterial colonization and the risk factors for bacterial colonization in a hospital setting. We screened 226 staff members at a regional Australian hospital (146 doctors and 80 medical students) between January 2013 and March 2014. The main outcomes of interest were the types of microorganisms and the amount of contamination of the mobile phones. This study found a high level of bacterial contamination (n = 168/226, 74%) on the mobile phones of staff members in a tertiary hospital, with similar organisms isolated from the staff member's dominant hand and mobile phones. While most of the isolated organisms were normal skin flora, a small percentage were potentially pathogenic (n = 12/226, 5%). Being a junior medical staff was found to be a risk factor for heavy microbial growth (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.54, 10.37). Only 31% (70/226) of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely, and only 21% (47/226) reported using alcohol containing wipes on their phones. This study demonstrates that mobile phones are potentially vehicles for pathogenic bacteria in a hospital setting. Only a minority of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely. Disinfection guidelines utilizing alcohol wipes should be developed and implemented.

  11. EEG Changes Due to Experimentally Induced 3G Mobile Phone Radiation.

    PubMed

    Roggeveen, Suzanne; van Os, Jim; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 15-minute placement of a 3G dialing mobile phone causes direct changes in EEG activity compared to the placement of a sham phone. Furthermore, it was investigated whether placement of the mobile phone on the ear or the heart would result in different outcomes. Thirty-one healthy females participated. All subjects were measured twice: on one of the two days the mobile phone was attached to the ear, the other day to the chest. In this single-blind, cross-over design, assessments in the sham phone condition were conducted directly preceding and following the mobile phone exposure. During each assessment, EEG activity and radiofrequency radiation were recorded jointly. Delta, theta, alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma activity was computed. The association between radiation exposure and the EEG was tested using multilevel random regression analyses with radiation as predictor of main interest. Significant radiation effects were found for the alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma bands. When analyzed separately, ear location of the phone was associated with significant results, while chest placement was not. The results support the notion that EEG alterations are associated with mobile phone usage and that the effect is dependent on site of placement. Further studies are required to demonstrate the physiological relevance of these findings. PMID:26053854

  12. EEG Changes Due to Experimentally Induced 3G Mobile Phone Radiation.

    PubMed

    Roggeveen, Suzanne; van Os, Jim; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 15-minute placement of a 3G dialing mobile phone causes direct changes in EEG activity compared to the placement of a sham phone. Furthermore, it was investigated whether placement of the mobile phone on the ear or the heart would result in different outcomes. Thirty-one healthy females participated. All subjects were measured twice: on one of the two days the mobile phone was attached to the ear, the other day to the chest. In this single-blind, cross-over design, assessments in the sham phone condition were conducted directly preceding and following the mobile phone exposure. During each assessment, EEG activity and radiofrequency radiation were recorded jointly. Delta, theta, alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma activity was computed. The association between radiation exposure and the EEG was tested using multilevel random regression analyses with radiation as predictor of main interest. Significant radiation effects were found for the alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma bands. When analyzed separately, ear location of the phone was associated with significant results, while chest placement was not. The results support the notion that EEG alterations are associated with mobile phone usage and that the effect is dependent on site of placement. Further studies are required to demonstrate the physiological relevance of these findings.

  13. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods: BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Results: Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited. PMID:27635206

  14. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods: BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Results: Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited.

  15. Mobile Phone Use and Human-Wildlife Conflict in Northern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ashley L.; Baird, Timothy D.; Sorice, Michael G.

    2016-07-01

    Throughout the developing world, mobile phones are spreading rapidly into rural areas where subsistence livelihoods, biodiversity conservation, and human-wildlife conflict (HWC) are each common. Despite this trend, little is known about the relationship between mobile phones and HWC in conservation landscapes. This paper examines this relationship within ethnically Maasai communities in northern Tanzania on the border of Tarangire National Park. Mixed qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis are used to (1) describe how Maasai agro-pastoralists use phones to manage human-wildlife interactions; and (2) assess the relationship between phone use and measures of HWC, controlling for other factors. The findings indicate that households use phones to reduce the number and severity of HWC events and that the relationship between phones and HWC varies according to the type of HWC.

  16. Integrating eye tracking and motion sensor on mobile phone for interactive 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-Wei; Chiang, Chen-Kuo; Lai, Shang-Hong

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an eye tracking and gaze estimation system for mobile phone. We integrate an eye detector, cornereye center and iso-center to improve pupil detection. The optical flow information is used for eye tracking. We develop a robust eye tracking system that integrates eye detection and optical-flow based image tracking. In addition, we further incorporate the orientation sensor information from the mobile phone to improve the eye tracking for accurate gaze estimation. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed eye tracking and gaze estimation system through experiments on some public video sequences as well as videos acquired directly from mobile phone.

  17. Influence of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phone on some biophysical blood properties in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Bediwi, Abu Bakr; Saad, Mohamed; El-kott, Attall F; Eid, Eman

    2013-04-01

    Effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phone on blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hemolysis, Osmotic fragility, and blood components of rats have been investigated. Experimental results show that there are significant change on blood components and its viscosity which affects on a blood circulation due to many body problems. Red blood cells, White blood cells, and Platelets are broken after exposure to electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phone. Also blood viscosity and plasma viscosity values are increased but Osmotic fragility value decreased after exposure to electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phone.

  18. Preservice Teachers' Perceptions about Using Mobile Phones and Laptops in Education as Mobile Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sad, Süleyman Nihat; Göktas, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate preservice teachers' perceptions about using m-phones and laptops in education as mobile learning tools. A total of 1087 preservice teachers participated in the study. The results indicated that preservice teachers perceived laptops potentially stronger than m-phones as m-learning tools. In…

  19. Mobile phone technology and hospitalized patients: a cross-sectional surveillance study of bacterial colonization, and patient opinions and behaviours.

    PubMed

    Brady, R R; Hunt, A C; Visvanathan, A; Rodrigues, M A; Graham, C; Rae, C; Kalima, P; Paterson, H M; Gibb, A P

    2011-06-01

    Healthcare workers' mobile phones provide a reservoir of bacteria known to cause nosocomial infections. UK National Health Service restrictions on the utilization of mobile phones within hospitals have been relaxed; however, utilization of these devices by inpatients and the risk of cross-contamination are currently unknown. Here, we examine demographics and characteristics of mobile phone utilization by inpatients and phone surface microbial contamination. One hundred and two out of 145 (70.3%) inpatients who completed a questionnaire detailing their opinions and utilization of mobile phones, also provided their mobile phones for bacteriological analysis and comparative bacteriological swabs from their nasal cavities; 92.4% of patients support utilization of mobile phones by inpatients; indeed, 24.5% of patients stated that mobile phones were vital to their inpatient stay. Patients in younger age categories were more likely to possess a mobile phone both inside and outside hospital (p <0.01) but there was no gender association. Eighty-six out of 102 (84.3%) patients' mobile phone swabs were positive for microbial contamination. Twelve (11.8%) phones grew bacteria known to cause nosocomial infection. Seven (6.9%) phones and 32 (31.4%) nasal swabs demonstrated Staphylococcus aureus contamination. MSSA/MRSA contamination of phones was associated with concomitant nasal colonization. Patient utilization of mobile phones in the clinical setting is popular and common; however, we recommend that patients are educated by clear guidelines and advice on inpatient mobile phone etiquette, power charging safety, regular cleaning of phones and hand hygiene, and advised not to share phones or related equipment with other inpatients in order to prevent transmission of bacteria.

  20. Mobile phone hygiene: potential risks posed by use in the clinics of an Indian dental school.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sweta; Acharya, Shashidhar; Bhat, Meghashyam; Rao, SreeVidya Krishna; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to determine the level and type of bacterial contamination of the mobile phones of dental personnel involved in direct patient care and to determine the usefulness of cleaning with 70 percent isopropyl alcohol for decontamination. Dental faculty and trainees in an Indian dental school were asked to participate in a study in which a questionnaire concerning patterns of mobile phone use and disinfection was administered. Swabs from mobile phones of the participants were taken using moist sterile swabs and plated on blood agar plates. The bacteria isolated were identified by biochemical tests. Eighteen percent of the participants (n=9) reported using their phones while attending patients. Nearly 64 percent (n=32) used their mobiles for checking time, and 64 percent (n=42) reported never cleaning their phones. In total, fifty mobile phones were cultured for microorganisms: 98 percent (n=49) were culture-positive, and 34 percent (n=17) grew potentially pathogenic bacteria. There was significant reduction in the mean number of colony-forming units after decontamination with alcohol (p<0.001). The bacterial load was reduced by around 87 percent. The results of this study show that mobile phones may act as an important source of nosocomial pathogens in the dental setting. Therefore, it is important for dental school administrators to encourage higher compliance with hand-washing practices and routine surface disinfection through framing of strict protocols to reduce the chances of occurrence of nosocomial infections.

  1. Maternal mobile phone exposure alters intrinsic electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Razavinasab, Moazamehosadat; Moazzami, Kasra; Shabani, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Some studies have shown that exposure to electromagnetic field (EMF) may result in structural damage to neurons. In this study, we have elucidated the alteration in the hippocampal function of offspring Wistar rats (n = 8 rats in each group) that were chronically exposed to mobile phones during their gestational period by applying behavioral, histological, and electrophysiological tests. Rats in the EMF group were exposed to 900 MHz pulsed-EMF irradiation for 6 h/day. Whole cell recordings in hippocampal pyramidal cells in the mobile phone groups did show a decrease in neuronal excitability. Mobile phone exposure was mostly associated with a decrease in the number of action potentials fired in spontaneous activity and in response to current injection in both male and female groups. There was an increase in the amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in mobile phone rats compared with the control. The results of the passive avoidance and Morris water maze assessment of learning and memory performance showed that phone exposure significantly altered learning acquisition and memory retention in male and female rats compared with the control rats. Light microscopy study of brain sections of the control and mobile phone-exposed rats showed normal morphology.Our results suggest that exposure to mobile phones adversely affects the cognitive performance of both female and male offspring rats using behavioral and electrophysiological techniques.

  2. Electromagnetic Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from GSM Mobile Phones Decreases the Accuracy of Home Blood Glucose Monitors.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Smj; Gholampour, M; Haghani, M; Mortazavi, G; Mortazavi, Ar

    2014-09-01

    Mobile phones are two-way radios that emit electromagnetic radiation in microwave range. As the number of mobile phone users has reached 6 billion, the bioeffects of exposure to mobile phone radiation and mobile phone electromagnetic interference with electronic equipment have received more attention, globally. As self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes control, home blood glucose testing kits are very popular. The main goal of this study was to investigate if radiofrequency radiation emitted from a common GSM mobile phone can alter the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. Forty five female nondiabetic students aged 17-20 years old participated in this study. For Control-EMF group (30 students), blood glucose concentration for each individual was measured in presence and absence of radiofrequency radiation emitted by a common GSM mobile phone (HTC touch, Diamond 2) while the phone was ringing. For Control- Repeat group (15 students), two repeated measurements were performed for each participant in the absence of electromagnetic fields. The magnitude of the changes between glucose levels in two repeated measurements (|ΔC|) in Control-Repeat group was 1.07 ± 0.88 mg/dl while this magnitude for Control-EMF group was 7.53 ± 4.76 mg/dl (P < 0.001, two-tailed test). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the electromagnetic interference in home blood glucose monitors. It can be concluded that electromagnetic interference from mobile phones has an adverse effect on the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. We suggest that mobile phones should be used at least 50 cm away from home blood glucose monitors.

  3. MobileFusion: real-time volumetric surface reconstruction and dense tracking on mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Ondrúška, Peter; Kohli, Pushmeet; Izadi, Shahram

    2015-11-01

    We present the first pipeline for real-time volumetric surface reconstruction and dense 6DoF camera tracking running purely on standard, off-the-shelf mobile phones. Using only the embedded RGB camera, our system allows users to scan objects of varying shape, size, and appearance in seconds, with real-time feedback during the capture process. Unlike existing state of the art methods, which produce only point-based 3D models on the phone, or require cloud-based processing, our hybrid GPU/CPU pipeline is unique in that it creates a connected 3D surface model directly on the device at 25Hz. In each frame, we perform dense 6DoF tracking, which continuously registers the RGB input to the incrementally built 3D model, minimizing a noise aware photoconsistency error metric. This is followed by efficient key-frame selection, and dense per-frame stereo matching. These depth maps are fused volumetrically using a method akin to KinectFusion, producing compelling surface models. For each frame, the implicit surface is extracted for live user feedback and pose estimation. We demonstrate scans of a variety of objects, and compare to a Kinect-based baseline, showing on average ∼ 1.5cm error. We qualitatively compare to a state of the art point-based mobile phone method, demonstrating an order of magnitude faster scanning times, and fully connected surface models.

  4. MobileFusion: real-time volumetric surface reconstruction and dense tracking on mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Ondrúška, Peter; Kohli, Pushmeet; Izadi, Shahram

    2015-11-01

    We present the first pipeline for real-time volumetric surface reconstruction and dense 6DoF camera tracking running purely on standard, off-the-shelf mobile phones. Using only the embedded RGB camera, our system allows users to scan objects of varying shape, size, and appearance in seconds, with real-time feedback during the capture process. Unlike existing state of the art methods, which produce only point-based 3D models on the phone, or require cloud-based processing, our hybrid GPU/CPU pipeline is unique in that it creates a connected 3D surface model directly on the device at 25Hz. In each frame, we perform dense 6DoF tracking, which continuously registers the RGB input to the incrementally built 3D model, minimizing a noise aware photoconsistency error metric. This is followed by efficient key-frame selection, and dense per-frame stereo matching. These depth maps are fused volumetrically using a method akin to KinectFusion, producing compelling surface models. For each frame, the implicit surface is extracted for live user feedback and pose estimation. We demonstrate scans of a variety of objects, and compare to a Kinect-based baseline, showing on average ∼ 1.5cm error. We qualitatively compare to a state of the art point-based mobile phone method, demonstrating an order of magnitude faster scanning times, and fully connected surface models. PMID:26439826

  5. Tolerance optimization of a mobile phone camera lens system.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sangjin; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Byung-Lyul; Kim, Ju Ho

    2011-08-10

    In the manufacturing process for the lens system of a mobile phone camera, various types of assembly and manufacturing tolerances, such as tilt and decenter, should be appropriately allocated. Because these tolerances affect manufacturing cost and the expected optical performance, it is necessary to choose a systematic design methodology for determining optimal tolerances. In order to determine the tolerances that minimize production cost while satisfying the reliability constraints on important optical performance indices, we propose a tolerance design procedure for a lens system. A tolerance analysis is carried out using Latin hypercube sampling for evaluating the expected optical performance. The tolerance optimization is carried out using a function-based sequential approximate optimization technique that can reduce the computational burden and smooth numerical noise occurring in the optimization process. Using the proposed design approach, the optimal production cost was decreased by 28.3% compared to the initial cost while satisfying all the constraints on the expected optical performance. We believe that the tolerance analysis and design procedure presented in this study can be applied to the tolerance optimization of other systems. PMID:21833148

  6. Reduced Lateral Mobility of Lipids and Proteins in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Goose, Joseph E.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli outer membrane proteins FhuA, LamB, NanC, OmpA and OmpF in a POPE/POPG (3∶1) bilayer were performed to characterise the diffusive nature of each component of the membrane. At small observation times (<10 ns) particle vibrations dominate phospholipid diffusion elevating the calculated values from the longer time-scale bulk value (>50 ns) of 8.5×10−7 cm2 s−1. The phospholipid diffusion around each protein was found to vary based on distance from protein. An asymmetry in the diffusion of annular lipids in the inner and outer leaflets was observed and correlated with an asymmetry in charged residues in the vicinity of the inner and outer leaflet head-groups. Protein rotational and translational diffusion were also found to vary with observation time and were inversely correlated with the radius of gyration of the protein in the plane of the bilayer. As the concentration of protein within the bilayer was increased, the overall mobility of the membrane decreased reflected in reduced lipid diffusion coefficients for both lipid and protein components. The increase in protein concentration also resulted in a decrease in the anomalous diffusion exponent α of the lipid. Formation of extended clusters and networks of proteins led to compartmentalisation of lipids in extreme cases. PMID:23592975

  7. Knowledge and Skill Retention of a Mobile Phone Data Collection Protocol in Rural Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Michelle L.; Lori, Jody R.; Boyd, Carol J.; Andreatta, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Introduction With a large number of births occurring outside the formal health system it is difficult to determine the number of pregnant women in rural regions of Liberia. The exponential growth of mobile phone use in developing countries provides a potential avenue for data collection on maternal and child health in such rural, remote regions. Methods A pre-, post-, and one-year post-test design was used to collect data on knowledge and skill retention for seven essential items required for mobile phone use among traditional birth attendants (TBAs) trained in a short message service (SMS) texting data collection protocol (n=99) in rural Liberia. Results Sixty-three participants (63.6% retention) completed the one-year post-test and displayed evidence of statistically significant knowledge and skill retention in six of the seven tasks (p<.005) including the ability to: (a) turn on the phone; (b) use the mobile phone to make a call; (c) recognize they have coverage; (d) recognize the mobile phone is charged; (e) create a SMS text message without help; and (f) send a SMS text message without help. The TBAs continued to have difficulty with more complex tasks such as adding minutes to a phone. Discussion The mobile phone data collection protocol proved feasible with TBAs demonstrating knowledge retention in a one-year post-test, however clinical significance needs further investigation. The protocol increased communication and collaboration among TBAs, certified midwives, and clinic staff. PMID:24655593

  8. A case–control study of risk of leukaemia in relation to mobile phone use

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R; Laing, S; Swerdlow, A J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mobile phone use is now ubiquitous, and scientific reviews have recommended research into its relation to leukaemia risk, but no large studies have been conducted. Methods: In a case–control study in South East England to investigate the relation of acute and non-lymphocytic leukaemia risk to mobile phone use, 806 cases with leukaemia incident 2003–2009 at ages 18–59 years (50% of those identified as eligible) and 585 non-blood relatives as controls (provided by 392 cases) were interviewed about mobile phone use and other potentially aetiological variables. Results: No association was found between regular mobile phone use and risk of leukaemia (odds ratio (OR)=1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.76, 1.46). Analyses of risk in relation to years since first use, lifetime years of use, cumulative number of calls and cumulative hours of use produced no significantly raised risks, and there was no evidence of any trends. A non-significantly raised risk was found in people who first used a phone 15 or more years ago (OR=1.87, 95% CI=0.96, 3.63). Separate analyses of analogue and digital phone use and leukaemia subtype produced similar results to those overall. Conclusion: This study suggests that use of mobile phones does not increase leukaemia risk, although the possibility of an effect after long-term use, while biologically unlikely, remains open. PMID:20940717

  9. Investigation of thermoluminescence properties of mobile phone screen displays as dosimeters for accidental dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozik, Anna; Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Kłosowski, M.

    2014-11-01

    The rapid assessment of the radiation dose after unexpected exposure is a task of accidental dosimetry. In case of a radiological accident glasses originating from mobile phone screens, placed usually near the human body, could be used as emergency thermoluminescent (TL) personal dosimeters. The time between irradiation and TL readout is crucial and therefore preparation of the mobile phone screens and their readout conditions should be optimized. The influence of the samples etching, bleaching and selection of the optical filters based on measurement of the emission spectrum of irradiated glass samples during heating for different types of mobile phones were the subjects of our investigation. Obtained results showed that glasses extracted from different brands of mobile phones have different dosimetric properties but all of them give a luminescent signal which can be used to calculate the dose.

  10. 78 FR 63492 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade...

  11. Development of a Brief Multicultural Version of the Test of Mobile Phone Dependence (TMDbrief) Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Chóliz, Mariano; Pinto, Lourdes; Phansalkar, Sukanya S.; Corr, Emily; Mujjahid, Ayman; Flores, Conni; Barrientos, Pablo E.

    2016-01-01

    The Test of Mobile Phone Dependence (TMD) questionnaire (Chóliz, 2012) evaluates the main features of mobile phone dependence: tolerance, abstinence syndrome, impaired impulse control, associated problems, excessive use, etc. Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a multicultural version of the TMD (TMDbrief) adapted to suit the novel communication tools of smartphones. Procedure: In this study, the TMD was completed by 2,028 young respondents in six distinct world regions: Southern Europe, Northwest Europe, South-America, Mesoamerica, Pakistan, and India. Results: Psychometric analysis of the reliability of the instrument and factor analysis were performed to adapt the TMDbrief for use in these regions. Differences among regions with respect to TMD Mobile Phone Dependence scores were obtained. Conclusion: A brief questionnaire for the evaluation of mobile phone addiction in cross-cultural studies was successfully developed. PMID:27252663

  12. Effects on auditory function of chronic exposure to electromagnetic fields from mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Sanjeev; Varshney, Saurabh; Bist, Sampan Singh; Goel, Deepak; Mishra, Sarita; Jha, Vivek Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones has given rise to apprehension regarding the possible hazardous health effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on auditory function. We conducted a study to investigate the effects of long-term (>4 yr) exposure to EMFs emitted by mobile phones on auditory function. Our study population was made up of 40 healthy medical students-31 men and 9 women, aged 20 to 30 years (mean 22.7). Of this group, 31 subjects typically held their phone to the right ear and 9 to the left ear; the non-phone-using ear served as each subject's control ear. The phone-using subjects were also split into two groups of 20 based on the duration of their daily phone use (≤60 min vs. >60 min). All subjects underwent pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, impedance audiometry, and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA), and comparisons were made between the phone-using ear and the control ear and between the shorter and longer duration of daily use. We found no statistically significant differences in high-frequency pure-tone average between the phone-using ears and the control ears (p = 0.69) or between the shorter- and longer-duration phone-using ears (p = 0.85). Moreover, statistical analysis of BERA findings revealed no significant differences between the phone-using ears and the control ears in terms of wave I-III, III-V, and I-V interpeak latencies (p = 0.59, 0.74 and 0.44, respectively). None of the subjects reported any subjective symptoms, such as headache, tinnitus, or sensations of burning or warmth behind, around, or on the phone-using ear. We conclude that the long-term exposure to EMFs from mobile phones does not affect auditory function.

  13. Effects on auditory function of chronic exposure to electromagnetic fields from mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Sanjeev; Varshney, Saurabh; Bist, Sampan Singh; Goel, Deepak; Mishra, Sarita; Jha, Vivek Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones has given rise to apprehension regarding the possible hazardous health effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on auditory function. We conducted a study to investigate the effects of long-term (>4 yr) exposure to EMFs emitted by mobile phones on auditory function. Our study population was made up of 40 healthy medical students-31 men and 9 women, aged 20 to 30 years (mean 22.7). Of this group, 31 subjects typically held their phone to the right ear and 9 to the left ear; the non-phone-using ear served as each subject's control ear. The phone-using subjects were also split into two groups of 20 based on the duration of their daily phone use (≤60 min vs. >60 min). All subjects underwent pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, impedance audiometry, and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA), and comparisons were made between the phone-using ear and the control ear and between the shorter and longer duration of daily use. We found no statistically significant differences in high-frequency pure-tone average between the phone-using ears and the control ears (p = 0.69) or between the shorter- and longer-duration phone-using ears (p = 0.85). Moreover, statistical analysis of BERA findings revealed no significant differences between the phone-using ears and the control ears in terms of wave I-III, III-V, and I-V interpeak latencies (p = 0.59, 0.74 and 0.44, respectively). None of the subjects reported any subjective symptoms, such as headache, tinnitus, or sensations of burning or warmth behind, around, or on the phone-using ear. We conclude that the long-term exposure to EMFs from mobile phones does not affect auditory function. PMID:27551848

  14. "I Wanna Go in the Phone": Literacy Acquisition, Informal Learning Processes, "Voice" and Mobile Phone Appropriation in a South African Township

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velghe, Fie

    2014-01-01

    The uptake of mobile phones has been especially remarkable in the developing world. For the first time in history, people at the bottom of the income pyramid can also take part in the telecommunication society. Mobile phones can play a unique role in reaching those who are outside the scope of formal or institutionalised schooling and open doors…

  15. Recycling of WEEE: Characterization of spent printed circuit boards from mobile phones and computers

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, Luciana Harue; Tavares de Moraes, Viviane; Crocce Romano Espinosa, Denise; Soares Tenorio, Jorge Alberto

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > This paper presents new and important data on characterization of wastes of electric and electronic equipments. > Copper concentration is increasing in mobile phones and remaining constant in personal computers. > Printed circuit boards from mobile phones and computers would not be mixed prior treatment. - Abstract: This paper presents a comparison between printed circuit boards from computers and mobile phones. Since printed circuits boards are becoming more complex and smaller, the amount of materials is constantly changing. The main objective of this work was to characterize spent printed circuit boards from computers and mobile phones applying mineral processing technique to separate the metal, ceramic, and polymer fractions. The processing was performed by comminution in a hammer mill, followed by particle size analysis, and by magnetic and electrostatic separation. Aqua regia leaching, loss-on-ignition and chemical analysis (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy - ICP-OES) were carried out to determine the composition of printed circuit boards and the metal rich fraction. The composition of the studied mobile phones printed circuit boards (PCB-MP) was 63 wt.% metals; 24 wt.% ceramics and 13 wt.% polymers; and of the printed circuit boards from studied personal computers (PCB-PC) was 45 wt.% metals; 27 wt.% polymers and ceramics 28 wt.% ceramics. The chemical analysis showed that copper concentration in printed circuit boards from personal computers was 20 wt.% and in printed circuit boards from mobile phones was 34.5 wt.%. According to the characteristics of each type of printed circuit board, the recovery of precious metals may be the main goal of the recycling process of printed circuit boards from personal computers and the recovery of copper should be the main goal of the recycling process of printed circuit boards from mobile phones. Hence, these printed circuit boards would not be mixed prior treatment. The results of

  16. [Use of mobile phones in hospitals do not jeopardise the safety of the patients].

    PubMed

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-03-25

    Cellular telephones are increasingly used in hospitals both among employees, patients and visiting relatives. The feared medical equipment malfunctions due to electromagnetic interference have resulted in restrictions in the use of mobile phones in hospitals. However, these restrictions are not consistent between different hospitals, and not based on solid evidence. This article presents the evidence in this field and concludes that by maintaining a distance of one metre to sensitive medical equipment, mobile phones can be used safely in all hospital areas.

  17. Predictors and overestimation of recalled mobile phone use among children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schüz, Joachim; Andersen, Tina Veje; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Prochazka, Michaela; Klæboe, Lars; Kuehni, Claudia E; Tynes, Tore; Röösli, Martin

    2011-12-01

    A growing body of literature addresses possible health effects of mobile phone use in children and adolescents by relying on the study participants' retrospective reconstruction of mobile phone use. In this study, we used data from the international case-control study CEFALO to compare self-reported with objectively operator-recorded mobile phone use. The aim of the study was to assess predictors of level of mobile phone use as well as factors that are associated with overestimating own mobile phone use. For cumulative number and duration of calls as well as for time since first subscription we calculated the ratio of self-reported to operator-recorded mobile phone use. We used multiple linear regression models to assess possible predictors of the average number and duration of calls per day and logistic regression models to assess possible predictors of overestimation. The cumulative number and duration of calls as well as the time since first subscription of mobile phones were overestimated on average by the study participants. Likelihood to overestimate number and duration of calls was not significantly different for controls compared to cases (OR=1.1, 95%-CI: 0.5 to 2.5 and OR=1.9, 95%-CI: 0.85 to 4.3, respectively). However, likelihood to overestimate was associated with other health related factors such as age and sex. As a consequence, such factors act as confounders in studies relying solely on self-reported mobile phone use and have to be considered in the analysis.

  18. Older adults’ attitudes and barriers toward the use of mobile phones

    PubMed Central

    Navabi, Nasrin; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Jannat-Alipoor, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The limitations caused by the process of aging and the prevalence of chronic diseases contribute to reduced performance in physical, psychological, and social areas of life in older people. The use of mobile phones as easily accessible portable tools with a high performance is associated with an increased health literacy, self-care, and independence in older people. The present study was conducted to determine older people’s attitudes toward the use of mobile phones and the barriers to their use. Materials and methods The present descriptive study was conducted on a sample population of 328 individuals older than 60 years presenting to health centers across cities in west Mazandaran, Iran. The data collection tools used included a mobile phone use checklist, a questionnaire on older people’s attitude toward the use of mobile phones, and a questionnaire on the barriers to the use of mobile phones. The reliability and validity of these questionnaires were confirmed by the researchers. The data obtained were recorded and then analyzed using SPSS. The level of statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results According to the results, 80% of the older people had regular mobile phones and 20% had smartphones. In 95% of the male and 80% of the female participants, the greatest use of mobile phones pertained to making phone calls. A total of 5% of the male and 2% of the female participants used the Internet in their mobile phones. A total of 44% of the female and 42.80% of the male participants had poor attitudes (score from 0 to 40) toward mobile phone use. As for the different dimensions of the attitude toward mobile phone use, the highest score obtained by the female participants (71.66%) pertained to the psychoemotional dimension and the highest score in the male participants (72.85%) to the instrumental dimension. The results also revealed the lack of knowledge of English as the greatest barrier to mobile phone use in both sexes

  19. The Development of the Recovery Assessments by Phone Points (RAPP): A Mobile Phone App for Postoperative Recovery Monitoring and Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Karuna; Eriksson, Mats; Grönlund, Åke; Nilsson, Ulrica

    2015-01-01

    Background In Sweden, day surgery is performed in almost 2 million patients per year. Patient satisfaction is closely related to potential adverse events during the recovery process. A way to empower patients and give them the opportunity to affect care delivery is to let them evaluate their recovery process. The most common evaluation method is a follow-up telephone call by a nurse one or two days after surgery. In recent years, mHealth apps have been used to evaluate the nurse-patient relationship for self-management in chronic diseases or to evaluate pain after surgery. To the best of our knowledge, no previous research has explored the recovery process after day surgery via mobile phone in a Swedish cohort. Objective The objective of the study is to describe the process of developing a mobile phone app using a Swedish Web-based Quality of Recovery (SwQoR) questionnaire to evaluate postoperative recovery after day surgery. Methods The development process included five steps: (1) setting up an interdisciplinary task force, (2) evaluating the potential needs of app users, (3) developing the Swedish Web version of a QoR questionnaire, (4) constructing a mobile phone app, and (5) evaluating the interface and design by staff working in a day-surgery department and patients undergoing day surgery. A task force including specialists in information and communication technology, eHealth, and nursing care worked closely together to develop a Web-based app. Modifications to the QoR questionnaire were inspired by instruments used in the field of recovery for both children and adults. The Web-based app, Recovery Assessment by Phone Points (RAPP) consists of two parts: (1) a mobile app installed on the patient’s private mobile phone, and (2) an administrator interface for the researchers. Results The final version of the SwQoR questionnaire, which includes 31 items, was successfully installed in RAPP. The interface and the design were evaluated by asking for user opinions

  20. A remote patient monitoring system using a Java-enabled 3G mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Kogure, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Hiroki; Akutagawa, Masatake; Kinouchi, Yohsuke; Zhang, Qinyu

    2007-01-01

    Telemedicine systems have become an important supporting for the medical staffs. As the development of the mobile phones, it is possible to apply the mobile phones to be a part of telemedicine systems. We developed an innovative Remote Patient Monitoring System using a Java-enabled 3G mobile phone. By using this system, doctors can monitor the vital biosignals of patients in ICU/CCU, such as ECG, RESP, SpO2, EtCO2 and so on by using the real-time waveform and data monitoring and list trend data monitoring functions of installed Java jiglet application on the mobile phone. Futhermore, doctors can check the patients' information by using the patient information checking function. The 3G mobile phone used has the ability to implement the application as the same time as being used to mak a voice call. Therefore, the doctor can get more and more information both from the browsing the screen of the mobile phone and the communicating with the medical staffs who are beside the patients and the monitors. The system can be conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, efficiency, and safety of telediagnosis. PMID:18002804

  1. Effects of the exposure to mobile phones on male reproduction: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Enzo; D'Agata, Rosario; Calogero, Aldo E

    2012-01-01

    The use of mobile phones is now widespread. A great debate exists about the possible damage that the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) emitted by mobile phones exerts on different organs and apparatuses. The aim of this article was to review the existing literature exploring the effects of RF-EMR on the male reproductive function in experimental animals and humans. Studies have been conducted in rats, mice, and rabbits using a similar design based upon mobile phone RF exposure for variable lengths of time. Together, the results of these studies have shown that RF-EMR decreases sperm count and motility and increases oxidative stress. In humans, 2 different experimental approaches have been followed: one has explored the effects of RF-EMR directly on spermatozoa and the other has evaluated the sperm parameters in men using or not using mobile phones. The results showed that human spermatozoa exposed to RF-EMR have decreased motility, morphometric abnormalities, and increased oxidative stress, whereas men using mobile phones have decreased sperm concentration, decreased motility (particularly rapid progressive motility), normal morphology, and decreased viability. These abnormalities seem to be directly related to the duration of mobile phone use.

  2. Evaluation of mobile phone camera benchmarking using objective camera speed and image quality metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2014-11-01

    When a mobile phone camera is tested and benchmarked, the significance of image quality metrics is widely acknowledged. There are also existing methods to evaluate the camera speed. However, the speed or rapidity metrics of the mobile phone's camera system has not been used with the quality metrics even if the camera speed has become a more and more important camera performance feature. There are several tasks in this work. First, the most important image quality and speed-related metrics of a mobile phone's camera system are collected from the standards and papers and, also, novel speed metrics are identified. Second, combinations of the quality and speed metrics are validated using mobile phones on the market. The measurements are done toward application programming interface of different operating systems. Finally, the results are evaluated and conclusions are made. The paper defines a solution to combine different image quality and speed metrics to a single benchmarking score. A proposal of the combined benchmarking metric is evaluated using measurements of 25 mobile phone cameras on the market. The paper is a continuation of a previous benchmarking work expanded with visual noise measurement and updates of the latest mobile phone versions.

  3. Mobile phone radiation during pubertal development has no effect on testicular histology in rats.

    PubMed

    Tumkaya, Levent; Kalkan, Yildiray; Bas, Orhan; Yilmaz, Adnan

    2016-02-01

    Mobile phones are extensively used throughout the world. There is a growing concern about the possible public health hazards posed by electromagnetic radiation emitted from mobile phones. Potential health risk applies particularly to the most intensive mobile phone users-typically, young people. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mobile phone exposure to the testes, by assessing the histopathological and biochemical changes in the testicular germ cells of rats during pubertal development. A total of 12 male Sprague Dawley rats were used. The study group (n = 6) was exposed to a mobile phone for 1 h a day for 45 days, while the control group (n = 6) remained unexposed. The testes were processed with routine paraffin histology and sectioned. They were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, caspase 3, and Ki-67 and then photographed. No changes were observed between the groups (p > 0.05). The interstitial connective tissue and cells of the exposed group were of normal morphology. No abnormalities in the histological appearance of the seminiferous tubules, including the spermatogenic cycle stage, were observed. Our study demonstrated that mobile phones with a low specific absorption rate have no harmful effects on pubertal rat testicles.

  4. Effects of high frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by mobile phones on the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Inomata-Terada, Satomi; Okabe, Shingo; Arai, Noritoshi; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Frubayashi, Toshiaki; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2007-10-01

    We investigated whether the pulsed high frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by a mobile phone has short term effects on the human motor cortex. We measured motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), before and after mobile phone exposure (active and sham) in 10 normal volunteers. Three sites were stimulated (motor cortex (CTX), brainstem (BST) and spinal nerve (Sp)). The short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the motor cortex reflecting GABAergic interneuronal function was also studied by paired pulse TMS method. MEPs to single pulse TMS were also recorded in two patients with multiple sclerosis showing temperature dependent neurological symptoms (hot bath effect). Neither MEPs to single pulse TMS nor the SICI was affected by 30 min of EMF exposure from mobile phones or sham exposure. In two MS patients, mobile phone exposure had no effect on any parameters of MEPs even though conduction block occurred at the corticospinal tracts after taking a bath. As far as available methods are concerned, we did not detect any short-term effects of 30 min mobile phone exposure on the human motor cortical output neurons or interneurons even though we can not exclude the possibility that we failed to detect some mild effects due to a small sample size in the present study. This is the first study of MEPs after electromagnetic exposure from a mobile phone in neurological patients. PMID:17516508

  5. Re-Identification Risk versus Data Utility for Aggregated Mobility Research Using Mobile Phone Location Data

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ling; Wang, Qian; Shaw, Shih-Lung; Fang, Zhixiang; Hu, Jinxing; Tao, Ye; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone location data is a newly emerging data source of great potential to support human mobility research. However, recent studies have indicated that many users can be easily re-identified based on their unique activity patterns. Privacy protection procedures will usually change the original data and cause a loss of data utility for analysis purposes. Therefore, the need for detailed data for activity analysis while avoiding potential privacy risks presents a challenge. The aim of this study is to reveal the re-identification risks from a Chinese city’s mobile users and to examine the quantitative relationship between re-identification risk and data utility for an aggregated mobility analysis. The first step is to apply two reported attack models, the top N locations and the spatio-temporal points, to evaluate the re-identification risks in Shenzhen City, a metropolis in China. A spatial generalization approach to protecting privacy is then proposed and implemented, and spatially aggregated analysis is used to assess the loss of data utility after privacy protection. The results demonstrate that the re-identification risks in Shenzhen City are clearly different from those in regions reported in Western countries, which prove the spatial heterogeneity of re-identification risks in mobile phone location data. A uniform mathematical relationship has also been found between re-identification risk (x) and data (y) utility for both attack models: y = -axb+c, (a, b, c>0; 0

  6. Skin temperature increase caused by a mobile phone: a methodological infrared camera study.

    PubMed

    Straume, Aksel; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Johnsson, Anders

    2005-09-01

    Mobile phone users often complain about burning sensations or a heating of the ear region. The increase in temperature may be due to thermal insulation by the phone, heating of the mobile phone resulting from its electrical power dissipation, and radio frequency (RF) exposure. The main objective of this study was to use infrared (IR) camera techniques to find how much each of these factors contributes to the increase in skin temperature resulting from the use of one GSM 900 phone. One subject, a healthy male, took part in the study. He was holding the phone in a normal position when the phone was switched off, when it was switched on but with the antenna replaced by a 50 Omega load to eliminate the RF exposure, and when it was transmitting RF fields. The output power could be fixed, and the minimal and the maximal power levels of the phone were used. The study was designed as a double blind experiment. The changes in temperature after 15 and 30 min of mobile phone use were calculated on the exposed side of the head relative to the unexposed side. The insulation and the electrical power dissipation led to statistically significant rises in the skin temperature, while the RF exposure did not.

  7. Mobile Phone and Social Media Use of Homeless Youth in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Harpin, Scott; Davis, Jillian; Low, Hana; Gilroy, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate homeless youth mobile phone and social media use, to plan health promotion efforts. Nearly half (46.7%) of runaway/homeless youth in this sample (n = 181) owned a mobile phone and a majority of those devices were smart phones. Ownership did not vary significantly by shelter location, though regular use of Facebook was more prevalent among those in housing programs or camping, than those living on the streets. Over 90% of youth in the sample reported using Facebook. Such media use might facilitate parent, family, and health provider communications with homeless youth. PMID:27074405

  8. A parametric duration model of the reaction times of drivers distracted by mobile phone conversations.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Mazharul; Washington, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones while driving is more prevalent among young drivers-a less experienced cohort with elevated crash risk. The objective of this study was to examine and better understand the reaction times of young drivers to a traffic event originating in their peripheral vision whilst engaged in a mobile phone conversation. The CARRS-Q advanced driving simulator was used to test a sample of young drivers on various simulated driving tasks, including an event that originated within the driver's peripheral vision, whereby a pedestrian enters a zebra crossing from a sidewalk. Thirty-two licensed drivers drove the simulator in three phone conditions: baseline (no phone conversation), hands-free and handheld. In addition to driving the simulator each participant completed questionnaires related to driver demographics, driving history, usage of mobile phones while driving, and general mobile phone usage history. The participants were 21-26 years old and split evenly by gender. Drivers' reaction times to a pedestrian in the zebra crossing were modelled using a parametric accelerated failure time (AFT) duration model with a Weibull distribution. Also tested where two different model specifications to account for the structured heterogeneity arising from the repeated measures experimental design. The Weibull AFT model with gamma heterogeneity was found to be the best fitting model and identified four significant variables influencing the reaction times, including phone condition, driver's age, license type (provisional license holder or not), and self-reported frequency of usage of handheld phones while driving. The reaction times of drivers were more than 40% longer in the distracted condition compared to baseline (not distracted). Moreover, the impairment of reaction times due to mobile phone conversations was almost double for provisional compared to open license holders. A reduction in the ability to detect traffic events in the periphery whilst distracted

  9. Mobile Phones Democratize and Cultivate Next-Generation Imaging, Diagnostics and Measurement Tools

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I discuss some of the emerging applications and the future opportunities and challenges created by the use of mobile phones and their embedded components for the development of next-generation imaging, sensing, diagnostics and measurement tools. The massive volume of mobile phone users, which has now reached ~7 billion, drives the rapid improvements of the hardware, software and high-end imaging and sensing technologies embedded in our phones, transforming the mobile phone into a cost-effective and yet extremely powerful platform to run e.g., biomedical tests and perform scientific measurements that would normally require advanced laboratory instruments. This rapidly evolving and continuing trend will help us transform how medicine, engineering and sciences are practiced and taught globally. PMID:24647550

  10. Role of mobile phone technology in health education in Asian and African countries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Madhusmita; Grover, Ashoo; Joshi, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to explore the role of mobile phone technologies in delivering health education programs in Asian and African countries. The search engine used was Pubmed during 2008-2011. Randomised controlled trials or controlled studies that improved health outcomes through delivery of health educational interventions using cell phone or text messaging were included in the review. Results showed studies from six Asian and African countries including Philippines, China, Kenya, South Korea, Taiwan and India. Mobile phone technology has shown to improve health outcomes for chronic disease conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and hypertension. Additional conditions include obesity and cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidance. Other studies have shown improvement in self management of breast cancer and post-hospitalisation HIV and pharmaceutical care. Overall results of the present review showed that mobile phone technologies can be a possible solution to improve healthcare outcome.

  11. A mobile phone system to find crosswalks for visually impaired pedestrians

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Huiying; Chan, Kee-Yip; Coughlan, James; Brabyn, John

    2010-01-01

    Urban intersections are the most dangerous parts of a blind or visually impaired pedestrian’s travel. A prerequisite for safely crossing an intersection is entering the crosswalk in the right direction and avoiding the danger of straying outside the crosswalk. This paper presents a proof of concept system that seeks to provide such alignment information. The system consists of a standard mobile phone with built-in camera that uses computer vision algorithms to detect any crosswalk visible in the camera’s field of view; audio feedback from the phone then helps the user align him/herself to it. Our prototype implementation on a Nokia mobile phone runs in about one second per image, and is intended for eventual use in a mobile phone system that will aid blind and visually impaired pedestrians in navigating traffic intersections. PMID:20411035

  12. A mobile phone system to find crosswalks for visually impaired pedestrians.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huiying; Chan, Kee-Yip; Coughlan, James; Brabyn, John

    2008-10-22

    Urban intersections are the most dangerous parts of a blind or visually impaired pedestrian's travel. A prerequisite for safely crossing an intersection is entering the crosswalk in the right direction and avoiding the danger of straying outside the crosswalk. This paper presents a proof of concept system that seeks to provide such alignment information. The system consists of a standard mobile phone with built-in camera that uses computer vision algorithms to detect any crosswalk visible in the camera's field of view; audio feedback from the phone then helps the user align him/herself to it. Our prototype implementation on a Nokia mobile phone runs in about one second per image, and is intended for eventual use in a mobile phone system that will aid blind and visually impaired pedestrians in navigating traffic intersections.

  13. Mobile phones democratize and cultivate next-generation imaging, diagnostics and measurement tools.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-09-01

    In this article, I discuss some of the emerging applications and the future opportunities and challenges created by the use of mobile phones and their embedded components for the development of next-generation imaging, sensing, diagnostics and measurement tools. The massive volume of mobile phone users, which has now reached ~7 billion, drives the rapid improvements of the hardware, software and high-end imaging and sensing technologies embedded in our phones, transforming the mobile phone into a cost-effective and yet extremely powerful platform to run, e.g., biomedical tests, and perform scientific measurements that would normally require advanced laboratory instruments. This rapidly evolving and continuing trend will help us transform how medicine, engineering and sciences are practiced and taught globally.

  14. Mobile phone based mini-spectrometer for rapid screening of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anshuman; Swedish, Tristan; Wahi, Akshat; Moufarrej, Mira; Noland, Marie; Gurry, Thomas; Aranda-Michel, Edgar; Aksel, Deniz; Wagh, Sneha; Sadashivaiah, Vijay; Zhang, Xu; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a highly sensitive mobile phone based spectrometer that has potential to detect cancerous skin lesions in a rapid, non-invasive manner. Earlier reports of low cost spectrometers utilize the camera of the mobile phone to image the field after moving through a diffraction grating. These approaches are inherently limited by the closed nature of mobile phone image sensors and built in optical elements. The system presented uses a novel integrated grating and sensor that is compact, accurate and calibrated. Resolutions of about 10 nm can be achieved. Additionally, UV and visible LED excitation sources are built into the device. Data collection and analysis is simplified using the wireless interfaces and logical control on the smart phone. Furthermore, by utilizing an external sensor, the mobile phone camera can be used in conjunction with spectral measurements. We are exploring ways to use this device to measure endogenous fluorescence of skin in order to distinguish cancerous from non-cancerous lesions with a mobile phone based dermatoscope.

  15. Estimation of end of life mobile phones generation: the case study of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Polák, Miloš; Drápalová, Lenka

    2012-08-01

    The volume of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has been rapidly growing in recent years. In the European Union (EU), legislation promoting the collection and recycling of WEEE has been in force since the year 2003. Yet, both current and recently suggested collection targets for WEEE are completely ineffective when it comes to collection and recycling of small WEEE (s-WEEE), with mobile phones as a typical example. Mobile phones are the most sold EEE and at the same time one of appliances with the lowest collection rate. To improve this situation, it is necessary to assess the amount of generated end of life (EoL) mobile phones as precisely as possible. This paper presents a method of assessment of EoL mobile phones generation based on delay model. Within the scope of this paper, the method has been applied on the Czech Republic data. However, this method can be applied also to other EoL appliances in or outside the Czech Republic. Our results show that the average total lifespan of Czech mobile phones is surprisingly long, exactly 7.99 years. We impute long lifespan particularly to a storage time of EoL mobile phones at households, estimated to be 4.35 years. In the years 1990-2000, only 45 thousands of EoL mobile phones were generated in the Czech Republic, while in the years 2000-2010 the number grew to 6.5 million pieces and it is estimated that in the years 2010-2020 about 26.3 million pieces will be generated. Current European legislation sets targets on collection and recycling of WEEE in general, but no specific collection target for EoL mobile phone exists. In the year 2010 only about 3-6% of Czech EoL mobile phones were collected for recovery and recycling. If we make similar estimation using an estimated average EU value, then within the next 10 years about 1.3 billion of EoL mobile phones would be available for recycling in the EU. This amount contains about 31 tonnes of gold and 325 tonnes of silver. Since Europe is dependent on import

  16. Integrating cell phones and mobile technologies into public health practice: a social marketing perspective.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Mobile communications are being used for many purposes, from instant messaging (IM), mobile or microblogging (Twitter), social networking sites (Facebook, MySpace), e-mail to basic voicemail. A brief background on cell phone and mobile technology use in public health is reviewed. The focus of the article is framing the use of mobile technologies in public health from a social marketer's perspective--using the 4 Ps marketing mix as a guide. PMID:19809002

  17. Influence of Mobile Learning Training on Pre-Service Social Studies Teachers' Technology and Mobile Phone Self-Efficacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Adedoja; Oluwadara, Abimbade

    2016-01-01

    Current instructional deliveries favour the use of mobile technology because of its inherent potentials and benefits such as portability, ease of use cost and others. Despite these benefits, many teachers especially in Sub-Saharan Africa still prefer the conventional method and use mobile phones for social engagements such as texting, chatting,…

  18. iShake: Mobile Phones as Seismic Sensors (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashti, S.; Reilly, J.; Bray, J. D.; Bayen, A. M.; Glaser, S. D.; Mari, E.

    2010-12-01

    Emergency responders must “see” the effects of an earthquake clearly and rapidly so that they can respond effectively to the damage it has produced. Great strides have been made recently in developing methodologies that deliver rapid and accurate post-earthquake information. However, shortcomings still exist. The iShake project is an innovative use of cell phones and information technology to bridge the gap between the high quality, but sparse, ground motion instrument data that are used to help develop ShakeMap and the low quality, but large quantity, human observational data collected to construct a “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI)-based map. Rather than using people as measurement “devices” as is being done through DYFI, the iShake project is using their cell phones to measure ground motion intensity parameters and automatically deliver the data to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for processing and dissemination. In this participatory sensing paradigm, quantitative shaking data from numerous cellular phones will enable the USGS to produce shaking intensity maps more accurately than presently possible. The phone sensor, however, is an imperfect device with performance variations among phones of a given model as well as between models. The sensor is the entire phone, not just the micro-machined transducer inside. A series of 1-D and 3-D shaking table tests were performed at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley, respectively, to evaluate the performance of a class of cell phones. In these tests, seven iPhones and iPod Touch devices that were mounted at different orientations were subjected to 124 earthquake ground motions to characterize their response and reliability as seismic sensors. The testing also provided insight into the seismic response of unsecured and falling instruments. The cell phones measured seismic parameters such as peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), peak ground displacement (PGD), and 5% damped spectral accelerations well

  19. Estimation of end of life mobile phones generation: The case study of the Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, Milos Drapalova, Lenka

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this paper, we define lifespan of mobile phones and estimate their average total lifespan. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The estimation of lifespan distribution is based on large sample of EoL mobile phones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total lifespan of Czech mobile phones is surprisingly long, exactly 7.99 years. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the years 2010-20, about 26.3 million pieces of EoL mobile phones will be generated in the Czech Republic. - Abstract: The volume of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has been rapidly growing in recent years. In the European Union (EU), legislation promoting the collection and recycling of WEEE has been in force since the year 2003. Yet, both current and recently suggested collection targets for WEEE are completely ineffective when it comes to collection and recycling of small WEEE (s-WEEE), with mobile phones as a typical example. Mobile phones are the most sold EEE and at the same time one of appliances with the lowest collection rate. To improve this situation, it is necessary to assess the amount of generated end of life (EoL) mobile phones as precisely as possible. This paper presents a method of assessment of EoL mobile phones generation based on delay model. Within the scope of this paper, the method has been applied on the Czech Republic data. However, this method can be applied also to other EoL appliances in or outside the Czech Republic. Our results show that the average total lifespan of Czech mobile phones is surprisingly long, exactly 7.99 years. We impute long lifespan particularly to a storage time of EoL mobile phones at households, estimated to be 4.35 years. In the years 1990-2000, only 45 thousands of EoL mobile phones were generated in the Czech Republic, while in the years 2000-2010 the number grew to 6.5 million pieces and it is estimated that in the years 2010-2020 about 26.3 million pieces will be generated. Current European legislation sets

  20. Analysis of the Genotoxic Effects of Mobile Phone Radiation using Buccal Micronucleus Assay: A Comparative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Sreedhar, Gadiputi; Mukherjee, Saikat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Micronucleus (MN) is considered to be a reliable marker for genotoxic damage and it determines the presence and the extent of the chromosomal damage. The MN is formed due to DNA damage or chromosomal disarrangements. The MN has a close association with cancer incidences. In the new era, mobile phones are constantly gaining popularity specifically in the young generation, but this device uses radiofrequency radiation that may have a possible carcinogenic effect. The available reports related to the carcinogenic effect of mobile radiation on oral mucosa are contradictory. Aim To explore the effects of mobile phone radiation on the MN frequency in oral mucosal cells. Materials and Methods The subjects were divided into two major groups: low mobile phone users and high mobile phone users. Subjects who used their mobile phone since less than five years and less than three hours a week comprised of the first group and those who used their mobile since more than five years and more than 10 hours a week comprised of the second group. Net surfing and text messaging was not considered in this study. Exfoliated buccal mucosal cells were collected from both the groups and the cells were stained with DNA-specific stain acridine orange. Thousand exfoliated buccal mucosal cells were screened and the cells which were positive for micronuclei were counted. The micronucleus frequency was represented as mean±SD, and unpaired Student t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. Results The number of micronucleated cells/ 1000 exfoliated buccal mucosal cells was found to be significantly increased in high mobile phone users group than the low mobile phone users group. The use of mobile phone with the associated complaint of warmth around the ear showed a maximum increase in the number of micronucleated cells /1000 exfoliated buccal mucosal cells. Conclusion Mobile phone radiation even in the permissible range when used for longer duration causes significant genotoxicity

  1. Distribution of RF energy emitted by mobile phones in anatomical structures of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardis, E.; Deltour, I.; Mann, S.; Moissonnier, M.; Taki, M.; Varsier, N.; Wake, K.; Wiart, J.

    2008-06-01

    The rapid worldwide increase in mobile phone use in the last decade has generated considerable interest in possible carcinogenic effects of radio frequency (RF). Because exposure to RF from phones is localized, if a risk exists it is likely to be greatest for tumours in regions with greatest energy absorption. The objective of the current paper was to characterize the spatial distribution of RF energy in the brain, using results of measurements made in two laboratories on 110 phones used in Europe or Japan. Most (97-99% depending on frequency) appears to be absorbed in the brain hemisphere on the side where the phone is used, mainly (50-60%) in the temporal lobe. The average relative SARSAR is the specific energy absorption rate i.e. energy absorption rate per unit mass (measured in W kg-1). is highest in the temporal lobe (6-15%, depending on frequency, of the spatial peak SAR in the most exposed region of the brain) and the cerebellum (2-10%) and decreases very rapidly with increasing depth, particularly at higher frequencies. The SAR distribution appears to be fairly similar across phone models, between older and newer phones and between phones with different antenna types and positions. Analyses of risk by location of tumour are therefore important for the interpretation of results of studies of brain tumours in relation to mobile phone use.

  2. Analysis of mobile phone design features affecting radiofrequency power absorbed in a human head phantom.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Sven; Kelsh, Michael A; Kuster, Niels; Sheppard, Asher R; Shum, Mona

    2013-09-01

    The US FCC mandates the testing of all mobile phones to demonstrate compliance with the rule requiring that the peak spatial SAR does not exceed the limit of 1.6 W/kg averaged over any 1 g of tissue. These test data, measured in phantoms with mobile phones operating at maximum antenna input power, permitted us to evaluate the variation in SARs across mobile phone design factors such as shape and antenna design, communication technology, and test date (over a 7-year period). Descriptive statistical summaries calculated for 850 MHz and 1900 MHz phones and ANOVA were used to evaluate the influence of the foregoing factors on SARs. Service technology accounted for the greatest variability in compliance test SARs that ranged from AMPS (highest) to CDMA, iDEN, TDMA, and GSM (lowest). However, the dominant factor for SARs during use is the time-averaged antenna input power, which may be much less than the maximum power used in testing. This factor is largely defined by the communication system; e.g., the GSM phone average output can be higher than CDMA by a factor of 100. Phone shape, antenna type, and orientation of a phone were found to be significant but only on the order of up to a factor of 2 (3 dB). The SAR in the tilt position was significantly smaller than for touch. The side of the head did not affect SAR levels significantly. Among the remaining factors, external antennae produced greater SARs than internal ones, and brick and clamshell phones produced greater SARs than slide phones. Assuming phone design and usage patterns do not change significantly over time, we have developed a normalization procedure and formula that permits reliable prediction of the relative SAR between various communication systems. This approach can be applied to improve exposure assessment in epidemiological research.

  3. Mobile Phone Based System Opportunities to Home-based Managing of Chemotherapy Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi, Somayeh; Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Safdari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Applying mobile base systems in cancer care especially in chemotherapy management have remarkable growing in recent decades. Because chemotherapy side effects have significant influences on patient’s lives, therefore it is necessary to take ways to control them. This research has studied some experiences of using mobile phone based systems to home-based monitor of chemotherapy side effects in cancer. Methods: In this literature review study, search was conducted with keywords like cancer, chemotherapy, mobile phone, information technology, side effects and self managing, in Science Direct, Google Scholar and Pub Med databases since 2005. Results: Today, because of the growing trend of the cancer, we need methods and innovations such as information technology to manage and control it. Mobile phone based systems are the solutions that help to provide quick access to monitor chemotherapy side effects for cancer patients at home. Investigated studies demonstrate that using of mobile phones in chemotherapy management have positive results and led to patients and clinicians satisfactions. Conclusion: This study shows that the mobile phone system for home-based monitoring chemotherapy side effects works well. In result, knowledge of cancer self-management and the rate of patient’s effective participation in care process improved. PMID:27482134

  4. Quantifying seasonal population fluxes driving rubella transmission dynamics using mobile phone data

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Amy; Metcalf, C. J. E.; Eagle, Nathan; Kombich, Janeth; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.; Lessler, Justin; Tatem, Andrew J.; Buckee, Caroline O.

    2015-01-01

    Changing patterns of human aggregation are thought to drive annual and multiannual outbreaks of infectious diseases, but the paucity of data about travel behavior and population flux over time has made this idea difficult to test quantitatively. Current measures of human mobility, especially in low-income settings, are often static, relying on approximate travel times, road networks, or cross-sectional surveys. Mobile phone data provide a unique source of information about human travel, but the power of these data to describe epidemiologically relevant changes in population density remains unclear. Here we quantify seasonal travel patterns using mobile phone data from nearly 15 million anonymous subscribers in Kenya. Using a rich data source of rubella incidence, we show that patterns of population travel (fluxes) inferred from mobile phone data are predictive of disease transmission and improve significantly on standard school term time and weather covariates. Further, combining seasonal and spatial data on travel from mobile phone data allows us to characterize seasonal fluctuations in risk across Kenya and produce dynamic importation risk maps for rubella. Mobile phone data therefore offer a valuable previously unidentified source of data for measuring key drivers of seasonal epidemics. PMID:26283349

  5. Quantifying seasonal population fluxes driving rubella transmission dynamics using mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Amy; Metcalf, C J E; Eagle, Nathan; Kombich, Janeth; Grenfell, Bryan T; Bjørnstad, Ottar N; Lessler, Justin; Tatem, Andrew J; Buckee, Caroline O

    2015-09-01

    Changing patterns of human aggregation are thought to drive annual and multiannual outbreaks of infectious diseases, but the paucity of data about travel behavior and population flux over time has made this idea difficult to test quantitatively. Current measures of human mobility, especially in low-income settings, are often static, relying on approximate travel times, road networks, or cross-sectional surveys. Mobile phone data provide a unique source of information about human travel, but the power of these data to describe epidemiologically relevant changes in population density remains unclear. Here we quantify seasonal travel patterns using mobile phone data from nearly 15 million anonymous subscribers in Kenya. Using a rich data source of rubella incidence, we show that patterns of population travel (fluxes) inferred from mobile phone data are predictive of disease transmission and improve significantly on standard school term time and weather covariates. Further, combining seasonal and spatial data on travel from mobile phone data allows us to characterize seasonal fluctuations in risk across Kenya and produce dynamic importation risk maps for rubella. Mobile phone data therefore offer a valuable previously unidentified source of data for measuring key drivers of seasonal epidemics.

  6. Using Mobile Phones for Vocabulary Activities: Examining the Effect of the Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockwell, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    While problems such as small screens and inconvenient keypads have been pointed out by researchers (e.g., Thornton & Houser, 2002), we still have little knowledge of how the mobile platform affects the way in which activities are completed and how learners make decisions about using mobile phones. Stockwell (2007b) provided preliminary evidence…

  7. A Historical Materialist Analysis of the Debate in Swedish Print Media on Mobile Phones in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Torbjörn

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones for teaching and learning in schools has been a controversial matter. In this paper the debate in two Swedish newspapers on the use of mobile phones in schools is analysed using a historical materialist framework. The results are discussed in relation to contemporary research on mobile learning. The analysis reveals that…

  8. Expectations and Levels of Understanding When Using Mobile Phones among 9-11-Year Olds in Wales, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turley, Joanne; Baker, Sally-Ann; Lewis, Christopher Alan

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in examining the use of mobile technology among children. The present study extended this literature among a sample of 9-11-year olds in Wales, UK in three ways. First, to examine the level of mobile phone ownership; second, to consider how mobile phones are used, investigate timescales and expectations when communicating…

  9. [Spanish adaptation of the "Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale" for adolescent population].

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Olatz; Honrubia-Serrano, Ma Luisa; Freixa-Blanxart, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Problematic use of the mobile telephone is an emerging phenomenon in our society, and one which particularly affects the teenage population. Knowledge from research on the problematic use of this technology is necessary, since such use can give rise to a behavioural pattern with addictive characteristics. There are hardly any scales for measuring possible problematic use of mobile phones, and none at all adapted exclusively for the Spanish adolescent population. The scale most widely used internationally is the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS). The aim of the present study is to adapt the MPPUS for use with Spanish adolescents. The Spanish version of the questionnaire was administered to a sample of 1132 adolescents aged 12 to 18. Reliability and factorial validity were comparable to those obtained in adult population, so that the measure of problematic mobile phone use in Spanish teenagers is one-dimensional. A prevalence of 14.8% of problematic users was detected.

  10. Measurement of output power density from mobile phone as a function of input sound frequency.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of power density emitted by a mobile phone were carried out as a function of the sound frequency transmitted by a sound generator, ranging from 250 to 14000 Hz. Output power density was monitored by means of the selective radiation meter Narda SRM 3000 in spectrum analysis mode, and the octave frequency analysis of each tone used for the experimental design was acquired by the sound level meter Larson Davis LxT Wind. Vodafone providers were used for mobile phone calls with respect to various local base station in Southern-Italy. A relationship between the mobile phone microwaves power density and the sound frequencies transmitted by the sound generator was observed. In particular, microwaves power density level decreases significantly at sound frequency values larger than 4500 Hz. This result can be explained assuming that discontinuous transmission mode of global system for mobile communications is powered not only in silence-mode, but also at frequencies larger than 4500 Hz.

  11. Thermal decomposition of electronic wastes: Mobile phone case and other parts

    SciTech Connect

    Molto, Julia; Egea, Silvia; Conesa, Juan Antonio; Font, Rafael

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Pyrolysis and combustion of different parts of mobile phones produce important quantities of CO and CO{sub 2}. > Naphthalene is the most abundant PAH obtained in the thermal treatment of mobile phones. > Higher combustion temperature increases the chlorinated species evolved. - Abstract: Pyrolysis and combustion runs at 850 {sup o}C in a horizontal laboratory furnace were carried out on different parts of a mobile phone (printed circuit board, mobile case and a mixture of both materials). The analyses of the carbon oxides, light hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), and dioxin-like PCBs are shown. Regarding semivolatile compounds, phenol, styrene, and its derivatives had the highest yields. In nearly all the runs the same PAHs were identified, naphthalene being the most common component obtained. Combustion of the printed circuit board produced the highest emission factor of PCDD/Fs, possibly due to the high copper content.

  12. A Mobile Phone App for Dietary Intake Assessment in Adolescents: An Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a great need for dietary assessment methods that suit the adolescent lifestyle and give valid intake data. Objective To develop a mobile phone app and evaluate its ability to assess energy intake (EI) and total energy expenditure (TEE) compared with objectively measured TEE. Furthermore, to investigate the impact of factors on reporting accuracy of EI, and to compare dietary intake with a Web-based method. Methods Participants 14 to 16 years of age were recruited from year nine in schools in Gothenburg, Sweden. In total, 81 adolescents used the mobile phone app over 1 to 6 days. TEE was measured with the SenseWear Armband (SWA) during the same or proximate days. Individual factors were assessed with a questionnaire. A total of 15 participants also recorded dietary intake using a Web-based method. Results The mobile phone app underestimated EI by 29% on a group level (P<.001) compared to TEE measured with the SWA, and there was no significant correlation between EI and TEE. Accuracy of EI relative to TEE increased with a weekend day in the record (P=.007) and lower BMI z-score (P=.001). TEE assessed with the mobile phone app was 1.19 times the value of TEE measured by the SWA on a group level (P<.001), and the correlation between the methods was .75 (P<.001). Analysis of physical activity levels (PAL) from the mobile phone app stratified by gender showed that accuracy of the mobile phone app was higher among boys. EI, nutrients, and food groups assessed with the mobile phone app and Web-based method among 15 participants were not significantly different and several were significantly correlated, but strong conclusions cannot be drawn due to the low number of participants. Conclusions By using a mobile phone dietary assessment app, on average 71% of adolescents’ EI was captured. The accuracy of reported dietary intake was higher with lower BMI z-score and if a weekend day was included in the record. The daily question in the mobile phone app

  13. Isolation, Identification and Antibacterial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus spp. Associated with the Mobile Phones of University Students.

    PubMed

    Furuhata, Katsunori; Ishizaki, Naoto; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kawakami, Yasushi; Lee, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Masahiro; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    From May 2014 to February 2015, 319 university students (male, n=173; female n=146) of 18 to 24 years of age who carried mobile phones or computer tablets were selected as subjects. Staphylococcus spp. were detected in 101 of 319 samples (31.7%). In the present study, 11 strains of S. aureus were isolated and identified, not all of which were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Overall, 14 species were identified, with 11 strains (10.9%) of S. xylosus being isolated at the highest frequency. Following this were eight strains (7.9%) of S. cohnii and seven strains (6.9%) each of S. capitis and S. haemolyticus. Staphylococcus spp. isolation was performed with bacterial samples obtained from the mobile phones of 22 specific subjects (males, n=12; females, n=10). Staphylococcus spp. isolation was performed on days -1, 7 and 30 of the experiment. Staphylococcus spp. were positively detected one or more times in 12 subjects (54.5%). In one subject (8.3%), all three tests were positive. Furthermore, two tests were positive in three (25.0%). In the eight remaining subjects (66.7%) Staphylococcus spp. were detected only once. For the three abovementioned tests, we investigated the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the strains derived from the mobile phone and from the fingers of three subjects in whom the same bacterial species were isolated twice. From the cases with similarities between strains derived from the fingers and the mobile phones and cases, with consistency in the strains derived from the mobile phone at different times, commonality was observed in the strains derived from the fingers and mobile phones along with chronological uniformity in the strains derived from the mobile phones. A total of 101 Staphylococcus spp. strains were isolated from mobile phones. According to drug susceptibility tests, 99 strains (98.0%) were found to have some degree of resistance to drugs (excluding one strain each of S. aureus and S. haemolyticus

  14. Influence of Mobile Phones on the Quality of ECG Signal Acquired by Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, T.; Janusek, D.; Zavala-Fernandez, H.; Skrok, M.; Kania, M.; Liebert, A.

    2013-10-01

    Health aspects of the use of radiating devices, like mobile phones, are still a public concern. Stand-alone electrocardiographic systems and those built-in, more sophisticated, medical devices have become a standard tool used in everyday medical practice. GSM mobile phones might be a potential source of electromagnetic interference (EMI) which may affect reliability of medical appliances. Risk of such event is particularly high in places remote from GSM base stations in which the signal received by GSM mobile phone is weak. In such locations an increase in power of transmitted radio signal is necessary to enhance quality of the communication. In consequence, the risk of interference of electronic devices increases because of the high level of EMI. In the present paper the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the interference have been examined. The influence of GSM mobile phone on multilead ECG recordings was studied. It was observed that the electrocardiographic system was vulnerable to the interference generated by the GSM mobile phone working with maximum transmit power and in DTX mode when the device was placed in a distance shorter than 7.5 cm from the ECG electrode located on the surface of the chest. Negligible EMI was encountered at any longer distance.

  15. Scope and effectiveness of mobile phone messaging for HIV/AIDS care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Velthoven, M H M M T; Brusamento, S; Majeed, A; Car, J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this mixed method systematic review was to assess the scope, effectiveness, acceptability and feasibility of the use of mobile phone messaging for HIV infection prevention, treatment and care. We comprehensively searched the peer-reviewed and grey literature. Two authors independently screened citations, extracted data and assessed study quality of included studies (any research design) focusing on mobile phone messaging interventions for HIV care. We present a narrative overview of the results. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria: three randomized controlled trials, 11 interventional studies using other study designs and seven qualitative or cross-sectional studies. We also found six on-going trials and 21 projects. Five of the on-going trials and all the above mentioned projects took place in low or middle-income countries. Mobile phone messaging was researched for HIV prevention, appointment reminders, HIV testing reminders, medication adherence and for communication between health workers. Of the three randomized controlled trials assessing the use of short message service (SMS) to improve medication adherence, two showed positive results. Other interventional studies did not provide significant results. In conclusion, despite an extensive search we found limited evidence on the effectiveness of mobile phone messaging for HIV care. There is a need to adequately document outcomes and constraints of programs using mobile phone messaging to support HIV care to assess the impact and to focus on best practice.

  16. Validation and Psychometric Properties of Mobile Phone Problematic Use Scale (MPPUS) in University Students of Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; Baba Reisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Despite the fact that the mobile phone has become a pervasive technology of our time, little research has been done on mobile dependency. Therefore, a valid and reliable instrument, conforming to Iranian culture seems essential. The aim of our study was to validate the Iranian version of MPPUS (Mobile Phone Problematic Use Scale). Methods: This was a cross-sectional research, in which data were collected from 600 students studying at Tehran universities. Stratified sampling method was used to collect data. All participants completed Demographic Questionnaire, Cellular Phone Dependency Questionnaire (CPDQ) anonymously. Finally, a clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was conducted with 100 participants. Data were analyzed using concurrent validity, factor analysis, internal consistency (Cronbach’s’α), split half, test-retest and ROC Curve by SPSS18 Software. Results: As a result of reliability analysis and factor analysis by principal component and Varimax rotation, we extracted three factors including preoccupation, withdrawal symptoms and overuse of mobile phones in both males and females. Internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) of the MPPUS was .91; Cronbach’s alpha of the factors was .87, .70, .82 respectively. The test-retest correlation of the MPPUS was .56. The best cut off point for this questionnaire (MPPUS) was 160. Conclusion: The MPPUS proved to be a reliable questionnaire with adequate factor models to assess the extent of problems caused by the “misuse” of mobile phones in the Iranian society; however, further studies are needed on this topic. PMID:26005477

  17. Mobile phone camera benchmarking: combination of camera speed and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2014-01-01

    When a mobile phone camera is tested and benchmarked, the significance of quality metrics is widely acknowledged. There are also existing methods to evaluate the camera speed. For example, ISO 15781 defines several measurements to evaluate various camera system delays. However, the speed or rapidity metrics of the mobile phone's camera system have not been used with the quality metrics even if the camera speed has become more and more important camera performance feature. There are several tasks in this work. Firstly, the most important image quality metrics are collected from the standards and papers. Secondly, the speed related metrics of a mobile phone's camera system are collected from the standards and papers and also novel speed metrics are identified. Thirdly, combinations of the quality and speed metrics are validated using mobile phones in the market. The measurements are done towards application programming interface of different operating system. Finally, the results are evaluated and conclusions are made. The result of this work gives detailed benchmarking results of mobile phone camera systems in the market. The paper defines also a proposal of combined benchmarking metrics, which includes both quality and speed parameters.

  18. Impact of mobile phone use on car-following behaviour of young drivers.

    PubMed

    Saifuzzaman, Mohammad; Haque, Md Mazharul; Zheng, Zuduo; Washington, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Multitasking, such as the concurrent use of a mobile phone and operating a motor vehicle, is a significant distraction that impairs driving performance and is becoming a leading cause of motor vehicle crashes. This study investigates the impact of mobile phone conversations on car-following behaviour. The CARRS-Q Advanced Driving Simulator was used to test a group of young Australian drivers aged 18-26 years on a car-following task in three randomised phone conditions: baseline (no phone conversation), hands-free and handheld. Repeated measure ANOVA was applied to examine the effect of mobile phone distraction on selected car-following variables such as driving speed, spacing, and time headway. Overall, drivers tended to select slower driving speeds, larger vehicle spacings, and longer time headways when they were engaged in either hands-free or handheld phone conversations, suggesting possible risk compensatory behaviour. In addition, phone conversations while driving influenced car-following behaviour such that variability was increased in driving speeds, vehicle spacings, and acceleration and decelerations. To further investigate car-following behaviour of distracted drivers, driver time headways were modelled using Generalized Estimation Equation (GEE). After controlling for various exogenous factors, the model predicts an increase of 0.33s in time headway when a driver is engaged in hands-free phone conversation and a 0.75s increase for handheld phone conversation. The findings will improve the collective understanding of distraction on driving performance, in particular car following behaviour which is most critical in the determination of rear-end crashes. PMID:26009990

  19. Impact of mobile phone use on car-following behaviour of young drivers.

    PubMed

    Saifuzzaman, Mohammad; Haque, Md Mazharul; Zheng, Zuduo; Washington, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Multitasking, such as the concurrent use of a mobile phone and operating a motor vehicle, is a significant distraction that impairs driving performance and is becoming a leading cause of motor vehicle crashes. This study investigates the impact of mobile phone conversations on car-following behaviour. The CARRS-Q Advanced Driving Simulator was used to test a group of young Australian drivers aged 18-26 years on a car-following task in three randomised phone conditions: baseline (no phone conversation), hands-free and handheld. Repeated measure ANOVA was applied to examine the effect of mobile phone distraction on selected car-following variables such as driving speed, spacing, and time headway. Overall, drivers tended to select slower driving speeds, larger vehicle spacings, and longer time headways when they were engaged in either hands-free or handheld phone conversations, suggesting possible risk compensatory behaviour. In addition, phone conversations while driving influenced car-following behaviour such that variability was increased in driving speeds, vehicle spacings, and acceleration and decelerations. To further investigate car-following behaviour of distracted drivers, driver time headways were modelled using Generalized Estimation Equation (GEE). After controlling for various exogenous factors, the model predicts an increase of 0.33s in time headway when a driver is engaged in hands-free phone conversation and a 0.75s increase for handheld phone conversation. The findings will improve the collective understanding of distraction on driving performance, in particular car following behaviour which is most critical in the determination of rear-end crashes.

  20. Mobile Phone Use Among Medical Residents: A Cross-Sectional Multicenter Survey in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Temsah, Mohamad-Hani; Khan, Samina A; Al-Eyadhy, Ayman; Chiang, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile phones have great potential for medical education, as they allow health care providers and students to access resources efficiently at the precise time at the point-of-care to help in informed decision making. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of mobile phone usage among medical residents and to explore their attitudes, perceptions, and the challenges they experience when using mobile phones in academic and clinical practice. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted on all 133 residents in 17 different specialties across two large academic hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The Web-based validated questionnaire measured mobile phone platform preferences, and their uses in general and medical practice. The perception of confidentiality and safety impact of using mobile phones for communication and accessing patient’s data was also explored, alongside challenges of use and how residents learn to use their mobile phone. Results With a response rate of 101/133 (75.9%) and mean age of 27.8 (SD 3.0) years, we found that 100/101 (99.0%) of participants were mobile phone users with mean duration of use of 5.12 (SD 2.4) years, and a range from 1 to 12 years. There was no significant difference in use between male and female respondents. A negative linear correlation was found between age and use duration (P=.004). The most common operating system used by participants was the iOS platform (55/101, 54.5%), with English the most commonly used language to operate residents’ mobile phones (96/100, 96.0%) despite their native language being Arabic. For communication outside medical practice, chatting applications such as WhatsApp matched phone calls as most commonly used tools (each 88/101, 87.1%). These were also the primary tools for medical communication, but used at a lower rate (each 65/101, 64.4%). In medical practice, drug (83/101, 82.2%) and medical (80/101, 79.2%) references and medical calculation

  1. Impact of one's own mobile phone in stand-by mode on personal radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Urbinello, Damiano; Röösli, Martin

    2013-01-01

    When moving around, mobile phones in stand-by mode periodically send data about their positions. The aim of this paper is to evaluate how personal radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) measurements are affected by such location updates. Exposure from a mobile phone handset (uplink) was measured during commuting by using a randomized cross-over study with three different scenarios: disabled mobile phone (reference), an activated dual-band phone and a quad-band phone. In the reference scenario, uplink exposure was highest during train rides (1.19 mW/m(2)) and lowest during car rides in rural areas (0.001 mW/m(2)). In public transports, the impact of one's own mobile phone on personal RF-EMF measurements was not observable because of high background uplink radiation from other people's mobile phone. In a car, uplink exposure with an activated phone was orders of magnitude higher compared with the reference scenario. This study demonstrates that personal RF-EMF exposure is affected by one's own mobile phone in stand-by mode because of its regular location update. Further dosimetric studies should quantify the contribution of location updates to the total RF-EMF exposure in order to clarify whether the duration of mobile phone use, the most common exposure surrogate in the epidemiological RF-EMF research, is actually an adequate exposure proxy.

  2. Socio-geography of human mobility: a study using longitudinal mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Olivier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A relationship between people's mobility and their social networks is presented based on an analysis of calling and mobility traces for one year of anonymized call detail records of over one million mobile phone users in Portugal. We find that about 80% of places visited are within just 20 km of their nearest (geographical) social ties' locations. This figure rises to 90% at a 'geo-social radius' of 45 km. In terms of their travel scope, people are geographically closer to their weak ties than strong ties. Specifically, they are 15% more likely to be at some distance away from their weak ties than strong ties. The likelihood of being at some distance from social ties increases with the population density, and the rates of increase are higher for shorter geo-social radii. In addition, we find that area population density is indicative of geo-social radius where denser areas imply shorter radii. For example, in urban areas such as Lisbon and Porto, the geo-social radius is approximately 7 km and this increases to approximately 15 km for less densely populated areas such as Parades and Santa Maria da Feira.

  3. Socio-Geography of Human Mobility: A Study Using Longitudinal Mobile Phone Data

    PubMed Central

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Olivier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A relationship between people’s mobility and their social networks is presented based on an analysis of calling and mobility traces for one year of anonymized call detail records of over one million mobile phone users in Portugal. We find that about 80% of places visited are within just 20km of their nearest (geographical) social ties’ locations. This figure rises to 90% at a ‘geo-social radius’ of 45km. In terms of their travel scope, people are geographically closer to their weak ties than strong ties. Specifically, they are 15% more likely to be at some distance away from their weak ties than strong ties. The likelihood of being at some distance from social ties increases with the population density, and the rates of increase are higher for shorter geo-social radii. In addition, we find that area population density is indicative of geo-social radius where denser areas imply shorter radii. For example, in urban areas such as Lisbon and Porto, the geo-social radius is approximately 7km and this increases to approximately 15km for less densely populated areas such as Parades and Santa Maria da Feira. PMID:22761748

  4. The sound of a mobile phone ringing affects the complex reaction time of its owner

    PubMed Central

    Zajdel, Justyna; Zwolińska, Anna; Śmigielski, Janusz; Beling, Piotr; Cegliński, Tomasz; Nowak, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mobile phone conversation decreases the ability to concentrate and impairs the attention necessary to perform complex activities, such as driving a car. Does the ringing sound of a mobile phone affect the driver's ability to perform complex sensory-motor activities? We compared a subject's reaction time while performing a test either with a mobile phone ringing or without. Material and methods The examination was performed on a PC-based reaction time self-constructed system Reactor. The study group consisted of 42 healthy students. The protocol included instruction, control without phone and a proper session with subject's mobile phone ringing. The terms of the study were standardised. Results There were significant differences (p < 0.001) in reaction time in control (597 ms), mobile (633 ms) and instruction session (673 ms). The differences in female subpopulation were also significant (p < 0.01). Women revealed the longest reaction time in instruction session (707 ms), were significantly quicker in mobile (657 ms, p < 0.01) and in control session (612 ms, p < 0.001). In men, the significant difference was recorded only between instruction (622 ms) and control session (573 ms, p < 0.01). The other differences were not significant (p > 0.08). Men proofed to complete significantly quicker than women in instruction (p < 0.01) and in mobile session (p < 0.05). Differences amongst the genders in control session was not significant (p > 0.05). Conclusions The results obtained proofed the ringing of a phone exerts a significant influence on complex reaction time and quality of performed task. PMID:23185201

  5. Validity and reliability of the Persian version of mobile phone addiction scale

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Maryam Amidi; Karbasi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Background: With regard to large number of mobile users especially among college students in Iran, addiction to mobile phone is attracting increasing concern. There is an urgent need for reliable and valid instrument to measure this phenomenon. This study examines validity and reliability of the Persian version of mobile phone addiction scale (MPAIS) in college students. Materials and Methods: this methodological study was down in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. One thousand one hundred and eighty students were selected by convenience sampling. The English version of the MPAI questionnaire was translated into Persian with the approach of Jones et al. (Challenges in language, culture, and modality: Translating English measures into American Sign Language. Nurs Res 2006; 55: 75-81). Its reliability was tested by Cronbach's alpha and its dimensionality validity was evaluated using Pearson correlation coefficients with other measures of mobile phone use and IAT. Construct validity was evaluated using Exploratory subscale analysis. Results: Cronbach's alpha of 0.86 was obtained for total PMPAS, for subscale1 (eight items) was 0.84, for subscale 2 (five items) was 0.81 and for subscale 3 (two items) was 0.77. There were significantly positive correlations between the score of PMPAS and IAT (r = 0.453, P < 0.001) and other measures of mobile phone use. Principal component subscale analysis yielded a three-subscale structure including: inability to control craving; feeling anxious and lost; mood improvement accounted for 60.57% of total variance. The results of discriminate validity showed that all the item's correlations with related subscale were greater than 0.5 and correlations with unrelated subscale were less than 0.5. Conclusion: Considering lack of a valid and reliable questionnaire for measuring addiction to the mobile phone, PMPAS could be a suitable instrument for measuring mobile phone addiction in future research. PMID:24778668

  6. Malaria Diagnosis Using a Mobile Phone Polarized Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnstill, Casey W.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2015-08-01

    Malaria remains a major global health burden, and new methods for low-cost, high-sensitivity, diagnosis are essential, particularly in remote areas with low-resource around the world. In this paper, a cost effective, optical cell-phone based transmission polarized light microscope system is presented for imaging the malaria pigment known as hemozoin. It can be difficult to determine the presence of the pigment from background and other artifacts, even for skilled microscopy technicians. The pigment is much easier to observe using polarized light microscopy. However, implementation of polarized light microscopy lacks widespread adoption because the existing commercial devices have complicated designs, require sophisticated maintenance, tend to be bulky, can be expensive, and would require re-training for existing microscopy technicians. To this end, a high fidelity and high optical resolution cell-phone based polarized light microscopy system is presented which is comparable to larger bench-top polarized microscopy systems but at much lower cost and complexity. The detection of malaria in fixed and stained blood smears is presented using both, a conventional polarized microscope and our cell-phone based system. The cell-phone based polarimetric microscopy design shows the potential to have both the resolution and specificity to detect malaria in a low-cost, easy-to-use, modular platform.

  7. Malaria Diagnosis Using a Mobile Phone Polarized Microscope.

    PubMed

    Pirnstill, Casey W; Coté, Gerard L

    2015-08-25

    Malaria remains a major global health burden, and new methods for low-cost, high-sensitivity, diagnosis are essential, particularly in remote areas with low-resource around the world. In this paper, a cost effective, optical cell-phone based transmission polarized light microscope system is presented for imaging the malaria pigment known as hemozoin. It can be difficult to determine the presence of the pigment from background and other artifacts, even for skilled microscopy technicians. The pigment is much easier to observe using polarized light microscopy. However, implementation of polarized light microscopy lacks widespread adoption because the existing commercial devices have complicated designs, require sophisticated maintenance, tend to be bulky, can be expensive, and would require re-training for existing microscopy technicians. To this end, a high fidelity and high optical resolution cell-phone based polarized light microscopy system is presented which is comparable to larger bench-top polarized microscopy systems but at much lower cost and complexity. The detection of malaria in fixed and stained blood smears is presented using both, a conventional polarized microscope and our cell-phone based system. The cell-phone based polarimetric microscopy design shows the potential to have both the resolution and specificity to detect malaria in a low-cost, easy-to-use, modular platform.

  8. Malaria Diagnosis Using a Mobile Phone Polarized Microscope.

    PubMed

    Pirnstill, Casey W; Coté, Gerard L

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global health burden, and new methods for low-cost, high-sensitivity, diagnosis are essential, particularly in remote areas with low-resource around the world. In this paper, a cost effective, optical cell-phone based transmission polarized light microscope system is presented for imaging the malaria pigment known as hemozoin. It can be difficult to determine the presence of the pigment from background and other artifacts, even for skilled microscopy technicians. The pigment is much easier to observe using polarized light microscopy. However, implementation of polarized light microscopy lacks widespread adoption because the existing commercial devices have complicated designs, require sophisticated maintenance, tend to be bulky, can be expensive, and would require re-training for existing microscopy technicians. To this end, a high fidelity and high optical resolution cell-phone based polarized light microscopy system is presented which is comparable to larger bench-top polarized microscopy systems but at much lower cost and complexity. The detection of malaria in fixed and stained blood smears is presented using both, a conventional polarized microscope and our cell-phone based system. The cell-phone based polarimetric microscopy design shows the potential to have both the resolution and specificity to detect malaria in a low-cost, easy-to-use, modular platform. PMID:26303238

  9. Mobile phone-based clinical guidance for rural health providers in India.

    PubMed

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Iyengar, M Sriram; Johnson, Craig W

    2015-12-01

    There are few tried and tested mobile technology applications to enhance and standardize the quality of health care by frontline rural health providers in low-resource settings. We developed a media-rich, mobile phone-based clinical guidance system for management of fevers, diarrhoeas and respiratory problems by rural health providers. Using a randomized control design, we field tested this application with 16 rural health providers and 128 patients at two rural/tribal sites in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. Protocol compliance for both groups, phone usability, acceptability and patient feedback for the experimental group were evaluated. Linear mixed-model analyses showed statistically significant improvements in protocol compliance in the experimental group. Usability and acceptability among patients and rural health providers were very high. Our results indicate that mobile phone-based, media-rich procedural guidance applications have significant potential for achieving consistently standardized quality of care by diverse frontline rural health providers, with patient acceptance.

  10. Mobile phone base stations and well-being--A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Klaps, Armin; Ponocny, Ivo; Winker, Robert; Kundi, Michael; Auersperg, Felicitas; Barth, Alfred

    2016-02-15

    It is unclear whether electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phone base stations affect well-being in adults. The existing studies on this topic are highly inconsistent. In the current paper we attempt to clarify this question by carrying out a meta-analysis which is based on the results of 17 studies. Double-blind studies found no effects on human well-being. By contrast, field or unblinded studies clearly showed that there were indeed effects. This provides evidence that at least some effects are based on a nocebo effect. Whether there is an influence of electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phone base stations thus depends on a person's knowledge about the presence of the presumed cause. Taken together, the results of the meta-analysis show that the effects of mobile phone base stations seem to be rather unlikely. However, nocebo effects occur.

  11. Automated Fast and Accurate Display Calibration Using ADT Compensated LCD for Mobile Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chan-Ho; Park, Kil-Houm

    Gamma correction is an essential function and is time consuming task in every display device such as CRT and LCD. And gray scale CCT reproduction in most LCD are quite different from those of standard CRT. An automated fast and accurate display adjusment method and system for gamma correction and for constant gray scale CCT calibration of mobile phone LCD is presented in this paper. We develop the test pattern disply and register control program in mobile phone and devleop automatic measure program in computer using spectroradimeter. The proposed system is maintain given gamma values and CCT values accuratly. In addition, This system is possible to fast mobile phone LCD adjusment within one hour.

  12. Experimental and numerical assessment of low-frequency current distributions from UMTS and GSM mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of the exposure from mobile communication devices requires consideration of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) over a broad frequency range from dc to GHz. Mobile phones in operation have prominent spectral components in the low-frequency (LF) and radio-frequency (RF) ranges. While the exposure to RF fields from mobile phones has been comprehensively assessed in the past, the LF fields have received much less attention. In this study, LF fields from mobile phones are assessed experimentally and numerically for the global system for mobile (GSM) and universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) communication systems and conclusions about the global (LF and RF) EMF exposure from both systems are drawn. From the measurements of the time-domain magnetic fields, it was found that the contribution from the audio signal at a normal speech level, i.e., -16 dBm0, is the same order of magnitude as the fields induced by the current bursts generated from the implementation of the GSM communication system at maximum RF output level. The B-field induced by currents in phones using the UMTS is two orders of magnitude lower than that induced by GSM. Knowing that the RF exposure from the UMTS is also two orders of magnitude lower than from GSM, it is now possible to state that there is an overall reduction of the exposure from this communication system.

  13. Can mobile phones help control neglected tropical diseases? Experiences from Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Madon, Shirin; Amaguru, Jackline Olanya; Malecela, Mwele Ntuli; Michael, Edwin

    2014-02-01

    The increasing proliferation of mobiles offers possibilities for improving health systems in developing countries. A case in point is Tanzania which has piloted a mobile phone-based Management Information System (MIS) for the control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) where village health workers (VHWs) were given mobile phones with web-based software to test the feasibility of using frontline health workers to capture data at point of source. Based on qualitative case study research carried out in 2011, we found that providing mobile phones to VHWs has helped to increase the efficiency of routine work boosting the motivation and self-esteem of VHWs. However, despite these advantages, the information generated from the mobile phone-based NTD MIS has yet to be used to support decentralised decision-making. Even with improved technology and political will, the biggest hindrance to local usage of information for health planning is the lack of synthesised and analysed health information from the district and national levels to the villages. Without inculcating a culture of providing health information feedback to frontline workers and community organisations, the benefits of the intervention will be limited. If not addressed, this will mean that mobiles have maintained the one-way upward flow of information for NTD control and simply made reporting more hi-tech. PMID:24565147

  14. Experimental and numerical assessment of low-frequency current distributions from UMTS and GSM mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of the exposure from mobile communication devices requires consideration of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) over a broad frequency range from dc to GHz. Mobile phones in operation have prominent spectral components in the low-frequency (LF) and radio-frequency (RF) ranges. While the exposure to RF fields from mobile phones has been comprehensively assessed in the past, the LF fields have received much less attention. In this study, LF fields from mobile phones are assessed experimentally and numerically for the global system for mobile (GSM) and universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) communication systems and conclusions about the global (LF and RF) EMF exposure from both systems are drawn. From the measurements of the time-domain magnetic fields, it was found that the contribution from the audio signal at a normal speech level, i.e., -16 dBm0, is the same order of magnitude as the fields induced by the current bursts generated from the implementation of the GSM communication system at maximum RF output level. The B-field induced by currents in phones using the UMTS is two orders of magnitude lower than that induced by GSM. Knowing that the RF exposure from the UMTS is also two orders of magnitude lower than from GSM, it is now possible to state that there is an overall reduction of the exposure from this communication system.

  15. Can mobile phones help control neglected tropical diseases? Experiences from Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Madon, Shirin; Amaguru, Jackline Olanya; Malecela, Mwele Ntuli; Michael, Edwin

    2014-02-01

    The increasing proliferation of mobiles offers possibilities for improving health systems in developing countries. A case in point is Tanzania which has piloted a mobile phone-based Management Information System (MIS) for the control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) where village health workers (VHWs) were given mobile phones with web-based software to test the feasibility of using frontline health workers to capture data at point of source. Based on qualitative case study research carried out in 2011, we found that providing mobile phones to VHWs has helped to increase the efficiency of routine work boosting the motivation and self-esteem of VHWs. However, despite these advantages, the information generated from the mobile phone-based NTD MIS has yet to be used to support decentralised decision-making. Even with improved technology and political will, the biggest hindrance to local usage of information for health planning is the lack of synthesised and analysed health information from the district and national levels to the villages. Without inculcating a culture of providing health information feedback to frontline workers and community organisations, the benefits of the intervention will be limited. If not addressed, this will mean that mobiles have maintained the one-way upward flow of information for NTD control and simply made reporting more hi-tech.

  16. Electronic waste recovery in Finland: Consumers' perceptions towards recycling and re-use of mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Mella, Jenni; Keiski, Riitta L; Pongrácz, Eva

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines consumers' awareness and perceptions towards mobile phone recycling and re-use. The results are based on a survey conducted in the city of Oulu, Finland, and analysed in the theoretical framework based on the theories of planned behaviour (TPB) and value-belief-norm (VBN). The findings indicate that consumers' awareness of the importance and existence of waste recovery system is high; however, awareness has not translated to recycling behaviour. The survey reveals that 55% of respondents have two or more unused mobile phones at homes. The more phones stored at homes, the more often reasons 'I don't know where to return' and/or 'have not got to do it yet' were mentioned. This indicates that proximity and the convenience of current waste management system are inadequate in promoting the return of small waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). To facilitate re-use, and the highest level of recovery, consumers will need to be committed to return end-of-use electronics to WEEE collection centres without delays. Further, the supply and demand of refurbished mobile phones do not meet at this moment in Finland due to consumer's storing habits versus expectations of recent features under guarantee and unrealistic low prizes. The study also points out that, in order to change current storing habits of consumers, there is an explicit need for more information and awareness on mobile phone collection in Finland, especially on regarding retailers' take-back.

  17. Recycling of WEEE: characterization of spent printed circuit boards from mobile phones and computers.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Luciana Harue; de Moraes, Viviane Tavares; Espinosa, Denise Crocce Romano; Tenório, Jorge Alberto Soares

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a comparison between printed circuit boards from computers and mobile phones. Since printed circuits boards are becoming more complex and smaller, the amount of materials is constantly changing. The main objective of this work was to characterize spent printed circuit boards from computers and mobile phones applying mineral processing technique to separate the metal, ceramic, and polymer fractions. The processing was performed by comminution in a hammer mill, followed by particle size analysis, and by magnetic and electrostatic separation. Aqua regia leaching, loss-on-ignition and chemical analysis (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy - ICP-OES) were carried out to determine the composition of printed circuit boards and the metal rich fraction. The composition of the studied mobile phones printed circuit boards (PCB-MP) was 63 wt.% metals; 24 wt.% ceramics and 13 wt.% polymers; and of the printed circuit boards from studied personal computers (PCB-PC) was 45 wt.% metals; 27 wt.% polymers and ceramics 28 wt.% ceramics. The chemical analysis showed that copper concentration in printed circuit boards from personal computers was 20 wt.% and in printed circuit boards from mobile phones was 34.5 wt.%. According to the characteristics of each type of printed circuit board, the recovery of precious metals may be the main goal of the recycling process of printed circuit boards from personal computers and the recovery of copper should be the main goal of the recycling process of printed circuit boards from mobile phones. Hence, these printed circuit boards would not be mixed prior treatment. The results of this paper show that copper concentration is increasing in mobile phones and remaining constant in personal computers.

  18. Why Do Drivers Use Mobile Phones While Driving? The Contribution of Compensatory Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ronggang; Yu, Mengli; Wang, Xinyi

    2016-01-01

    The current study is the first to investigate the contribution of compensatory beliefs (i.e., the belief that the negative effects of an unsafe behavior can be "neutralized" by engaging in another safe behavior; e.g., "I can use a mobile phone now because I will slow down ") on drivers’ mobile phone use while driving. The effects of drivers’ personal characteristics on compensatory beliefs, mobile phone use and self-regulatory behaviors were also examined. A series of questions were administered to drivers, which included (1) personal measures, (2) scales that measured compensatory beliefs generally in substance use and with regard to driving safety, and (3) questions to measure drivers’ previous primary mobile phone usage and corresponding self-regulatory actions. Overall, drivers reported a low likelihood of compensatory beliefs, prior mobile phone use, and a strong frequency of self-regulatory behaviors. Respondents who had a higher tendency toward compensatory beliefs reported more incidents or crash involvement caused by making or answering calls and sending or reading messages. The findings provide strong support for the contribution of compensatory beliefs in predicting mobile phone usage in the context of driving. Compensatory beliefs can explain 41% and 43% of the variance in the active activities of making calls and texting/sending messages compared with 18% and 31% of the variance in the passive activities of answering calls and reading messages. Among the regression models for predicting self-regulatory behaviors at the tactical or operational level, compensatory beliefs emerge as significant predictors only in predicting shorter conversations while on a call. The findings and limitations of the current study are discussed. PMID:27494524

  19. Why Do Drivers Use Mobile Phones While Driving? The Contribution of Compensatory Beliefs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ronggang; Yu, Mengli; Wang, Xinyi

    2016-01-01

    The current study is the first to investigate the contribution of compensatory beliefs (i.e., the belief that the negative effects of an unsafe behavior can be "neutralized" by engaging in another safe behavior; e.g., "I can use a mobile phone now because I will slow down ") on drivers' mobile phone use while driving. The effects of drivers' personal characteristics on compensatory beliefs, mobile phone use and self-regulatory behaviors were also examined. A series of questions were administered to drivers, which included (1) personal measures, (2) scales that measured compensatory beliefs generally in substance use and with regard to driving safety, and (3) questions to measure drivers' previous primary mobile phone usage and corresponding self-regulatory actions. Overall, drivers reported a low likelihood of compensatory beliefs, prior mobile phone use, and a strong frequency of self-regulatory behaviors. Respondents who had a higher tendency toward compensatory beliefs reported more incidents or crash involvement caused by making or answering calls and sending or reading messages. The findings provide strong support for the contribution of compensatory beliefs in predicting mobile phone usage in the context of driving. Compensatory beliefs can explain 41% and 43% of the variance in the active activities of making calls and texting/sending messages compared with 18% and 31% of the variance in the passive activities of answering calls and reading messages. Among the regression models for predicting self-regulatory behaviors at the tactical or operational level, compensatory beliefs emerge as significant predictors only in predicting shorter conversations while on a call. The findings and limitations of the current study are discussed. PMID:27494524

  20. Recycling of WEEE: characterization of spent printed circuit boards from mobile phones and computers.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Luciana Harue; de Moraes, Viviane Tavares; Espinosa, Denise Crocce Romano; Tenório, Jorge Alberto Soares

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a comparison between printed circuit boards from computers and mobile phones. Since printed circuits boards are becoming more complex and smaller, the amount of materials is constantly changing. The main objective of this work was to characterize spent printed circuit boards from computers and mobile phones applying mineral processing technique to separate the metal, ceramic, and polymer fractions. The processing was performed by comminution in a hammer mill, followed by particle size analysis, and by magnetic and electrostatic separation. Aqua regia leaching, loss-on-ignition and chemical analysis (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy - ICP-OES) were carried out to determine the composition of printed circuit boards and the metal rich fraction. The composition of the studied mobile phones printed circuit boards (PCB-MP) was 63 wt.% metals; 24 wt.% ceramics and 13 wt.% polymers; and of the printed circuit boards from studied personal computers (PCB-PC) was 45 wt.% metals; 27 wt.% polymers and ceramics 28 wt.% ceramics. The chemical analysis showed that copper concentration in printed circuit boards from personal computers was 20 wt.% and in printed circuit boards from mobile phones was 34.5 wt.%. According to the characteristics of each type of printed circuit board, the recovery of precious metals may be the main goal of the recycling process of printed circuit boards from personal computers and the recovery of copper should be the main goal of the recycling process of printed circuit boards from mobile phones. Hence, these printed circuit boards would not be mixed prior treatment. The results of this paper show that copper concentration is increasing in mobile phones and remaining constant in personal computers. PMID:21820883

  1. Analysis of three-dimensional SAR distributions emitted by mobile phones in an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Deltour, Isabelle; Wiart, Joe; Taki, Masao; Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Mann, Simon; Schüz, Joachim; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2011-12-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of the specific absorption rate of energy (SAR) in phantom models was analysed to detect clusters of mobile phones producing similar spatial deposition of energy in the head. The clusters' characteristics were described from the phones external features, frequency band and communication protocol. Compliance measurements with phones in cheek and tilt positions, and on the left and right side of a physical phantom were used. Phones used the Personal Digital Cellular (PDC), Code division multiple access One (CdmaOne), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) and Nordic Mobile Telephony (NMT) communication systems, in the 800, 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz bands. Each phone's measurements were summarised by the half-ellipsoid in which the SAR values were above half the maximum value. Cluster analysis used the Partitioning Around Medoids algorithm. The dissimilarity measure was based on the overlap of the ellipsoids, and the Manhattan distance was used for robustness analysis. Within the 800 MHz frequency band, and in part within the 900 MHz and the 1800 MHz frequency bands, weak clustering was obtained for the handset shape (bar phone, flip with top and flip with central antennas), but only in specific positions (tilt or cheek). On measurements of 120 phones, the three-dimensional distribution of SAR in phantom models did not appear to be related to particular external phone characteristics or measurement characteristics, which could be used for refining the assessment of exposure to radiofrequency energy within the brain in epidemiological studies such as the Interphone.

  2. Analysis of three-dimensional SAR distributions emitted by mobile phones in an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Deltour, Isabelle; Wiart, Joe; Taki, Masao; Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Mann, Simon; Schüz, Joachim; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2011-12-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of the specific absorption rate of energy (SAR) in phantom models was analysed to detect clusters of mobile phones producing similar spatial deposition of energy in the head. The clusters' characteristics were described from the phones external features, frequency band and communication protocol. Compliance measurements with phones in cheek and tilt positions, and on the left and right side of a physical phantom were used. Phones used the Personal Digital Cellular (PDC), Code division multiple access One (CdmaOne), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) and Nordic Mobile Telephony (NMT) communication systems, in the 800, 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz bands. Each phone's measurements were summarised by the half-ellipsoid in which the SAR values were above half the maximum value. Cluster analysis used the Partitioning Around Medoids algorithm. The dissimilarity measure was based on the overlap of the ellipsoids, and the Manhattan distance was used for robustness analysis. Within the 800 MHz frequency band, and in part within the 900 MHz and the 1800 MHz frequency bands, weak clustering was obtained for the handset shape (bar phone, flip with top and flip with central antennas), but only in specific positions (tilt or cheek). On measurements of 120 phones, the three-dimensional distribution of SAR in phantom models did not appear to be related to particular external phone characteristics or measurement characteristics, which could be used for refining the assessment of exposure to radiofrequency energy within the brain in epidemiological studies such as the Interphone. PMID:21695709

  3. On-line measurement data of wastewater systems via WAP mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Alex, J; Jumar, U; Schütze, M

    2003-01-01

    In order to support the operation of wastewater systems a system was developed which allows us to access plant data by standard mobile devices such as WAP mobile phones. This system is suited complement the standard application of alarm and message systems based for example on SMS or pager services. This technology provides useful options for mobile remote monitoring and remote control of automated plants. This technology is particularly appropriate for the use in remote facilities where no staff is available. The technology has been implemented succesfully and shows how standard IT and Internet technologies can be utilised to support the operation of spatially distributed plants with reasonable effort. Two implementations are presented which access plant data via WAP mobile phones and via mobile pocket PCs. First application experiences are presented. PMID:12636081

  4. "MXing it up": how African adolescents may affect social change through mobile phone use.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    This chapter outlines mobile phone use among African (particularly South African) adolescents. With an estimated 350 million active mobile phone subscriptions, improving network infrastructure, low-cost Internet-ready handsets, innovative programs and applications, mobiles in Africa, and their increasingly younger, increasingly poorer, and increasingly savvy users have the potential to act as conduits for local and regional socially just change. This broad-based connectedness not only provides access to information, but also, and crucially, connects individuals and their social, intellectual, and financial capital. It may represent a powerful, transformative shift in a region where access to similar technologies was historically limited to a privileged few. In order to best leverage these developments and opportunities to promote socially just change, I argue that future mobile-based programs or initiatives in the region should be based in both contemporary developmental systems theory as well as current, popular mobile applications and services.

  5. Anomalous dynamics of intruders in a crowded environment of mobile obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentjabrskaja, Tatjana; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; de Michele, Cristiano; Sciortino, Francesco; Tartaglia, Piero; Voigtmann, Thomas; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.; Laurati, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Many natural and industrial processes rely on constrained transport, such as proteins moving through cells, particles confined in nanocomposite materials or gels, individuals in highly dense collectives and vehicular traffic conditions. These are examples of motion through crowded environments, in which the host matrix may retain some glass-like dynamics. Here we investigate constrained transport in a colloidal model system, in which dilute small spheres move in a slowly rearranging, glassy matrix of large spheres. Using confocal differential dynamic microscopy and simulations, here we discover a critical size asymmetry, at which anomalous collective transport of the small particles appears, manifested as a logarithmic decay of the density autocorrelation functions. We demonstrate that the matrix mobility is central for the observed anomalous behaviour. These results, crucially depending on size-induced dynamic asymmetry, are of relevance for a wide range of phenomena ranging from glassy systems to cell biology.

  6. Anomalous dynamics of intruders in a crowded environment of mobile obstacles.

    PubMed

    Sentjabrskaja, Tatjana; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; De Michele, Cristiano; Sciortino, Francesco; Tartaglia, Piero; Voigtmann, Thomas; Egelhaaf, Stefan U; Laurati, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes rely on constrained transport, such as proteins moving through cells, particles confined in nanocomposite materials or gels, individuals in highly dense collectives and vehicular traffic conditions. These are examples of motion through crowded environments, in which the host matrix may retain some glass-like dynamics. Here we investigate constrained transport in a colloidal model system, in which dilute small spheres move in a slowly rearranging, glassy matrix of large spheres. Using confocal differential dynamic microscopy and simulations, here we discover a critical size asymmetry, at which anomalous collective transport of the small particles appears, manifested as a logarithmic decay of the density autocorrelation functions. We demonstrate that the matrix mobility is central for the observed anomalous behaviour. These results, crucially depending on size-induced dynamic asymmetry, are of relevance for a wide range of phenomena ranging from glassy systems to cell biology. PMID:27041068

  7. Anomalous dynamics of intruders in a crowded environment of mobile obstacles.

    PubMed

    Sentjabrskaja, Tatjana; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; De Michele, Cristiano; Sciortino, Francesco; Tartaglia, Piero; Voigtmann, Thomas; Egelhaaf, Stefan U; Laurati, Marco

    2016-04-04

    Many natural and industrial processes rely on constrained transport, such as proteins moving through cells, particles confined in nanocomposite materials or gels, individuals in highly dense collectives and vehicular traffic conditions. These are examples of motion through crowded environments, in which the host matrix may retain some glass-like dynamics. Here we investigate constrained transport in a colloidal model system, in which dilute small spheres move in a slowly rearranging, glassy matrix of large spheres. Using confocal differential dynamic microscopy and simulations, here we discover a critical size asymmetry, at which anomalous collective transport of the small particles appears, manifested as a logarithmic decay of the density autocorrelation functions. We demonstrate that the matrix mobility is central for the observed anomalous behaviour. These results, crucially depending on size-induced dynamic asymmetry, are of relevance for a wide range of phenomena ranging from glassy systems to cell biology.

  8. Anomalous dynamics of intruders in a crowded environment of mobile obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Sentjabrskaja, Tatjana; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; De Michele, Cristiano; Sciortino, Francesco; Tartaglia, Piero; Voigtmann, Thomas; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.; Laurati, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes rely on constrained transport, such as proteins moving through cells, particles confined in nanocomposite materials or gels, individuals in highly dense collectives and vehicular traffic conditions. These are examples of motion through crowded environments, in which the host matrix may retain some glass-like dynamics. Here we investigate constrained transport in a colloidal model system, in which dilute small spheres move in a slowly rearranging, glassy matrix of large spheres. Using confocal differential dynamic microscopy and simulations, here we discover a critical size asymmetry, at which anomalous collective transport of the small particles appears, manifested as a logarithmic decay of the density autocorrelation functions. We demonstrate that the matrix mobility is central for the observed anomalous behaviour. These results, crucially depending on size-induced dynamic asymmetry, are of relevance for a wide range of phenomena ranging from glassy systems to cell biology. PMID:27041068

  9. Global Outreach of a Locally-Developed Mobile Phone App for Undergraduate Psychiatry Education

    PubMed Central

    Cheok, Christopher CS; Ho, Roger CM

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, there have been massive developments in both Web-based and mobile phone technologies. Mobile phones are well accepted by students, trainees, and doctors. A review of the current literature has identified the following specialties that have used mobile phones in education: pediatrics, ophthalmology, nephrology, plastic surgery, orthopedics, pharmacology, and urology. However, to date, there are no published papers examining the application of the latest mobile phone technologies for psychiatry education internationally. Objectives The main objectives of this study are (1) to determine the feasibility and receptiveness of a locally-developed psychiatry mobile phone app and user perspectives (both quantitative and qualitative) towards it, and (2) to determine the receptiveness of a locally-developed app for psychiatry education internationally. Methods A Web-based app that contained textbook contents, videos, and quizzes was developed using HTML5 technologies in 2012. Native apps were subsequently developed in 2013. Information about the apps was disseminated locally to Singaporean medical students, but the respective native apps were made available on the app stores. A user perspective survey was conducted locally to determine student’s perception of the app. Results From the inception of the app until the time of preparation of this manuscript, there have been a cumulative total of 28,500 unique visits of the responsive HTML5 Web-based mobile phone app. There have been a cumulative total of 2200 downloads of the Mastering Psychiatry app from the Apple app store and 7000 downloads of the same app from the Android app store. The initial user perspective survey conducted locally highlighted that approximately a total of 95.2% (177/186) of students felt that having a psychiatry mobile phone app was deemed to be useful. Further chi-squared analysis demonstrated that there was a significant difference between males and females in their

  10. Popular Mobile Phone Apps for Diet and Weight Loss: A Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roehrer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Background A review of the literature has revealed that the rates of overweight and obesity have been increasing in Australia over the last two decades and that wellness mobile phone apps play a significant role in monitoring and managing individuals’ weight. Although mobile phone app markets (iTunes and Google Play) list thousands of mobile phone health apps, it is not always clear whether those apps are supported by credible sources. Likewise, despite the prevailing use of mobile phone apps to aid with weight management, the usability features of these apps are not well characterized. Objective The research explored how usability taxonomy could inform the popularity of downloaded, socially focused wellness mobile phone apps, in particular weight loss and diet apps. The aim of the study was to investigate the Australian mobile phone app stores (iTunes and Google Play) in order to examine the usability features of the most popular (ie, most downloaded) wellness apps. Methods The design of this study comprises 3 main stages: stage 1, identifying apps; stage 2, development of weight loss and diet evaluation framework; and stage 3, application of the evaluation framework. Each stage includes specific data collection, analysis tools, and techniques. Results The study has resulted in the development of a justified evaluation framework for weight loss and diet mobile phone apps. Applying the evaluation framework to the identified apps has shown that the most downloaded iTunes and Google Play apps are not necessarily the most usable or effective. In addition, the research found that search algorithms for iTunes and Google Play are biased toward apps’ titles and keywords that do not accurately define the real functionality of the app. Moreover, the study has also analyzed the apps’ user reviews, which served as justification for the developed evaluation framework. Conclusions The analysis has shown that ease of use, reminder, bar code scanning, motivation, usable for

  11. A new metal detection method based on balanced coil for mobile phone wireless charging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, B.; Liu, Z. Z.; Chen, H. X.; Zeng, H.; Hei, T.

    2016-08-01

    The wireless charging time of mobile phone will increase greatly if the metal objects mix in the magnetic field coupling area. In addition, the fire may be caused as for the high temperature of metal objects. The paper proposed an improved detecting method based on balance coil for mobile phone wireless charging system according to comparing the advantages and disadvantages of traditional metal detection methods. The circuit model was established, and hardware and software were optimized. At last, experimental results verified the theoretical analysis.

  12. Studies on the effect of mobile phone radiation on DNA using laser induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnu, K.; Nithyaja, B.; Pradeep, C.; Sujith, R.; Mohanan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2011-11-01

    In the present study we have investigated the effect of mobile phone radiation on deoxyribonucleic acid by using fluorescence technique. Absorption spectra shows increase in absorption of DNA after exposure to radiation from mobile phone with different SAR values and microwave frequency which give information about unwinding of the DNA double strand. Fluorescence intensity of dye doped DNA solution is getting reduced suggesting that the absorbed energy is used for unwinding of double strand of DNA after irradiating with microwave radiation. Unwinding of the DNA is very sensitive to power of the microwave radiation.

  13. More screen operation than calling: the results of observing cyclists' behaviour while using mobile phones.

    PubMed

    de Waard, Dick; Westerhuis, Frank; Lewis-Evans, Ben

    2015-03-01

    Operating a mobile telephone while riding a bicycle is fairly common practice in the Netherlands, yet it is unknown if this use is stable or increasing. As such, whether the prevalence of mobile phone use while cycling has changed over the past five years was studied via on-road observation. In addition the impact of mobile phone use on lateral position, i.e. distance from the front wheel to the curb, was also examined to see if it compared to the results seen in previous experimental studies. Bicyclists were observed at six different locations and their behaviour was scored. It was found that compared to five years ago the use of mobile phones while cycling has changed, not in frequency, but in how cyclists were operating their phones. As found in 2008, three percent of the bicyclists were observed to be operating a phone, but a shift from calling (0.7% of cyclists observed) to operating (typing, texting, 2.3% of cyclists) was found. In 2008 nearly the complete opposite usage was observed: 2.2% of the cyclists were calling and 0.6% was texting. Another finding was that effects on lateral position were similar to those seen in experimental studies in that cyclists using a phone maintained a cycling position which was further away from the curb. It was also found that when at an intersection, cyclist's operating their phone made less head movements to the right than cyclists who were just cycling. This shift from calling to screen operation, when combined with the finding related to reduced head movements at intersections, is worrying and potentially dangerous.

  14. [Determining health policy for sensible mobile phone use--current world status].

    PubMed

    Sagi, Omer Itzhak; Sadetzki, Siegal

    2011-03-01

    Mobile phones have become the leading communication system, with more than 4.5 billions users around the world. The sharp increase in the number of users, and its penetration to all populations, including children, has raised concern about possible adverse health effects, particularly cancer This article reviews the public health policies introduced in Israel and several other countries regarding mobile phone use in view of the lack of clarity concerning the safety of this new technology. The data show that most countries have adopted the precautionary principle as the leading guideline, recommending the use of simple and low-cost safety measures which could substantially reduce exposure to the brain and other body organs from mobile phones. These include the use of text messages, hands-free kits, and/or the loud-speaker mode of the phone. Accordingly, recommendations, guidelines, standards, and legislation aimed at the general population, drivers, state institutions and the industry have been formulated. For children, who are considered to be more susceptible to cancer development following exposure to carcinogens, there is widespread consensus for a stricter approach. In some countries, measures such as banning use of mobile phones in schools, prohibiting sales/advertisements targeted at young age groups, expanding warnings on phones/ packages, and encouraging educational campaigns have been adopted for this population. Regulations regarding phone use while driving have been instituted in most countries. In conclusion, many public health practitioners have moved from the theoretical level (adoption of the precautionary principle) to an active phase of introducing regulations, with specific emphasis to various populations.

  15. More screen operation than calling: the results of observing cyclists' behaviour while using mobile phones.

    PubMed

    de Waard, Dick; Westerhuis, Frank; Lewis-Evans, Ben

    2015-03-01

    Operating a mobile telephone while riding a bicycle is fairly common practice in the Netherlands, yet it is unknown if this use is stable or increasing. As such, whether the prevalence of mobile phone use while cycling has changed over the past five years was studied via on-road observation. In addition the impact of mobile phone use on lateral position, i.e. distance from the front wheel to the curb, was also examined to see if it compared to the results seen in previous experimental studies. Bicyclists were observed at six different locations and their behaviour was scored. It was found that compared to five years ago the use of mobile phones while cycling has changed, not in frequency, but in how cyclists were operating their phones. As found in 2008, three percent of the bicyclists were observed to be operating a phone, but a shift from calling (0.7% of cyclists observed) to operating (typing, texting, 2.3% of cyclists) was found. In 2008 nearly the complete opposite usage was observed: 2.2% of the cyclists were calling and 0.6% was texting. Another finding was that effects on lateral position were similar to those seen in experimental studies in that cyclists using a phone maintained a cycling position which was further away from the curb. It was also found that when at an intersection, cyclist's operating their phone made less head movements to the right than cyclists who were just cycling. This shift from calling to screen operation, when combined with the finding related to reduced head movements at intersections, is worrying and potentially dangerous. PMID:25590920

  16. Ethical considerations of mobile phone use by patients in KwaZulu-Natal: Obstacles for mHealth?

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background mHealth has the potential to facilitate telemedicine services, particularly in the developing world. Concern has been expressed about the confidentiality of health information that is relayed by mobile phone. Aim We examined the habits and practices of mobile phone use by patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods We conducted a descriptive survey of two patient populations: 137 urban patients attending private practitioners and 139 patients in remote rural areas attending outpatient departments in Government-funded hospitals. The questionnaire covered several domains: demographics, mobile phone use, privacy and confidentiality and future use for health-related matters. Results Two hundred and seventy-six patients completed the questionnaire. We found that a third of our participants shared their mobile phone with others, 24% lent their phone to others and more than half received health-related messages for other people. Mobile phone theft was common, as was number changing. Thirty-eight percent of the people were not able to afford airtime for more than a week in the past year and 22% of rural patients were unable to keep their phone charged. Mobile phone signal coverage was significantly worse in the rural areas than in urban areas. Conclusion This study highlights the legal and ethical ramifications that these practices and findings will have on mHealth programmes in our setting. Healthcare providers and regulators will need to consider how patients use and manage their mobile phones when developing services and regulations. PMID:26245406

  17. Evaluation of Mobile Phone Interference With Aircraft GPS Navigation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Scott; Oria, A. J.; Guckian, Paul; Nguyen, Truong X.

    2004-01-01

    This report compiles and analyzes tests that were conducted to measure cell phone spurious emissions in the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio frequency band that could affect the navigation system of an aircraft. The cell phone in question had, as reported to the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration), caused interference to several GPS receivers on-board a small single engine aircraft despite being compliant with data filed at the time with the FCC by the manufacturer. NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and industry tests show that while there is an emission in the 1575 MHz GPS band due to a specific combination of amplifier output impedance and load impedance that induces instability in the power amplifier, these spurious emissions (i.e., not the intentional transmit signal) are similar to those measured on non-intentionally transmitting devices such as, for example, laptop computers. Additional testing on a wide sample of different commercial cell phones did not result in any emission in the 1575 MHz GPS Band above the noise floor of the measurement receiver.

  18. Effect of electromagnetic radiations from mobile phone base stations on general health and salivary function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kushpal; Nagaraj, Anup; Yousuf, Asif; Ganta, Shravani; Pareek, Sonia; Vishnani, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cell phones use electromagnetic, nonionizing radiations in the microwave range, which some believe may be harmful to human health. The present study aimed to determine the effect of electromagnetic radiations (EMRs) on unstimulated/stimulated salivary flow rate and other health-related problems between the general populations residing in proximity to and far away from mobile phone base stations. Materials and Methods: A total of four mobile base stations were randomly selected from four zones of Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Twenty individuals who were residing in proximity to the selected mobile phone towers were taken as the case group and the other 20 individuals (control group) who were living nearly 1 km away in the periphery were selected for salivary analysis. Questions related to sleep disturbances were measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and other health problems were included in the questionnaire. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: It was unveiled that a majority of the subjects who were residing near the mobile base station complained of sleep disturbances, headache, dizziness, irritability, concentration difficulties, and hypertension. A majority of the study subjects had significantly lesser stimulated salivary secretion (P < 0.01) as compared to the control subjects. Conclusions: The effects of prolonged exposure to EMRs from mobile phone base stations on the health and well-being of the general population cannot be ruled out. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on general health and more specifically on oral health. PMID:27011934

  19. Mobile Phones, Brain Tumors, and the Interphone Study: Where Are We Now?

    PubMed Central

    Feychting, Maria; Green, Adele C.; Kheifets, Leeka; Savitz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the past 15 years, mobile telephone use has evolved from an uncommon activity to one with > 4.6 billion subscriptions worldwide. However, there is public concern about the possibility that mobile phones might cause cancer, especially brain tumors. Objectives: We reviewed the evidence on whether mobile phone use raises the risk of the main types of brain tumor—glioma and meningioma—with a particular focus on the recent publication of the largest epidemiologic study yet: the 13-country Interphone Study. Discussion: Methodological deficits limit the conclusions that can be drawn from the Interphone study, but its results, along with those from other epidemiologic, biological, and animal studies and brain tumor incidence trends, suggest that within about 10–15 years after first use of mobile phones there is unlikely to be a material increase in the risk of brain tumors in adults. Data for childhood tumors and for periods beyond 15 years are currently lacking. Conclusions: Although there remains some uncertainty, the trend in the accumulating evidence is increasingly against the hypothesis that mobile phone use can cause brain tumors in adults. PMID:22171384

  20. Community Attitudes to the Appropriation of Mobile Phones for Monitoring and Managing Depression, Anxiety, and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Gordon; Hadzi Pavlovic, Dusan; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Adler, Einat; Whitton, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Background The benefits of self-monitoring on symptom severity, coping, and quality of life have been amply demonstrated. However, paper and pencil self-monitoring can be cumbersome and subject to biases associated with retrospective recall, while computer-based monitoring can be inconvenient in that it relies on users being at their computer at scheduled monitoring times. As a result, nonadherence in self-monitoring is common. Mobile phones offer an alternative. Their take-up has reached saturation point in most developed countries and is increasing in developing countries; they are carried on the person, they are usually turned on, and functionality is continually improving. Currently, however, public conceptions of mobile phones focus on their use as tools for communication and social identity. Community attitudes toward using mobile phones for mental health monitoring and self-management are not known. Objective The objective was to explore community attitudes toward the appropriation of mobile phones for mental health monitoring and management. Methods We held community consultations in Australia consisting of an online survey (n = 525), focus group discussions (n = 47), and interviews (n = 20). Results Respondents used their mobile phones daily and predominantly for communication purposes. Of those who completed the online survey, the majority (399/525 or 76%) reported that they would be interested in using their mobile phone for mental health monitoring and self-management if the service were free. Of the 455 participants who owned a mobile phone or PDA, there were no significant differences between those who expressed interest in the use of mobile phones for this purpose and those who did not by gender (χ21, = 0.98, P = .32, phi = .05), age group (χ24, = 1.95, P = .75, phi = .06), employment status (χ22, = 2.74, P = .25, phi = .08) or marital status (χ24, = 4.62, P = .33, phi = .10). However, the presence of current symptoms of depression, anxiety, or

  1. Managing Mobile Relationships: Children's Perceptions of the Impact of the Mobile Phone on Relationships in Their Everyday Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Emma

    2010-01-01

    This article explores English children's use of mobile phones in managing and maintaining friendships and relationships in their everyday lives. Based on the accounts of 30 young people aged between 11 and 17, this research adopts a social constructivist perspective to offer a theoretical framework which explores how children themselves actually…

  2. Using Social Identity to Explore the Link between a Decline in Adolescent Smoking and an Increase in Mobile Phone Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Purpose--The study seeks to further explore the hypothesised link between the increase in mobile phone ownership and use and the reported decline in adolescent smoking. Evidence for the link was gathered by examining perceptions of mobile phone use in the context of social identity and adolescent smoking. Design/methodology/approach--The study…

  3. A Study of the Impact of Mobile Phones as Learning Tools for Youth in Southern Baptist Churches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Jerry David

    2012-01-01

    Problem: The problem of this study was to determine the differences between two groups of learners across four specified learner variables. The two groups were students using mobile phones and students without the use of mobile phones in youth Bible studies in selected Southern Baptist churches. The four learner variables were cognitive test…

  4. Looking across the New Digital Divide: A Comparison of Inservice and Preservice Teacher Perceptions of Mobile Phone Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kevin; O'Bannon, Blanche W.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the perceptions of 1,121 inservice teachers and 245 preservice teachers in Kentucky and Tennessee to determine the difference in their support for the use of mobile phones in the classroom, as well as their perceptions of the mobile phone features that are useful for school-related work and the instructional barriers to mobile…

  5. A Mobile-Phone-Based Breath Carbon Monoxide Meter to Detect Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mobile phones hold considerable promise for delivering evidence-based smoking cessation interventions that require frequent and objective assessment of smoking status via breath carbon monoxide (Breath CO) measurement. However, there are currently no commercially available mobile-phone-based Breath CO meters. We developed a mobile-phone-based Breath CO meter prototype that attaches to and communicates with a smartphone through an audio port. We then evaluated the reliability and the validity of Breath CO measures collected with the mobile meter prototype and assessed the usability and acceptability of the meter. Methods: Participants included 20 regular smokers (≥10 cigarettes/day), 20 light smokers (<10 cigarettes/day), and 20 nonsmokers. Expired air samples were collected 4 times from each participant: twice with the mobile meter and twice with a commercially available Breath CO meter. Results: Measures calculated by the mobile meter correlated strongly with measures calculated by the commercial meter (r = .96, p < .001). Additionally, the mobile meter accurately distinguished between smokers and nonsmokers. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for the mobile meter was 94.7%, and the meter had a combined sensitivity and specificity of 1.86 at an abstinence threshold of ≤6 ppm. Responses on an acceptability survey indicated that smokers liked the meter and would be interested in using it during a quit attempt. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that a mobile-phone-based Breath CO meter is a reliable, valid, and acceptable device for distinguishing between smokers and nonsmokers. PMID:24470633

  6. A mobile phone integrated health care delivery system of medical images.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fuk-hay; Law, Maria Y Y; Lee, Ares C H; Chan, Lawrence W C

    2004-09-01

    With the growing computing capability of mobile phones, a handy mobile controller is developed for accessing the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) to enhance image management for clinicians with nearly no restriction in time and location using various wireless communication modes. The PACS is an integrated system for the distribution and archival of medical images that are acquired by different imaging modalities such as CT (computed tomography) scanners, CR (computed radiography) units, DR (digital radiography) units, US (ultrasonography) scanners, and MR (magnetic resonance) scanners. The mobile controller allows image management of the PACS including display, worklisting, query and retrieval of medical images in DICOM format. In this mobile system, a server program is developed in a PACS Web server which serves as an interface for client programs in the mobile phone and the enterprise PACS for image distribution in hospitals. The application processing is performed on the server side to reduce computational loading in the mobile device. The communication method of mobile phones can be adapted to multiple wireless environments in Hong Kong. This allows greater feasibility to accommodate the rapidly changing communication technology. No complicated computer hardware or software is necessary. Using a mobile phone embedded with the mobile controller client program, this system would serve as a tool for heath care and medical professionals to improve the efficiency of the health care services by speedy delivery of image information. This is particularly important in case of urgent consultation, and it allows health care workers better use of the time for patient care. PMID:15534754

  7. Brain-muscle-computer interface: mobile-phone prototype development and testing.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Scott; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2011-07-01

    We report prototype development and testing of a new mobile-phone-based brain-muscle-computer interface for severely paralyzed persons, based on previous results from our group showing that humans may actively create specified power levels in two separate frequency bands of a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. EMG activity on the surface of a single face muscle site (auricularis superior) is recorded with a standard electrode. This analog electrical signal is imported into an Android-based mobile phone and digitized via an internal A/D converter. The digital signal is split, and then simultaneously filtered with two band-pass filters to extract total power within two separate frequency bands. The user-modulated power in each frequency band serves as two separate control channels for machine control. After signal processing, the Android phone sends commands to external devices via a Bluetooth interface. Users are trained to use the device via visually based operant conditioning, with simple cursor-to-target activities on the phone screen. The mobile-phone prototype interface is formally evaluated on a single advanced Spinal Muscle Atrophy subject, who has successfully used the interface in his home in evaluation trials and for remote control of a television. Development of this new device will not only guide future interface design for community use, but will also serve as an information technology bridge for in situ data collection to quantify human sEMG manipulation abilities for a relevant population.

  8. Using mobile phone data to predict the spatial spread of cholera.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Linus; Gaudart, Jean; Lu, Xin; Moore, Sandra; Wetter, Erik; Sallah, Kankoe; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-03-09

    Effective response to infectious disease epidemics requires focused control measures in areas predicted to be at high risk of new outbreaks. We aimed to test whether mobile operator data could predict the early spatial evolution of the 2010 Haiti cholera epidemic. Daily case data were analysed for 78 study areas from October 16 to December 16, 2010. Movements of 2.9 million anonymous mobile phone SIM cards were used to create a national mobility network. Two gravity models of population mobility were implemented for comparison. Both were optimized based on the complete retrospective epidemic data, available only after the end of the epidemic spread. Risk of an area experiencing an outbreak within seven days showed strong dose-response relationship with the mobile phone-based infectious pressure estimates. The mobile phone-based model performed better (AUC 0.79) than the retrospectively optimized gravity models (AUC 0.66 and 0.74, respectively). Infectious pressure at outbreak onset was significantly correlated with reported cholera cases during the first ten days of the epidemic (p < 0.05). Mobile operator data is a highly promising data source for improving preparedness and response efforts during cholera outbreaks. Findings may be particularly important for containment efforts of emerging infectious diseases, including high-mortality influenza strains.

  9. Using mobile phone data to predict the spatial spread of cholera.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Linus; Gaudart, Jean; Lu, Xin; Moore, Sandra; Wetter, Erik; Sallah, Kankoe; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Effective response to infectious disease epidemics requires focused control measures in areas predicted to be at high risk of new outbreaks. We aimed to test whether mobile operator data could predict the early spatial evolution of the 2010 Haiti cholera epidemic. Daily case data were analysed for 78 study areas from October 16 to December 16, 2010. Movements of 2.9 million anonymous mobile phone SIM cards were used to create a national mobility network. Two gravity models of population mobility were implemented for comparison. Both were optimized based on the complete retrospective epidemic data, available only after the end of the epidemic spread. Risk of an area experiencing an outbreak within seven days showed strong dose-response relationship with the mobile phone-based infectious pressure estimates. The mobile phone-based model performed better (AUC 0.79) than the retrospectively optimized gravity models (AUC 0.66 and 0.74, respectively). Infectious pressure at outbreak onset was significantly correlated with reported cholera cases during the first ten days of the epidemic (p < 0.05). Mobile operator data is a highly promising data source for improving preparedness and response efforts during cholera outbreaks. Findings may be particularly important for containment efforts of emerging infectious diseases, including high-mortality influenza strains. PMID:25747871

  10. A Review of Integrating Mobile Phones for Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darmi, Ramiza; Albion, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mobile learning (m-learning) is gradually being introduced in language classrooms. All forms of mobile technology represent portability with smarter features. Studies have proven the concomitant role of technology beneficial for language learning. Various features in the technology have been exploited and researched for acquiring and learning…

  11. The impact of mobile phone screen size on user comprehension of health information.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ebtisam; Yunus, Faisel; Househ, Mowafa

    2013-01-01

    Within the field of mobile health, there is little research conducted on the impacts of mobile health technologies and applications on user comprehension of health content. In this study, we examine the difference between small, medium and large screen mobile phone that affect the user comprehension of health content. We designed an experimental study where 33 users read the contents of a health application on different mobile phone screen sizes. Each participant was timed, tracked for correctness, and gave ratings for both readability and satisfaction on each task. In addition, they were asked some questions about the contents. Results show that there was no significant impact of the screen size on user comprehension of the contents. However, it was found that participants with small screen size took longer to read the health contents.

  12. Mobile phone based electrochemiluminescence detection in paper-based microfluidic sensors.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Jacqui L; Hogan, Conor F

    2015-01-01

    The development of simple, inexpensive paper-based sensors for medical diagnostics and other applications is now an important emerging area in the field of biosensors; however, the electronic instrument or reader used to interrogate such sensors adds significantly to the cost of the analysis. In this chapter we describe the design and construction of novel, low-cost disposable electrochemiluminescent (ECL) sensors based on screen printed carbon electrodes and paper-based microfluidics. Moreover, a method to interrogate these sensors using only a mobile phone is articulated. This is realized by exploiting the audio output of the device to achieve electrochemical control, while using the camera to detect the resulting light emitted during the ECL reaction. The combination of cell phone technology with low-cost paper microfluidic sensors dramatically reduces the cost of sensing and has the potential to enhance health-care outcomes by exploiting the functionality, connectivity, and close to worldwide penetration of mobile phone technology. PMID:25626546

  13. INTEGRATED CIRCUITS FROM MOBILE PHONES AS POSSIBLE EMERGENCY OSL/TL DOSIMETERS.

    PubMed

    Sholom, S; McKeever, S W S

    2016-09-01

    In this article, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data are presented from integrated circuits (ICs) extracted from mobile phones. The purpose is to evaluate the potential of using OSL from components in personal electronic devices such as smart phones as a means of emergency dosimetry in the event of a large-scale radiological incident. ICs were extracted from five different makes and models of mobile phone. Sample preparation procedures are described, and OSL from the IC samples following irradiation using a (90)Sr/(90)Y source is presented. Repeatability, sensitivity, dose responses, minimum measureable doses, stability and fading data were examined and are described. A protocol for measuring absorbed dose is presented, and it was concluded that OSL from these components is a viable method for assessing dose in the days following a radiological incident. PMID:26516131

  14. Risk and benefit perceptions of mobile phone and base station technology in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    van Kleef, Ellen; Fischer, Arnout R H; Khan, Moin; Frewer, Lynn J

    2010-06-01

    Research in developed countries showed that many citizens perceive that radio signals transmitted by mobile phones and base stations represent potential health risks. Less research has been conducted in developing countries focused on citizen perceptions of risks and benefits, despite the recent and rapid introduction of mobile communication technologies. This study aims to identify factors that are influential in determining the tradeoffs that Bangladeshi citizens make between risks and benefits in terms of mobile phone technology acceptance and health concerns associated with the technology. Bangladesh was selected as representative of many developing countries inasmuch as terrestrial telephone infrastructure is insubstantial, and mobile phone use has expanded rapidly over the last decade, even among the poor. Issues of importance were identified in a small-scale qualitative study among Bangladeshi citizens (n = 13), followed by a survey within a sample of Bangladeshi citizens (n = 500). The results demonstrate that, in general, the perceived benefits of mobile phone technology outweigh the risks. The perceived benefits are primarily related to the social and personal advantages of mobile phone use, including the ability to receive emergency news about floods, cyclones, and other natural disasters. Base stations were seen as a symbol of societal advance. The results furthermore suggest that overall risk perceptions are relatively low, in particular health risks, and are primarily driven by perceptions that related to crime and social inconvenience. Perceived health risks are relatively small. These findings show that risk communication and management may be particularly effective when contextual factors of the society where the system is implemented are taken into consideration.

  15. The effect of macromolecular crowding on mobility of biomolecules, association kinetics and gene expression in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaka, Marcin; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Hou, Sen; Hołyst, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We discuss a quantitative influence of macromolecular crowding on biological processes: motion, bimolecular reactions, and gene expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We present scaling laws relating diffusion coefficient of an object moving in a cytoplasm of cells to a size of this object and degree of crowding. Such description leads to the notion of the length scale dependent viscosity characteristic for all living cells. We present an application of the length-scale dependent viscosity model to the description of motion in the cytoplasm of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic living cells. We compare the model with all recent data on diffusion of nanoscopic objects in HeLa, and E. coli cells. Additionally a description of the mobility of molecules in cell nucleus is presented. Finally we discuss the influence of crowding on the bimolecular association rates and gene expression in living cells.

  16. Mobile Phone Sensor Correlates of Depressive Symptom Severity in Daily-Life Behavior: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Sohrab; Zhang, Mi; Karr, Christopher J; Schueller, Stephen M; Corden, Marya E; Kording, Konrad P

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a common, burdensome, often recurring mental health disorder that frequently goes undetected and untreated. Mobile phones are ubiquitous and have an increasingly large complement of sensors that can potentially be useful in monitoring behavioral patterns that might be indicative of depressive symptoms. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the detection of daily-life behavioral markers using mobile phone global positioning systems (GPS) and usage sensors, and their use in identifying depressive symptom severity. Methods A total of 40 adult participants were recruited from the general community to carry a mobile phone with a sensor data acquisition app (Purple Robot) for 2 weeks. Of these participants, 28 had sufficient sensor data received to conduct analysis. At the beginning of the 2-week period, participants completed a self-reported depression survey (PHQ-9). Behavioral features were developed and extracted from GPS location and phone usage data. Results A number of features from GPS data were related to depressive symptom severity, including circadian movement (regularity in 24-hour rhythm; r=-.63, P=.005), normalized entropy (mobility between favorite locations; r=-.58, P=.012), and location variance (GPS mobility independent of location; r=-.58, P=.012). Phone usage features, usage duration, and usage frequency were also correlated (r=.54, P=.011, and r=.52, P=.015, respectively). Using the normalized entropy feature and a classifier that distinguished participants with depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score ≥5) from those without (PHQ-9 score <5), we achieved an accuracy of 86.5%. Furthermore, a regression model that used the same feature to estimate the participants’ PHQ-9 scores obtained an average error of 23.5%. Conclusions Features extracted from mobile phone sensor data, including GPS and phone usage, provided behavioral markers that were strongly related to depressive symptom severity. While these findings must

  17. Mobile Phone Applications in the University Classroom: Perceptions of Undergraduate Students in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashour, Rateb; Alzghool, Haneen; Iyadat, Yousef; Abu-Alruz, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine the level of mobile phone applications in university classrooms in Jordan. A sample of 313 undergraduate students participated in the study by completing the researchers' designed questionnaire, which is composed of 13 items. The results of the study indicate that participants perceived a high…

  18. Mobile Phones and Psychosocial Therapies with Vulnerable People: a First State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Maria Yolanda García; Sexto, Carlos Ferrás; Rocha, Álvaro; Aguilera, Adrián

    2016-06-01

    Mobile phones are becoming a communication tool commonly used by people all over the world; and they are started to be adopted in psychosocial therapies involving vulnerable people. We are herein presenting the results of an academic literature review. We identified scientific papers published between 2006 and 2015 resorting to academic databases available on the Internet, applying a systematic selection method based on quality criteria. Secondly, we analysed contents, highlighting the scarcity of research involving vulnerable people. The available literature specialized in psychosocial therapies offers investigation results which involve mobile phones and patients in general, focusing particularly on the clinical psychology field and, to a lesser extent, on the social work field. Particularly significant are the investigation works developed in the United States. In the present paper we introduce a first "state of the art", identifying opportunities and also the limitations surrounding the use of mobile phones in psychosocial therapies targeting the vulnerable. Issues concerning privacy and data confidentiality, and the access of vulnerable people to mobile phones and how they use them, pose significant challenges; but they offer the opportunity to reach isolated or impoverished populations, or even to facilitate access to social and healthcare services. We close this paper formulating possible orientations, hypotheses and goals to design new investigation works involving vulnerable populations.

  19. Mobile Phones for Spain's University Entrance Examination Language Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García Laborda, Jesús; Magal Royo, Teresa; Litzler, Mary Frances; Giménez López, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Few tests were delivered using mobile phones a few years ago, but the flexibility and capability of these devices make them valuable tools even for high stakes testing. This paper addresses research done through the PAULEX (2007-2010) and OPENPAU (2012-2014) research projects at the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia and Universidad de Alcalá…

  20. Pursuing the Anonymous User: Privacy Rights and Mandatory Registration of Prepaid Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, Gordon A.; Parisi, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been concern among law enforcement and national security organizations about the use of "anonymous" prepaid mobile phone service and its purported role in supporting criminal and terrorist activities. As a result, a number of countries have implemented registration requirements for such service. Privacy rights advocates…

  1. A Comparison of Undergraduate Students' English Vocabulary Learning: Using Mobile Phones and Flash Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basoglu, Emrah Baki; Akdemir, Omur

    2010-01-01

    Knowing a foreign language has become crucial to reach information. Learning vocabulary is the fundamental step to learn a foreign language. New devices are invented everyday to fulfill the needs of citizens of the twenty-first century. Increased use of mobile phones has made them popular for not only communication, but also entertainment and…

  2. Training Learners to Use Quizlet Vocabulary Activities on Mobile Phones in Vietnam with Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone ownership among university students in Vietnam has reached almost 100%, exceeding that of Internet-capable desktop computers. This has made them increasingly popular to allow learners to carry out learning activities outside of the classroom, but some studies have suggested that learners are not always willing to engage in activities…

  3. Improving Student Learning via Mobile Phone Video Content: Evidence from the BridgeIT India Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wennersten, Matthew; Quraishy, Zubeeda Banu; Velamuri, Malathi

    2015-01-01

    Past efforts invested in computer-based education technology interventions have generated little evidence of affordable success at scale. This paper presents the results of a mobile phone-based intervention conducted in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu in 2012-13. The BridgeIT project provided a pool of audio-visual learning…

  4. Perceptions of Civility for Mobile Phone Use in Formal and Informal Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Melvin C.; Okoro, Ephraim A.; Cardon, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    We report our survey research about what American business professionals consider appropriate or civil mobile phone behavior during formal and informal meetings. The findings come from two of our recent research studies: an open-ended survey of 204 employees at a beverage distributor on the East Coast and a nationwide, random-sample survey of 350…

  5. The Influence of Electromagnetic Radiation Generated by a Mobile Phone on the Skeletal System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Teister, Łukasz; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Dominik; Śliwinski, Zbigniew; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of electromagnetic field generated by mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats, assessed by measuring the macrometric parameters of bones, mechanical properties of long bones, calcium and phosphorus content in bones, and the concentration of osteogenesis (osteocalcin) and bone resorption (NTX, pyridinoline) markers in blood serum. The study was carried out on male rats divided into two groups: experimental group subjected to 28-day cycle of exposures in electromagnetic field of 900 MHz frequency generated by mobile phone and a control, sham-exposed one. The mobile phone-generated electromagnetic field did not influence the macrometric parameters of long bones and L4 vertebra, it altered mechanical properties of bones (stress and energy at maximum bending force, stress at fracture), it decreased the content of calcium in long bones and L4 vertebra, and it altered the concentration of osteogenesis and bone resorption markers in rats. On the basis of obtained results, it was concluded that electromagnetic field generated by 900 MHz mobile phone does not have a direct impact on macrometric parameters of bones; however, it alters the processes of bone mineralization and the intensity of bone turnover processes and thus influences the mechanical strength of bones. PMID:25705697

  6. Mobile Phone Appropriation of Students and Staff at an Institution of Higher Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karim, Nor Shahriza Abdul; Oyebisi, Ishaq Oyefolahan; Mahmud, Murni

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption and appropriation of mobile phone (MP) technologies by building on the technology appropriation theories. The paper also looks into the choice of MP use through various attractors, the purposes of MP use and the extent of use of various MP applications and features by the targeted…

  7. 47 CFR 14.61 - Obligations with respect to internet browsers built into mobile phones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Obligations with respect to internet browsers... GENERAL ACCESS TO ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Internet... internet browsers built into mobile phones. (a) Accessibility. If on or after October 8, 2013...

  8. 47 CFR 14.61 - Obligations with respect to internet browsers built into mobile phones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Obligations with respect to internet browsers... GENERAL ACCESS TO ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Internet... internet browsers built into mobile phones. (a) Accessibility. If on or after October 8, 2013...

  9. Development of a retrospective/fortuitous accident dosimetry service based on OSL of mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Smith, R W; Eakins, J S; Hager, L G; Rothkamm, K; Tanner, R J

    2015-04-01

    Work is presented on the development of a retrospective/fortuitous accident dosimetry service using optically stimulated luminescence of resistors found in mobile phones to determine the doses of radiation to members of the public following a radiological accident or terrorist incident. The system is described and discussed in terms of its likely accuracy in a real incident. PMID:25841040

  10. Undergraduate Usage of Mobile Phones and Its Implication of School Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dania, P. O.; Iwe-Ewenode, J.

    2016-01-01

    The study is a survey research intended to find out undergraduate usage of mobile phones and its implication of school application. The colloquium population is 27,650 at which two hundred and thirty-eight undergraduate students were randomly selected from two universities in the Federal Republic of Nigeria. A questionnaire on "current trends…

  11. Using Mobile Phones as Placed Resources for Literacy Learning in a Remote Indigenous Community in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auld, Glenn; Snyder, Ilana; Henderson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Despite massive funding from the Australian government, the literacy achievement of Australian Indigenous children remains significantly lower than for non-Indigenous. With the aim of identifying innovative ways to improve Indigenous children's literacy achievement, this study explored the social practices surrounding everyday mobile phone use by…

  12. Spatiotemporal detection of unusual human population behavior using mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Dobra, Adrian; Williams, Nathalie E; Eagle, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to contribute to humanitarian response to disasters and violent events, scientists have proposed the development of analytical tools that could identify emergency events in real-time, using mobile phone data. The assumption is that dramatic and discrete changes in behavior, measured with mobile phone data, will indicate extreme events. In this study, we propose an efficient system for spatiotemporal detection of behavioral anomalies from mobile phone data and compare sites with behavioral anomalies to an extensive database of emergency and non-emergency events in Rwanda. Our methodology successfully captures anomalous behavioral patterns associated with a broad range of events, from religious and official holidays to earthquakes, floods, violence against civilians and protests. Our results suggest that human behavioral responses to extreme events are complex and multi-dimensional, including extreme increases and decreases in both calling and movement behaviors. We also find significant temporal and spatial variance in responses to extreme events. Our behavioral anomaly detection system and extensive discussion of results are a significant contribution to the long-term project of creating an effective real-time event detection system with mobile phone data and we discuss the implications of our findings for future research to this end.

  13. Using a mobile phone acceleration sensor in physics experiments on free and damped harmonic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos Castro-Palacio, Juan; Velázquez-Abad, Luisberis; Giménez, Marcos H.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2013-06-01

    We have used a mobile phone acceleration sensor, and the Accelerometer Monitor application for Android, to collect data in physics experiments on free and damped oscillations. Results for the period, frequency, spring constant, and damping constant agree very well with measurements obtained by other methods. These widely available sensors are likely to find increased use in instructional laboratories.

  14. Constant connections: piloting a mobile phone-based peer support program for Nuer (southern Sudanese) women.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Dennis; Koh, Lee; Walker, Rae; Liamputtong, Pranee

    2013-01-01

    Refugee women have poor psychosocial health as a result of past trauma and difficulties associated with settlement. This study was a pilot to find out how to use mobile phone-based peer support to improve the psychosocial health of, and facilitate settlement in a group of nine Nuer refugee women in Melbourne, Australia. Nine participants recruited by a community leader received peer support training over two five-week periods. They were further provided with mobile phone recharge vouchers to call one another to practice peer support techniques. The fifth and final sessions were focus groups to evaluate the intervention. Notes from the focus groups were thematically analysed. The women reported greater confidence and empowerment as they received more support, had better connections within the group and better access to information. Relationships with friends, family and the community became richer as they adopted and experienced more functional communication patterns. Using mobile phones for peer support helped to re-create community by bridging the geographical distance that separates refugee women. It allowed the women, from similar backgrounds and with similar experiences, to provide mutual support and exchange information through a verbal channel, the form of communication they are most comfortable with. The program demonstrates the positive psychosocial effect of peer support in a refugee community, and provides a viable model for using mobile phones in health promotion interventions. The successful outcomes, as perceived by the participants, are indicative of the potential of using technology to bridge health inequities in a marginalised group.

  15. Individual differences in the effects of mobile phone exposure on human sleep: rethinking the problem.

    PubMed

    Loughran, Sarah P; McKenzie, Raymond J; Jackson, Melinda L; Howard, Mark E; Croft, Rodney J

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phone exposure-related effects on the human electroencephalogram (EEG) have been shown during both waking and sleep states, albeit with slight differences in the frequency affected. This discrepancy, combined with studies that failed to find effects, has led many to conclude that no consistent effects exist. We hypothesised that these differences might partly be due to individual variability in response, and that mobile phone emissions may in fact have large but differential effects on human brain activity. Twenty volunteers from our previous study underwent an adaptation night followed by two experimental nights in which they were randomly exposed to two conditions (Active and Sham), followed by a full-night sleep episode. The EEG spectral power was increased in the sleep spindle frequency range in the first 30 min of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep following Active exposure. This increase was more prominent in the participants that showed an increase in the original study. These results confirm previous findings of mobile phone-like emissions affecting the EEG during non-REM sleep. Importantly, this low-level effect was also shown to be sensitive to individual variability. Furthermore, this indicates that previous negative results are not strong evidence for a lack of an effect and, given the far-reaching implications of mobile phone research, we may need to rethink the interpretation of results and the manner in which research is conducted in this field.

  16. The "Trainer in Your Pocket:" Mobile Phones within a Teacher Continuing Professional Development Program in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Christopher S.; Power, Tom; Khatoon, Masuda; Biswas, Sudeb Kumar; Paul, Ashok Kumar; Sarkar, Bikash Chandra; Griffiths, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Examples of mobile phones being used with teachers to provide continuing professional development (CPD) in emerging economies at scale are largely absent from the research literature. We outline English in Action's (EIA) model for providing 80,000 teachers with CPD to improve their communicative language teaching in Bangladesh over nine…

  17. Developing Teachers' Pedagogical Practice in Teaching Science Lessons with Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanayake, T. M. S. S. K. Y.; Wishart, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of an investigation carried out in Sri Lanka to explore how mobile phones can support science teachers' pedagogical practices throughout the teaching cycle of planning, teaching and evaluation. Data were collected using observation supported by audio and video recordings from both continuing professional…

  18. New Uses for a Familiar Technology: Introducing Mobile Phone Polling in Large Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Bennett, Daimark

    2014-01-01

    We have introduced a real-time polling system to support student engagement and feedback in four large Level 1 and 2 modules in Biological Sciences. The audience response system makes use of a technology that is ubiquitous and familiar to the students. To participate, students send text messages using their mobile phones or send a message via…

  19. Spatiotemporal Detection of Unusual Human Population Behavior Using Mobile Phone Data

    PubMed Central

    Dobra, Adrian; Williams, Nathalie E.; Eagle, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to contribute to humanitarian response to disasters and violent events, scientists have proposed the development of analytical tools that could identify emergency events in real-time, using mobile phone data. The assumption is that dramatic and discrete changes in behavior, measured with mobile phone data, will indicate extreme events. In this study, we propose an efficient system for spatiotemporal detection of behavioral anomalies from mobile phone data and compare sites with behavioral anomalies to an extensive database of emergency and non-emergency events in Rwanda. Our methodology successfully captures anomalous behavioral patterns associated with a broad range of events, from religious and official holidays to earthquakes, floods, violence against civilians and protests. Our results suggest that human behavioral responses to extreme events are complex and multi-dimensional, including extreme increases and decreases in both calling and movement behaviors. We also find significant temporal and spatial variance in responses to extreme events. Our behavioral anomaly detection system and extensive discussion of results are a significant contribution to the long-term project of creating an effective real-time event detection system with mobile phone data and we discuss the implications of our findings for future research to this end. PMID:25806954

  20. The influence of electromagnetic radiation generated by a mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats.

    PubMed

    Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Teister, Łukasz; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Dominik; Śliwinski, Zbigniew; Kucharzewski, Marek; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of electromagnetic field generated by mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats, assessed by measuring the macrometric parameters of bones, mechanical properties of long bones, calcium and phosphorus content in bones, and the concentration of osteogenesis (osteocalcin) and bone resorption (NTX, pyridinoline) markers in blood serum. The study was carried out on male rats divided into two groups: experimental group subjected to 28-day cycle of exposures in electromagnetic field of 900 MHz frequency generated by mobile phone and a control, sham-exposed one. The mobile phone-generated electromagnetic field did not influence the macrometric parameters of long bones and L4 vertebra, it altered mechanical properties of bones (stress and energy at maximum bending force, stress at fracture), it decreased the content of calcium in long bones and L4 vertebra, and it altered the concentration of osteogenesis and bone resorption markers in rats. On the basis of obtained results, it was concluded that electromagnetic field generated by 900 MHz mobile phone does not have a direct impact on macrometric parameters of bones; however, it alters the processes of bone mineralization and the intensity of bone turnover processes and thus influences the mechanical strength of bones.

  1. Non-Work-Related Use of Personal Mobile Phones by Hospital Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices (smartphones and tablet computers) provide users with an ever-increasing number and diversity of non-work-related activities while at work. In hospitals, where the vigilance of health care workers is essential for patient care, the potential distraction of these devices could be hazardous to patients. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of non-work-related use of personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices among hospital registered nurses. Methods In March 2014, a previously validated 30-question survey was emailed to the 10,978 members of the Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses. There were 825 respondents who met the inclusion criteria. Results The use of a personal mobile phone or other personal communication device while working (excluding meal times and breaks) was reported by 78.1% (644/825) of respondents. Nurses reported regularly (sometimes, often, or always) sending personal emails and text messages (38.6%, 318/825), reading news (25.7%, 212/825), checking/posting on social networking sites (20.8%, 172/825), shopping (9.6%, 79/825), and playing games (6.5%, 54/825) while working. Conclusions This study found that hospital nurses frequently use their personal mobile phones or other personal communication devices for non-work-related activities at work. The primary activity reported was to send personal emails and text messages to family and friends. PMID:25586982

  2. Penetration and Growth Rates of Mobile Phones in Developing Countries: An Analytical Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This brief paper uses a simple arithmetic framework to classify and explain the performance of developing countries in closing the absolute digital divide. Four categories are created on the basis of two variables, namely, the penetration and rate of growth of mobile phones. The paper answers questions such as: Which countries do well and badly on…

  3. Communicating textual health information to the mobile phones of visually-impaired users.

    PubMed

    Kummervold, Per Egil; Holthe, Halgeir

    2008-01-01

    We investigated how short messages communicating health information would best be distributed to people with vision difficulties using mobile phones. Twelve visually-impaired persons who were unable to read short message service (SMS) messages directly compared three methods of presenting text messages as speech: (1) ordinary SMS messages were sent to the users and converted into speech by the mobile phone; (2) multimedia messages were sent to the users with prerecorded speech-synthesized information; and (3) mobile phone calls were placed to the users and prerecorded speech-synthesized messages were streamed to them. The latter two approaches used server-generated sound files. Over a three-month trial period, we sent a total of 88 SMS messages to the subjects, 111 multimedia messaging service (MMS) messages and 104 telephone calls. All of the SMS messages, 88% of the MMS messages and 69% of the telephone calls were received. In subsequent interviews, we asked the users which presentation method they preferred. SMS scored significantly better than both MMS (P = 0.033) and telephones (P = 0.006). All three methods had serious drawbacks. However, the study suggests that it might be possible to develop suitable technology for communicating with people with vision difficulties by mobile phone. PMID:18534952

  4. Mobile Phones and Psychosocial Therapies with Vulnerable People: a First State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Maria Yolanda García; Sexto, Carlos Ferrás; Rocha, Álvaro; Aguilera, Adrián

    2016-06-01

    Mobile phones are becoming a communication tool commonly used by people all over the world; and they are started to be adopted in psychosocial therapies involving vulnerable people. We are herein presenting the results of an academic literature review. We identified scientific papers published between 2006 and 2015 resorting to academic databases available on the Internet, applying a systematic selection method based on quality criteria. Secondly, we analysed contents, highlighting the scarcity of research involving vulnerable people. The available literature specialized in psychosocial therapies offers investigation results which involve mobile phones and patients in general, focusing particularly on the clinical psychology field and, to a lesser extent, on the social work field. Particularly significant are the investigation works developed in the United States. In the present paper we introduce a first "state of the art", identifying opportunities and also the limitations surrounding the use of mobile phones in psychosocial therapies targeting the vulnerable. Issues concerning privacy and data confidentiality, and the access of vulnerable people to mobile phones and how they use them, pose significant challenges; but they offer the opportunity to reach isolated or impoverished populations, or even to facilitate access to social and healthcare services. We close this paper formulating possible orientations, hypotheses and goals to design new investigation works involving vulnerable populations. PMID:27194134

  5. The influence of electromagnetic radiation generated by a mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats.

    PubMed

    Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Teister, Łukasz; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Dominik; Śliwinski, Zbigniew; Kucharzewski, Marek; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of electromagnetic field generated by mobile phone on the skeletal system of rats, assessed by measuring the macrometric parameters of bones, mechanical properties of long bones, calcium and phosphorus content in bones, and the concentration of osteogenesis (osteocalcin) and bone resorption (NTX, pyridinoline) markers in blood serum. The study was carried out on male rats divided into two groups: experimental group subjected to 28-day cycle of exposures in electromagnetic field of 900 MHz frequency generated by mobile phone and a control, sham-exposed one. The mobile phone-generated electromagnetic field did not influence the macrometric parameters of long bones and L4 vertebra, it altered mechanical properties of bones (stress and energy at maximum bending force, stress at fracture), it decreased the content of calcium in long bones and L4 vertebra, and it altered the concentration of osteogenesis and bone resorption markers in rats. On the basis of obtained results, it was concluded that electromagnetic field generated by 900 MHz mobile phone does not have a direct impact on macrometric parameters of bones; however, it alters the processes of bone mineralization and the intensity of bone turnover processes and thus influences the mechanical strength of bones. PMID:25705697

  6. Spatiotemporal detection of unusual human population behavior using mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Dobra, Adrian; Williams, Nathalie E; Eagle, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to contribute to humanitarian response to disasters and violent events, scientists have proposed the development of analytical tools that could identify emergency events in real-time, using mobile phone data. The assumption is that dramatic and discrete changes in behavior, measured with mobile phone data, will indicate extreme events. In this study, we propose an efficient system for spatiotemporal detection of behavioral anomalies from mobile phone data and compare sites with behavioral anomalies to an extensive database of emergency and non-emergency events in Rwanda. Our methodology successfully captures anomalous behavioral patterns associated with a broad range of events, from religious and official holidays to earthquakes, floods, violence against civilians and protests. Our results suggest that human behavioral responses to extreme events are complex and multi-dimensional, including extreme increases and decreases in both calling and movement behaviors. We also find significant temporal and spatial variance in responses to extreme events. Our behavioral anomaly detection system and extensive discussion of results are a significant contribution to the long-term project of creating an effective real-time event detection system with mobile phone data and we discuss the implications of our findings for future research to this end. PMID:25806954

  7. Evidence for mobile phone radiation exposure effects on reproductive pattern of male rats: role of ROS.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Behari, Jitendra

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between radiofrequency electromagnetic fields emitted from mobile phone and infertility is a matter of continuing debate. It is postulated that these radiations may affect the reproduction pattern spell by targeting biochemistry of sperm. In an attempt to expedite the issue, 70 days old Wistar rats (n = 6) were exposed to mobile phone radiofrequency (RF) radiation for 2 h per day for 45 days and data compared with sham exposed (n = 6) group. A significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the level of testosterone and an increase in caspase-3 activity were found in the RF-exposed animals. Distortions in sperm head and mid piece of sperm mitochondrial sheath were also observed as captured by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). In addition, progeny from RF-exposed rats showed significant decreases in number and weight as compared with that of sham-exposed animals. A reduction in testosterone, an increase in caspase-3, and distortion in spermatozoa could be caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in animals under mobile phone radiation exposure. Our findings on these biomarkers are clear indications of possible health implications of repeated exposure to mobile phone radiation.

  8. Technologies, Multitasking, and Driving: Attending to and Preparing for a Mobile Phone Conversation in a Car

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddington, Pentti; Rauniomaa, Mirka

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates mobile phone calls initiated or received by drivers and passengers in cars and focuses on the participants' actions before the telephone conversation proper. Drawing on video-recorded data of real driving situations, and building on conversation analysis and multimodal interaction analysis, this article discusses how…

  9. Mobile Phone Use and its Association With Sitting Time and Meeting Physical Activity Recommendations in a Mexican American Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Daniel, Carrie R; Wu, Xifeng; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefits of physical activity (PA) are well-documented. Mobile phones influence PA by promoting screen-based sedentary time, providing prompts or reminders to be active, aiding in tracking and monitoring PA, or providing entertainment during PA. It is not known how mobile phone use is associated with PA and sitting time in Mexican Americans, and how mobile phone users may differ from nonusers. Objective To determine the associations between mobile phone use, PA, and sitting time and how these behaviors differ from mobile phone nonusers in a sample of 2982 Mexican-American adults from the Mano a Mano cohort. Methods Differences in meeting PA recommendations and sitting time between mobile phone users and nonusers were examined using chi-square and analysis of variance tests. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between mobile phone use, PA, and sitting. Results Mobile phone users were more likely to be obese by body mass index criteria (≥30 kg/m2), younger, born in the United States and lived there longer, more educated, and sit more hours per day but more likely to meet PA recommendations than nonusers. Males (odds ratio [OR] 1.42, 95% CI 1.16-1.74), use of text messaging (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.56), and having a higher acculturation score (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07-1.52) were associated with higher odds of meeting PA recommendations. Sitting more hours per day was associated with being male, obese, born in the United States, a former alcohol drinker, and having at least a high school education. Among nonusers, being born in the United States was associated with higher odds of more sitting time, and being married was associated with higher odds of meeting PA recommendations. Conclusions Mobile phone interventions using text messages could be tailored to promote PA in less acculturated and female Mexican American mobile phone users. PMID:27311831

  10. On the use of new generation mobile phone (smart phone) for retrospective accident dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. I.; Chang, I.; Pradhan, A. S.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, B. H.; Chung, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) characteristics of resistors, inductors and integrated-circuit (IC) chips, extracted from new generation smart phones, were investigated for the purpose of retrospective accident dosimetry. Inductor samples were found to exhibit OSL sensitivity about 5 times and 40 times higher than that of the resistors and the IC chips, respectively. On post-irradiation storage, the resistors exhibited a much higher OSL fading (about 80 % in 36 h as compared to the value 3 min after irradiation) than IC chips (about 20 % after 36 h) and inductors (about 50 % in 36 h). Higher OSL sensitivity, linear dose response (from 8.7 mGy up to 8.9 Gy) and acceptable fading make inductors more attractive for accident dosimetry than widely studied resistors.

  11. Role of mobile phones in motor vehicle crashes resulting in hospital attendance: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Suzanne P; Stevenson, Mark R; McCartt, Anne T; Woodward, Mark; Haworth, Claire; Palamara, Peter; Cercarelli, Rina

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To explore the effect of drivers' use of mobile (cell) phones on road safety. Design A case-crossover study. Setting Perth, Western Australia. Participants 456 drivers aged ≥ 17 years who owned or used mobile phones and had been involved in road crashes necessitating hospital attendance between April 2002 and July 2004. Main outcome measure Driver's use of mobile phone at estimated time of crash and on trips at the same time of day in the week before the crash. Interviews with drivers in hospital and phone company's records of phone use. Results Driver's use of a mobile phone up to 10 minutes before a crash was associated with a fourfold increased likelihood of crashing (odds ratio 4.1, 95% confidence interval 2.2 to 7.7, P < 0.001). Risk was raised irrespective of whether or not a hands-free device was used (hands-free: 3.8, 1.8 to 8.0, P < 0.001; hand held: 4.9, 1.6 to 15.5, P = 0.003). Increased risk was similar in men and women and in drivers aged ≥ 30 and < 30 years. A third (n = 21) of calls before crashes and on trips during the previous week were reportedly on hand held phones. Conclusions When drivers use a mobile phone there is an increased likelihood of a crash resulting in injury. Using a hands-free phone is not any safer. PMID:16012176

  12. Mobile phone use among motorcyclists and electric bike riders: A case study of Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Truong, Long T; Nguyen, Hang T T; De Gruyter, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Motorcyclist injuries and fatalities are a major concern of many developing countries. In Vietnam, motorcycles are involved in more than 70% of all road traffic crashes. This paper aims to explore the prevalence and factors associated with mobile phone use among motorcyclists and electric bike riders, using a case study of Hanoi, Vietnam. A cross-sectional observation survey was undertaken at 12 sites, in which each site was surveyed during a two-hour peak period from 16:30 to 18:30 for two weekdays and one weekend day. A total of 26,360 riders were observed, consisting of 24,759 motorcyclists and 1601 electric bike riders. The overall prevalence of mobile phone use while riding was 8.4% (95% CI: 8.06-8.74%) with calling having higher prevalence than screen operation: 4.64% (95% CI: 4.39-4.90%) vs. 3.76% (95% CI: 3.52-3.99%) respectively. Moreover, the prevalence of mobile phone use was higher among motorcyclists than electric bike riders: 8.66% (95%CI: 8.30-9.01%) vs. 4.43% (95% CI: 3.40-5.47%) respectively. Logistic regression analyses revealed that mobile phone use while riding was associated with vehicle type, age, gender, riding alone, weather, day of week, proximity to city centre, number of lanes, separate car lanes, red traffic light duration, and police presence. Combining greater enforcement of existing legislations with extensive education and publicity programs is recommended to reduce potential deaths and injuries related to the use of mobile phones while riding.

  13. Mobile phone use among motorcyclists and electric bike riders: A case study of Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Truong, Long T; Nguyen, Hang T T; De Gruyter, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Motorcyclist injuries and fatalities are a major concern of many developing countries. In Vietnam, motorcycles are involved in more than 70% of all road traffic crashes. This paper aims to explore the prevalence and factors associated with mobile phone use among motorcyclists and electric bike riders, using a case study of Hanoi, Vietnam. A cross-sectional observation survey was undertaken at 12 sites, in which each site was surveyed during a two-hour peak period from 16:30 to 18:30 for two weekdays and one weekend day. A total of 26,360 riders were observed, consisting of 24,759 motorcyclists and 1601 electric bike riders. The overall prevalence of mobile phone use while riding was 8.4% (95% CI: 8.06-8.74%) with calling having higher prevalence than screen operation: 4.64% (95% CI: 4.39-4.90%) vs. 3.76% (95% CI: 3.52-3.99%) respectively. Moreover, the prevalence of mobile phone use was higher among motorcyclists than electric bike riders: 8.66% (95%CI: 8.30-9.01%) vs. 4.43% (95% CI: 3.40-5.47%) respectively. Logistic regression analyses revealed that mobile phone use while riding was associated with vehicle type, age, gender, riding alone, weather, day of week, proximity to city centre, number of lanes, separate car lanes, red traffic light duration, and police presence. Combining greater enforcement of existing legislations with extensive education and publicity programs is recommended to reduce potential deaths and injuries related to the use of mobile phones while riding. PMID:27015225

  14. A pilot study on mobile phones as a means to access maternal health education in eastern rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sanford; Birgisson, Natalia; Julia Chang, Diana; Koopman, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Maternal mortality in Uganda has remained relatively high since 2006. We studied access to mobile phones and people's interest in receiving audio-based maternal health lessons delivered via a toll-free telephone line. Interviews were conducted, using a male and a female translator, with 42 men and 41 women in four villages located in eastern rural Uganda. Most of the participants were recruited through systematic sampling, but some were recruited through community organizations and antenatal clinics. Ownership of a mobile phone was reported by 79% of men and by 42% of women. Among those who did not own a mobile phone, 67% of men and 88% of women reported regularly borrowing a mobile phone. Among women, 98% reported interest in receiving maternal mobile health lessons, and 100% of men. Providing local communities with mobile maternal health education offers a new potential method of reducing maternal mortality. PMID:25059242

  15. An Investigation of the Relationship between High-School Students' Problematic Mobile Phone Use and Their Self-Esteem Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isiklar, Abdullah; Sar, Ali Haydar; Durmuscelebi, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Excessive mobile phone use, especially among adolescents, brings too many debates about its effects. To this end, in this study, we try to investigate the relationship between adolescents' mobile phone use and their self-esteem levels with regard to their genders. For 919 high school students, we evaluated mobile phone use concerning their…

  16. Older Adult Self-Efficacy Study of Mobile Phone Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charlene C; Khokhar, Bilal; Weed, Kelly; Barr, Erik; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate participant self-efficacy and use of a mobile phone diabetes health intervention for older adults during a 4-week period. Participants included seven adults (mean age, 70.3 years) with type 2 diabetes cared for by community-based primary care physicians. Participants entered blood glucose data into a mobile phone and personalized patient Internet Web portal. Based on blood glucose values, participants received automatic messages and educational information to self-manage their diabetes. Study measures included prior mobile phone/Internet use, the Stanford Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Scale, the Stanford Energy/Fatigue Scale, the Short Form-36, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (depression), the Patient Reported Diabetes Symptom Scale, the Diabetes Stages of Change measure, and a summary of mobile system use. Participants had high self-efficacy and high readiness and confidence in their ability to monitor changes to control their diabetes. Participants demonstrated ability to use the mobile intervention and communicate with diabetes educators.

  17. Remote Mobile Health Monitoring System Based on Smart Phone and Browser/Server Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunzhou; Liu, Huiyu; Su, Xiaolin; Jiang, Pei; Wei, Dongfei

    2015-01-01

    A remote mobile health monitoring system with mobile phone and web service capabilities is proposed in this paper. It provides an end-to-end solution; specifically, (1) physiologic parameters, including respiration rate and heart rate, are measured by wearable sensors and recorded by a mobile phone which presents the graphical interface for the user to observe his/her health status more easily; (2) it provides doctors and family members with necessary data through a web interface and enables authorized personnel to monitor the patient's condition and to facilitate remote diagnosis; and (3) it supports real-time alarming and positioning services during an urgent situation, such as a tumble or a heart attack, so that unexpected events can be handled in a timely manner. Experimental results show that the proposed system can reliably monitor the physiologic parameters and conveniently report the user's position.

  18. Sensor-Aware Recognition and Tracking for Wide-Area Augmented Reality on Mobile Phones.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Cao, Ruochen; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-12-10

    Wide-area registration in outdoor environments on mobile phones is a challenging task in mobile augmented reality fields. We present a sensor-aware large-scale outdoor augmented reality system for recognition and tracking on mobile phones. GPS and gravity information is used to improve the VLAD performance for recognition. A kind of sensor-aware VLAD algorithm, which is self-adaptive to different scale scenes, is utilized to recognize complex scenes. Considering vision-based registration algorithms are too fragile and tend to drift, data coming from inertial sensors and vision are fused together by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to achieve considerable improvements in tracking stability and robustness. Experimental results show that our method greatly enhances the recognition rate and eliminates the tracking jitters.

  19. Mobile phone technologies and advanced data analysis towards the enhancement of diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Kouris, Ioannis; Mougiakakou, Stavroula; Scarnato, Luca; Iliopoulou, Dimitra; Diem, Peter; Vazeou, Andriani; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the area of mobile and wireless communication for healthcare (m-Health) along with the improvements in information science allow the design and development of new patient-centric models for the provision of personalised healthcare services, increase of patient independence and improvement of patient's self-control and self-management capabilities. This paper comprises a brief overview of the m-Health applications towards the self-management of individuals with diabetes mellitus and the enhancement of their quality of life. Furthermore, the design and development of a mobile phone application for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) self-management is presented. The technical evaluation of the application, which permits the management of blood glucose measurements, blood pressure measurements, insulin dosage, food/drink intake and physical activity, has shown that the use of the mobile phone technologies along with data analysis methods might improve the self-management of T1DM.

  20. Assessment of gold and silver in assorted mobile phone printed circuit boards (PCBs): Original article.

    PubMed

    Vats, M C; Singh, S K

    2015-11-01

    Demand for gold and silver has been escalating with increasing usage of electronic equipment globally. Around 267.3 MT of gold and 7275 MT of silver are being consumed annually for manufacturing mobile phones, laptops and other electronic equipment. However, only 15% is recuperated from these equipment; the remainder lies in the storage yards or landfills. The waste comprise glass, plastics, wires, batteries, PCBs, metal casing, etc. The PCB is composed of precious metals, which creates immense purpose for recycling and recovery. This paper characterises and assesses the recoverable metallic fraction of gold and silver from PCBs of mobile phones. The methodology is based on dismantling of the mobile handset and subjecting the PCBs to roasting and acid digestion. The digested samples were analysed by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the content of gold and silver in the PCBs was to be found in the range of 0.009-0.017% and 0.25-0.79% by weight respectively.

  1. Remote Mobile Health Monitoring System Based on Smart Phone and Browser/Server Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunzhou; Liu, Huiyu; Su, Xiaolin; Jiang, Pei; Wei, Dongfei

    2015-01-01

    A remote mobile health monitoring system with mobile phone and web service capabilities is proposed in this paper. It provides an end-to-end solution; specifically, (1) physiologic parameters, including respiration rate and heart rate, are measured by wearable sensors and recorded by a mobile phone which presents the graphical interface for the user to observe his/her health status more easily; (2) it provides doctors and family members with necessary data through a web interface and enables authorized personnel to monitor the patient's condition and to facilitate remote diagnosis; and (3) it supports real-time alarming and positioning services during an urgent situation, such as a tumble or a heart attack, so that unexpected events can be handled in a timely manner. Experimental results show that the proposed system can reliably monitor the physiologic parameters and conveniently report the user's position. PMID:27010652

  2. Sensor-Aware Recognition and Tracking for Wide-Area Augmented Reality on Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Cao, Ruochen; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    Wide-area registration in outdoor environments on mobile phones is a challenging task in mobile augmented reality fields. We present a sensor-aware large-scale outdoor augmented reality system for recognition and tracking on mobile phones. GPS and gravity information is used to improve the VLAD performance for recognition. A kind of sensor-aware VLAD algorithm, which is self-adaptive to different scale scenes, is utilized to recognize complex scenes. Considering vision-based registration algorithms are too fragile and tend to drift, data coming from inertial sensors and vision are fused together by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to achieve considerable improvements in tracking stability and robustness. Experimental results show that our method greatly enhances the recognition rate and eliminates the tracking jitters. PMID:26690439

  3. A mobile-phone immunization record in Ontario: uptake and opportunities for improving public health.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kumanan; Atkinson, Katherine; Pluscauskas, Michael; Bell, Cameron

    2014-12-01

    A free iPhone app was designed to help parents in Ontario track their children's vaccination records. It was launched in the iTunes app store on 20 November 2012. There were 4867 downloads in the following 12 months. We observed that downloads of the app were correlated with media coverage. Usage of the app was measured by app opens and the time spent in the app per open: on average there were 53 opens per day and 126 seconds spent per open. Users expressed concerns about the privacy of health information and accessibility by people of lower socioeconomic status, who were less likely to be smartphone owners. A national version of the app is now being developed for multiple mobile phone types. There is potential to develop additional features such as mobile adverse event reporting, vaccine vial barcode scanning and integration with immunization registries. Immunization is an area in which a mobile solution is very useful.

  4. A mobile-phone immunization record in Ontario: uptake and opportunities for improving public health.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kumanan; Atkinson, Katherine; Pluscauskas, Michael; Bell, Cameron

    2014-12-01

    A free iPhone app was designed to help parents in Ontario track their children's vaccination records. It was launched in the iTunes app store on 20 November 2012. There were 4867 downloads in the following 12 months. We observed that downloads of the app were correlated with media coverage. Usage of the app was measured by app opens and the time spent in the app per open: on average there were 53 opens per day and 126 seconds spent per open. Users expressed concerns about the privacy of health information and accessibility by people of lower socioeconomic status, who were less likely to be smartphone owners. A national version of the app is now being developed for multiple mobile phone types. There is potential to develop additional features such as mobile adverse event reporting, vaccine vial barcode scanning and integration with immunization registries. Immunization is an area in which a mobile solution is very useful. PMID:25084770

  5. Metal toxicity assessment of mobile phone parts using Milli Q water.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sudesh; Yadav, Satyamanyu; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-07-01

    Environmentally safe disposal of end-of-life (EoL) or discarded mobile phone is a serious problem on account of their ever increasing number and toxic metals contents. In the present work, metal toxicity of mobile phone plastics, printed wire boards (PWBs) and batteries were assessed through dynamic batch leaching using Milli Q (MQ) water. Phone plastics failed Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Waste Extraction Test (WET) for Pb as the cumulative amount of Pb leached from plastics (5.33 mg/l) exceeded the regulatory limits (5.0mg/l) used in characterizing a waste as hazardous. Similarly, the average cumulative amount (21.83 mg/l) of Ni leached from PWBs exceeded the regulatory limit of 20mg/l and thus PWBs failed WET. Metals leached from batteries in small amounts (Cr: 0.40 mg/l and Ni: 0.15 mg/l). The presence of Fe in the batteries and its precipitation as oxides/hydroxides in the leaching solution hindered the leaching of other metals in MQ water. Both plastics and PWBs should be treated as hazardous waste and should not be disposed in open landfills. Further, MQ water leaching could provide good simulation of metals leaching from the mobile phones disposed at landfill sites.

  6. Metal toxicity assessment of mobile phone parts using Milli Q water.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sudesh; Yadav, Satyamanyu; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-07-01

    Environmentally safe disposal of end-of-life (EoL) or discarded mobile phone is a serious problem on account of their ever increasing number and toxic metals contents. In the present work, metal toxicity of mobile phone plastics, printed wire boards (PWBs) and batteries were assessed through dynamic batch leaching using Milli Q (MQ) water. Phone plastics failed Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Waste Extraction Test (WET) for Pb as the cumulative amount of Pb leached from plastics (5.33 mg/l) exceeded the regulatory limits (5.0mg/l) used in characterizing a waste as hazardous. Similarly, the average cumulative amount (21.83 mg/l) of Ni leached from PWBs exceeded the regulatory limit of 20mg/l and thus PWBs failed WET. Metals leached from batteries in small amounts (Cr: 0.40 mg/l and Ni: 0.15 mg/l). The presence of Fe in the batteries and its precipitation as oxides/hydroxides in the leaching solution hindered the leaching of other metals in MQ water. Both plastics and PWBs should be treated as hazardous waste and should not be disposed in open landfills. Further, MQ water leaching could provide good simulation of metals leaching from the mobile phones disposed at landfill sites. PMID:24685400

  7. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher W. T.; Himelhoch, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (SD = 9.2). The majority of participants were males (63%), black (93%), and Hispanic (11.4%) and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%). Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%). The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%). Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE < 10). Ninety-six percent reported owning a mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily (P = 0.03) and use their phone for text messages (P = 0.002). The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication. PMID:23997948

  8. SecurePhone: a mobile phone with biometric authentication and e-signature support for dealing secure transactions on the fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, R.; Chollet, G.; Crispino, M. V.; Jassim, S.; Koreman, J.; Olivar-Dimas, M.; Garcia-Salicetti, S.; Soria-Rodriguez, P.

    2006-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the SecurePhone project, with an account of the first results obtained. SecurePhone's primary aim is to realise a mobile phone prototype - the 'SecurePhone' - in which biometrical authentication enables users to deal secure, dependable transactions over a mobile network. The SecurePhone is based on a commercial PDA-phone, supplemented with specific software modules and a customised SIM card. It integrates in a single environment a number of advanced features: access to cryptographic keys through strong multimodal biometric authentication; appending and verification of digital signatures; real-time exchange and interactive modification of (esigned) documents and voice recordings. SecurePhone's 'biometric recogniser' is based on original research. A fused combination of three different biometric methods - speaker, face and handwritten signature verification - is exploited, with no need for dedicated hardware components. The adoption of non-intrusive, psychologically neutral biometric techniques is expected to mitigate rejection problems that often inhibit the social use of biometrics, and speed up the spread of e-signature technology. Successful biometric authentication grants access to SecurePhone's built-in esignature services through a user-friendly interface. Special emphasis is accorded to the definition of a trustworthy security chain model covering all aspects of system operation. The SecurePhone is expected to boost m-commerce and open new scenarios for m-business and m-work, by changing the way people interact and by improving trust and confidence in information technologies, often considered intimidating and difficult to use. Exploitation plans will also explore other application domains (physical and logical access control, securised mobile communications).

  9. Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning Supported by Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echeverria, Alejandro; Nussbaum, Miguel; Calderon, Juan Felipe; Bravo, Claudio; Infante, Cristian; Vasquez, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of handheld computers in educational contexts has increased considerably in recent years and their value as a teaching tool has been confirmed by many positive experiences, particular within collaborative learning systems (Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning [MCSCL]). The cost of the devices has hindered widespread use in…

  10. Effects of short-term radiation emitted by WCDMA mobile phones on teenagers and adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With the rapid increasing use of third generation (3 G) mobile phones, social concerns have arisen concerning the possible health effects of radio frequency-electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) emitted by wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA) mobile phones in humans. The number of people, who complain of various symptoms such as headache, dizziness, and fatigue, has also increased. Recently, the importance of researches on teenagers has been on the rise. However, very few provocation studies have examined the health effects of WCDMA mobile phone radiation on teenagers. Methods In this double-blind study, two volunteer groups of 26 adults and 26 teenagers were simultaneously investigated by measuring physiological changes in heart rate, respiration rate, and heart rate variability for autonomic nervous system (ANS), eight subjective symptoms, and perception of RF-EMFs during sham and real exposure sessions to verify its effects on adults and teenagers. Experiments were conducted using a dummy phone containing a WCDMA module (average power, 250 mW at 1950 MHz; specific absorption rate, 1.57 W/kg) within a headset placed on the head for 32 min. Results Short-term WCDMA RF-EMFs generated no significant changes in ANS, subjective symptoms or the percentages of those who believed they were being exposed in either group. Conclusions Considering the analyzed physiological data, the subjective symptoms surveyed, and the percentages of those who believed they were being exposed, 32 min of RF radiation emitted by WCDMA mobile phones demonstrated no effects in either adult or teenager subjects. PMID:24886241

  11. Impact of head morphology on local brain specific absorption rate from exposure to mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, Fatemeh; Bakker, Jurriaan F; Paulides, Margarethus M; Verhaart, René F; van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2015-01-01

    Among various possible health effects of mobile phone radiation, the risk of inducing cancer has the strongest interest of laymen and health organizations. Recently, the Interphone epidemiological study investigated the association between the estimated Radio Frequency (RF) dose from mobile phones and the risk of developing a brain tumor. Their dosimetric analysis included over 100 phone models but only two homogeneous head phantoms. So, the potential impact of individual morphological features on global and local RF absorption in the brain was not investigated. In this study, we performed detailed dosimetric simulations for 20 head models and quantified the variation of RF dose in different brain regions as a function of head morphology. Head models were exposed to RF fields from generic mobile phones at 835 and 1900 MHz in the "tilted" and "cheek" positions. To evaluate the local RF dose variation, we used and compared two different post-processing methods, that is, averaging specific absorption rate (SAR) over Talairach regions and over sixteen predefined 1 cm(3) cube-shaped field-sensors. The results show that the variation in the averaged SAR among the heads can reach up to 16.4 dB at a 1 cm(3) cube inside the brain (field-sensor method) and alternatively up to 15.8 dB in the medulla region (Talairach method). In conclusion, we show head morphology as an important uncertainty source for dosimetric studies of mobile phones. Therefore, any dosimetric analysis dealing with RF dose at a specific region in the brain (e.g., tumor risk analysis) should be based upon real morphology.

  12. The Relationship between Mental Health and Addiction to Mobile Phones among University Students of Shahrekord, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Babadi-Akashe, Zahra; Zamani, Bibi Eshrat; Abedini, Yasamin; Akbari, Hojaetolah; Hedayati, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Background The risk of cell phone addiction is a social and psychological problem which has been proposed by psychologists, psychiatrists, and educational supervisors. The present study aimed to investigate the behavior of mobile phone addicts and mental health of university students of Shahrekord, Iran. Methods This study was an applied research survey for the purposes of this study. The study population ýconsisted of all the students of Payame Noor University, Islamic Azad University, and University of Medical Sciences. The study population consisted of 296 students who were randomly selected from the target population. To collect data, two types of questionnaires were used, the Symptom Checklist-90-R(SCL-90-R) questionnaire, and the 32-point scale questionnaire of behavior associated with ýmobile phone use (Hooper and Zhou, 2007). Data analysis was performed using SPSS software, statistical analysis, frequency distribution, mean, one-way ANOVA, chi-square, and LSD (Least significance difference). Findings The results showed that university students of Shahrekord, based on the six categories of mobile ýaddiction behaviors, were mostly placed in habitual behaviors (21.49%), addiction (21.49%), and intentional (21.49%) categories. By reviewing mental health indicators, it was found that students were affected with depressive disorder (17.30%), obsessive compulsive disorder (14.20%), and interpersonal sensitivity (13.80%). The results showed that there was a significant inverse relationship ýbetween mental health and habitual behaviors (r = -0.417), dependence (r = -0.317), addiction (r = -0.330), and incontinence (r = -0.309) in using mobile phone (P < 0.001). Conclusion Survey results showed that with increased and improved mental health, the student’s rate of cell phone addiction reduced. PMID:25984275

  13. Does a Mobile Phone Depression-Screening App Motivate Mobile Phone Users With High Depressive Symptoms to Seek a Health Care Professional’s Help?

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Eman M; Aljadhey, Hisham; Basyouni, Mada H; Kowalski, Stefan R; Pont, Lisa G; Shaman, Ahmed M; Trevena, Lyndal; Alhawassi, Tariq M

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of disease screening is to encourage high-risk subjects to seek health care diagnosis and treatment. Mobile phone apps can effectively screen mental health conditions, including depression. However, it is not known how effective such screening methods are in motivating users to discuss the obtained results of such apps with health care professionals. Does a mobile phone depression-screening app motivate users with high depressive symptoms to seek health care professional advice? This study aimed to address this question. Method This was a single-cohort, prospective, observational study of a free mobile phone depression app developed in English and released on Apple’s App Store. Apple App Store users (aged 18 or above) in 5 countries, that is, Australia, Canada, New Zealand (NZ), the United Kingdom (UK), and the United States (US), were recruited directly via the app’s download page. The participants then completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and their depression screening score was displayed to them. If their score was 11 or above and they had never been diagnosed with depression before, they were advised to take their results to their health care professional. They were to follow up after 1 month. Results A group of 2538 participants from the 5 countries completed PHQ-9 depression screening with the app. Of them, 322 participants were found to have high depressive symptoms and had never been diagnosed with depression, and received advice to discuss their results with health care professionals. About 74% of those completed the follow-up; approximately 38% of these self-reported consulting their health care professionals about their depression score. Only positive attitude toward depression as a real disease was associated with increased follow-up response rate (odds ratio (OR) 3.2, CI 1.38-8.29). Conclusions A mobile phone depression-screening app motivated some users to seek a depression diagnosis. However, further study

  14. Adolescents’ perceptions of a mobile cell phone text messaging-enhanced intervention and development of a mobile cell phone-based HIV prevention intervention

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Judith B.; St. Lawrence, Janet S.; Howard, Jacquelyn C.; Shah, Deval; Poka, Avinash; McDonald, Delilah; White, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examined African American adolescents’ perceptions of a mobile cell phone (MCP)-enhanced intervention and development of an MCP-based HIV prevention intervention. Design and Methods One focus group was conducted with 11 adolescents who participated in the Becoming a Responsible Teen Text Messaging project. Results Adolescents said they benefited from the MCP-enhanced approach and were receptive to the idea of developing an MCP-based intervention. Practice Implications Nurses can use the findings of this report as a starting point in examining the development of MCP-based sexuality education with parents and adolescents. PMID:22188273

  15. Mobile phone use and risk of glioma: a case-control study in Korea for 2002-2007

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyonggin; Choi, Hyong Do

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There has been a growing concern about the possible carcinogenic effects of the electromagnetic radiofrequency fields emitted from mobile phones. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between mobile phone use and the development of gliomas in Korea. Methods Our study methods were based on the International Interphone study that aimed to evaluate possible adverse effects of mobile phone use. This study included 285 histologically-confirmed Korean patients 15 to 69 years of age, with gliomas diagnosed between 2002 and 2007 in 9 hospitals. The 285 individually matched controls were healthy individuals that had their medical check-up in the same hospitals. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for use of mobile phones. Results For the entire group, no significant relationship was investigated between gliomas and regular use of mobile phones, types of mobile phones, lifetime years of use, monthly service fee, and the other exposure indices. Analyses restricted to self-respondents showed similar results. For ipsilateral users, whose the body side for usual mobile phone use match the location of glioma, the aORs (95% CIs) for lifetime years of use and cumulative hours of use were 1.25 (0.55 to 2.88) and 1.77 (0.32 to 1.84), respectively. However, the contralateral users showed slightly lower risk than ipsilateral users. Conclusions Our results do not support the hypothesis that the use of mobile phones increases the risk of glioma; however, we found a non-significant increase in risk among ipsilateral users. These findings suggest further evaluation for glioma risk among long-term mobile phone users. PMID:26726040

  16. U.S. Minority Homeless Youth's Access to and Use of Mobile Phones: Implications for mHealth Intervention Design.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Larissa; Lee, Nicole; Shore, Deborah; Strohminger, Nancy; Allison, Burgundi; Conserve, Donaldson F; Cheskin, Lawrence J

    2016-07-01

    Few interventions for homeless youth have leveraged the potential of mHealth technologies, in part because of the limited data on phone behaviors, perceptions, and intervention preferences among youth experiencing homelessness. We conducted 9 focus groups (n = 52 homeless youth) and 41 individual structured interviews also with homeless youth in underserved communities in Baltimore and Washington, DC, to ascertain how youth perceived their mobile phone, acquired and maintained mobile services over time, and thought mHealth programs for this population should be designed. We also measured phone use, functionality, source, duration of ownership, and reasons for changing phones or numbers. Results showed that mobile coverage was high, as most youth self-purchased phones or received gift payments from others. Maintaining mobile connectivity was often challenging because of financial constraints and interpersonal conflict. Youth valued phones to access social support but used several tactics to avoid perceived negative consequences of phone ownership, such as harassment, theft, or relational disputes. Youth most preferred mHealth content relating to sexual, reproductive, and mental health provided that mobile communication was confidential, empowering, and integrated with other digital media. Integrating hidden phones, financial support, and safety management may improve homeless youth's access to and engagement with mHealth strategies over time. PMID:27232544

  17. Mobile phones are good for you, p<0.36! Observations on Keetley, Wood, Spong and Stough (2006).

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael B

    2007-04-01

    Keetley et al. [Keetley, V., Wood, A. W., Spong, J., & Stough, C. (2006). Neuropsychological sequelae of digital mobile phone exposure in humans. Neuropsychologia, 44, 1843-1848] report a study into the effects of mobile phones on a variety of cognitive tasks. They report that the presence of an active mobile phone reduces performance on some tasks but, surprisingly, improved performance on others. Bonferroni correction of this multi-hypothesis exploratory research, however, reveals that none of the findings reach normally accepted levels of significance. The results of the study remain interesting in suggesting hypotheses for further research, however, care must be taken if making conclusions based on this research. PMID:17224164

  18. Impact of dynamic rate coding aspects of mobile phone networks on forensic voice comparison.

    PubMed

    Alzqhoul, Esam A S; Nair, Balamurali B T; Guillemin, Bernard J

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that landline and mobile phone networks are different in their ways of handling the speech signal, and therefore in their impact on it. But the same is also true of the different networks within the mobile phone arena. There are two major mobile phone technologies currently in use today, namely the global system for mobile communications (GSM) and code division multiple access (CDMA) and these are fundamentally different in their design. For example, the quality of the coded speech in the GSM network is a function of channel quality, whereas in the CDMA network it is determined by channel capacity (i.e., the number of users sharing a cell site). This paper examines the impact on the speech signal of a key feature of these networks, namely dynamic rate coding, and its subsequent impact on the task of likelihood-ratio-based forensic voice comparison (FVC). Surprisingly, both FVC accuracy and precision are found to be better for both GSM- and CDMA-coded speech than for uncoded. Intuitively one expects FVC accuracy to increase with increasing coded speech quality. This trend is shown to occur for the CDMA network, but, surprisingly, not for the GSM network. Further, in respect to comparisons between these two networks, FVC accuracy for CDMA-coded speech is shown to be slightly better than for GSM-coded speech, particularly when the coded-speech quality is high, but in terms of FVC precision the two networks are shown to be very similar.

  19. Effect of mobile phone radiation on brain using EEG analysis by Higuichi's fractal dimension method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitha, C. K.; Narayanan, N. K.

    2013-01-01

    venient window on the mind, revealing synaptic action that is moderately to strongly co-relate with brain state. Fractal dimension, measure of signal complexity can be used to characterize the physiological conditions of the brain. As the EEG signal is non linear, non stationary and noisy, non linear methods will be suitable for the analysis. In this paper Higuichi's fractal method is applied to find the fractal dimension. EEGs of 5 volunteers were recorded at rest and on exposure to radiofrequency (RF) emissions from mobile phones having different SAR values. Mobiles were positioned near the ears and then near the cz position. Fractal dimensions for all conditions are calculated using Higuich's FD estimation algorithm. The result shows that there are some changes in the FD while using mobile phone. The change in FD of the signal varies from person to person. The changes in FD show the variations in EEG signal while using mobile phone, which demonstrate transformation in the activities of brain due to radiation.

  20. A comparative analysis of the statistical properties of large mobile phone calling networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Wen-Jie; Miccichè, Salvatore; Tumminello, Michele; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Mantegna, Rosario N

    2014-05-30

    Mobile phone calling is one of the most widely used communication methods in modern society. The records of calls among mobile phone users provide us a valuable proxy for the understanding of human communication patterns embedded in social networks. Mobile phone users call each other forming a directed calling network. If only reciprocal calls are considered, we obtain an undirected mutual calling network. The preferential communication behavior between two connected users can be statistically tested and it results in two Bonferroni networks with statistically validated edges. We perform a comparative analysis of the statistical properties of these four networks, which are constructed from the calling records of more than nine million individuals in Shanghai over a period of 110 days. We find that these networks share many common structural properties and also exhibit idiosyncratic features when compared with previously studied large mobile calling networks. The empirical findings provide us an intriguing picture of a representative large social network that might shed new lights on the modelling of large social networks.

  1. A comparative analysis of the statistical properties of large mobile phone calling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Wen-Jie; Miccichè, Salvatore; Tumminello, Michele; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2014-05-01

    Mobile phone calling is one of the most widely used communication methods in modern society. The records of calls among mobile phone users provide us a valuable proxy for the understanding of human communication patterns embedded in social networks. Mobile phone users call each other forming a directed calling network. If only reciprocal calls are considered, we obtain an undirected mutual calling network. The preferential communication behavior between two connected users can be statistically tested and it results in two Bonferroni networks with statistically validated edges. We perform a comparative analysis of the statistical properties of these four networks, which are constructed from the calling records of more than nine million individuals in Shanghai over a period of 110 days. We find that these networks share many common structural properties and also exhibit idiosyncratic features when compared with previously studied large mobile calling networks. The empirical findings provide us an intriguing picture of a representative large social network that might shed new lights on the modelling of large social networks.

  2. Developing a Mobile Phone Based GUI for Users in the Construction Industry: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yammiyavar, Pradeep; Kate, Prasanna

    This paper reports work done in conceptualizing, developing and testing of a mobile phone based graphical user interface (GUI) package targeted at users from the construction industry. System analysis and information design principles were adopted during the development processes. Starting from user requirements based on field studies the development of graphic icons and their testing has been outlined. In addition to integrating individual icons into a GUI, coding and loading the application on a mobile phone has been done to enable testing of the GUI prototype. Users from the construction trade (sample size = 29), randomly selected, were asked to evaluate the designed icons in terms of their acceptance, adaptability and learnability aspects. It was found that learnability of the new GUI was more dependent on age and education level of the user rather than on the length of prior experience they had with mobile phones in general. The length of experience of using mobiles may not be an indicator of learnability in new applications for such user segments due to rapid rise in 'digital literacy' levels amongst semi literate users.

  3. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile Phone Addiction Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; BabaReisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under “impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified”. This study surveyed the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture. Method: Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was performed for all the cases, and another specialist reevaluated the interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient) and test-retest via SPSS18 software. Results: The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the DSM–IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was appropriate, and two items, including “SMS pathological use” and “High monthly cost of using the mobile phone” were added to promote its validity. Internal reliability (Kappa) and test–retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 (p<0. 01) respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder. PMID:27437008

  4. Predicting Negative Emotions Based on Mobile Phone Usage Patterns: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Ching; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Chen, Ying-Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Prompt recognition and intervention of negative emotions is crucial for patients with depression. Mobile phones and mobile apps are suitable technologies that can be used to recognize negative emotions and intervene if necessary. Objective Mobile phone usage patterns can be associated with concurrent emotional states. The objective of this study is to adapt machine-learning methods to analyze such patterns for the prediction of negative emotion. Methods We developed an Android-based app to capture emotional states and mobile phone usage patterns, which included call logs (and use of apps). Visual analog scales (VASs) were used to report negative emotions in dimensions of depression, anxiety, and stress. In the system-training phase, participants were requested to tag their emotions for 14 consecutive days. Five feature-selection methods were used to determine individual usage patterns and four machine-learning methods were tested. Finally, rank product scoring was used to select the best combination to construct the prediction model. In the system evaluation phase, participants were then requested to verify the predicted negative emotions for at least 5 days. Results Out of 40 enrolled healthy participants, we analyzed data from 28 participants, including 30% (9/28) women with a mean (SD) age of 29.2 (5.1) years with sufficient emotion tags. The combination of time slots of 2 hours, greedy forward selection, and Naïve Bayes method was chosen for the prediction model. We further validated the personalized models in 18 participants who performed at least 5 days of model evaluation. Overall, the predictive accuracy for negative emotions was 86.17%. Conclusion We developed a system capable of predicting negative emotions based on mobile phone usage patterns. This system has potential for ecological momentary intervention (EMI) for depressive disorders by automatically recognizing negative emotions and providing people with preventive treatments before it

  5. Development of Portable Automatic Number Plate Recognition System on Android Mobile Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutholib, Abdul; Gunawan, Teddy S.; Chebil, Jalel; Kartiwi, Mira

    2013-12-01

    The Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) System has performed as the main role in various access control and security, such as: tracking of stolen vehicles, traffic violations (speed trap) and parking management system. In this paper, the portable ANPR implemented on android mobile phone is presented. The main challenges in mobile application are including higher coding efficiency, reduced computational complexity, and improved flexibility. Significance efforts are being explored to find suitable and adaptive algorithm for implementation of ANPR on mobile phone. ANPR system for mobile phone need to be optimize due to its limited CPU and memory resources, its ability for geo-tagging image captured using GPS coordinates and its ability to access online database to store the vehicle's information. In this paper, the design of portable ANPR on android mobile phone will be described as follows. First, the graphical user interface (GUI) for capturing image using built-in camera was developed to acquire vehicle plate number in Malaysia. Second, the preprocessing of raw image was done using contrast enhancement. Next, character segmentation using fixed pitch and an optical character recognition (OCR) using neural network were utilized to extract texts and numbers. Both character segmentation and OCR were using Tesseract library from Google Inc. The proposed portable ANPR algorithm was implemented and simulated using Android SDK on a computer. Based on the experimental results, the proposed system can effectively recognize the license plate number at 90.86%. The required processing time to recognize a license plate is only 2 seconds on average. The result is consider good in comparison with the results obtained from previous system that was processed in a desktop PC with the range of result from 91.59% to 98% recognition rate and 0.284 second to 1.5 seconds recognition time.

  6. How dangerous are mobile phones, transmission masts, and electricity pylons?

    PubMed

    Wood, A W

    2006-04-01

    Electrical power and mobile communications deliver enormous benefit to society, but there are concerns whether the electric and magnetic field (EMF) emissions associated with the delivery of this benefit are linked to cancer or other health hazards. This article reviews the strength of the available epidemiological and laboratory evidence and notes that this falls short of what is normally required to establish a causal link. However, because of scientific uncertainty a cautious approach is often advocated, but here, too, there may be a tendency to judge these risks more harshly than those in other areas with similar strength of evidence. PMID:16551794

  7. How dangerous are mobile phones, transmission masts, and electricity pylons?

    PubMed

    Wood, A W

    2006-04-01

    Electrical power and mobile communications deliver enormous benefit to society, but there are concerns whether the electric and magnetic field (EMF) emissions associated with the delivery of this benefit are linked to cancer or other health hazards. This article reviews the strength of the available epidemiological and laboratory evidence and notes that this falls short of what is normally required to establish a causal link. However, because of scientific uncertainty a cautious approach is often advocated, but here, too, there may be a tendency to judge these risks more harshly than those in other areas with similar strength of evidence.

  8. Mobile Phone and Web 2.0 Technologies for Weight Management: A Systematic Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Widespread diffusion of mobile phone and Web 2.0 technologies make them potentially useful tools for promoting health and tackling public health issues, such as the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity. Research in this domain is growing rapidly but, to date, no review has comprehensively and systematically documented how mobile and Web 2.0 technologies are being deployed and evaluated in relation to weight management. Objective To provide an up-to-date, comprehensive map of the literature discussing the use of mobile phone and Web 2.0 apps for influencing behaviors related to weight management (ie, diet, physical activity [PA], weight control, etc). Methods A systematic scoping review of the literature was conducted based on a published protocol (registered at PROSPERO: CRD42014010323). Using a comprehensive search strategy, we searched 16 multidisciplinary electronic databases for original research documents published in English between 2004 and 2014. We used duplicate study selection and data extraction. Using an inductively developed charting tool, selected articles were thematically categorized. Results We identified 457 articles, mostly published between 2013 and 2014 in 157 different journals and 89 conference proceedings. Articles were categorized around two overarching themes, which described the use of technologies for either (1) promoting behavior change (309/457, 67.6%) or (2) measuring behavior (103/457, 22.5%). The remaining articles were overviews of apps and social media content (33/457, 7.2%) or covered a combination of these three themes (12/457, 2.6%). Within the two main overarching themes, we categorized articles as representing three phases of research development: (1) design and development, (2) feasibility studies, and (3) evaluations. Overall, articles mostly reported on evaluations of technologies for behavior change (211/457, 46.2%). Conclusions There is an extensive body of research on mobile phone and Web 2

  9. Mobile phone data highlights the role of mass gatherings in the spreading of cholera outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Finger, Flavio; Genolet, Tina; Mari, Lorenzo; de Magny, Guillaume Constantin; Manga, Noël Magloire; Rinaldo, Andrea; Bertuzzo, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of human mobility and the related fluctuations of population density are known to be key drivers of the dynamics of infectious disease outbreaks. These factors are particularly relevant in the case of mass gatherings, which may act as hotspots of disease transmission and spread. Understanding these dynamics, however, is usually limited by the lack of accurate data, especially in developing countries. Mobile phone call data provide a new, first-order source of information that allows the tracking of the evolution of mobility fluxes with high resolution in space and time. Here, we analyze a dataset of mobile phone records of ∼150,000 users in Senegal to extract human mobility fluxes and directly incorporate them into a spatially explicit, dynamic epidemiological framework. Our model, which also takes into account other drivers of disease transmission such as rainfall, is applied to the 2005 cholera outbreak in Senegal, which totaled more than 30,000 reported cases. Our findings highlight the major influence that a mass gathering, which took place during the initial phase of the outbreak, had on the course of the epidemic. Such an effect could not be explained by classic, static approaches describing human mobility. Model results also show how concentrated efforts toward disease control in a transmission hotspot could have an important effect on the large-scale progression of an outbreak. PMID:27217564

  10. Mobile phone data highlights the role of mass gatherings in the spreading of cholera outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Finger, Flavio; Genolet, Tina; Mari, Lorenzo; de Magny, Guillaume Constantin; Manga, Noël Magloire; Rinaldo, Andrea; Bertuzzo, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of human mobility and the related fluctuations of population density are known to be key drivers of the dynamics of infectious disease outbreaks. These factors are particularly relevant in the case of mass gatherings, which may act as hotspots of disease transmission and spread. Understanding these dynamics, however, is usually limited by the lack of accurate data, especially in developing countries. Mobile phone call data provide a new, first-order source of information that allows the tracking of the evolution of mobility fluxes with high resolution in space and time. Here, we analyze a dataset of mobile phone records of ∼150,000 users in Senegal to extract human mobility fluxes and directly incorporate them into a spatially explicit, dynamic epidemiological framework. Our model, which also takes into account other drivers of disease transmission such as rainfall, is applied to the 2005 cholera outbreak in Senegal, which totaled more than 30,000 reported cases. Our findings highlight the major influence that a mass gathering, which took place during the initial phase of the outbreak, had on the course of the epidemic. Such an effect could not be explained by classic, static approaches describing human mobility. Model results also show how concentrated efforts toward disease control in a transmission hotspot could have an important effect on the large-scale progression of an outbreak.

  11. Mobile phone data highlights the role of mass gatherings in the spreading of cholera outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Flavio; Genolet, Tina; Mari, Lorenzo; de Magny, Guillaume Constantin; Manga, Noël Magloire; Rinaldo, Andrea; Bertuzzo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of human mobility and the related fluctuations of population density are known to be key drivers of the dynamics of infectious disease outbreaks. These factors are particularly relevant in the case of mass gatherings, which may act as hotspots of disease transmission and spread. Understanding these dynamics, however, is usually limited by the lack of accurate data, especially in developing countries. Mobile phone call data provide a new, first-order source of information that allows the tracking of the evolution of mobility fluxes with high resolution in space and time. Here, we analyze a dataset of mobile phone records of ∼150,000 users in Senegal to extract human mobility fluxes and directly incorporate them into a spatially explicit, dynamic epidemiological framework. Our model, which also takes into account other drivers of disease transmission such as rainfall, is applied to the 2005 cholera outbreak in Senegal, which totaled more than 30,000 reported cases. Our findings highlight the major influence that a mass gathering, which took place during the initial phase of the outbreak, had on the course of the epidemic. Such an effect could not be explained by classic, static approaches describing human mobility. Model results also show how concentrated efforts toward disease control in a transmission hotspot could have an important effect on the large-scale progression of an outbreak. PMID:27217564

  12. CrowdMag - Crowdsourcing magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, M. C.; Boneh, N.; Chulliat, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the CrowdMag project, we explore whether digital magnetometers built in modern mobile phones can be used as scientific instruments to measure Earth's magnetic field. Most modern mobile phones have digital magnetometers to orient themselves. A phone's magnetometer measures three components of the local magnetic field with a typical sensitivity of about 150 to 600 nanotesla (nT). By combining data from vector magnetometers and accelerometers, phone's orientation is determined. Using phone's Internet connection, magnetic data and location are sent to a central server. At the server, we check quality of the magnetic data from all users and make the data available to the public as aggregate maps. We have two long-term goals. 1) Develop near-real-time models of Earth's time changing magnetic field by reducing man-made noise from crowdsourced data and combining it with geomagnetic data from other sources. 2) Improving accuracy of magnetic navigation by mapping magnetic noise sources (for e.g. power transformer and iron pipes). Key challenges to this endeavor are the low sensitivity of the phone's magnetometer and the noisy environment within and surrounding the phone. URL : http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/geomag/crowdmag.shtml

  13. The controversy about a possible relationship between mobile phone use and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Over the last decade, mobile phone use increased to almost 100% prevalence in many countries. Evidence for potential health hazards accumulated in parallel by epidemiologic investigations has raised controversies about the appropriate interpretation and the degree of bias and confounding responsible for reduced or increased risk estimates. Overall, 33 epidemiologic studies were identified in the peer-reviewed literature, mostly (25) about brain tumors. Methodologic considerations revealed that three important conditions for epidemiologic studies to detect an increased risk are not met:no evidence-based exposure metric is available; the observed duration of mobile phone use is generally still too low; no evidence-based selection of end points among the grossly different types of neoplasias is possible because of lack of etiologic hypotheses. The overall evidence speaks in favor of an increased risk, but its magnitude cannot be assessed at present because of insufficient information on long-term use. PMID:20802874

  14. The temporal variation of ethnic segregation in a city: evidence from a mobile phone use dataset.

    PubMed

    Silm, Siiri; Ahas, Rein

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the temporal variation of ethnic segregation in the city of Tallinn, the capital of Estonia. We employ data on mobile-phone use to compare variations in segregation indices during the day, the week, and the year. The results indicate that the locations of people are more segregated at night, with considerably less segregation during the daytime. The segregation is significantly lower on workdays compared to weekends. Segregation is also lower during summer holidays compared to the winter working period. The results show that although places of residence are segregated, different ethnic groups use the city together during the day, which increases the potential for interethnic contacts. The results demonstrate also that temporal segregation indices based on mobile-phone use are considerably lower than segregation indices of places of residence that are derived from the census. PMID:24913943

  15. The temporal variation of ethnic segregation in a city: evidence from a mobile phone use dataset.

    PubMed

    Silm, Siiri; Ahas, Rein

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the temporal variation of ethnic segregation in the city of Tallinn, the capital of Estonia. We employ data on mobile-phone use to compare variations in segregation indices during the day, the week, and the year. The results indicate that the locations of people are more segregated at night, with considerably less segregation during the daytime. The segregation is significantly lower on workdays compared to weekends. Segregation is also lower during summer holidays compared to the winter working period. The results show that although places of residence are segregated, different ethnic groups use the city together during the day, which increases the potential for interethnic contacts. The results demonstrate also that temporal segregation indices based on mobile-phone use are considerably lower than segregation indices of places of residence that are derived from the census.

  16. Do mobile phones of patients, companions and visitors carry multidrug-resistant hospital pathogens?

    PubMed

    Tekerekoǧlu, Mehmet Sait; Duman, Yucel; Serindağ, Ayfer; Cuǧlan, Serpil Semiha; Kaysadu, Halim; Tunc, Emine; Yakupogullari, Yusuf

    2011-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine bacterial colonization on the mobile phones (MPs) used by patients, patients' companions, visitors, and health care workers (HCWs). Significantly higher rates of pathogens (39.6% vs 20.6%, respectively; P = .02) were found in MPs of patients' (n = 48) versus the HCWs' (n = 12). There were also more multidrug pathogens in the patents' MPs including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella spp, high-level aminoglycoside-resistant Enterococcus spp, and carabepenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanii. Our findings suggest that mobile phones of patients, patients' companions, and visitors represent higher risk for nosocomial pathogen colonization than those of HCWs. Specific infection control measures may be required for this threat.

  17. Emergency OSL/TL dosimetry with integrated circuits from mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholom, S.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2014-09-01

    Integrated circuits (ICs) from several mobile phones were studied as possible emergency dosimeters using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. Measurement protocols were developed for ICs that take into consideration the effect of sensitization of the samples with increasing dose as well as fading of the signals after sample exposure. It was found that the OSL technique has a higher sensitivity with ICs when compared to TL, while the TL signals were characterized by better stability with time after exposure. Values of minimum measurable doses were found to be in the range between a few tens of mGy and several tens of mGy for the tested samples. It was concluded that ICs from mobile phones could be used for emergency dose reconstruction.

  18. [Investigation on Mobile Phone Based Thermal Imaging System and Its Preliminary Application].

    PubMed

    Li, Fufeng; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    The technical structure of a low-cost thermal imaging system (TIM) lunched on a mobile phone was investigated, which consists of a thermal infrared module and mobile phone and application software. The designing strategies and technical factors toward realizing various TIM array performances are interpreted, including sensor cost and Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD). In the software algorithm, a mechanism for scene-change detection was implemented to optimize the efficiency of non-uniformity correction (NUC). The performance experiments and analysis indicate that the NETD of the system can be smaller than 150 mK when the integration time is larger than 16 frames. Furthermore, a practical application for human temperature monitoring during physical exercise is proposed and interpreted. The measurement results support the feasibility and facility of the system in the medical application. PMID:26524779

  19. Visible light communication using mobile-phone camera with data rate higher than frame rate.

    PubMed

    Chow, Chi-Wai; Chen, Chung-Yen; Chen, Shih-Hao

    2015-10-01

    Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors are widely used in mobile-phone and cameras. Hence, it is attractive if these image sensors can be used as the visible light communication (VLC) receivers (Rxs). However, using these CMOS image sensors are challenging. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a VLC link using mobile-phone camera with data rate higher than frame rate of the CMOS image sensor. We first discuss and analyze the features of using CMOS image sensor as VLC Rx, including the rolling shutter effect, overlapping of exposure time of each row of pixels, frame-to-frame processing time gap, and also the image sensor "blooming" effect. Then, we describe the procedure of synchronization and demodulation. This includes file format conversion, grayscale conversion, column matrix selection avoiding blooming, polynomial fitting for threshold location. Finally, the evaluation of bit-error-rate (BER) is performed satisfying the forward error correction (FEC) limit.

  20. The effect of electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones on human sleep.

    PubMed

    Loughran, Sarah P; Wood, Andrew W; Barton, Julie M; Croft, Rodney J; Thompson, Bruce; Stough, Con

    2005-11-28

    Previous research has suggested that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields increases electroencephalogram spectral power in non-rapid eye movement sleep. Other sleep parameters have also been affected following exposure. We examined whether aspects of sleep architecture show sensitivity to electromagnetic fields emitted by digital mobile phone handsets. Fifty participants were exposed to electromagnetic fields for 30 min prior to sleep. Results showed a decrease in rapid eye movement sleep latency and increased electroencephalogram spectral power in the 11.5-12.25 Hz frequency range during the initial part of sleep following exposure. These results are evidence that mobile phone exposure prior to sleep may promote rapid eye movement sleep and modify the sleep electroencephalogram in the first non-rapid eye movement sleep period. PMID:16272890

  1. Punctuation and Capitalization in Text Messages Sent from Traditional Mobile Phones versus Smartphones: Implications for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Technology often mediates, and thus influences, written language conventions such as punctuation and capitalization. Fifty university students sent two text messages, one with an alphanumeric multi-press keypad mobile phone (i.e., Nokia 1101) and another with a full QWERTY keypad smartphone (i.e., Apple iPhone 4). Compared to text messages sent…

  2. The Model Human Processor and the Older Adult: Parameter Estimation and Validation within a Mobile Phone Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jastrzembski, Tiffany S.; Charness, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The authors estimate weighted mean values for nine information processing parameters for older adults using the Card, Moran, and Newell (1983) Model Human Processor model. The authors validate a subset of these parameters by modeling two mobile phone tasks using two different phones and comparing model predictions to a sample of younger (N = 20;…

  3. Mobile phone model with metamaterials to reduce the exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Yenny; Begaud, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a terminal mobile model where an Inverted-F Antenna (IFA) is associated with three different kinds of metamaterials: artificial magnetic conductor (AMC), electromagnetic band gap (EBG) and resistive high-impedance surface (RHIS). The objective was to evaluate whether some metamaterials may be used to reduce exposure while preserving the antenna performances. The exposure has been evaluated using a simplified phantom model. Two configurations, antenna in front of the phantom and antenna hidden by the ground plane, have been evaluated. Results show that using an optimized RHIS, the SAR 10 g is reduced and the antenna performances are preserved. With RHIS solution, the SAR 10 g peak is reduced by 8 % when the antenna is located in front of the phantom and by 6 % when the antenna is hidden by ground plane.

  4. Schooling Mobile Phones: Assumptions about Proximal Benefits, the Challenges of Shifting Meanings, and the Politics of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, Thomas M.; Garcia, Antero

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly upheld as powerful tools for learning and school reform. In this article, we prioritize youth voices to critically examine assumptions about student interest in mobile devices that often drive the incorporation of new technologies into schools. By demonstrating how the very meaning of mobile phones shift as they are…

  5. Mobile phone radiation causes brain tumors and should be classified as a probable human carcinogen (2A) (review).

    PubMed

    Morgan, L Lloyd; Miller, Anthony B; Sasco, Annie; Davis, Devra Lee

    2015-05-01

    Quickly changing technologies and intensive uses of radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF)‑emitting phones pose a challenge to public health. Mobile phone users and uses and exposures to other wireless transmitting devices (WTDs) have increased in the past few years. We consider that CERENAT, a French national study, provides an important addition to the literature evaluating the use of mobile phones and risk of brain tumors. The CERENAT finding of increased risk of glioma is consistent with studies that evaluated use of mobile phones for a decade or longer and corroborate those that have shown a risk of meningioma from mobile phone use. In CERENAT, exposure to RF‑EMF from digitally enhanced cordless telephones (DECTs), used by over half the population of France during the period of this study, was not evaluated. If exposures to DECT phones could have been taken into account, the risks of glioma from mobile phone use in CERENAT are likely to be higher than published. We conclude that radiofrequency fields should be classified as a Group 2A ̔probable̓ human carcinogen under the criteria used by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (Lyon, France). Additional data should be gathered on exposures to mobile and cordless phones, other WTDs, mobile phone base stations and Wi‑Fi routers to evaluate their impact on public health. We advise that the as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA) principle be adopted for uses of this technology, while a major cross‑disciplinary effort is generated to train researchers in bioelectromagnetics and provide monitoring of potential health impacts of RF‑EMF. PMID:25738972

  6. Mobile phone radiation causes brain tumors and should be classified as a probable human carcinogen (2A) (review).

    PubMed

    Morgan, L Lloyd; Miller, Anthony B; Sasco, Annie; Davis, Devra Lee

    2015-05-01

    Quickly changing technologies and intensive uses of radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF)‑emitting phones pose a challenge to public health. Mobile phone users and uses and exposures to other wireless transmitting devices (WTDs) have increased in the past few years. We consider that CERENAT, a French national study, provides an important addition to the literature evaluating the use of mobile phones and risk of brain tumors. The CERENAT finding of increased risk of glioma is consistent with studies that evaluated use of mobile phones for a decade or longer and corroborate those that have shown a risk of meningioma from mobile phone use. In CERENAT, exposure to RF‑EMF from digitally enhanced cordless telephones (DECTs), used by over half the population of France during the period of this study, was not evaluated. If exposures to DECT phones could have been taken into account, the risks of glioma from mobile phone use in CERENAT are likely to be higher than published. We conclude that radiofrequency fields should be classified as a Group 2A ̔probable̓ human carcinogen under the criteria used by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (Lyon, France). Additional data should be gathered on exposures to mobile and cordless phones, other WTDs, mobile phone base stations and Wi‑Fi routers to evaluate their impact on public health. We advise that the as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA) principle be adopted for uses of this technology, while a major cross‑disciplinary effort is generated to train researchers in bioelectromagnetics and provide monitoring of potential health impacts of RF‑EMF.

  7. Mobile phone imaging and cloud-based analysis for standardized malaria detection and reporting.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Thomas F; Gupta, Sparsh; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been widely deployed in low-resource settings. These tests are typically read by visual inspection, and accurate record keeping and data aggregation remains a substantial challenge. A successful malaria elimination campaign will require new strategies that maximize the sensitivity of RDTs, reduce user error, and integrate results reporting tools. In this report, an unmodified mobile phone was used to photograph RDTs, which were subsequently uploaded into a globally accessible database, REDCap, and then analyzed three ways: with an automated image processing program, visual inspection, and a commercial lateral flow reader. The mobile phone image processing detected 20.6 malaria parasites/microliter of blood, compared to the commercial lateral flow reader which detected 64.4 parasites/microliter. Experienced observers visually identified positive malaria cases at 12.5 parasites/microliter, but encountered reporting errors and false negatives. Visual interpretation by inexperienced users resulted in only an 80.2% true negative rate, with substantial disagreement in the lower parasitemia range. We have demonstrated that combining a globally accessible database, such as REDCap, with mobile phone based imaging of RDTs provides objective, secure, automated, data collection and result reporting. This simple combination of existing technologies would appear to be an attractive tool for malaria elimination campaigns. PMID:27345590

  8. Segmenting texts from outdoor images taken by mobile phones using color features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zongyi; Zhou, Hanning

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing texts from images taken by mobile phones with low resolution has wide applications. It has been shown that a good image binarization can substantially improve the performances of OCR engines. In this paper, we present a framework to segment texts from outdoor images taken by mobile phones using color features. The framework consists of three steps: (i) the initial process including image enhancement, binarization and noise filtering, where we binarize the input images in each RGB channel, and apply component level noise filtering; (ii) grouping components into blocks using color features, where we compute the component similarities by dynamically adjusting the weights of RGB channels, and merge groups hierachically, and (iii) blocks selection, where we use the run-length features and choose the Support Vector Machine (SVM) as the classifier. We tested the algorithm using 13 outdoor images taken by an old-style LG-64693 mobile phone with 640x480 resolution. We compared the segmentation results with Tsar's algorithm, a state-of-the-art camera text detection algorithm, and show that our algorithm is more robust, particularly in terms of the false alarm rates. In addition, we also evaluated the impacts of our algorithm on the Abbyy's FineReader, one of the most popular commercial OCR engines in the market.

  9. Mobile phone imaging and cloud-based analysis for standardized malaria detection and reporting.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Thomas F; Gupta, Sparsh; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2016-06-27

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been widely deployed in low-resource settings. These tests are typically read by visual inspection, and accurate record keeping and data aggregation remains a substantial challenge. A successful malaria elimination campaign will require new strategies that maximize the sensitivity of RDTs, reduce user error, and integrate results reporting tools. In this report, an unmodified mobile phone was used to photograph RDTs, which were subsequently uploaded into a globally accessible database, REDCap, and then analyzed three ways: with an automated image processing program, visual inspection, and a commercial lateral flow reader. The mobile phone image processing detected 20.6 malaria parasites/microliter of blood, compared to the commercial lateral flow reader which detected 64.4 parasites/microliter. Experienced observers visually identified positive malaria cases at 12.5 parasites/microliter, but encountered reporting errors and false negatives. Visual interpretation by inexperienced users resulted in only an 80.2% true negative rate, with substantial disagreement in the lower parasitemia range. We have demonstrated that combining a globally accessible database, such as REDCap, with mobile phone based imaging of RDTs provides objective, secure, automated, data collection and result reporting. This simple combination of existing technologies would appear to be an attractive tool for malaria elimination campaigns.

  10. Preferred listening levels of mobile phone programs when considering subway interior noise

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jyaehyoung; Lee, Donguk; Han, Woojae

    2016-01-01

    Today, people listen to music loud using personal listening devices. Although a majority of studies have reported that the high volume played on these listening devices produces a latent risk of hearing problems, there is a lack of studies on “double noise exposures” such as environmental noise plus recreational noise. The present study measures the preferred listening levels of a mobile phone program with subway interior noise for 74 normal-hearing participants in five age groups (ranging from 20s to 60s). The speakers presented the subway interior noise at 73.45 dB, while each subject listened to three application programs [Digital Multimedia Broadcasting (DMB), music, game] for 30 min using a tablet personal computer with an earphone. The participants’ earphone volume levels were analyzed using a sound level meter and a 2cc coupler. Overall, the results showed that those in their 20s listened to the three programs significantly louder with DMB set at significantly higher volume levels than for the other programs. Higher volume levels were needed for middle frequency compared to the lower and higher frequencies. We concluded that any potential risk of noise-induced hearing loss for mobile phone users should be communicated when users listen regularly, although the volume level was not high enough that the users felt uncomfortable. When considering individual listening habits on mobile phones, further study to predict total accumulated environmental noise is still needed. PMID:26780960

  11. Mobile phone imaging and cloud-based analysis for standardized malaria detection and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Thomas F.; Gupta, Sparsh; Wright, David W.; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2016-06-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been widely deployed in low-resource settings. These tests are typically read by visual inspection, and accurate record keeping and data aggregation remains a substantial challenge. A successful malaria elimination campaign will require new strategies that maximize the sensitivity of RDTs, reduce user error, and integrate results reporting tools. In this report, an unmodified mobile phone was used to photograph RDTs, which were subsequently uploaded into a globally accessible database, REDCap, and then analyzed three ways: with an automated image processing program, visual inspection, and a commercial lateral flow reader. The mobile phone image processing detected 20.6 malaria parasites/microliter of blood, compared to the commercial lateral flow reader which detected 64.4 parasites/microliter. Experienced observers visually identified positive malaria cases at 12.5 parasites/microliter, but encountered reporting errors and false negatives. Visual interpretation by inexperienced users resulted in only an 80.2% true negative rate, with substantial disagreement in the lower parasitemia range. We have demonstrated that combining a globally accessible database, such as REDCap, with mobile phone based imaging of RDTs provides objective, secure, automated, data collection and result reporting. This simple combination of existing technologies would appear to be an attractive tool for malaria elimination campaigns.

  12. Assessment of soil health and fertility indicators with mobile phone imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkenhead, Matt; Gwatkin, Richard; Coull, Malcolm; Donnelly, David

    2015-04-01

    Work on rapid soil assessment in the field has led to many hand-held sensors for soil monitoring (e.g. NIR, FTIR, XRF). Recent work by a research team at the James Hutton Institute has led to an integrated framework of mobile phones, apps and server-side processing. One example of this is the SOCIT app for estimating soil organic matter and carbon using geolocated mobile phone camera imagery. The SOCIT app is only applicable for agricultural soils in Scotland, and our intention is to expand this work both geographically and in functional ability. Ongoing work for the development of a prototype app for estimating soil characteristics across Europe using mobile phone imagery and the JRC LUCAS dataset will be described. Additionally, we will demonstrate recent work in estimating a number of soil health indicators from more detailed analysis of soil photographs. Accuracy levels achieved for estimating soil organic matter and organic carbon content, pH, structure, cation exchange capacity and texture vary and are not as good as those achieved with laboratory analysis, but are suitable for rapid field-based assessment. Issues relating to this work include colour stabilisation and calibration, integration with data on site characteristics, data processing, model development and the ethical use of data captured by others, and each of these topics will also be discussed.

  13. Mobile phones and social structures: an exploration of a closed user group in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the Millennium Villages Project site of Bonsaaso, Ghana, the Health Team is using a mobile phone closed user group to place calls amongst one another at no cost. Methods In order to determine the utilization and acceptability of the closed user group amongst users, social network analysis and qualitative methods were used. Key informants were identified and interviewed. The key informants also kept prospective call journals. Billing statements and de-identified call data from the closed user group were used to generate data for analyzing the social structure revealed by the network traffic. Results The majority of communication within the closed user group was personal and not for professional purposes. The members of the CUG felt that the group improved their efficiency at work. Conclusions The methods used present an interesting way to investigate the social structure surrounding communication via mobile phones. In addition, the benefits identified from the exploration of this closed user group make a case for supporting mobile phone closed user groups amongst professional groups. PMID:24007331

  14. Mobile phone electromagnetic radiation activates MAPK signaling and regulates viability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Choi, Jong-Soon; Hong, Sae-Yong; Son, Tae-Ho; Yu, Kweon

    2008-07-01

    Mobile phones are widely used in the modern world. However, biological effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phones are largely unknown. In this report, we show biological effects of the mobile phone 835 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) in the Drosophila model system. When flies were exposed to the specific absorption rate (SAR) 1.6 W/kg, which is the proposed exposure limit by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), more than 90% of the flies were viable even after the 30 h exposure. However, in the SAR 4.0 W/kg strong EMF exposure, viability dropped from the 12 h exposure. These EMF exposures triggered stress response and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. The EMF exposures also activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, but not p38 kinase signaling. Interestingly, SAR 1.6 W/kg activated mainly ERK signaling and expression of an anti-apoptotic gene, whereas SAR 4.0 W/kg strongly activated JNK signaling and expression of apoptotic genes. In addition, SAR 4.0 W/kg amplified the number of apoptotic cells in the fly brain. These findings demonstrate that the exposure limit on electromagnetic radiation proposed by ANSI triggered ERK-survival signaling but the strong electromagnetic radiation activated JNK-apoptotic signaling in Drosophila.

  15. Characterization of drug authenticity using thin-layer chromatography imaging with a mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hojeong; Le, Huy M; Kaale, Eliangiringa; Long, Kenneth D; Layloff, Thomas; Lumetta, Steven S; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-06-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) has a myriad of separation applications in chemistry, biology, and pharmacology due to its simplicity and low cost. While benchtop laboratory sample application and detection systems for TLC provide accurate quantitation of TLC spot positions and densities, there are many applications where inexpensive and portable instruments would greatly expand the applicability of the technology. In this work, we demonstrate identity verification and concentration determination of pharmaceutical compounds via TLC using a custom 3D-printed cradle that interfaces with an ordinary mobile phone. The cradle holds the mobile phone's internal, rear-facing camera in a fixed position relative to a UV lamp and a TLC plate that includes a phosphor in the stationary phase. Analysis of photographs thus reveals the locations and intensities of principal spots of UV--absorbing drugs. Automated image analysis software determines the center location and density of dark spots, which, using integrated calibration spots of known drug compounds and concentrations, can be used to determine if a drug has been diluted or substituted. Two independent image processing approaches have been developed that may be selected based upon the processing capabilities of the smartphone. Each approach is able to discern 5% drug concentration differences. Using single-component solutions of nevirapine, amodiaquine, and paracetamol that have been manually applied, the mobile phone-based detection instrument provides measurements that are equivalent to those obtained with a commercially available lab-based desktop TLC densitometer. PMID:27015410

  16. Use of mobile phone text messaging to deliver an individualized smoking behaviour intervention in Chinese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui-Jing; Jiang, Xiao-Xiao; Yu, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Yue

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a mobile phone text-messaging based smoking cessation intervention package among Chinese adolescent smokers. Students aged 16-19 years were recruited from six vocational high schools located in Shanghai. We assigned the six schools to an intervention group or a control group by cluster randomization. The 92 participants in the intervention group were given tailored information via mobile phone text-messaging for 12 weeks. The 87 participants in the control group were provided with a self-help pamphlet about smoking cessation instead. After the intervention, attitudes towards the disadvantages of smoking were significantly improved, and the level of nicotine dependence and cigarette dependence significantly decreased in the intervention group. The intervention group had a relatively higher self-reported 7-day abstinence compared to the control group and 30-day abstinence, but the differences were not significant. However, the intervention group had a significantly higher rate of smoking reduction (66% vs. 35%) and moving forward in quitting stages (52% vs. 18%) compared to the control group. The interactive and tailored assistance provided by the mobile phone text-messaging was effective in smoking behaviour intervention in Chinese adolescent smokers.

  17. Preferred listening levels of mobile phone programs when considering subway interior noise.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jyaehyoung; Lee, Donguk; Han, Woojae

    2016-01-01

    Today, people listen to music loud using personal listening devices. Although a majority of studies have reported that the high volume played on these listening devices produces a latent risk of hearing problems, there is a lack of studies on "double noise exposures" such as environmental noise plus recreational noise. The present study measures the preferred listening levels of a mobile phone program with subway interior noise for 74 normal-hearing participants in five age groups (ranging from 20s to 60s). The speakers presented the subway interior noise at 73.45 dB, while each subject listened to three application programs [Digital Multimedia Broadcasting (DMB), music, game] for 30 min using a tablet personal computer with an earphone. The participants' earphone volume levels were analyzed using a sound level meter and a 2cc coupler. Overall, the results showed that those in their 20s listened to the three programs significantly louder with DMB set at significantly higher volume levels than for the other programs. Higher volume levels were needed for middle frequency compared to the lower and higher frequencies. We concluded that any potential risk of noise-induced hearing loss for mobile phone users should be communicated when users listen regularly, although the volume level was not high enough that the users felt uncomfortable. When considering individual listening habits on mobile phones, further study to predict total accumulated environmental noise is still needed. PMID:26780960

  18. Mobile phone imaging module with extended depth of focus based on axial irradiance equalization phase coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Chen, Po-Chang; Chang, Chuan-Chung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Yang, Sidney S.; Chang, Horng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mobile phone imaging module with extended depth of focus (EDoF) by using axial irradiance equalization (AIE) phase coding. From radiation energy transfer along optical axis with constant irradiance, the focal depth enhancement solution is acquired. We introduce the axial irradiance equalization phase coding to design a two-element 2-megapixel mobile phone lens for trade off focus-like aberrations such as field curvature, astigmatism and longitudinal chromatic defocus. The design results produce modulation transfer functions (MTF) and phase transfer functions (PTF) with substantially similar characteristics at different field and defocus positions within Nyquist pass band. Besides, the measurement results are shown. Simultaneously, the design results and measurement results are compared. Next, for the EDoF mobile phone camera imaging system, we present a digital decoding design method and calculate a minimum mean square error (MMSE) filter. Then, the filter is applied to correct the substantially similar blur image. Last, the blur and de-blur images are demonstrated.

  19. A walking intervention for postmenopausal women using mobile phones and Interactive Voice Response.

    PubMed

    David, Prabu; Buckworth, Janet; Pennell, Michael L; Katz, Mira L; DeGraffinreid, Cecilia R; Paskett, Electra D

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a feasibility study of a 12-week walking intervention administered through an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system and mobile phones. We also examined the added benefit of a human coach. Post-menopausal women (n = 71) were given a daily-steps goal, which they monitored using a pedometer. Each day, they answered an automated call from the IVR system to their mobile phone and provided assessments of walking goals and mood. Every evening, they called the IVR system to report their steps, answered a brief questionnaire and received a message with a helpful hint. Participants took less time to complete a one-mile walk after the intervention, compared to baseline (0.77 min, SE = 0.22, P < 0.001). In addition, a significant loss in body weight (0.93 kg, SE = 0.31) and body-mass index (0.28 kg/m(2), SE = 0.11) were observed. The key psychometric measures of exercise goal setting (0.67 units, SE = 0.12) and exercise planning (0.48 units, SE = 0.09) also improved from baseline (both P < 0.001). However, results in the coach and no-coach conditions were not significantly different. The study suggests that mobile phones can be used to deliver an effective, low-cost walking intervention, irrespective of the addition of a human coach. PMID:22052963

  20. Mobile phone imaging and cloud-based analysis for standardized malaria detection and reporting

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Thomas F.; Gupta, Sparsh; Wright, David W.; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been widely deployed in low-resource settings. These tests are typically read by visual inspection, and accurate record keeping and data aggregation remains a substantial challenge. A successful malaria elimination campaign will require new strategies that maximize the sensitivity of RDTs, reduce user error, and integrate results reporting tools. In this report, an unmodified mobile phone was used to photograph RDTs, which were subsequently uploaded into a globally accessible database, REDCap, and then analyzed three ways: with an automated image processing program, visual inspection, and a commercial lateral flow reader. The mobile phone image processing detected 20.6 malaria parasites/microliter of blood, compared to the commercial lateral flow reader which detected 64.4 parasites/microliter. Experienced observers visually identified positive malaria cases at 12.5 parasites/microliter, but encountered reporting errors and false negatives. Visual interpretation by inexperienced users resulted in only an 80.2% true negative rate, with substantial disagreement in the lower parasitemia range. We have demonstrated that combining a globally accessible database, such as REDCap, with mobile phone based imaging of RDTs provides objective, secure, automated, data collection and result reporting. This simple combination of existing technologies would appear to be an attractive tool for malaria elimination campaigns. PMID:27345590