Science.gov

Sample records for crown inclination measured

  1. Assessment of crown angulations, crown inclinations, and tooth size discrepancies in a South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Doodamani, Geeta Maruti; Khala, Anmol S; Manohar, Mala; Umashankar

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The aim of this study was to assess crown angulations, crown inclinations, and tooth size discrepancy in a sample population from Davangere, South India. Materials and Methods: One hundred adults (50 male and 50 female) of age 18–30 years, with Angle's class I ideal occlusion and balanced profiles, were selected for the study. Study models were prepared and crown angulations and crown inclinations were measured using a customized protractor device. Bolton's analysis was used to measure the tooth size discrepancies. Results: Maxillary and mandibular teeth had less crown angulations. Maxillary and mandibular incisors and maxillary molars showed increased crown inclinations, whereas mandibular molars and premolars had less crown inclinations than the original Andrews sample. The mean maxillary and mandibular tooth size ratios, overall and anterior, were similar to Bolton's ratios. Conclusions: The finding of this study indicates that there are possible racial and ethnic factors contributing to variations in crown angulations and crown inclinations. PMID:22090760

  2. Crown angulation and inclination of Northern Thais with good occlusion.

    PubMed

    Jotikasthira, Dhirawat; Sheffield, Peter; Kalha, Anmol; Syed, Zameer

    2010-01-01

    When patients of differing ethnicities are treated with one bracket system, negative consequences for the occlusion can result. This study investigated the crown angulation and inclination on study casts of 60 Northern Thais (30 males and 30 females) with a good occlusion. In all study casts, each tooth (except the third molars) was evaluated with the orthodontic Torque Angulation Device (TAD) twice on the right side; this was also performed twice on the left side. The mean of the two evaluations was used for the statistical analysis. The means of the males and females were compared with the independent Student t test. The results were that the crown angulation of the mandibular first and second molars was significantly higher in females (P<.01) and that the crown inclination of all teeth did not differ between the two sexes.

  3. On wind turbine power performance measurements at inclined airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, T. F.

    2004-07-01

    The average airflow inclination in complex terrain may be substantial. The airflow inclination affects wind turbine performance and also affects the cup anemometer being used in power performance measurements. In this article the overall dependence of the power curve on inclined airflow is analysed for its influence on both the wind turbine and the cup anemometer. The wind turbine performance analysis is based on results of measurements and theoretical calculations with the aeroelastic code HAWC coupled to a 3D actuator disc model for varying yaw angle. The cup anemometer analysis at inclined flow is based on an averaging of measured angular characteristics in a wind tunnel with the distribution of airflow inclination angles over time. The relative difference in annual energy production in terrain with inclined airflow compared with flat terrain is simulated for cup anemometers with theoretical optimal angular characteristics for two different definitions of wind speed, as well as for five commercial cup anemometers with measured angular characteristics. Copyright

  4. Avian orientation at steep angles of inclination: experiments with migratory white-crowned sparrows at the magnetic North Pole.

    PubMed

    Akesson, S; Morin, J; Muheim, R; Ottosson, U

    2001-09-22

    The Earth's magnetic field and celestial cues provide animals with compass information during migration. Inherited magnetic compass courses are selected based on the angle of inclination, making it difficult to orient in the near vertical fields found at high geomagnetic latitudes. Orientation cage experiments were performed at different sites in high Arctic Canada with adult and young white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) in order to investigate birds' ability to use the Earth's magnetic field and celestial cues for orientation in naturally very steep magnetic fields at and close to the magnetic North Pole. Experiments were performed during the natural period of migration at night in the local geomagnetic field under natural clear skies and under simulated total overcast conditions. The experimental birds failed to select a meaningful magnetic compass course under overcast conditions at the magnetic North Pole, but could do so in geomagnetic fields deviating less than 3 degrees from the vertical. Migratory orientation was successful at all sites when celestial cues were available.

  5. Towards an Optimized Method of Olive Tree Crown Volume Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Llorens, Jordi; Gamarra-Diezma, Juan L.; Gil-Ribes, Jesús A.; Gil, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Accurate crown characterization of large isolated olive trees is vital for adjusting spray doses in three-dimensional crop agriculture. Among the many methodologies available, laser sensors have proved to be the most reliable and accurate. However, their operation is time consuming and requires specialist knowledge and so a simpler crown characterization method is required. To this end, three methods were evaluated and compared with LiDAR measurements to determine their accuracy: Vertical Crown Projected Area method (VCPA), Ellipsoid Volume method (VE) and Tree Silhouette Volume method (VTS). Trials were performed in three different kinds of olive tree plantations: intensive, adapted one-trunked traditional and traditional. In total, 55 trees were characterized. Results show that all three methods are appropriate to estimate the crown volume, reaching high coefficients of determination: R2 = 0.783, 0.843 and 0.824 for VCPA, VE and VTS, respectively. However, discrepancies arise when evaluating tree plantations separately, especially for traditional trees. Here, correlations between LiDAR volume and other parameters showed that the Mean Vector calculated for VCPA method showed the highest correlation for traditional trees, thus its use in traditional plantations is highly recommended. PMID:25658396

  6. Profile measurement of transparent inclined surface with transmitted differential interference contrast shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng-Kang; Chen, Wei-Lun; Liu, Ting-Kun; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2012-08-27

    A quantitative phase shifting differential interference contrast (PS-DIC) shearing interferometer is adopted to measure the profile of transparent specimen with inclined surface. The effects of the incline angle on DIC measurement accuracy were studied. The optical model of the test system was constructed and the measurement of surface with various incline angles ranging from 5° to 60° was simulated. The experiments validate the simulation model and show the feasibility of profile reconstruction of inclined structure. It is interested to find that even with an inclined angle of 15°, unwrapping technique is required to make the measurement more accurate. In addition, the measurement can be further improved by taking into account the effects of the change in shear distance on the optical path difference. This study provides useful information that should be considered for complex geometry measurement with quantitative DIC technique.

  7. Measuring residual stress in ceramic zirconia-porcelain dental crowns by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Allahkarami, M; Hanan, J C

    2012-02-01

    Residual stress plays a critical role in failure of ceramic dental crowns. The magnitude and distribution of residual stress in the crown system are largely unknown. Determining the residual stress quantitatively is challenging since the crown has such complex contours and shapes. This work explored the feasibility and validity of measuring residual stress of zirconia and porcelain in ceramic crowns by nanoindentation. Nanoindentation tests were performed on the cross-section of a crown for both porcelain and zirconia along four critical locations: the thickest, thinnest and medium porcelain thicknesses. Zirconia and porcelain pieces, chipped off from the crown and annealed at 400 °C, were used as reference samples. The residual stress was determined by comparing the measured hardness of the stressed sample with that of the reference sample. Nanoindentation impression images were acquired through a scanning probe microscope (SPM) equipped with a Hysitron Triboindenter. Zirconia showed large pile-up. Residual stress is determined along the thickness of crowns at the chosen locations for both porcelain and zirconia. The measured results were compared with the results from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and finite element modeling (FEM). Results show there are large amounts of residual stresses in the dental crown and their magnitude differs between locations due to the complex shape of the crown. The average residual stress readings were as high as -637 MPa and 323 MPa for zirconia and porcelain respectively.

  8. Simultaneous PLIF/PIV measurements for a single-mode inclined interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghar, Mohammad; Reilly, David; Carter, John; McFarland, Jacob; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    The Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory (STAML) at Georgia Institute of Technology is using a newly established inclined shock tube facility to study an inclined interface perturbation. This facility allows for simultaneous characterization of density and velocity fields by employing high-resolution, full-field Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), respectively. The incident shock strength of Mach 1.55 was used to impulsively accelerate a N2-Acetone mixture over CO2 inclined interface with an Atwood number of 0.23 and an 80° angle of inclination. This angle of inclination results in a linear perturbation as defined by the amplitude-to-wavelength ratio (η/ λ = 0.097). The development of the turbulent mixing layer for both pre- and post-reshock is determined by measuring several quantities, including two BHR model parameters: density self-correlation and turbulent mass flux.

  9. Measurements of Stellar Inclinations for Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Winn, Joshua N.; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi

    2012-09-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period Ps inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity Vsin Is and stellar radius obtained by a high-resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination Is of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line of sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination Is can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) systems, whose light curves show periodic flux variations. Detailed analyses of their light curves and spectra revealed that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations Is for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with Is = 90° suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small Is for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.

  10. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR INCLINATIONS FOR KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio

    2012-09-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period P{sub s} inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity Vsin I{sub s} and stellar radius obtained by a high-resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination I{sub s} of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line of sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination I{sub s} can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) systems, whose light curves show periodic flux variations. Detailed analyses of their light curves and spectra revealed that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations I{sub s} for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with I{sub s} 90 Degree-Sign suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small I{sub s} for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.

  11. Detection method of inclination angle in image measurement based on improved triangulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jiye

    2015-02-01

    Image distortion seriously affects the accuracy in microscope image measurement. One source of such distortion is related to the tilting of the microscope stage during laser scanning, thereby resulting in various degrees of inclination angles. This paper describes a novel technique that improves the traditional laser triangulation method by using multiple parallel laser beams that can solve the inclination problem. Moreover, a multi-light-spot measurement device, based on the improved laser triangulation technique, is proposed that can accurately detect the degree and directions of the inclination angles in real time. Furthermore, experimental results generated from a prototype of this device show that the new measurement system can effectively detect small inclination angles at a precision up to ±0.5  μrad.

  12. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L.; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R.; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A.

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  13. Application of Replica Technique and SEM in Accuracy Measurement of Ceramic Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifkovic, B.; Budak, I.; Todorovic, A.; Hodolic, J.; Puskar, T.; Jevremovic, D.; Vukelic, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of the measuring values of the marginal gap related to the ceramic crowns made by dental CAD/CAM system using the replica technique and SEM. The study was conducted using three experimental groups, which consisted of ceramic crowns manufactured by the Cerec CAD/CAM system. The scanning procedure was carried out using three specialized dental 3D digitization systems from the Cerec family - two types of extraoral optical scanning systems and an intraoral optical scanner. Measurements of the marginal gap were carried out using the replica technique and SEM. The comparison of aggregate values of the marginal gap using the replica technique showed a statistically significant difference between the systems. The measured values of marginal gaps of ceramic crowns using the replica technique were significantly lower compared to those measured by SEM. The results indicate that the choice of technique for measuring the accuracy of ceramic crowns influences the final results of investigation.

  14. Assessment of postural stability using inertial measurement unit on inclined surfaces in healthy adults - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Frames, Chris; Soangra, Rahul; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2013-01-01

    Fatal and nonfatal falls in the construction domain remain a significant issue in today’s workforce. The roofing industry in particular, annually ranks amongst the highest in all industries. Exposure to an inclined surface, such as an inclined roof surface, has been reported to have adverse effects on postural stability. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the intra-individual differences in stability parameters on both inclined and level surfaces. Postural Stability (PS) and Limit of Stability (LOS) were assessed in seven healthy subjects (aged 25-35 years) on inclined and level surfaces using embedded force plates and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). Four 90-second trials were collected on the inclined surface in distinctive positions: (1) Toes raised 20o above heel; (2) Heels raised 20o above toes (3); Transverse direction with dominant foot inverted at a lower height; (4) Transverse direction with non-dominant foot inverted at a lower height. Limit of Stability was evaluated by the two measurement devices in all four directions and margin of safety was quantified for each individual on both surfaces. The results reveal significant differences in postural stability between the flat surface condition and the inclined surface condition when subject was positioned perpendicular to the surface slope with one foot descended below the other; specifically, a significant increase was identified when visual support was interrupted. The findings lend support to the literature and will assist in future research regarding early detection of postural imbalance and preventative measures to reduce fall risks in professions where workers are consistently exposed to inclined surfaces.

  15. Large tree crowns in closed forest canopies: Measuring structure and estimating light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolosin, Michael Stephen

    Trees compete for light. Crown traits are the result of an evolutionary history dominated by this fact, and species exhibit a range of strategies including characteristic shapes and light-foraging abilities in response to this competition. Shape plasticity and crown asymmetry result from the growth and death of branches over long time scales. It is impossible to track every branch in stand-scale forest models, and there are no good approaches that accurately capture the emergent tree-level properties of this branch-scale process. Most forest models therefore ignore tree shape and asymmetry. Models of tree size and shape are important in both scientific research and in evaluating policy questions. Light absorption in large canopy trees determines their own demographic rates and sets the template of light levels that drives understory growth and mortality, driving both community and ecosystem processes. Models that ignore crown shape and asymmetry could lead to faulty inferences and predictions. Our work attempts to overcome some of the difficulties in both measuring and modeling large crown shape and light availability. We develop a new approach to extracting three-dimensional crown structural information from high resolution digital stereo imagery to accurately measure crown structure of over nine hundred well-studied large canopy trees. We also present a statistical model that integrates multiple data sources into estimates of the "true" but unmeasurable light available to individual trees. Third, we develop two crown models for forest simulations that capture their space-filling nature with minimum detail, and we parameterize these models from data; one models crown shape, the other crown location. Fourth, we investigate the relationship between light availability and growth. We extract extensive fine-scale structural detail from the imagery, and generate detailed crown envelopes. We find that light availability predicts the growth rates of large trees primarily

  16. Three-dimensional structure measurement of diamond crowns based on stereo vision.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhiguo; Cai, Lilong

    2009-11-01

    We present an effective method for reconstructing and measuring the three-dimensional (3D) structures of diamond crowns based on stereo vision. To reach high measurement accuracy, the influences of 3D measurement errors are analyzed in detail. Then, a method to accurately extract the linear features of diamond edges based on virtual motion control is described. Depending on the obtained linear features, the 3D structure of a diamond crown can be reconstructed with least squares error. The validity of the proposed method is verified by experiments. The results show that the proposed method can be used to measure the 3D structures of diamond crowns with satisfactory accuracy and efficiency, and it also can be used to extract linear features and measure other similar artificial objects that can be represented by line segments.

  17. Electromyographic Patterns during Level and Inclined Treadmill Running and Their Relationship to Step Cycle Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Patrick R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Eight highly skilled male runners were filmed running on level and inclined treadmills while electromyographic measures from right thigh muscles were collected. Results indicate that treadmill grade had a significant effect on the relative duration of both stance and swing phases of the step cycle and on total step cycle duration. (MT)

  18. How to Detect Inclined Water Maser Disks (and Possibly Measure Black Hole Masses)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremy

    2017-03-01

    We describe a method for identifying inclined water maser disks orbiting massive black holes and for potentially using them to measure black hole masses. Owing to the geometry of maser amplification pathways, the minority of water maser disks are observable: only those viewed nearly edge-on have been identified, suggesting that an order of magnitude additional maser disks exist. We suggest that inward-propagating masers are gravitationally deflected by the central black hole, thereby scattering water maser emission out of the disk plane and enabling detection. The signature of an inclined water maser disk would be narrow masers near the systemic velocity that appear to emit from the black hole position, as identified by the radio continuum core. To explore this possibility, we present high-resolution (0.″07–0.″17) Very Large Array line and continuum observations of 13 galaxies with narrow water maser emission and show that three are good inclined-disk candidates (five remain ambiguous). For the best case, CGCG 120‑039, we show that the maser and continuum emission are coincident to within 3.5 ± 1.4 pc (6.7 ± 2.7 mas). Subsequent very long baseline interferometric maps can confirm candidate inclined disks and have the potential to show maser rings or arcs that provide a direct measurement of black hole mass, although the mass precision will rely on knowledge of the size of the maser disk.

  19. Distinctive expression patterns and roles of the miRNA393/TIR1 homolog module in regulating flag leaf inclination and primary and crown root growth in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Bian, Hongwu; Xie, Yakun; Guo, Fu; Han, Ning; Ma, Shengyun; Zeng, Zhanghui; Wang, Junhui; Yang, Yinong; Zhu, Muyuan

    2012-10-01

    • MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of auxin signaling components plays a critical role in plant development. miRNA expression and functional diversity contribute to the complexity of regulatory networks of miRNA/target modules. • This study functionally characterizes two members of the rice (Oryza sativa) miR393 family and their target genes, OsTIR1 and OsAFB2 (AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX), the two closest homologs of Arabidopsis TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 (TIR1). • We found that the miR393 family members possess distinctive expression patterns, with miR393a expressed mainly in the crown and lateral root primordia, as well as the coleoptile tip, and miR393b expressed in the shoot apical meristem. Transgenic plants overexpressing miR393a/b displayed a severe phenotype with hallmarks of altered auxin signaling, mainly including enlarged flag leaf inclination and altered primary and crown root growth. Furthermore, OsAFB2- and OsTIR1-suppressed lines exhibited increased inclination of flag leaves at the booting stage, resembling miR393-overexpressing plants. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that OsTIR1 and OsAFB2 interact with OsIAA1. • Expression diversification of miRNA393 implies the potential role of miRNA regulation during species evolution. The conserved mechanisms of the miR393/target module indicate the fundamental importance of the miR393-mediated regulation of auxin signal transduction in rice.

  20. Trunk inclination estimate during the sprint start using an inertial measurement unit: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Elena; Guillon, Pélagie; Camomilla, Valentina; Pillet, Hélène; Skalli, Wafa; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2013-10-01

    The proper execution of the sprint start is crucial in determining the performance during a sprint race. In this respect, when moving from the crouch to the upright position, trunk kinematics is a key element. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of a trunk-mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU) in estimating the trunk inclination and angular velocity in the sagittal plane during the sprint start. In-laboratory sprint starts were performed by five sprinters. The local acceleration and angular velocity components provided by the IMU were processed using an adaptive Kalman filter. The accuracy of the IMU inclination estimate and its consistency with trunk inclination were assessed using reference stereophotogrammetric measurements. A Bland-Altman analysis, carried out using parameters (minimum, maximum, and mean values) extracted from the time histories of the estimated variables, and curve similarity analysis (correlation coefficient > 0.99, root mean square difference < 7 deg) indicated the agreement between reference and IMU estimates, opening a promising scenario for an accurate in-field use of IMUs for sprint start performance assessment.

  1. Slip resistance of winter footwear on snow and ice measured using maximum achievable incline

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jennifer; Shaw, Robert; Novak, Alison; Li, Yue; Ormerod, Marcus; Newton, Rita; Dutta, Tilak; Fernie, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protective footwear is necessary for preventing injurious slips and falls in winter conditions. Valid methods for assessing footwear slip resistance on winter surfaces are needed in order to evaluate footwear and outsole designs. The purpose of this study was to utilise a method of testing winter footwear that was ecologically valid in terms of involving actual human testers walking on realistic winter surfaces to produce objective measures of slip resistance. During the experiment, eight participants tested six styles of footwear on wet ice, on dry ice, and on dry ice after walking over soft snow. Slip resistance was measured by determining the maximum incline angles participants were able to walk up and down in each footwear–surface combination. The results indicated that testing on a variety of surfaces is necessary for establishing winter footwear performance and that standard mechanical bench tests for footwear slip resistance do not adequately reflect actual performance. Practitioner Summary: Existing standardised methods for measuring footwear slip resistance lack validation on winter surfaces. By determining the maximum inclines participants could walk up and down slopes of wet ice, dry ice, and ice with snow, in a range of footwear, an ecologically valid test for measuring winter footwear performance was established. PMID:26555738

  2. Slip resistance of winter footwear on snow and ice measured using maximum achievable incline.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer; Shaw, Robert; Novak, Alison; Li, Yue; Ormerod, Marcus; Newton, Rita; Dutta, Tilak; Fernie, Geoff

    2016-05-01

    Protective footwear is necessary for preventing injurious slips and falls in winter conditions. Valid methods for assessing footwear slip resistance on winter surfaces are needed in order to evaluate footwear and outsole designs. The purpose of this study was to utilise a method of testing winter footwear that was ecologically valid in terms of involving actual human testers walking on realistic winter surfaces to produce objective measures of slip resistance. During the experiment, eight participants tested six styles of footwear on wet ice, on dry ice, and on dry ice after walking over soft snow. Slip resistance was measured by determining the maximum incline angles participants were able to walk up and down in each footwear-surface combination. The results indicated that testing on a variety of surfaces is necessary for establishing winter footwear performance and that standard mechanical bench tests for footwear slip resistance do not adequately reflect actual performance. Practitioner Summary: Existing standardised methods for measuring footwear slip resistance lack validation on winter surfaces. By determining the maximum inclines participants could walk up and down slopes of wet ice, dry ice, and ice with snow, in a range of footwear, an ecologically valid test for measuring winter footwear performance was established.

  3. Measurement of Interfacial Profiles of Wavy Film Flow on Inclined Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, N.; Amagai, K.

    2016-02-01

    Falling liquid films on inclined wall present in many industrial processes such as in food processing, seawater desalination and electronic devices manufacturing industries. In order to ensure an optimal efficiency of the operation in these industries, a fundamental study on the interfacial flow profiles of the liquid film is of great importance. However, it is generally difficult to experimentally predict the interfacial profiles of liquid film flow on inclined wall due to the instable wavy flow that usually formed on the liquid film surface. In this paper, the liquid film surface velocity was measured by using a non-intrusive technique called as photochromic dye marking method. This technique utilizes the color change of liquid containing the photochromic dye when exposed to the UV light source. The movement of liquid film surface marked by the UV light was analyzed together with the wave passing over the liquid. As a result, the liquid film surface was found to slightly shrink its gradual movement when approached by the wave before gradually move again after the intersection with the wave.

  4. Stratified shear flow in an inclined duct: near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Jamie; Lefauve, Adrien; Dalziel, Stuart; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a new experimental setup to study the exchange flow in an inclined square duct between two reservoirs containing fluids of different densities. This system can exhibit stratified shear wave motions, and has a distinct parameter threshold above which turbulence is triggered and progressively fills a larger fraction of the duct. To probe these intrinsically 3D flows, we introduce a new setup in which a traversing laser sheet allows us to obtain near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density fields. Three components of velocity are measured on successive 2D planes using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) with density information obtained simultaneously using laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled "Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence".

  5. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... off when the child loses the baby tooth. Metal crowns: Hold up to chewing and teeth grinding ... porcelain crowns: Wear down opposing teeth more than metal crowns Match the color of other teeth May ...

  6. Shear-Sensitive Liquid Crystal Coating Method: Surface-Inclination Effects on Shear Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating (SSLCC) method is an image-based technique for both visualizing dynamic surface-flow phenomena, such as transition and separation, and for measuring the continuous shear-stress vector distribution acting on an aerodynamic surface. Under proper lighting and viewing conditions (discussed below), the coating changes color in response to an applied aerodynamic shear. This color-change response is continuous and reversible, with a response time of milliseconds, and is a function of both the shear magnitude and the shear vector orientation relative to the observer. The liquid crystal phase of matter is a weakly-ordered, viscous, non-Newtonian fluid state that exists between the nonuniform liquid phase and the ordered solid phase of certain organic compounds. Cholesteric liquid crystal compounds possess a helical molecular arrangement that selectively scatters white light, incident along the helical axis, as a three-dimensional spectrum. This property is linked to the helical pitch length, which is within the range of wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The pitch length, and hence the wavelength of the scattered light, is influenced by shear stress normal to the helical axis. This unique optical property produces a measurable color change in response to an applied shearing force. The full-surface shear stress vector measurement method, developed at NASA-Ames, is schematically illustrated. As with the visualization method, the coated test surface is illuminated from the normal direction with white light and the camera is positioned at an above-plane view angle of approximately 30 deg. Experiments have been initiated at NASA Ames to begin the process of quantifying surface-inclination (surface-curvature) effects on shear vector measurement accuracy. In preliminary experiments, surface-inclination angles theta(sub x), theta(sub y) of 0, +/-5, +/-10, and +/-15 deg were employed. In this arrangement, white-light illumination was

  7. Root type matters: measurements of water uptake by seminal, crown and lateral roots of maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Roots play a key role in water acquisition and are a significant component of plant adaptation to different environmental conditions. Although maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and types in extracting water from soils. Aim of this study was to investigate the location of root water uptake in mature maize. We used neutron radiography to image the spatial distribution of maize roots and trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maize plants were grown in aluminum containers filled with a sandy soil that was kept homogeneously wet throughout the experiment. When the plants were five weeks-old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions. The transport of D2O was simulated using a diffusion-convection numerical model. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusion coefficient and the water uptake of the different root segments. The model was initially developed and tested with two weeks-old maize (Ahmed et. al. 2015), for which we found that water was mainly taken up by lateral roots and the water uptake of the seminal roots was negligible. Here, we used this method to measure root water uptake in a mature maize root system. The root architecture of five weeks-old maize consisted of primary and seminal roots with long laterals and crown (nodal) roots that emerged from the above ground part of the plant two weeks after planting. The crown roots were thicker than the seminal roots and had fewer and shorter laterals. Surprisingly, we found that the water was mainly taken up by the crown roots and their laterals, while the lateral roots of seminal roots, which were the main location of water uptake of younger plants, stopped to take up water. Interestingly, we also found that in contrast to the seminal roots, the crown roots were able to take up water also from their distal segments. We conclude that for the two weeks

  8. A Comparison of Casual In-Clinic Blood Pressure Measurements to Standardized Guideline-Concordant Measurements in Severely Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Vahidy, Sana; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Padwal, Raj S.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare casual BP taken in a bariatric clinic to standardized guideline-concordant BP. Subjects/Methods. A cross sectional analysis was performed using baseline data from a weight management trial. Patients were recruited from a Canadian bariatric care program. Standardized BP was performed using a Watch BP oscillometric device. Casual in-clinic BP single readings, taken using a Welch Allyn oscillometric device, were chart-abstracted. Paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots, and Pearson's correlations were used for analysis. Results. Data from 134 patients were analyzed. Mean age was 41.5 ± 8.9 y, mean BMI was 46.8 ± 6.5 kg/m2, and 40 (30%) had prior hypertension. Mean casual in-clinic BP was 128.8 ± 14.1/81.6 ± 9.9 mmHg and mean standardized BP was 133.2 ± 15.0/82.0 ± 10.3 mmHg (difference of −4.3 ± 12.0 for systolic (p < 0.0001) and −0.4 ± 10.0 mmHg for diastolic BP (p = 0.6)). Pearson's coefficients were 0.66 (p < 0.0001) for SBP and 0.50 (p < 0.0001) for DBP. 28.4% of casual versus 26.9% of standardized measurements were ≥140/90 mmHg (p < 0.0001). Conclusion. In this bariatric clinic, casual BP was unexpectedly lower than standardized BP. This could potentially lead to the underdiagnosis of hypertension. PMID:26294966

  9. Difficulties in applying laser technique to measure drop sizes in vertical and inclined Annular gas-liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Sohail H.

    1996-11-01

    Annular two phase flow is one of the most common regimes of gas/liquid flow found in industrial equipment. In this regime, the liquid flows in part as a film on the channel walls while the rest of the liquid is carried as drops by the gas flowing in the center of the channel. Detailed knowledge of the liquid drops particularly their sizes and velocities is essential in processes involving heat and mass transfer. This information is of great importance for the oil industry where inclined drilling has recently become a common practice. The effect of inclination on the drop sizes is still unknown and requires further investigation. Laser diffraction is one of the few available techniques which is widely used for the measurement of droplet size distribution. Although the technique is simple to use, it is not free from problems. This paper highlights the practical difficulties encountered when the technique was used to measure the drop size distribution in an inclinable flow column. The laser system was mounted on the rig and the flow column was rotated from vertical to horizontal position. Liquid drops appearing on the optical windows prohibited laser measurements. Other problems included the glass reflections and vibration when the rig was in operation. In this paper some practical suggestions have been made to overcome these problems and some useful results have been included.

  10. Inclination distributions and size measurements of hemlock and red spruce needles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel S.; Smith, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Needle inclination angle distributions were plotted for 5 and 10 deg intervals for two hemlock trees and one red spruce. The distributions for the hemlock and spruce were similar, with the peak normal angle occurring between 10 and 20 deg. These distributions are between two theoretical (planophile and spherical) leaf angle distributions. The results can be used as an input to radiative transfer models that require a distribution of the orientation of the scattering elements of the canopy.

  11. A High-Precision, Optical Polarimeter to Measure Inclinations of High Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Matthews, K.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2007-12-01

    While most astrophysical objects require many parameters in order to be fully described, black holes are unique in that only three parameters are required: mass, spin, and charge. Of these, mass and spin are enough to describe the black hole's gravitational field and event horizon location. Therefore, theory and observation may jointly pursue one or two quantities to uncover the progenitor star's history. Constraints on black hole mass exist for high mass X-ray binaries, such as Cygnus X-1, which is thought to consist of a 40 ± 10 solar mass O9.7Iab star and a 13.5-29 solar mass black hole (Ziolkowski 2005). While the constraints on the mass of the compact object are tight enough to declare that it is a black hole, they are sufficiently loose as to prohibit precise modeling of the progenitor star's mass. We have built an optical polarimeter for the Hale 5-m telescope at Mt. Palomar to provide an independent method for determining black hole mass. Degree of polarization will vary for an edge-on system, while position angle of net polarization will vary for a face-on system. Therefore, by monitoring the linear polarimetric variability of the binary, inclination can be estimated. Coupled with the known mass function of the binary from radial velocity work (Gies et al. 2003), inclination estimates constrain the mass of the black hole. Our polarimeter, POLISH (POLarimeter for Inclination Studies of High mass x-ray binaries), has achieved linear polarimetric precision of less than 10 parts per million on bright, unpolarized standard stars. We will also present results for polarized standard stars and Cygnus X-1 itself. This instrument has been funded by an endowment from the Moore Foundation.

  12. Evaporation of inclined water droplets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-16

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  13. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  14. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  15. Crown Gall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown gall disease occurs on diverse dicotyledonous and gymnospermous plant species worldwide. Reports of crown gall on hop date back to at least 1929, and the disease has been reported from most countries where hop is or has been grown commercially. The epidemiology of the causal bacterium, Agrob...

  16. Lidar-based measurement of surface roughness features of single tree crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolditz, Melanie; Krahwinkler, Petra M.; Roßmann, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    In remote sensing data, trees have a low interspecies variability and show a high variability within the tree species. Therefore, specific features that distinguish between unique properties of two tree species are required for a single tree based genera classification. To improve classification results, the suitability of seven surface roughness features, calculated on single tree crown regions, is studied. The algorithms developed to provide roughness parameters can be validated and prototyped in a Virtual Forest testbed. The features are extracted from a normalized digital surface model with a resolution of 0.4m per pixel. Within the test area of 340km2 more than 4000 single trees of eleven different species and additionally 200 buildings are available as reference data. Technical standards define several parameters to describe surface properties. These roughness features are evaluated in the context of single tree crowns. All of these features are based on the deviation of the height values of the tree crown to its mean height. As an additional feature the relationship between the crown's surface area and its occupied ground area is used. The evaluation results of these features regarding the discrimination of tree species on different levels - eleven single tree species, seven tree classes, deciduous and coniferous - and also towards discrimination of trees from buildings will be presented.

  17. A technique to determine a desired preparation axial inclination.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Harry; Ivanhoe, John R; Blalock, John S; Frazier, Kevin B; Plummer, Kevin D

    2003-10-01

    The guidelines recommended in the literature for the convergence angle of a crown preparation vary from 3 to 24 degrees. There is a lack of guidelines on techniques to achieve a specific axial inclination. The purpose of this article was to present a practical technique, with a diamond rotary cutting instrument of known axial inclination, to determine the diamond rotary cutting instrument angulations required to achieve the desired axial inclination of a preparation.

  18. A multifibre optic sensor to measure the liquid film thickness between a moving bubble and an inclined solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, A.; Kiss, L. I.; Verreault, R.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a multifibre optic sensor is developed to measure the thickness of the liquid film located between a moving bubble and an inclined surface. The sensor takes into account the presence of a second interface independently of its distance from the solid surface. In the first part of the paper, a mathematical model is developed to simulate the behaviour of several configurations of the fibre optic sensor in order to determine the best configuration of the sensor. In the second part, the calibration setup is presented and described in detail. In the last part of the paper, the method is validated. The results showed that the applicability range of the sensor is from 125 µm to 1400 µm. In the operating range, the accuracy of the sensor is around 5%.

  19. Analysis of the dental morphology of Plio-pleistocene hominids. I. Mandibular molars: crown area measurements and morphological traits.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B A; Abbott, S A

    1983-01-01

    This study has used accurate measurements of crown area and precise assessments of the morphological traits of mandibular molars in an attempt to define the metrical and morphological characteristics of early hominid taxa. A total of 196 Plio-Pleistocene hominid molars were either allocated to one of six informal taxonomic groups or considered as individual cases. Accurate measurements of crown base area made from occlusal photographs have enabled us to estimate the effects of interproximal wear on crown areas. The average correction factor over the three molar types is around 2-4% with a maximum of 6%. The patterns of distribution of extra cusps show interesting differences between taxa. None of the M-1S in the two groups of 'gracile' hominids from East and South Africa bears a C6, but it is common in the two 'robust' taxa. The distribution of a C7 is the reverse of this, it being rare in the robust' taxa, and more common in the 'gracile' groups. There is thus no simple relationship between cusp number and tooth size. Our observations on the protostylid suggest that though it is more common in the 'robust' australopithecines than the 'graciles', when it does occur it is more strongly expressed in the 'gracile' group. The combination of simple metrical data, and the assessment of morphological traits, can help in the classification of enigmatic or incomplete specimens. Some isolated teeth from the collection at Koobi Fora can confidently be assigned to Australopithecus boisei, and useful guides have been provided for taxonomic assessment of the skull KNM-ER 1805, and the mandibles KNM-ER 1506 and 1820. PMID:6403498

  20. Measurement of ulnar variance and radial inclination on X-rays of healed distal radius fractures. With the axis of the distal radius or ulna?

    PubMed

    Thuysbaert, Gilles; Ringburg, Akkie; Petronilia, Steven; Vanden Berghe, Alex; Hollevoet, Nadine

    2015-06-01

    Ulnar variance and radial inclination are radiological parameters frequently used to evaluate displacement of distal radius fractures. In most studies measurements are based on the long central axis of the distal radius, although the axis of the distal ulna can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine which axis is more reliable. Four observers performed measurements on standard anteroposterior digital wrist X-rays of 20 patients taken 1 and 2 months after sustaining an extra-articular distal radius fracture. Intraobserver reliability was similar with both methods. No difference was found in interobserver reliability between both methods for ulnar variance, but for radial inclination it was better with the axis through the radius. Measurements on two X-rays of the same wrist taken at a different moment were similar with both methods. It can be concluded that the central axis of the distal radius can remain the basis to determine ulnar variance and radial inclination.

  1. Crown wart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown wart has been found widely distributed in Australia, New Zealand, and European countries. It has been recorded sporadically in India (Punjab), South Africa, South America (Ecuador, Chile, Peru), Panama, Mexico, and Canada (British Columbia). In the United States, it has been found more frequ...

  2. All-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lehner, C R; Schärer, P

    1992-06-01

    Despite the good appearance and biocompatibility of dental porcelains, failures are still of considerable concern because of some limited properties common to all-ceramic crown systems. As in the years before, pertinent scientific articles published between November 1990 and December 1991 focused on strengthening mechanisms and compared fracture toughness for different ceramic systems by using various test methods. Some evaluated the clinical implications thereon for seating and loading crowns and measured wear against different ceramic surface conditions. Recently introduced with pleasing aesthetic qualities, IPS-Empress (Ivoclar, Schaan, Liechtenstein), a new European leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, has finally drawn attention in some journals and has been reviewed with promising in vitro test results. Using a simple press-molding technique, well-fitting crowns, inlays, and veneers can be fabricated without an additional ceramming procedure. Again, only long-term clinical trials will validate achievements compared with other all-ceramic systems and with well-established metal ceramics.

  3. Three-dimensional inclination of the dental axes in healthy permanent dentitions--A cross-sectional study in a normal population.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Colombo, A; Ciusa, V; Serrao, G

    2001-08-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) inclination of the facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) and the size of the clinical crowns were measured in 100 white northern Italians. The subjects consisted of 22 girls and 21 boys, ages 13-15 years (adolescents), and 31 women and 26 men, ages 16-26 years (adults), all with a complete permanent dentition and Class I dental relationships. The 3-D coordinates of dental landmarks were obtained with a computerized electromagnetic digitizer. Clinical crowns heights and FACC inclinations in the anatomical frontal and sagittal planes relative to 2 reference planes, maxillary and mandibular (between the incisive papilla and the intersection of the palatal/lingual sulci of the first permanent molars with the gingival margin), were calculated. Ages and sexes were compared by ANOVA. On average, the frontal plane FACCs of most teeth converged toward the midline plane of symmetry. In contrast, the incisors diverged from the midline plane or were nearly vertical. Within each quadrant, the inclinations of the postincisor teeth progressively increased. In the sagittal plane, most teeth had a nearly vertical FACC. FACC inclinations showed sex- and age-related differences (P < .05). In the frontal plane, the canines, premolars, and molars were more inclined in adolescents than in adults. In the sagittal plane, a large within-group variability was observed. Clinical crown height was significantly larger in males than in females in all maxillary and mandibular canines, premolars, second molars, maxillary central incisors, and first molars. With age, some degree of dental eruption was found in maxillary and mandibular canines, maxillary second premolars, and molars. The age-related decrease in FACC inclination may be the effect of a progressive buccal and mesial drift.

  4. Measuring and modelling seasonal patterns of carbohydrate storage and mobilization in the trunks and root crowns of peach trees

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, David; Qin, Liangchun; DeBuse, Carolyn; DeJong, Theodore M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Developing a conceptual and functional framework for simulating annual long-term carbohydrate storage and mobilization in trees has been a weak point for virtually all tree models. This paper provides a novel approach for solving this problem using empirical field data and details of structural components of simulated trees to estimate the total carbohydrate stored over a dormant season and available for mobilization during spring budbreak. Methods The seasonal patterns of mobilization and storage of non-structural carbohydrates in bark and wood of the scion and rootstock crowns of the trunks of peach (Prunus persica) trees were analysed subsequent to treatments designed to maximize differences in source–sink behaviour during the growing season. Mature peach trees received one of three treatments (defruited and no pruning, severe pruning to 1·0 m, and unthinned with no pruning) in late winter, just prior to budbreak. Selected trees of each treatment were harvested at four times (March, June, August and November) and slices of trunk and root crown tissue above and below the graft union were removed for carbohydrate analysis. Inner bark and xylem tissues from the first to fifth rings were separated and analysed for non-structural carbohydrates. Data from these experiments were then used to estimate the amount of non-structural carbohydrates available for mobilization and to parameterize a carbohydrate storage sub-model in the functional–structural L-PEACH model. Key Results The mass fraction of carbohydrates in all sample tissues decreased from March to June, but the decrease was greatest in the severely pruned and unthinned treatments. November carbohydrate mass fractions in all tissues recovered to values similar to those in the previous March, except in the older xylem rings of the severely pruned and unthinned treatment. Carbohydrate storage sink capacity in trunks was empirically estimated from the mean maximum measured trunk non

  5. Internal dynamics of a free-surface viscoplastic flow down an inclined plane: experimental results through PIV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freydier, Perrine; Chambon, Guillaume; Naaim, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows constitute one of the most important natural hazards throughout the mountainous regions of the world, causing significant damages and economic losses. These mass are composed of particles of all sizes from clay to boulders suspended in a viscous fluid. An important goal resides in developing models that are able to accurately predict the hydraulic properties of debris flows. First, these flows are generally represented using models based on a momentum integral approach that consists in assuming a shallow flow and in depth averaging the local conservation equations. These models take into account closure terms depending on the shape of the velocity profile inside the flow. Second, the specific migration mechanisms of the suspended particles, which have a strong influence on the propagation of the surges, also depend on the internal dynamics within the flow. However, to date, few studies concerning the internal dynamics in particular in the vicinity of the front, of such flows have been carried out. The aim of this study is to document the internal dynamics in free-surface viscoplastic flows down an inclined channel. The rheological studies concerning natural muddy debris flows, rich in fine particles, have shown that these materials can be modeled, at least as a first approximation as non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluids. Experiments are conducted in an inclined channel whose bottom is constituted by an upward-moving conveyor belt with controlled velocity. Carbopol microgel has been used as a homogeneous transparent viscoplastic fluid. This experimental setup allows generating and monitoring stationary gravity-driven surges in the laboratory frame. We use PIV technique (Particle Image Velocimetry) to obtain velocity fields both in the uniform zone and within the front zone where flow thickness is variable and where recirculation takes place. Experimental velocity profiles and determination of plug position will be presented and compared to theoretical

  6. Inclined Levitron experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Max M.

    2012-11-01

    An inclined Levitron demonstration serves to illustrate macroscopically the basic non-quantum mechanical principle of nuclear magnetic resonance. By tuning a "rotary driver" to either the precession or the nutation frequency, the levitated top is made to precess or nutate visibly. By reflecting the beam from a laser-pointer off the Levitron, cycloidal pictures of the induced motion are obtained. Steady inclination at a steep angle is demonstrated in contrast to rotating inclination. Levitron traps are analogous to particle traps. Inclined or horizontal axis operation could lead to nearly frictionless bearings.

  7. Measurements of stellar inclinations for Kepler planet candidates. II. Candidate spin-orbit misalignments in single- and multiple-transiting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.

    2014-03-01

    We present a test for spin-orbit alignment for the host stars of 25 candidate planetary systems detected by the Kepler spacecraft. The inclination angle of each star's rotation axis was estimated from its rotation period, rotational line broadening, and radius. The rotation periods were determined using the Kepler photometric time series. The rotational line broadening was determined from high-resolution optical spectra with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph. Those same spectra were used to determine the star's photospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), which were then interpreted with stellar-evolutionary models to determine stellar radii. We combine the new sample with the seven stars from our previous work on this subject, finding that the stars show a statistical tendency to have inclinations near 90°, in alignment with the planetary orbits. Possible spin-orbit misalignments are seen in several systems, including three multiple-planet systems (KOI-304, 988, 2261). Ideally, these systems should be scrutinized with complementary techniques, such as the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, starspot-crossing anomalies, or asteroseismology, but the measurements will be difficult owing to the relatively faint apparent magnitudes and small transit signals in these systems.

  8. Measurements of Stellar Inclinations for Kepler Planet Candidates. II. Candidate Spin-Orbit Misalignments in Single- and Multiple-transiting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Takeda, Yoichi; Winn, Joshua N.; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.

    2014-03-01

    We present a test for spin-orbit alignment for the host stars of 25 candidate planetary systems detected by the Kepler spacecraft. The inclination angle of each star's rotation axis was estimated from its rotation period, rotational line broadening, and radius. The rotation periods were determined using the Kepler photometric time series. The rotational line broadening was determined from high-resolution optical spectra with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph. Those same spectra were used to determine the star's photospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), which were then interpreted with stellar-evolutionary models to determine stellar radii. We combine the new sample with the seven stars from our previous work on this subject, finding that the stars show a statistical tendency to have inclinations near 90°, in alignment with the planetary orbits. Possible spin-orbit misalignments are seen in several systems, including three multiple-planet systems (KOI-304, 988, 2261). Ideally, these systems should be scrutinized with complementary techniques, such as the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, starspot-crossing anomalies, or asteroseismology, but the measurements will be difficult owing to the relatively faint apparent magnitudes and small transit signals in these systems.

  9. Inclination Distribution of Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragozzine, Darin; K. Team

    2011-09-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope is revealing for the first time valuable constraints on the inclination distribution of planetary systems with the discovery of systems of candidate multiple transiting planets. As an ensemble, the 170 candidate multi-transiting systems discovered by Kepler reveal a large population of 3-4 small nearly-coplanar planets with periods less than 125 days (Lissauer, Ragozzine, et al. 2011). The presence of multiple transiting planets does not measure the true mutual inclinations, but transit timing and duration variations (or lack thereof), multi-Rossiter-McLaughlin, and/or exoplanet mutual events can measure or put good constraints on true mutual inclinations in individual systems (Ragozzine & Holman 2010). I will discuss the recent results from Kepler observations on the inclination distributions of different exoplanet population. I will also discuss a new method for validating candidates in multi-transiting systems that uses the coplanarity of planetary systems to minimize the probability that such candidates are false positives. A summary of our understanding of exoplanetary inclinations and implications for the formation and evolution of planetary systems will also be provided. ESSII SOC: It is possible that I will focus my talk on a detailed analysis of KOI-500, the Kepler system with 5 candidate planets with new results showing that all the candidates are planets and discussing the intricate three-body resonance structure seen in this system. This work is supported by the Institute for Theory and Computation at Harvard University. Kepler was competitively selected as the tenth Discovery mission. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  10. FRACTURE-RESISTANT MONOLITHIC DENTAL CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Methods Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Results Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. Significance The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. PMID:26792623

  11. Evaporation dynamics of water droplets on inclined surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    When a water droplet is gently placed on a flat substrate, particularly which is tilted at an inclined angle, usually there are advancing and receding angles inside the droplet formed by inclination under gravitational force. Evaporation dynamics of an nonspherical inclined droplet at inclinations would deviate from that of a spherical droplet. Here we study on evaporation dynamics rates of inclined droplets by measuring mass changes with time and their lifetimes. We find that the lifetime of an evaporating inclined droplets becomes longer as the gravitational influence becomes stronger. The lifetime depends on the pinning-depinning transitions and the depinning onset times, which are changed by the gravitational influence. This The dependence inclination-induced evaporation behavior would be useful important in understanding evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  12. Measuring social desirability across language and sex: A comparison of Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale factor structures in English and Mandarin Chinese in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kurz, A Solomon; Drescher, Christopher F; Chin, Eu Gene; Johnson, Laura R

    2016-06-01

    Malaysia is a Southeast Asian country in which multiple languages are prominently spoken, including English and Mandarin Chinese. As psychological science continues to develop within Malaysia, there is a need for psychometrically sound instruments that measure psychological phenomena in multiple languages. For example, assessment tools for measuring social desirability could be a useful addition in psychological assessments and research studies in a Malaysian context. This study examined the psychometric performance of the English and Mandarin Chinese versions of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale when used in Malaysia. Two hundred and eighty-three students (64% female; 83% Chinese, 9% Indian) from two college campuses completed the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale in their language of choice (i.e., English or Mandarin Chinese). Proposed factor structures were compared with confirmatory factor analysis, and multiple indicators-multiple causes models were used to examine measurement invariance across language and sex. Factor analyses supported a two-factor structure (i.e., Attribution and Denial) for the measure. Invariance tests revealed the scale was invariant by sex, indicating that social desirability can be interpreted similarly across sex. The scale was partially invariant by language version, with some non-invariance observed within the Denial factor. Non-invariance may be related to differences in the English and Mandarin Chinese languages, as well as cultural differences. Directions for further research include examining the measurement of social desirability in other contexts where both English and Mandarin Chinese are spoken (i.e., China) and further examining the causes of non-invariance on specific items.

  13. Crown ethers in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I.; ...

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basicmore » structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.« less

  14. Crown ethers in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basic structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.

  15. An analytic algorithm to calculate the inclination, ascending node, and semimajor axis of spectroscopic binary orbits using a single speckle measurement and the parallax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docobo, J. A.; Campo, P. P.; Andrade, M.; Horch, E. P.

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that in spectroscopic binary orbits, the inclination, the ascending node, and the semimajor axis remain undetermined, therefore the principal objective of this research is to establish an analytic methodology for the calculation of these parameters for spectroscopic binaries, both single-lined (SB1) and double-lined (SB2). In other words, the goal is to determine their "three-dimensional" orbits using a single speckle measurement ( ρ, θ, t) and the parallax ( π). Moreover, estimates of the individual masses of each system can also be obtained. The proposed algorithm was successfully applied to SB1 systems: YSC 148 (HD 37393) and CHR 225 (HD 34318), and SB2 systems: LSC 1 Aa1,2 (HD 200077) and Mkt 11 Aa, Ab (HD 358). In this late case, previously determined spectroscopic and visual orbits have been used to compare and contrast the results obtained from them with our results. The methodology presented is especially interesting for those cases in which it is only possible to resolve the spectroscopic binary in the zones of maximum angular separation by optical means thereby making it impossible to avail of sufficient observations in order to calculate the visual orbit.

  16. First Results from Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE): Differential Flux Measurements of Energetic Particles in a Highly Inclined Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Palo, S. E.; Kohnert, R.; Gerhardt, D.; Blum, L. W.; Schiller, Q.; Turner, D. L.; Tu, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the National Science Foundation, scheduled for launch into a low-Earth, polar orbit after August 14th, 2012 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. The science objectives of CSSWE are to investigate the relationship of the location, magnitude, and frequency of solar flares to the timing, duration, and energy spectrum of solar energetic particles (SEP) reaching Earth, and to determine the precipitation loss and the evolution of the energy spectrum of radiation belt electrons. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a miniaturization of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). The REPT instrument will fly onboard the NASA/Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft scheduled to launch after August 23rd, 2012 that will go through the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination orbit. CSSWE's REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 10 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3 MeV. Such differential flux measurements have significant science value, and a number of engineering challenges were overcome to enable these clean measurements to be made under the mass and power limits of a CubeSat. The CSSWE is an ideal class project, providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project. We will report the first results from this exciting mission.

  17. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsaperla, Paolo; Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-08-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068-3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only.

  18. Use of IQRF technology for detection of construction inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Pies; Radovan, Hajovsky

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the application of wireless measurement of inclination of objects located at mining dumps. Measurement of inclination uses a set of sensors including a gyroscope, an accelerometer and a magnetometer. Measured data is processed by AHRS algorithm that, once applied, allows getting more precise information on rotation of the object in the area compared to unprocessed data from accelerometer or gyroscope. Measurement chain consists of two parts. The first one is a wireless module reading the data from particular sensors via I2C bus and sends it consequently to a computer that performs evaluation and visualization of inclination. Communication among particular devices is ensured by IQRF technology working within ISM band of 868MHz. Application of this approach for measurement of inclination is a reasonable choice in case of measurement of inclination by inclinometers.

  19. Marginal Fit of CEREC Crowns at Different Finish Line Curvatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    24 Figure 4: Master die abraded with Aluminium Oxide................................................. 24...measurement form the internal surface of the crown margin to the axial wall of the preparation is called the internal gap, and the same measurement at the...Fasbinder, 2010): the addition of a cylinder diamond, enabling the form -grinding of partial and full crowns (CEREC 2); the introduction of a two-bur

  20. Geometric-optical bidirectional reflectance modeling of the discrete crown vegetation canopy - Effect of crown shape and mutual shadowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaowen; Strahler, Alan H.

    1992-01-01

    Many natural vegetation covers can be regarded as assemblages of plant crowns, on a background, which interact with light as discrete objects. On this basis, geometric optics furnish an approach to the modeling of vegetation canopies that captures the most important features of such growths' bidirectional measurements. Attention is presently given to models which approximate these phenomena and relate the size, shape, and count density of plant crowns to viewing and illumination positions and to crown-background reflectance contrasts.

  1. Inclined, collisional sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    We apply the constitutive relations of kinetic theory of granular gases to the transport of cohesionless sediments driven by a gravitational liquid turbulent stream in steady uniform conditions. The sediment-laden flow forms self-equilibrated mechanisms of resistance at the bed surface, below which the sediments are at rest. This geo-physical process takes place quite often in streams at moderate slope and may be interpreted through tools common to fluid mechanics and particle physics. Taking into account the viscous dissipation of the fluctuation energy of the particles, and using approximate methods of integration of the governing differential equations, permit to obtain a set of simple formulas for predicting how depths and flow rates adjust to the angle of inclination of the bed, without requiring additional tuning parameters besides the particle and fluid properties. The agreement with laboratory experiments performed with either plastic cylinders or gravel in water is remarkable. We also provide quantitative criteria to determine the range of validity of the theory, i.e., the values of the Shields number and the angle of inclination of the bed for which the particle stresses can be mostly ascribed to collisional exchange of momentum.

  2. Investigation of distortions around the cervical area of teeth restored with two kinds of crown materials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chikako; Miura, Hiroyuki; Okada, Daizo; Komada, Wataru; Miyasaka, Munenaga; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Masuoka, David

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify crown materials to decrease the stress concentrated at the cervical area of endodontically treated teeth. To this end, 14 extracted human mandibular premolars were divided into two groups for this study: complete cast crowns versus polymer-based crown and bridge material crowns. Both complete cast crowns (MC) and polymer-based crown and bridge material crowns (HC) were cemented with a glycidyl methacrylate-based resin cement (RC) to composite resin cores with glass fiber posts. Static loading was applied and distortion was measured with four pieces of strain gages attached to the marginal area. Findings showed that there was a large difference in distortion between crown and root in MC. On the other hand, distortions at the cervical area of crown and root were similar in HC.

  3. The Gothic arch (needle point) tracing and condylar inclination.

    PubMed

    el-Gheriani, A S; Winstanley, R B

    1987-11-01

    The records of 11 patients referred for treatment of TMJ disorders were used to compare condylar inclination found by drawing a tangent and by using a mathematic technique. Needle point tracing angles were also measured for the same patients and were compared with the condylar inclination. It can be concluded that (1) the mathematic technique outlined records a more accurate condylar angulation, and (2) there is a great variation in condylar inclination values between patients and between left and right sides of the same patient, and (3) there is no direct relationship between condylar inclination and the needle point tracing angle.

  4. The Ballistic Cart on an Incline Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serway, Raymond A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents the theory behind the mechanics demonstration that involves projecting a ball vertically upward from a ballistic cart moving along an inclined plane. The measured overshoot is believed to be due, in part, to the presence of rolling friction and the inertial properties of the cart wheels. (JRH)

  5. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Pablo Santos; Chiarelli, Fabio; Rodrigues, José A.; Shibli, Jamil A.; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey), crown lengthening is the most habitual surgical periodontal treatment. PMID:26609452

  6. Relationships between Migration to Urban Settings and Children's Creative Inclinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Baoguo; Lu, Yongli; Dai, David Yun; Lin, Chongde

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 909 5th- and 6th-grade children were recruited as participants, and questionnaires were used to investigate the relationships between migration to urban settings and children's creative inclinations. The study was broken down to 2 parts. Study 1 compared scores on measures of creative inclinations among migrant, rural, and urban…

  7. Critical inclinations in satellite theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deprit, A.

    1978-01-01

    The main problem of satellite theory is described in polar coordinates by a Hamiltonian function. It is proposed to find a solution of the Hamiltonian function with the following properties: (1) the reference orbit is Keplerian; (2) no restriction is imposed on the eccentricity; in particular, it is exempt of singularities - real or apparent - for small eccentricities; and (3) no restriction is imposed on the inclination; in particular, it is exempt of singularities - real or apparent - for small inclinations; also it is valid even in the neighborhood of inclinations at which the perigee is stationary.

  8. Aurora Australis, Red Crown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights (location unknown) shows a spiked band of red airglow called a 'Red Crown' above the Earth Limb. Calculated to be in the 80 - 120 km altitude region, auroral activity is due to exitation of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere by radiation from the van Allen Radiation Belts and is most common above the 65 degree north and south latitude range during the spring and fall of the year.

  9. Migratory blackcaps can use their magnetic compass at 5 degrees inclination, but are completely random at 0 degrees inclination

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, Susanne; Steenken, Friederike; Thiele, Nadine; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Lefeldt, Nele; Dreyer, David; Schneider, Nils-Lasse; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    It is known that night-migratory songbirds use a magnetic compass measuring the magnetic inclination angle, i.e. the angle between the Earth’s surface and the magnetic field lines, but how do such birds orient at the magnetic equator? A previous study reported that birds are completely randomly oriented in a horizontal north-south magnetic field with 0° inclination angle. This seems counter-intuitive, because birds using an inclination compass should be able to separate the north-south axis from the east-west axis, so that bimodal orientation might be expected in a horizontal field. Furthermore, little is known about how shallow inclination angles migratory birds can still use for orientation. In this study, we tested the magnetic compass orientation of night-migratory Eurasian blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) in magnetic fields with 5° and 0° inclination. At 5° inclination, the birds oriented as well as they did in the normal 67° inclined field in Oldenburg. In contrast, they were completely randomly oriented in the horizontal field, showing no sign of bimodality. Our results indicate that the inclination limit for the magnetic compass of the blackcap is below 5° and that these birds indeed seem completely unable to use their magnetic compass for orientation in a horizontal magnetic field. PMID:27667569

  10. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Buarque e Silva, Wilkens Aurélio; Andrade e Silva, Frederico; De Souza, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM); Bi-layer crowns (BL). Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37 °C), and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = .05) indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM = 3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM = 3561.5 N ± 991.6), which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6). There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength.

  11. An Investigation Into the Integrity of Fit of Provisional Crowns Using Current Proprietary Temporary Crown Materials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip D; Georgakis, Georgios; Niggli, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Three methods of direct provisional crown construction were investigated for accuracy of marginal fit. A modified proprietary crown coping was compared to Bis GMA and isobutyl methacrylate resin provisional crowns with margins modified by using a flowable composite and 'bead on' isobutyl methacrylate respectively. Measurement was at 50x magnification at seven sites over the fit surface. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13.0.1 and measurement compared using the Mann Whitney test set at a significance level of 0.05. Reliability was checked using the Bland Altman test. Statistical significant differences were found between the three groups. The order of best fit was Bis-GMA and flowable composite > isobutyl methacrylate with 'bead on' margins > Bis-GMA modified implant temporary coping. The clinical significance is that the Bis GMA and flowable composite combination can be used with equal confidence to traditional methods of temporarisation.

  12. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified.

  13. The Effect of Changes in Lower Incisor Inclination on Gingival Recession

    PubMed Central

    Kamak, Gulen; Kamak, Hasan; Keklik, Hakan; Gurel, Hakan Gurcan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Orthodontic treatment may promote development of recessions. The mechanism by which orthodontic treatment influences occurrence of recessions remains unclear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a change of mandibular incisor inclination promotes development of labial gingival recessions. Materials and Methods. The study sample comprised dental casts and lateral cephalograms obtained from 109 subjects before orthodontic treatment (Tb) and after orthodontic treatment (Ta). Depending on the change of lower incisor inclination during treatment, the subjects were divided into three groups: Retroclination (R), Stable Position (S), and Proclination (P). The presence of gingival recessions of mandibular incisors and clinical crown heights were assessed on plaster models. Results and Conclusions. From Tb to Ta, Inc_Incl showed a statistically significant change in the R, P, and S groups (p < 0.05). Increase of clinical crown heights of the lower incisors (42, 4, and 31) was not statistically significant in any group. The only statistically significant intergroup difference was the greater increase of the clinical crown height of tooth number 32 in the P group in comparison with the R group (p = 0.049). The change of lower incisor inclination during treatment did not lead to development of labial gingival recessions in the study sample. PMID:25961071

  14. INTERNAL ADAPTATION OF CAST TITANIUM CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Sicknan Soares; Adabo, Gelson Luis; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Fonseca, Renata Garcia

    2007-01-01

    As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm). For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height) was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430°C, 515°C and 600°C. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3) for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X) and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm2). The data for each experimental condition (n=8) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05). The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD) of internal misfit were obtained for the 430°C/100%: (7.25 mm2 ±1.59) and 600°C/100% (8.8 mm2 ±2.25) groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit. PMID:19089139

  15. Bursts in inclined layer convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, F. H.; Clever, R. M.

    2000-08-01

    A new instability of longitudinal rolls in an inclined fluid layer heated from below is analyzed in the case of the Prandtl number P=0.71. The instability assumes the form of subharmonic undulations and evolves into a spatially chaotic pattern when the angle of inclination is of the order of 20°. The chaotic state rapidly decays and longitudinal rolls recover until the next burst of chaotic convection occurs. The theoretical findings closely correspond to recent experimental observations by Daniels et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. (to be published)].

  16. Two scenarios for avalanche dynamics in inclined granular layers.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2005-05-27

    We report experimental measurements of avalanche behavior of thin granular layers on an inclined plane for low volume flow rate. The dynamical properties of avalanches were quantitatively and qualitatively different for smooth glass beads compared to irregular granular materials such as sand. Two scenarios for granular avalanches on an incline are identified, and a theoretical explanation for these different scenarios is developed based on a depth-averaged approach that takes into account the differing rheologies of the granular materials.

  17. High-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA) of quasistatic contact angles on silanized silicon wafers with different surface topographies during inclining-plate measurements: Influence of the surface roughness on the contact line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heib, F.; Hempelmann, R.; Munief, W. M.; Ingebrandt, S.; Fug, F.; Possart, W.; Groß, K.; Schmitt, M.

    2015-07-01

    Contact angles and wetting of solid surfaces are strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. These influence quantities are difficult to distinguish from each other if contact angle measurements are performed by measuring only the advancing θa and the receding θr contact angle. In this regard, time-dependent water contact angles are measured on two hydrophobic modified silicon wafers with different physical surface topographies. The first surface is nearly atomically flat while the second surface is patterned (alternating flat and nanoscale rough patterns) which is synthesized by a photolithography and etching procedure. The different surface topographies are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The resulting set of contact angle data obtained by the high-precision drop shape analysis approach is further analyzed by a Gompertzian fitting procedure and a statistical counting procedure in dependence on the triple line velocity. The Gompertzian fit is used to analyze overall properties of the surface and dependencies between the motion on the front and the back edge of the droplets. The statistical counting procedure results in the calculation of expectation values E(p) and standard deviations σ(p) for the inclination angle φ, contact angle θ, triple line velocity vel and the covered distance of the triple line dis relative to the first boundary points XB,10. Therefore, sessile drops during the inclination of the sample surface are video recorded and different specific contact angle events in dependence on the acceleration/deceleration of the triple line motion are analyzed. This procedure results in characteristically density distributions in dependence on the surface properties. The used procedures lead to the possibility to investigate influences on contact

  18. Retention force of secondary crowns to copings after temporary cementation: the effect of crown material and luting agent.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Torsten; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Golecki, Gudrun; Schwahn, Christian; Biffar, Reiner

    2010-12-01

    Tooth-implant supported restorations can be temporarily cemented if the natural abutments are protected by permanently cemented copings. This in vitro study investigated the retention forces of pure titanium crowns to milled titanium alloy copings and of cobalt-chromium crowns to copings made of electroplated gold after cementation with different luting agents. Five specimens per group were cemented with acrylic-urethane cement (inner crown surface preisolated with petroleum jelly) and provisional zinc oxide cement. The retention was measured using a universal testing machine and a dental device for crown removal. The differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance. The pull-off forces for the cobalt-chromium secondary crowns cemented on gold copings using zinc oxide cement were significantly higher (mean=144.5 N) than the other crown-cement combinations (32.2-54.4 N), which showed no significant differences in the retention force. The impulse number and magnitude of the dental device was usually low and showed no substantial differences between the crown-cement combinations. It can be concluded that the results of the clinical removal method for prostheses differ from the results of the pull-off test. The question which luting agent is the better choice for retrievable restorations remains unanswered without further clinical and laboratory studies.

  19. Crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Dung, S Z; Yang, Y H

    2000-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to characterize the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese; (2) to compare the differences in the deciduous crown diameters between different populations. The results might provide odontometric information in making preformed stainless steel crowns of the Chinese population. Study casts of 90 children (51 boys and 39 girls) of aged 3 to 6 years were used in this study. The maximum mesiodistal crown diameter (the greatest distance between the contact points of the approximal surfaces) and the buccolingual crown diameter (the greatest distance at a right angle to the mesiodistal measurement) were obtained by using an electronic digital caliper. Significant differences between antimeres were found in the mesiodistal diameters of maxillary canine and maxillary molars (p < 0.001) as well as in the buccolingual diameters of mandibular molars (p < 0.05). Excellent correlations between the antimeres of the corresponding teeth were found (r = 0.70 to 0.96). Boys generally had larger crown diameters than girls with the exception of mesiodistal diameters of maxillary and mandibular canines, and mandibular lateral incisor, whereas the statistically significant gender difference was only found in the buccolingual diameter of mandibular second molar (p < 0.05). The higher the percentage of sexual dimorphism, the larger the gender differences. The percentage of sexual dimorphism ranged from 0.09 to 1.94 for mesiodistal diameters and 0.04 to 2.86 for buccolingual diameters. The mandibular second molar was the most dimorphic tooth. Variations in the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth existed among and within different populations. Deciduous mesiodistal crown diameters of Taiwanese were, in general, smaller than those of Australian aborigines, Taiwan Chinese aborigines, and Hong Kong Chinese, but larger than those of American whites. When considering the buccolingual crown diameters, our data were significantly smaller than those

  20. Turner syndrome isochromosome karyotype correlates with decreased dental crown width.

    PubMed

    Rizell, S; Barrenäs, M-L; Andlin-Sobocki, A; Stecksén-Blicks, C; Kjellberg, H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this project was to study possible influences of Turner syndrome (TS) karyotype and the number of X chromosomes with intact short arm (p-arm) on dental crown width. Primary and permanent mesio-distal crown width was measured on plaster casts from 112 TS females. The influence on crown width of four karyotypes: 1. monosomy (45,X), 2. mosaic (45,X/46,XX), 3. isochromosome, and 4. other, and the number of intact X chromosomal p-arms were investigated. In comparisons between karyotypes, statistically significant differences were found for isochromosome karyotype maxillary second premolars, canines, laterals, mandibular first premolars, and canines, indicating that this karyotype was the most divergent as shown by the most reduced crown width. When each karyotype group were compared versus controls, all teeth in the isochromosome group were significantly smaller than controls (P < 0.01-0.001). The 45,X/46,XX karyotype expressed fewer and smaller differences from controls, while 45,X individuals seemed to display an intermediate tooth width compared with 45,X/46,XX and isochromosomes. No significant difference in crown width was found comparing the groups with one or two intact X chromosomal p-arms. Both primary and permanent teeth proved to have a significantly smaller crown width in the entire group of TS females compared to healthy females. We conclude that the isochromosome group deviates most from other karyotypes and controls, exhibiting the smallest dental crown width, while individuals with 45,X/46,XX mosaicism seemed to have a less affected crown width. An influence of the number of intact p-arms on crown width could not be demonstrated in this study.

  1. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ∼2-2.5 km s{sup –1}. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84{sub −20}{sup +6} deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of ψ=4{sub −4}{sup +18} considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45{sub −19}{sup +9}, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s{sup –1}.

  2. Evaluation of marginal fit of 2 CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Park, Ji-Hee; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Oh, Gye-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the marginal fit of two CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems compared to lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shoulder and deep chamfer margin were formed on each acrylic resin tooth model of a maxillary first premolar. Two CAD-CAM systems (Prettau®Zirconia and ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max®press) crowns were made (n=16). Each crown was bonded to stone dies with resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Marginal gap and absolute marginal discrepancy of crowns were measured using a light microscope equipped with a digital camera (Leica DFC295) magnified by a factor of 100. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's HSD test were conducted to analyze the significance of crown marginal fit regarding the finish line configuration and the fabrication system. RESULTS The mean marginal gap of lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) was significantly lower than that of the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) (P<.05). Both fabrication systems and finish line configurations significantly influenced the absolute marginal discrepancy (P<.05). CONCLUSION The lithium disilicate glass ceramic crown (IPS e.max®press) had significantly smaller marginal gap than the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia). In terms of absolute marginal discrepancy, the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) had under-extended margin, whereas the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) had overextended margins. PMID:26330973

  3. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Crown Galls Host Distinct Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Faist, Hanna; Keller, Alexander; Hentschel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    other Agrobacterium species were found to be avirulent, even though they lived together with A. vitis in the same crown gall tumor. As has been reported for human cancer, the crown gall tumor also hosted opportunistic bacteria that are adapted to the tumor microenvironment. Characterization of the microbiota in various diseases using amplicon sequencing may help in early diagnosis, to serve as a preventative measure of disease in the future. PMID:27371584

  4. Heliospheric current sheet inclinations predicted from source surface maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shodhan, S.; Crooker, N. U.; Hughes, W. J.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    The inclinations of the neutral line at the ecliptic plane derived from source surface model maps of coronal fields are measured for the interval from June 1976 to March 1992. The mean and median values of 53 deg and 57 deg are close to the average inclinations determined earlier from minimum variance analyses of solar wind measurements at sector boundaries, but the mode falls in the 80 deg - 90 deg bin. This result, which is based on the model assumptions implicit in deriving the source surface maps, predicts that the heliospheric current sheet typically intersects the ecliptic plane nearly at right angles, even without steepening by stream interaction regions. High inclinations dominate the solar cycle for about 7 years around solar maximum. Dips to lower inclination occur near solar minimum, but high variance admits a wide range of inclinations throughout the cycle. Compared to the smooth solar cycle variation of the maximum latitudinal excursion of the neutral line, often treated as the tilt angle of a flat heliospheric current sheet, the noisy variation of the inclinations reflects the degree to which the neutral line deviates from a sine wave, implying warps and corrugations in the current sheet. About a third of the time the neutral line so deviates that it doubles back in longitude.

  5. INCLINATION MIXING IN THE CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu

    2011-07-20

    We investigate the long-term evolution of the inclinations of the known classical and resonant Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This is partially motivated by the observed bimodal inclination distribution and by the putative physical differences between the low- and high-inclination populations. We find that some classical KBOs undergo large changes in inclination over gigayear timescales, which means that a current member of the low-inclination population may have been in the high-inclination population in the past, and vice versa. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the time variability of inclinations are predominantly distant encounters with Neptune and chaotic diffusion near the boundaries of mean motion resonances. We reassess the correlations between inclination and physical properties including inclination time variability. We find that the size-inclination and color-inclination correlations are less statistically significant than previously reported (mostly due to the increased size of the data set since previous works with some contribution from inclination variability). The time variability of inclinations does not change the previous finding that binary classical KBOs have lower inclinations than non-binary objects. Our study of resonant objects in the classical Kuiper Belt region includes objects in the 3:2, 7:4, 2:1, and eight higher-order mean motion resonances. We find that these objects (some of which were previously classified as non-resonant) undergo larger changes in inclination compared to the non-resonant population, indicating that their current inclinations are not generally representative of their original inclinations. They are also less stable on gigayear timescales.

  6. Plume impingement forces on inclined flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, H.

    Plume impingement from spacecraft control thrusters on vehicles in space is simulated in wind tunnel scale experiments. Pressure and shear stress are measured on flat plates inclined to the plume axis between 0 and 90 deg. In addition to a nozzle of a 0.5N thruster, a free jet from a thin plate orifice was used, by which the flow regime from nearly free molecular flow to continuum flow was covered. Simple pressure and shear stress laws are given by which the impingement pressure and shear stress can be estimated for engineering applications.

  7. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fits of complete crowns loaded at the central fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1995-05-01

    In dentistry, a defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry was applied to evaluate the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different materials (Au alloy, Pd-Ag alloy, Ni-Cr alloy, and porcelain fused to metal) were tested. The out-of-plane displacements of the crown specimens were measured by the method of multiple observations. The displacements measured range from 6 to 10 micrometers under normal load (25 N). However, the marginal openings of all four crowns were estimated to be less than 0.2 micrometers . In addition the defect of the crown was examined.

  8. 46 CFR 28.535 - Inclining test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inclining test. 28.535 Section 28.535 Shipping COAST... VESSELS Stability § 28.535 Inclining test. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... order to do the calculations required in this subpart must have an inclining test performed. (b)...

  9. 46 CFR 28.535 - Inclining test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inclining test. 28.535 Section 28.535 Shipping COAST... VESSELS Stability § 28.535 Inclining test. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... order to do the calculations required in this subpart must have an inclining test performed. (b)...

  10. Synthesis and fluorescence properties of divalent europium-poly(methacrylate containing crown ether structure) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiyama, N.; Nakamura, H.; Mishima, T.; Shiokawa, J.; Adachi, G. )

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on divalent europium complexes with poly(methacrylate containing crown ether structure)s, poly(crown ether)s, prepared and their fluorescence properties studied. The polymers used were poly(15-crown-5-methyl methacrylate) (PMA15C5), copoly(15- crown-5-methyl methacrylate-X) (copoly(MA15C5-X)); (X = MMA, EMA, BMA, 2-methoxyethyl methacrylate (MAGI) 3,6,9,12,15- pentaoxahexadecyl methacrylate (MAG5)), poly(18-crown-6- methyl methacrylate) (PMA18C6), and copoly(18-crown-6-methyl methacrylate-MMA) (copoly(MA18C6-MMA)), which were obtained by bulk polymerization. The fluorescence properties of Eu{sup 2+} polymers activated by complexing Eu{sup 2+} ions with crown ether groups were measured in powder form. The Eu{sup 2+}-poly (crown ether)s irradiated by UV light generally gave blue bright emission in the region of 420-465 nm. It was Eu{sup 2+}-copoly(Ma15C5-X); (X = MMA, EMA, and MAG1) that showed the largest emission intensity among the Eu{sup 2+} polymers, and its emission intensity was ca. 20% of that for CaWO{sub 4}:Pb (NBS1026) whose quantum efficiency is about 76%. The intensities of emission for the Eu{sup 2+} polymers containing 15-crown-5 were much larger than that for the ones containing 18-crown-6.

  11. The Photometric and Kinematic Structure of Face-on Disk Galaxies. III. Kinematic Inclinations from Hα Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained Hα velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i kin = 23° for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20° and 6% at 30°. Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical "face-on" Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15° and 5% at 30°. This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  12. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above 4×1018 eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-08-26

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding 4×1018 eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above 5.3×1018 eV, the ``ankle'', the flux can be described by a power law E–γ with index γ=2.70 ± 0.02 (stat) ± 0.1 (sys) followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy (Es) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value inmore » the absence of suppression, we find Es=(5.12±0.25 (stat)+1.0–1.2 (sys))×1019 eV.« less

  13. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fit of complete crowns loaded at central fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1993-07-01

    In dentistry, the defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry is applied to study the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different casting materials (Au, Pd-Ag, Ni-Cr, and PFM) were tested. The horizontal displacements of two points near the margin, measured by the method of multiple observations, could be as large as 15 micrometers under normal load (25 kgw). However, the marginal discrepancy of all four crowns estimated were quite small (< 0.2 micrometers ). This also indicates that the cementation between the crown and the tooth is quite good. Nevertheless, when the load was increased to 45 kgw, a defect of cementation was found on the Pd-Ag crown.

  14. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above 4 × 10{sup 18} eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration: Pierre Augur Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding 4×10{sup 18} eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above 5.3×10{sup 18} eV, the ''ankle'', the flux can be described by a power law E{sup −γ} with index γ=2.70 ± 0.02 (stat) ± 0.1 (sys) followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy (E{sub s}) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find E{sub s}=(5.12±0.25 (stat){sup +1.0}{sub −1.2} (sys))×10{sup 19} eV.

  15. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above 4×1018 eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-08-26

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding 4×1018 eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above 5.3×1018 eV, the ``ankle'', the flux can be described by a power law E–γ with index γ=2.70 ± 0.02 (stat) ± 0.1 (sys) followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy (Es) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find Es=(5.12±0.25 (stat)+1.0–1.2 (sys))×1019 eV.

  16. Legged-locomotion on inclined granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieser, Jennifer; Qian, Feifei; Goldman, Daniel

    Animals traverse a wide variety of complex environments, including situations in which the ground beneath them can yield (e.g. dry granular media in desert dunes). Locomotion strategies that are effective on level granular media can fail when traversing a granular slope. Taking inspiration from successful legged-locomotors in sandy, uneven settings, we explore the ability of a small (15 cm long, 100 g), six-c-shaped legged robot to run uphill in a bed of 1-mm-diameter poppy seeds, using an alternating tripod gait. Our fully automated experiments reveal that locomotor performance can depend sensitively on both environmental parameters such as the inclination angle and volume fraction of the substrate, and robot morphology and control parameters like leg shape, step frequency, and the friction between the feet of the robot and the substrate. We assess performance by measuring the average speed of the robot, and we find that the robot tends to perform better at higher step frequency and lower inclination angles, and that average speed decreases more rapidly with increasing angle for higher step frequency.

  17. [An automatic extraction algorithm for individual tree crown projection area and volume based on 3D point cloud data].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Heng; Feng, Zhong-Ke; Su, Zhi-Fang; Xu, Hui; Jiao, You-Quan; Deng, Ou

    2014-02-01

    Tree crown projection area and crown volume are the important parameters for the estimation of biomass, tridimensional green biomass and other forestry science applications. Using conventional measurements of tree crown projection area and crown volume will produce a large area of errors in the view of practical situations referring to complicated tree crown structures or different morphological characteristics. However, it is difficult to measure and validate their accuracy through conventional measurement methods. In view of practical problems which include complicated tree crown structure, different morphological characteristics, so as to implement the objective that tree crown projection and crown volume can be extracted by computer program automatically. This paper proposes an automatic untouched measurement based on terrestrial three-dimensional laser scanner named FARO Photon120 using plane scattered data point convex hull algorithm and slice segmentation and accumulation algorithm to calculate the tree crown projection area. It is exploited on VC+6.0 and Matlab7.0. The experiments are exploited on 22 common tree species of Beijing, China. The results show that the correlation coefficient of the crown projection between Av calculated by new method and conventional method A4 reaches 0.964 (p<0.01); and the correlation coefficient of tree crown volume between V(VC) derived from new method and V(C) by the formula of a regular body is 0.960 (p<0.001). The results also show that the average of V(C) is smaller than that of V(VC) at the rate of 8.03%, and the average of A4 is larger than that of A(V) at the rate of 25.5%. Assumed Av and V(VC) as ture values, the deviations of the new method could be attributed to irregularity of the crowns' silhouettes. Different morphological characteristics of tree crown led to measurement error in forest simple plot survey. Based on the results, the paper proposes that: (1) the use of eight-point or sixteen-point projection with

  18. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Silva, Wilkens Aurélio Buarque e; Silva, Frederico Andrade e; De Souza, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM); Bi-layer crowns (BL). Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37°C), and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = .05) indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM = 3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM = 3561.5 N ± 991.6), which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6). There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength. PMID:26576423

  19. Wear of posterior metal-free polymer crowns after 2 years.

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, B; Trame, J-P; Dreyhaupt, J; Gabbert, O; Koob, A; Rammelsberg, P

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical wear behaviour of posterior, metal-free polymer crowns and to compare it with that of metal-ceramic crowns. After randomization, a total of 120 single crowns were set in posterior teeth. These 120 crowns were divided into three groups: 40 polymer crowns with a glass-fibre framework (group 1), 40 polymer crowns without framework stabilization (group 2) and 40 metal-ceramic crowns (control group). Wear was measured by use of gypsum replicas and a 3D laser scanner at baseline and after 2 years. Statistical analysis was performed by use of a mixed-effects regression model. The mean total wear of posterior single crowns was -19.0 mum (+/- 18.5 microm) in group 1, -24.3 microm (+/- 31.5 microm) in group 2 and -7.0 microm (+/- 8.8 microm) in the control group. Statistical analysis revealed the mean total wear of the polymer crowns in groups 1 (P < or = 0.01) and 2 (P < or = 0.01) was significantly greater than in the control group. No significant difference was detected between groups 1 and 2 (P = 0.58). Age, gender and opposing teeth had no significant effect on wear behaviour.

  20. In-cylinder flows of a motored four-stroke engine with flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.F.; Yang, H.S.; Yeh, C.-N.

    2008-04-15

    The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the in-cylinder flow structures and turbulence intensities in the symmetry and offset planes of a motored four-valve, four-stroke engine during the intake and compression strokes are diagnosed by using a particle image velocimeter. Two pistons of different crown shapes (flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons) are studied. The inception, establishment, and evolution of the tumbling vortical flow structures during the intake and compression strokes are clearly depicted. Quantitative strengths of the rotating vortical flow motions are presented by a dimensionless parameter, the tumble ratio, which can represent the mean angular velocity of the vortices in the target plane. The turbulence intensity of the in-cylinder flow is also calculated by using the measured time-varying velocity data. The results show that the flat-crown piston induces higher bulk-averaged tumble ratio and turbulence intensity than the slightly concave-crown piston does because the tumble ratio and turbulence generated by the flat-crown piston in the offset planes during the compression stroke are particularly large. The engine with the flat-crown piston also presents larger torque and power outputs and lower hydrocarbon emission than that with the slightly concave-crown piston. This might be caused by the enhanced combustion in the engine cylinder due to the stronger tumble ratio and turbulence intensity. (author)

  1. Fitting accuracy and fracture resistance of crowns using a hybrid zirconia frame made of both porous and dense zirconia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Sugano, Tsuyoshi; Usami, Hirofumi; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Sekino, Tohru; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the fitting accuracy and fracture resistance of crowns using a hybrid zirconia frame made of both porous and dense zirconia. Commercial semi-sintered zirconia, sintered dense zirconia and sintered hybrid zirconia were used. Sintered zirconia was milled using the CAD/CAM system, and semi-sintered zirconia was milled and sintered to fabricate molar crown frames. Completed frames were veneered with tooth-colored porcelain. The marginal and internal gaps between frames/crowns and abutments were measured. Each crown specimen was subjected to a fracture test. There were no significant differences in marginal and internal gap among all the frames and crowns. The crown with the hybrid zirconia frame had a 31-35% greater fracture load than that with the commercial or dense zirconia frame (p<0.01). This suggests that the all-ceramic crowns with a hybrid zirconia frame have a high fracture resistance.

  2. Drop motion due to oscillations of an inclined substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2014-11-01

    A sessile drop on a stationary inclined substrate remains pinned unless the angle of inclination is greater than some critical value. Alternatively, when shaken at even small angles of inclination, the drop undergoes shape deflections which may lead to drop translation. Translation occurs when large contact angle fluctuations, favored by oscillations at resonance, overcome contact angle hysteresis. In this study, resonance is triggered by substrate-normal oscillations. The drop translation is typically observed to be of constant speed for a given set of parameters. The speed is measured experimentally as a function of resonance mode, driving amplitude and drop volume. This technique of activating the motion of drops having a particular volume can be utilized for applications of droplet selection and transport.

  3. Effects of lumbar extensor fatigue and surface inclination on postural control during quiet stance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dingding; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2012-11-01

    A number of work environments require workers to perform tasks on inclined surfaces. Such tasks, along with muscle fatigue, can impair postural control and increase falling risks. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of surface inclination angle, standing direction, and lumbar extensor fatigue on postural control during quiet standing. A group of 16 young, healthy participants were tested while standing on inclined surfaces before and after lumbar extensor fatigue (induced by repetitive isotonic exercise). Three inclination angles (0°, 18° and 26°) and three standing directions (uphill, downhill, and lateral facing) were examined. Postural control was assessed using several measures derived from center-of-pressure time series and subjectively perceived stability. Significant main and interactive effects of inclination angle and standing direction were found for all dependent measures. The adverse effects of standing on inclined surfaces were found to differ between the three standing directions. In general, dose-response relationships with inclination angle were evident, particularly in the lateral-facing direction. Fatigue-related effects differed between conditions, suggesting that the adverse effect of lumbar extensor fatigue on postural control depend on inclination angle and standing direction. These findings may facilitate the development of fall prevention interventions for work involving inclined surfaces.

  4. Inclination flattening and the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, Lisa

    2005-05-01

    model. The method can be tested using sediments deposited in a known field. Application of the elongation/inclination correction method to two magnetostratigraphic data sets from red beds in Asia and Pakistan brings the inclinations into agreement with those predicted from modern GPS measurements and from global paleomagnetic data. There appears to be no compelling reason at this time to abandon the geocentric dipole hypothesis, which has provided such an excellent working model for so long.

  5. Lower incisor inclination regarding different reference planes.

    PubMed

    Zataráin, Brenda; Avila, Josué; Moyaho, Angeles; Carrasco, Rosendo; Velasco, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of lower incisor inclination with respect to different reference planes. It was an observational, analytical, longitudinal, prospective study conducted on 100 lateral cephalograms which were corrected according to the photograph in natural head position in order to draw the true vertical plane (TVP). The incisor mandibular plane angle (IMPA) was compensated to eliminate the variation of the mandibular plane growth type with the formula "FMApx.- 25 (FMA) + IMPApx. = compensated IMPA (IMPACOM)". As the data followed normal distribution determined by the KolmogorovSmirnov test, parametric tests were used for the statistical analysis, Ttest, ANOVA and Pearson coefficient correlation test. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical significance of p <0.05. There is correlation between TVP and NB line (NB) (0.8614), Frankfort mandibular incisor angle (FMIA) (0.8894), IMPA (0.6351), Apo line (Apo) (0.609), IMPACOM (0.8895) and McHorris angle (MH) (0.7769). ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the means for the 7 variables with 95% confidence level, P=0.0001. The multiple range test showed no significant difference among means: APoNB (0.88), IMPAMH (0.36), IMPANB (0.65), FMIAIMPACOM (0.01), FMIATVP (0.18), TVPIMPACOM (0.17). There was correlation among all reference planes. There were statistically significant differences among the means of the planes measured, except for IMPACOM, FMIA and TVP. The IMPA differed significantly from the IMPACOM. The compensated IMPA and the FMIA did not differ significantly from the TVP. The true horizontal plane was mismatched with Frankfort plane in 84% of the sample with a range of 19°. The true vertical plane is adequate for measuring lower incisor inclination.

  6. Chipping resistance of graded zirconia ceramics for dental crowns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Chai, H; Lee, J J-W; Lawn, B R

    2012-03-01

    A serious drawback of veneering porcelains is a pronounced susceptibility to chipping. Glass-infiltrated dense zirconia structures can now be produced with esthetic quality, making them an attractive alternative. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that such infiltrated structures are much more chip-resistant than conventional porcelains, and at least as chip-resistant as non-infiltrated zirconia. A sharp indenter was used to produce chips in flat and anatomically correct glass-infiltrated zirconia crown materials, and critical loads were measured as a function of distance from the specimen edge (flat) or side wall (crown). Control data were obtained on zirconia specimens without infiltration and on crowns veneered with porcelains. The results confirmed that the resistance to chipping in graded zirconia is more than 4 times higher than that of porcelain-veneered zirconia and is at least as high as that of non-veneered zirconia.

  7. Optimum inclination for shuttle retrieval of inclination non-sensitive satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A study to identify the optimum inclination for a satellite when the satellite is inclination non-sensitive and is to be retrieved is reported. This inclination is such that it provides an opportunity for a retrieval flight at least once each day with minimal on-orbit phasing requirements and minimal ascent performance losses.

  8. Crown dimensions of the maxillary molars in Tupaia glis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Hanamura, H; Wakatsuki, E

    1994-03-01

    The crown dimensions of the maxillary molars in Tupaia glis were measured, and the most common molar size sequence was M1 > M2 > M3. The M2 and M3 molars were smaller than the M1 in the mesiodistal crown diameters. With regard to the buccolingual diameters, the distal part of M1 and mesial part of M2 were relatively larger and less variable in size. This stable area corresponded to the inflection point of the maxillary arch curve. These results could be explained from a functional morphological standpoint.

  9. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  10. Cooperativity of dynamics of 18-crown-6 molecule forming one-dimensional chain in Cs2(18-crown-6)3[Ni(dmit)2]2.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Satoaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Takeda, Sadamu; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Sadafumi; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Saito, Kazuya

    2005-07-22

    Heat capacity of Cs2(18-crown-6)3[Ni(dmit)2]2 was measured by adiabatic calorimetry. A broad thermal anomaly was observed around 225 K. The entropy gain (about 52 J K(-1) mol(-1)) is much larger than that expected for twofold disordering of 18-crown-6 assumed in the previous structure analysis. The shape of thermal anomaly was qualitatively explained by a linear Ising model developed for cooperative disordering in polymers. The 18-crown-6 molecules forming a one-dimensional chain in the crystal are orientationally disordered with moderate cooperativity.

  11. [Sunrise gold foil jacket crown].

    PubMed

    Lecardonnel, A

    1989-09-01

    This technique permits the preparation of ceramic jacket crowns made on Sunrise laminated precious metal alloy. The Sunrise foil is gold-colored, made of 99% of precious metals and is 50 microns thick. The die is prepared in order to display a moderate and regular undercut beyond the cervical limit. The margin will be underlined with a red pencil. The Sunrise foil is cut according to predetermined templates. Then the foil is applied without burnishing, according to the technique of jacket crowns on platinum foil only by finger pressure. The double folding on closure is preferably done distally or mesially. Then, the metal base is disinserted, sandblasted with 100 microns aluminum oxide, replaced on its die, and placed in a rubber casing before being placed in the isostatic press, to be subjected to a pressure of 2,000 TSI (14 kg par cm2). Sunrise's orange color reinforces rather subtetly the overall color, making these reconstructions particularly esthetic. The color of the Sunrise metal does not require, therefore a too thick opaque. Any ceramic intended to be fired on a metal base, may be used in respecting its firing protocol. Sunrise, as any other technique of this type, require a careful preparation with a shoulder that has a rounded gingivoaxial line angle. Bridges may be built on the "thimbles" crowns, fitted on Sunrise cores, the pontics being made as a ceramo-metal framework.

  12. Changes in posture through the use of simple inclines with notebook computers placed on a standard desk.

    PubMed

    Asundi, Krishna; Odell, Dan; Luce, Adam; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the use of simple inclines as a portable peripheral for improving head and neck postures during notebook computer use on tables in portable environments such as hotel rooms, cafés, and airport lounges. A 3D motion analysis system measured head, neck and right upper extremity postures of 15 participants as they completed a 10 min computer task in six different configurations, all on a fixed height desk: no-incline, 12° incline, 25° incline, no-incline with external mouse, 25° incline with an external mouse, and a commercially available riser with external mouse and keyboard. After completion of the task, subjects rated the configuration for comfort and ease of use and indicated perceived discomfort in several body segments. Compared to the no-incline configuration, use of the 12° incline reduced forward head tilt and neck flexion while increasing wrist extension. The 25° incline further reduced head tilt and neck flexion while further increasing wrist extension. The 25° incline received the lowest comfort and ease of use ratings and the highest perceived discomfort score. For portable, temporary computing environments where internal input devices are used, users may find improved head and neck postures with acceptable wrist extension postures with the utilization of a 12° incline.

  13. Inclination Excitation in Compact Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Adams, Fred C.

    2015-05-01

    The Kepler Mission has detected dozens of compact planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of close-packed planetary systems with relatively little spread in the inclination angles of the inferred orbits. We have explored the effectiveness of dynamical mechanisms in exciting orbital inclination in this class of solar systems. The two mechanisms we discuss are self-excitation of orbital inclination in initially (nearly) coplanar planetary systems and perturbations by additional unseen larger bodies in the outer regions of the solar systems. For both of these scenarios, we determine the regimes of parameter space for which orbital inclination can be effectively excited. For compact planetary systems with the observed architectures, we find that the orbital inclination angles are not spread out appreciably through self-excitation, resulting in a negligible scatter in impact parameter and a subsequently stable transiting system. In contrast, companions in the outer solar system can be effective in driving variations of the inclination angles of the inner planetary orbits, leading to significant scatter in impact parameter and resultantly non-transiting systems. We present the results of our study, the regimes in which each excitation method - self-excitation of inclination and excitation by a perturbing secondary - are relevant, and the magnitude of the effects.

  14. Experimental free convection heat transfer from inclined square cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Natural convection from axisymmetric objects such as vertical or horizontal cylinders and spheres are two dimensional. However, for inclined circular or noncircular cylinders the flow and heat transfer is three dimensional and hence more complex and needs more attention. This study investigates the steady state mechanism of natural convection from inclined square cylinders in air. Five different cylinders of 1 m length, 8 × 8, 7 × 7, 6 × 6, 4 × 4 and 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 cross sections are used. The cylinders are heated using inserted heating element of 6 mm in diameter. Self-adhesive thermocouples are used at the upper, bottom and at one side of the cylinders for temperature measurement. Three inclination angles to the horizontal 30, 45 and 60o are used for each cylinder with uniform heat flux boundary conditions. For each cylinder, about ten heat fluxes are used to generate the heat transfer data. Local and average heat transfer coefficient is determined for each cylinder at each inclination angle for each uniform heat flux. Laminar and transition to turbulent regimes are obtained and characterized. Local critical axial distance where heat transfer coefficient changes the mode is obtained for each heat flux. Local and averaged Nusselt numbers are correlated with the modified Rayleigh numbers for all angles.

  15. Analysis of aerodynamic noise generated from inclined circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haramoto, Yasutake; Yasuda, Shouji; Matsuzaki, Kazuyoshi; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2000-06-01

    Making clear the generation mechanism of fluid dynamic noise is essential to reduce noise deriving from turbomachinery. The analysis of the aerodynamic noise generated from circular cylinder is carried out numerically and experimentally in a low noise wind tunnel. In this study, aerodynamic sound radiated from a circular cylinder in uniform flow is predicted numerically by the following two step method. First, the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved using the high order accurate upwind scheme. Next, the sound pressure level at the observed point is calculated from the fluctuating surface pressure on the cylinder, based on modified Lighthill-Curl’s equation. It is worth to note that the noise generated from the model is reduced rapidly when it is inclined against the mean flow. In other words, the peak level of the radiated noise decreases rapidly with inclination of the circular cylinder. The simulated SPL for the inclined circular cylinder is compared with the measured value, and good agreement is obtained for the peak spectrum frequency of the sound pressure level and tendency of noise reduction. So we expect that the change of flow structures makes reduction of the aerodynamic noise from the inclined models.

  16. Slip Potential for Commonly Used Inclined Grated Metal Walkways

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Jonisha P.; Heberger, John R.; Dempsey, Patrick G.

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific guidelines or regulations are provided by the Mine Safety and Health Administration for the use of inclined grated metal walkways in mining plants. Mining and other companies may be using walkway materials that do not provide sufficient friction, contributing to slip and fall injuries. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there are significant differences in the required friction for different grated metal walkways during walking in diverse conditions. Methods The normalized coefficients of friction were measured for 12 participants while walking up and down an instrumented walkway with different inclinations (0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°) and with and without the presence of a contaminant (glycerol). Self-reported slip events were recorded and the required coefficients of friction were calculated considering only the anterior/posterior components of the shear forces. Additionally, the available coefficients of friction for these walkway materials were measured at the 0° orientation using a tribometer, with and without the presence of the contaminant, using a boot heel as well as Neolite as the test feet. Results The number of slips increased when the inclination angle reached 10° and above. Of all materials tested, the diamond weave grating was found to have the best performance at all inclines and when contaminated or dry. A high number of slips occurred for the perforated grating and serrated bar grating at 20° when contaminated. Conclusions Results of this study suggest that the diamond weave grating provides significantly better friction compared to serrated bar and perforated gratings, especially at inclines greater than 10°. PMID:26779388

  17. [Artificial crowns influence upon edge parodontium status].

    PubMed

    Zhulev, E N; Serov, A B

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of prosthetic treatment efficacy increase study of edge parodontium tissue reaction upon different types of artificial crowns was done and methods of chronic localized parodontitis prevention were developed. Changes of the main gingival fluid characteristics (amount, acidity, interleukine-1beta concentration) and indicators of microcirculation in edge parodontium of the teeth under the artificial crowns influence were disclosed. There were developed methods of chronic localized parodontitis prevention produced by artificial crowns edge.

  18. Effects of crown retrieval on implants and the surrounding bone: a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Server Mutluay; Yurekli, Emel; Güven, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to observe stress concentration in the implant, the surrounding bone, and other components under the pull-out force during the crown removal. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two 3-dimensional models of implant-supported conventional metal ceramic crowns were digitally constructed. One model was designed as a vertically placed implant (3.7 mm × 10 mm) with a straight abutment, and the other model was designed as a 30-degree inclined implant (3.7 mm × 10 mm) with an angled abutment. A pull-out force of 40 N was applied to the crown. The stress values were calculated within the dental implant, the abutment, the abutment screw, and the surrounding bone. RESULTS The highest stress concentration was observed at the coronal portion of the straight implant (9.29 MPa). The stress concentrations at the cortical bone were lower than at the implants, and maximum stress concentration in bone structure was 1.73 MPa. At the abutment screws, the stress concentration levels were similiar (3.09 MPa and 3.44 MPa), but the localizations were different. The stress at the angled abutment was higher than the stress at the straight abutment. CONCLUSION The pull-out force, applied during a crown removal, did not show an evident effect in bone structure. The higher stress concentrations were mostly observed at the implant and the abutment collar. In addition, the abutment screw, which is the weakest part of an implant system, also showed stress concentrations. Implant angulation affected the stress concentration levels and localizations. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS These results will help clinicians understand the mechanical behavior of cement-retained implant-supported crowns during crown retrieval. PMID:27141257

  19. How do the substrate reaction forces acting on a gecko's limbs respond to inclines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhouyi; Dai, Zhendong; Li, Wei; Ji, Aihong; Wang, Wenbao

    2015-02-01

    Locomotion is an essential character of animals, and excellent moving ability results from the delicate sensing of the substrate reaction forces (SRF) acting on body and modulating the behavior to adapt the motion requirement. The inclined substrates present in habitats pose a number of functional challenges to locomotion. In order to effectively overcome these challenges, climbing geckos execute complex and accurate movements that involve both the front and hind limbs. Few studies have examined gecko's SRF on steeper inclines of greater than 90°. To reveal how the SRFs acting on the front and hind limbs respond to angle incline changes, we obtained detailed measurements of the three-dimensional SRFs acting on the individual limbs of the tokay gecko while it climbed on an inclined angle of 0-180°. The fore-aft forces acting on the front and hind limbs show opposite trends on inverted inclines of greater than 120°, indicating propulsion mechanism changes in response to inclines. When the incline angles change, the forces exerted in the normal and fore-aft directions by gecko's front and hind limbs are reassigned to take full advantage of limbs' different roles in overcoming resistance and in propelling locomotion. This also ensures that weight acts in the angle range between the forces generated by the front and hind limbs. The change in the distribution of SRF with a change in the incline angle is directly linked to the favorable trade-off between locomotive maneuverability and stability.

  20. The importance of crown dimensions to improve tropical tree biomass estimates.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Rosa C; Phillips, Oliver L; Baker, Timothy R

    2014-06-01

    Tropical forests play a vital role in the global carbon cycle, but the amount of carbon they contain and its spatial distribution remain uncertain. Recent studies suggest that once tree height is accounted for in biomass calculations, in addition to diameter and wood density, carbon stock estimates are reduced in many areas. However, it is possible that larger crown sizes might offset the reduction in biomass estimates in some forests where tree heights are lower because even comparatively short trees develop large, well-lit crowns in or above the forest canopy. While current allometric models and theory focus on diameter, wood density, and height, the influence of crown size and structure has not been well studied. To test the extent to which accounting for crown parameters can improve biomass estimates, we harvested and weighed 51 trees (11-169 cm diameter) in southwestern Amazonia where no direct biomass measurements have been made. The trees in our study had nearly half of total aboveground biomass in the branches (44% +/- 2% [mean +/- SE]), demonstrating the importance of accounting for tree crowns. Consistent with our predictions, key pantropical equations that include height, but do not account for crown dimensions, underestimated the sum total biomass of all 51 trees by 11% to 14%, primarily due to substantial underestimates of many of the largest trees. In our models, including crown radius greatly improves performance and reduces error, especially for the largest trees. In addition, over the full data set, crown radius explained more variation in aboveground biomass (10.5%) than height (6.0%). Crown form is also important: Trees with a monopodial architectural type are estimated to have 21-44% less mass than trees with other growth patterns. Our analysis suggests that accounting for crown allometry would substantially improve the accuracy of tropical estimates of tree biomass and its distribution in primary and degraded forests.

  1. Avalanche dynamics on a rough inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    The avalanche behavior of gravitationally forced granular layers on a rough inclined plane is investigated experimentally for different materials and for a variety of grain shapes ranging from spherical beads to highly anisotropic particles with dendritic shape. We measure the front velocity, area, and height of many avalanches and correlate the motion with the area and height. We also measure the avalanche profiles for several example cases. As the shape irregularity of the grains is increased, there is a dramatic qualitative change in avalanche properties. For rough nonspherical grains, avalanches are faster, bigger, and overturning in the sense that individual particles have down-slope speeds u p that exceed the front speed uf as compared with avalanches of spherical glass beads that are quantitatively slower and smaller and where particles always travel slower than the front speed. There is a linear increase of three quantities: (i) dimensionless avalanche height, (ii) ratio of particle to front speed, and (iii) the growth rate of avalanche speed with increasing avalanche size with increasing tan theta r where theta r is the bulk angle of repose, or with increasing beta P, the slope of the depth averaged flow rule, where both theta r and beta P reflect the grain shape irregularity. These relations provide a tool for predicting important dynamical properties of avalanches as a function of grain shape irregularity. A relatively simple depth-averaged theoretical description captures some important elements of the avalanche motion, notably the existence of two regimes of this motion.

  2. Inclination Excitation in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Adams, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has detected dozens of planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of planetary systems with little or no excited inclination between the inferred orbits. This present study examines the magnitude and efficacy of three potential mechanisms for exciting orbital inclination in these systems: self-excitation of orbital inclination in initially coplanar planetary systems, perturbations by larger bodies within the planetary systems, and perturbations by massive bodies external to the systems. For each of these mechanisms, we determine the regime(s) of parameter space for which orbital inclination excitation is effective. This work provides constraints on the properties (masses and orbital elements) of possible additional bodies in observed planetery systems, and on their dynamical history. One interesting application is to consider the relative size of the external perturbations both in and out of clusters.

  3. Capillary Penetration into Inclined Circular Glass Tubes.

    PubMed

    Trabi, Christophe L; Ouali, F Fouzia; McHale, Glen; Javed, Haadi; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I

    2016-02-09

    The spontaneous penetration of a wetting liquid into a vertical tube against the force of gravity and the imbibition of the same liquid into a horizontal tube (or channel) are both driven by capillary forces and described by the same fundamental equations. However, there have been few experimental studies of the transition from one orientation to the other. We report systematic measurements of capillary penetration of polydimethylsiloxane oils of viscosities 9.6, 19.2, and 48.0 mPa·s into glass capillary tubes. We first report the effect of tube radii R between 140 and 675 μm on the dynamics of spontaneous imbibition. We show that the data can be fitted using the exact numerical solution to the governing equations and that these are similar to fits using the analytical viscogravitational approximation. However, larger diameter tubes show a rate of penetration slower than expected using an equilibrium contact angle and the known value of liquid viscosity. To account for the slowness, an increase in viscosity by a factor (η/ρ)(scaling) is needed. We show full agreement with theory requires the ratio R/κ(-1) ∼ 0.1 or less, where κ(-1) is the capillary length. In addition, we propose an experimental method that enables the determination of the dynamic contact angle during imbibition, which gives values that agree with the literature values. We then report measurements of dynamic penetration into the tubes of R = 190 and 650 μm for a range of inclination angles to the horizontal, φ, from 5 to 90°. We show that capillary penetration can still be fitted using the viscogravitational solution, rather than the Bosanquet solution which describes imbibition without gravity, even for inclination angles as low as 10°. Moreover, at these low angles, the effect of the tube radius is found to diminish and this appears to relate to an effective capillary length, κ(-1)(φ) = (γ(LV)/ρg sin φ)(1/2).

  4. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping.

    PubMed

    Kannas, Theodoros M; Kellis, Eleftherios; Amiridis, Ioannis G

    2011-12-01

    Kannas, TM, Kellis, E, and Amiridis, IG. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3334-3341, 2011-The need for the generation of higher joint power output during performance of dynamic activities led us to investigate the force-length relationship of the plantar flexors during consecutive stretch-shortening cycles of hopping. The hypothesis of this study was that hopping (consecutive jumps with the knee as straight as possible) on an inclined (15°) surface might lead to a better jumping performance compared with hopping on a plane surface (0°). Twelve active men performed 3 sets of 10 consecutive hops on both an incline and plane surface. Ground reaction forces; ankle and knee joint kinematics; electromyographic (EMG) activity from the medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA); and architectural data from the MG were recorded. The results showed that participants jumped significantly higher (p < 0.05) when hopping on an inclined surface (30.32 ± 8.18 cm) compared with hopping on a plane surface (27.52 ± 4.97 cm). No differences in temporal characteristics between the 2 types of jumps were observed. Incline hopping induced significantly greater ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension at takeoff compared with plane hopping (p < 0.05). The fascicle length of the MG was greater at initial contact with the ground during incline hopping (p < 0.05). Moreover, the EMG activities of Sol and TA during the propulsion phase were significantly higher during incline compared with that during plane hopping (p < 0.05). It does not seem unreasonable to suggest that, if the aim of hopping plyometrics is to improve plantar flexor explosivity, incline hopping might be a more effective exercise than hopping on a plane surface.

  5. Evolution of Vortex Rings Exiting Inclined Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Webster, D. R.; Reetz, M.; Gefroh, D.

    1996-11-01

    Vortex rings initiated in cylinders with exit incline lengths of 0, D/4, and D/2 were investigated for Reynolds numbers up to 30,000. The fluid exiting each cylinder was visualized with an ionized bromothymol blue solution, and velocity fields were obtained with PIV. In each inclined case, vortex rings form at angles smaller than the cylinder incline angle. Entrainment of ambient fluid on the short side of the cylinder is much stronger than that on the long side. This results in a larger circulation about the short side of the ring and a greater propagation velocity on that side. The incline angle of the ring thus decreases as it moves downstream. Behind the ring core, an impulsive wave of entrained ambient fluid flows parallel to the cylinder exit plane. Some of this fluid is wrapped into the core, while the rest is ejected outward past the long cylinder edge. The vortex ring dynamics differ significantly from those observed in jets from inclined nozzles where neighboring rings are connected by straining zones, and ring incline angles increase with downstream distance.

  6. Marginal and internal fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated with two different CAD/CAM systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Bok; Park, Charn-Woon; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2008-05-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of marginal and internal fit between the all-ceramic crowns manufactured by a conventional double-layer computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and a single-layer system. Ten standardized crowns were fabricated from each of these two systems: conventional double-layer CAD/CAM system (Procera) and a single-layer system (Cerec 3D). The copings and completed crowns were seated on the abutments by a special device that facilitated uniform loading, and the marginal discrepancies were measured. Internal gaps were also measured using a low-viscosity silicone material. Marginal discrepancies of Procera copings were significantly smaller than those of Procera crowns and Cerec 3D crowns (p < 0.05), but Procera crowns and Cerec 3D crowns did not differ significantly from each other (p > 0.05). On internal gaps, Cerec 3D crowns showed significantly larger internal gaps than Procera copings and crowns (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, the single-layer system demonstrated acceptable marginal and internal fit.

  7. The cost of incline locomotion in ghost crabs (Ocypode quadrata) of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Alexa; Andrus, Scott C

    2011-10-01

    It is well established that the metabolic cost of horizontal locomotion decreases as a regular function of animal body mass, regardless of body form and phylogeny. How body size affects the cost of incline exercise remains much less clear. Studies on vertebrates have led to the hypotheses that the cost of vertical work is independent of body mass and that the added cost of locomoting on inclines is lower for small animals. Studies on vertebrates and a few invertebrates provide evidence both for and against these hypotheses. To gain further insight into the cost of incline exercise, we measured oxygen consumption of small (2.33 ± 0.07 g) and large (46.66 ± 5.33 g) ghost crabs (Ocypode quadrata) locomoting horizontally and up a 20° incline. The slope of the oxygen consumption versus speed relationship (= minimum cost of transport) was not significantly different for small crabs exercising horizontally and on an incline. However, the intercept for incline exercise was significantly higher, indicating that small crabs used more energy during incline exercise than during horizontal exercise. Incline had no effect on the slope or intercept of the oxygen consumption versus speed relationship for large crabs. Our results suggest that the cost of incline locomotion may be large for small animals and that the cost is not independent of body size. Our results add to the growing body of research indicating that body mass is but one factor that determines the cost of incline locomotion and efficiency of vertical work.

  8. Effects of using an unstable inclined board on active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The present study assessed the effects of using an unstable inclined board on the active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness. [Subjects] The study included 10 young female patients with ankle stiffness. [Methods] The patients were divided into the following two groups: a group that performed ankle dorsiflexion stretching exercises using a wooden inclined board and a group that performed stretching exercises using an air-cushioned inclined board (unstable inclined board). Active and passive ankle dorsiflexion angles were measured bilaterally using a goniometer. [Results] Both inclined boards significantly increased active and passive ankle dorsiflexion. After performing ankle stretching exercises, active dorsiflexion significantly increased the unstable inclined board compared to that using the wooden inclined board. However, the passive dorsiflexion angles did not differ significantly between the two groups after ankle stretching exercises. [Conclusion] The use of an unstable inclined board might stimulate activation of the ankle dorsiflexors in addition to stretching muscle or tissue. Active ankle dorsiflexion was more effectively improved with stretching exercises using an unstable inclined board than with exercises using a wooden inclined board.

  9. Fracture resistance of zirconia-composite veneered crowns in comparison with zirconia-porcelain crowns.

    PubMed

    Alsadon, Omar; Patrick, David; Johnson, Anthony; Pollington, Sarah; Wood, Duncan

    2017-02-11

    The objectives were to evaluate the fracture resistance and stress concentration in zirconia/composite veneered crowns in comparison to zirconia/porcelain crowns using occlusal fracture resistance and by stress analysis using finite element analysis method. Zirconia substructures were divided into two groups based on the veneering material. A static load was applied occlusally using a ball indenter and the load to fracture was recorded in Newtons (N). The same crown design was used to create 3D crown models and evaluated using FEA. The zirconia/composite crowns subjected to static occlusal load showed comparable results to the zirconia/porcelain crowns. Zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress on the zirconia substructure at 63.6 and 50.9 MPa on the zirconia substructure veneered with porcelain. In conclusion, zirconia/composite crowns withstood high occlusal loads similar to zirconia/porcelain crowns with no significant difference. However, the zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress values than the zirconia/porcelain crowns at the zirconia substructure.

  10. Polymeric Electrolyte Containing 12-Crown-4 Ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesa; Distefano, Salvador

    1992-01-01

    Experiments show incorporation of 12-crown-4 ether into solid electrolytes based on polyethylene oxide enhances their electrochemical properties. More specifically, 12-crown-4 ether increases Faradaic efficiency for Li+ ions in low-power secondary Li cells and enables operation of these cells at lower temperatures with higher efficiencies.

  11. Pipe weld crown removal device

    DOEpatents

    Sword, Charles K.; Sette, Primo J.

    1992-01-01

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  12. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

    1992-11-24

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels. 2 figs.

  13. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device that provides for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  14. Enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns after 6 months of clinical use.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Rammelsberg, P; Schmitter, M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia crowns were placed in 20 patients requiring full molar crowns. For measurement of wear, impressions of both jaws were made at baseline after crown cementation and at 6-month follow-up. Mean and maximum wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists and of the two contralateral natural antagonists were measured by the use of plaster replicas and 3D laser scanning methods. Wear differences were investigated by the use of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and by linear regression analysis. Mean vertical loss (maximum vertical loss in parentheses) was 10 (43) μm for the zirconia crowns, 33 (112) μm for the opposing enamel, 10 (58) μm for the contralateral teeth and 10 (46) μm for the contralateral antagonists. Both mean and maximum enamel wear were significantly different between the antagonists of the zirconia crowns and the contralateral antagonists. Gender and activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were identified as possible confounders which significantly affected wear. Under clinical conditions, monolithic zirconia crowns seem to be associated with more wear of opposed enamel than are natural teeth. With regard to wear behaviour, clinical application of monolithic zirconia crowns is justifiable because the amount of antagonistic enamel wear after 6 months is comparable with, or even lower than, that caused by other ceramic materials in previous studies.

  15. Clinical Acceptability of the Internal Gap of CAD/CAM PD-AG Crowns Using Intraoral Digital Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Gyung; Kim, Sungtae; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the internal gap between CAD/CAM palladium-silver crowns and cast gold crowns generated from intraoral digital versus conventional impressions and to determine the clinical acceptability. Nickel-chrome master dies were made from the prepared resin tooth with the conventional impression method (n = 40). For ICC (Intraoral, CAD/CAM) group, 10 intraoral digital impressions were made, and 10 CAD/CAM crowns of a PD-AG (palladium-silver) machinable alloy were generated. For IC (Intraoral, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were cast from ten intraoral digital impressions. For CCC (Conventional, CAD/CAM) group, 10 CAD/CAM PD-AG crowns were made using the conventional impression method. For CC (Conventional, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were fabricated from 10 conventional impressions. One hundred magnifications of the internal gaps of each crown were measured at 50 points with an optical microscope and these values were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05). The internal gap of the intraoral digital impression group was significantly larger than in the conventional impression group (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the CAD/CAM group and the cast group (P > 0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, crowns from intraoral digital impressions showed larger internal gap values than crowns from conventional impressions. PMID:28018914

  16. Clinical Acceptability of the Internal Gap of CAD/CAM PD-AG Crowns Using Intraoral Digital Impressions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Gyung; Kim, Sungtae; Choi, Hyunmin; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hong; Moon, Hong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the internal gap between CAD/CAM palladium-silver crowns and cast gold crowns generated from intraoral digital versus conventional impressions and to determine the clinical acceptability. Nickel-chrome master dies were made from the prepared resin tooth with the conventional impression method (n = 40). For ICC (Intraoral, CAD/CAM) group, 10 intraoral digital impressions were made, and 10 CAD/CAM crowns of a PD-AG (palladium-silver) machinable alloy were generated. For IC (Intraoral, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were cast from ten intraoral digital impressions. For CCC (Conventional, CAD/CAM) group, 10 CAD/CAM PD-AG crowns were made using the conventional impression method. For CC (Conventional, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were fabricated from 10 conventional impressions. One hundred magnifications of the internal gaps of each crown were measured at 50 points with an optical microscope and these values were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05). The internal gap of the intraoral digital impression group was significantly larger than in the conventional impression group (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the CAD/CAM group and the cast group (P > 0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, crowns from intraoral digital impressions showed larger internal gap values than crowns from conventional impressions.

  17. Ion selectivity of crown ethers investigated by UV and IR spectroscopy in a cold ion trap.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kusaka, Ryoji; Haino, Takeharu; Ebata, Takayuki; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2012-04-26

    Electronic and vibrational spectra of benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) and benzo-18-crown-6 (B18C6) complexes with alkali metal ions, M(+)•B15C5 and M(+)•B18C6 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), are measured using UV photodissociation (UVPD) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in a cold, 22-pole ion trap. We determine the structure of conformers with the aid of density functional theory calculations. In the Na(+)•B15C5 and K(+)•B18C6 complexes, the crown ethers open the most and hold the metal ions at the center of the ether ring, demonstrating an optimum matching in size between the cavity of the crown ethers and the metal ions. For smaller ions, the crown ethers deform the ether ring to decrease the distance and increase the interaction between the metal ions and oxygen atoms; the metal ions are completely surrounded by the ether ring. In the case of larger ions, the metal ions are too large to enter the crown cavity and are positioned on it, leaving one of its sides open for further solvation. Thermochemistry data calculated on the basis of the stable conformers of the complexes suggest that the ion selectivity of crown ethers is controlled primarily by the enthalpy change for the complex formation in solution, which depends strongly on the complex structure.

  18. Dense granular flows down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Borzsonyi, Tamas

    2006-03-01

    Granular flow on a rough inclined plane is an important model system in which to study the basic rules of the dynamics of granular materials. Despite intensive study, many features of such flows are still incompletely understood. For uniformly flowing layers at relatively shallow inclination, we consider experimentally the the basic flow rheology of the granular media and propose new scalings to collapse our data for glass beads and rough sand as a function of inclination angle and particle diameter. At steep inclinations above some angle θs (θs/θr 1.3-1.5, where θr stands for the angle of repose) for flowing grains, numerics and theory predict that the surface roughness is inadequate to dissipate energy gained in the gravitational field, and the flow should continue to accelerate. We report on our experimental results on the properties of granular flows on a steeply inclined plane and define the domains of steady flows. We also discuss the instabilities of such flows leading to spatial patterns.

  19. Crown condition dynamics of oak in southern Sweden 1988-1999.

    PubMed

    Drobyshev, Igor; Anderson, Stefan; Sonesson, Kerstin

    2007-11-01

    Crown defoliation of oak (Quercus robur and Q. petraea) was analysed in 808 trees during three forest condition surveys (1988, 1993, and 1999) in the southern Sweden. From 1988 to 1999 crown defoliation increased by more than 20%. Changes in crown defoliation were related to the pH in the upper 20-30 cm of the mineral soils, which was closely connected to other measures of soil fertility (cation exchange capacity, CEC and C/N ratio). Trees growing on soils with a high pH (> or =4.00, in BaCl2 filtrate), high CEC and low C/N ratio had significantly lower crown defoliation than trees growing on more acid soils (pH <4.00), indicating that less favourable soil conditions may further enhance oak decline. Age did not differentiate trees with respect to crown defoliation, indicating that decline in crown condition was not due to an age-related increase in crown transparency. Considering only trees younger than 100 years, a significant interaction was observed between changes in crown defoliation and soil pH. Trees younger than 100 years old growing on more acidic soils had a greater increase in crown transparency than trees on more basic soils between 1988 and 1999. Trees > or =100 years old had significantly higher defoliation on more acidic than on more basic soils, however defoliation dynamics of these trees over 1988-99 was not related to soil acidity. Two biotic agents (insect and fungal leaf infections) evaluated in this study did not prove to be important drivers of defoliation dynamics.

  20. Recognizing the threshold magnetic anisotropy for inclination shallowing: Implications for correcting inclination errors of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiang; Wang, Shipeng; Fu, Shaoying; Jiao, Wenjun

    2014-05-01

    Post-depositional compaction is an integral part of sedimentary rock formation and thus has been reasonably deemed as a major culprit for the long-recognized inclination-shallowing problem in sedimentary rocks. Although theoretical treatment elegantly envisions magnetic anisotropy (or oblate fabrics) to correspond to the degree of compaction and the magnitude of inclination flattening, such correspondence has rarely been seen in nature quantitavely, which leaves the possibility of misidentification and/or over-correction for inclination shallowing using magnetic anisotropy. This is because the extent to which oblate magnetic fabrics are developed strongly enough for inclination to start becoming shallow is not yet known. Here, we present sedimentary paleomagnetic data from two ~6 m long gravity cores GHE24L and GHE27L from the northern slope of the South China Sea to examine the down-core changes in magnetic anisotropy and inclinations, and to explore the possible connection between the two parameters. The results show that oblate fabrics are dominantly developed at depths >~2m and the degree of anisotropy displays an overall gradual increase with depth. Inclination shallowing occurs in the > 5m segment of the relatively distal core GHE27L and the amount of shallowing largely correlates with the degree of anisotropy, suggesting a causal relation between the development of magnetic anisotropy and the degree of inclination shallowing. Examination of down-core changes in inclination and magnetic anisotropy suggests that a threshold anisotropy of PAMS~1.04 and PAAR~1.10 exists for inclination shallowing in the cores. For PAAR<1.10, over-correction is mostly negligible, but can amount >10° if particle anisotropy is <1.4. This study provides strong field evidence that complements and substantiates the theoretical model and suggests that the threshold anisotropy can be used as a first-order criterion to identify inclination errors of some sedimentary rocks.

  1. Classifying bed inclination using pressure images.

    PubMed

    Baran Pouyan, M; Ostadabbas, S; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is one of the most prevalent problems for bed-bound patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Pressure ulcers are painful for patients and costly for healthcare systems. Accurate in-bed posture analysis can significantly help in preventing pressure ulcers. Specifically, bed inclination (back angle) is a factor contributing to pressure ulcer development. In this paper, an efficient methodology is proposed to classify bed inclination. Our approach uses pressure values collected from a commercial pressure mat system. Then, by applying a number of image processing and machine learning techniques, the approximate degree of bed is estimated and classified. The proposed algorithm was tested on 15 subjects with various sizes and weights. The experimental results indicate that our method predicts bed inclination in three classes with 80.3% average accuracy.

  2. Moments of inclination error distribution computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program is described which calculates orbital inclination error statistics using a closed-form solution. This solution uses a data base of trajectory errors from actual flights to predict the orbital inclination error statistics. The Scott flight history data base consists of orbit insertion errors in the trajectory parameters - altitude, velocity, flight path angle, flight azimuth, latitude and longitude. The methods used to generate the error statistics are of general interest since they have other applications. Program theory, user instructions, output definitions, subroutine descriptions and detailed FORTRAN coding information are included.

  3. Flow through very porous inclined screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muramoto, K. K.; Durbin, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The steady, inviscid flow through and around a screen inclined at a uniform angle to the incoming flow was investigated. For a screen placed in an infinite flow field, an asymptotic analysis for small resistance coefficients was performed, and the effects of inclination were determined. The velocity at first order in the asymptotic expansion was nonuniform along the screen. This nonuniformity caused the wake behind the screen to contain distributed vorticity at second order. These effects therefore occurred at one order lower than for normal screens.

  4. Optimizing snake locomotion on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Osborne, Matthew T; Alben, Silas

    2014-01-01

    We develop a model to study the locomotion of snakes on inclined planes. We determine numerically which snake motions are optimal for two retrograde traveling-wave body shapes, triangular and sinusoidal waves, across a wide range of frictional parameters and incline angles. In the regime of large transverse friction coefficients, we find power-law scalings for the optimal wave amplitudes and corresponding costs of locomotion. We give an asymptotic analysis to show that the optimal snake motions are traveling waves with amplitudes given by the same scaling laws found in the numerics.

  5. Model-based conifer crown surface reconstruction from multi-ocular high-resolution aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yongwei

    2000-12-01

    Tree crown parameters such as width, height, shape and crown closure are desirable in forestry and ecological studies, but they are time-consuming and labor intensive to measure in the field. The stereoscopic capability of high-resolution aerial imagery provides a way to crown surface reconstruction. Existing photogrammetric algorithms designed to map terrain surfaces, however, cannot adequately extract crown surfaces, especially for steep conifer crowns. Considering crown surface reconstruction in a broader context of tree characterization from aerial images, we develop a rigorous perspective tree image formation model to bridge image-based tree extraction and crown surface reconstruction, and an integrated model-based approach to conifer crown surface reconstruction. Based on the fact that most conifer crowns are in a solid geometric form, conifer crowns are modeled as a generalized hemi-ellipsoid. Both the automatic and semi-automatic approaches are investigated to optimal tree model development from multi-ocular images. The semi-automatic 3D tree interpreter developed in this thesis is able to efficiently extract reliable tree parameters and tree models in complicated tree stands. This thesis starts with a sophisticated stereo matching algorithm, and incorporates tree models to guide stereo matching. The following critical problems are addressed in the model-based surface reconstruction process: (1) the problem of surface model composition from tree models, (2) the occlusion problem in disparity prediction from tree models, (3) the problem of integrating the predicted disparities into image matching, (4) the tree model edge effect reduction on the disparity map, (5) the occlusion problem in orthophoto production, and (6) the foreshortening problem in image matching, which is very serious for conifer crown surfaces. Solutions to the above problems are necessary for successful crown surface reconstruction. The model-based approach was applied to recover the

  6. ARTICULATOR-RELATED REGISTRATION AND ANALYSIS OF SAGITTAL CONDYLAR INCLINATION.

    PubMed

    Cimić, Samir; Simunković, Sonja Kraljević; Suncana Simonić Kocijan; Matijević, Jurica; Dulcić, Niksa; Catić, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study sagittal condylar inclination values within a uniform sample (Angle class I occlusion) using 'articulator-related registration' and Camper's plane as a reference plane. The study was performed on a sample of 58 Angle class I subjects (mean age 25.1, SD 3.1). Measurements were performed with an ultrasonic jaw tracking device with six degrees of freedom. After a paraocclusal tray was fixed in the mouth, each subject had to make three protrusive movements and three right and left laterotrusive movements. From protrusive movements the software of the device automatically calculated the left and the right sagittal condylar inclination values used for setting of the articulator. The mean sagittal condylar inclinationvalue was 41.0° (SD 10.5) for the right joint and 40.7° (SD 9.8) for the left joint. The maximum value was 65.0° for the right and 68.6° for the left joint, and the minimum value was 13.7° for the right and 21.7° for the left joint. The results of this study suggested the average articulator setting for sagittal condylar inclination for fully dentate adult subjects to be 40° in relation to Camper's plane. This is especially important for the articulators that are set up in relation to Camper's plane.

  7. ASSEMBLY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND INCLINATIONS OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Foucart, Francois; Lai, Dong

    2013-02-10

    The Kepler satellite has discovered a number of transiting planets around close binary stars. These circumbinary systems have highly aligned planetary and binary orbits. In this paper, we explore how the mutual inclination between the planetary and binary orbits may reflect the physical conditions of the assembly of protoplanetary disks and the interaction between protostellar binaries and circumbinary disks. Given the turbulent nature of star-forming molecular clouds, it is possible that the gas falling onto the outer region of a circumbinary disk and the central protostellar binary have different axes of rotation. Thus, the newly assembled circumbinary disk can be misaligned with respect to the binary. However, the gravitational torque from the binary produces a warp and twist in the disk, and the back-reaction torque tends to align the disk and the binary orbital plane. We present a new, analytic calculation of this alignment torque and show that the binary-disk inclination angle can be reduced appreciably after the binary accretes a few percent of its mass from the disk. Our calculation suggests that in the absence of other disturbances, circumbinary disks and planets around close (sub-AU) stellar binaries, for which mass accretion onto the proto-binary is very likely to have occurred, are expected to be highly aligned with the binary orbits, while disks and planets around wide binaries can be misaligned. Measurements of the mutual inclinations of circumbinary planetary systems can provide a clue to the birth environments of such systems.

  8. Applicability of the polysulphone horizontal calibration to differently inclined dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Casale, Giuseppe R; Siani, Anna Maria; Diémoz, Henri; Kimlin, Michael G; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Polysulphone (PS) dosimetry has been a widely used technique for more than 30 years to quantify the erythemally effective UV dose received by anatomic sites (personal exposure). The calibration of PS dosimeters is an important issue as their spectral response is different from the erythemal action spectrum. It is performed exposing a set of PS dosimeters on a horizontal plane and measuring the UV doses received by dosimeters using calibrated spectroradiometers or radiometers. In this study, data collected during PS field campaigns (from 2004 to 2006), using horizontal and differently inclined dosimeters, were analyzed to provide some considerations on the transfer of the horizontal calibration to differently inclined dosimeters, as anatomic sites usually are. The role of sky conditions, of the angle of incidence between the sun and the normal to the slope, and of the type of surrounding surface on the calibration were investigated. It was concluded that PS horizontal calibrations apply to differently inclined dosimeters for incidence angles up to approximately 70° and for surfaces excluding ones with high albedo. Caution should be used in the application of horizontal calibrations for cases of high-incidence angle and/or high albedo surfaces.

  9. Wear of double crown systems - electroplated vs. casted female part

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Stefan; KRAUS, Dominik; KEILIG, Ludger; GÖLZ, Lina; STARK, Helmut; ENKLING, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The wear of telescopic crowns is a common problem often reducing the patient's satisfaction with the denture and resulting in a renewal of the denture. The study aims to compare the wear behavior of conical crowns using electroplated copings (group E) with standard telescopic crowns with cast female parts (group C). Material and Methods 10 conical crowns were milled for each group of a cast gold alloy. The specimen of group E had a conicity of 2º. The cast secondary crowns of group C had a 0º design. The electroplated coping was established by direct electroforming. An apparatus accomplishing 10,000 wear cycles performed the wear test. The retentive forces and the correlating distance during insertion and separation were measured. The wear test was separated in a start phase, an initial wear phase and the long term wear period. The retention force value and the force-distance integral of the first 0.33 mm of each cycle were calculated. Results The retentive forces were significantly higher for group E and the integrals were significantly lower for this group except the integral at cycle 10,000. The changes of retention force and integral did not differ significantly between both groups in all phases. The change of the integrals as well as the integral at the particular cycles showed higher interquartile distances for group C. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study the tested conical crowns showed clinically acceptable retentive properties. The values reached a range comparable to retentive elements tested in recent literature. The values of group C showed higher ranges. The force measured for group E was significantly higher than for group C but the integrals showed an opposite tendency. The results indicate that an exclusive analysis of the force is not sufficient as the integral is not equivalent to the force although it describes the retentive property of the system in a better way than the force over a distance is described. Both systems

  10. [Computer aided design and manufacture of the porcelain fused to metal crown].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Dai, Ning; Yu, Qing; Hao, Guodong; Sun, Quanping

    2009-04-01

    In order to satisfy the current demand for fast and high-quality prosthodontics, we have carried out a research in the fabrication process of the porcelain fused to metal crown on molar with CAD/CAM technology. Firstly, we get the data of the surface mesh on preparation teeth through a 3D-optical grating measuring system. Then, we reconstruct the 3D-model crown with the computer-aided design software which was developed by ourselves. Finally, with the 3D-model data, we produce a metallic crown on a high-speed CNC carving machine. The result has proved that the metallic crown can match the preparation teeth ideally. The fabrication process is reliable and efficient, and the restoration is precise and steady in quality.

  11. Well productivity for arbitrarily inclined well

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, S.

    1995-12-31

    This work extends Peaceman`s equation to a well areally and vertically inclined at arbitrary angles with respect to grid lines in anisotropic reservoirs. The method is based on the transformation of the anisotropic flow equation to a homogeneous equation, and interpolating the effective well block radius, wellbore radius, and equivalent well length as a function of angles.

  12. Airborne LIDAR point cloud tower inclination judgment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    liang, Chen; zhengjun, Liu; jianguo, Qian

    2016-11-01

    Inclined transmission line towers for the safe operation of the line caused a great threat, how to effectively, quickly and accurately perform inclined judgment tower of power supply company safety and security of supply has played a key role. In recent years, with the development of unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with a laser scanner, GPS, inertial navigation is one of the high-precision 3D Remote Sensing System in the electricity sector more and more. By airborne radar scan point cloud to visually show the whole picture of the three-dimensional spatial information of the power line corridors, such as the line facilities and equipment, terrain and trees. Currently, LIDAR point cloud research in the field has not yet formed an algorithm to determine tower inclination, the paper through the existing power line corridor on the tower base extraction, through their own tower shape characteristic analysis, a vertical stratification the method of combining convex hull algorithm for point cloud tower scarce two cases using two different methods for the tower was Inclined to judge, and the results with high reliability.

  13. Particle Sliding on a Rough Incline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study a particle sliding on a rough inclined plane as an example of a mechanical problem with nonholonomic constraint. The particle is launched in an arbitrary direction so that its motion has both a horizontal and a "vertical" (i.e., up- and downhill) direction. The friction force acts along the instantaneous velocity, so that the horizontal…

  14. Penning trap with an inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaremko, Yurij; Przybylska, Maria; Maciejewski, Andrzej J.

    2016-08-01

    A modified Penning trap with a spatially uniform magnetic field B inclined with respect to the axis of rotational symmetry of the electrodes is considered. The inclination angle can be arbitrary. Canonical transformation of phase variables transforming the Hamiltonian of the considered system into a sum of three uncoupled harmonic oscillators is found. We determine the region of stability in space of two parameters controlling the dynamics: the trapping parameter κ and the squared sine of the inclination angle ϑ 0 . If the angle ϑ 0 is smaller than 54°, a charge occupies a finite spatial volume within the processing chamber. A rigid hierarchy of trapping frequencies is broken if B is inclined at the critical angle: the magnetron frequency reaches the modified cyclotron frequency while the axial frequency exceeds them. Apart from this resonance, we reveal the family of resonant curves in the region of stability. In the relativistic regime, the system is not linear. We show that it is not integrable in the Liouville sense. The averaging over the fast variable allows to reduce the system to two degrees of freedom. An analysis of the Poincaré cross-sections of the averaged systems shows the regions of effective stability of the trap.

  15. Numerical and experimental study of transient natural convection in an inclined wall cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, J.; Avila, F.

    1995-09-01

    Transient natural convection in an open cavity with one inclined wall is analyzed both numerically and experimentally. The fluid and the cavity are in thermal equilibrium at the onset of the experiment. The inclined wall is heated in such a way that the wall temperature increases uniformly according to an hyperbolic tangent function. The transport equations are solved using a 2-D transient model with a non-orthogonal body fitted coordinate system and an exponential grid distribution for better spatial resolution near the inclined wall. Measurements of velocity and temperature are performed at some key points of the boundary layer and intrusion layer. The fluid motion and heat transfer are analyzed from the time at which heat is applied though the inclined wall to the time at which its effect is detected at the opposite sidewall. The main patterns of the fluid flow and heat transfer are well predicted as comparisons against experimental results indicate.

  16. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... crown is a prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after...

  17. Induction of Crown Gall on Carrot Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, H.; Fox, K. D.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the transfer of plasmid from a bacterium to a plant cell has received little attention. Presents an experiment for studying this type of genetic transformation using the causative agent of crown gall, a malignant plant tumor. (DDR)

  18. Success of Hall technique crowns questioned.

    PubMed

    Nainar, S M Hashim

    2012-01-01

    Hall technique is a method of providing stainless steel crowns for primary molars without tooth preparation and requires no local anesthesia. Literature review showed inconclusive evidence and therefore this technique should not be used in clinical practice.

  19. Collaborative Research to Optimize Warfighter Nutrition (CROWN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0209 TITLE: Collaborative Research to Optimize Warfighter Nutrition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jennifer C. Rood, Ph.D...Collaborative Research to Optimize Warfighter Nutrition (CROWN) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0209 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Collaborative Research to Optimize Warfighter Nutrition (CROWN) project supports communication and interaction between USARIEM and PBRC scientists

  20. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. In the context of exoplanets, this allows us to derive the true obliquity of a system if the projected stellar spin-planetary orbit angle can measured via the Rossiter-Mclaughlin effect. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than 2-2.5 km.s-1. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 that can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit the activity variation of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. The case of the equator-on star HD189733 will be presented, as well as the case of Alpha Centauri B, which present an inclination of 45+9-19 degrees, implying that the earth-mass orbiting planet is not transiting if aligned with its host star. Other exemples will also demonstrate the power of the technique, that can infer a stellar inclination, even for slow rotators like Alpha Centauri B, that present a projected rotational velocity smaller than 1.15 km.s-1. In addition, the SOAP 2.0 simulation can be used to correct for the effect of activity when one major active region is dominating the RV signal. This could enhance the detection of small mass exoplanets orbiting slightly active stars.This project is funded by ETAEARTH (European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n. 313014), a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of

  1. The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst.

    PubMed

    Owen, Reuel

    2003-01-01

    The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst Appliance is evaluated and combined with Straight Wire Arch Fixed Orthodontics in treatment of Class II, Division I malocclusions. This article will evaluate a combined orthodontic approach of "straightening teeth" and an orthognathic approach of "moving jaws or making skeletal changes." Orthodontic treatment cannot be accomplished well without establishing a healthy temporomandibular joint. This is defined by Keller as a joint that is "noiseless, painless and has a normal range of motion without deviation and deflection." It is not prudent to separate orthodontic treatment as its own entity without being aware of the changes in the temporomandibular joint before, during and after treatment. In other words, "If you're doing orthodontics you're doing TMJ treatment." One should treat toward a healthy, beautiful face asking, "Will proposed treatment achieve this goal?" Treatment should be able to be carried out in an efficient manner, minimizing treatment time, be comfortable and affordable for the patient, and profitable for the dentist. The finished treatment should meet Andrews' Six Keys of Occlusion, or Loudon's Twelve Commandments. Above all, do no harm to the patient. We think that a specific treatment plan can embrace these tenets. The focus will be to show Class II treatment using a modified Herbst Appliance and fixed straight wire orthodontics.

  2. Effect of the shades of background substructures on the overall color of zirconia-based all-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Tulapornchai, Chantana; Mamani, Jatuphol; Kamchatphai, Wannaporn; Thongpun, Noparat

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the color of a background substructure on the overall color of a zirconia-based all-ceramic crown. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty one posterior zirconia crowns were made for twenty subjects. Seven premolar crowns and six molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with metal post and core in the first and second group. In the third group, eight molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with a prefabricated post and composite core build-up. The color measurements of all-ceramic crowns were made before try-in, before and after cementation. A repeated measure ANOVA was used for a statistical analysis of a color change of all-ceramic crowns at α=.05. Twenty four zirconia specimens, with different core thicknesses (0.4-1 mm) were also prepared to obtain the contrast ratio of zirconia materials after veneering. RESULTS L*, a*, and b* values of all-ceramic crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or on a prefabricated post did not show significant changes (P>.05). However, the slight color changes of zirconia crowns were detected and represented by ΔE*ab values, ranging from 1.2 to 3.1. The contrast ratios of zirconia specimens were 0.92-0.95 after veneering. CONCLUSION No significant differences were observed between the L*, a*, and b* values of zirconia crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or a prefabricated post and composite core. However, the color of a background substructure could affect the overall color of posterior zirconia restorations with clinically recommended core thickness according to ΔE*ab values. PMID:24049574

  3. Temporal matching among diurnal photosynthetic patterns within the crown of the evergreen sclerophyll Olea europaea L.

    PubMed

    Granado-Yela, C; García-Verdugo, C; Carrillo, K; Rubio DE Casas, R; Kleczkowski, L A; Balaguer, L

    2011-05-01

    Trees are modular organisms that adjust their within-crown morphology and physiology in response to within-crown light gradients. However, whether within-plant variation represents a strategy for optimizing light absorption has not been formally tested. We investigated the arrangement of the photosynthetic surface throughout one day and its effects on the photosynthetic process, at the most exposed and most sheltered crown layers of a wild olive tree (Olea europaea L.). Similar measurements were made for cuttings taken from this individual and grown in a greenhouse at contrasted irradiance-levels (100 and 20% full sunlight). Diurnal variations in light interception, carbon fixation and carbohydrate accumulation in sun leaves were negatively correlated with those in shade leaves under field conditions when light intensity was not limiting. Despite genetic identity, these complementary patterns were not found in plants grown in the greenhouse. The temporal disparity among crown positions derived from specialization of the photosynthetic behaviour at different functional and spatial scales: architectural structure (crown level) and carbon budget (leaf level). Our results suggest that the profitability of producing a new module may not only respond to construction costs or light availability, but also rely on its spatio-temporal integration within the productive processes at the whole-crown level.

  4. Materials design in the performance of all-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Brian R; Pajares, Antonia; Zhang, Yu; Deng, Yan; Polack, Mariano A; Lloyd, Isabel K; Rekow, E Dianne; Thompson, Van P

    2004-06-01

    Results from a systematic study of damage in material structures representing the basic elements of dental crowns are reported. Tests are made on model flat-layer specimens fabricated from various dental ceramic combinations bonded to dentin-like polymer substrates, in bilayer (ceramic/polymer) and trilayer (ceramic/ceramic/polymer) configurations. The specimens are loaded at their top surfaces with spherical indenters, in simulation of occlusal function. The onset of fracture is observed in situ using a video camera system mounted beneath the transparent polymer substrate. Critical loads to induce fracture and deformation at the ceramic top and bottom surfaces are measured as functions of layer thickness and contact duration. Radial cracking at the ceramic undersurface occurs at relatively low loads, especially in thinner layers. Fracture mechanics relations are used to confirm the experimental data trends, and to provide explicit dependencies of critical loads in terms of key variables: material-elastic modulus, hardness, strength and toughness; geometric-layer thicknesses and contact radius. Tougher, harder and (especially) stronger materials show superior damage resistance. Critical loads depend strongly (quadratically) on crown net thickness. The analytic relations provide a sound basis for the materials design of next-generation dental crowns.

  5. In vitro study of fracture strength of provisional crown materials

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Gulsum; Kara, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this report was to evaluate the effect of the fabrication method and material type on the fracture strength of provisional crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS A master model with one crown (maxillary left second premolar) was manufactured from Cr-Co alloy. The master model was scanned, and the data set was transferred to a CAD/CAM unit (Yenamak D50, Yenadent Ltd, Istanbul, Turkey) for the Cercon Base group. For the other groups, temporary crowns were produced by direct fabrication methods (Imident, Temdent, Structur Premium, Takilon, Systemp c&b II, and Acrytemp). The specimens were subjected to water storage at 37℃ for 24 hours, and then they were thermocycled (TC, 5000×, 5-55℃) (n=10). The maximum force at fracture (Fmax) was measured in a universal test machine at 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed by non-parametric statistics (α=.05). RESULTS Fmax values varied between 711.09-1392.1 N. In the PMMA groups, Takilon showed the lowest values (711.09 N), and Cercon Base showed the highest values (959.59 N). In the composite groups, Structur Premium showed the highest values (1392.1 N), and Acrytemp showed the lowest values (910.05 N). The composite groups showed significantly higher values than the PMMA groups (P=.01). CONCLUSION Composite-based materials showed significantly higher fracture strengths than PMMA-based materials. The CAD-CAM technique offers more advantages than the direct technique. PMID:25722834

  6. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... designed to operate when the vessel is upright, when the vessel is inclined under static conditions at any angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions...

  7. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... designed to operate when the vessel is upright, when the vessel is inclined under static conditions at any angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions...

  8. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... designed to operate when the vessel is upright, when the vessel is inclined under static conditions at any angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions...

  9. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... designed to operate when the vessel is upright, when the vessel is inclined under static conditions at any angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions...

  10. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... designed to operate when the vessel is upright, when the vessel is inclined under static conditions at any angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions...

  11. 5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ABUTMENT, FILL CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  12. 2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  13. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  14. 6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MIDSLOPE VICINITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MID-SLOPE VICINITY, CUT CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  15. Fringes of equal tangential inclination by curvature-induced birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; Hendawy, N. I.; Zaki, A. A.

    2003-02-01

    A new kind of interference fringes, fringes of equal tangential inclination by curvature-induced birefringence, is presented. These are two-beam interference fringes produced by bending a thin sheet of birefringent material into a part of an exact cylinder such that the curvature is constant. Due to this curvature there is a uniform birefringence being induced. The change in birefringence induced by applying different radii of curvatures to a Fortepan sheet is measured. The stored (fixed) or natural birefringence of this sheet is deduced.

  16. A Comparison of Kinematic and Photometric Inclinations in the RESOLVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, Ryan William; Kannappan, Sheila; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Hall, Kirsten; Resolve

    2015-01-01

    Using standard prescriptions relating axial ratios to inclinations, the inferred distribution of inclinations for galaxies in the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey departs from theoretical expectations for a complete volume-limited sample. We compare kinematic inclinations from velocity fields of ˜200 disk galaxies in RESOLVE with their respective photometric inclinations to examine the origin of this discrepancy. We further investigate which galaxy properties may correlate with differences between inclination estimates, considering morphology, mass, optical size, and rotation curve asymmetry. Our test sample spans galaxy masses between 109 and 1011 M⊙, axial ratios between 0.2 and 0.9, rotation curve asymmetries between 0% and 30%, and the full range of morphological types, which are representative of the distribution for the parent survey, RESOLVE. However, the test sample does not represent the optically largest or smallest galaxies in RESOLVE, denoted by 90% r-band light radii greater than 70" or less than 6". The kinematic data for our sample galaxies were acquired with our custom image slicer on the SOAR telescope/Goodman spectrograph, and inclinations were measured using DiskFit. This analysis will contribute to the RESOLVE kinematic database in preparation. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under an REU supplement to CAREER award AST-0955368.

  17. The effects of forward and backward walking according to treadmill inclination in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-hyo; Kim, Won-bok; Yun, Chang-kyo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward and backward walking using different treadmill incline positions on lower muscle activity in children with cerebral palsy, to provide baseline data for gait training intensity. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen subjects with cerebral palsy walked forward and backward at a self-selected pace on a treadmill with inclines of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%. Activation of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialisanterior, and lateral gastrocnemius was measured using surface electromyography during the stance phase. [Results] As treadmill incline increased during forward walking, muscle activation of the paralyzed lower limbs did not significantly change. However, as treadmill incline increased during backward walking, rectus femoris activation significantly increased and a significant difference was found between treadmill inclines of 0% and 10%. A comparison of backward and forward walking showed a significant difference in rectus femoris activation at treadmill inclines of 0%, 5%, and 10%. Activation of the tibialis anterior was only significantly higher for backward walking at the 10% gradient. [Conclusion] Backward walking may strengthen the rectus femoris and tibialis anterior in walking training for cerebral palsy. Gradient adjustment of the treadmill can be used to select the intensity of walking training. PMID:27313373

  18. An inclined plane system with microcontroller to determine limb motor function of laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Wen; Young, Ming-Shing; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2008-02-15

    This study describes a high-accuracy inclined plane test system for quantitative measurement of the limb motor function of laboratory rats. The system is built around a microcontroller and uses a stepping motor to drive a ball screw, which changes the angle of the inclined plane. Any of the seven inclination speeds can be selected by the user. Two infrared (IR) LED/detector pairs function as interrupt sensors for objective determination of the moment that the rat loses its grip on the textured flooring of the starting area and slips down the plane. Inclination angle at the moment of IR interrupt (i.e. rat slip) is recorded. A liquid crystal display module shows the inclination speed and the inclination angle. The system can function as a stand alone device but a RS232 port allows connection to a personal computer (PC), so data can be sent directly to hard disk for storage and analysis. Experiments can be controlled by a local keypad or by the connected PC. Advantages of the presented system include easy operation, high accuracy, non-dependence on human observation for determination of slip angle, stand-alone capability, low cost and easy modification of the controlling software for different types of experiments. A fully functional prototype of the system is described. The prototype was used experimentally by a hospital group testing traumatic brain injury experiments, and some of their results are presented for system verification. It is found that the system is stable, accurate and easily used by investigators.

  19. Simulations of Seasonal and Latitudinal Variations in Leaf Inclination Angle Distribution: Implications for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huemmrich, Karl F.

    2013-01-01

    The leaf inclination angle distribution (LAD) is an important characteristic of vegetation canopy structure affecting light interception within the canopy. However, LADs are difficult and time consuming to measure. To examine possible global patterns of LAD and their implications in remote sensing, a model was developed to predict leaf angles within canopies. Canopies were simulated using the SAIL radiative transfer model combined with a simple photosynthesis model. This model calculated leaf inclination angles for horizontal layers of leaves within the canopy by choosing the leaf inclination angle that maximized production over a day in each layer. LADs were calculated for five latitude bands for spring and summer solar declinations. Three distinct LAD types emerged: tropical, boreal, and an intermediate temperate distribution. In tropical LAD, the upper layers have a leaf angle around 35 with the lower layers having horizontal inclination angles. While the boreal LAD has vertical leaf inclination angles throughout the canopy. The latitude bands where each LAD type occurred changed with the seasons. The different LADs affected the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) with similar relationships between fAPAR and leaf area index (LAI), but different relationships between NDVI and LAI for the different LAD types. These differences resulted in significantly different relationships between NDVI and fAPAR for each LAD type. Since leaf inclination angles affect light interception, variations in LAD also affect the estimation of leaf area based on transmittance of light or lidar returns.

  20. Vortex-induced vibrations of a flexibly-mounted inclined cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anil; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2013-11-01

    The majority of studies on vortex-induced vibrations of a flexibly-mounted rigid cylinder are for the cases where the flow direction is perpendicular to the long axis of the structure. However, in many engineering applications, such as cable stays in bridges and mooring lines of floating offshore wind turbines, the flow direction may not be perpendicular to the structure. To understand the vortex shedding behind a fixed inclined cylinder, the Independence Principle (IP) has been used. The IP assumes that an inclined cylinder behaves similarly to a normal-incidence case, if only the component of the free stream velocity normal to the cylinder axis is considered. The IP neglects the effect of the axial component of the flow, which seems reasonable for small angles of inclination, but not for large angles. In the present study, a series of experiments have been conducted on a flexibly-mounted rigid cylinder placed inclined to the oncoming flow with various angles of inclination (0°<θ<75°) in a range of Reynolds numbers from 500 to 4000 to investigate how the angle of inclination affects VIV. A rigid cylinder was mounted on springs, and air bearings were used to reduce the structural damping of the system. The system was placed in the test-section of a recirculating water tunnel and the crossflow displacements were measured at each flow velocity. Even at high angles of inclination, large-amplitude oscillations were observed. As the angle of inclination was increased, the lock-in range (the range of reduced flow velocities for which the cylinder oscillates with a large amplitude) started at a higher reduced velocity. When only the normal component of the oncoming flow was considered, the onset of lock-in was observed to be at the same normalized flow velocity for all angles of inclination except for 75°. However, the width of the lock-in region, its pattern, the maximum amplitude of oscillations and its corresponding normalized reduced velocity were not following

  1. A new inclination instability in planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madigan, Ann-Marie

    2015-08-01

    I describe a new instability in Keplerian disks of massive particles on eccentric orbits. Gravitational torques between the orbits align their angles of pericenter and drive exponential growth in orbital inclination. This instability implies specific ratios for Kepler elements of the orbits, similar to what is seen in the inner Oort Cloud of our solar system. I also discuss implications for extra-solar planetary systems and for nuclear star clusters in the centers of galaxies.

  2. An investigation of the surface chemistry of crown ethers: the adsorption and reaction of 12-crown-4 on palladium ( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, S.; Laack, B.; Tysoe, W. T.

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of 12-crown-4 on Pd(1 1 1) is investigated using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption. Analysis of the infrared spectrum of 12-crown-4 suggests that it adsorbs in a flat-lying geometry with C 4v symmetry with a saturation coverage of 0.073±0.008 monolayers. This implies that the crown ether bonds to the surface via the lone pair orbitals on the ether oxygen atoms. Estimating the saturation coverage for this geometry using Van der Waals' radii yields a value of 0.088 monolayers in good agreement with the measured value. 12-crown-4 thermally decomposes to leave predominantly CO and ethylidyne species on the surface where the desorbing CO removes three of the four crown ether oxygen atoms, the fourth remaining on the surface. Small amounts of ethylene are also found to desorb along with a high molecular weight product which is tentatively assigned to the formation of C 2H 5OCH 2CHO.

  3. Protonation of calix[4]arene-(2,3-naphthylene-crown-6,crown-6): Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvíčalová, Magdalena; Makrlík, Emanuel; Böhm, Stanislav; Vaňura, Petr; Asfari, Zouhair

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the extraction constant corresponding to the equilibrium H3O+ (aq) + 1·Na+ (nb) ⇄1·H3O+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) occurring in the two-phase water-nitrobenzene system (1 = calix[4]arene-(2,3-naphthylene-crown-6,crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) was determined as log Kex(H3O+,1·Na+) = -0.2 ± 0.1. Further, the stability constant of the 1·H3O+ complex in nitrobenzene saturated with water was calculated for a temperature of 25 °C: log βnb(1·H3O+) = 5.9 ± 0.2. Finally, applying quantum chemical DFT calculations, the most probable structure of the cationic complex species 1·H3O+ was derived. In the resulting complex, the "central" cation H3O+ is bound by three strong hydrogen bonds to two phenoxy oxygen atoms and to one ethereal oxygen from the crown-6 moiety of the parent ligand 1. The interaction energy, E(int), of the considered 1·H3O+ complex was found to be -416.0 kJ/mol, confirming the formation of this cationic species as well.

  4. Granular avalanches down inclined and vibrated planes.

    PubMed

    Gaudel, Naïma; Kiesgen de Richter, Sébastien; Louvet, Nicolas; Jenny, Mathieu; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we study granular avalanches when external mechanical vibrations are applied. We identify conditions of flow arrest and compare with the ones classically observed for nonvibrating granular flows down inclines [Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999)PHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.869928]. We propose an empirical law to describe the thickness of the deposits with the inclination angle and the vibration intensity. The link between the surface velocity and the depth of the flow highlights a competition between gravity and vibrations induced flows. We identify two distinct regimes: (a) gravity-driven flows at large angles where vibrations do not modify dynamical properties but the deposits (scaling laws in this regime are in agreement with the literature for nonvibrating granular flows) and (b) vibrations-driven flows at small angles where no flow is possible without applied vibrations (in this last regime, the flow behavior can be properly described by a vibration induced activated process). We show, in this study, that granular flows down inclined planes can be finely tuned by external mechanical vibrations.

  5. Granular avalanches down inclined and vibrated planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudel, Naïma; Kiesgen de Richter, Sébastien; Louvet, Nicolas; Jenny, Mathieu; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we study granular avalanches when external mechanical vibrations are applied. We identify conditions of flow arrest and compare with the ones classically observed for nonvibrating granular flows down inclines [Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999), 10.1063/1.869928]. We propose an empirical law to describe the thickness of the deposits with the inclination angle and the vibration intensity. The link between the surface velocity and the depth of the flow highlights a competition between gravity and vibrations induced flows. We identify two distinct regimes: (a) gravity-driven flows at large angles where vibrations do not modify dynamical properties but the deposits (scaling laws in this regime are in agreement with the literature for nonvibrating granular flows) and (b) vibrations-driven flows at small angles where no flow is possible without applied vibrations (in this last regime, the flow behavior can be properly described by a vibration induced activated process). We show, in this study, that granular flows down inclined planes can be finely tuned by external mechanical vibrations.

  6. Drop impact on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonjae; Leclear, Sani; Leclear, Johnathon; Abhijeet, .; Park, Kyoo-Chul

    We report an empirical study and dimensional analysis on the impact patterns of water drops on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces. While the classic Weber number determines the spreading and recoiling dynamics of a water drop on a horizontal / smooth surface, for a superhydrophobic surface, the dynamics depends on two distinct Weber numbers, each calculated using the length scale of the drop or of the pores on the surface. Impact on an inclined superhydrophobic surface is even more complicated, as the velocity that determines the Weber number is not necessarily the absolute speed of the drop but the velocity components normal and tangential to the surface. We define six different Weber numbers, using three different velocities (absolute, normal and tangential velocities) and two different length scales (size of the drop and of the texture). We investigate the impact patterns on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces with three different types of surface texture: (i) posts, (ii) ridges aligned with and (iii) ridges perpendicular to the impact direction. Results suggest that all six Weber numbers matter, but affect different parts of the impact dynamics, ranging from the Cassie-Wenzel transition, maximum spreading, to anisotropic deformation. We acknowledge financial support from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through Contract 3002453812.

  7. 30 CFR 57.19135 - Rollers in inclined shafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rollers in inclined shafts. 57.19135 Section 57... Hoisting Inspection and Maintenance § 57.19135 Rollers in inclined shafts. Rollers used in operating inclined shafts shall be lubricated, properly aligned, and kept in good repair....

  8. 30 CFR 56.19135 - Rollers in inclined shafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rollers in inclined shafts. 56.19135 Section 56.19135 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Inspection and Maintenance § 56.19135 Rollers in inclined shafts. Rollers used in operating inclined...

  9. Precession of a Spinning Ball Rolling down an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    A routine problem in an introductory physics course considers a rectangular block at rest on a plane inclined at angle a to the horizontal. In order for the block not to slide down the incline, the coefficient of sliding friction, µ, must be at least tan a. The situation is similar for the case of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. In order…

  10. 4. VIEW EAST, PERSPECTIVE DOWN INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW EAST, PERSPECTIVE DOWN INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ABUTMENT TO CONEMAUGH RIVER AND AREA OF LOWER INCLINE - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  11. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  12. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  13. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  14. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  15. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  16. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  17. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  18. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  19. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  20. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  1. Tooth inclination in elderly with many remaining teeth observed by 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Fukagawa, Hiroko; Motegi, Etsuko; Fuma, Asuka; Nomura, Mayumi; Kano, Masataka; Sueishi, Kenji; Okano, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    Tooth inclination has been discussed many times in terms of esthetics and functionality, but reports related to aging are extremely rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tooth inclination in the elderly from the orthodontic point of view. The dental casts of twenty elderly persons with many remaining teeth were digitized with a 3-D laser scanner (VMS-100F,UNISN INC., Osaka, Japan) for reconstruction into 3-D images. Inclination of each tooth was then measured with an analytical software (SURFLACER, UNISN INC. and IMAGEWARE 12, UGS PLM Solutions, MO, USA). The occlusal plane formed by the incisal edge of the central incisor and distal buccal cusp tip of the first molar on either side was used as a reference plane to measure tooth inclination, and the complementary angle as tooth inclination was measured. The average tooth inclinations (degrees) of the maxillary teeth were 8.08 for central incisors, 8.10 for lateral incisors, 4.85 for canines, -6.68 for first premolars, -5.58 for second premolars, -5.15 for first molars, and -5.41 for second molars. The corresponding values for the mandibular teeth were 6.78 for central incisors, 4.87 for lateral incisors, -5.73 for canines, -13.74 for first premolars, -19.21 for second premolars, -23.76 for first molars, and -28.63 for second molars. There was no statistical difference between men and women, except for in the maxillary lateral incisors (p<0.05). Tooth inclination showed a progressive decrease from anterior to posterior. The decrease in the mandibular teeth was more regular than that of the maxillary teeth.

  2. Crown cover chart for oak savannas. Forest Service technical brief

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.R.; Johnson, P.S.; Houf, G.

    1994-07-01

    Although oak savannas have been defined in many ways, they are characterized by scattered trees, largely comprised of oaks, and a sparse ground layer rich in grasses and forbs. The crown cover chart can be used to estimate the crown cover of trees as a percent of total area. Potential applications of the chart include monitoring changes in savanna crown cover, determining needed reductions in crown cover, and defining the savanna state. in restoring savannas that have grown into closed canopy stands, one can use the chart to estimate initial crown cover before restoration work is begun and again after crown cover has been reduced.

  3. Correlation between accuracy of crowns fabricated using CAD/CAM and elastic deformation of CAD/CAM materials.

    PubMed

    Yara, Atsushi; Goto, Shin-ichi; Ogura, Hideo

    2004-12-01

    Full crowns were fabricated from three different materials (titanium, ceramic, and resin composite) at different rest diameters using a dental CAD/CAM system, and then their marginal discrepancy measured. The deflection of cylindrical specimens at 500 gf was measured using the same materials and diameters as for the accuracy measurement. Marginal discrepancy decreased as rest diameter increased, and at the same rest diameter the titanium crown had lower marginal discrepancy than ceramic and composite crowns. A significant correlation was found between marginal discrepancy of the crowns and deflection of the materials. This correlation was aptly expressed in the regression equation, MG = 4.54DF+53.9, where MG represented marginal discrepancy and DF represented deflection. This equation can be used as a good measure for new materials which have different modulus of elasticity.

  4. A simplified Red Bed Inclination Correction: Case Study from the Permian Esterel Group of France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, D.; Kodama, K. P.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic anisotropy-based inclinations corrections have been performed in the paleomagnetic laboratory at Lehigh University, on both hematite and magnetite-bearing sedimentary rocks. Results of these corrections indicate a latitudinal variation of inclination shallowing with the formations initially located at mid latitudes suffering from more shallowing than those initially closer to the equator, consistent with the tan (Im)= f * tan (If) relationship observed by King (1955) for inclination shallowing, where Im is the measured inclination and If is the field inclination during deposition. Shallowing of the paleomagnetic vectors can be expressed in terms of the flattening factor f, that relates tan (Im) to tan (If). Anisotropy- derived hematite f factors from the Maritime Provinces of Canada and Northwest China were combined with f factors derived from corrections that use models of geomagnetic field secular variation (the EI technique of Tauxe and Kent, 2004) on red bed Formations from North America, Greenland and Europe. The dataset was used to derive a probability density function for f. The mean f value will allow a simplified inclination correction for hematite-bearing red bed formations that are suspected to be affected by inclination shallowing. This approach was tested by correcting the Permian Esterel Group red beds from France: using the distribution mean f factor of 0.64 (±0.11, ±1 standard deviation), the corrected red bed paleopole becomes statistically indistinguishable from the paleopole measured for the Esterel Group volcanic rocks that have not suffered from inclination shallowing. f data was also compiled for magnetite-bearing sedimentary rocks from the Perforada Formation and the Valle Group from Baja California, Mexico, the Pigeon Point Formation of Central California, the Ladd and the Point Loma Formations from Southern California, the Nanaimo Group of British Columbia and the Deer Lake Group of Newfoundland that have been corrected for

  5. Rock magnetic evidence for inclination shallowing in the early Carboniferous Deer Lake Group red beds of western Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2010-04-01

    A paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of the Carboniferous Deer Lake Group red beds of Newfoundland was performed to detect and correct for inclination shallowing. Results indicate a primary remanence carried by magnetite, with a mean direction of D = 179.7°, I = 33.7°, α95 = 7.2° which corresponds to a paleopole position of 22.2°N, 122.3°E, A95 = 7.6°. Correcting the inclination using anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence and the measured individual particle anisotropy gives a corrected direction of D = 178.8°, I = 50.9°, α95 = 6.3° corresponding to a paleopole position at 8.4°N, 122.7°E, A95 = 7.2°. This correction is larger than that of other red beds from the Maritime Provinces of Canada, but is consistent with paleoenvironmental reconstructions, placing North America in a more arid climate zone. Our inclination-corrected results have important implications for this portion of North America's apparent polar wander path and suggest a correction is needed for other red bed-derived APWPs. We have determined the range of flattening factors f, defined as the proportionality constant between the tangents of the measured (Im) and field (Io) inclinations, tan(Im) = ftan(I0), from this study and previous inclination correction studies to estimate inclination corrections. Using the range of haematite f factors observed in this study to correct the Neogene red bed inclinations from the Vallès-Penedès Basin (NE Spain) yields inclinations consistent with the known geomagnetic field inclination in the Neogene, thus indicating that the range of f factors reported here may be used to estimate the magnitude of inclination shallowing in red beds.

  6. Light-trapping properties of the Si inclined nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaopeng; Huangfu, Huichao; He, Long; Wang, Jiazhuang; Yang, Dong; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    The light trapping performance of Si nanowire with different inclination angles were systematically studied by COMSOL Multiphysics. The inclined nanowires with inclination angles smaller than 60° show greater light trapping ability than their counterparts of the vertical nanowires. The Si solar cell with the inclined nanowires of the optimal parameters, whose θ=30°, P=400 nm, D=140 nm, can achieve a 32.395 mA/cm2 short circuit photocurrent density and a 35.655% conversion efficiency. The study of the inclined nanowire provides an effective way for further utilization of the incoming light.

  7. a Modified Method for Image Triangulation Using Inclined Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsadik, Bashar

    2016-06-01

    The ongoing technical improvements in photogrammetry, Geomatics, computer vision (CV), and robotics offer new possibilities for many applications requiring efficient acquisition of three-dimensional data. Image orientation is one of these important techniques in many applications like mapping, precise measurements, 3D modeling and navigation. Image orientation comprises three main techniques of resection, intersection (triangulation) and relative orientation, which are conventionally solved by collinearity equations or by using projection and fundamental matrices. However, different problems still exist in the state - of -the -art of image orientation because of the nonlinearity and the sensitivity to proper initialization and spatial distribution of the points. In this research, a modified method is presented to solve the triangulation problem using inclined angles derived from the measured image coordinates and based on spherical trigonometry rules and vector geometry. The developed procedure shows promising results compared to collinearity approach and to converge to the global minimum even when starting from far approximations. This is based on the strong geometric constraint offered by the inclined angles that are enclosed between the object points and the camera stations. Numerical evaluations with perspective and panoramic images are presented and compared with the conventional solution of collinearity equations. The results show the efficiency of the developed model and the convergence of the solution to global minimum even with improper starting values.

  8. [The method of esthetic crown restoration with composite resin jacket crown in primary molars].

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Shibui, N; Suda, M; Uehara, M; Karibe, H; Kondou, K

    1990-10-01

    The term "esthetics" has recently been also used in the dental field, and a field called esthetic dentistry is increasingly being noted. The number of not only adult but also pediatric patients who visit for treatment aiming at esthetic recovery is being increased. Inpedodontics, composite resin of the coronal color is generally used in the restoration of deciduous incisors. However, the method using metal crowns for the deciduous teeth is used for the deciduous molars at present. We applied a composite resin jacket crown to the deciduous molar in a way similar to that of esthetic crown restoration for the anterior teeth. The surgical procedure before crown preparation varied slightly according to the presence or absence of pulpal treatment of vital teeth and with non-vital teeth, but the application was performed as follows: 1) Desensitization of pulp, pulpal treatment and core construction. 2) Preparation of crown. 3) Selection, trial set and occlusal equilibration of a metal crown for the deciduous tooth. 4) Precision impression with a silicone impression material. 5) Removal of the metal crown for the deciduous tooth from the impression material. 6) Making of an under-cut to the abutment tooth on the buccal lingual side. 7) Filling of the impression with chemical polymerization resin. 8) Application of pressure in the oral cavity. 9) Adjustment of edge and crown forms. Thus, the preparation method for the composite resin jacket crown was relatively simple. Since this surgery, the patient has been followed up for 1 year and 6 months, and no specifically troublesome points have been observed clinically. The patient and her parents are satisfied with the results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. A basic study on the production of enriched isotope {}^{48}Ca by using crown-ether resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Kakubata, H.; Nomura, M.; Kaneshiki, T.; Suzuki, T.; Fujii, Y.; Nemoto, S.

    2015-05-01

    The use of enriched ^{48}Ca is expected to improve the sensitivity of ^{48}Ca double beta decay measurements. We have studied the enrichment of ^{48}Ca with chemical exchange isotope separation using benzo-18-crown-6-ether resin. Chromatographic migrations of the calcium adsorption band were carried out at different migration lengths, 1 m, 20 m, and 200 m, using glass columns. Separation coefficients were observed as approximately 3 × 10^{-3}. Efforts have been made towards the production of benzo-18-crown-6-ether monomer at reasonable cost for the production of crown-ether resin for the separation of ^{48}Ca.

  10. Crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness of mandibular second bicuspids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sérgio Augusto; Vellini-Ferreira, Flávio; Scavone-Junior, Helio; Ferreira, Rívea Inês

    2011-01-01

    To achieve proper recontouring of anterior and posterior teeth, to obtain optimal morphology during enamel stripping, it is important to be aware of dental anatomy. This study aimed at evaluating crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness in a sample of 40 extracted sound, human, mandibular, second bicuspids (20 right and 20 left). Mesiodistal, cervico-occlusal and buccolingual crown dimensions were measured using a digital caliper, accurate to 0.01 mm. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and cut along their long axes through the proximal surfaces to obtain 0.7 mm-thick central sections. Enamel thickness on the cut sections was measured using a perfilometer. Comparative analyses were carried out using the Student's-t test (α= 5%). The mean mesiodistal crown widths for right and left teeth were 7.79 mm (± 0.47) and 7.70 mm (± 0.51), respectively. Mean cervico-occlusal heights ranged from 8.31 mm (± 0.75) on the right to 8.38 mm (± 0.85) on the left teeth. The mean values for the buccolingual dimension were 8.67 mm (± 0.70) on the right and 8.65 mm (± 0.54) on the left teeth. The mean enamel thickness on the mesial surfaces ranged from 1.35 mm (± 0.22) to 1.40 mm (± 0.17), on the left and right sides, respectively. On the distal surfaces, the corresponding values were 1.44 mm (± 0.21) and 1.46 mm (± 0.12). No significant differences were found between measurements for right and left teeth. However, enamel thickness was significantly greater on the distal surfaces, compared with the mesial surfaces.

  11. Growth rates of great egret, snowy egret and black-crowned night-heron chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Growth rates of Great Erget (Casmerodius albus), Snowy Erget (Egretta thula), and Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) chicks to 18 days-of-age were estimated from repeated measurements of chicks in broods of three young. Weight gain (g/day) or increase in length (mm/day) of forearm, tarsus, or culmen did not between Black-crowned Night-Heron chicks at a colony in Rhode Island and a colony in Texas (USA). In Black-crowned night-Herons and Great Egrets, the last chick (C-chick) to hatch had lower growth rates than the first (A-) or second (B-) hatched chick. Black-crowned Night-Heron and Great Egret A-chicks gained weight faster than Snowy Egret A-chicks; however growth rates of the forearm, tarsus, or culmen each were not different among the three species. Equations based on the growth rate of culmen, forearm, or tarsus for repeatedly measured A-chicks estimated age of Great Egret, Snowy Egret, and Black-crowned Night-Heron chicks collected elsewhere to within two days of known age.

  12. Tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hmaidouch, Rim; Weigl, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to assess tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region in vitro and in vivo. An electronic PubMed search was conducted to identify studies on tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region. The selected studies were analyzed in regard to type of crowns, natural antagonist, measuring protocol and outcome. From a yield of 1 000 titles, 43 articles were selected for full-text analysis; finally, no in vitro and only five in vivo studies met the inclusion criteria. As there is heterogeneity in design, used measuring method, ceramics and analysis-form, a meta-analysis was not possible. Results of these studies are very controversial which makes a scientifically valid comparison impossible. This review indicated that some all-ceramic crowns are as wear friendly as metal-ceramic crowns. Up to now, it has been impossible to associate tooth wear with any specific causal agent. The role of ceramic surface treatment that might be responsible for the changing in rate of tooth wear seems undetermined as yet through clinical trials. The literature reveals that studies on this topic are subject to a substantial amount of bias. Therefore, additional clinical studies, properly designed to diminish bias, are warranted. PMID:24136675

  13. The speed of an inclined ruck.

    PubMed

    Balmforth, N J; Craster, R V; Hewitt, I J

    2015-01-08

    Steady rucks in an elastic beam can roll at constant speed down an inclined plane. We examine the dynamics of these travelling-wave structures and argue that their speed can be dictated by a combination of the physical conditions arising in the vicinity of the 'contact points' where the beam is peeled off the underlying plane and stuck back down. We provide three detailed models for the contact dynamics: viscoelastic fracture, a thermodynamic model for bond formation and detachment and adhesion mediated by a thin liquid film. The results are compared with experiments.

  14. Braiding patterns on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Keith; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Vorobieff, Peter

    2004-07-08

    A jet of fluid flowing down a partially wetting, inclined plane usually meanders but--by maintaining a constant flow rate--meandering can be suppressed, leading to the emergence of a beautiful braided structure. Here we show that this flow pattern can be explained by the interplay between surface tension, which tends to narrow the jet, and fluid inertia, which drives the jet to widen. These observations dispel misconceptions about the relationship between braiding and meandering that have persisted for over 20 years.

  15. Sexual dimorphism in deciduous crown traits of a European derived Australian sample.

    PubMed

    Adler, C J; Donlon, D

    2010-06-15

    Sex determination of juvenile skeletal remains is a problematic area affecting physical anthropology, forensic science and archaeology. Sexual dimorphism in the morphometric crown traits of the deciduous dentition may be used to help resolve this issue. Dental stone casts from a European derived Australian sample (n=151) were used to investigate variation within crown traits of the deciduous canine and molars. The metric traits investigated were crown size, trigonid size and talonid size. The morphological features included Carabelli's trait and molar cusp number. Metric crown traits were significantly larger in males (p<0.05). The morphological crown traits were not significantly different between the sexes. The largest degree of sexual dimorphism was 11.11% in the trigonid mesiodistal diameter of the first deciduous molar. This is the first recording of the measurement in a European derived sample. Two multivariate statistics, linear functional discriminant analysis and binary logistic regression, were used to determine the success rate of sex classification from the crown traits. The most suitable was linear functional discriminant analysis, however similar results were found when using binary logistic regression. When using all variables investigated in this study, sex could be classified with accuracy of 70.2% from linear functional discriminant analysis (cross validated). The mandibular teeth had greater sexual dimorphism, classifying sex correctly 74.8% of the time compared to maxillary variables that had a success rate of 55.6%. Our results have shown that morphometric crown traits in the deciduous dentition can be used to classify sex of juvenile skeletons (11 months to 12 years) of European descent from linear functional discriminant analysis with accuracy between 70.2% and 74.8%.

  16. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Kiran Kumar; Patil, Veena Ashok; John, Jiji

    2012-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20) patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening) and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI) & (GI), Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS), Probing depth (PD), and Biologic Width (BW). Statistical Analysis Used. Student "t" Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group) and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group) and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening.

  17. Comparative analysis of trunk muscle activities in climbing of during upright climbing at different inclination angles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung-Joon; Kim, Joong-Hwi; Kim, Jang-Hwan; Choi, Byeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to provide evidence for the therapeutic exercise approach through a compative analysis of muscle activities according to climbing wall inclination. [Subjects and Methods] Twentyfour healthy adult subjects without climbing experience performed static exercises at a therapeutic climbing at with various inclination angles (0°, 10°, 20°), and the activities of the trunk muscles (rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, erector spinae) were measured using surface electromyography (EMG) for 7 seconds. [Results] Significant differences were found between the inclination angles of 10° and 0°, as well as 20° in the rectus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, right obliquus externus abdominis, and right erector spinae. [Conclusion] Based on measurements of trunk muscle activity in a static climbing standing position at different angles, significant changes in muscle activity appear to be induced at 10 degrees. Therefore, the results appear to provide clinically relevant evidence. PMID:26644661

  18. Experimental investigation of the effect of multimodal inclined interface on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghar, Mohammad; Carter, John; Musci, Benjamin; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    In the Georgia Tech Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory, the evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) which arises from two initial conditions, namely, a predominantly single mode, inclined interface between two gases, and a perturbed, multimodal, inclined interface are studied. The gas combination of nitrogen-acetone as light gas and carbon dioxide as heavy gas (Atwood number of 0.23) with an inclination angle of 80 degrees (η/ λ = 0.097) was chosen in this set of experiments. The interface is visualized using planar laser diagnostics (simultaneous PLIF/PIV measurements), once impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.55. The ensemble-averaged turbulence measurements of the density, velocity and density-velocity cross-statistics are used to investigate the effects of added secondary modes to the interface on the correlation between turbulence and mixing quantities.

  19. Tree Crown Mapping in Managed Woodlands (Parklands) of Semi-Arid West Africa Using WorldView-2 Imagery and Geographic Object Based Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karlson, Martin; Reese, Heather; Ostwald, Madelene

    2014-01-01

    Detailed information on tree cover structure is critical for research and monitoring programs targeting African woodlands, including agroforestry parklands. High spatial resolution satellite imagery represents a potentially effective alternative to field-based surveys, but requires the development of accurate methods to automate information extraction. This study presents a method for tree crown mapping based on Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) that use spectral and geometric information to detect and delineate individual tree crowns and crown clusters. The method was implemented on a WorldView-2 image acquired over the parklands of Saponé, Burkina Faso, and rigorously evaluated against field reference data. The overall detection rate was 85.4% for individual tree crowns and crown clusters, with lower accuracies in areas with high tree density and dense understory vegetation. The overall delineation error (expressed as the difference between area of delineated object and crown area measured in the field) was 45.6% for individual tree crowns and 61.5% for crown clusters. Delineation accuracies were higher for medium (35–100 m2) and large (≥100 m2) trees compared to small (<35 m2) trees. The results indicate potential of GEOBIA and WorldView-2 imagery for tree crown mapping in parkland landscapes and similar woodland areas. PMID:25460815

  20. An in vitro evaluation of the integrity of stainless steel crown margins cemented with different luting agents.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, R L; Kambhu, P P; Asmussen, C M; Damiano, P C

    1998-01-01

    The elderly population is retaining more teeth which require extensive restorations. The purpose of this study was to identify a luting agent which had the least marginal breakdown when used with stainless steel crowns. Thirty-six caries-free molars were selected, prepared for stainless steel crowns, and embedded in acrylic to support the crown and tooth. The crowns (Unitek/3M) were cemented with 4 different luting agents: (A) Fleck's Cement, (B) Ketac-Cem, (C) All-Bond C & B Cement, and (D) Panavia EX Cement. All the restored teeth were thermocycled and divided into 3 experimental groups. Twelve teeth were stained. The remaining teeth were occlusally loaded and stained. The remaining 12 teeth were thermocycled and stained again. The stainless steel crowns were then sectioned and photographed at 7.5x mag. The dye penetration was evaluated by measurement of the percentage of dye penetration from the crown margin to the cusp tip on each side. Statistical analysis found that the least dye penetration was with All-Bond C & B Cement (p = 0.0001). The most extensive penetration was observed in Ketac-Cem Occlusal loading was a significant factor (p = 0.0001) increasing the dye penetration, but the crown-tooth gap was not.

  1. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-01-01

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns. PMID:27023532

  2. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-03-25

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  3. Influence of cementation and cement type on the fracture load testing methodology of anterior crowns made of different materials.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Beuer, Florian; Ender, Andreas; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Wimmer, Timea

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of cementation on fracture load of anterior crowns made of CAD/CAM-resin-blocks (ART), leucite-reinforced glass-ceramics (LRG), lithium disilicate ceramics (LIT), veneered zirconia (ZRO) and veneered alloy (DEG). Each crown group (n=15/subgroup) was cemented on the metal abutment as follows: i. using glass ionomer, ii. using self-adhesive resin cement, and iii. not cemented. Crowns were tested and analyzed with 2-way and 1-way ANOVA (Scheffé test), and Weibull statistics (p<0.05). Within LRG, self-adhesive cemented subgroup showed higher fracture load compared to other groups (p<0.001). Among DEG, lower results were measured for non-cemented crowns than for cemented (p<0.001). For ART, LIT and ZRO no influence of cementation was observed. For fracture load test methodology, metal ceramic crowns should be generally cemented. Glass-ceramic crowns should be cemented using adhesive cement. Cementation and cement type did not have an influence on the fracture load results for resin, zirconia or lithium disilicate crowns.

  4. 28. Photocopy of Crown Roller Mill illustration; originally published in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of Crown Roller Mill illustration; originally published in The Crown Roller Mill, Northwestern Miller 9 (May 21, 1880): 321; SHOWING WEST SIDE, LOOKING EAST - Crown Roller Mill, 105 Fifth Avenue, South, West Side Milling District, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  5. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  6. Evaluation of wild juglans species for crown gall resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A. tumefaciens is a soil-borne Gram-negative bacterium which causes crown gall on many dicotyledonous plant species including walnut. Crown gall symptoms on walnut are characterized by large tumors located near the crown of the tree but can occur near wounds caused by bleeding cuts or at the graft u...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  8. Vortex Formation Behind an Inclined 2-Dimensional Thin Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebi, Meraj; Wood, David H.; Martinuzzi, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry was used to measure the turbulent wake of a 2D flat plate inclined relative to a uniform stream as a heuristic model for airfoils and wind turbine blades at high incidence. Phase Averaging was performed to study the vortex dynamics and relate these to the force characteristics. Below 90°, immediately behind the plate, rounder and more organized trailing edge vortices form which possess higher circulation and are associated with higher Reynolds stresses than the counter-rotating, weaker and elongated leading edge vortices. The quasi-periodically shed vortices on the sides of the wake decay in strength at different rates to reach a circulation ratio of -1 within a distance less than 5 chords downstream of the plate for all angles. This equalization of vortex strength is related to an increase in turbulence diffusion, due to mostly-incoherent 3-dimensionality which progressively increases as the inclination angle is reduced, and convective transfer of vorticity between counter-rotating vortices. The wake experiences a sudden change in vortex formation mechanism at around 40°. At this angle, the frequency analysis on the signals of a pair of micro-pressure transducers in the wake also shows a discontinuity in the trends. This work was supported by NSERC Discovery grants to R. J. Martinuzzi and D. H. Wood.

  9. Tenebrio beetles use magnetic inclination compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vácha, Martin; Drštková, Dana; Půžová, Tereza

    2008-08-01

    Animals that guide directions of their locomotion or their migration routes by the lines of the geomagnetic field use either polarity or inclination compasses to determine the field polarity (the north or south direction). Distinguishing the two compass types is a guideline for estimation of the molecular principle of reception and has been achieved for a number of animal groups, with the exception of insects. A standard diagnostic method to distinguish a compass type is based on reversing the vertical component of the geomagnetic field, which leads to the opposite reactions of animals with two different compass types. In the present study, adults of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor were tested by means of a two-step laboratory test of magnetoreception. Beetles that were initially trained to memorize the magnetic position of the light source preferred, during the subsequent test, this same direction, pursuant geomagnetic cues only. In the following step, the vertical component was reversed between the training and the test. The beetles significantly turned their preferred direction by 180°. Our results brought until then unknown original findings that insects, represented here by the T. molitor species, use—in contrast to another previously researched Arthropod, spiny lobster—the inclination compass.

  10. Nonlocal modeling of granular flows down inclines.

    PubMed

    Kamrin, Ken; Henann, David L

    2015-01-07

    Flows of granular media down a rough inclined plane demonstrate a number of nonlocal phenomena. We apply the recently proposed nonlocal granular fluidity model to this geometry and find that the model captures many of these effects. Utilizing the model's dynamical form, we obtain a formula for the critical stopping height of a layer of grains on an inclined surface. Using an existing parameter calibration for glass beads, the theoretical result compares quantitatively to existing experimental data for glass beads. This provides a stringent test of the model, whose previous validations focused on driven steady-flow problems. For layers thicker than the stopping height, the theoretical flow profiles display a thickness-dependent shape whose features are in agreement with previous discrete particle simulations. We also address the issue of the Froude number of the flows, which has been shown experimentally to collapse as a function of the ratio of layer thickness to stopping height. While the collapse is not obvious, two explanations emerge leading to a revisiting of the history of inertial rheology, which the nonlocal model references for its homogeneous flow response.

  11. Sound radiation from a flanged inclined duct.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Alan; Daymond-King, Alex P; Kempton, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    A simple method to calculate sound radiation from a flanged inclined duct is presented. An inclined annular duct is terminated by a rigid vertical plane. The duct termination is representative of a scarfed exit. The concept of a scarfed duct has been examined in turbofan aero-engines as a means to, potentially, shield a portion of the radiated sound from being transmitted directly to the ground. The sound field inside the annular duct is expressed in terms of spinning modes. Exterior to the duct, the radiated sound field owing to each mode can be expressed in terms of its directivity pattern, which is found by evaluating an appropriate form of Rayleigh's integral. The asymmetry is shown to affect the amplitude of the principal lobe of the directivity pattern, and to alter the proportion of the sound power radiated up or down. The methodology detailed in this article provides a simple engineering approach to investigate the sound radiation for a three-dimensional problem.

  12. Aspergillosis in a red-crowned crane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroud, R.K.; Duncan, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    An unusual form of pulmonary aspergillosis in a red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) is described in this report. The major lesion is unique because it closely resembles a lesion referred to as an aspergilloma. An aspergilloma is a single large granulomatous lesion that resembles a tumor and is caused by fungi of the genus Aspergillus.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed crown. 872.3330 Section 872.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... device also may be intended for use as a functional restoration for a badly decayed deciduous...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed crown. 872.3330 Section 872.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... device also may be intended for use as a functional restoration for a badly decayed deciduous...

  15. PREFORMED METAL CROWNS FOR THE PERMANENT DENTITION.

    PubMed

    Millar, Lynsey M; Cairns, Alison M; Fowler, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    Preformed metal crowns have a range of uses in paediatric dentistry in both the primary and permanent dentition. This article provides an overview of their use in permanent teeth, including teeth that have been affected by molar incisor hypomineralisation, caries, developmental defects and tooth surface loss. The indications for use are described, along with the clinical technique for placement

  16. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after removal of, or breakage of, the natural crown (that portion of the tooth that normally protrudes above the...) tooth until the adult tooth erupts. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after removal of, or breakage of, the natural crown (that portion of the tooth that normally protrudes above the...) tooth until the adult tooth erupts. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is...

  18. Crowning achievement: a case of dental aspiration.

    PubMed

    Mark, Nicholas M; Lessing, Juan N; Çoruh, Başak

    2015-12-01

    Aspiration of foreign bodies during dental procedures is a rare but potentially serious complication. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who aspirated a dental crown requiring flexible bronchoscopic retrieval. We discuss the risk factors for aspiration, the radiographic features of diagnosis, and the techniques for management and retrieval.

  19. Crowning achievement: a case of dental aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Nicholas M.; Lessing, Juan N.; Çoruh, Başak

    2015-01-01

    Aspiration of foreign bodies during dental procedures is a rare but potentially serious complication. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who aspirated a dental crown requiring flexible bronchoscopic retrieval. We discuss the risk factors for aspiration, the radiographic features of diagnosis, and the techniques for management and retrieval. PMID:26649115

  20. Stress and Reliability Analysis of a Metal-Ceramic Dental Crown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Sokolowski, Todd M.; Hojjatie, Barry; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses with the flaws and microcracks within the ceramic region of metal-ceramic dental crowns can result in catastrophic or delayed failure of these restorations. The objective of this study was to determine the combined influence of induced functional stresses and pre-existing flaws and microcracks on the time-dependent probability of failure of a metal-ceramic molar crown. A three-dimensional finite element model of a porcelain fused-to-metal (PFM) molar crown was developed using the ANSYS finite element program. The crown consisted of a body porcelain, opaque porcelain, and a metal substrate. The model had a 300 Newton load applied perpendicular to one cusp, a load of 30ON applied at 30 degrees from the perpendicular load case, directed toward the center, and a 600 Newton vertical load. Ceramic specimens were subjected to a biaxial flexure test and the load-to-failure of each specimen was measured. The results of the finite element stress analysis and the flexure tests were incorporated in the NASA developed CARES/LIFE program to determine the Weibull and fatigue parameters and time-dependent fracture reliability of the PFM crown. CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/Or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program.

  1. Alveolar bone thickness around maxillary central incisors of different inclination assessed with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Sun, Hong-jing; Lv, Pin; Cao, Yu-ming; Yu, Mo; Yue, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the labial and lingual alveolar bone thickness in adults with maxillary central incisors of different inclination by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods Ninety maxillary central incisors from 45 patients were divided into three groups based on the maxillary central incisors to palatal plane angle; lingual-inclined, normal, and labial-inclined. Reformatted CBCT images were used to measure the labial and lingual alveolar bone thickness (ABT) at intervals corresponding to every 1/10 of the root length. The sum of labial ABT and lingual ABT at the level of the root apex was used to calculate the total ABT (TABT). The number of teeth exhibiting alveolar fenestration and dehiscence in each group was also tallied. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference test were applied for statistical analysis. Results The labial ABT and TABT values at the root apex in the lingual-inclined group were significantly lower than in the other groups (p < 0.05). Lingual and labial ABT values were very low at the cervical level in the lingual-inclined and normal groups. There was a higher prevalence of alveolar fenestration in the lingual-inclined group. Conclusions Lingual-inclined maxillary central incisors have less bone support at the level of the root apex and a greater frequency of alveolar bone defects than normal maxillary central incisors. The bone plate at the marginal level is also very thin. PMID:26445719

  2. Fiber optic inclination detector system having a weighted sphere with reference points

    DOEpatents

    Cwalinski, Jeffrey P.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic inclination detector system for determining the angular displacement of an object from a reference surface includes a simple mechanical transducer which requires a minimum number of parts and no electrical components. The system employs a single light beam which is split into two light beams and provided to the transducer. Each light beam is amplitude modulated upon reflecting off the transducer to detect inclination. The power values associated with each of the reflected light beams are converted by a pair of photodetectors into voltage signals, and a microprocessor manipulates the voltage signals to provide a measure of the angular displacement between the object and the reference surface.

  3. PHASES differential astrometry and the mutual inclination of the V819 Herculis triple star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, M. W.; Lane, B. F.; Konacki, M.; Burke, B. F.; Colavita, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Shao, M.

    2006-02-01

    V819 Herculis is a well-studied triple star system consisting of a "wide" pair with 5.5 year period, one component of which is a 2.2-day period eclipsing single-line spectroscopic binary. Differential astrometry measurements from the Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) are presented and used to determine a relative inclination between the short- and long-period orbits of 23.6 ± 4.9 degrees. This represents only the sixth unambiguous determination of the mutual inclination of orbits in a hierarchical triple system. This result is combined with those for the other five systems for analysis of the observed distribution of mutual inclinations in nearby triple systems. It is found that this distribution is different than that which one would expect from random orientations with statistical significance at the 94% level; implications for studying the spatial distribution of angular momentum in star forming regions is discussed.

  4. Bimolecular gas-phase exchange of alkali metals between cationized biomolecules and neutral crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M.; Dearden, D.V.; Hofstadler, S.

    1995-12-31

    Electrospray ionization of polypeptides and nucleic acids often yields ions containing sodium or potassium charge carriers. These alkali adducts are frequently the residue of ionic buffers used to preserve protein conformation in solution or artifacts of a natural matrix such as blood plasma. Measures taken in solution to desalinate these samples are hindered by the desire to maintain native conformation. The authors here show that ion-molecule chemistry is an alternate means of removing alkali metal ions from multiply-charged biomolecules. Ion-molecule reactions of multiply charged polypeptides with crown ethers result in adduction of the crown if protons are the only charge bearing species, or desalting if alkali metals are among the charge carriers. Both product ions, the desalted peptide and the crown/alkali metal complex, are observed in the latter case.

  5. The effect of laser irradiation on retention of full cast crowns.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, W M; Palamara, J E; Almohammed, S N

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect on the retention force of full cast crowns cemented on short tooth preparations after preparation of dentine with an erbium, chromium: yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er, Cr:YSGG) laser at different sub-ablative power settings. Thirty teeth were prepared for full cast crowns using a milling machine. The surface area for all preparations was measured. The surfaces of the preparations were irradiated with 0 (control), 0.25 and 0.75 W laser. The crowns were cemented with self-cure resin cement and tested for retention on a Hounsfield Tensometer machine. The 0.75 W power setting produced the highest failure load value (346.2 +/- 86.1 N) and was significantly higher than the other groups. There were no significant differences between the 0.25 W and 0 W control groups

  6. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant.

  7. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of an inclined nanowire array solar cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-11-30

    An innovative solar cell based on inclined p-i-n nanowire array is designed and analyzed. The results show that the inclined geometry can sufficiently increase the conversion efficiency of solar cells by enhancing the absorption of light in the active region. By tuning the nanowire array density, nanowire diameter, nanowire length, as well as the proportion of intrinsic region of the inclined nanowire solar cell, a remarkable efficiency in excess of 16% can be obtained in GaAs. Similar results have been obtained in InP and Si nanowire solar cells, demonstrating the universality of the performance enhancement of inclined nanowire arrays.

  8. Impact of flow inclination on downwind turbine loads and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, C.; Chokani, N.; Abhari, R. S.; Hashimoto, T.; Watanabe, M.; Sano, T.; Saeki, M.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbines frequently operate under situations of pronounced flow inclinations, such as in complex terrain. In the present work the performance and rotor thrust of downwind and upwind turbines in upward and downward flow inclinations are experimentally investigated. In an upward flow inclination of +13°, downwind turbines are shown to have a 29% larger power output than a corresponding upwind turbine, whereas the relative increase in rotor thrust is only 9%. Furthermore, it is also shown that the performance of downwind turbines is less sensitive to changes in the flow inclination, as the upstream nacelle on downwind turbines beneficially redirects and accelerates the flow around the nacelle into the rotor plane.

  9. Detection of very inclined showers with the Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Nellen, Lukas; /Mexico U., ICN

    2005-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory can detect air showers with high efficiency at large zenith angles with both the fluorescence and surface detectors. Since half the available solid angle corresponds to zeniths between 60 and 90 degrees, a large number of inclined events can be expected and are indeed observed. In this paper, we characterize the inclined air showers detected by the Observatory and we present the aperture for inclined showers and an outlook of the results that can be obtained in future studies of the inclined data set.

  10. Differences in articular-eminence inclination between medieval and contemporary human populations.

    PubMed

    Kranjčić, Josip; Vojvodić, Denis; Žabarović, Domagoj; Vodanović, Marin; Komar, Daniel; Mehulić, Ketij

    2012-08-01

    The articular-eminence inclination is an important element in the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint and the entire masticatory system; however, very little is known about this inclination in archaeological human populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the values of, in addition to the differences between, the articular-eminence inclination in medieval and contemporary human populations. The study was carried out on two dry skull groups. The first group consisted of 14 dry skulls from the medieval culture group Bijelo Brdo (BB) of East Croatia, and the other consisted of 137 recent dry skulls from the osteologic collection of the Institute of Anatomy (IA) in Zagreb. All BB skulls were dentulous, whereas the IA skulls were divided into dentulous and edentulous groups. The articular-eminence inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal plane on digital images of the skull's two lateral views using AutoCAD computer software. The mean value of the articular-eminence inclination in the BB sample group (49.57°) was lower, with a statistical significance (p<0.01), than those of the IA dentulous (61.56°), the IA edentulous (62.54°), and all the combined IA (61.99°) specimens. Because the values of the articular-eminence inclination can vary a lot with reference to the number of specimens and the different methods used for measuring, the obtained values yield only orientational information. Further investigations including a larger number of medieval specimens are needed to confirm the results obtained from this study.

  11. Detecting and correcting for paleomagnetic inclination shallowing of sedimentary rocks: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Kodama, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic anisotropy and the elongation/inclination (E-I) approaches have been increasingly employed as two important means for detecting and correcting the paleomagnetic inclination shallowing in sedimentary rocks that was first recognized sixty years ago. Both approaches are based on certain assumptions, and thus have advantages and intrinsic limitations in investigating shallow inclinations in sedimentary rocks. The E-I approach is relatively easy to use, but it needs a large dataset to adequately sample paleomagnetic directions due to paleosecular variation of the geomagnetic field. Also, slow sediment accumulation rates and local tectonics could lead to under- or over-corrections using the E-I approach. For the magnetic anisotropy technique, labor-intensive, sophisticated laboratory rock magnetic experiments are required in order to accurately determine both bulk magnetic anisotropy of remanence-carrying grains and magnetic anisotropy of an individual particle, i.e., "a" factor, of samples. Our review shows that, despite the intensive laboratory work necessary for applying anisotropy-based inclination corrections, it is worth investing the effort. In addition, the joint use of magnetic susceptibility and remanence anisotropy measurements as well as detailed rock magnetic measurements for determining the particle anisotropy "a" factor have the advantage of retrieving direct evidence of inclination shallowing and correcting for it with high confidence. We caution against use of either of the two approaches without full appreciation of the underlying assumptions and intrinsic limitations of each technique. The use and comparison of both techniques could provide the most robust inclination shallowing correction for sedimentary rocks.

  12. Unsteady granular flows down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parez, Stanislav; Aharonov, Einat; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The continuum description of granular flows is still a challenge despite their importance in many geophysical and industrial applications. We extend previous works, which have explored steady flow properties, by focusing on unsteady flows accelerating or decelerating down an inclined plane in the simple shear configuration. We solve the flow kinematics analytically, including predictions of evolving velocity and stress profiles and the duration of the transient stage. The solution shows why and how granular materials reach steady flow on slopes steeper than the angle of repose and how they decelerate on shallower slopes. The model might facilitate development of natural hazard assessment and may be modified in the future to explore unsteady granular flows in different configurations.

  13. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap

  14. Unsteady granular flows down an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Parez, Stanislav; Aharonov, Einat; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The continuum description of granular flows is still a challenge despite their importance in many geophysical and industrial applications. We extend previous works, which have explored steady flow properties, by focusing on unsteady flows accelerating or decelerating down an inclined plane in the simple shear configuration. We solve the flow kinematics analytically, including predictions of evolving velocity and stress profiles and the duration of the transient stage. The solution shows why and how granular materials reach steady flow on slopes steeper than the angle of repose and how they decelerate on shallower slopes. The model might facilitate development of natural hazard assessment and may be modified in the future to explore unsteady granular flows in different configurations.

  15. Transverse Bursts in Inclined Layer Convection: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Wiener, Richard; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2002-03-01

    We report experimental results on inclined layer convection in a fluid of Prandtl number σ ≈ 1. A codimension-two point divides regions of buoyancy-driven convection (longitudinal rolls) at lower angles from shear-driven convection (transverse rolls) at higher angles (Daniels et al. PRL 84: 5320, 2000). In the region of buoyancy-driven convection, near the codimension-two point, we observe longitudinal rolls with intermittent, localized, subharmonic transverse bursts. The patterns are spatiotemporally chaotic. With increasing temperature difference the bursts increase in duration and number. We examine the details of the bursting process (e.g. the energy of longitudinal, transverse, and mixed modes) and compare our results to bursting processes in other systems. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant DMR-0072077 and the IGERT program in nonlinear systems, grant DGE-9870631.

  16. Crown Features Extraction from Low Altitude AVIRIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjemiyo, S. O.; Roberts, D.; Ustin, S.

    2005-12-01

    Automated tree recognition and crown delineations are computer-assisted procedures for identifying individual trees and segmenting their crown boundaries on digital imagery. The success of the procedures is dependent on the quality of the image data and the physiognomy of the stand as evidence by previous studies, which have all used data with spatial resolution less than 1 m and average crown diameter to pixel size ratio greater than 4. In this study we explored the prospect of identifying individual tree species and extracting crown features from low altitude AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) data with spatial resolution of 4 m. The test site is a Douglas-fir and Western hemlock dominated old-growth conifer forest in the Pacific Northwest with average crown diameter of 12 m, which translates to a crown diameter pixel ratio less than 4 m; the lowest value ever used in similar studies. The analysis was carried out using AVIRIS reflectance imagery in the NIR band centered at 885 nm wavelength. The analysis required spatial filtering of the reflectance imagery followed by application of a tree identification algorithm based on maximum filter technique. For every identified tree location a crown polygon was delineated by applying crown segmentation algorithm. Each polygon boundary was characterized by a loop connecting pixels that were geometrically determined to define the crown boundary. Crown features were extracted based on the area covered by the polygons, and they include crown diameters, average distance between crowns, species spectral, pixel brightness at the identified tree locations, average brightness of pixels enclosed by the crown boundary and within crown variation in pixel brightness. Comparison of the results with ground reference data showed a high correlation between the two datasets and highlights the potential of low altitude AVIRIS data to provide the means to improve forest management and practices and estimates of critical

  17. Favorable pressure gradient turbulent flow over straight and inclined ribs on both channel walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachie, Mark F.; Shah, Mohammad K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports on experimental study of turbulent flows over straight and inclined transverse ribs of square and triangular cross sections attached to the bottom and top walls of an asymmetric converging channel. The pitch-to-height ratio of the ribs was 10. A particle image velocimetry technique was used to conduct extensive velocity measurements at channel midspan and in planes close to the leading and trailing edges of the inclined ribs. From these measurements, spatial averaged profiles of the mean velocity and higher order statistics were obtained to study the effects of rib geometry, pressure gradient, spanwise plane, and rib inclination on the flow characteristics. The results show that rib geometry has no significant effects on the mean flow and turbulent quantities. The roughness effects produced by the straight ribs outweighed pressure gradient effects in the inner region of the flow. As a result, the skin friction coefficient is nearly independent of pressure gradient. The Reynolds shear stress and turbulent transport of the shear stress are also independent of pressure gradient. On the contrary, favorable pressure gradient decreased the Reynolds normal stresses in the outer region and increased the magnitudes of the triple velocity correlations and transport of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The three-dimensional secondary motion produced by the inclined ribs distorted the mean flow pattern and substantially diminished the ribs' effectiveness to augment skin friction and turbulence. For example, the skin friction over the inclined ribs is only 50%-70% of the value measured over the straight ribs. Furthermore, the size of equivalent sand grain required to produce the same amount of drag is one-tenth to one-third of the rib height for the inclined ribs compared to two- to fourfold for the straight ribs. The inclined ribs also reduced the level of the Reynolds stresses, triple velocity correlations, and transport of both the turbulent kinetic energy

  18. Oil spill fluorosensing lidar for inclined onshore or shipboard operation.

    PubMed

    Karpicz, Renata; Dementjev, Andrej; Kuprionis, Zenonas; Pakalnis, Saulius; Westphal, Rainer; Reuter, Rainer; Gulbinas, Vidmantas

    2006-09-01

    An oil spill detection fluorosensing lidar for onshore or shipboard operation is described. Some difficulties for its operation arise from the inclined path of rays. This is due to the increased reflection of the laser beam at the air-water interface, the decreased fluorescence signal, and the increased background light when compared with other instruments having a close-to-nadir measuring geometry. The analysis of these problems shows that they significantly reduce the detection distance in the presence of a flat water surface. However, waves on the water surface weaken the influence of the laser beam reflections but at the same time cause a variable fluorescence signal, which makes specific signal processing necessary for increased detection ranges. A fluorescence data processing method is proposed that efficiently eliminates the background water column fluorescence from signals such as yellow substance. This enables oil fluorescence to be distinguished from variable natural water fluorescence.

  19. Oil spill fluorosensing lidar for inclined onshore or shipboard operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpicz, Renata; Dementjev, Andrej; Kuprionis, Zenonas; Pakalnis, Saulius; Westphal, Rainer; Reuter, Rainer; Gulbinas, Vidmantas

    2006-09-01

    An oil spill detection fluorosensing lidar for onshore or shipboard operation is described. Some difficulties for its operation arise from the inclined path of rays. This is due to the increased reflection of the laser beam at the air-water interface, the decreased fluorescence signal, and the increased background light when compared with other instruments having a close-to-nadir measuring geometry. The analysis of these problems shows that they significantly reduce the detection distance in the presence of a flat water surface. However, waves on the water surface weaken the influence of the laser beam reflections but at the same time cause a variable fluorescence signal, which makes specific signal processing necessary for increased detection ranges. A fluorescence data processing method is proposed that efficiently eliminates the background water column fluorescence from signals such as yellow substance. This enables oil fluorescence to be distinguished from variable natural water fluorescence.

  20. Standing jumps in shallow granular flows down smooth inclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faug, Thierry; Childs, Philippa; Wyburn, Edward; Einav, Itai

    2015-07-01

    The shapes of standing jumps formed in shallow granular flows down an inclined smooth-based chute are analysed in detail, by varying both the slope and mass discharge. Laboratory tests and analytic jump solutions highlight two important transitions. First, for dense flows at high mass discharge, we observe a transition between steep jumps and more diffuse jumps. The traditional shallow-water equation offers a valid prediction for the thickness of the steep water-like jumps. Diffuse frictional jumps require a more general equation accounting for the forces acting inside the jump volume. Second, moving from dense to dilute flows produces another transition between incompressible and compressible jumps. The observed jump height decrease may be reproduced for a more dilute incoming flow by including experimentally measured density variation in the jump equation. Finally, we briefly discuss the likely relevance to avalanche protection dam design that currently utilises traditional shock equations for incompressible frictionless fluids.

  1. Treatment of crown fractures with pulp exposure.

    PubMed

    de Blanco, L P

    1996-11-01

    Thirty permanent incisors with vital pulps and complicated crown fractures were treated by a partial pulpotomy (Cvek technique). This consisted of amputation of 1 to 2 mm of the exposed pulp, placement of calcium hydroxide powder, and a temporary restoration. Clinical and radiographic assessment of the hard tissue barrier was done after 3 months and again after 1 to 8 years. The treatment was successful in all incisors. No differences were found in stage of root development, size of exposure, and length of time exposed. In conclusion, the partial pulpotomy technique is a successful and permanent treatment for crown fractures with pulp exposure regardless of the size of exposure, the maturity of the root, or the interval between accident and dental treatment.

  2. Radiolytic degradation of a crown ether for extractability of strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Noriaki; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Ema, Kimiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Nishizawa, Kazushige

    1999-11-01

    Dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC18C6), dissolved in chloroform, 1-octanol, toluene or cyclohexane, was irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. Radiolytic destruction of DC18C6, measured by gas chromatography, decreased in the order: chloroform > cyclohexane > 1-octanol > toluene. Distribution coefficients in the solvent extraction of strontium from nitric acid solution were measured. These distribution coefficients were minimally affected by {gamma}-irradiation in toluene solution, but decreased with the absorbed dose in chloroform solution. It was suggested that the distribution coefficient for the liquid-liquid extraction system was influenced by radiolytic products. The effect of radiolytic products on the distribution coefficients was evaluated by considering DC18C6 remaining in the organic phase after irradiation. The distribution coefficient measured for the organic phase with radiolytic products was larger than that without radiolytic products. The radiolytic products were thus shown to contribute to the increase in the distribution coefficient.

  3. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  4. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Oing; McBreen, James

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  5. The use of stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Seale, N Sue

    2002-01-01

    The stainless steel crown (SSC) is an extremely durable restoration with several clear-cut indications for use in primary teeth including: following a pulpotomy/pulpectomy; for teeth with developmental defects or large carious lesions involving multiple surfaces where an amalgam is likely to fail; and for fractured teeth. In other situations, its use is less clear cut, and caries risk factors, restoration longevity and cost effectiveness are considerations in decisions to use the SSC. The literature on caries risk factors in young children indicates that children at high risk exhibiting anterior tooth decay and/or molar caries may benefit by treatment with stainless steel crowns to protect the remaining at-risk tooth surfaces. Studies evaluating restoration longevity, including the durability and lifespan of SSCs and Class II amalgams demonstrate the superiority of SSCs for both parameters. Children with extensive decay, large lesions or multiple surface lesions in primary molars should be treated with stainless steel crowns. Because of the protection from future decay provided by their feature of full coverage and their increased durability and longevity, strong consideration should be given to the use of SSCs in children who require general anesthesia. Finally, a strong argument for the use of the SSC restoration is its cost effectiveness based on its durability and longevity.

  6. Operational Experiences in Planning and Reconstructing Aqua Inclination Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, David; Reilly, Jacqueline; Schiff, Conrad

    2004-01-01

    As the lead satellite in NASA's growing Earth Observing System (EOS) PM constellation, it is increasingly critical that Aqua maintain its various orbit requirements. The two of interest for this paper are maintaining an orbit inclination that provides for a consistent mean local time and a semi-major Axis (SMA) that allows for ground track repeatability. Maneuvers to adjust the orbit inclination involve several flight dynamics constraints and complexities which make planning such maneuvers challenging. In particular, coupling between the orbital and attitude degrees of freedom lead to changes in SMA when changes in inclination are effected. A long term mission mean local time trend analysis was performed in order to determine the size and placement of the required inclination maneuvers. Following this analysis, detailed modeling of each burn and its Various segments was performed to determine its effects on the immediate orbit state. Data gathered from an inclination slew test of the spacecraft and first inclination maneuver uncovered discrepancies in the modeling method that were investigated and resolved. The new modeling techniques were applied and validated during the second spacecraft inclination maneuver. These improvements should position Aqua to successfully complete a series of inclination maneuvers in the fall of 2004. The following paper presents the events and results related

  7. 46 CFR 111.01-19 - Inclination of the vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inclination of the vessel. 111.01-19 Section 111.01-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-19 Inclination of the vessel. (a) All electrical equipment must...

  8. Gaining Momentum: Re-Creating Galileo's Inclined Plane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

    1998-01-01

    Provides an excerpt of Galileo's description of his inclined plane experiment. Describes the replication of Galileo's inclined plane experiment by students at Rice University (Texas) using an Internet site called the Galileo Project; then describes the authors' replication of the Project. (AEF)

  9. A New Dynamics Cart on an Inclined Plane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodorsson, Pall

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experiment to study the acceleration of a cart moving up and down an inclined plane. Demonstrates how multitiming and the study of the movement in both directions allows the determination of the component of gravitational force along an inclined plane without any assumptions about friction. (JRH)

  10. 3. Inclined Plane 10, 1970. Track bed at left. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Inclined Plane 10, 1970. Track bed at left. View some what similar to that of NJ-30-2. Stone track bed is visible under cable system of NJ-30-2. - Morris Canal, Inclined Plane 10 West, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  11. 7. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF TOP OF INCLINED PLANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF TOP OF INCLINED PLANE AND EAST FACE OF CUT STONE TOWER - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  12. 40. CONSTRUCTION OF GALLERY NO. 3, SHOWING INCLINED PLANE USED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. CONSTRUCTION OF GALLERY NO. 3, SHOWING INCLINED PLANE USED TO TRANSPORT MATERIALS, ALSO SPOIL FROM TUNNEL INTERIOR. POWDER HOUSE AND TOOL SHED VISIBLE TO RIGHT OF BASE INCLINE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Tunnel, Two miles east of Zion Canyon Scenic Drive, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  13. Archimedes and the Golden Crown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Archimedes (287-212 BC) is well known for his explanation of buoyancy, and in particular for his "eureka" moment. This experiment uses his density measurement method to find the purity of gold, and additional confirmation of the findings are given by x-ray fluorescence. (Contains 4 figures and 1 table.)

  14. Spatial and seasonal variability of temperature responses of biochemical photosynthesis parameters and leaf nitrogen content within a Pinus densiflora crown.

    PubMed

    Han, Qingmin; Kawasaki, Tatsuro; Nakano, Takashi; Chiba, Yukihiro

    2004-07-01

    We measured seasonal variation in area-based nitrogen concentration (N), maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax) and maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax) in 1-year-old needles along four first-order branches within a Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc. crown, and analyzed their relationships to growth irradiance and temperature. Each leaf light environment was expressed as a ratio of the monthly mean of daily integrated photosynthetically active irradiance (Iint) for the particular needle to Iint above the canopy (Irel). Needle N decreased in the upper crown during the development of new needles, whereas it remained fairly constant in the lower crown, reflecting differences between upper and lower crown needles in their contribution to the nitrogen of new needles. Gradients of N within the crown were correlated with Irel in all seasons (r2 = 0.40-0.78). Seasonal variation in N was weakly correlated with mean daily air minimum temperatures. Both Vcmax and Jmax showed seasonal variation in all first-order branches, and decreased to their lowest values in winter. The gradients of Vcmax and Jmax within the crown were not correlated with Irel in some seasons, but were correlated with changes in N in most months (r2 = 0.33-0.75), except in the winter. Furthermore, the regression slope of the relationship between N and Vcmax and the temperature response of Vcmax and Jmax exhibited seasonal variation.

  15. Development and characterization of an inclined quad-vortex range hood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Lee, Ji-Heng

    2013-11-01

    In order to increase containment efficiency and reduce energy consumption, an inclined quad-vortex range hood (IQV range hood) was developed and tested by experimental methods. The flow structure was observed by a laser-assisted flow visualization technique and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Leakage characteristics were measured by the tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) detection method. By arranging a narrow suction slot on the bottom face of the hood and two side plates hanging under lateral faces of the hood, a flow field featuring four backwards-inclined vortical flow structures was formed at suction velocities of larger than about 10 m s(-1) (suction flow rate 7.2 m(3) min(-1)). Oil mists were coherently contained in the vortical flow structures without observable dispersion out of the vortices; they rose up spirally with inclination towards the rear wall and were inducted into the suction slot. The backwards inclination of the oil-mist-containing vortical flow structures, caused by the backwards offset arrangement of the suction slot and the Coanda effect, benefited from the reduction in pollutant leakage induced by the influence of a mannequin's presence. Experimental results using the tracer gas concentration detection method showed a close correlation with the results from the flow visualization and LDV measurements. Under both occupied and unoccupied conditions, in which the mannequin was either present or not present, the IQV range hood provided low SF6 leakage concentration levels.

  16. Vaulting mechanics successfully predict decrease in walk-run transition speed with incline.

    PubMed

    Hubel, Tatjana Y; Usherwood, James R

    2013-04-23

    There is an ongoing debate about the reasons underlying gait transition in terrestrial locomotion. In bipedal locomotion, the 'compass gait', a reductionist model of inverted pendulum walking, predicts the boundaries of speed and step length within which walking is feasible. The stance of the compass gait is energetically optimal-at walking speeds-owing to the absence of leg compression/extension; completely stiff limbs perform no work during the vaulting phase. Here, we extend theoretical compass gait vaulting to include inclines, and find good agreement with previous observations of changes in walk-run transition speed (approx. 1% per 1% incline). We measured step length and frequency for humans walking either on the level or up a 9.8 per cent incline and report preferred walk-run, walk-compliant-walk and maximum walk-run transition speeds. While the measured 'preferred' walk-run transition speed lies consistently below the predicted maximum walking speeds, and 'actual' maximum walking speeds are clearly above the predicted values, the onset of compliant walking in level as well as incline walking occurs close to the predicted values. These findings support the view that normal human walking is constrained by the physics of vaulting, but preferred absolute walk-run transition speeds may be influenced by additional factors.

  17. Vaulting mechanics successfully predict decrease in walk–run transition speed with incline

    PubMed Central

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Usherwood, James R.

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the reasons underlying gait transition in terrestrial locomotion. In bipedal locomotion, the ‘compass gait’, a reductionist model of inverted pendulum walking, predicts the boundaries of speed and step length within which walking is feasible. The stance of the compass gait is energetically optimal—at walking speeds—owing to the absence of leg compression/extension; completely stiff limbs perform no work during the vaulting phase. Here, we extend theoretical compass gait vaulting to include inclines, and find good agreement with previous observations of changes in walk–run transition speed (approx. 1% per 1% incline). We measured step length and frequency for humans walking either on the level or up a 9.8 per cent incline and report preferred walk–run, walk–compliant-walk and maximum walk–run transition speeds. While the measured ‘preferred’ walk–run transition speed lies consistently below the predicted maximum walking speeds, and ‘actual’ maximum walking speeds are clearly above the predicted values, the onset of compliant walking in level as well as incline walking occurs close to the predicted values. These findings support the view that normal human walking is constrained by the physics of vaulting, but preferred absolute walk–run transition speeds may be influenced by additional factors. PMID:23325739

  18. UNBIASED INCLINATION DISTRIBUTIONS FOR OBJECTS IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Adams, E. R.; Benecchi, S. D.; Buie, M. W.; Trilling, D. E.; Wasserman, L. H. E-mail: jle@mit.ed E-mail: lhw@lowell.ed E-mail: buie@boulder.swri.ed

    2010-08-15

    Using data from the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES), we investigate the inclination distributions of objects in the Kuiper Belt. We present a derivation for observational bias removal and use this procedure to generate unbiased inclination distributions for Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) of different DES dynamical classes, with respect to the Kuiper Belt plane. Consistent with previous results, we find that the inclination distribution for all DES KBOs is well fit by the sum of two Gaussians, or a Gaussian plus a generalized Lorentzian, multiplied by sin i. Approximately 80% of KBOs are in the high-inclination grouping. We find that Classical object inclinations are well fit by sin i multiplied by the sum of two Gaussians, with roughly even distribution between Gaussians of widths 2.0{sup +0.6}{sub -0.5}{sup 0} and 8.1{sup +2.6}{sub -2.1}{sup 0}. Objects in different resonances exhibit different inclination distributions. The inclinations of Scattered objects are best matched by sin i multiplied by a single Gaussian that is centered at 19.1{sup +3.9}{sub -3.6}{sup 0} with a width of 6.9{sup +4.1}{sub -2.7}{sup 0}. Centaur inclinations peak just below 20{sup 0}, with one exceptionally high-inclination object near 80{sup 0}. The currently observed inclination distribution of the Centaurs is not dissimilar to that of the Scattered Extended KBOs and Jupiter-family comets, but is significantly different from the Classical and Resonant KBOs. While the sample sizes of some dynamical classes are still small, these results should begin to serve as a critical diagnostic for models of solar system evolution.

  19. Debris dynamics under evection and inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Santos, M. T.; Celestino, C. C.; Winter, O. C.; Neto, E. V.; Cordeiro, R. R.

    The human activity in exploring the space has generated undesirable artificial debris Unfortunately the number of them is increasing so fast that a tremendous problem is arising The natural and artificial debris are distributed in a very large range of altitude and according to the semi major axis of the orbit the particle may survive for very long time For low altitude less than 200 km the life time of the particles is mostly dominated by the atmospheric drag while for more distant debris different disturbing forces should be considered and the dynamics is slight more complicated Although the maximum concentration of the debris is not at high altitude the problem at high altitudes is important since the mitigation mechanism to clean these regions is very slow Usually Poynting Robertson P-R effect and similar other forces are not efficient to remove rapidly the particles at high altitudes in opposition to human activities which are always feeding more rapidly almost any region of the space Therefore since the debris survive for very long time it is important to increase our theoretical knowledge on the dynamics of these regions In this work we show the existence of some important resonances which may give significant variations in the inclination and eccentricity of the particle In the case of the Earth they occur at about 10128 5 km and 12309 8 km and are related to a commensurability involving the mean longitude of the sun and

  20. Transverse Bursts in Inclined Layer Convection: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Brink, Jeandrew; Pesch, Werner

    2002-03-01

    We report theoretical and computational results on thermally driven inclined layer convection. For small Prandtl number fluids, experiments have reported bursting phenomena at both small angles, strong driving and high angles, weak driving (Daniels et al. PRL 84: 5320, 2000). Theoretically, the small angle, strong driving case was described by Clever and Busse (Physics of Fluids 12: 2137, 2000) and was connected to a subharmonic instability. At large angles, close to the codimension-two point, intermittent, localized, transverse subharmonic bursts occur at weak driving. Qualitatively, the bursts draw energy from the roll modes, exhaust them while growing, and die out when they are unable to find a new attractor. We investigate a connection between the small- and large-angle bursts. Using Galerkin methods and direct simulations of the underlying Boussinesq equations, we examine the extent to which they are related to a linear instability of the roll pattern. We address a possible connection to the shear flow turbulent bursts observed in Taylor-Couette flow. In addition, we present a theoretical analysis of the small Prandtl number case, for which the codimension-two point moves to zero angle. This work is supported by a Cornell Graduate Student Fellowship and by the National Science Foundation under grant DMR-0072077.

  1. Alternative crown systems. Is the metal-ceramic crown always the restoration of choice?

    PubMed

    Wall, J G; Cipra, D L

    1992-07-01

    The metal-ceramic crown system still is selected the most frequently because of its strength and versatility. The ability to select metals for color or strength for single units or fixed partial dentures gives great flexibility, but when esthetics of the anterior region are a prime concern, the all-ceramic crown is still an excellent choice. Choice of which all-ceramic system to use is dependent on the strength demands, esthetic needs, amount of tooth structure that can be preserved, and laboratory support available. Where good tooth structure remains but some color, contour, or incisal length changes are desired, the porcelain laminate veneer is an outstanding esthetic and restorative choice. When good labial tooth structure remains but lingual structure is inadequate, a partial veneer gold crown can be an excellent esthetic choice. If moderate tooth structure is lost or moderate staining is present, the Dicor crown is a superb choice. In those instances in which heavy staining is present, a foil or core system should be considered to completely block out the background colors. As the occlusal forces become more of a factor, selection of a restorative system will depend more on strength than esthetic demands. The aluminous porcelain jacket crown still offers great strength and esthetics at a reasonable price. When most of the color is on the surface of the teeth, or when there is a high translucency to the teeth, Dicor can provide very esthetic results, and the Dicor Plus crown offers the opportunity to develop intrinsic shading. When greater strength is required, selection of a foil and core system is suggested, as might be a system that provides a stronger core material, like Alceram or Inceram. These stronger core materials will render improved flexural and compressive strengths, but some increases in brightness may occur with the increased alumina content of the cores. The future in ceramic restorative dentistry may be in the computer-generated crown if ways

  2. Evaluation of the marginal and internal gap of metal-ceramic crown fabricated with a selective laser sintering technology: two- and three-dimensional replica techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hae-Young

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE One of the most important factors in evaluating the quality of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) is their gap. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal gap of two different metal-ceramic crowns, casting and selective laser sintering (SLS), before and after porcelain firing. Furthermore, this study evaluated whether metal-ceramic crowns made using the SLS have the same clinical acceptability as crowns made by the traditional casting. MATERIALS AND METHODS The 10 study models were produced using stone. The 20 specimens were produced using the casting and the SLS methods; 10 samples were made in each group. After the core gap measurements, 10 metal-ceramic crowns in each group were finished using the conventional technique of firing porcelain. The gap of the metal-ceramic crowns was measured. The marginal and internal gaps were measured by two-dimensional and three-dimensional replica techniques, respectively. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and nonparametric ANCOVA were used for statistical analysis (α=.05). RESULTS In both groups, the gap increased after completion of the metal-ceramic crown compared to the core. In all measured areas, the gap of the metal cores and metal-ceramic crowns produced by the SLS was greater than that of the metal cores and metal-ceramic crowns produced using the casting. Statistically significant differences were found between cast and SLS (metal cores and metal-ceramic crown). CONCLUSION Although the gap of the FDPs produced by the SLS was greater than that of the FDPs produced by the conventional casting in all measured areas, none exceeded the clinically acceptable range. PMID:23755345

  3. Zirconia crowns - the new standard for single-visit dentistry?

    PubMed

    Wiedhahn, Klaus; Fritzsche, Günter; Wiedhahn, Claudine; Schenk, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia crowns combine the advantages of metal restorations, such as minimally invasive tooth preparation and ease of cementation, with those of full ceramic crowns, such as low thermal conductivity and tooth color. With the introduction of a high-speed sintering procedure, it is possible to produce and cement zirconia crowns and small monolithic bridges in a Cerec Single Visit procedure. This new procedure is compared to established chairside methods.

  4. Characterization of Microsolvated Crown Ethers from Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Cristobal; Schnell, Melanie; Blanco, Susana; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Since they were first synthetized, crown ethers have been extensively used in organometallic chemistry due to their unparalleled binding selectivity with alkali metal cations. From a structural point of view, crown ethers are heterocycles containing oxygen and/or other heteroatoms, although the most common ones are formed from ethylene oxide unit. Crown ethers are conventionally seen as being hydrophilic inside and hydrophobic outside when the structures found for the metal cation complexes are considered. However, crown ethers are extremely flexible and in isolation may present a variety of stable conformations so that their structure may be easily adapted in presence of a strong ligand as an alkali metal cation minimize the energy of the resulting complex. Water can be considered a soft ligand which interacts with crown ethers through moderate hydrogen bonds. It is thus interesting to investigate which conformers are selected by water to form complexes, the preferred interaction sites and the possible conformational changes due to the presence of one or more water molecules. Previous studies identified microsolvated crown ethers but in all cases with a chromophore group attached to the structure. Here we present a broadband rotational spectroscopy study of microsolvated crown ethers produced in a pulsed molecular jet expansion. Several 1:1 and 1:2 crown ether:water aggregates are presented for 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6. Unambiguous identification of the structures has been achieved using isotopic substitution within the water unit. The subtle changes induced in the structures of the crown ether monomer upon complexation and the hydrogen-bonding network that hold them together will be also discussed. F. Gámez, B. Martínez-Haya, S. Blanco,J. C. López and J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 14 12912-12918 V. A. Shubert, C.W. Müller and T. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113 8067-8079

  5. Movements of a Sphere Moving Over Smooth and Rough Inclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Chyan-Deng

    1992-01-01

    The steady movements of a sphere over a rough incline in air, and over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid were studied theoretically and experimentally. The principle of energy conservation was used to analyze the translation velocities, rolling resistances, and drag coefficients of a sphere moving over the inclines. The rolling resistance to the movement of a sphere from the rough incline was presumed to be caused by collisions and frictional slidings. A varnished wooden board was placed on the bottom of an experimental tilting flume to form a smooth incline and a layer of spheres identical to the sphere moving over them was placed on the smooth wooden board to form a rough incline. Spheres used in the experiments were glass spheres, steel spheres, and golf balls. Experiments show that a sphere moving over a rough incline with negligible fluid drag in air can reach a constant translation velocity. This constant velocity was found to be proportional to the bed inclination (between 11 ^circ and 21^circ) and the square root of the sphere's diameter, but seemingly independent of the sphere's specific gravity. Two empirical coefficients in the theoretical expression of the sphere's translation velocity were determined by experiments. The collision and friction parts of the shear stress exerted on the interface between the moving sphere and rough incline were determined. The ratio of collision to friction parts appears to increase with increase in the bed inclination. These two parts seem to be of the same order of magnitude. The rolling resistances and the relations between the drag coefficient and Reynolds number for a sphere moving over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid, such as water or salad oil, were determined by a regression analysis based on experimental data. It was found that the drag coefficient for a sphere over the rough incline is larger than that for a sphere over the smooth incline, and both of which are much larger than that for a sphere in free

  6. Quantitative characterization of clumping in Scots pine crowns

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina; Sievänen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Proper characterization of the clumped structure of forests is needed for calculation of the absorbed radiation and photosynthetic production by a canopy. This study examined the dependency of crown-level clumping on tree size and growth conditions in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and determined the ability of statistical canopy radiation models to quantify the degree of self-shading within crowns as a result of the clumping effect. Methods Twelve 3-D Scots pine trees were generated using an application of the LIGNUM model, and the crown-level clumping as quantified by the crown silhouette to total needle area ratio (STARcrown) was calculated. The results were compared with those produced by the stochastic approach of modelling tree crowns as geometric shapes filled with a random medium. Key Results Crown clumping was independent of tree height, needle area and growth conditions. The results supported the capability of the stochastic approach in characterizing clumping in crowns given that the outer shell of the tree crown is well represented. Conclusions Variation in the whole-stand clumping index is induced by differences in the spatial pattern of trees as a function of, for example, stand age rather than by changes in the degree of self-shading within individual crowns as they grow bigger. PMID:24431344

  7. The Effects of Boundary Conditions and Friction on the Helical Buckling of Coiled Tubing in an Inclined Wellbore.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yinchun; Ai, Zhijiu; Sun, Xu; Fu, Biwei

    2016-01-01

    Analytical buckling models are important for down-hole operations to ensure the structural integrity of the drill string. A literature survey shows that most published analytical buckling models do not address the effects of inclination angle, boundary conditions or friction. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of boundary conditions, friction and angular inclination on the helical buckling of coiled tubing in an inclined wellbore. In this paper, a new theoretical model is established to describe the buckling behavior of coiled tubing. The buckling equations are derived by applying the principles of virtual work and minimum potential energy. The proper solution for the post-buckling configuration is determined based on geometric and natural boundary conditions. The effects of angular inclination and boundary conditions on the helical buckling of coiled tubing are considered. Many significant conclusions are obtained from this study. When the dimensionless length of the coiled tubing is greater than 40, the effects of the boundary conditions can be ignored. The critical load required for helical buckling increases as the angle of inclination and the friction coefficient increase. The post-buckling behavior of coiled tubing in different configurations and for different axial loads is determined using the proposed analytical method. Practical examples are provided that illustrate the influence of the angular inclination on the axial force. The rate of change of the axial force decreases with increasing angular inclination. Moreover, the total axial friction also decreases with an increasing inclination angle. These results will help researchers to better understand helical buckling in coiled tubing. Using this knowledge, measures can be taken to prevent buckling in coiled tubing during down-hole operations.

  8. The Effects of Boundary Conditions and Friction on the Helical Buckling of Coiled Tubing in an Inclined Wellbore

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Zhijiu; Sun, Xu; Fu, Biwei

    2016-01-01

    Analytical buckling models are important for down-hole operations to ensure the structural integrity of the drill string. A literature survey shows that most published analytical buckling models do not address the effects of inclination angle, boundary conditions or friction. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of boundary conditions, friction and angular inclination on the helical buckling of coiled tubing in an inclined wellbore. In this paper, a new theoretical model is established to describe the buckling behavior of coiled tubing. The buckling equations are derived by applying the principles of virtual work and minimum potential energy. The proper solution for the post-buckling configuration is determined based on geometric and natural boundary conditions. The effects of angular inclination and boundary conditions on the helical buckling of coiled tubing are considered. Many significant conclusions are obtained from this study. When the dimensionless length of the coiled tubing is greater than 40, the effects of the boundary conditions can be ignored. The critical load required for helical buckling increases as the angle of inclination and the friction coefficient increase. The post-buckling behavior of coiled tubing in different configurations and for different axial loads is determined using the proposed analytical method. Practical examples are provided that illustrate the influence of the angular inclination on the axial force. The rate of change of the axial force decreases with increasing angular inclination. Moreover, the total axial friction also decreases with an increasing inclination angle. These results will help researchers to better understand helical buckling in coiled tubing. Using this knowledge, measures can be taken to prevent buckling in coiled tubing during down-hole operations. PMID:27649535

  9. Distribution of Planetary Inclinations as Inferred from Kepler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragozzine, Darin; Kepler Team

    2011-05-01

    The true mutual inclination between orbits in a planetary system is a key indicator of dominant planet formation mechanisms. It is, therefore, unfortunate that the vast majority of current exoplanet observations are only sensitive to line-of-sight inclinations, at best. Even in systems with multiple transiting planets, arguably the best observational case, the line-of-sight inclinations are a weak constraint on the mutual inclination between planetary orbits. However, the large and homogeneous observations from the Kepler Space Telescope provide a population that can be assessed statistically in order to estimate the typical mutual inclination of exoplanetary systems. Lissauer et al. 2011b use the Quarter 0-2 Kepler observations presented in Borucki et al. 2011 to show that there is a population of planetary systems with multiple, small (radii between 1.5 and 6 Earth radii), short-period planets and that the typical mutual inclination in these systems is only a few degrees. Based on these new Kepler results and other observations, I will present the current best understanding of the inclination distribution of planetary systems and prospects for future progress. Kepler was competitively selected as the tenth Discovery mission. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  10. Simple Model of a Rolling Water-Filled Bottle on an Inclined Ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shihao; Hu, Naiwen; Yao, Tianchen; Chu, Charles; Babb, Simona; Cohen, Jenna; Sangiovanni, Giana; Watt, Summer; Weisman, Danielle; Klep, James; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Walecki, Eve S.; Walecki, Peter S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a water-filled bottle rolling down an incline and ask the following question: is a rolling bottle better described by a model ignoring all internal motion where the bottle is approximated by a material point sliding down an incline, or is it better described by a rigid solid cylinder rolling down the incline without skidding? The measurements presented here represent a special case of similar experiments described by K.A. Jackson et al. (see Ref. 1 and references within). There exists also a report by Kagan describing the motion of soda cans rolling on an incline. In our case we investigate motion of the fully filled bottle. We demonstrate that within accuracy of our experiment the motion of the bottle can be described by a simple "frictionless water" model. The analysis of the dynamics of the bodies sliding and rolling on a ramp is a standard component of introductory physics classes, and a required component of the Advanced Placement (AP) Physics curriculum.

  11. Transition to turbulence in stratified shear flow: experiments in an inclined square duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Colin; Linden, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We describe laboratory experiments of countercurrent stratified shear flow in an inclined square duct. To achieve this, a long water tank was partitioned into regions of higher and lower density saltwater that are connected by an inclined square duct. The flow regime was characterized to be turbulent, intermittent, Holmboe or laminar as a function of the duct inclination, θ, and the density difference, Δρ , between the two reservoirs. The density difference and duct angle were systematically varied and a phase plane of flow regime was developed. The transition between the interrmittent regime and turbulence was experimentally determined to occur at θΔρ ~= 20 [degrees kg m-3]. This critical combination of parameters fits into the buoyancy-compensated Reynolds number scaling proposed by Brethouwer et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2007). The turbulent interfacial thickness was found to be a function of the inclination angle, which can be predicted using the buoyancy lengthscale from Waite and Bartello (J. Fluid Mech., 2004) and others. Furthermore, we measured the density profiles at multiple points along the duct, and using these profiles, we modeled the entrainment at the interface. Support provided by the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States.

  12. The stability of buoyancy-driven gaseous boundary layers over inclined semi-infinite hot plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamanickam, Prabakaran; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    The free-convective boundary-layer flow that develops over a semi-infinite inclined hot plate is known to become unstable at a finite distance from the leading edge, characterized by a critical value of the Grashof number Grδ based on the local boundary-layer thickness δ. The character of the instability depends on the inclination angle ϕ, measured from the vertical direction. For values of ϕ below a critical value ϕc the instability is characterized by the appearance of spanwise vortices, whereas for ϕ >ϕc the bifurcated flow displays Görtler-like streamwise vortices. The Boussinesq approximation, employed in previous linear stability analyses, ceases to be valid for gaseous flow when the wall-to-ambient temperature ratio θw =Tw /T∞ is not close to unity. The corresponding non-Boussinesq analysis is presented here, accounting also for the variation with temperature of the different transport properties. The base-flow profiles are used in a parallel-flow temporal stability analysis to delineate the dependence of the critical Grashof numbers Grδ on the inclination angles ϕ and on the temperature ratio θw. The analysis provides in particular the values of the crossover inclination angles ϕc (θw) .

  13. Coordination patterns of shoulder muscles during level-ground and incline wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Liping; Wakeling, James; Grange, Simon; Ferguson-Pell, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how the coordination patterns of shoulder muscles change with level-ground and incline wheelchair propulsion. Wheelchair kinetics and electromyography (EMG) activity of seven muscles were recorded with surface electrodes for 15 nondisabled subjects during wheelchair propulsion on a stationary ergometer and wooden ramp (4 degree slope). Kinetic data were measured by a SmartWheel. The kinetics variables and the onset, cessation, and duration of EMG activity from seven muscles were compared with paired t-tests for two sessions. Muscle coordination patterns across seven muscles were analyzed by principal component analysis. Push forces on the push rim and the percentage of push phase in the cycle increased significantly during incline propulsion. Propulsion condition and posture affected muscle coordination patterns. During incline propulsion, there was more intense and longer EMG activity of push muscles in the push phase and less EMG activity of the recovery muscles, which corresponded with the increased kinetic data total force output and longer push phase in the incline condition. This work establishes a framework for developing a performance feedback system for wheelchair users to better coordinate their muscle patterning activity.

  14. Is Mandibular Fossa Morphology and Articular Eminence Inclination Associated with Temporomandibular Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Akhlaghian, Marzieh; Abolvardi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Finding a significant relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology and the incidence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) may help early prediction and prevention of these problems. Purpose The purpose of the present study was to determine the morphology of mandibular fossa and the articular eminence inclination in patients with TMD and in control group using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method The CBCT data of bilateral TMJs of 40 patients with TMD and 23 symptom-free cases were evaluated. The articular eminence inclination, as well as the glenoid fossa depth and width of the mandibular fossa were measured. The paired t-test was used to compare these values between two groups. Results The articular eminence inclination and glenoid fossa width and depth were significantly higher in patients with TMD than in the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The articular eminence inclination was steeper in patients with TMD than in the control group. Glenoid fossa width and depth were higher in patients with TMD than that in the control group. This information may shed light on the relationship between TMJ morphology and the incidence of TMD. PMID:27284559

  15. Comparison of Primary Molar Crown Dimensions with Stainless Steel Crowns in a Sample of Iranian Children

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Kamali Sabeti, Arghavan; Shahrabi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Due to anatomic variation in tooth anatomy between populations, this study compared the buccolingual (BL) and mesiodistal (MD) dimensions of primary molars with those of stainless steel crowns (SSCs) in anIranian population. Materials and methods. Impressions were taken from both dental arches of children, and casts were poured. Teeth with caries, restoration, hypoplasia or other dental anomalies were excluded. 216 primary molars were selected and divided into 4 groups of 54 each (maxillary and mandibular first and second primary molars). MD/BL dimensions were measured using a digital caliper with 0.01 mm precision on casts and SCCs (3M brand). Data were assessed using paired t-test, post hoc test and ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. The MD dimension of the lower first molar SSC and the BL dimension of the lower second molar SSC had the least difference with the corresponding values of the respective teeth. The MD dimension of the upper second molar SSC and the BL dimension of the upper first molar SSC had the greatest difference with the corresponding values in the respective teeth. Comparison of the two different brands of SSCs for the upper first molar revealed that both types had significant differences with the teeth in terms of both MD (P = 0.0) and BL (P = 0.0) dimensions. Conclusion. In the studied population, best adaptation was seen in second lower molars and the least adaptationswere seen in first and second upper molars. PMID:26236433

  16. Trajectory of a projectile on a frictional inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaosun

    2014-08-01

    A closed form solution is given for the trajectory of a particle sliding on an inclined plane with Coulomb-type friction. If the inclination of the plane is less than the friction angle, the particle eventually comes to rest and expressions for the location of this point and the duration of the motion are given. If the initial launch is inclined at a small angle with respect to the upward line of greatest slope, the direction of the velocity changes rapidly during the last instants of motion.

  17. Rainforest air-conditioning: the moderating influence of epiphytes on the microclimate in tropical tree crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuntz, Sabine; Simon, Ulrich; Zotz, Gerhard

    2002-05-01

    Epiphytes are often assumed to influence the microclimatic conditions of the tree crowns that they inhabit. In order to quantify this notion, we measured the parameters "temperature" (of the substrate surface and the boundary layer of air above it), "evaporative drying rate" and "evapotranspiration" at various locations within tree crowns with differing epiphyte assemblages. The host tree species was Annona glabra, which was either populated by one of three epiphyte species ( Dimerandra emarginata, Tillandsia fasciculata, or Vriesea sanguinolenta) or was epiphyte-free. We found that during the hottest and driest time of day, microsites in the immediate proximity of epiphytes had significantly lower temperatures than epiphyte-bare locations within the same tree crown, even though the latter were also shaded by host tree foliage or branches. Moreover, water loss through evaporative drying at microsites adjacent to epiphytes was almost 20% lower than at exposed microsites. We also found that, over the course of several weeks, the evapotranspiration in tree crowns bearing epiphytes was significantly lower than in trees without epiphytes. Although the influence of epiphytes on temperature extremes and evaporation rates is relatively subtle, their mitigating effect could be of importance for small animals like arthropods inhabiting an environment as harsh and extreme as the tropical forest canopy.

  18. Micro-CT evaluation of the marginal fit of CAD/CAM all ceramic crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenes, Christian

    Objectives: Evaluate the marginal fit of CAD/CAM all ceramic crowns made from lithium disilicate and zirconia using two different fabrication protocols (model and model-less). METHODS: Forty anterior all ceramic restorations (20 lithium disilicate, 20 zirconia) were fabricated using a CEREC Bluecam scanner. Two different fabrication methods were used: a full digital approach and a printed model. Completed crowns were cemented and marginal gap was evaluated using Micro-CT. Each specimen was analyzed in sagittal and trans-axial orientations, allowing a 360° evaluation of the vertical and horizontal fit. RESULTS: Vertical measurements in the lingual, distal and mesial views had and estimated marginal gap from 101.9 to 133.9 microns for E-max crowns and 126.4 to 165.4 microns for zirconia. No significant differences were found between model and model-less techniques. CONCLUSION: Lithium disilicate restorations exhibited a more accurate and consistent marginal adaptation when compared to zirconia crowns. No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing model or model-less approaches.

  19. Rainforest air-conditioning: the moderating influence of epiphytes on the microclimate in tropical tree crowns.

    PubMed

    Stuntz, Sabine; Simon, Ulrich; Zotz, Gerhard

    2002-05-01

    Epiphytes are often assumed to influence the microclimatic conditions of the tree crowns that they inhabit. In order to quantify this notion, we measured the parameters "temperature" (of the substrate surface and the boundary layer of air above it), "evaporative drying rate" and "evapotranspiration" at various locations within tree crowns with differing epiphyte assemblages. The host tree species was Annona glabra, which was either populated by one of three epiphyte species (Dimerandra emarginata, Tillandsia fasciculata, or Vriesea sanguinolenta) or was epiphyte-free. We found that during the hottest and driest time of day, microsites in the immediate proximity of epiphytes had significantly lower temperatures than epiphyte-bare locations within the same tree crown, even though the latter were also shaded by host tree foliage or branches. Moreover, water loss through evaporative drying at microsites adjacent to epiphytes was almost 20% lower than at exposed microsites. We also found that, over the course of several weeks, the evapotranspiration in tree crowns bearing epiphytes was significantly lower than in trees without epiphytes. Although the influence of epiphytes on temperature extremes and evaporation rates is relatively subtle, their mitigating effect could be of importance for small animals like arthropods inhabiting an environment as harsh and extreme as the tropical forest canopy.

  20. Functional implications of variation in tooth spacing and crown size in pinnipedimorpha (mammalia: carnivora).

    PubMed

    Churchill, Morgan; Clementz, Mark T

    2015-05-01

    Pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) show variation in tooth morphology that relates to ecology. However, crown size and spacing are two aspects of morphology that have not been quantified in prior studies. We measured these characters for nearly all extant pinnipeds and three fossil taxa and then determined the principal sources of variation in tooth size and spacing using principal components (PCAs) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). PCA and HCA showed that species sorted into three groups: taxa with small crowns and large diastemata, taxa with large crowns and small diastemata, and taxa that fell between these two extremes. We then performed discriminant function analysis (DFA) to determine if tooth morphology correlated with foraging strategy or diet. DFA results indicated weak correlation with diet, and stronger correlation with prey capture strategies. Tooth size and spacing were most strongly correlated with the importance of teeth in prey acquisition, with tooth size decreasing and tooth spacing increasing as teeth become less necessary in capturing food items. Taxa which relied on teeth for filtering prey from the water column or processing larger or tougher food items generally had larger crowns and smaller tooth spacing then taxa which swallowed prey whole. We found the fossil taxa Desmatophoca and Enaliarctos were most similar in tooth morphology to extant otariids, suggesting that both taxa were generalist feeders. This study established the relationship between tooth size and feeding behavior, and provides a new tool to explore the paleoecology of fossil pinnipeds and other aquatic tetrapods.

  1. Equilibria and speciation in the solvent extraction of lithium chloride by nonamethyl-14-crown-4 ether in 1-octanol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Chen, Z.; Cavenaugh, K.L.; Sachleben, R.A.; Moyer, B.A.

    1996-05-30

    The equilibria and speciation in the solvent extraction of LiCl by nonamethyl-14-crown-4 ether in 1-octanol have been determined by use of ion chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses, equilibrium modeling with the program SXLSQI, and {sup 7}Li NMR measurements. SXLSQI modeling of the extraction data indicates the formation of a 1:1 metal:crown complex in the organic phase. The complex apparently exists as an ion-pair Li(crown)Cl, which partially dissociates to the complex cation Li(crown){sup +} and free chloride anion Cl{sup -}. Extraction of LiCl by 1-octanol to give the organic-phase ion-pair LiCl and its dissociated ions Li{sup +} and Cl{sup -} must be included in the data analysis. {sup 7}Li NMR measurements verify the existence of free and crown-complexed lithium species in 1-octanol, and the measurements quantitatively agree with results from the SXLSQI model. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Stars and Nebulae in the Southern Crown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    The R Coronae Australis complex of young stars and interstellar gas clouds is one of the nearest star-forming regions, at a distance of approx. 500 light-years from the Sun. It is seen in the southern constellation of that name (The "Southern Crown"). Images of this sky area were recently obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) , a 67-million pixel digital camera that is installed at the 2.2-m MPG/ESO Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory. Some of these exposures have been combined into a magnificent colour image, here reproduced as PR Photo 25a/00 . The field shown measures about 4.7 x 4.7 light-years 2. It displays the central part of the complex, its brightest stars, and the nebulosity that they illuminate. The interstellar clouds that are associated with the complex are visible all across this field and also beyond its borders (on other exposures), due to the obscuring effect of the dust particles that "dim" the light of stars behind these clouds. This effect is particularly noticeable in the lower left corner where very few stars are seen. R Coronae Australis , the bright star from which the entire complex is named, is located at the center of the field and illuminates the reddish nebula around it. The bright star in the lower part, illuminating a somewhat bluer nebula, is known as TY Coronae Australis . The brightness of these two stars and several others in the same field is variable. They belong to the so-called "T Tauri" class , a type that is quite common in star-forming regions. T Tauri stars are in the early stages of stellar evolution and display various observable characteristics of this phase, e.g. emission at visible and infrared wavelengths due to the accretion of matter left over from their formation, as well as X-ray emission. The nebulosity seen in this picture is mostly due to reflection of the stellar light by small dust particles. The stars in the R Coronae Australis complex do not emit sufficient ultraviolet light to ionize a substantial

  3. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED STOPPING BLOCK AT SHOREWARD END OF TRACK GIRDER - Seddon Island Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Garrison Channel from Tampa to Seddon Island, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  4. Safety Case Notations: Alternatives for the Non-Graphically Inclined?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    This working paper presents preliminary ideas of five possible text-based notations for representing safety cases, which may be easier for non-graphically inclined people to use and understand than the currently popular graphics-based representations.

  5. 2. FULL VIEW OF BRIDGE, SHOWING INCLINED END POST (HATTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FULL VIEW OF BRIDGE, SHOWING INCLINED END POST (HATTER POST), PORTAL BRACING, AND PORTAL STRUT AT EAST PORTAL, LOOKING WEST - Chester Bridge, Spanning Rock River on Old Marsh Road, East Waupun, Dodge County, WI

  6. 12. WESTWARD VIEW OF INCLINE HOIST BUCKET BRIDGE AND NEELAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. WESTWARD VIEW OF INCLINE HOIST BUCKET BRIDGE AND NEELAND CHARGING BUCKET FOR BLAST FURNACE No. 1. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  7. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTHEAST CORNER, SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTHEAST CORNER, SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, INCLINED END POST, AND UPPER CHORD - Kennan-Jump River Bridge, Spanning South fork of Jump River on County Highway "N", Kennan, Price County, WI

  8. 8. DETAIL VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  9. 7. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL AND STEM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL AND STEM, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  10. The Asymmetrical "Sticking" Behavior of Two Balls on an Incline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, A. John

    1999-01-01

    Offers a relatively simple analysis of the asymmetrical "sticking" and rolling behavior of two balls, one steel and one rubber, on an incline. Describes an Interactive Physics (TM) simulation designed to study the problem and gives rough experimental results. (WRM)

  11. 58. VIEW OF CABLE INCLINE, LOCATED ON THE HILLSIDE BELOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. VIEW OF CABLE INCLINE, LOCATED ON THE HILLSIDE BELOW THE FOREBAY (NORTHWEST OF FOREBAY), Print No. 156, August 1903 - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  12. 12. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, INCLINED ENDPOST, PORTAL BRACING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, INCLINED ENDPOST, PORTAL BRACING, TOP CHORD, SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SOUTH TRUSS (RIVETED CONNECTION) - Marathon City Bridge, Spanning Big Rib River, on state Trunk Highway 107, Marathon, Marathon County, WI

  13. 20. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF NORTH PONY TRUSS; SHOWING INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF NORTH PONY TRUSS; SHOWING INCLINED END POST, HIP VERTICAL, VERTICAL POSTS, DIAGONALS, AND COUNTER BRACING - Boyleston Bridge, Spanning Skunk River, Lowell, Henry County, IA

  14. 26. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL. Monongahela Incline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  15. Mission analysis data for inclined geosynchronous orbits, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, O. F., Jr.; Wang, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    Data needed for preliminary design of inclined geosynchronous missions are provided. The inertial and Earth fixed coordinate systems are described, as well as orbit parameters and elements. The complete family of geosynchronous orbits is discussed. It is shown that circular inclined geosynchronous orbits comprise only one set in this family. The major orbit perturbation and their separate effects on the geosynchronous orbit are discussed. Detailed information on the orbit perturbation of inclined circular geosynchronous orbits is given, with emphasis on time history data of certain orbital elements. Orbit maintenance delta velocity (V) requirements to counteract the major orbit perturbations are determined in order to provide order of magnitude estimates and to show the effects of orbit inclination on delta V. Some of the considerations in mission design for a multisatellite system, such as a halo orbit constellation, are discussed.

  16. 11. A DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THE WEST INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. A DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THE WEST INCLINED END POST, AND OF THE PIN CONNECTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERN VERTICAL MEMBER. - Wells County Bridge No. 74, Spanning Rock Creek Ditch at County Road 400, Bluffton, Wells County, IN

  17. Students as Researchers: An Inclined-Plane Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an inquiry activity in which students explore the variables that influence the amount of time it takes a ball to roll down an inclined plane. Relates features of the activity to recommendations in the NCTM Standards. (MKR)

  18. 9. DETAIL VIEW OF PIN CONNECTION, SHOWING INCLINED END POSTS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL VIEW OF PIN CONNECTION, SHOWING INCLINED END POSTS, PORTAL BRACING, HIP VERTICALS, LATTICE BRACING AND EYEBARS, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Nepesta Bridge, Spanning Arkansas River on County Road 613, Boone, Pueblo County, CO

  19. 8. Detail of northeast inclined endpost, hip vertical, upper chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail of northeast inclined endpost, hip vertical, upper chord, and portal bracing; looking north/northeast - Brosseau Road Bridge, County Road 694 spanning Cloquet at River, Burnett, St. Louis County, MN

  20. 5. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE, (12' DIAMETER HARDESTY MODEL 112 CIRCULAR GATE), LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Island Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  1. 4. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL AND STEM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL AND STEM, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Brown Duck Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.4 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  2. 5. VIEW SHOWING INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE (28' WIDE HARDESTY CAST IRON SLIDE HEADGATE), LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Duck Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  3. 6. VIEW SHOWING INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE (18' HARDESTY GATE), LOOKING SOUTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Long Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  4. 7. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE (15' HARDESTY MODEL 115 GATE), LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Marjorie Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  5. 4. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE, STEM, STEM GUIDE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF INCLINED OUTLET GATE, STEM, STEM GUIDE AND WHEEL (10' HARDESTY VERTICAL LIFT GATE), LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Pot Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  6. Development and characterization of an inclined air-curtain (IAC) fume hood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Tang, Kun-Chi

    2015-06-01

    An inclined air-curtain (IAC) fume hood was developed and characterized using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique and tracer-gas (sulphur hexafluoride) concentration detection method. The IAC fume hood features four innovative design elements: (i) an elongated suction slot installed at the hood roof with an offset towards the rear wall, (ii) an elongated up-blowing planar jet issued from the work surface near the hood inlet, (iii) two deflection plates installed at the left and right side walls, and (iv) a boundary-layer separation controller installed at the sash bottom. Baffles employed in conventional hoods were not used. The suction slot and the up-blowing planar jet formed a rearward-inclined push-pull air curtain. The deflection plates worked with the inclined air curtain to induce four rearward-inclined counter-rotating 'tornados.' The fumes generated in the hood were isolated behind the rearward-inclined air curtain, entrained by the low pressure within the vortical flows, moved up spirally, and finally exhausted through the suction slot. The risk of containment leakage due to the large recirculation vortex that usually exists behind the sash of conventional hoods was reduced by the boundary-layer separation controller. The results of the tracer-gas concentration detection method based on the EN-14175 method showed that the flow field created by the geometric configurations of the IAC hood presented characteristics of low leakage and high resistance to dynamic disturbances at low face velocities. The leakage levels measured by the static, sash movement, and walk-by tests were negligible at a face velocity of 0.26 m s(-1).

  7. Estimating canine tooth crown height in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ward, Carol V; Paulus, Faydre L

    2009-07-01

    Canine tooth size reduction and the associated reduction in canine dimorphism is a basal hominin character that also provides important evidence for models of behavioral evolution. Two specimens of Australopithecus anamensis (KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283) that do not preserve the canine crown, but do preserve the root or alveolus, appear to suggest that canine size variation and canine dimorphism in this species may have been greater than in other hominins. We evaluate canine root and crown dimensions in a series of extant hominoids, and estimate canine crown height in Australopithecus afarensis and A. anamensis. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to generate estimates of canine crown height from basal canine crown and root dimensions with a moderate degree of accuracy. Estimates of maxillary canine crown size for A. anamensis are slightly larger than those of A. afarensis, and are approximately the same size as canines of modern female chimpanzees. Estimated mandibular canine crown height is very similar in the two species. Variation within the A. anamensis sample of estimated canine crown heights is similar to that of modern humans, suggesting a low degree of sexual dimorphism. Inclusion of estimates for KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283 does not substantially increase either the estimate of overall canine size or variation for A. anamensis.

  8. Management of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot of subarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani and is one of the most severe soil-borne diseases of sugarbeet in Minnesota and North Dakota. Rhizoctonia root and crown rot may reduce yield significantly, and diseased beets may cause problems in storage piles. Fields with...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin....

  10. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin....

  11. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin....

  12. Evaluation of wild Juglans species for crown gall resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paradox, the most widely used rootstock in CA walnut production, is highly susceptible to the causal agent of crown gall (CG) Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The bacterial pathogen induces the formation of large tumors around the crown of the tree resulting in a reduction in both vigor and yield. If left...

  13. Variation in the Use of Crowns and Their Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugars, Daniel A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the use and effectiveness of dental crowns and alternative treatments for posterior teeth, using data from insurance claims. Results show older patients more likely to receive crowns, with higher costs. Regional treatment differences were also found. Data raised questions about consistency of treatment recommendations among…

  14. Short clinical crowns (SCC) – treatment considerations and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rahul, G. R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    When the clinical crowns of teeth are dimensionally inadequate, esthetically and biologically acceptable restoration of these dental units is difficult. Often an acceptable restoration cannot be accomplished without first surgically increasing the length of the existing clinical crowns; therefore, successful management requires an understanding of both the dental and periodontal parameters of treatment. The complications presented by teeth with short clinical crowns demand a comprehensive treatment plan and proper sequencing of therapy to ensure a satisfactory result. Visualization of the desired result is a prerequisite of successful therapy. This review examines the periodontal and restorative factors related to restoring teeth with short clinical crowns. Modes of therapy are usually combined to meet the biologic, restorative, and esthetic requirements imposed by short clinical crowns. In this study various methods for treating short clinical crowns are reviewed, the role that restoration margin location play in the maintenance of periodontal and dental symbiosis and the effects of violation of the supracrestal gingivae by improper full-coverage restorations has also been discussed. Key words:Short clinical crown, surgical crown lengthening, forced eruption, diagnostic wax up, alveoloplasty, gingivectomy. PMID:24558561

  15. Effect of framework design on crown failure.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Estevam A; da Silva, Nelson R F A; Coelho, Paulo G; Bayardo-González, Daniel E; Thompson, Van P; Bonfante, Gerson

    2009-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of core-design modification on the characteristic strength and failure modes of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram) (ICA) compared with porcelain fused to metal (PFM). Premolar crowns of a standard design (PFMs and ICAs) or with a modified framework design (PFMm and ICAm) were fabricated, cemented on dies, and loaded until failure. The crowns were loaded at 0.5 mm min(-1) using a 6.25 mm tungsten-carbide ball at the central fossa. Fracture load values were recorded and fracture analysis of representative samples were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Probability Weibull curves with two-sided 90% confidence limits were calculated for each group and a contour plot of the characteristic strength was obtained. Design modification showed an increase in the characteristic strength of the PFMm and ICAm groups, with PFM groups showing higher characteristic strength than ICA groups. The PFMm group showed the highest characteristic strength among all groups. Fracture modes of PFMs and of PFMm frequently reached the core interface at the lingual cusp, whereas ICA exhibited bulk fracture through the alumina core. Core-design modification significantly improved the characteristic strength for PFM and for ICA. The PFM groups demonstrated higher characteristic strength than both ICA groups combined.

  16. RANS Calculations of the Flow Past Inclined Propellers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Defence R&D Canada – Atlantic DEFENCE DÉFENSE & RANS calculations of the flow past inclined propellers Paul-Edouard Leras ENSIETA, Brest, France...développement pour la défense Canada This page intentionally left blank. RANS calculations of the flow past inclined propellers Paul-Edouard Leras ...Original signed by David Hally David Hally Approved by Original signed by D. Hopkin D. Hopkin Head/Maritime Asset Protection Approved for release by C

  17. Buckling and lockup of tubulars in inclined wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes sinusoidal and helical buckling of tubulars in inclined wellbores and the ``lockup`` of tubulars due to buckling. The results show that tubular buckling starts from the tubular bottom in low-inclination wellbores, where axial compressive load is largest due to tubular weight. In high inclination wellbores it may start from the top portion of the tubular, where axial compressive load is largest due to frictional drag. This clarifies the confusion about whether or not tubulars buckle all at once, in the entire inclined wellbore. New sinusoidal and helical buckling load equations are presented to give better tubular buckling prediction in inclined wellbores (0--90 degrees). They show that the lower the wellbore inclination angle, the smaller the axial compressive load to initiate tubular buckling. But a certain non-zero axial compressive load is still needed to buckle the tubulars in vertical wellbores. When tubulars buckle helically, a large wall contact force will be generated. The `slack-off` weight at the surface will not be fully transmitted to the bottom of the tubulars due to the large resultant frictional drag. The ``lockup`` of tubulars, where the bottom load (bit weight) cannot be increased by slacking-off weight at the surface, usually is approached when a large portion of the tubular buckles helically in the wellbore.

  18. Buckling and lockup of tubulars in inclined wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper studies sinusoidal and helical buckling of tubulars in inclined wellbores and the ``lockup`` of tubulars due to buckling. The results show that tubular buckling starts from the tubular bottom in low-inclination wellbores, where the axial compressive load is largest due to tubular weight. In high-inclination wellbores it may start from the top portion of the tubular, where the axial compressive load is largest due to frictional drag. This clarifies the confusion on whether or not the tubular buckles at once on it entire length in inclined wellbores. New sinusoidal and helical buckling load equations are presented to better predict tubular buckling in inclined wellbores (0--90 deg). The lower the wellbore inclination angle, the smaller the axial compressive load required to initiate tubular buckling. However, a certain nonzero axial compressive load is still needed to buckle the tubulars in vertical wellbores. When tubulars buckle helically, a large wall contact force will be generated, and the ``slack-off`` weight at the surface will not be fully transmitted to the tubular bottom due to large resultant frictional drag. The ``lockup`` of tubulars may even occur, where the tubular bottom load cannot be increased by slacking-off weight at the surface.

  19. Spreading dynamics of droplet on an inclined surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chaoqun; Yu, Cheng; Chen, Yongping

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional unsteady theoretical model of droplet spreading process on an inclined surface is developed and numerically analyzed to investigate the droplet spreading dynamics via the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The contact line motion and morphology evolution for the droplet spreading on an inclined surface, which are, respectively, represented by the advancing/receding spreading factor and droplet wetted length, are evaluated and analyzed. The effects of surface wettability and inclination on the droplet spreading behaviors are examined. The results indicate that, dominated by gravity and capillarity, the droplet experiences a complex asymmetric deformation and sliding motion after the droplet comes into contact with the inclined surfaces. The droplet firstly deforms near the solid surface and mainly exhibits a radial expansion flow in the start-up stage. An evident sliding-down motion along the inclination is observed in the middle stage. And the surface-tension-driven retraction occurs during the retract stage. Increases in inclination angle and equilibrium contact angle lead to a faster droplet motion and a smaller wetted area. In addition, increases in equilibrium contact angle lead to a shorter duration time of the middle stage and an earlier entry into the retract stage.

  20. An Explanation for the High Inclinations of Amalthea and Thebe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Amanda; Hamilton, Douglas; Rauch, Kevin

    2002-04-01

    We propose that the anomalously large inclinations of the inner moons Amalthea (I=0.33^circ) and Thebe (I=1.09^circ) result from kicks imparted by Io's strong resonances as those resonances scan across the location of the moons. Both the eccentricities and inclinations of the moons are excited during resonant passages. But while the eccentricities decay rapidly due to the large satellite tides raised by the planet, the inclinations are basically preserved since they decay slowly due to the tiny planetary tides raised by the satellite. Through analysis of our numerical simulations we were able to limit Io's formation distance from Jupiter to between 4.02 and 4.92 Jovian Radii. Io's 3:1 resonances can impart an inclination of ~ 0.3^circ to Amalthea, while the 4:2 resonance gives too large a kick. We find that either the 4:2 resonance acting alone, or in combination with the 5:3 and the 6:4, causes Thebe's inclination to rise to about 1 degree. Our theory naturally explains the high inclinations of these two small satellites.

  1. Comparison of the fit of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital and the conventional impression techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the fit of cast gold crowns fabricated from the conventional and the digital impression technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Artificial tooth in a master model and abutment teeth in ten patients were restored with cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital and the conventional impression technique. The forty silicone replicas were cut in three sections; each section was evaluated in nine points. The measurement was carried out by using a measuring microscope and I-Soultion. Data from the silicone replica were analyzed and all tests were performed with α-level of 0.05. RESULTS 1. The average gaps of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital impression technique were larger than those of the conventional impression technique significantly. 2. In marginal and internal axial gap of cast gold crowns, no statistical differences were found between the two impression techniques. 3. The internal occlusal gaps of cast gold crowns fabricated from the digital impression technique were larger than those of the conventional impression technique significantly. CONCLUSION Both prostheses presented clinically acceptable results with comparing the fit. The prostheses fabricated from the digital impression technique showed more gaps, in respect of occlusal surface. PMID:28243386

  2. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    collaboration, The Pierre Augur

    2014-08-01

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  3. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  4. Clouds homogenize shoot temperatures, transpiration, and photosynthesis within crowns of Abies fraseri (Pursh.) Poiret.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Moreno, J Melissa; Bayeur, Nicole M; Coley, Harold D; Hughes, Nicole M

    2017-03-01

    Multiple studies have examined the effects of clouds on shoot and canopy-level microclimate and physiological processes; none have yet done so on the scale of individual plant crowns. We compared incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), leaf temperatures, chlorophyll fluorescence, and photosynthetic gas exchange of shoots in three different spatial locations of Abies fraseri crowns on sunny (clear to partly cloudy) versus overcast days. The field site was a Fraser fir farm (1038 m elevation) in the Appalachian mountains, USA. Ten saplings of the same age class were marked and revisited for all measurements. Sunny conditions corresponded with 5-10× greater sunlight incidence on south-facing outer shoots compared to south-facing inner and north-facing outer shoots, which were shaded and received only indirect (diffuse) sunlight. Differences in spatial distribution of irradiance were mirrored in differences in shoot temperatures, photosynthesis, and transpiration, which were all greater in south-facing outer shoots compared to more shaded crown locations. In contrast, overcast conditions corresponded with more homogeneous sunlight distribution between north and south-facing outer shoots, and similar shoot temperatures, chlorophyll fluorescence (ΦPSII), photosynthesis, and transpiration; these effects were observed in south-facing inner shoots as well, but to a lesser extent. There was no significant difference in conductance between different crown locations on sunny or overcast days, indicating spatial differences in transpiration under sunny conditions were likely driven by leaf temperature differences. We conclude that clouds can affect spatial distribution of sunlight and associated physiological parameters not only within forest communities, but within individual crowns as well.

  5. Aerodynamics of wing-assisted incline running in birds.

    PubMed

    Tobalske, Bret W; Dial, Kenneth P

    2007-05-01

    Wing-assisted incline running (WAIR) is a form of locomotion in which a bird flaps its wings to aid its hindlimbs in climbing a slope. WAIR is used for escape in ground birds, and the ontogeny of this behavior in precocial birds has been suggested to represent a model analogous to transitional adaptive states during the evolution of powered avian flight. To begin to reveal the aerodynamics of flap-running, we used digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and measured air velocity, vorticity, circulation and added mass in the wake of chukar partridge Alectoris chukar as they engaged in WAIR (incline 65-85 degrees; N=7 birds) and ascending flight (85 degrees, N=2). To estimate lift and impulse, we coupled our DPIV data with three-dimensional wing kinematics from a companion study. The ontogeny of lift production was evaluated using three age classes: baby birds incapable of flight [6-8 days post hatching (d.p.h.)] and volant juveniles (25-28 days) and adults (45+ days). All three age classes of birds, including baby birds with partially emerged, symmetrical wing feathers, generated circulation with their wings and exhibited a wake structure that consisted of discrete vortex rings shed once per downstroke. Impulse of the vortex rings during WAIR was directed 45+/-5 degrees relative to horizontal and 21+/-4 degrees relative to the substrate. Absolute values of circulation in vortex cores and induced velocity increased with increasing age. Normalized circulation was similar among all ages in WAIR but 67% greater in adults during flight compared with flap-running. Estimated lift during WAIR was 6.6% of body weight in babies and between 63 and 86% of body weight in juveniles and adults. During flight, average lift was 110% of body weight. Our results reveal for the first time that lift from the wings, rather than wing inertia or profile drag, is primarily responsible for accelerating the body toward the substrate during WAIR, and that partially developed wings, not yet

  6. Inclination of standing posture due to the presentation of tilted view through an immersive head-mounted display

    PubMed Central

    Ohmura, Yuji; Yano, Shiro; Katsuhira, Junji; Migita, Masato; Yozu, Arito; Kondo, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study is to clarify whether tilted scenery presented through an immersive head-mounted display (HMD) causes the inclination of standing posture. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy young adult males who provided informed consent participated in the experiment. An immersive HMD and a stereo camera were employed to develop a visual inclination system. The subjects maintained a standing posture twice for 5s each while wearing the visual inclination system. They performed this task under two conditions: normal view and 20° leftward tilted view. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to measure the subjects’ postures, and two force plates were used to measure the vertical component of the floor reaction force of each leg. [Results] In the 20° leftward tilted view, the head and trunk angles in the frontal plane were similarly inclined toward the left, and the vertical component of the floor reaction force increased in the left leg, whereas it decreased in the right leg. [Conclusion] When the view in the immersive HMD was tilted, the participants’ trunk side bent toward the same side as that of the view. This visual inclination system seems to be a simple intervention for changing standing posture. PMID:28265145

  7. Adaptation from restricted geometries: the shell inclination of terrestrial gastropods.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Ryoko; Chiba, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The adaptations that occur for support and protection can be studied with regard to the optimal structure that balances these objectives with any imposed constraints. The shell inclination of terrestrial gastropods is an appropriate model to address this problem. In this study, we examined how gastropods improve shell angles to well-balanced ones from geometrically constrained shapes. Our geometric analysis and physical analysis showed that constantly coiled shells are constrained from adopting a well-balanced angle; the shell angle of such basic shells tends to increase as the spire index (shell height/width) increases, although the optimum angle for stability is 90° for flat shells and 0° for tall shells. Furthermore, we estimated the influences of the geometric rule and the functional demands on actual shells by measuring the shell angles of both resting and active snails. We found that terrestrial gastropods have shell angles that are suited for balance. The growth lines of the shells indicated that this adaptation depends on the deflection of the last whorl: the apertures of flat shells are deflected downward, whereas those of tall shells are deflected upward. Our observations of active snails demonstrated that the animals hold their shells at better balanced angles than inactive snails.

  8. Protective effect of overlying geosynthetic on geomembrane liner observed from landfill field tests and inclined board laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moonkyung; Seo, Min Woo; Kim, Kang Suk; Park, Jun Boum

    2006-06-01

    Geosynthetic liner systems are generally installed in landfill sites to prevent toxic leachate from escaping into the adjoining environment by utilizing their impervious characteristics. Therefore, it is important to protect the geomembrane from being damaged or destroyed during all phases of landfilling, namely landfill construction, waste tipping and landfill closure. This paper presents firstly the observed performance of a geomembrane liner from a landfill site where the geomembrane liner was installed on the slopes of a Korean landfill; and secondly the results of an inclined board laboratory test. Two types of experiments were conducted to identify the protecting effect of the overlaying geosynthetic on the geomembrane liners. At a testing landfill site, the slope consisted of three different sub-inclines and two 2-m-wide intermediate levels. The sub-inclines were each 8 m in vertical height and their angle of inclination was 1: 1.5 (vertical: horizontal). The reported observations were made for a time period of approximately 1 year, until the landfill was filled with wastes to the top of the uppermost slope. In addition, inclined board laboratory tests were carried out. During the inclined board test, a base table is inclined slowly and steadily until the block located on the base table starts to slide, when the tension and displacements of two geosynthetics, namely the geomembrane liner and protecting geotextile, are measured. In conclusion, test results showed that the down-drag force generated by waste accumulation and sliding of upper material was to a large extent dissipated through the elongation of the protecting geosynthetic overlying the geomembrane and thus was not transferred to the geomembrane. Unless the protecting geosynthetic undergoes structural failure, this stress relaxation phenomenon continues to occur so that the magnitude of tensile force to be applied on the geomembrane remains marginal.

  9. The vibration of inclined backrests: perception and discomfort of vibration applied parallel to the back in the z-axis of the body.

    PubMed

    Basri, Bazil; Griffin, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    This study determined how backrest inclination and the frequency of vibration influence the perception and discomfort of vibration applied parallel to the back (vertical vibration when sitting upright, horizontal vibration when recumbent). Subjects experienced backrest vibration at frequencies in the range 2.5 to 25 Hz at vibration magnitudes up to 24 dB above threshold. Absolute thresholds, equivalent comfort contours, and the principal locations for feeling vibration were determined with four backrest inclinations: 0° (upright), 30°, 60° and 90° (recumbent). With all backrest inclinations, acceleration thresholds and equivalent comfort contours were similar and increased with increasing frequency at 6 dB per octave (i.e. velocity constant). It is concluded that backrest inclination has little effect on the frequency dependence of thresholds and equivalent comfort contours for vibration applied along the back, and that the W (d) frequency weighting in current standards is appropriate for evaluating z-axis vibration of the back at all backrest inclinations. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: To minimise the vibration discomfort of seated people, it is necessary to understand how discomfort varies with backrest inclination. It is concluded that the vibration on backrests can be measured using a pad between the backrest and the back, so that it reclines with the backrest, and the measured vibration evaluated without correcting for the backrest inclination.

  10. Further analysis of mandibular molar crown and cusp areas in Pliocene and early Pleistocene hominids.

    PubMed

    Suwa, G; Wood, B A; White, T D

    1994-04-01

    Crown and cusp areas of mandibular molars were measured and analyzed on a sample of 249 specimens attributed to Australopithecus afarensis, A. africanus, A. (Paranthropus) robustus, A. (P.) boisei, and early Homo. In addition to intertaxon comparisons, we compared data that had been collected independently by two of the authors using methods that differ slightly in technique of measurement. Interobserver differences were evaluated by the t-test of paired comparisons, method error statistic, percent differences, and principal component analysis. Results suggest that between-technique error of measurement of overall crown area is small. Error estimates for individual cusp area measurements were of larger relative magnitude. However, these were not sufficient to detract from the conclusions derived from comparative analyses. Our results are in general agreement with previous assessments of early hominid dental size. Crown areas of A. africanus, however, exhibit a mosaic pattern, with M1 similar in size to that of A. afarensis and early Homo, and M2 and M3 similar in size to that of A. robustus. Intertaxon comparisons of relative cusp area were undertaken by univariate statistics and principal component analysis. These analyses revealed that while A. (P.) robustus and A. (P.) boisei both possess mandibular molars with cusp proportions significantly different from the 'non-robust' taxa, these differences are substantially greater in A. (P.) boisei.

  11. [Human frontal inclination of the skull as a trait of sexual dimorphism--terminology and quantification].

    PubMed

    Kölzer, Sarah C; Kümmell, Ines V; Kölzer, Jan T; Ramsthaler, Frank; Plenzig, Stefanie; Gehl, Axel; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2015-01-01

    The skull presents a variety of morphological traits suitable for sex discrimination due to the degree of their development. The vertical frontal inclination has been established. as another marker of sex discrimination, as a steep forehead is considered as a female and a receding frontal inclination as a male attribute. In the literature, there are many different ways to define the morphognostic term "frontal inclination" and "forehead profile" respectively. As part of the project "Digital Forensic Osteology" definitions of the frontal inclination commonly found in the literature have been tested with regard to their applicability to virtual skulls based on post-mortem CT data. The actual angle measurements were carried out automatically using software developed by the authors of this article. For the investigations, profile images of skulls generated from volume-rendered CT data were used in which anthropometric measuring points had been set manually. With the help of discriminant analysis it was tested whether sex discrimination on virtual skulls based on defined variables can be carried out with sufficient sensitivity. The measurement accuracy of the defined variables on the volume-rendered images turned out to be good. No significant sex differences regarding the tested variables were found. Using all the four selected variables the sensitivity for female skulls was only about 66%, whereas for male skulls it was not much higher than the rate of coincidence (53%). The results of this pilot study suggest that apart from extending the sample size the inclusion of additional variables based on strict consideration of validity and reliability criteria should be critically tested.

  12. Estimating forest crown area removed by selection cutting: a linked regression-GIS approach based on stump diameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.C.; Kupfer, J.A.; Wilson, R.R.; Cooper, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a model that could be used to provide a spatial representation of uneven-aged silvicultural treatments on forest crown area. We began by developing species-specific linear regression equations relating tree DBH to crown area for eight bottomland tree species at White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas, USA. The relationships were highly significant for all species, with coefficients of determination (r(2)) ranging from 0.37 for Ulmus crassifolia to nearly 0.80 for Quercus nuttalliii and Taxodium distichum. We next located and measured the diameters of more than 4000 stumps from a single tree-group selection timber harvest. Stump locations were recorded with respect to an established gl id point system and entered into a Geographic Information System (ARC/INFO). The area occupied by the crown of each logged individual was then estimated by using the stump dimensions (adjusted to DBHs) and the regression equations relating tree DBH to crown area. Our model projected that the selection cuts removed roughly 300 m(2) of basal area from the logged sites resulting in the loss of approximate to 55 000 m(2) of crown area. The model developed in this research represents a tool that can be used in conjunction with remote sensing applications to assist in forest inventory and management, as well as to estimate the impacts of selective timber harvest on wildlife.

  13. Earliest known crown-group salamanders.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ke-Qin; Shubin, Neil H

    2003-03-27

    Salamanders are a model system for studying the rates and patterns of the evolution of new anatomical structures. Recent discoveries of abundant Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous salamanders are helping to address these issues. Here we report the discovery of well-preserved Middle Jurassic salamanders from China, which constitutes the earliest known record of crown-group urodeles (living salamanders and their closest relatives). The new specimens are from the volcanic deposits of the Jiulongshan Formation (Bathonian), Inner Mongolia, China, and represent basal members of the Cryptobranchidae, a family that includes the endangered Asian giant salamander (Andrias) and the North American hellbender (Cryptobranchus). These fossils document a Mesozoic record of the Cryptobranchidae, predating the previous record of the group by some 100 million years. This discovery provides evidence to support the hypothesis that the divergence of the Cryptobranchidae from the Hynobiidae had taken place in Asia before the Middle Jurassic period.

  14. [Restoration of composite on etched stainless steel crowns. (1)].

    PubMed

    Goto, G; Zang, Y; Hosoya, Y

    1990-01-01

    Object of investigation The retention of composite resin to etched stainless steel crowns was tested as a possible method for restoring primary anterior teeth. Method employed 1) SEM observation Stainless steel crowns (Sankin Manufacture Co.) were etched with an aqua resia to create surface roughness and undercut to retain the composite resin to the crowns. Etching times were 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 20 minutes, then washed in a 70% alcohol solution using an ultrasonic washer and dried. A total of 96 etched samples and non etched control samples were observed through the scanning electron microscope (Hitachi 520). 2) Shear bond strength test Stainless steel crowns were etched in an aqua resia from 1 to 20 minutes, then washed and dried. Composite resin (Photo Clearfil A, Kuraray Co.) with the bonding agent was placed on the crowns and the shear bond strength was tested in 56 samples using an Autograph (DCS-500, Shimazu). Results 1) SEM observation showed that the etching surface of stainless steel crowns created surface roughness and undercut. The most desirable surface was obtained in the 3 to 5 minute etching time specimens. 2) The highest bond strength was obtained in a 3 minute etching specimen. It was 42.12 MPa, although 29.26 MPa in mean value. Conclusion Etching with an aqua resia increased the adherence of composite resin to the surface of stainless steel crowns.

  15. Survival Predictions of Ceramic Crowns Using Statistical Fracture Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, S; Katsube, N; Seghi, R R; Rokhlin, S I

    2017-01-01

    This work establishes a survival probability methodology for interface-initiated fatigue failures of monolithic ceramic crowns under simulated masticatory loading. A complete 3-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis model of a minimally reduced molar crown was developed using commercially available hardware and software. Estimates of material surface flaw distributions and fatigue parameters for 3 reinforced glass-ceramics (fluormica [FM], leucite [LR], and lithium disilicate [LD]) and a dense sintered yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YZ) were obtained from the literature and incorporated into the model. Utilizing the proposed fracture mechanics-based model, crown survival probability as a function of loading cycles was obtained from simulations performed on the 4 ceramic materials utilizing identical crown geometries and loading conditions. The weaker ceramic materials (FM and LR) resulted in lower survival rates than the more recently developed higher-strength ceramic materials (LD and YZ). The simulated 10-y survival rate of crowns fabricated from YZ was only slightly better than those fabricated from LD. In addition, 2 of the model crown systems (FM and LD) were expanded to determine regional-dependent failure probabilities. This analysis predicted that the LD-based crowns were more likely to fail from fractures initiating from margin areas, whereas the FM-based crowns showed a slightly higher probability of failure from fractures initiating from the occlusal table below the contact areas. These 2 predicted fracture initiation locations have some agreement with reported fractographic analyses of failed crowns. In this model, we considered the maximum tensile stress tangential to the interfacial surface, as opposed to the more universally reported maximum principal stress, because it more directly impacts crack propagation. While the accuracy of these predictions needs to be experimentally verified, the model can provide a fundamental understanding of the

  16. Gait event detection on level ground and incline walking using a rate gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Catalfamo, Paola; Ghoussayni, Salim; Ewins, David

    2010-01-01

    Gyroscopes have been proposed as sensors for ambulatory gait analysis and functional electrical stimulation systems. Accurate determination of the Initial Contact of the foot with the floor (IC) and the final contact or Foot Off (FO) on different terrains is important. This paper describes the evaluation of a gyroscope placed on the shank for determination of IC and FO in subjects walking outdoors on level ground, and up and down an incline. Performance was compared with a reference pressure measurement system. The mean difference between the gyroscope and the reference was less than -25 ms for IC and less than 75 ms for FO for all terrains. Detection success was over 98%. These results provide preliminary evidence supporting the use of the gyroscope for gait event detection on inclines as well as level walking.

  17. Role of Edge Inclination in an Optical Microdisk Resonator for Label-Free Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Davide; Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Rebollo, Francisco Javier Aparicio; Ghulinyan, Mher; Pucker, Georg; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the measurement and modeling of enhanced optical refractometric sensors based on whispering gallery modes. The devices under test are optical microresonators made of silicon nitride on silicon oxide, which differ in their sidewall inclination angle. In our approach, these microresonators are vertically coupled to a buried waveguide with the aim of creating integrated and cost-effective devices. Device modeling shows that the optimization of the device is a delicate balance of the resonance quality factor and evanescent field overlap with the surrounding environment to analyze. By numerical simulations, we show that the microdisk thickness is critical to yield a high figure of merit for the sensor and that edge inclination should be kept as high as possible. We also show that bulk-sensing figures of merit as high as 1600 RIU−1 (refractive index unit) are feasible. PMID:25730483

  18. Total skin electron beam therapy using an inclinable couch on motorized table and a compensating filter

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, H.; Suzuki, K.; Shida, K.; Takahashi, H.; Kobayashi, D.; Seki, M.; Mori, Y.; Sakae, T.; Isobe, T.; Okumura, T.; Sakurai, H.

    2014-06-15

    Total skin electron beam is a specialized technique that involves irradiating the entire skin from the skin surface to only a few millimetres in depth. In the Stanford technique, the patient is in a standing position and six different directional positions are used during treatment. Our technique uses large electron beams in six directions with an inclinable couch on motorized table and a compensating filter was also used to spread the electron beam and move its intensity peak. Dose uniformity measurements were performed using Gafchromic films which indicated that the surface dose was 2.04 ± 0.05 Gy. This technique can ensure the dose reproducibility because the patient is fixed in place using an inclinable couch on a motorized table.

  19. Diffuse ultraviolet erythemal irradiance on inclined planes: a comparison of experimental and modeled data.

    PubMed

    Utrillas, María P; Marín, María J; Esteve, Anna R; Estellés, Victor; Tena, Fernando; Cañada, Javier; Martínez-Lozano, José A

    2009-01-01

    Values of measured and modeled diffuse UV erythemal irradiance (UVER) for all sky conditions are compared on planes inclined at 40 degrees and oriented north, south, east and west. The models used for simulating diffuse UVER are of the geometric-type, mainly the Isotropic, Klucher, Hay, Muneer, Reindl and Schauberger models. To analyze the precision of the models, some statistical estimators were used such as root mean square deviation, mean absolute deviation and mean bias deviation. It was seen that all the analyzed models reproduce adequately the diffuse UVER on the south-facing plane, with greater discrepancies for the other inclined planes. When the models are applied to cloud-free conditions, the errors obtained are higher because the anisotropy of the sky dome acquires more importance and the models do not provide the estimation of diffuse UVER accurately.

  20. Modeling intra-crown and intra-canopy interactions in red maple: assessment of light transfer on carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange.

    PubMed

    Bauerle, William L; Bowden, Joseph D; McLeod, Michael F; Toler, Joe E

    2004-05-01

    Daily and seasonal net photosynthesis (Anet), transpiration (E), absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (Qa) and light-use efficiency (epsilonc) in a red maple container nursery were simulated with MAESTRA, a three-dimensional canopy model. Effects of canopy heterogeneity were simulated by imposing changes in crown spacing. The light transfer sub-model, a distribution model of incident, direct, diffuse and scattered radiation within MAESTRA, was validated against field measurements of light interception on an intra-crown scale. In the container nursery, we found that a fiber-optic-based method of integrating photosynthetically active radiation (Q) was more suitable for crown-layer light transfer measurements and adjustments than either orthogonal line or individual quantum sensor measurements. The model underestimated intercepted Q by 9.3, 18 and 11.1% for crown layers 1, 2 and 3, respectively; however, there were linear relationships between model estimates and observations made with each of the three measurement methods. We used the validated and parameterized light transfer model to assess intra-crown and intra-canopy light transfer on a layer, crown and canopy basis, and investigated effects of tree size ratio and tree spacing interactions on Anet, E, Qa and epsilonc in the container nursery. Heterogeneous crown and canopy photosynthesis were predicted to exceed values for a uniform canopy under space-limiting conditions. Tree size ratio had large effects on Anet, E, Qa and epsilonc when light to lower-canopy layers was limited by inadequate space between crowns. Increasing Qa at lower-crown layers had the largest impact on whole-crown and whole-canopy Anet, E, Qa and epsilonc. Increases in canopy productivity led to increased water use. Simulations of heterogeneous stands with adequate soil water indicated that light absorption is maximized under space-limiting conditions as a canopy crown moves toward heterogeneity. Nursery and plantation productivity

  1. TRANSIT PROBABILITIES FOR STARS WITH STELLAR INCLINATION CONSTRAINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, Thomas G.; Seager, Sara

    2010-04-01

    The probability that an exoplanet transits its host star is high for planets in close orbits, but drops off rapidly for increasing semimajor axes. This makes transit surveys for planets with large semimajor axes orbiting bright stars impractical, since one would need to continuously observe hundreds of stars that are spread out over the entire sky. One way to make such a survey tractable is to constrain the inclination of the stellar rotation axes in advance, and thereby enhance the transit probabilities. We derive transit probabilities for stars with stellar inclination constraints, considering a reasonable range of planetary system inclinations. We find that stellar inclination constraints can improve the transit probability by almost an order of magnitude for habitable-zone planets. When applied to an ensemble of stars, such constraints dramatically lower the number of stars that need to be observed in a targeted transit survey. We also consider multiplanet systems where only one planet has an identified transit and derive the transit probabilities for the second planet assuming a range of mutual planetary inclinations.

  2. Origin of the Moon's orbital inclination from resonant disk interactions

    PubMed

    Ward; Canup

    2000-02-17

    The Moon is generally believed to have formed from the debris disk created by a large body colliding with the early Earth. Recent models of this process predict that the orbit of the newly formed Moon should be in, or very near, the Earth's equatorial plane. This prediction, however, is at odds with the known history of the lunar orbit: the orbit is currently expanding, but can be traced back in time to reveal that, when the Moon formed, its orbital inclination relative to the Earth's equator was I approximately = 10 degrees. The cause of this initial inclination has been a mystery for over 30 years, as most dynamical processes (such as those that act to flatten Saturn's rings) will tend to decrease orbital inclinations. Here we show that the Moon's substantial orbital inclination is probably a natural result of its formation from an impact-generated disk. The mechanism involves a gravitational resonance between the Moon and accretion-disk material, which can increase orbital inclinations up to approximately 15 degrees.

  3. Postural Control of Elderly Adults on Inclined Surfaces.

    PubMed

    da Costa Barbosa, Renata; Vieira, Marcus Fraga

    2017-03-01

    This study analyzed the postural control of older adults on inclined surfaces, and was conducted in 17 elderly adults and 18 young adults of both genders. Ground reaction forces and moments were collected using two AMTI force platforms, one of which was in a horizontal position (HOR), while the other was inclined 14° in relation to the horizontal plane. Each participant executed three 70 s-trials of bipedal standing with their eyes open and eyes closed in three inclination conditions: the HOR, the inclined position at ankle dorsi-flexion (UP), and the inclined position at ankle plantar-flexion (DOWN). Spectral analysis, global (mean velocity-Velm, ellipse area-Area and F80), and structural stabilometric descriptors (sway density curve-SDC, detrended fluctuation analysis-DFA, sample entropy-SEn) were employed to assess the center of pressure sway. Velm and F80 were greater for the elderly, whereas SDC, DFA, and SEn were smaller for this group. Global, SDC and DFA variables were sensitive to visual deprivation, however the relative difference from the EO to EC condition was higher in young than in elderly. The DOWN condition was more stable than the UP condition for both young and older adults. With regard to the UP condition, the challenge observed is essentially associated with the corresponding biomechanical constraints. In conclusion, the elderly showed significant differences compared to the young, but age per se may not necessarily result in compromised postural control.

  4. Evolution of magnetic field inclination in a forming penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčák, Jan; Bello González, Nazaret; Schlichenmaier, Rolf; Rezaei, Reza

    2014-12-01

    As a sunspot penumbra forms, the magnetic field vector at the outer boundary of the protospot undergoes a transformation. We study the changes of the magnetic field vector at this boundary as a penumbral segment forms. We analyze a set of spectropolarimetric maps covering 2 hr during the formation of a sunspot in NOAA 11024. The data were recorded with the GFPI instrument attached to the German VTT. We observe a stationary umbra/quiet Sun boundary, where the magnetic field becomes more horizontal with time. The magnetic field inclination increases by 5°, reaching a maximum value of about 59°. The maximum inclination coincides with the onset of filament formation. In time, the penumbra filaments become longer and the penumbral bright grains protrude into the umbra, where the magnetic field is stronger and more vertical. Consequently, we observe a decrease in the magnetic field inclination at the boundary as the penumbra grows. In summary, in order to initiate the formation of the penumbra, the magnetic field at the umbral (protospot) boundary becomes more inclined. As the penumbra grows, the umbra/penumbra boundary migrates inwards, and at this boundary the magnetic field turns more vertical again, while it remains inclined in the outer penumbra.

  5. Noise reduction of shortly ducted fan by using forward swept and inclined blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuta, Katsuhisa; Akishita, Sadao

    1990-10-01

    Experimental investigation was conducted to clarify the effect of the blades swept forward and inclined to the suction side on the noise characteristics of the low-speed propeller fan with a short duct used for ventilating. Three-dimensional velocity of the discharge flow near the trailing edge was measured by a slanted hot wire probe. Surface pressure fluctuation on the part of the trailing edge was measured by a microphone. Results are as follows: the inclination to the suction side with swept forward blades reduces the trailing edge noise lower over normal operating range. When the center of tip-vortex shifts in peripheral direction by about 70 percent or more of the blade pitch from the trailing edge, the turbulence transition of the boundary layer on the suction surface near the trailing edge occurs and the noise level increases sharply. The forward sweep of the blades prevents the shift of the tip-vortex toward the pressure surface of the adjoining blade while the shift is accelerated by the suction side inclination.

  6. The Association between Lower Incisal Inclination and Morphology of the Supporting Alveolar Bone — A Cone-Beam CT Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Quan; Pan, Xiao-gang; Ji, Guo-ping; Shen, Gang

    2009-01-01

    Aim To investigate the relationship between the positioning of the lower central incisor and physical morphology of the surrounding alveolar bone. Methodology Thirty-eight patients (18 males, 20 females), with mean age of 13.4 years, were included in this study. As part of orthodontic treatment planning the patients were required to take dental Cone-beam CT (CBCT) covering the region of lower incisors, the surrounding alveolar bone and the mandibular symphysis. The cephalometric parameters were designed and measured to indicate the inclination of lower central incisor and physical morphology of the adjacent alveolar bone. Computer-aided descriptive statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 15.0 software package for Windows. A correlation analysis and a linear regression analysis between the incisor inclination and the alveolar bone morphology were performed. Results Significant positive correlations were found between the lower central incisor inclination and the morphological contour of the alveolar bone (P <0.05). The lower central incisor root apex was closer to the lingual alveolar crest when it was buccally inclined. Conclusion The morphology of the alveolar bone may be affected by incisal inclination. PMID:20690425

  7. A unified approach to aerodynamic damping and drag/lift instabilities, and its application to dry inclined cable galloping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, J. H. G.; Larose, G. L.

    2006-02-01

    Inclined cables of cable-stayed bridges often experience large amplitude vibrations. One of the potential excitation mechanisms is dry inclined cable galloping, which has been observed in wind tunnel tests but which has not previously been fully explained theoretically. In this paper, a general expression is derived for the quasi-steady aerodynamic damping (positive or negative) of a cylinder of arbitrary cross-section yawed/inclined to the flow, for small amplitude vibrations in any plane. The expression covers the special cases of conventional quasi-steady aerodynamic damping, Den Hartog galloping and the drag crisis, as well as dry inclined cable galloping. A nondimensional aerodynamic damping parameter governing this behaviour is proposed, which is a function of only the Reynolds number, the angle between the wind velocity and the cable axis, and the orientation of the vibration plane. Measured static force coefficients from wind tunnel tests have been used with the theoretical expression to predict values of this parameter. Two main areas of instability (i.e. negative aerodynamic damping) have been identified, both in the critical Reynolds number region, one of which was previously observed in separate wind tunnel tests on a dynamic cable model. The minimum values of structural damping required to prevent dry inclined cable galloping are defined, and other factors in the behaviour in practice are discussed.

  8. Crown lengthening procedure in the management of amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Kalaivani, S.; Manohar, Jenish; Shakunthala, P.; Sujatha, S.; Rajasekaran, S. A.; Karthikeyan, B.; Kalaiselvan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation includes a promising treatment planning and execution thus fulfilling esthetic, occlusal, and functional parameters maintaining the harmony of the stomatognathic system. Crown lengthening procedures have become an integral component of the esthetic armamentarium and are utilized with increasing frequency to enhance the appearance of restorations placed in the esthetic zone. Crown lengthening plays a role to create healthy relationship of the gingiva and bone levels so as to gain access to more of the tooth which can be restored, if it is badly worn, decayed or fractured, below the gum line. This paper highlights the full mouth crown lengthening procedure performed on a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta. PMID:26538965

  9. Achieving optimal outcomes with all-zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Christensen, John Juel

    2014-01-01

    All-zirconia crowns are enjoying an unprecedented popularity. Dental laboratories are acquiring new equipment and adopting novel techniques, some of which require a learning curve. As a result, some crowns fabricated by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology may come back to the dentist with unsatisfactory features. Dentists should carefully examine each crown under magnification prior to delivery to the patient. The dentist and dental laboratory should establish a close partnership with clear communication to yield the most favorable outcome for the patient.

  10. Crown lengthening procedure in the management of amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, S; Manohar, Jenish; Shakunthala, P; Sujatha, S; Rajasekaran, S A; Karthikeyan, B; Kalaiselvan, S

    2015-08-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation includes a promising treatment planning and execution thus fulfilling esthetic, occlusal, and functional parameters maintaining the harmony of the stomatognathic system. Crown lengthening procedures have become an integral component of the esthetic armamentarium and are utilized with increasing frequency to enhance the appearance of restorations placed in the esthetic zone. Crown lengthening plays a role to create healthy relationship of the gingiva and bone levels so as to gain access to more of the tooth which can be restored, if it is badly worn, decayed or fractured, below the gum line. This paper highlights the full mouth crown lengthening procedure performed on a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta.

  11. Tree crown structural characterization: A study using terrestrial laser scanning and three-dimensional radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, Inian

    Spectroscopic observational data for vegetated environments, have been coupled with 3D physically-based radiative transfer models for retrievals of biochemical and biophysical indicators of vegetation health and condition. With the recent introduction of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) units, there now exists a means of rapidly measuring intricate structural details of vegetation canopies, which can also serve as input into 3D radiative transfer models. In this investigation, Intelligent Laser Ranging and Imaging System (ILRIS-3D) data was acquired of individual tree crowns in laboratory, and field-based experiments. The ILRIS-3D uses the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) principle to measure the distances of objects based on the time interval between laser pulse exitance and return, upon reflection from an object. At the laboratory-level, this exploratory study demonstrated and validated innovative approaches for retrieving crown-level estimates of Leaf Area Index (LAI) (r2 = 0.98, rmse = 0.26m2/m2), a critical biophysical parameter for vegetation monitoring and modeling. These methods were implemented and expanded in field experiments conducted in olive (Olea europaea L.) orchards in Cordoba, Spain, where ILRIS-3D observations for 24 structurally-variable trees were made. Robust methodologies were developed to characterize diagnostic architectural parameters, such as tree height (r2 = 0.97, rmse = 0.21m), crown width (r 2 = 0.98, rmse = 0.12m), crown height (r2 = 0.81, rmse = 0.11m), crown volume (r2 = 0.99, rmse = 2.6m3), and LAI (r2 = 0.76, rmse = 0.27m2/ m2). These parameters were subsequently used as direct inputs into the Forest LIGHT (FLIGHT) 3D ray tracing model for characterization of the spectral behavior of the olive crowns. Comparisons between FLIGHT-simulated spectra and measured data showed small differences in the visible (< 3%) and near infrared (< 10%) spectral ranges. These differences between model simulations and measurements were significantly correlated

  12. 78 FR 63559 - Order of Suspension of Trading; In The Matter of Crown Alliance Capital Limited

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Order of Suspension of Trading; In The Matter of Crown Alliance Capital Limited October 22, 2013... information concerning the securities of Crown Alliance Capital Limited (``Crown Alliance''), quoted under the ticker symbol CACL, because of questions regarding the accuracy of assertions in Crown Alliance's...

  13. Effect of upper torso inclination in Fowler's position on autonomic cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Satoshi; Endo, Yutaka; Kubota, Mitsue

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigates autonomic cardiovascular regulation during postural changes while in Fowler's position. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and sequence baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS) were measured in 12 healthy individuals in three positions (Experiment 1). We also measured RSA, sBRS, tidal volume (TV), lung volume spectrum (LV spectrum), and transfer gain and phase between lung volume and RR interval (RSA-TF, RSATF-phase) in 11 healthy individuals in two positions (Experiment 2). All participants maintained respiratory frequency at 15 breaths/min. The three positions in Experiment 1 were 30°, 45°, and 60° of upper torso inclination with a lower torso inclination of 30° throughout all evaluations. The two positions in Experiment 2 were 30° and 60° of upper torso backrest inclination with a lower torso inclination of 30° throughout all evaluations. The results of Experiment 1 showed significantly higher RSA and sBRS at 60° and 45° than at 30°, whereas RR interval (RRI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) did not differ significantly under any condition. The results of Experiment 2 showed that RSA, RSA-TF, sBRS, TV, and LV spectrum were significantly higher at 60° than at 30°, and that RRI, SBP, DBP, and the RSATF phase did not significantly differ under any condition. These findings suggested that slight flexion of the upper torso in Fowler's position activates respiratory function and increases the contribution of vagal nerve activity to the cardiovascular system in young participants under conditions of a fixed respiratory rate.

  14. Fully Automated Gis-Based Individual Tree Crown Delineation Based on Curvature Values from a LIDAR Derived Canopy Height Model in a Coniferous Plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argamosa, R. J. L.; Paringit, E. C.; Quinton, K. R.; Tandoc, F. A. M.; Faelga, R. A. G.; Ibañez, C. A. G.; Posilero, M. A. V.; Zaragosa, G. P.

    2016-06-01

    The generation of high resolution canopy height model (CHM) from LiDAR makes it possible to delineate individual tree crown by means of a fully-automated method using the CHM's curvature through its slope. The local maxima are obtained by taking the maximum raster value in a 3 m x 3 m cell. These values are assumed as tree tops and therefore considered as individual trees. Based on the assumptions, thiessen polygons were generated to serve as buffers for the canopy extent. The negative profile curvature is then measured from the slope of the CHM. The results show that the aggregated points from a negative profile curvature raster provide the most realistic crown shape. The absence of field data regarding tree crown dimensions require accurate visual assessment after the appended delineated tree crown polygon was superimposed to the hill shaded CHM.

  15. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    de MENDONÇA, Luana Menezes; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando; LANZA, Marcos Daniel Septímio; PEGORARO, Thiago Amadei; de CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins

    2014-01-01

    Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin), after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10) according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal) and R (resin)- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5) were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001) and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007). Conclusion The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the cement properties

  16. On the inclination and habitability of the HD 10180 system

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2014-09-10

    There are numerous multi-planet systems that have now been detected via a variety of techniques. These systems exhibit a range of both planetary properties and orbital configurations. For those systems without detected planetary transits, a significant unknown factor is the orbital inclination. This produces an uncertainty in the mass of the planets and their related properties, such as atmospheric scale height. Here we investigate the HD 10180 system, which was discovered using the radial velocity technique. We provide a new orbital solution for the system which allows for eccentric orbits for all planets. We show how the inclination of the system affects the mass/radius properties of the planets and how the detection of phase signatures may resolve the inclination ambiguity. We finally evaluate the Habitable Zone properties of the system and show that the g planet spends 100% of an eccentric orbit within the Habitable Zone.

  17. Influence of porcelain veneering on the marginal fit of Digident and Lava CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Hyun-Soon; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Marginal fit is a very important factor considering the restoration's long-term success. However, adding porcelain to copings can cause distortion and lead to an inadequate fit which exposes more luting material to the oral environment and causes secondary caries. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal fit of 2 different all-ceramic crown systems before and after porcelain veneering. This study was also intended to verify the marginal fit of crowns originated from green machining of partially sintered blocks of zirconia (Lava CAD/CAM system) and that of crowns obtained through machining of fully sintered blocks of zirconia (Digident CAD/CAM system). MATERIALS AND METHODS 20 crowns were made per each system and the marginal fit was evaluated through a light microscope with image processing (Accura 2000) at 50 points that were randomly selected. Each crown was measured twice: the first measurement was done after obtaining a 0.5 mm coping and the second measurement was done after porcelain veneering. The means and standard deviations were calculated and statistical inferences among the 2 groups were made using independent t-test and within the same group through paired t-test. RESULTS The means and standard deviations of the marginal fit were 61.52 ± 2.88 µm for the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns before porcelain veneering and 83.15 ± 3.51 µm after porcelain veneering. Lava CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns showed means and standard deviations of 62.22 ± 1.78 µm before porcelain veneering and 82.03 ± 1.85 µm after porcelain veneering. Both groups showed significant differences when analyzing the marginal gaps before and after porcelain veneering within each group. However, no significant differences were found when comparing the marginal gaps of each group before porcelain veneering and after porcelain veneering as well. CONCLUSION The 2 all-ceramic crown systems showed marginal gaps that were within a reported clinically

  18. Excitation of the orbital inclination of Iapetus during planetary encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2014-09-01

    Saturn's moon, Iapetus, has an orbit in a transition region where the Laplace surface is bending from the equator to the orbital plane of Saturn. The orbital inclination of Iapetus to the local Laplace plane is ≅ 8°, which is unexpected because the inclination should be ≅ 0 if Iapetus formed from a circumplanetary disk on the Laplace surface. It thus appears that some process has pumped up Iapetus's inclination while leaving its eccentricity near zero (e ≅ 0.03 at present). Here, we examined the possibility that Iapetus's inclination was excited during the early solar system instability when encounters between Saturn and ice giants occurred. We found that the dynamical effects of planetary encounters on Iapetus's orbit sensitively depend on the distance of the few closest encounters. In 4 out of 10 instability cases studied here, the orbital perturbations were too large to be plausible. In one case, Iapetus's orbit was practically unaffected. In the remaining five cases, the perturbations of Iapetus's inclination were adequate to explain its present value. In three of these cases, however, Iapetus's eccentricity was excited to >0.1-0.25, and it is not clear whether it could have been damped to its present value (≅ 0.03) by a subsequent process (e.g., tides and dynamical friction from captured irregular satellites do not seem to be strong enough). Our results therefore imply that only 2 out of 10 instability cases (∼20%) can excite Iapetus's inclination to its current value (∼30% of trials lead to >5°) while leaving its orbital eccentricity low.

  19. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS FOR INCLINED AND RETROGRADE EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Veras, Dimitri

    2010-03-20

    We perform numerical calculations of the expected transit timing variations (TTVs) induced on a hot-Jupiter by an Earth-mass perturber. Motivated by the recent discoveries of retrograde transiting planets, we concentrate on an investigation of the effect of varying relative planetary inclinations, up to and including completely retrograde systems. We find that planets in low-order (e.g., 2:1) mean-motion resonances (MMRs) retain approximately constant TTV amplitudes for 0 deg. < i < 170 deg., only reducing in amplitude for i>170 deg. Systems in higher order MMRs (e.g., 5:1) increase in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase toward 45 deg., becoming approximately constant for 45 deg. < i < 135 deg., and then declining for i>135 deg. Planets away from resonance slowly decrease in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase from 0 deg. to 180 deg., whereas planets adjacent to resonances can exhibit a huge range of variability in TTV amplitude as a function of both eccentricity and inclination. For highly retrograde systems (135 deg. < i {<=} 180 deg.), TTV signals will be undetectable across almost the entirety of parameter space, with the exceptions occurring when the perturber has high eccentricity or is very close to an MMR. This high inclination decrease in TTV amplitude (on and away from resonance) is important for the analysis of the known retrograde and multi-planet transiting systems, as inclination effects need to be considered if TTVs are to be used to exclude the presence of any putative planetary companions: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  20. The effect of thermal barrier coated piston crown on engine characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Khor, K.A.

    2000-02-01

    While there have been numerous research papers in recent years describing the theoretical benefits obtained from the use of ceramic components in reciprocating engines, the amount of literature that describes practical results is very limited. Although successes have been reported and ceramic components are now in service in production engines, mainly for reduced in-cylinder heat rejection, many researchers have experienced failures or a drop in engine performance. This article presents the work completed on a low heat rejection engine. Extensive experiments were conducted on a three-cylinder SI Daihatsu engine with piston crowns coated with a layer of ceramic, which consisted of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Measurement and comparison of engine performance, in particular fuel consumption, were made before and after the application of YSZ coatings deposited onto the piston crowns. The details of the cylinder pressures during the combustion process were also investigated.

  1. EXAFS investigations of strontium complexation by a polymer-supported crown ether.

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, M. L.; Jensen, M. P.; Chemistry

    2004-01-09

    Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements have been used to probe the coordination environment of strontium ion sorbed from aqueous nitric acid solutions on an extraction chromatographic resin comprising a macrocyclic polyether dispersed on a polymeric support. The strontium EXAFS of the metal ions sorbed onto the resin are consistent with a 1:1:2 strontium:crown ether:nitrate stoichiometry in which the strontium is enveloped in the crown ether ring and both nitrate anions are coordinated to the strontium as bidentate ligands. This is the same structure and stoichiometry observed for complexes in liquid-liquid extraction when the macrocyclic polyether is dissolved in a diluent with low water miscibility like 1-octanol.

  2. A morphological study on the crown dimensions of the mandibular molars in Tupaia glis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Hanamura, H; Wakatsuki, E

    1994-03-01

    The crown dimensions of the mandibular molars in Tupaia glis were measured. All the mean values of crown diameters and areas were larger for the M1 molar than for the M2 and M3. The last two molars were more reduced in the talonid component than in the trigonid compared to the M1, and were more reduced in the buccolingual than in the mesiodistal direction. The most common molar size sequence (MSS) was M1 > M2 > M3, and this pattern was more frequently observed in the talonid component than in the trigonid. In the canonical discriminant analysis, all the cases of the M3 were discriminated correctly, but some cases of the first two molars were confused with each other. The molars size of the mandible was closely related to that of the maxilla.

  3. Inclined heterolithic stratification—Terminology, description, interpretation and significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Richard G.; Smith, Derald G.; Wood, James M.; Visser, John; Calverley-Range, E. Anne; Koster, Emlyn H.

    1987-06-01

    Parallel to sub-parallel strata possessing original (depositional) dips occur within both lithologically "homogeneous" and "heterogeneous" units of water-lain, siliciclastic sedimentary sequences. Most such inclined strata form as a result of the lateral growth of "active", large-scale "bedforms" such as point bars or Gilbert-type deltas. The confusing diversity of terms previously used to describe inclined stratified deposits is reviewed. Virtually all these terms, including epsilon-cross-stratification and its derivatives are unsatisfactory because they are non-descriptive and/or communicate an overt genetic bias. The names Inclined Heterolithic Stratification (IHS) and Inclined Stratification (IS) are proposed as replacements. To facilitate comparison of IHS deposits a "standard" descriptive nomenclature is also proposed. IHS may occur as solitary sets or show vertical or lateral stacking forming cosets. Co-directional laterally stacked sets constitute an imbricate coset. Composite sets are those in which IHS sequences gradationally overlie inclined-stratified lithofacies units (typically sandstones). Individual inclined units comprising IHS sets may be either normally graded or (more commonly) consist of two distinct lithological members ar anged as a coarse-to-fine couplet. Inclined units are separated by inclined surfaces indicative of non-deposition or erosion. Published examples of modern and ancient IHS deposits are known or inferred to occur in a variety of environments, but the overwhelming majority are products of point-bar lateral accretion within meandering channels of freshwater rivers, tidally influenced rivers and creeks draining intertidal mudflats. Descriptions are given of the most characteristic and important (from an interpretation standpoint) physical features of point-bar IHS deposits and their probable modes of origin. Deposits predominantly composed of sand and mud layers arranged as coarse-to-fine couplets are emphasized. Factors thought

  4. Large area mapping of southwestern forest crown cover, canopy height, and biomass using the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid canopy reflectance model inversion experiment was performed using multiangle reflectance data from the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) on the Earth Observing System Terra satellite, with the goal of obtaining measures of forest fractional crown cover, mean canopy height, a...

  5. 6. BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTH FROM CROWN POINT STATE PARK SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTH FROM CROWN POINT STATE PARK SHOWING SURROUNDING DEVELOPMENT FROM CONSTRUCTION OF DAM - Columbia River Bridge at Grand Coulee Dam, Spanning Columbia River at State Route 155, Coulee Dam, Okanogan County, WA

  6. Newel post and balustrade (west passage), column (seminary), crown molding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Newel post and balustrade (west passage), column (seminary), crown molding (second floor), window sill (second floor), and baseboard (second floor). - Russian Bishop's House, 501 Lincoln Street, Sitka, Sitka Borough, AK

  7. Estimation of crown closure from AVIRIS data using regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staenz, K.; Williams, D. J.; Truchon, M.; Fritz, R.

    1993-01-01

    Crown closure is one of the input parameters used for forest growth and yield modelling. Preliminary work by Staenz et al. indicates that imaging spectrometer data acquired with sensors such as the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) have some potential for estimating crown closure on a stand level. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to establish a relationship between AVIRIS data and the crown closure derived from aerial photography of a forested test site within the Interior Douglas Fir biogeoclimatic zone in British Columbia, Canada; (2) to investigate the impact of atmospheric effects and the forest background on the correlation between AVIRIS data and crown closure estimates; and (3) to improve this relationship using multiple regression analysis.

  8. Analysis of the dental morphology of Plio-Pleistocene hominids. III. Mandibular premolar crowns.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B A; Uytterschaut, H

    1987-01-01

    Accurate measurements were made of the overall size of both the crown and its components of 91 mandibular premolar teeth of early hominids. The shape of the crown outline and the fissure pattern, and the expression of four morphological traits, were also recorded. Non-dental criteria were used to allocate the specimens into four major taxonomic categories (EAFROB, EAFHOM, SAFROB and SAFGRA), approximating to the hypodigms of, respectively, A. boisei, H. habilis and Homo sp., A. robustus and A. africanus. Those specimens that could not be so allocated were regarded as 'unknown'. Intertaxonomic overall size differences were established for both the P3 and P4, with the latter showing little overlap in crown size between the three taxonomic categories usually associated with East African sites (i.e. EAFROB, EAFHOM and SAFGRA). Crown shape is a better discriminator between taxonomic groups for P3 than for P4, with the P3s of EAFHOM showing less buccolingual expansion than the other taxonomic categories. Cusp number, the location of the lingual cusp and the expression of the median longitudinal fissure, show systematic variation between the main taxonomic categories, with the 'robust' taxa being distinguished by additional distal cusps, and a more deeply incised median longitudinal fissure, and EAFHOM being peculiar in having a distally situated lingual cusp. Marginal grooves show more overlap in their incidence and expression between taxonomic categories. Both the 'robust' australopithecine taxonomic categories have relatively large talonids, apparently at the expense of the size of the buccal cusp. The relative talonid enlargement was greater for P3 than for P4, a conclusion which is at variance with previous published assessments. Investigation of the allometric relationships between relative talonid size and overall crown size in the pooled 'non-robust' taxonomic categories did not suggest that talonid enlargement was a simple consequence of a larger-size crown. The

  9. The mesiodistal crown diameters of primary dentition in Indonesian Javanese children.

    PubMed

    Kuswandari, Sri; Nishino, Mizuho

    2004-03-01

    Dentition analysis of primary teeth is necessary for recognising and correcting occlusal problems in every stage of dental development to enable normal adult occlusion. To do this, normative data of mesiodistal tooth crown diameters from the same ethnic population are needed. The aims of this study were to gather normative data of mesiodistal crown diameters of primary dentition in Indonesian Javanese children and to compare this normative data with published data of other ethnic populations. Dental casts of 160 males and 137 females with acceptable occlusion, aged 3.25-6.58 years, were taken in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Mesiodistal diameter was measured as the distance between the anatomic contact points using calipers with accuracy to within 0.05 mm. Each measurement was taken twice on different occasions. The results indicated that the magnitude of asymmetry between right and left teeth was larger in distal teeth within a tooth field, larger in males than females, and larger in mandibular than maxillary teeth. The stability of mesiodistal tooth crown diameters was less in males than in females, and was most prominent in the mandibular central incisor. Sexual dimorphisms were found in, the lateral incisor and first molar in the maxilla, and the canine, first and second molars in the mandible. Compared with other ethnic populations, Indonesian Javanese falls between Hong Kong Chinese and Australian Aboriginal.

  10. Effect of Vertical Misfit on Screw Joint Stability of Implant-Supported Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Gomes, Érica Alves

    2011-08-01

    The passive fit between prosthesis and implant is a relevant factor for screw joint stability and treatment success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface on preload maintenance of retention screw of implant-supported crowns. The crowns were fabricated with different abutments and veneering materials and divided into 5 groups ( n = 12): Gold UCLA abutments cast in gold alloy veneered with ceramic (Group I) and resin (Group II), UCLA abutments cast in titanium veneered with ceramic (Group III) and resin (Group IV), and zirconia abutments with ceramic veneering (Group V). The crowns were attached to implants by gold retention screws with 35-N cm insertion torque. Specimens were submitted to mechanical cycling up to 106 cycles. Measurements of detorque and vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface were performed before and after mechanical cycling. ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference ( P < 0.05) among groups for vertical misfit measured before and after mechanical cycling. The abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values. Pearson correlation test did not demonstrate significant correlation ( P > 0.05) between vertical misfit and detorque value. It was concluded that vertical misfit did not influence torque maintenance and the abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values.

  11. The voodoo doll task: Introducing and validating a novel method for studying aggressive inclinations.

    PubMed

    Dewall, C Nathan; Finkel, Eli J; Lambert, Nathaniel M; Slotter, Erica B; Bodenhausen, Galen V; Pond, Richard S; Renzetti, Claire M; Fincham, Frank D

    2013-01-01

    Aggression pervades modern life. To understand the root causes of aggression, researchers have developed several methods to assess aggressive inclinations. The current article introduces a new behavioral method-the voodoo doll task (VDT)-that offers a reliable and valid trait and state measure of aggressive inclinations across settings and relationship contexts. Drawing on theory and research on the law of similarity and magical beliefs (Rozin, Millman, & Nemeroff [1986], Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 50, 703-712), we propose that people transfer characteristics of a person onto a voodoo doll representing that person. As a result, causing harm to a voodoo doll by stabbing it with pins may have important psychological similarities to causing actual harm to the person the voodoo doll represents. Nine methodologically diverse studies (total N = 1,376) showed that the VDT had strong reliability, construct validity, and convergent validity. Discussion centers on the importance of magical beliefs in understanding the causes of aggressive inclinations.

  12. Dynamic characteristics of an inclined flexible cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinghua; Ma, Yexuan; Xu, Wanhai; Lu, Yan; Cheng, Ankang

    2017-04-01

    A series of experimental tests were conducted on vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a flexible inclined cylinder with a yaw angle equals 45° for investigating the response characteristics in a towing tank. The flexible cylinder model was 5.6 m in length and 16 mm in diameter with an aspect ratio of 350 and a mass ratio of 1.9. The Reynolds numbers ranged from about 800 to 16,000.The strain responses were measured directly in both cross-flow (CF) and in-line (IL) directions and corresponding displacements were obtained using a modal approach. The dynamic response characteristics of the inclined flexible cylinder excited by vortex shedding was examined from the aspect of strain response, displacement amplitudes, dominant modes, response frequencies and drag force coefficients. The experimental results indicated that the CF response amplitude could be up to a value of 3.0D and the IL one more than 1.1D. The dominant modes were from 1 to 3 in CF direction and 1 to 5 in IL direction. And it was found that dominant frequencies increased linearly with the reduced velocity. The multi-modal response of the flexible inclined cylinder model excited by VIV was observed and analyzed. Moreover, the values of drag coefficients were in the range of 0.9-2.6.

  13. Natural convection in inclined pipes - A new correlation for heat transfer estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebach, R.; Haberstroh, Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Heat intake minimization is one of the main challenges during the design process of cryogenic storage tanks. It is widely known that connection pipes significantly contribute to this residual heat transfer from ambient temperature conditions to the cold inner vessel. A certain pipe inclination can cause a convective flow field within the fluid. This effect usually increases the total heat transfer much more dramatically than anticipated. In several previous papers we discussed the impact of pipe geometry as well as boundary conditions intensively. However, there is no suitable correlation in literature available which could be used to estimate the total heat transfer properly. The large number of experimental data we gained during our investigations allows us to propose a new correlation in order to predict the total heat transfer through an inclined pipe in function of the inclination angle. In this paper we derivate this new correlation and show its application for heat transfer estimations. Several comparisons are carried out against our own measurements as well as literature data.

  14. A test of source-surface model predictions of heliospheric current sheet inclination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M. E.; Crooker, N. U.; Siscoe, G. L.; Smith, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    The orientation of the heliospheric current sheet predicted from a source surface model is compared with the orientation determined from minimum-variance analysis of International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 3 magnetic field data at 1 AU near solar maximum. Of the 37 cases analyzed, 28 have minimum variance normals that lie orthogonal to the predicted Parker spiral direction. For these cases, the correlation coefficient between the predicted and measured inclinations is 0.6. However, for the subset of 14 cases for which transient signatures (either interplanetary shocks or bidirectional electrons) are absent, the agreement in inclinations improves dramatically, with a correlation coefficient of 0.96. These results validate not only the use of the source surface model as a predictor but also the previously questioned usefulness of minimum variance analysis across complex sector boundaries. In addition, the results imply that interplanetary dynamics have little effect on current sheet inclination at 1 AU. The dependence of the correlation on transient occurrence suggests that the leading edge of a coronal mass ejection (CME), where transient signatures are detected, disrupts the heliospheric current sheet but that the sheet re-forms between the trailing legs of the CME. In this way the global structure of the heliosphere, reflected both in the source surface maps and in the interplanetary sector structure, can be maintained even when the CME occurrence rate is high.

  15. Accuracy Assessment of Crown Delineation Methods for the Individual Trees Using LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. T.; Lin, C.; Lin, Y. C.; Liu, J. K.

    2016-06-01

    Forest canopy density and height are used as variables in a number of environmental applications, including the estimation of biomass, forest extent and condition, and biodiversity. The airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is very useful to estimate forest canopy parameters according to the generated canopy height models (CHMs). The purpose of this work is to introduce an algorithm to delineate crown parameters, e.g. tree height and crown radii based on the generated rasterized CHMs. And accuracy assessment for the extraction of volumetric parameters of a single tree is also performed via manual measurement using corresponding aerial photo pairs. A LiDAR dataset of a golf course acquired by Leica ALS70-HP is used in this study. Two algorithms, i.e. a traditional one with the subtraction of a digital elevation model (DEM) from a digital surface model (DSM), and a pit-free approach are conducted to generate the CHMs firstly. Then two algorithms, a multilevel morphological active-contour (MMAC) and a variable window filter (VWF), are implemented and used in this study for individual tree delineation. Finally, experimental results of two automatic estimation methods for individual trees can be evaluated with manually measured stand-level parameters, i.e. tree height and crown diameter. The resulting CHM generated by a simple subtraction is full of empty pixels (called "pits") that will give vital impact on subsequent analysis for individual tree delineation. The experimental results indicated that if more individual trees can be extracted, tree crown shape will became more completely in the CHM data after the pit-free process.

  16. Indications and complications of crown halo vest placement: A review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dennis; Adeoye, Adeola L; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2017-02-10

    Crown halo vest placement remains an option for the treatment of a variety of upper and subaxial cervical spinal fractures. While the device remains a useful non-operative option for the treatment of these injuries, it has been associated with a variety of complications. This manuscript represents an up to date narrative review of the indications, complications, and complication avoidance for the placement of crown halo vests.

  17. Proton-Ionizable Crown Ethers. A Short Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-30

    identify by blocknumber) FIELD I GROUP SUB-GROUP 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if iecessary and identify by block number) A review of the synthesis of...Pederson reported the synthesis and cation-complexing characteristics of the crown .:hers in 19671-. there has been increasing interest in theze...to obtain the desired product. The synthesis of 15 is shovn in Erocedure B. Crown ether phenols 15-18 (Figure I, Table 1) were obtained according to

  18. Failure Probability of Three Designs of Zirconia Crowns.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gabriela Freitas; Monteiro, Evelyn Barbosa; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Zhang, Yu; Marques de Melo, Renata

    2015-01-01

    This study used a two-parameter Weibull analysis for evaluation of the lifespan of fully or partially porcelain-/glaze-veneered zirconia crowns after fatigue test. A sample of 60 first molars were selected and prepared for full-coverage crowns with three different designs (n = 20): traditional (crowns with zirconia framework covered with feldspathic porcelain), modified (crowns partially covered with veneering porcelain), and monolithic (full-contour zirconia crowns). All specimens were treated with a glaze layer. Specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (100 N, 3 Hz) with a piston with a hemispherical tip (Ø = 6 mm) until the specimens failed or up to 2 × 10⁶ cycles. Every 500,000 cycles, the fatigue tests were interrupted and stereomicroscopy (10×) was used to inspect the specimens for damage. The authors performed Weibull analysis of interval data to calculate the number of failures in each interval. The types and numbers of failures according to the groups were: cracking (13 traditional, 6 modified) and chipping (4 traditional) of the feldspathic porcelain, followed by delamination (1 traditional) at the veneer/core interface and debonding (2 monolithic) at the cementation interface. Weibull parameters (β, scale; η, shape), with a two-sided confidence interval of 95%, were: traditional-1.25 and 0.9 × 10⁶ cycles; modified-0.58 and 11.7 × 10⁶ cycles; and monolithic-1.05 and 16.5 × 10⁶ cycles. Traditional crowns showed greater susceptibility to fatigue, the modified group presented higher propensity to early failures, and the monolithic group showed no susceptibility to fatigue. The modified and monolithic groups presented the highest number of crowns with no failures after the fatigue test. The three crown designs presented significantly different behaviors under fatigue. The modified and monolithic groups presented less probability of failure after 2 × 10⁶ cycles.

  19. Failure probability of three designs of zirconia crowns

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, G. Freitas; Monteiro, E. Barbosa Carmona; Bottino, M.A.; Zhang, Y.; de Melo, R. Marques

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study utilized a 2-parameter Weibull analysis for evaluation of lifetime of fully or partially porcelain-/glaze-veneered zirconia crowns after fatigue test. Methods Sixty first molars were selected and prepared for full-coverage crowns with three different designs(n = 20): Traditional –crowns with zirconia framework covered with feldspathic porcelain; Modified– crowns partially covered with veneering porcelain; and Monolithic–full-contour zirconia crowns. All specimens were treated with a glaze layer. Specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (100N, 3Hz) with a piston with hemispherical tip (Ø=6 mm) until the specimens failed or up to 2×106 cycles. Every 500,000 cycles intervals, the fatigue tests were interrupted, and stereomicroscopy (10 X) was used to inspect the specimens for damage. We performed Weibull analysis of interval data to calculate the number of failures in each interval. Results The types and number of failures according to the groups were: cracking (Traditional-13, Modified-6) and chipping (Traditional-4) of the feldspathic porcelain, followed by delamination (Traditional-1) at the veneer/core interface and debonding (Monollithic-2) at the cementation interface. Weibull parameters (beta, scale; and eta, shape), with a two-sided confidence interval of 95%, were: Traditional – 1.25 and 0.9 × 106cycles; Modified– 0.58 and 11.7 × 106 cycles; and Monolithic – 1.05 and 16.5 × 106 cycles. Traditional crowns showed greater susceptibility to fatigue, the Modified group presented higher propensity to early failures, and the Monolithic group showed no susceptibility to fatigue. The Modified and Monolithic groups presented the highest number of crowns with no failures after the fatigue test. Conclusions The three crown designs presented significantly different behaviors under fatigue. The Modified and the Monolithic groups presented less probability to failure after 2×106cycles. PMID:26509988

  20. Minimum energy shapes of one-side-pinned static drops on inclined surfaces.

    PubMed

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Govindarajan, Rama

    2011-10-01

    The shape that a liquid drop will assume when resting statically on a solid surface inclined to the horizontal is studied here in two dimensions. Earlier experimental and numerical studies yield multiple solutions primarily because of inherent differences in surface characteristics. On a solid surface capable of sustaining any amount of hysteresis, we obtain the global, and hence unique, minimum energy shape as a function of equilibrium contact angle, drop volume, and plate inclination. It is shown, in the energy minimization procedure, how the potential energy of this system is dependent on the basis chosen to measure it from, and two realistic bases, front-pinned and back-pinned, are chosen for consideration. This is at variance with previous numerical investigations where both ends of the contact line are pinned. It is found that the free end always assumes Young's equilibrium angle. Using this, simple equations that describe the angles and the maximum volume are then derived. The range of parameters where static drops are possible is presented. We introduce a detailed force balance for this problem and study the role of the wall in supporting the drop. We show that a portion of the wall reaction can oppose gravity while the other portion aids it. This determines the maximum drop volume that can be supported at a given plate inclination. This maximum volume is the least for a vertical wall, and is higher for all other wall inclinations. This study can be extended to three-dimensional drops in a straightforward manner and, even without this, lends itself to experimental verification of several of its predictions.

  1. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  2. Predictors of sprint start speed: the effects of resistive ground-based vs. inclined treadmill training.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Brent, Jensen L; Divine, Jon G; Hewett, Timothy E

    2007-08-01

    There is currently no consensus with regard to the most effective method to train for improved acceleration, or with regard to which kinematic variable provides the greatest opportunity for improvement in this important performance characteristic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of resistive ground-based speed training and incline treadmill speed training on speed-related kinematic measures and sprint start speed. The hypothesis tested was that incline treadmill training would improve sprint start time, while the ground-based resistive training would not. Corollary hypotheses were that treadmill training would increase stride frequency and ground-based training would not affect kinematics during the sprint start. Thirty-one high school female soccer players (15.7 +/- 0.5 years) were assigned to either treadmill (n = 17) or ground-based (n = 14) training groups and trained 2 times a week for 6 weeks. The treadmill group utilized incline speed training on a treadmill, while the ground-based group utilized partner band resistance ground-based techniques. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used (4.5 m mark) before and after training to quantify kinematics during the fastest of 3 recorded sprint starts (9.1 m). Both groups decreased average sprint start time from 1.75 +/- 0.12 to 1.68 +/- 0.08 seconds (p < 0.001). Training increased stride frequency (p = 0.030) but not stride length. After training, total vertical pelvic displacement and stride length predicted 62% of the variance in sprint start time for the resistive ground-based group, while stride length and stride frequency accounted for 67% prediction of the variance in sprint start time for the treadmill group. The results of this study indicate that both incline treadmill and resistive ground-based training are effective at improving sprint start speed, although they potentially do so through differing mechanisms.

  3. Monte Carlo calculation model for heat radiation of inclined cylindrical flames and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhangyu; Ji, Jingwei; Huang, Yuankai; Wang, Zhiyi; Li, Qingjie

    2017-02-01

    Based on Monte Carlo method, a calculation model and its C++ calculating program for radiant heat transfer from an inclined cylindrical flame are proposed. In this model, the total radiation energy of the inclined cylindrical flame is distributed equally among a certain number of energy beams, which are emitted randomly from the flame surface. The incident heat flux on a surface is calculated by counting the number of energy beams which could reach the surface. The paper mainly studies the geometrical evaluation criterion for validity of energy beams emitted by inclined cylindrical flames and received by other surfaces. Compared to Mudan's formula results for a straight cylinder or a cylinder with 30° tilt angle, the calculated view factors range from 0.0043 to 0.2742 and the predicted view factors agree well with Mudan's results. The changing trend and values of incident heat fluxes computed by the model is consistent with experimental data measured by Rangwala et al. As a case study, incident heat fluxes on a gasoline tank, both the side and the top surface are calculated by the model. The heat radiation is from an inclined cylindrical flame generated by another 1000 m3 gasoline tank 4.6 m away from it. The cone angle of the flame to the adjacent oil tank is 45° and the polar angle is 0°. The top surface and the side surface of the tank are divided into 960 and 5760 grids during the calculation, respectively. The maximum incident heat flux on the side surface is 39.64 and 51.31 kW/m2 on the top surface. Distributions of the incident heat flux on the surface of the oil tank and on the ground around the fire tank are obtained, too.

  4. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages.

  5. Thickness of immediate dentin sealing materials and its effect on the fracture load of a reinforced all-ceramic crown

    PubMed Central

    Spohr, Ana Maria; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Platt, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate, in vitro, the thickness of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) materials on full crown preparations and its effect on the fracture load of a reinforced all-ceramic crown. Materials and Methods: Sixty premolars received full crown preparation and were divided into the following groups according to the IDS technique: G1-control; G2-Clearfil SE Bond; and G3-Clearfil SE Bond and Protect Liner F. After the impressions were taken, the preparations were temporized with acrylic resin crowns. IPS empress 2 restorations were fabricated and later cemented on the preparations with Panavia F. 10 specimens from each group were submitted to fracture load testing. The other 10 specimens were sectioned buccolingually before the thicknesses of Panavia F, Clearfil SE Bond and Protect Liner F were measured in 10 different positions using a microscope. Results: According to analysis of variance and Tukey's test, the fracture load of Group 3 (1300 N) was significantly higher than that of Group 1 (1001 N) (P < 0.01). Group 2 (1189 N) was not significantly different from Groups 1 and 3. The higher thickness of Clearfil SE Bond was obtained in the concave part of the preparation. Protect Liner F presented a more uniform range of values at different positions. The thickness of Panavia F was higher in the occlusal portion of the preparation. Conclusions: The film thickness formed by the IDS materials is influenced by the position under the crown, suggesting its potential to increase the fracture load of the IPS empress 2 ceramic crowns. PMID:24932124

  6. Cost studies for commercial fuselage crown designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Smith, P. J.; Truslove, G.; Willden, K. S.; Metschan, S. L.; Pfahl, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the cost and weight potential of advanced composite design concepts in the crown region of a commercial transport. Two designs from each of three design families were developed using an integrated design-build team. A range of design concepts and manufacturing processes were included to allow isolation and comparison of cost centers. Detailed manufacturing/assembly plans were developed as the basis for cost estimates. Each of the six designs was found to have advantages over the 1995 aluminum benchmark in cost and weight trade studies. Large quadrant panels and cobonded frames were found to save significant assembly labor costs. Comparisons of high- and intermediate-performance fiber systems were made for skin and stringer applications. Advanced tow placement was found to be an efficient process for skin lay up. Further analysis revealed attractive processes for stringers and frames. Optimized designs were informally developed for each design family, combining the most attractive concepts and processes within that family. A single optimized design was selected as the most promising, and the potential for further optimization was estimated. Technical issues and barriers were identified.

  7. The energetic characterization of pineapple crown leaves.

    PubMed

    Braga, R M; Queiroga, T S; Calixto, G Q; Almeida, H N; Melo, D M A; Melo, M A F; Freitas, J C O; Curbelo, F D S

    2015-12-01

    Energetic characterization of biomass allows for assessing its energy potential for application in different conversion processes into energy. The objective of this study is to physicochemically characterize pineapple crown leaves (PC) for their application in energy conversion processes. PC was characterized according to ASTM E871-82, E1755-01, and E873-82 for determination of moisture, ash, and volatile matter, respectively; the fixed carbon was calculated by difference. Higher heating value was determined by ASTM E711-87 and ash chemical composition was determined by XRF. The thermogravimetric and FTIR analyses were performed to evaluate the thermal decomposition and identify the main functional groups of biomass. PC has potential for application in thermochemical processes, showing high volatile matter (89.5%), bulk density (420.8 kg/m(3)), and higher heating value (18.9 MJ/kg). The results show its energy potential justifying application of this agricultural waste into energy conversion processes, implementing sustainability in the production, and reducing the environmental liabilities caused by its disposal.

  8. Highly Inclined Jets in Cross Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, I. M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20deg and 45deg and yawed between Beta = 0deg and 90deg in increments of 15deg. The measurements were performed with two ×-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulent stresses. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x, normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, ? max, with the downstream distance is significantly less at higher Beta but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, ?xmax is about five times larger for Beta = 75deg compared to the levels at Beta = 0deg. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J. Distributions of turbulent stresses for various cases are documented. Peak normal stresses are found to occur within the core of the streamwise vortices. With yaw, at lower values of J, high turbulence is also observed in the boundary layer underneath the jet-vortex structure

  9. Transit Timing Variations for Eccentric and Inclined Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David

    2009-08-01

    The Transit Timing Variation (TTV) method relies on monitoring changes in timing of transits of known exoplanets. Nontransiting planets in the system can be inferred from TTVs by their gravitational interactions with the transiting planet. The TTV method is sensitive to low-mass planets that cannot be detected by other means. Inferring the orbital elements and mass of the nontransiting planets from TTVs, however, is more challenging than for other planet detection schemes. It is a difficult inverse problem. Here, we extended the new inversion method proposed by Nesvorný & Morbidelli to eccentric transiting planets and inclined orbits. We found that the TTV signal can be significantly amplified for hierarchical planetary systems with substantial orbital inclinations and/or for an eccentric transiting planet with anti-aligned orbit of the planetary companion. Thus, a fortuitous orbital setup of an exoplanetary system may significantly enhance our chances of TTV detection. We also showed that the detailed shape of the TTV signal is sensitive to the orbital inclination of the nontransiting planetary companion. The TTV detection method may thus provide important constraints on the orbital inclination of exoplanets and be used to test theories of planetary formation and evolution.

  10. South portal and deck view from south, showing inclined endposts, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South portal and deck view from south, showing inclined endposts, Pratt through trusses, south portal strut, overhead bracing, pipe rails and posts, and concrete deck with bituminous wearing surface - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  11. North portal and deck view, from north, showing inclined endposts, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North portal and deck view, from north, showing inclined endposts, Pratt through trusses, north portal strut, overhead bracing, pipe rails and posts, and concrete deck with bituminous wearing surface - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  12. 47 CFR 25.280 - Inclined orbit operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inclined orbit; and (4) Continue to maintain the space station at the authorized longitude orbital location in the geostationary satellite arc with the appropriate east-west station-keeping tolerance. ... Commission is notified by letter within 30 days after the last north-south station keeping maneuver....

  13. 47 CFR 25.280 - Inclined orbit operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inclined orbit; and (4) Continue to maintain the space station at the authorized longitude orbital location in the geostationary satellite arc with the appropriate east-west station-keeping tolerance. ... Commission is notified by letter within 30 days after the last north-south station keeping maneuver....

  14. 47 CFR 25.280 - Inclined orbit operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inclined orbit; and (4) Continue to maintain the space station at the authorized longitude orbital location in the geostationary satellite arc with the appropriate east-west station-keeping tolerance. ... Commission is notified by letter within 30 days after the last north-south station keeping maneuver....

  15. 47 CFR 25.280 - Inclined orbit operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inclined orbit; and (4) Continue to maintain the space station at the authorized longitude orbital location in the geostationary satellite arc with the appropriate east-west station-keeping tolerance. ... Commission is notified by letter within 30 days after the last north-south station keeping maneuver....

  16. 47 CFR 25.280 - Inclined orbit operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inclined orbit; and (4) Continue to maintain the space station at the authorized longitude orbital location in the geostationary satellite arc with the appropriate east-west station-keeping tolerance. [69 FR... Commission is notified by letter within 30 days after the last north-south station keeping maneuver....

  17. Students' Entrepreneurial Inclination at a Malaysian Polytechnic: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasin, Ahmad Yasruddin Md; Mahmood, Nik Abdul Aziz Nik; Jaafar, Nik Azyyati Nik

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of an ongoing project to examine students' inclination towards entrepreneurship at a Malaysian polytechnic. The study used a self-administered questionnaire to explore the influence of entrepreneurial intent, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, perceived barriers, perceived support factors and…

  18. 1. SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (RIGHT), COVERED INCLINE CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (RIGHT), COVERED INCLINE CONVEYOR (LOWER RIGHT) THAT EXTENDS TO THE SAND-SORTING BUILDING, AND REMAINS OF ORIGINAL (1917) WASHING, DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (LEFT), VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF SAND-SORTING BUILDING - Mill "C" Complex, Sand Draining & Drying Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  19. Shade avoidance and the regulation of leaf inclination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jack L; Weinig, Cynthia; Hangarter, Roger P

    2006-06-01

    As a rosette plant, Arabidopsis thaliana forms leaves near to the ground, which causes the plant to be vulnerable to shading by neighbours. One mechanism to avoid such shading is the regulation of leaf inclination, such that leaves can be raised to more vertical orientations to prevent neighbouring leaves from overtopping them. Throughout Arabidopsis rosette development, rosette leaves move to more vertical orientations when shaded by neighbouring leaves, exposed to low light levels or placed in the dark. After dark-induced reorientation of leaves, returning them to white light causes the leaves to reorient to more horizontal inclinations. These light-dependent leaf movements are more robust than, and distinct from, the diurnal movements of rosette leaves. However, the movements are gated by the circadian clock. The light-dependent leaf orientation response is mediated primarily through phytochromes A, B and E, with the orientation varying with the ratio of red light to far-red light, consistent with other shade-avoidance responses. However, even plants lacking these phytochromes were able to alter leaf inclination in response to white light, suggesting a role for other photoreceptors. In particular, we found significant changes in leaf inclination for plants exposed to green light. This green light response may be caused, in part, by light-dependent regulation of abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis.

  20. 11. VIEW SOUTHEAST, DETAIL OF INCLINED END POST, SHOWING CASTIRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW SOUTHEAST, DETAIL OF INCLINED END POST, SHOWING CAST-IRON WEDGE SET INTO LOWER CHORD; FLOOR-BEAM HANGER BLOCKS TO LEFT - Meeting House Bridge, Spanning Boston & Maine Railroad 0.1 mile east of Biddleford Road, Arundel, York County, ME

  1. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS FOR ECCENTRIC AND INCLINED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David

    2009-08-20

    The Transit Timing Variation (TTV) method relies on monitoring changes in timing of transits of known exoplanets. Nontransiting planets in the system can be inferred from TTVs by their gravitational interactions with the transiting planet. The TTV method is sensitive to low-mass planets that cannot be detected by other means. Inferring the orbital elements and mass of the nontransiting planets from TTVs, however, is more challenging than for other planet detection schemes. It is a difficult inverse problem. Here, we extended the new inversion method proposed by Nesvorny and Morbidelli to eccentric transiting planets and inclined orbits. We found that the TTV signal can be significantly amplified for hierarchical planetary systems with substantial orbital inclinations and/or for an eccentric transiting planet with anti-aligned orbit of the planetary companion. Thus, a fortuitous orbital setup of an exoplanetary system may significantly enhance our chances of TTV detection. We also showed that the detailed shape of the TTV signal is sensitive to the orbital inclination of the nontransiting planetary companion. The TTV detection method may thus provide important constraints on the orbital inclination of exoplanets and be used to test theories of planetary formation and evolution.

  2. Ethical Inclinations of Tomorrow's Managers: One More Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, George E.

    1985-01-01

    This article reports comparison of the results of the ethical inclinations of present and future managers. Three hundred and six undergraduate business majors completed the survey. Results and implications are presented, along with a discussion of the ethics of future executives. (CT)

  3. Reconstruction of Galileo Galilei's Experiment: The Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the "Third Day" of the "Discourses and Mathematical Demonstrations Concerning Two New Sciences" Galileo Galilei describes the famous experiment of the inclined plane and uses it to bring an experimental confirmation to the laws of uniformly accelerated motion. We describe a reconstruction of the experiment and how the results can be used for…

  4. 46 CFR 111.01-19 - Inclination of the vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-19 Inclination of the vessel. (a) All electrical equipment must be.... Additionally, electrical equipment necessary for the maneuvering, navigation, and safety of the vessel or...

  5. 46 CFR 111.01-19 - Inclination of the vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-19 Inclination of the vessel. (a) All electrical equipment must be.... Additionally, electrical equipment necessary for the maneuvering, navigation, and safety of the vessel or...

  6. 46 CFR 111.01-19 - Inclination of the vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-19 Inclination of the vessel. (a) All electrical equipment must be.... Additionally, electrical equipment necessary for the maneuvering, navigation, and safety of the vessel or...

  7. 46 CFR 111.01-19 - Inclination of the vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-19 Inclination of the vessel. (a) All electrical equipment must be.... Additionally, electrical equipment necessary for the maneuvering, navigation, and safety of the vessel or...

  8. Inclined Planes and Motion Detectors: A Study of Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Dyanne M.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students work in cooperative groups and roll balls down inclined planes, collect data with the help of an electronic motion detector, and represent data with a graphing calculator to explore concepts such as mass, gravity, velocity, and acceleration. (Contains 12 references.) (Author/ASK)

  9. Motion on an Inclined Plane and the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ekström, Peter; Hansson, Lena; Mars, Patrik; Ouattara, Lassana; Ryan, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Friction is an important phenomenon in everyday life. All children are familiar with playground slides, which may thus be a good starting point for investigating friction. Motion on an inclined plane is a standard physics example. This paper presents an investigation of friction by a group of 11-year olds. How did they plan their investigations?…

  10. 85. INCLINED PLANE 7 EAST. FLUME AND STONE POWER HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    85. INCLINED PLANE 7 EAST. FLUME AND STONE POWER HOUSE ARE ON RIGHT SIDE OF PHOTOGRAPH. NOTE THE CABLE LEAVING THE POWER HOUSE. THIS CABLE IS ATTATCHED TO A DRUM ON THE INSIDE THE POWER HOUSE WHICH IS TURNED BY MEANS OF A WATER POWERED TURBINE. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  11. 46 CFR 108.159 - Stairways and exterior inclined ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stairways and exterior inclined ladders. 108.159 Section 108.159 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.159 Stairways and...

  12. 46 CFR 108.159 - Stairways and exterior inclined ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stairways and exterior inclined ladders. 108.159 Section 108.159 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.159 Stairways and...

  13. Crown ether-modified electrodes for the simultaneous stripping voltammetric determination of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Serrano, Núria; González-Calabuig, Andreu; del Valle, Manel

    2015-06-01

    This work describes the immobilization of 4-carboxybenzo-18-crown-6 (CB-18-crown-6) and 4-carboxybenzo-15-crown-5 (CB-15-crown-5) assisted by lysine on aryl diazonium salt monolayers anchored to the surface of graphite-epoxy composite electrodes (GEC), and their use for the simultaneous determination of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). These modified electrodes display a good repeatability and reproducibility with detection and quantification limits at levels of µg L(-1) (ppb), confirming their suitability for the determination of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions in environmental samples. The overlapped nature of the multimetal stripping measurements was resolved by employing the two-sensor array CB-15-crown-5-GEC and CB-18-crown-6-GEC, since the metal complex selectivity exhibited by the considered ligands could add some discrimination power. For the processing of the voltammograms, Discrete Wavelet Transform and Causal Index were selected as preprocessing tools for data compression coupled with an artificial neural network for the modeling of the obtained responses, allowing the resolution of mixtures of these metals with good prediction of their concentrations (correlation with expected values for an external test subset better than 0.942).

  14. Does crown/implant ratio influence the survival and marginal bone level of short single implants in the mandibular molar? A preliminary investigation consisting of 12 patients.

    PubMed

    Ghariani, L; Segaan, L; Rayyan, M M; Galli, S; Jimbo, R; Ibrahim, A

    2016-02-01

    Crown/implant (C/I) ratio has been proven to not affect the survival of the implants; however, it is also a fact that no evidence exists with regard to the use of single short implants in the mandibular molar. The aim of this study was to determine whether the crown/implant ratios of single implant-supported fixed restorations on implants of 6-8 mm in the mandibular molar have an impact on the implant survival and marginal bone maintenance. Twelve short dental implants (6-8 mm) were installed and restored with single crowns, loaded after 3 months of healing. The restorations were divided according to crown-to-implant ratio into two groups: Group 1: C/I < 2.0 and Group 2: C/I ≧ 2.0. Alveolar bone loss was measured using CBCT scan, taken at the implant placement and after 12 months follow-up from loading. Reduced implant/crown ratio shown no statistic significant differences on implant survival and the alveolar bone level compared with recommended implant/crown ratio. Within the limitation of this study, it can be concluded that reduced C/I ratio could be used as a substitute for recommended C/I ratio in severely mandibular atrophic residual alveolar ridges.

  15. Comparison of the Effect of Dentin Bonding, Dentin Sealing Agents on the Microleakage of Provisional Crowns Fabricated with Direct and Indirect Technique-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, B; Kumar, M Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    showed the least amount of microleakage when compared with group A and group C. Group C (Dental Varnish) specimen showed comparatively more amount of microleakage than that of group B. Group A (control group) specimens showed the maximum amount of microleakage. Conclusion The application of a single layer of Dental varnish appears to be of no significant benefit when compared to crowns cemented with the application of Dentin bonding agent on the tooth surface. The application of a single layer of Dentin bonding agent (Solobond M) and temporary crowns fabricated with direct technique may be of some benefit for crown preparations as an interim measure prior to the luting of final crown. PMID:26266219

  16. Crown depth as a result of evolutionary games: decreasing solar angle should lead to shallower, not deeper crowns.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Peter Johannes

    2014-06-01

    There is a general notion in the literature that, with increasing latitude, trees have deeper crowns as a result of a lower solar elevation angle. However, these predictions are based on models that did not include the effects of competition for light between individuals. Here, I argue that there should be selection for trees to increase the height of the crown base, as this decreases shading by neighbouring trees, leading to an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Because the level of between-tree shading increases with decreasing solar angle, the predicted ESS will shift to higher crown base height. This argument is supported by a simulation model to check for the effects of crown shape and the change of light intensity that occurs with changing solar angle on model outcomes. So, the lower solar angle at higher latitudes would tend to select for shallower, and not deeper, crowns. This casts doubt on the common belief that a decreasing solar angle increases crown depth. More importantly, it shows that different assumptions about what should be optimized can lead to different predictions, not just for absolute trait values, but for the direction of selection itself.

  17. Composite crown-form crowns for severely decayed primary molars: a technique for restoring function and esthetics.

    PubMed

    Ram, D; Peretz, B

    2000-01-01

    Current developments in esthetic dentistry center around new techniques and materials that improve the ability of the clinician to provide esthetic services. This article describes a step-by-step method of placing composite crown-form crowns on severely decayed primary mandibular molars. The described technique allows for restoring, as close as possible, form and function lost to caries in an esthetic mode in cases of severely decayed primary molars that would have required stainless steel crowns had they been treated traditionally. Disadvantages of this treatment mode are that dryness may not be prevented in the proximal margins, especially where subgingival carious involvement is encountered and the margin areas may be contaminated with gingival fluid or blood. Although no long-term follow-up has been reported for the technique, when strong opposition by the parent or child to the stainless steel crown is encountered, and a desire for esthetic restoration is strongly expressed, the composite crown-form crowns may be considered as an alternative.

  18. Large ontogenetic declines in intra-crown leaf area index in two temperate deciduous tree species.

    PubMed

    Nock, C A; Caspersen, J P; Thomas, S C

    2008-03-01

    The widespread occurrence of age-related changes in leaf morphology and allocation suggests that the leaf area index of individual trees (intra-crown LAI) may decline late in ontogeny. We used direct, within-canopy measurements to quantify the LAI of canopy trees with exposed crowns of two temperate deciduous species. Intra-crown LAI declined from approximately 7 to 4 in Acer saccharum, and from approximately 9.5 to 6.5 in Betula alleghaniensis, as tree size increased (from 15 to 72 cm diameter at breast height [dbh]). For A. saccharum, age (which varied from 30 to 160 years) was a significantly better predictor of LAI decline than dbh. We also modeled the effect of ontogenetic declines in LAI on understory light availability and found that light transmission increases significantly as canopy trees grow and mature. Our results thus suggest that gradual declines in LAI with tree age may play an important and overlooked role in contributing to the heterogeneity of sub-canopy light regimes in mature forests.

  19. Characterization of the Migration of Hop Volatiles into Different Crown Cork Liner Polymers and Can Coatings.

    PubMed

    Wietstock, Philip C; Glattfelder, Richard; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Methner, Frank-Jürgen

    2016-04-06

    Absorption of hop volatiles by crown cork liner polymers and can coatings was investigated in beer during storage. All hop volatiles measured were prone to migrate into the closures, and the absorption kinetics was demonstrated to fit Fick's second law of diffusion well for a plane sheet. The extent and rate of diffusion were significantly dissimilar and were greatly dependent upon the nature of the volatile. Diffusion coefficients ranged from 1.32 × 10(-5) cm(2)/day (limonene) to 0.26 × 10(-5) cm(2)/day (α-humulene). The maximum amounts absorbed into the material at equilibrium were in the following order: limonene > α-humulene > trans-caryophyllene > myrcene ≫ linalool > α-terpineol > geraniol. With the application of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) liners with oxygen-scavenging functionality, oxygen-barrier liners made up from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or liner polymers from a different manufacturer had no significant effect on the composition of hop volatiles in beers after prolonged storage of 55 days; however, significantly higher amounts of myrcene and limonene were found in the oxygen-barrier-type crown cork, while all other closures behaved similarly. Can coatings were demonstrated to absorb hop volatiles in a similar pattern as crown corks but to a lesser extent. Consequently, significantly higher percentages of myrcene were found in the beers.

  20. Schiff's Bases and Crown Ethers as Supramolecular Sensing Materials in the Construction of Potentiometric Membrane Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Norouzi, Parviz; Riahi, Siavash

    2008-01-01

    Ionophore incorporated PVC membrane sensors are well-established analytical tools routinely used for the selective and direct measurement of a wide variety of different ions in complex biological and environmental samples. Potentiometric sensors have some outstanding advantages including simple design and operation, wide linear dynamic range, relatively fast response and rational selectivity. The vital component of such plasticized PVC members is the ionophore involved, defining the selectivity of the electrodes' complex formation. Molecular recognition causes the formation of many different supramolecules. Different types of supramolecules, like calixarenes, cyclodextrins and podands, have been used as a sensing material in the construction of ion selective sensors. Schiff's bases and crown ethers, which feature prominently in supramolecular chemistry, can be used as sensing materials in the construction of potentiometric ion selective electrodes. Up to now, more than 200 potentiometric membrane sensors for cations and anions based on Schiff's bases and crown ethers have been reported. In this review cation binding and anion complexes will be described. Liquid membrane sensors based on Schiff's bases and crown ethers will then be discussed. PMID:27879786

  1. Numerical simulation of the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Wagner, I; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of this paper were to simulate the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges; to predict and control porosity defect. A casting simulation software, MAGMASOFT, was used. The geometry of the crowns with fine details of the occlusal surface were digitized by means of laser measuring technique, then converted and read in the simulation software. Both mold filling and solidification were simulated, the shrinkage porosity was predicted by a "feeding criterion", and the gas pore sensitivity was studied based on the mold filling and solidification simulations. Two types of dental prostheses (a single-crown casting and a three-unit-bridge) with various sprue designs were numerically "poured", and only one optimal design for each prosthesis was recommended for real casting trial. With the numerically optimized design, real titanium dental prostheses (five replicas for each) were made on a centrifugal casting machine. All the castings endured radiographic examination, and no porosity was detected in the cast prostheses. It indicates that the numerical simulation is an efficient tool for dental casting design and porosity control.

  2. Modelling fruit-temperature dynamics within apple tree crowns using virtual plants

    PubMed Central

    Saudreau, M.; Marquier, A.; Adam, B.; Sinoquet, H.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Fruit temperature results from a complex system involving the climate, the tree architecture, the fruit location within the tree crown and the fruit thermal properties. Despite much theoretical and experimental evidence for large differences (up to 10 °C in sunny conditions) between fruit temperature and air temperature, fruit temperature is never used in horticultural studies. A way of modelling fruit-temperature dynamics from climate data is addressed in this work. Methods The model is based upon three-dimensional virtual representation of apple trees and links three-dimensional virtual trees with a physical-based fruit-temperature dynamical model. The overall model was assessed by comparing model outputs to field measures of fruit-temperature dynamics. Key Results The model was able to simulate both the temperature dynamics at fruit scale, i.e. fruit-temperature gradients and departure from air temperature, and at the tree scale, i.e. the within-tree-crown variability in fruit temperature (average root mean square error value over fruits was 1·43 °C). Conclusions This study shows that linking virtual plants with the modelling of the physical plant environment offers a relevant framework to address the modelling of fruit-temperature dynamics within a tree canopy. The proposed model offers opportunities for modelling effects of the within-crown architecture on fruit thermal responses in horticultural studies. PMID:21474503

  3. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in inclined channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-08-01

    Linear stability of the stratified gas-liquid and liquid-liquid plane-parallel flows in the inclined channels is studied with respect to all wavenumber perturbations. The main objective is to predict the parameter regions in which the stable stratified configuration in inclined channels exists. Up to three distinct base states with different holdups exist in the inclined flows, so that the stability analysis has to be carried out for each branch separately. Special attention is paid to the multiple solution regions to reveal the feasibility of the non-unique stable stratified configurations in inclined channels. The stability boundaries of each branch of the steady state solutions are presented on the flow pattern map and are accompanied by the critical wavenumbers and the spatial profiles of the most unstable perturbations. Instabilities of different nature are visualized by the streamlines of the neutrally stable perturbed flows, consisting of the critical perturbation superimposed on the base flow. The present analysis confirms the existence of two stable stratified flow configurations in a region of low flow rates in the countercurrent liquid-liquid flows. These configurations become unstable with respect to the shear mode of instability. It was revealed that in slightly upward inclined flows the lower and middle solutions for the holdup are stable in the part of the triple solution region, while the upper solution is always unstable. In the case of downward flows, in the triple solution region, none of the solutions are stable with respect to the short-wave perturbations. These flows are stable only in the single solution region at low flow rates of the heavy phase, and the long-wave perturbations are the most unstable ones.

  4. Gap comparison between single crown and three-unit bridge zirconia substructures

    PubMed Central

    Charoenchitt, Masnisa; Asvanund, Chanavut

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare marginal and internal gaps of zirconia substructure of single crowns with those of three-unit fixed dental prostheses. MATERIALS AND METHODS Standardized Co-Cr alloy simulated second premolar and second molar abutments were fabricated and subsequently duplicated into type-III dental stone for working casts. After that, all zirconia substructures were made using Lava™ system. Marginal and internal gaps were measured in 2 planes (mesial-distal plane and buccal-palatal plane) at 5 locations: marginal opening (MO), chamfer area (CA), axial wall (AW), cusp tip (CT) and mid-occlusal (OA) using Replica technique. RESULTS There were significant differences between gaps at all locations. The mean ± SD of marginal gap in premolar was 43.6 ± 0.4 µm and 46.5 ± 0.5 µm for single crown and 3-unit bridge substructure respectively. For molar substructure the mean ± SD of marginal gap was 48.5 ± 0.4 µm and 52.6 ± 0.4 µm for single crown and 3-unit bridge respectively. The largest gaps were found at the occlusal area, which was 150.5 ± 0.5 µm and 154.5 ± 0.4 µm for single and 3-unit bridge premolar substructures respectively and 146.5 ± 0.4 µm and 211.5 ± 0.4 µm for single and 3-unit bridge molar substructure respectively. CONCLUSION Independent-samples t-test showed significant differences of gap in zirconia substructure between single crowns and three-unit bridge (P<.001). Therefore, the span length has the effect on the fit of zirconia substructure that is fabricated using CAD/CAM technique especially at the occlusal area. PMID:25177467

  5. A graph-based segmentation algorithm for tree crown extraction using airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strîmbu, Victor F.; Strîmbu, Bogdan M.

    2015-06-01

    This work proposes a segmentation method that isolates individual tree crowns using airborne LiDAR data. The proposed approach captures the topological structure of the forest in hierarchical data structures, quantifies topological relationships of tree crown components in a weighted graph, and finally partitions the graph to separate individual tree crowns. This novel bottom-up segmentation strategy is based on several quantifiable cohesion criteria that act as a measure of belief on weather two crown components belong to the same tree. An added flexibility is provided by a set of weights that balance the contribution of each criterion, thus effectively allowing the algorithm to adjust to different forest structures. The LiDAR data used for testing was acquired in Louisiana, inside the Clear Creek Wildlife management area with a RIEGL LMS-Q680i airborne laser scanner. Three 1 ha forest areas of different conditions and increasing complexity were segmented and assessed in terms of an accuracy index (AI) accounting for both omission and commission. The three areas were segmented under optimum parameterization with an AI of 98.98%, 92.25% and 74.75% respectively, revealing the excellent potential of the algorithm. When segmentation parameters are optimized locally using plot references the AI drops to 98.23%, 89.24%, and 68.04% on average with plot sizes of 1000 m2 and 97.68%, 87.78% and 61.1% on average with plot sizes of 500 m2. More than introducing a segmentation algorithm, this paper proposes a powerful framework featuring flexibility to support a series of segmentation methods including some of those recurring in the tree segmentation literature. The segmentation method may extend its applications to any data of topological nature or data that has a topological equivalent.

  6. Open-grown crown radius of eleven bottomland hardwood species: Prediction and use in assessing stocking

    SciTech Connect

    Goelz, J.C.G.

    1996-08-01

    Equations were prepared to predict crown radius for eleven species of open-grown bottomland hardwood trees. Crown radius was predicted as a function of diameter at breast height (dbh) and as a function of dbh, total height, and crown ratio. Equations were prepared for individual species and species groups. Pecan has the largest crowns over a broad range of dbh. Eastern cottonwood has the smallest crowns for most levels of dbh. Sweetgum has relatively small crowns for trees of small dbh, but crown radius is comparable to most species at the largest dbh. The crown radius predictions may be used to calculate crown competition factor. B-lines of stocking may be calculated that represent a stand of one species as well as a mixed-species stand of any particular species proportion.

  7. Retention of esthetic veneers on primary stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Baker, L H; Moon, P; Mourino, A P

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the amount of shearing force necessary to fracture, dislodge or deform the esthetic veneer facings of four commercially available veneered primary incisor stainless steel crowns. The four types tested were: Cheng Crowns, [Peter Cheng Orthodontic Laboratory]; Whiter Biter Crown II, [White Bite Inc.]; Kinder Krowns, [Mayclin Dental Studio, Inc]; and NuSmile Primary Crowns, [Orthodontic Technologies, Inc]. The crowns (#4 right central incisor) from each manufacturer were obtained with the facings attached. The crowns were soaked for ninety days and thermocycled at 4 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 500 45-second cycles. The crowns were cemented to standardized chromium cobalt metal dies. Each die was placed in to a custom holder on the Instron Universal testing machine. A force was applied at the incisal edge of the veneer at 148 degrees, (the primary interincisal angle), with a crosshead speed of 0.05 inches/minute until the veneer either fractured, dislodged or deformed. The mean force (Ibs) required +/- SD to produce failure, in descending order, was as follows: Cheng (107.8 +/- 17.3); NuSmile (100.2 +/- 18.2); KinderKrown (91.3 +/- 27.4)d Whiter Biter (81.5 +/- 21.7). To test the hypothesis of no difference among the four manufacturers, an analysis of variance was performed using PROC GLM. The resultant F statistic was 2.79 (p < 0.0543), indicating a marginally statistically significant difference in the response variable "pressure" among the four groups. A posthoc test was then performed to ascertain where these differences occurred. These results, using Turkey's studentized range test for pairwise comparisons, suggested that the only difference was between the Cheng and Whiter Biter manufacturers.

  8. 3D statistical failure analysis of monolithic dental ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Sadia; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I

    2016-07-05

    For adhesively retained ceramic crown of various types, it has been clinically observed that the most catastrophic failures initiate from the cement interface as a result of radial crack formation as opposed to Hertzian contact stresses originating on the occlusal surface. In this work, a 3D failure prognosis model is developed for interface initiated failures of monolithic ceramic crowns. The surface flaw distribution parameters determined by biaxial flexural tests on ceramic plates and point-to-point variations of multi-axial stress state at the intaglio surface are obtained by finite element stress analysis. They are combined on the basis of fracture mechanics based statistical failure probability model to predict failure probability of a monolithic crown subjected to single-cycle indentation load. The proposed method is verified by prior 2D axisymmetric model and experimental data. Under conditions where the crowns are completely bonded to the tooth substrate, both high flexural stress and high interfacial shear stress are shown to occur in the wall region where the crown thickness is relatively thin while high interfacial normal tensile stress distribution is observed at the margin region. Significant impact of reduced cement modulus on these stress states is shown. While the analyses are limited to single-cycle load-to-failure tests, high interfacial normal tensile stress or high interfacial shear stress may contribute to degradation of the cement bond between ceramic and dentin. In addition, the crown failure probability is shown to be controlled by high flexural stress concentrations over a small area, and the proposed method might be of some value to detect initial crown design errors.

  9. Rolling and slipping down Galileo's inclined plane: Rhythms of the spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1996-05-01

    In ``Two New Sciences'' (TNS) Galileo presents a number of theorems and propositions for smooth solid spheres released from rest and rolling a distance d in time t down an incline of height H and length L. We collect and summarize his results in a single grand proportionality P: d1/d2=(t21/t22)(H/L)1/(H/L)2. (P) From what he writes in TNS it is clear that what we call P is assumed by Galileo to hold for all inclinations including vertical free fall with H/L=1. But in TNS he describes only experiments with gentle inclinations H/L<1/2. Indeed he cannot have performed the vertical free fall (H=L) experiment, because we (moderns) know that as we increase H/L, P starts to break down when H/L exceeds about 0.5, because the sphere, which rolls without slipping for small H/L, starts to slip, whence d starts to exceed the predictions of P, becoming too large by a factor of 7/5 for vertical free fall at H/L=1. In 1973 Drake and in 1975 Drake and MacLachlan published their analysis of a previously unpublished experiment that Galileo performed that (without his realizing it) directly compared rolling without slipping to free fall. In the experiment, a sphere that has gained speed v1 while rolling down a gentle incline is deflected so as to be launched horizontally with speed v1 into a free fall orbit discovered by Galileo to be a parabola. The measured horizontal distance X2 traveled in this parabolic orbit (for a given vertical distance fallen to the floor) was smaller than he expected, by a factor 0.84. But that is exactly what we (moderns) expect, since we know that Galileo did not appreciate the difference between rolling without slipping, and slipping on a frictionless surface. We therefore expect him to predict X2 too large by a factor (7/5)1/2=1/0.84. He must have been puzzled. Easy ``home experiments'' with simple apparatus available to Galileo (no frictionless air tracks, strobe lamps, or electronic timers!) allow the student to use his/her musical ear (for rhythm and

  10. The role of tyloses in crown hydraulic failure of mature walnut trees afflicted by apoplexy disorder.

    PubMed

    McElrone, Andrew J; Grant, Joseph A; Kluepfel, Daniel A

    2010-06-01

    In the Central Valley of California, mature walnut trees afflicted with apoplexy disorder exhibit rapid and complete crown defoliation within a few weeks of symptom initiation. Symptoms are typically found throughout the entire crown and are initially expressed as wilting and chlorosis followed by scorching of leaves. Since the cause of apoplexy disorder is unknown, we set out to elucidate the water relations physiology underlying this condition. Stem water potential (Psi(s)) of healthy, asymptomatic trees remained high throughout the 2007 growing season, while that of apoplexy-afflicted trees decreased significantly with the onset of symptoms for both healthy-appearing and symptomatic portions of these trees. Psi(s)s were significantly reduced by at least 0.7 MPa in the lower, middle and upper portions of the symptomatic canopies compared with those from asymptomatic trees. Heat pulse velocities measured in the main trunk at three radial depths consistently decreased prior to the onset of symptoms and eventually reached zero with complete crown defoliation. Comparison of sap flow with predicted water use based on walnut evapotranspiration suggests that stomata of symptomatic trees were closing at higher evaporative demand prior to symptom formation. Specific hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) of symptomatic stems was significantly lower than that of asymptomatic stems, and no detectable K(s) could be measured on several of the symptomatic stem samples. However, shallow root K(s) did not significantly differ between symptomatic and asymptomatic trees, suggesting that hydraulic failure was isolated to the crown of these grafted trees. Light and scanning electron microscopy of stem and trunk sapwood revealed extensive tylose development in vessels throughout the crown of symptomatic trees. Analysis of the formation of tyloses on multiple dates revealed rapid development of these vessel occlusions in conjunction with visual symptom formation and dramatic decreases in sap

  11. 18-crown-6-sodium cholate complex: thermochemistry, structure, and stability.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, Tea; Tomašić, Vlasta; Biliškov, Nikola

    2014-06-03

    18-Crown-6, one of the most relevant crown ethers, and sodium cholate, a steroidal surfactant classified as a natural bile salt, are components of a novel, synthesized coordination complex: 18-crown-6-sodium cholate (18C6·NaCh). Like crown ethers, bile salts act as building blocks in supramolecular chemistry to design new functionalized materials with a desired structure and properties. In order to obtain thermal behavior of this 1:1 coordination complex, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis were used, as well as microscopic observations and differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature dependent infrared (IR) spectroscopy gave a detailed view into phase transitions. The structures during thermal treatment were observed with powder X-ray diffraction, and molecular models of the phases were made. Hard, glassy, colorless compound 18C6·NaCh goes through crystalline-crystalline polymorphic phase transitions at higher temperatures. The room temperature phase is indexed to a triclinic lattice, while in the high temperature phases molecules take randomly one of the two different configurations in the unit cell, resulting in the 2-fold symmetry. The formation of cholesteric liquid crystalline phase occurs simultaneously with partial decomposition, followed by the isotropization with simultaneous and complete decomposition at much higher temperature, as obtained by IR. The results provide valuable information about the relationship between molecular structure, thermal properties, and stability of the complex, indicating the importance of an appropriate choice of cation, amphiphilic, and crown ether unit in order to synthesize compounds with desired behavior.

  12. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the fracture load of the crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  13. Digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhong, Yicheng; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Fusong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-04-01

    A dental defect is one of the most common oral diseases, and it often requires a full crown restoration. In this clinical operation, the dentist must manually prepare the affected tooth for the full crown so that it has a convergence angle between 4° and 10°, no undercuts, and uniform and even shoulder widths and depths using a high speed diamond bur in the patient׳s mouth within one hour, which is a difficult task that requires visual-manual operation. The quality of the tooth preparation has an important effect on the success rate of the subsequent prosthodontic treatment. This study involved research into digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation. First, the margin line of the tooth preparation was designed using a semi-automatic interactive process. Second, the inserting direction was automatically computed. Then, the characteristic parameters and the constraints on the tooth preparation were defined for the model. Next, the shoulder and axial surface of the tooth preparation were formed using parametric modeling. Finally, the implicit surface of a radial basis function was used to construct the tooth preparation׳s occlusal surface. The experimental results verified that the method of digital modeling for full crown preparation proposed in this study can quickly and accurately implement personalized designs of various parameters, such as the shoulder width and the convergence angle; it provides a digital design tool for full crown preparation.

  14. Constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer practice in supersonic flows. II - The inclined wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, A. J.; Muck, K. C.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of a constant-temperature inclined hot-wire in a supersonic flow is critically examined. It is shown that calibration techniques applicable to subsonic flow, such as the cosine cooling law cannot be used when the flow is supersonic. Calibration and measurement procedures appropriate to supersonic flow are suggested, together with the possible limits on their validity. Experimental results for different wires indicate that the sensitivities do not seem to depend on flow direction according to any simple correlation. When the sensitivity exhibits a strong dependence on flow direction, the wire should be discarded to avoid errors due to nonlinear effects.

  15. Numerical solution of supersonic laminar flow over an inclined body of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    A mixed explicit-implicit scheme is used to solve the time-dependent thin-layer approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations for a supersonic laminar flow over an inclined body of revolution. Test cases for Mach 2.8 flow over a cylinder with 15 deg flare angle at angles of attack of 0, 1, and 4 deg are calculated. Good agreement is obtained between the present computed results and experimental measurements of surface pressure. A pair of vortices on the leeward and a peak in the normal force distribution near the flared juncture are predicted; the role of circumferential communication is discussed.

  16. Numerical Solution of Supersonic Laminar Flow Over an Inclined Body of Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A mixed explicit-implicit scheme is used to solve the time-dependent thin-layer approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations for a supersonic laminar flow over an inclined body of revolution. Test cases for Mach 2.8 flow over a cylinder with 15-deg flare angle at angles of attack of 0,1, and 4 deg are calculated. Good agreement is obtained between the present computed results and experimental measurements of surface pressure. A pair of vortices on the leeward and a peak in the normal force distribution near the flared juncture are predicted; the role of circumferential communication is discussed.

  17. Improved determination of dynamic balance using the centre of mass and centre of pressure inclination variables in a complete golf swing cycle.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Golf requires proper dynamic balance to accurately control the club head through a harmonious coordination of each human segment and joint. In this study, we evaluated the ability for dynamic balance during a golf swing by using the centre of mass (COM)-centre of pressure (COP) inclination variables. Twelve professional, 13 amateur and 10 novice golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras, two force platforms and SB-Clinic software were used to measure the net COM and COP trajectories. In order to evaluate dynamic balance ability, the COM-COP inclination angle, COM-COP inclination angular velocity and normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk were used. Professional golfer group revealed a smaller COM-COP inclination angle and angular velocity than novice golfer group in the lead/trail direction (P < 0.01). In the normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk, the professional golfer group showed a lower value than the other two groups in all directions. Professional golfers tend to exhibit improved dynamic balance, and this can be attributed to the neuromusculoskeletal system that maintains balance with proper postural control. This study has the potential to allow for an evaluation of the dynamic balance mechanism and will provide useful basic information for swing training and prevention of golf injuries.

  18. Patterns of crown damage within a large wildfire in the Klamath-Siskiyou bioregion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jonathan R.

    The 2002 Biscuit Fire burned through more than 200,000 ha of mixed-conifer/evergreen hardwood forests in southwestern Oregon and northwestern California. In chapter two, I focused on a region that had burned previously by the 1987 Silver Fire then was subject, in part, to salvage-logging and conifer planting before being reburned by the Biscuit Fire. I used the Landsat-based differenced normalized burn ratio (dNBR) to quantify severity in both fires and took a hypothesis-testing approach to answering two questions: First, was severity in the Biscuit Fire associated with severity in the Silver Fire in unmanaged areas? And second, did areas that were salvaged-logged and planted with conifers after the Silver Fire burn more or less severely in the Biscuit Fire than comparable unmanaged areas? I found that areas that burned severely in 1987 tended to re-burn at high severity in 2002, after controlling for the influence of several topographical and biophysical covariates. Areas unaffected by the initial fire tended to burn at the lowest severities in 2002. In addition, areas that were salvage-logged and planted after the initial fire burned more severely than comparable unmanaged areas, suggesting that post-fire logging and planting did not reduce future fire severity as had been suggested by some. In chapter three, I again focused on the twice-burned landscape, but this time I used a temporal sequence of digital aerial photography plots (6.25 ha) to measure changes in shrub-stratum, hardwood, and conifer cover. I estimated the strength and nature of relationships between crown damage and several fuel, topographical, weather, and management variables. Median crown damage, including damage to the shrub-stratum, on unmanaged plots was 63% after the Biscuit Fire and was most strongly related to damage in the Silver Fire. Plots that burned severely in the Silver Fire and had succeeded to a mix of shrubs and tree regeneration experienced high levels of Biscuit Fire damage

  19. Inclination not force is sensed by plants during shoot gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Hugo; Pouliquen, Olivier; Forterre, Yoël; Legué, Valérie; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-10-14

    Gravity perception plays a key role in how plants develop and adapt to environmental changes. However, more than a century after the pioneering work of Darwin, little is known on the sensing mechanism. Using a centrifugal device combined with growth kinematics imaging, we show that shoot gravitropic responses to steady levels of gravity in four representative angiosperm species is independent of gravity intensity. All gravitropic responses tested are dependent only on the angle of inclination from the direction of gravity. We thus demonstrate that shoot gravitropism is stimulated by sensing inclination not gravitational force or acceleration as previously believed. This contrasts with the otolith system in the internal ear of vertebrates and explains the robustness of the control of growth direction by plants despite perturbations like wind shaking. Our results will help retarget the search for the molecular mechanism linking shifting statoliths to signal transduction.

  20. Inclination not force is sensed by plants during shoot gravitropism

    PubMed Central

    Chauvet, Hugo; Pouliquen, Olivier; Forterre, Yoël; Legué, Valérie; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Gravity perception plays a key role in how plants develop and adapt to environmental changes. However, more than a century after the pioneering work of Darwin, little is known on the sensing mechanism. Using a centrifugal device combined with growth kinematics imaging, we show that shoot gravitropic responses to steady levels of gravity in four representative angiosperm species is independent of gravity intensity. All gravitropic responses tested are dependent only on the angle of inclination from the direction of gravity. We thus demonstrate that shoot gravitropism is stimulated by sensing inclination not gravitational force or acceleration as previously believed. This contrasts with the otolith system in the internal ear of vertebrates and explains the robustness of the control of growth direction by plants despite perturbations like wind shaking. Our results will help retarget the search for the molecular mechanism linking shifting statoliths to signal transduction. PMID:27739470

  1. Spectrum of 100-kyr glacial cycle: orbital inclination, not eccentricity.

    PubMed

    Muller, R A; MacDonald, G J

    1997-08-05

    Spectral analysis of climate data shows a strong narrow peak with period approximately 100 kyr, attributed by the Milankovitch theory to changes in the eccentricity of the earth's orbit. The narrowness of the peak does suggest an astronomical origin; however the shape of the peak is incompatible with both linear and nonlinear models that attribute the cycle to eccentricity or (equivalently) to the envelope of the precession. In contrast, the orbital inclination parameter gives a good match to both the spectrum and bispectrum of the climate data. Extraterrestrial accretion from meteoroids or interplanetary dust is proposed as a mechanism that could link inclination to climate, and experimental tests are described that could prove or disprove this hypothesis.

  2. Kepler-108: A Mutually Inclined Giant Planet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of well studied giant-planet systems, including the solar system, are nearly coplanar, which implies dissipation within a primordial gas disk. However, intrinsic instability may lead to planet–planet scattering, which often produces non-coplanar, eccentric orbits. Planet scattering theories have been developed to explain observed high-eccentricity systems and also hot Jupiters; thus far their predictions for mutual inclination (I) have barely been tested. Here we characterize a highly mutually inclined (I={24}-8+11°), moderately eccentric (e≳ 0.1) giant planet system: Kepler-108. This system consists of two approximately Saturn-mass planets with periods of approximately 49 and 190 days around a star with a wide (∼300 au) binary companion in an orbital configuration inconsistent with a purely disk migration origin.

  3. Control system for inclined impact-type surface seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, G.M.

    1987-07-28

    A system is described for controlling the azimuths and inclinations of the respective shooting paths of separate vehicle-transported surface seismic sources. Each source has an impact mass, means for propelling the mass along the shooting path to strike an earth contacting base plate, and means for adjusting each shooting path by rotation thereof about two mutually perpendicular gimbal axes oriented in predetermined relation to the heading of the associated vehicle. The system consists of: (a) means for determining each such vehicle heading; (b) means dependent upon each vehicle heading for calculating the angular positions of each shooting path with respect to the gimbal axes which align the shooting path with desired values of azimuth and inclination; and (c) means responsive to the calculation means for actuating each shooting path adjustment means to effect such alignment.

  4. Inclination not force is sensed by plants during shoot gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Hugo; Pouliquen, Olivier; Forterre, Yoël; Legué, Valérie; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Gravity perception plays a key role in how plants develop and adapt to environmental changes. However, more than a century after the pioneering work of Darwin, little is known on the sensing mechanism. Using a centrifugal device combined with growth kinematics imaging, we show that shoot gravitropic responses to steady levels of gravity in four representative angiosperm species is independent of gravity intensity. All gravitropic responses tested are dependent only on the angle of inclination from the direction of gravity. We thus demonstrate that shoot gravitropism is stimulated by sensing inclination not gravitational force or acceleration as previously believed. This contrasts with the otolith system in the internal ear of vertebrates and explains the robustness of the control of growth direction by plants despite perturbations like wind shaking. Our results will help retarget the search for the molecular mechanism linking shifting statoliths to signal transduction.

  5. Granular flow down an inclined plane: Bagnold scaling and rheology.

    PubMed

    Silbert, L E; Ertaş, D; Grest, G S; Halsey, T C; Levine, D; Plimpton, S J

    2001-11-01

    We have performed a systematic, large-scale simulation study of granular media in two and three dimensions, investigating the rheology of cohesionless granular particles in inclined plane geometries, i.e., chute flows. We find that over a wide range of parameter space of interaction coefficients and inclination angles, a steady-state flow regime exists in which the energy input from gravity balances that dissipated from friction and inelastic collisions. In this regime, the bulk packing fraction (away from the top free surface and the bottom plate boundary) remains constant as a function of depth z, of the pile. The velocity profile in the direction of flow vx(z) scales with height of the pile H, according to vx(z) proportional to H(alpha), with alpha=1.52+/-0.05. However, the behavior of the normal stresses indicates that existing simple theories of granular flow do not capture all of the features evidenced in the simulations.

  6. Wind and gravity mechanical effects on leaf inclination angles.

    PubMed

    Tadrist, Loïc; Saudreau, Marc; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2014-01-21

    In a tree, the distribution of leaf inclination angles plays an important role in photosynthesis and water interception. We investigate here the effect of mechanical deformations of leaves due to wind or their own weight on this distribution. First, the specific role of the geometry of the tree is identified and shown to be weak, using models of idealized tree and tools of statistical mechanics. Then the deformation of individual leaves under gravity or wind is quantified experimentally. New dimensionless parameters are proposed, and used in simple models of these deformations. By combining models of tree geometry and models of leaf deformation, we explore the role of all mechanical parameters on the Leaf Inclination Angle Distributions. These are found to have a significant influence, which is exemplified finally in computations of direct light interception by idealized trees.

  7. Film cooling from inclined cylindrical holes using large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, Yulia V.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of the present study is to investigate numerically the physics of the flow, which occurs during the film cooling from inclined cylindrical holes, Film cooling is a technique used in gas turbine industry to reduce heat fluxes to the turbine blade surface. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed modeling a realistic film cooling configuration, which consists of a large stagnation-type reservoir, feeding an array of discrete cooling holes (film holes) flowing into a flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Special computational methodology is developed for this problem, involving coupled simulations using multiple computational codes. A fully compressible LES code is used in the area above the flat plate, while a low Mach number LES code is employed in the plenum and film holes. The motivation for using different codes comes from the essential difference in the nature of the flow in these different regions. Flowfield is analyzed inside the plenum, film hole and a crossflow region. Flow inside the plenum is stagnating, except for the region close to the exit, where it accelerates rapidly to turn into the hole. The sharp radius of turning at the trailing edge of the plenum pipe connection causes the flow to separate from the downstream wall of the film hole. After coolant injection occurs, a complex flowfield is formed consisting of coherent vortical structures responsible for bringing hot crossflow fluid in contact with the walls of either the film hole or the blade, thus reducing cooling protection. Mean velocity and turbulent statistics are compared to experimental measurements, yielding good agreement for the mean flowfield and satisfactory agreement for the turbulence quantities. LES results are used to assess the applicability of basic assumptions of conventional eddy viscosity turbulence models used with Reynolds-averaged (RANS) approach, namely the isotropy of an eddy viscosity and thermal diffusivity. It is shown here that these assumptions do not hold

  8. Equilibria and effect of diluent in the solvent extraction of lithium salts by highly alkylated 14-crown-4-ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Sun, Y.; Driver, J.L.; Chen, Z. Cavenaugh, K.L.; Carter, R.W.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    As shown by survey experiments, 14-crown-4 ethers bearing certain aliphatic substituents exhibit strong selectivity for lithium. Both selectivity and overall extraction efficiency depend markedly on type of ring substituents and on diluent properties. To understand such effects in greater detail, extraction of LiCl by the crown ether 2,2,3,3,6,9,9,10,10-nonamethyl-14-crown-4 (NM14C4) was subjected to equilibrium analysis. By use of the program SXLSQI (a solvent-extraction modeling program), the extraction behavior as determined by ion chromatography has been modeled quantitatively in terms of four equilibrium in 1-octanol. The following neutral and ionic organic-phase species have been considered: LiCl, Li+, Cl{sup {minus}}, LiCECl, and LiCE+ (CE = crown ether). Parallel measurements of the same system by {sup 7}Li NMR techniques agree with the ion-chromatography results. The NMR experiment affords the advantage of distinguishing between free and bound lithium and thus provides a check on the species indicated by the modeling. Extraction of LiCl by NM 14C4 correlates with diluent properties, including the Shmidt-Marcus diluent parameter and Reichardt`s E{sub T} parameter; as diluent polarity increases, LiCl extraction increases steeply.

  9. Effect of the Crystallization Process on the Marginal and Internal Gaps of Lithium Disilicate CAD/CAM Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Oh, Seunghan; Uhm, Soo-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of the crystallization process on lithium disilicate ceramic crowns fabricated using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and to determine whether the effect of crystallization is clinically acceptable by comparing values of fit before and after the crystallization process. The mandibular right first molar was selected as the abutment for the experiments. Fifteen working models were prepared. Lithium disilicate crowns appropriate for each abutment were prepared using a commercial CAD/CAM system. Gaps in the marginal area and 4 internal areas of each crown were measured twice—before and after crystallization—using the silicone replica technique. The mean values of fit before and after crystallization were analyzed using a paired t-test to examine whether the conversion that occurred during crystallization affected marginal and internal gaps (α = 0.05). Gaps increased in the marginal area and decreased in the internal areas after crystallization. There were statistically significant differences in all of the investigated areas (P < 0.05). None of the values for marginal and internal fit of lithium disilicate CAD/CAM crowns after crystallization exceeded 120 μm, which is the clinically acceptable threshold. PMID:27123453

  10. Graphs and matroids weighted in a bounded incline algebra.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-Xia; Zhang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Firstly, for a graph weighted in a bounded incline algebra (or called a dioid), a longest path problem (LPP, for short) is presented, which can be considered the uniform approach to the famous shortest path problem, the widest path problem, and the most reliable path problem. The solutions for LPP and related algorithms are given. Secondly, for a matroid weighted in a linear matroid, the maximum independent set problem is studied.

  11. Inclined fluidized bed system for drying fine coal

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Merriam, Norman W.; Boysen, John E.

    1992-02-11

    Coal is processed in an inclined fluidized bed dryer operated in a plug-flow manner with zonal temperature and composition control, and an inert fluidizing gas, such as carbon dioxide or combustion gas. Recycled carbon dioxide, which is used for drying, pyrolysis, quenching, and cooling, is produced by partial decarboxylation of the coal. The coal is heated sufficiently to mobilize coal tar by further pyrolysis, which seals micropores upon quenching. Further cooling with carbon dioxide enhances stabilization.

  12. Closing a gap in tropical forest biomass estimation: accounting for crown mass variation in pantropical allometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploton, P.; Barbier, N.; Momo, S. T.; Réjou-Méchain, M.; Boyemba Bosela, F.; Chuyong, G.; Dauby, G.; Droissart, V.; Fayolle, A.; Goodman, R. C.; Henry, M.; Kamdem, N. G.; Katembo Mukirania, J.; Kenfack, D.; Libalah, M.; Ngomanda, A.; Rossi, V.; Sonké, B.; Texier, N.; Thomas, D.; Zebaze, D.; Couteron, P.; Berger, U.; Pélissier, R.

    2015-12-01

    Accurately monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks is an outstanding challenge. Allometric models that consider tree diameter, height and wood density as predictors are currently used in most tropical forest carbon studies. In particular, a pantropical biomass model has been widely used for approximately a decade, and its most recent version will certainly constitute a reference in the coming years. However, this reference model shows a systematic bias for the largest trees. Because large trees are key drivers of forest carbon stocks and dynamics, understanding the origin and the consequences of this bias is of utmost concern. In this study, we compiled a unique tree mass dataset on 673 trees measured in five tropical countries (101 trees > 100 cm in diameter) and an original dataset of 130 forest plots (1 ha) from central Africa to quantify the error of biomass allometric models at the individual and plot levels when explicitly accounting or not accounting for crown mass variations. We first showed that the proportion of crown to total tree aboveground biomass is highly variable among trees, ranging from 3 to 88 %. This proportion was constant on average for trees < 10 Mg (mean of 34 %) but, above this threshold, increased sharply with tree mass and exceeded 50 % on average for trees ≥ 45 Mg. This increase coincided with a progressive deviation between the pantropical biomass model estimations and actual tree mass. Accounting for a crown mass proxy in a newly developed model consistently removed the bias observed for large trees (> 1 Mg) and reduced the range of plot-level error from -23-16 to 0-10 %. The disproportionally higher allocation of large trees to crown mass may thus explain the bias observed recently in the reference pantropical model. This bias leads to far-from-negligible, but often overlooked, systematic errors at the plot level and may be easily corrected by accounting for a crown mass proxy for the largest trees in a stand, thus suggesting that

  13. Modular control during incline and level walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Janshen, Lars; Santuz, Alessandro; Ekizos, Antonis; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2017-03-01

    The neuromuscular control of human movement can be described by a set of muscle synergies factorized from myoelectric signals. There is some evidence that the selection, activation and flexible combination of these basic activation patterns are of a neural origin. We investigated the muscle synergies during incline and level walking to evaluate changes in the modular organization of neuromuscular control related to changes in the mechanical demands. Our results revealed five fundamental (not further factorizable) synergies for both walking conditions but with different frequencies of appearance of the respective synergies during incline compared with level walking. Low similarities across conditions were observed in the timing of the activation patterns (motor primitives) and the weightings of the muscles within the respective elements (motor modules) for the synergies associated with the touchdown, mid-stance and early push-off phase. The changes in neuromuscular control could be attributed to changes in the mechanical demands in support, propulsion and medio-lateral stabilization of the body during incline compared with level walking. Our findings provide further evidence that the central nervous system flexibly uses a consistent set of neural control elements with a flexible temporal recruitment and modifications of the relative muscle weightings within each element to provide stable locomotion under varying mechanical demands during walking.

  14. On the Orbital Inclination of Proxima Centauri b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Turnbull, Margaret C.

    2017-02-01

    The field of exoplanetary science has seen discovery rates increase dramatically over recent years, due largely to the data from the Kepler mission. Even so, individual discoveries of planets orbiting nearby stars are very important for studies of characterization and near-term follow-up prospects. The recent discovery of a terrestrial planet candidate orbiting Proxima Centauri presents numerous opportunities for studying a super-Earth within our own stellar backyard. One of the remaining ambiguities of the discovery is the true mass of the planet since the discovery signature was obtained via radial velocities. Here, we describe the effect of orbital inclination on the Proxima Centauri planet, in terms of mass, radius, atmosphere, and albedo. We calculate the astrometric, angular separation, and reflected light properties of the planet including the effects of orbital eccentricity. We further provide dynamical simulations that show how the presence of additional terrestrial planets within the Habitable Zone varies as a function of inclination. Finally, we discuss these effects in the context of future space-based photometry and imaging missions that could potentially detect the planetary signature and resolve the inclination and mass ambiguity of the planet.

  15. a Study of Ricochet Phenomenon for Inclined Impact of Projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Young-Shin

    In this study, the numerical simulation using AUTODYN-3D program was investigated for trajectory prediction for inclined impacts of projectiles. The penetration and perforation of polycarbonate(PC) plate by 7.62 mm projectile was investigated numerically. The characteristic structure of the projectile's trajectory in the PC plates was studied. Two combined failure criteria were used in the target plate, and the target plate was modeled with the properties of polycarbonate for simulating the ricochet phenomenon. The numerical analyses were used to study the effect of the angle of inclination on the trajectory and kinetic energy of the projectile. The dynamic deformation behaviors tests of PC were compared with numerical simulation results which can be used for predictive purpose. Ricochet phenomenon for angles of inclination of 0° ≤ θ ≤ 20° in the analysis. The projectile perforated the plate for θ > 30°, thus defined a failure envelope for numerical configuration. The numerical analyses was used to study the effect under the projectile impact velocity on the depth of penetration(DOP).

  16. Breakup of rivulet falling over an inclined plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Galvin, Janine

    2016-11-01

    The multiscale modeling of solvent absorption in a structured packing is a complex problem. The local hydrodynamics in the packing, specifically existing flow regimes, is a key factor for overall efficiency. A single packing unit is made of corrugated sheets arranged perpendicularly to each other. In this effort, breakup of rivulet over an inclined plate is examined, which might be helpful to explain some fundamental aspects of this system. Rivulet breakup is a complex phenomenon dictated by many factors such as solvent physical properties, contact angle (γ) , inertia, plate inclination angle (θ) , etc. The multiphase flow simulations using the volume of fluid method were conducted considering these factors. Decreasing solvent flow rate results in the transition of flow regimes from a film to a rivulet and then to a droplet. Demarcation between a stable and an unstable flow regime that leads to breakup is presented in terms of the critical Weber number (Wecr) . Values of Weber number below Wecr correspond to breakup behavior and above to a stable rivulet. The impact of solvent properties is presented by the Kapitza number (Ka), which only depends on fluid properties. Variation of Wecr with Ka shows two trends depending on the Ka value of the solvent. Solvents with low Ka show a linear variation of Wecr with Ka whereas those with high Ka show a quadratic variation. The effect of plate inclination on the rivulet breakup reveals that Wecr decreases with increased θ value. In addition, higher values of γ promote breakup.

  17. Instability of a transverse liquid rivulet on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Javier A.; González, Alejandro G.; Kondic, Lou

    2012-03-01

    This work concentrates on the stability of a viscous liquid rivulet positioned across an inclined plane under partial wetting conditions. The study is performed within the framework of lubrication approximation by employing a slip model. Both normal and parallel components of gravity are considered. We find the stability regions for given area of the cross section of the rivulet, A, plane inclination angle, α, and static contact angle, θ0, characterizing the wettability of the substrate. For α's smaller than some critical angle, α*, a static solution exists. This solution is characterized by rear/front contact angles given by θ0 ± δ. The linear stability analysis of this solution is performed using an efficient pseudo-spectral Chebyshev method. We analyze the effects of A, θ0, and α on the predictions of the model, such as the dominant wavelength, the maximum growth rate, and the behavior of the most unstable perturbation mode. To verify them, we also carry out experiments with silicone oils spreading on a coated glass substrate for several different fluid volumes and inclination angles. We find very good agreement between the wavelength of maximum growth rate given by the theory and the average distance between the drops after rivulet breakup. An analysis of finite size effects shows that the inclusion of normal gravity effects leads to a better agreement between theoretical and experimental results.

  18. Simple Model of a Rolling Water-Filled Bottle on an Inclined Ramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shihao; Hu, Naiwen; Yao, Tianchen; Chu, Charles; Babb, Simona; Cohen, Jenna; Sangiovanni, Giana; Watt, Summer; Weisman, Danielle; Klep, James; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Walecki, Eve S.; Walecki, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a water-filled bottle rolling down an incline and ask the following question: is a rolling bottle better described by a model ignoring all internal motion where the bottle is approximated by a material point sliding down an incline, or is it better described by a rigid solid cylinder rolling down the incline without skidding? The…

  19. Detailed statistical contact angle analyses; "slow moving" drops on inclining silicon-oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, M; Groß, K; Grub, J; Heib, F

    2015-06-01

    Contact angle determination by sessile drop technique is essential to characterise surface properties in science and in industry. Different specific angles can be observed on every solid which are correlated with the advancing or the receding of the triple line. Different procedures and definitions for the determination of specific angles exist which are often not comprehensible or reproducible. Therefore one of the most important things in this area is to build standard, reproducible and valid methods for determining advancing/receding contact angles. This contribution introduces novel techniques to analyse dynamic contact angle measurements (sessile drop) in detail which are applicable for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric drops. Not only the recently presented fit solution by sigmoid function and the independent analysis of the different parameters (inclination, contact angle, velocity of the triple point) but also the dependent analysis will be firstly explained in detail. These approaches lead to contact angle data and different access on specific contact angles which are independent from "user-skills" and subjectivity of the operator. As example the motion behaviour of droplets on flat silicon-oxide surfaces after different surface treatments is dynamically measured by sessile drop technique when inclining the sample plate. The triple points, the inclination angles, the downhill (advancing motion) and the uphill angles (receding motion) obtained by high-precision drop shape analysis are independently and dependently statistically analysed. Due to the small covered distance for the dependent analysis (<0.4mm) and the dominance of counted events with small velocity the measurements are less influenced by motion dynamics and the procedure can be called "slow moving" analysis. The presented procedures as performed are especially sensitive to the range which reaches from the static to the "slow moving" dynamic contact angle determination. They are characterised by

  20. Uniform versus asymmetric shading mediates crown recession in conifers.

    PubMed

    Schoonmaker, Amanda L; Lieffers, Victor J; Landhäusser, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explore the impact of asymmetrical vs. uniform crown shading on the mortality and growth of upper and lower branches within tree crowns, for two conifer species: shade intolerant lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and shade tolerant white spruce (Picea glauca). We also explore xylem hydraulics, foliar nutrition, and carbohydrate status as drivers for growth and expansion of the lower and upper branches in various types of shading. This study was conducted over a two-year period across 10 regenerating forest sites dominated by lodgepole pine and white spruce, in the lower foothills of Alberta, Canada. Trees were assigned to one of four shading treatments: (1), complete uniform shading of the entire tree, (2) light asymmetric shading where the lower 1/4-1/3 of the tree crown was shaded, (3) heavy asymmetric shading as in (2) except with greater light reduction and (4) control in which no artificial shading occurred and most of the entire crown was exposed to full light. Asymmetrical shading of only the lower crown had a larger negative impact on the bud expansion and growth than did uniform shading, and the effect was stronger in pine relative to spruce. In addition, lower branches in pine also had lower carbon reserves, and reduced xylem-area specific conductivity compared to spruce. For both species, but particularly the pine, the needles of lower branches tended to store less C than upper branches in the asymmetric shade, which could suggest a movement of reserves away from the lower branches. The implications of these findings correspond with the inherent shade tolerance and self-pruning behavior of these conifers and supports a carbon based mechanism for branch mortality--mediated by an asymmetry in light exposure of the crown.

  1. Uniform versus Asymmetric Shading Mediates Crown Recession in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Schoonmaker, Amanda L.; Lieffers, Victor J.; Landhäusser, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explore the impact of asymmetrical vs. uniform crown shading on the mortality and growth of upper and lower branches within tree crowns, for two conifer species: shade intolerant lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and shade tolerant white spruce (Picea glauca). We also explore xylem hydraulics, foliar nutrition, and carbohydrate status as drivers for growth and expansion of the lower and upper branches in various types of shading. This study was conducted over a two-year period across 10 regenerating forest sites dominated by lodgepole pine and white spruce, in the lower foothills of Alberta, Canada. Trees were assigned to one of four shading treatments: (1), complete uniform shading of the entire tree, (2) light asymmetric shading where the lower 1/4–1/3 of the tree crown was shaded, (3) heavy asymmetric shading as in (2) except with greater light reduction and (4) control in which no artificial shading occurred and most of the entire crown was exposed to full light. Asymmetrical shading of only the lower crown had a larger negative impact on the bud expansion and growth than did uniform shading, and the effect was stronger in pine relative to spruce. In addition, lower branches in pine also had lower carbon reserves, and reduced xylem-area specific conductivity compared to spruce. For both species, but particularly the pine, the needles of lower branches tended to store less C than upper branches in the asymmetric shade, which could suggest a movement of reserves away from the lower branches. The implications of these findings correspond with the inherent shade tolerance and self-pruning behavior of these conifers and supports a carbon based mechanism for branch mortality – mediated by an asymmetry in light exposure of the crown. PMID:25136823

  2. Immediate esthetic crown with a facet of the extracted element

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, Giovanni de Almeida Prado; Magalhães, Amanda; Ajzen, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes a case of implant loading with an immediate temporary crown. The buccal crown surface was removed from the extracted tooth to obtain an aesthetically satisfactory result. After periodontal treatment, tooth 21 appeared proclined and showed Grade 3 mobility, indicating the need for its extraction. The remaining bone was imaged using computed tomography, and virtual surgical planning was performed using these results. The implant was immediately loaded postextraction into the fresh alveolus without a graft and flap procedure. The temporary tooth, which was manufactured using the extracted buccal surface, was a simple, fast, and low cost procedure that produced an excellent esthetic outcome. PMID:25202225

  3. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a unauthorized piece he created and placed

  4. Macromolecular leakage benath full cast crowns. Part II: The diffusion of lipopolysaccharide and dextran.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen extracted molars were prepared for crowns. Crowns with access ports (one facial, one lingual) were cast in gold. Teeth and crowns luted with provisional cement with filters inserted into the ports were immersed in a solution of labeled macromolecules (FITC-dextran, TRITC-LPS) and evaluated for leakage. Filters were retrieved and analyzed by use of fluorescent microscopy. Leakage of LPS and dextran occurred as early as 2 weeks beneath crowns luted with a provisional cement (NoGenol).

  5. On pelvic reference lines and the MR evaluation of genital prolapse: a proposal for standardization using the Pelvic Inclination Correction System.

    PubMed

    Betschart, C; Chen, L; Ashton-Miller, J A; Delancey, J O L

    2013-09-01

    Five midsagittal pelvic reference lines have been employed to quantify prolapse using MRI. However, the lack of standardization makes study results difficult to compare. Using MRI scans from 149 women, we demonstrate how use of existing reference lines can systematically affect measurements in three distinct ways: in oblique line systems, distances measured to the reference line vary with antero-posterior location; soft issue-based reference lines can underestimate organ movement relative to the pelvic bones; and systems defined relative to the MR scanner are affected by intra- and interindividual differences in the pelvic inclination angle at rest and strain. Thus, we propose a standardized approach called the Pelvic Inclination Correction System (PICS). Based on bony structures and the body axis, the PICS system corrects for variation in pelvic inclination, at rest of straining, and allows for the standardized measurement of organ displacement in the direction of prolapse.

  6. Growth temperature modulates the spatial variability of leaf morphology and chemical elements within crowns of climatically divergent Acer rubrum genotypes.

    PubMed

    Shahba, Mohamed A; Bauerle, William L

    2009-07-01

    Our understanding of leaf acclimation in relation to temperature of fully grown or juvenile tree crowns is mainly based on research involving spatially uncontrolled growth temperature. In this study, we test the hypothesis that leaf morphology and chemical elements are modulated by within-crown growth temperature differences. We ask whether within-species variation can influence acclimation to elevated temperatures. Within-crown temperature dependence of leaf morphology, carbon and nitrogen was examined in two genotypes of Acer rubrum L. (red maple) from different latitudes, where the mean annual temperature varies between 7.2 and 19.4 degrees C. Crown sections were grown in temperature-controlled chambers at three daytime growth temperatures (25, 33 and 38 degrees C). Leaf growth and resource acquisition were measured at regular intervals over long-term (50 days) controlled daytime growth temperatures. We found significant intraspecific variation in temperature dependence of leaf carbon and nitrogen accumulation between genotypes. Additionally, there was evidence that leaf morphology depended on inherited adaptation. Leaf dry matter and nitrogen content decreased as growth temperature was elevated above 25 degrees C in the genotype native to the cooler climate, whereas they remained fairly constant in response to temperature in the genotype native to the warmer climate. Specific leaf area (SLA) was correlated positively to leaf nitrogen content in both genotypes. The SLA and the relative leaf dry matter content (LM), on the other hand, were correlated negatively to leaf thickness. However, intraspecific variation in SLA and LM versus leaf thickness was highly significant. Intraspecific differences in leaf temperature response between climatically divergent genotypes yielded important implications for convergent evolution of leaf adaptation. Comparison of our results with those of previous studies showed that leaf carbon allocation along a vertical temperature

  7. Evaluation of the marginal fit of full ceramic crowns by the microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) technique

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Necla; Ozturk, Atiye Nilgun; Malkoc, Meral Arslan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the marginal gap (MG) and absolute marginal discrepancy (MD) of full ceramic crowns with two finish line designs, shoulder and chamfer, using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) before and after cementation. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were divided into two groups based on the finish line design: Group I: 90° shoulder and Group II: 135° chamfer. The specimens were further grouped based on the type of full ceramic crown they received: Group A: Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system, Group B: Cerec inLab aluminum oxide ceramic system and Group C: Lithium disilicate press ceramic system. Before cementation, five crowns from each group were scanned using micro-CT in two sections, sagittal and coronal, to determine the MG and MD values for four regions of the crown (sagittal buccal, sagittal lingual, coronal mesial and coronal distal). After cementation and thermal cycling, the scanning was repeated. Measurements were obtained from 10 points for each region, 80 points totally, to evaluate the MG and MD values. Files were processed using NRecon and CTAn software. Results were statistically analyzed using one- and two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (P = 0.05). Results: Full ceramic systems showed clinically acceptable marginal adaptation values. The Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system generally presented the lowest variance, except in the MG values of the coronal mesial region. The MG and MD values of all ceramics increased significantly after cementation, except in the shoulder preparation design (sagittal buccal region) for MG and in the chamfer preparation design (sagittal lingual region) for MD values. Conclusions: Full-ceramic crowns showed clinically acceptable marginal adaptation values. The Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system (Vitablocs Mark II) generally presented the lowest variance when compared with the other ceramics, except for the MG values on the mesial surface of the coronal section

  8. [Effect of the convergence angle of the ground tooth and the force of cast crown fastening using various types of cement].

    PubMed

    Jedrzejewski, T; Sokołowski, J; Połać, B

    1989-01-01

    The authors measured the effect of the convergence angle of the ground tooth on the fastening of cast crowns. The study was carried out on phantom models of teeth made of stainless steel with abutement convergence angles from 1 to 10 degrees. The force of the connection was measured using the Instron testing device. The avulsing force acted along the long axis of the abutement. Additionally the fixing force of phosphate, polycarboxylate and ionomer-glass was compared. A fall of the force of crown fastening was observed with increasing value of the convergence angle of the abutement, especially for phosphorus and ionomer-glass cement. The crowns fastened with polycarboxylate cement showed a threefold smaller fall of the fastening force with increasing value of the convergence angle of the abutement.

  9. Intersegmental coordination while walking up inclined surfaces: age and ramp angle effects.

    PubMed

    Noble, Jeremy W; Prentice, Stephen D

    2008-08-01

    The lower-limb segment elevation angles during human locomotion have been shown to co-vary in a manner such that they approximate a plane when plotted against each other over a gait cycle. This relationship has been described as the Planar Co-Variation Law and has been shown to be consistent across various modes of locomotion on level ground. The goal of this study is to determine whether the Planar Co-Variation Law will hold in situations where the orientation of the walking surface is altered and if aging will have an effect on this intersegmental coordination during these locomotor tasks. Nine healthy young females (mean age = 21.4), and nine older adult females (mean age = 73.3) were asked to complete walking trials on level ground, and walking up ramps with inclines of 3 degrees , 6 degrees , 9 degrees and 12 degrees while the kinematics of their lower limbs were measured. It was found that the Planar Co-Variation Law was held across all ramp incline conditions by both the young adult and older adult groups. It was found that the changes in intersegmental coordination required to walk up the ramp resulted in a unique orientation of the co-variation plane for both groups when walking up a particular incline. The results of this study indicate that the Planar Co-Variation Law will include situations where the walking surface is not level and provides further support to models of motor control that have been proposed where walking patterns for different modes of gait can be predicted based on the orientation of the co-variation plane.

  10. Preformed resin-veneered stainless steel crowns for restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P; Helpin, M L

    1996-05-01

    Stainless steel crown forms with bonded resin veneers for primary incisors are commercially available to dentists. This type of preveneered crown was developed to serve as a convenient, durable, reliable, and esthetic solution to the difficult challenge of restoring severely carious primary incisors. This article describes preveneered crowns, reviews their advantages and disadvantages, and details a technique for placement of such restorations.

  11. Comparative fracture strength analysis of Lava and Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Taek-Ka; Pak, Hyun-Soon; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE All-ceramic crowns are subject to fracture during function. To minimize this common clinical complication, zirconium oxide has been used as the framework for all-ceramic crowns. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia crown systems: Lava and Digident. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and twenty Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were fabricated. A metal die was also duplicated from the original prepared tooth for fracture testing. A universal testing machine was used to determine the fracture strength of the crowns. RESULTS The mean fracture strengths were as follows: 54.9 ± 15.6 N for the Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and 87.0 ± 16.0 N for the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns. The difference between the mean fracture strengths of the Lava and Digident crowns was statistically significant (P<.001). Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed a complete fracture of both the veneering porcelain and the core whereas the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed fracture only of the veneering porcelain. CONCLUSION The fracture strengths of CAD/CAM zirconia crowns differ depending on the compatibility of the core material and the veneering porcelain. PMID:23755332

  12. First report of Fusarium hostae causing crown rot of wheat (Triticum spp.) in Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown rot disease of wheat is caused by a complex of Fusarium species. To identify species associated with crown rot in Turkey, crowns and stems of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum wheat (T. durum Desf.) were collected from the Central and Southeast Anatolia, Black Sea, Aegean, Mediterr...

  13. 76 FR 40354 - Notice of Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Crowned Ridge Wind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project, Codington and Grant Counties, SD AGENCY: Western Area Power... 150-megawatt Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project (Project) in Codington and Grant counties, South... process for NextEra's proposed Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project with the publication of...

  14. Automated individual tree crown delineation from LIDAR data using morphological techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, L.; Hu, B.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Noland, T.

    2014-03-01

    In current tree crown delineation from LiDAR data, treetops and 3D geometric shapes of tree crowns are frequently extracted from LiDAR-derived Crown Height Model (CHM) and used as references to localize and delineate crowns. However, it is difficult to detect deciduous treetops and delineate deciduous tree crowns. The 3D shape of a crown, which can be derived from CHM, may be taken as a half ellipsoid, and any horizontal slice of the ellipsoid contains the treetop and indicates not only the location but also the spatial extent of the crown. Based on such slices, a novel multi-scale method for individual tree crown delineation from CHM was proposed in this study. This method consists mainly of two steps: (1) morphologically open the CHM over the scale range of target tree crowns; and (2) take local maxima within each resulting opened CHM as the horizontal slices of target crowns at the corresponding scale level and integrate all the slices within the scale range together to represent the spatial distribution of target crowns. In an experiment on CHMs over two natural closed canopy forests in Ontario, Canada, the proposed method accurately delineated the majority of the tree crowns from closed canopy forests.

  15. Apparatus to study the onset of free convection about vertical and inclined hot wires.

    PubMed

    Giaretto, Valter; Miraldi, Elio; Torchio, Marco F

    2007-07-01

    This article describes a methodology and an apparatus used to evaluate the onset time of free convection in hot-wire experiments. The evaluation of the onset time is useful to obtain a measurement interval that is suitable to estimate the thermal properties of a fluid. If a pure conduction regime is present, the hot-wire temperature increment versus time is a straight line in a semilog plot, whereas the convection effect induces a deviation from this trend. An algorithm based on the F test is proposed to evaluate the onset time of free convection. The experimental facility has the particular feature of allowing an easy change of the hot-wire inclination angle up to 118.3 mrad. The wire is kept in a tilted position by a permanent horseshoe magnet, and the tilting angle from the vertical is measured by a theodolite. Some testing results using water are discussed for vertical and inclined wires. A good agreement between the experimental onset times and the theoretical ones is found in the case of a vertical wire.

  16. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer of thin films on inclined structured plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, Karsten; Yu, Hongyi; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Stephan, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Thin liquid films flowing down vertical and inclined plates are widely used in industrial applications, e.g. in falling film evaporators for concentrating of sugar solutions. Falling films exhibit very complex wavy patterns, which depend on various parameters. Using structured, in particular, grooved plates is a promising way to enhance the heat transfer rate in thin film evaporators. The influence of the plate topography on the wave motion is still not completely understood. In the present work the evolution of the water film thickness on smooth and structured (longitudinal and sinusoidal grooves and herringbone structures) plates has been experimentally investigated for different inclination angles, Reynolds numbers and at various distances from the inlet. A confocal chromatic sensoring technique was used to measure the film dynamics. Additionally, the temperature distribution at the heated wall has been measured with thermocouples and the liquid-gas interface has been observed with infrared thermography for different heat fluxes. The heat flux has been gradually increased until film rupture occurred. The effect of the wall topography on the film stability has been quantified. It has been found that the wall topography significantly affects the wave pattern, the heat transport and the film stability.

  17. Inclined layer convection in a colloidal suspension with negative Soret coefficient at large solutal Rayleigh numbers.

    PubMed

    Italia, Matteo; Croccolo, Fabrizio; Scheffold, Frank; Vailati, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Convection in an inclined layer of fluid is affected by the presence of a component of the acceleration of gravity perpendicular to the density gradient that drives the convective motion. In this work we investigate the solutal convection of a colloidal suspension characterized by a negative Soret coefficient. Convection is induced by heating the suspension from above, and at large solutal Rayleigh numbers (of the order of 10(7)-10(8)) convective spoke patterns form. We show that in the presence of a marginal inclination of the cell as small as 19 mrad the isotropy of the spoke pattern is broken and the convective patterns tend to align in the direction of the inclination. At intermediate inclinations of the order of 33 mrad ordered square patterns are obtained, while at inclination of the order of 67 mrad the strong shear flow determined by the inclination gives rise to ascending and descending sheets of fluid aligned parallel to the direction of inclination.

  18. Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of Bilayer Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Crown Performance

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher’s exact test. Results There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns

  19. Restoration of decayed primary incisors using strip crowns.

    PubMed

    Pollard, M A; Curzon, J A; Fenlon, W L

    1991-05-01

    Caries of the primary incisors is a common problem that can be arrested if recognized early enough. However, the arrested decay is unsightly. Celluloid 'strip' crown forms, used with composite resin, now allow the restoration of even the most badly decayed primary incisors. The authors describe this quick and efficient technique.

  20. Evolution of the mandibular third premolar crown in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Delezene, Lucas K; Kimbel, William H

    2011-06-01

    The Pliocene hominins Australopithecus anamensis and Australopithecus afarensis likely represent ancestor-descendent taxa--possibly an anagenetic lineage--and capture significant change in the morphology of the canine and mandibular third premolar (P(3)) crowns, dental elements that form the canine honing complex in nonhuman catarrhines. This study focuses on the P(3) crown, highlighting plesiomorphic features in A. anamensis. The A. afarensis P(3) crown, in contrast, is variable in its expression of apomorphic features that are characteristic of geologically younger hominins. Temporal variation characterizes each taxon as well. The A. anamensis P(3) from Allia Bay, Kenya expresses apomorphic character states, shared with A. afarensis, which are not seen in the older sample of A. anamensis P(3)s from Kanapoi, Kenya, while spatiotemporal differences in shape exist within the A. afarensis hypodigm. The accumulation of derived features in A. afarensis results in an increased level of P(3) molarisation. P(3) molarisation did not evolve concurrent with postcanine megadontia and neither did the appearance of derived aspects of P(3) occlusal form coincide with the loss of canine honing in hominins, which is apparent prior to the origin of the genus Australopithecus. A. afarensis P(3) variation reveals the independence of shape, size, and occlusal form. The evolution of the P(3) crown in early Australopithecus bridges the wide morphological gap that exists between geologically younger hominins on the one hand and extant apes and Ardipithecus on the other.