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Sample records for crown inclination measured

  1. Assessment of crown angulations, crown inclinations, and tooth size discrepancies in a South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Doodamani, Geeta Maruti; Khala, Anmol S; Manohar, Mala; Umashankar

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The aim of this study was to assess crown angulations, crown inclinations, and tooth size discrepancy in a sample population from Davangere, South India. Materials and Methods: One hundred adults (50 male and 50 female) of age 18–30 years, with Angle's class I ideal occlusion and balanced profiles, were selected for the study. Study models were prepared and crown angulations and crown inclinations were measured using a customized protractor device. Bolton's analysis was used to measure the tooth size discrepancies. Results: Maxillary and mandibular teeth had less crown angulations. Maxillary and mandibular incisors and maxillary molars showed increased crown inclinations, whereas mandibular molars and premolars had less crown inclinations than the original Andrews sample. The mean maxillary and mandibular tooth size ratios, overall and anterior, were similar to Bolton's ratios. Conclusions: The finding of this study indicates that there are possible racial and ethnic factors contributing to variations in crown angulations and crown inclinations. PMID:22090760

  2. Crown angulation and inclination of Northern Thais with good occlusion.

    PubMed

    Jotikasthira, Dhirawat; Sheffield, Peter; Kalha, Anmol; Syed, Zameer

    2010-01-01

    When patients of differing ethnicities are treated with one bracket system, negative consequences for the occlusion can result. This study investigated the crown angulation and inclination on study casts of 60 Northern Thais (30 males and 30 females) with a good occlusion. In all study casts, each tooth (except the third molars) was evaluated with the orthodontic Torque Angulation Device (TAD) twice on the right side; this was also performed twice on the left side. The mean of the two evaluations was used for the statistical analysis. The means of the males and females were compared with the independent Student t test. The results were that the crown angulation of the mandibular first and second molars was significantly higher in females (P<.01) and that the crown inclination of all teeth did not differ between the two sexes.

  3. A jig for measuring incisor inclination.

    PubMed

    Shah, N; Spary, D J; Rock, W P

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to design and construct a jig for measuring the inclination of the upper incisors to the maxillary plane and of the lower incisors to the mandibular plane. After several prototypes had been tested, the required properties for a successful jig were identified and a simple inexpensive device was produced. Measurements obtained when using the jig on 51 subjects were compared with cephalometric values by means of regression analysis. This revealed that measurements obtained using the jig against the upper and then the lower incisor crowns could be converted to cephalometric incisor angulations with 96 per cent accuracy to 10 degrees, by adding 23 and 3 degrees, respectively. The jig was accurate to 5 degrees on 69 per cent of occasions for the upper teeth. The 5 degrees accuracy with the lower incisors was only 27 per cent, although over a 6 degree range it improved to 78 per cent. For upper and lower tooth measurements combined, the jig was accurate to within 6 degrees on 75 per cent of occasions.

  4. On wind turbine power performance measurements at inclined airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, T. F.

    2004-07-01

    The average airflow inclination in complex terrain may be substantial. The airflow inclination affects wind turbine performance and also affects the cup anemometer being used in power performance measurements. In this article the overall dependence of the power curve on inclined airflow is analysed for its influence on both the wind turbine and the cup anemometer. The wind turbine performance analysis is based on results of measurements and theoretical calculations with the aeroelastic code HAWC coupled to a 3D actuator disc model for varying yaw angle. The cup anemometer analysis at inclined flow is based on an averaging of measured angular characteristics in a wind tunnel with the distribution of airflow inclination angles over time. The relative difference in annual energy production in terrain with inclined airflow compared with flat terrain is simulated for cup anemometers with theoretical optimal angular characteristics for two different definitions of wind speed, as well as for five commercial cup anemometers with measured angular characteristics. Copyright

  5. Analysis of inclined showers measured with LOPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Collaboration; Saftoiu, A.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Asch, T.; Auffenberg, J.; Badea, F.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Kolotaev, Y.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Nigl, A.; Oehlschläger, J.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.; LOPES Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, we analyze the radio signal from inclined air showers recorded by LOPES-30 in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. LOPES-30 consists of 30 East-West oriented digital antennas, which are amplitude calibrated by an external source. Radio emission from air showers is considered a geomagnetic effect. Inclined events provide a larger range of values for geomagnetic angle (angle between shower axis and geomagnetic field direction) than vertical showers and thus more information on the emission processes can be gathered. In order to have the geometry of the air shower we use the reconstruction provided by the KASCADE-Grande particle detectors array. Analyzing events observed by both LOPES and the extended part of the KASCADE array, Grande, gives the possibility to test in particular the capability and efficiency of radio detection of more distant events. The results are compared with a previous analysis of inclined events recorded by the initial 10 antenna set-up, LOPES-10, in coincidence with the Grande array.

  6. Avian orientation at steep angles of inclination: experiments with migratory white-crowned sparrows at the magnetic North Pole.

    PubMed

    Akesson, S; Morin, J; Muheim, R; Ottosson, U

    2001-09-22

    The Earth's magnetic field and celestial cues provide animals with compass information during migration. Inherited magnetic compass courses are selected based on the angle of inclination, making it difficult to orient in the near vertical fields found at high geomagnetic latitudes. Orientation cage experiments were performed at different sites in high Arctic Canada with adult and young white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) in order to investigate birds' ability to use the Earth's magnetic field and celestial cues for orientation in naturally very steep magnetic fields at and close to the magnetic North Pole. Experiments were performed during the natural period of migration at night in the local geomagnetic field under natural clear skies and under simulated total overcast conditions. The experimental birds failed to select a meaningful magnetic compass course under overcast conditions at the magnetic North Pole, but could do so in geomagnetic fields deviating less than 3 degrees from the vertical. Migratory orientation was successful at all sites when celestial cues were available.

  7. Measurements of Cuspal Slope Inclination Angles in Palaeoanthropological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaboutchian, A. V.; Knyaz, V. A.; Leybova, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    Tooth crown morphological features, studied in palaeoanthropology, provide valuable information about human evolution and development of civilization. Tooth crown morphology represents biological and historical data of high taxonomical value as it characterizes genetically conditioned tooth relief features averse to substantial changes under environmental factors during lifetime. Palaeoanthropological studies are still based mainly on descriptive techniques and manual measurements of limited number of morphological parameters. Feature evaluation and measurement result analysis are expert-based. Development of new methods and techniques in 3D imaging creates a background provides for better value of palaeoanthropological data processing, analysis and distribution. The goals of the presented research are to propose new features for automated odontometry and to explore their applicability to paleoanthropological studies. A technique for automated measuring of given morphological tooth parameters needed for anthropological study is developed. It is based on using original photogrammetric system as a teeth 3D models acquisition device and on a set of algorithms for given tooth parameters estimation.

  8. Measurement of the buccolingual inclination of teeth: manual technique vs 3-dimensional software.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mahtab; Abdi, Amir Hossein; Farzan, Arash; Mokhtarpour, Faraneh; Baghban, AliReza Akbarzadeh

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to measure the inclination of teeth on dental casts by a manual technique with the tooth inclination protractor (TIP; MBI, Newport, United Kingdom) and a newly designed 3-dimensional (3D) software program. The correlation of the 2 techniques was evaluated, and the reliability of each technique was assessed separately. This study was conducted on 36 dental casts of normal, well-aligned Class I occlusions; we assessed 432 teeth. All casts had a normal Class I occlusion. After determining the facial axis of the clinical crown and the facial axis points on the dental casts, we measured the inclinations of the incisors and posterior teeth up to the first molars in each dental arch relative to Andrews' occlusal plane and the posterior occlusal plane using the TIP. Moreover, the casts were scanned by a structured-light 3D scanner. The inclination of teeth relative to the occlusal plane was determined using the new software. To assess the reliability, measurements of all teeth from 15 casts were repeated twice by the 2 methods. Intraclass correlation coefficient and Dahlberg's formula were used for calculation of correlation and reliability. Overall, the 2 techniques were not significantly different in the measurements of the inclinations of the teeth in both jaws. The ranges of Dahlberg's formula were 3.1° to 5.8° for the maxilla and 3.3° to 5.9° for the mandible. The overall correlation of the 2 techniques according to the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.91. For calculation of reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the TIP and the 3D method were 0.73 and 0.82, respectively. The TIP and the 3D software showed a high correlation for measurement of the inclinations of maxillary and mandibular teeth relative to the occlusal plane. Also, the reproducibility of the measurements in each method was high. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Online measurement system for the surface inclination of metal workpieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Peng; Sun, Changku; Wang, Peng; Yang, Qian

    2013-12-01

    The online measurement of the metal surfaces' parameters plays an important role in many industrial fields. Because the surfaces of the machined metal pieces have the characteristics of strong reflection and high possibilities of scattered disturbing irradiation points, this paper designs an online measurement system based on the measurement principles of linear structured light to detect whether the parameters of the machined metal surfaces' height difference and inclination fulfill the compliance requirements, in which the grayscale gravity algorithm is applied to extract the sub-pixel coordinates of the center of laser, the least squares method is employed to fit the data and the Pauta criterion is utilized to remove the spurious points. The repeat accuracy of this system has been tested. The experimental results prove that the precision of inclination is 0.046° RMS under the speed of 40mm/sec, and the precision of height difference is 0.072mm RMS, which meets the design expectations. Hence, this system can be applied to online industrial detection of high speed and high precision.

  10. Towards an Optimized Method of Olive Tree Crown Volume Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Llorens, Jordi; Gamarra-Diezma, Juan L.; Gil-Ribes, Jesús A.; Gil, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Accurate crown characterization of large isolated olive trees is vital for adjusting spray doses in three-dimensional crop agriculture. Among the many methodologies available, laser sensors have proved to be the most reliable and accurate. However, their operation is time consuming and requires specialist knowledge and so a simpler crown characterization method is required. To this end, three methods were evaluated and compared with LiDAR measurements to determine their accuracy: Vertical Crown Projected Area method (VCPA), Ellipsoid Volume method (VE) and Tree Silhouette Volume method (VTS). Trials were performed in three different kinds of olive tree plantations: intensive, adapted one-trunked traditional and traditional. In total, 55 trees were characterized. Results show that all three methods are appropriate to estimate the crown volume, reaching high coefficients of determination: R2 = 0.783, 0.843 and 0.824 for VCPA, VE and VTS, respectively. However, discrepancies arise when evaluating tree plantations separately, especially for traditional trees. Here, correlations between LiDAR volume and other parameters showed that the Mean Vector calculated for VCPA method showed the highest correlation for traditional trees, thus its use in traditional plantations is highly recommended. PMID:25658396

  11. Profile measurement of transparent inclined surface with transmitted differential interference contrast shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng-Kang; Chen, Wei-Lun; Liu, Ting-Kun; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2012-08-27

    A quantitative phase shifting differential interference contrast (PS-DIC) shearing interferometer is adopted to measure the profile of transparent specimen with inclined surface. The effects of the incline angle on DIC measurement accuracy were studied. The optical model of the test system was constructed and the measurement of surface with various incline angles ranging from 5° to 60° was simulated. The experiments validate the simulation model and show the feasibility of profile reconstruction of inclined structure. It is interested to find that even with an inclined angle of 15°, unwrapping technique is required to make the measurement more accurate. In addition, the measurement can be further improved by taking into account the effects of the change in shear distance on the optical path difference. This study provides useful information that should be considered for complex geometry measurement with quantitative DIC technique.

  12. Simultaneous PLIF/PIV measurements for a single-mode inclined interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghar, Mohammad; Reilly, David; Carter, John; McFarland, Jacob; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    The Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory (STAML) at Georgia Institute of Technology is using a newly established inclined shock tube facility to study an inclined interface perturbation. This facility allows for simultaneous characterization of density and velocity fields by employing high-resolution, full-field Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), respectively. The incident shock strength of Mach 1.55 was used to impulsively accelerate a N2-Acetone mixture over CO2 inclined interface with an Atwood number of 0.23 and an 80° angle of inclination. This angle of inclination results in a linear perturbation as defined by the amplitude-to-wavelength ratio (η/ λ = 0.097). The development of the turbulent mixing layer for both pre- and post-reshock is determined by measuring several quantities, including two BHR model parameters: density self-correlation and turbulent mass flux.

  13. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR INCLINATIONS FOR KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio

    2012-09-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period P{sub s} inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity Vsin I{sub s} and stellar radius obtained by a high-resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination I{sub s} of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line of sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination I{sub s} can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) systems, whose light curves show periodic flux variations. Detailed analyses of their light curves and spectra revealed that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations I{sub s} for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with I{sub s} 90 Degree-Sign suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small I{sub s} for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.

  14. Measurements of Stellar Inclinations for Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Winn, Joshua N.; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi

    2012-09-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period Ps inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity Vsin Is and stellar radius obtained by a high-resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination Is of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line of sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination Is can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) systems, whose light curves show periodic flux variations. Detailed analyses of their light curves and spectra revealed that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations Is for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with Is = 90° suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small Is for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.

  15. Revealing strong bias in common measures of galaxy properties using new inclination-independent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devour, Brian M.; Bell, Eric F.

    2017-06-01

    Accurate measurement of galaxy structures is a prerequisite for quantitative investigation of galaxy properties or evolution. Yet, the impact of galaxy inclination and dust on commonly used metrics of galaxy structure is poorly quantified. We use infrared data sets to select inclination-independent samples of disc and flattened elliptical galaxies. These samples show strong variation in Sérsic index, concentration and half-light radii with inclination. We develop novel inclination-independent galaxy structures by collapsing the light distribution in the near-infrared on to the major axis, yielding inclination-independent 'linear' measures of size and concentration. With these new metrics we select a sample of Milky Way analogue galaxies with similar stellar masses, star formation rates, sizes and concentrations. Optical luminosities, light distributions and spectral properties are all found to vary strongly with inclination: When inclining to edge-on, r-band luminosities dim by >1 magnitude, sizes decrease by a factor of 2, 'dust-corrected' estimates of star formation rate drop threefold, metallicities decrease by 0.1 dex and edge-on galaxies are half as likely to be classified as star forming. These systematic effects should be accounted for in analyses of galaxy properties.

  16. Detection method of inclination angle in image measurement based on improved triangulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jiye

    2015-02-01

    Image distortion seriously affects the accuracy in microscope image measurement. One source of such distortion is related to the tilting of the microscope stage during laser scanning, thereby resulting in various degrees of inclination angles. This paper describes a novel technique that improves the traditional laser triangulation method by using multiple parallel laser beams that can solve the inclination problem. Moreover, a multi-light-spot measurement device, based on the improved laser triangulation technique, is proposed that can accurately detect the degree and directions of the inclination angles in real time. Furthermore, experimental results generated from a prototype of this device show that the new measurement system can effectively detect small inclination angles at a precision up to ±0.5  μrad.

  17. Measuring residual stress in ceramic zirconia-porcelain dental crowns by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Allahkarami, M; Hanan, J C

    2012-02-01

    Residual stress plays a critical role in failure of ceramic dental crowns. The magnitude and distribution of residual stress in the crown system are largely unknown. Determining the residual stress quantitatively is challenging since the crown has such complex contours and shapes. This work explored the feasibility and validity of measuring residual stress of zirconia and porcelain in ceramic crowns by nanoindentation. Nanoindentation tests were performed on the cross-section of a crown for both porcelain and zirconia along four critical locations: the thickest, thinnest and medium porcelain thicknesses. Zirconia and porcelain pieces, chipped off from the crown and annealed at 400 °C, were used as reference samples. The residual stress was determined by comparing the measured hardness of the stressed sample with that of the reference sample. Nanoindentation impression images were acquired through a scanning probe microscope (SPM) equipped with a Hysitron Triboindenter. Zirconia showed large pile-up. Residual stress is determined along the thickness of crowns at the chosen locations for both porcelain and zirconia. The measured results were compared with the results from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and finite element modeling (FEM). Results show there are large amounts of residual stresses in the dental crown and their magnitude differs between locations due to the complex shape of the crown. The average residual stress readings were as high as -637 MPa and 323 MPa for zirconia and porcelain respectively.

  18. Glenoid inclination: in vivo measures in rotator cuff tear patients and associations with superior glenohumeral joint translation.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jennifer L; Kline, Stephanie K; Aalderink, Kristopher J; Zauel, Roger; Bey, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Glenoid inclination has been associated with rotator cuff tears and superior humeral translation, but the relationship between glenoid inclination and superior humeral translation has not been assessed in vivo. This study compared glenoid inclination between repaired and contralateral shoulders in 21 unilateral rotator cuff repair patients. As a secondary analysis, we assessed the relationship between glenoid inclination and in vivo superior humeral translation. Glenoid inclination was measured from patient-specific, computed tomography-based bone models. Glenohumeral joint motion was measured from biplane radiographs collected during coronal-plane abductions. Glenoid inclination was significantly lower for the rotator cuff tear shoulders (90.7 degrees ) than the asymptomatic, contralateral shoulders (92.3 degrees , P = .04). No significant correlation existed between increased glenoid inclination and superior-inferior translation of the uninjured shoulder (P > .30). This study failed to support the theory that glenoid inclination is responsible for superior humeral translation and the development of subacromial impingement.

  19. A Psychometric Investigation of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale Using Rasch Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seol, Hyunsoo

    2007-01-01

    The author used Rasch measurement to examine the reliability and validity of 382 Korean university students' scores on the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS; D. P. Crowne and D. Marlowe, 1960). Results revealed that item-fit statistics and principal component analysis with standardized residuals provide evidence of MCSDS'…

  20. Assessment of postural stability using inertial measurement unit on inclined surfaces in healthy adults - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Frames, Chris; Soangra, Rahul; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2013-01-01

    Fatal and nonfatal falls in the construction domain remain a significant issue in today’s workforce. The roofing industry in particular, annually ranks amongst the highest in all industries. Exposure to an inclined surface, such as an inclined roof surface, has been reported to have adverse effects on postural stability. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the intra-individual differences in stability parameters on both inclined and level surfaces. Postural Stability (PS) and Limit of Stability (LOS) were assessed in seven healthy subjects (aged 25-35 years) on inclined and level surfaces using embedded force plates and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). Four 90-second trials were collected on the inclined surface in distinctive positions: (1) Toes raised 20o above heel; (2) Heels raised 20o above toes (3); Transverse direction with dominant foot inverted at a lower height; (4) Transverse direction with non-dominant foot inverted at a lower height. Limit of Stability was evaluated by the two measurement devices in all four directions and margin of safety was quantified for each individual on both surfaces. The results reveal significant differences in postural stability between the flat surface condition and the inclined surface condition when subject was positioned perpendicular to the surface slope with one foot descended below the other; specifically, a significant increase was identified when visual support was interrupted. The findings lend support to the literature and will assist in future research regarding early detection of postural imbalance and preventative measures to reduce fall risks in professions where workers are consistently exposed to inclined surfaces.

  1. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L.; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R.; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A.

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  2. Application of Replica Technique and SEM in Accuracy Measurement of Ceramic Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifkovic, B.; Budak, I.; Todorovic, A.; Hodolic, J.; Puskar, T.; Jevremovic, D.; Vukelic, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of the measuring values of the marginal gap related to the ceramic crowns made by dental CAD/CAM system using the replica technique and SEM. The study was conducted using three experimental groups, which consisted of ceramic crowns manufactured by the Cerec CAD/CAM system. The scanning procedure was carried out using three specialized dental 3D digitization systems from the Cerec family - two types of extraoral optical scanning systems and an intraoral optical scanner. Measurements of the marginal gap were carried out using the replica technique and SEM. The comparison of aggregate values of the marginal gap using the replica technique showed a statistically significant difference between the systems. The measured values of marginal gaps of ceramic crowns using the replica technique were significantly lower compared to those measured by SEM. The results indicate that the choice of technique for measuring the accuracy of ceramic crowns influences the final results of investigation.

  3. Measurement of boundary plane inclination in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Randle, V.; Dingley, D. )

    1989-09-01

    Recently, a method has been devised for measuring the boundary orientations using backscattered Kikuchi diffraction (BKD, otherwise known as electron backscattering, EBS). The work reported demonstrates that BKD can be efficiently used to measure both the misorientation across grain boundaries and also the orientation of boundary planes. In nickel it has been shown that the boundaries of grains which are situated along the corner of a rectangular specimen rotate so as to minimize their interfacial energy. For non-coincidence site lattices related grains, boundaries tend to align normal to the edge of the specimen, while {Sigma} = 3 and {Sigma} = 9 CSLs tend to rotate to tilt configuration, particularly asymmetric tilts such as {l brace}111{r brace}/ {l brace}115{r brace} or {l brace}110{r brace}/{l brace}114{r brace}.

  4. Electromyographic Patterns during Level and Inclined Treadmill Running and Their Relationship to Step Cycle Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Patrick R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Eight highly skilled male runners were filmed running on level and inclined treadmills while electromyographic measures from right thigh muscles were collected. Results indicate that treadmill grade had a significant effect on the relative duration of both stance and swing phases of the step cycle and on total step cycle duration. (MT)

  5. Electromyographic Patterns during Level and Inclined Treadmill Running and Their Relationship to Step Cycle Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Patrick R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Eight highly skilled male runners were filmed running on level and inclined treadmills while electromyographic measures from right thigh muscles were collected. Results indicate that treadmill grade had a significant effect on the relative duration of both stance and swing phases of the step cycle and on total step cycle duration. (MT)

  6. Laboratory fire behavior measurements of chaparral crown fire

    Treesearch

    C. Sanpakit; S. Omodan; D. Weise; M Princevac

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, there was an estimated 9,900 wildland fires that claimed more than 577,000 acres of land. That same year, about 542 prescribed fires were used to treat 48,554 acres by several agencies in California. Being able to understand fires using laboratory models can better prepare individuals to combat or use fires. Our research focused on chaparral crown fires....

  7. How to Detect Inclined Water Maser Disks (and Possibly Measure Black Hole Masses)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremy

    2017-03-01

    We describe a method for identifying inclined water maser disks orbiting massive black holes and for potentially using them to measure black hole masses. Owing to the geometry of maser amplification pathways, the minority of water maser disks are observable: only those viewed nearly edge-on have been identified, suggesting that an order of magnitude additional maser disks exist. We suggest that inward-propagating masers are gravitationally deflected by the central black hole, thereby scattering water maser emission out of the disk plane and enabling detection. The signature of an inclined water maser disk would be narrow masers near the systemic velocity that appear to emit from the black hole position, as identified by the radio continuum core. To explore this possibility, we present high-resolution (0.″07-0.″17) Very Large Array line and continuum observations of 13 galaxies with narrow water maser emission and show that three are good inclined-disk candidates (five remain ambiguous). For the best case, CGCG 120-039, we show that the maser and continuum emission are coincident to within 3.5 ± 1.4 pc (6.7 ± 2.7 mas). Subsequent very long baseline interferometric maps can confirm candidate inclined disks and have the potential to show maser rings or arcs that provide a direct measurement of black hole mass, although the mass precision will rely on knowledge of the size of the maser disk.

  8. Large tree crowns in closed forest canopies: Measuring structure and estimating light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolosin, Michael Stephen

    Trees compete for light. Crown traits are the result of an evolutionary history dominated by this fact, and species exhibit a range of strategies including characteristic shapes and light-foraging abilities in response to this competition. Shape plasticity and crown asymmetry result from the growth and death of branches over long time scales. It is impossible to track every branch in stand-scale forest models, and there are no good approaches that accurately capture the emergent tree-level properties of this branch-scale process. Most forest models therefore ignore tree shape and asymmetry. Models of tree size and shape are important in both scientific research and in evaluating policy questions. Light absorption in large canopy trees determines their own demographic rates and sets the template of light levels that drives understory growth and mortality, driving both community and ecosystem processes. Models that ignore crown shape and asymmetry could lead to faulty inferences and predictions. Our work attempts to overcome some of the difficulties in both measuring and modeling large crown shape and light availability. We develop a new approach to extracting three-dimensional crown structural information from high resolution digital stereo imagery to accurately measure crown structure of over nine hundred well-studied large canopy trees. We also present a statistical model that integrates multiple data sources into estimates of the "true" but unmeasurable light available to individual trees. Third, we develop two crown models for forest simulations that capture their space-filling nature with minimum detail, and we parameterize these models from data; one models crown shape, the other crown location. Fourth, we investigate the relationship between light availability and growth. We extract extensive fine-scale structural detail from the imagery, and generate detailed crown envelopes. We find that light availability predicts the growth rates of large trees primarily

  9. Volume measurement of crowns in mandibular primary central incisors by micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Lan; Shi, Si-Zhen; Ide, Y; Saka, H; Matsunaga, S; Agematsu, H

    2013-09-01

    To determine sex differences in the tissue proportions of crowns of mandibular primary central incisors in Chinese children and to quantify the volume of crown components in three dimensions using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The specimens used in this study were 41 mandibular first deciduous incisor teeth with intact crowns (21 males and 20 females) obtained from patients between 5-6 years of age. Each specimen was scanned using micro-CT at a resolution of 0.05 mm and 3D-rendered images were created. The volume of each component of the crown was measured and examined for differences in different sex and ages. The pulp chamber volume decreased with age and the volume ratio of the pulp chamber to the whole crown was significantly smaller in 6-year-olds than in 5-year-olds (p < 0.05). Males had significantly larger tooth crown volumes and dentin volumes than females did (p < 0.001), while the volume of enamel showed no sexual dimorphism.

  10. Application of PIV to velocity measurements in a liquid film flowing down an inclined cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Antipin, V. A.; Bobylev, A. V.; Markovich, D. M.

    2007-08-01

    PIV technique is applied for measurements of instant velocity distributions in a liquid film flowing down an inclined tube in the form of a wavy rivulet. An application of special optical calibration is applied to correct distortion effects caused by the curvature of the interface. A vortex flow of liquid is observed inside a wave hump in the reference system moving with wave phase velocity. Conditionally averaged profiles of longitudinal and transverse components of liquid velocity are obtained for different cross-sections of developed non-linear waves. It is shown that the increase in wave amplitude slightly changes the location of the vortex center. The analysis of modification of vortex motion character due to wavy flow conditions, such as tube inclination angle, film Reynolds number, wave excitation frequency, is fulfilled.

  11. Trunk inclination estimate during the sprint start using an inertial measurement unit: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Elena; Guillon, Pélagie; Camomilla, Valentina; Pillet, Hélène; Skalli, Wafa; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2013-10-01

    The proper execution of the sprint start is crucial in determining the performance during a sprint race. In this respect, when moving from the crouch to the upright position, trunk kinematics is a key element. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of a trunk-mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU) in estimating the trunk inclination and angular velocity in the sagittal plane during the sprint start. In-laboratory sprint starts were performed by five sprinters. The local acceleration and angular velocity components provided by the IMU were processed using an adaptive Kalman filter. The accuracy of the IMU inclination estimate and its consistency with trunk inclination were assessed using reference stereophotogrammetric measurements. A Bland-Altman analysis, carried out using parameters (minimum, maximum, and mean values) extracted from the time histories of the estimated variables, and curve similarity analysis (correlation coefficient > 0.99, root mean square difference < 7 deg) indicated the agreement between reference and IMU estimates, opening a promising scenario for an accurate in-field use of IMUs for sprint start performance assessment.

  12. Glenoid Inclination: In-Vivo Measures in Rotator Cuff Tear Patients and Associations with Superior Glenohumeral Joint Translation

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Jennifer L.; Kline, Stephanie K.; Aalderink, Kristopher J.; Zauel, Roger; Bey, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Glenoid inclination has been associated with rotator cuff tears and superior humeral translation, but the relationship between glenoid inclination and superior humeral translation has not been assessed in-vivo. The objective of this study was to compare glenoid inclination between repaired and contralateral shoulders of unilateral rotator cuff repair patients. As a secondary analysis, we assessed the relationship between glenoid inclination and in-vivo superior humeral translation. Glenoid inclination was measured from patient-specific, CT-based bone models. Glenohumeral joint motion was measured from biplane x-ray images collected during coronal-plane abduction of 21 rotator cuff repair patients. Glenoid inclination was significantly lower for the rotator cuff tear shoulders (90.7°) than the asymptomatic, contralateral shoulders (92.3°, p=0.04). There was no significant correlation between increased glenoid inclination and superior/inferior translation of the uninjured shoulder (p>0.30). This study failed to support the theory that glenoid inclination is responsible for superior humeral translation and the development of subacromial impingement. PMID:19062313

  13. Association of spinal inclination with physical performance measures among community-dwelling Japanese women aged 40 years and older.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yasuyo; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Tsurumoto, Tadao; Chen, Chih-Yu; Kanagae, Mitsuo; Mizukami, Satoshi; Ye, Zhaojia; Kusano, Yosuke

    2013-10-01

    Spinal inclination assesses spinal posture as a whole. However, the association between spinal inclination and physical performance has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the association of spinal inclination with physical performance measures. The participants were 107 Japanese women aged 40-84 years. Spinal posture was assessed as inclination to a perpendicular line by using a computer-assisted device. Increased inclination value means forward inclination of the spine. Physical performance was measured by using the following methods: 6-m walking time, chair stand time, functional reach, Timed Up & Go Test, and grip strength. Information on participants' comorbidities, osteoporosis, knee joint pain, back pain, falls in the previous year, regular exercise and usage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), was also collected. Pearson's correlation analysis showed significant associations between spinal inclination and all of the physical performance measures. Pearson's partial correlation analysis adjusted for age showed significant associations of increased inclination with poor physical functioning in 6-m walking time, chair stand time, functional reach, and Timed Up & Go Test, but not in grip strength. Linear regression analysis adjusted for age, grip strength, number of comorbidities, osteoporosis, knee joint pain, back pain, falls in previous year, regular activity and taking NSAIDs showed that spinal inclination was associated with poor function in 6-m walking time, chair stand time, functional reach and Timed Up & Go Test. Forward spinal inclination was associated with impairment in various physical performance measures. Proper prevention and treatment of underlying disorders should be prompted. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  14. Distinctive expression patterns and roles of the miRNA393/TIR1 homolog module in regulating flag leaf inclination and primary and crown root growth in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Bian, Hongwu; Xie, Yakun; Guo, Fu; Han, Ning; Ma, Shengyun; Zeng, Zhanghui; Wang, Junhui; Yang, Yinong; Zhu, Muyuan

    2012-10-01

    • MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of auxin signaling components plays a critical role in plant development. miRNA expression and functional diversity contribute to the complexity of regulatory networks of miRNA/target modules. • This study functionally characterizes two members of the rice (Oryza sativa) miR393 family and their target genes, OsTIR1 and OsAFB2 (AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX), the two closest homologs of Arabidopsis TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 (TIR1). • We found that the miR393 family members possess distinctive expression patterns, with miR393a expressed mainly in the crown and lateral root primordia, as well as the coleoptile tip, and miR393b expressed in the shoot apical meristem. Transgenic plants overexpressing miR393a/b displayed a severe phenotype with hallmarks of altered auxin signaling, mainly including enlarged flag leaf inclination and altered primary and crown root growth. Furthermore, OsAFB2- and OsTIR1-suppressed lines exhibited increased inclination of flag leaves at the booting stage, resembling miR393-overexpressing plants. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that OsTIR1 and OsAFB2 interact with OsIAA1. • Expression diversification of miRNA393 implies the potential role of miRNA regulation during species evolution. The conserved mechanisms of the miR393/target module indicate the fundamental importance of the miR393-mediated regulation of auxin signal transduction in rice.

  15. The densiometer for measurement of crown intercept above a line transect.

    Treesearch

    J. Edward. Dealy

    1960-01-01

    An adaptation in the use of Lemmon's spherical densiometer, has been developed to measure low overstory crown foliage as intercept above a line transect. This adaptation provides added information for the evaluation of ecological relationships within and among plant communities where some species are too low for overstory density estimates and too high for direct...

  16. Slip resistance of winter footwear on snow and ice measured using maximum achievable incline

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jennifer; Shaw, Robert; Novak, Alison; Li, Yue; Ormerod, Marcus; Newton, Rita; Dutta, Tilak; Fernie, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protective footwear is necessary for preventing injurious slips and falls in winter conditions. Valid methods for assessing footwear slip resistance on winter surfaces are needed in order to evaluate footwear and outsole designs. The purpose of this study was to utilise a method of testing winter footwear that was ecologically valid in terms of involving actual human testers walking on realistic winter surfaces to produce objective measures of slip resistance. During the experiment, eight participants tested six styles of footwear on wet ice, on dry ice, and on dry ice after walking over soft snow. Slip resistance was measured by determining the maximum incline angles participants were able to walk up and down in each footwear–surface combination. The results indicated that testing on a variety of surfaces is necessary for establishing winter footwear performance and that standard mechanical bench tests for footwear slip resistance do not adequately reflect actual performance. Practitioner Summary: Existing standardised methods for measuring footwear slip resistance lack validation on winter surfaces. By determining the maximum inclines participants could walk up and down slopes of wet ice, dry ice, and ice with snow, in a range of footwear, an ecologically valid test for measuring winter footwear performance was established. PMID:26555738

  17. Slip resistance of winter footwear on snow and ice measured using maximum achievable incline.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer; Shaw, Robert; Novak, Alison; Li, Yue; Ormerod, Marcus; Newton, Rita; Dutta, Tilak; Fernie, Geoff

    2016-05-01

    Protective footwear is necessary for preventing injurious slips and falls in winter conditions. Valid methods for assessing footwear slip resistance on winter surfaces are needed in order to evaluate footwear and outsole designs. The purpose of this study was to utilise a method of testing winter footwear that was ecologically valid in terms of involving actual human testers walking on realistic winter surfaces to produce objective measures of slip resistance. During the experiment, eight participants tested six styles of footwear on wet ice, on dry ice, and on dry ice after walking over soft snow. Slip resistance was measured by determining the maximum incline angles participants were able to walk up and down in each footwear-surface combination. The results indicated that testing on a variety of surfaces is necessary for establishing winter footwear performance and that standard mechanical bench tests for footwear slip resistance do not adequately reflect actual performance. Practitioner Summary: Existing standardised methods for measuring footwear slip resistance lack validation on winter surfaces. By determining the maximum inclines participants could walk up and down slopes of wet ice, dry ice, and ice with snow, in a range of footwear, an ecologically valid test for measuring winter footwear performance was established.

  18. Construct validity of posture as a measure of physical function in elderly individuals: Use of a digitalized inclinometer to assess trunk inclination.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Hisashi; Kojima, Motonaga; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Yoshida, Hideyo; Hirano, Hirohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Ihara, Kazushige; Obuchi, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    The first aim of the present study was to determine the construct validity of evaluating posture as a measure of physical function in elderly individuals. The second aim was to determine reference values for sternum inclination in elderly individuals when measured using a digitalized inclinometer. We included 834 community-dwelling elderly individuals (350 men and 484 women) in this study. We used a digital inclinometer for measuring sternum inclination angle. We evaluated physical functions, including muscle strength, static balance, gait ability and the functional mobility of our study participants. To assess the construct validity of sternum inclination in elderly people, Pearson's correlation coefficient between sternum inclination and participant characteristics was calculated. To determine a reference value of sternum inclination by age, P for trend was calculated. In men, the sternum inclination angle and sternum inclination index were significantly associated with all anthropometric measures, except static balance. In women, the sternum inclination index was significantly associated with all measures, whereas the sternum inclination angle was associated with all measures except for balance and the Timed Up and Go test. Trend of sternum inclination index by age was significant. Our results show that the sternum inclination as a measure of physical function in elderly men and women has construct validity. We determined reference values for sternum inclination of which trend by age was considered. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 1068-1073. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Utilizing CAD/CAM to Measure Total Occlusal Convergence of Preclinical Dental Students' Crown Preparations.

    PubMed

    Mays, Keith A; Crisp, H Alex; Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, faculty assessment of preclinical crown preparations occurs by visualizing preparation features. However, contemporary CAD/CAM tools have the ability to more precisely evaluate preparation features, which is beneficial for psychomotor development. Taper is one of the most challenging features to objectively assess. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to validate the software's ability to distinguish differences in taper, and second, to compare traditional faculty assessment with digital assessment of taper. In the study, 30 all-metal crown preparations were created on typodont teeth with varying degrees of axial reduction and placed into three groups based on amount of taper (minimum, moderate, or excessive). Each tooth was scanned with the D4D scanner, and the taper was analyzed using E4D Compare. A second experiment used 50 crown preparations of tooth #19, which were done as a formative exercise. A comparison faculty assessment with CAD/CAM assessments of taper was performed. The results showed that when the taper was varied, E4D Compare was able to distinguish those differences; the Tukey post-hoc test revealed a significant difference (p=0.001). The qualitative analysis comparing faculty grading to CAD/CAM grading demonstrated a trend for CAD/CAM to be more precise. These results suggest that E4D Compare is an effective means of quantitatively measuring the amount of total occlusal convergence or taper on a crown preparation and that digital assessment may be more precise than faculty visual grading.

  20. Measurement of Interfacial Profiles of Wavy Film Flow on Inclined Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, N.; Amagai, K.

    2016-02-01

    Falling liquid films on inclined wall present in many industrial processes such as in food processing, seawater desalination and electronic devices manufacturing industries. In order to ensure an optimal efficiency of the operation in these industries, a fundamental study on the interfacial flow profiles of the liquid film is of great importance. However, it is generally difficult to experimentally predict the interfacial profiles of liquid film flow on inclined wall due to the instable wavy flow that usually formed on the liquid film surface. In this paper, the liquid film surface velocity was measured by using a non-intrusive technique called as photochromic dye marking method. This technique utilizes the color change of liquid containing the photochromic dye when exposed to the UV light source. The movement of liquid film surface marked by the UV light was analyzed together with the wave passing over the liquid. As a result, the liquid film surface was found to slightly shrink its gradual movement when approached by the wave before gradually move again after the intersection with the wave.

  1. Stratified shear flow in an inclined duct: near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Jamie; Lefauve, Adrien; Dalziel, Stuart; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a new experimental setup to study the exchange flow in an inclined square duct between two reservoirs containing fluids of different densities. This system can exhibit stratified shear wave motions, and has a distinct parameter threshold above which turbulence is triggered and progressively fills a larger fraction of the duct. To probe these intrinsically 3D flows, we introduce a new setup in which a traversing laser sheet allows us to obtain near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density fields. Three components of velocity are measured on successive 2D planes using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) with density information obtained simultaneously using laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled "Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence".

  2. Quality of first-trimester measurement of crown-rump length.

    PubMed

    Dhombres, Ferdinand; Khoshnood, Babak; Bessis, Roger; Fries, Nicolas; Senat, Marie-Victoire; Jouannic, Jean-Marie

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of crown-rump length (CRL) measurements in scans judged to be of high quality for the measurement of the nuchal translucency. We analyzed prospective data on 68,250 scans by 1913 sonographers that were collected by the French College of Fetal Echography (CFEF) national practice assessment program for the first-trimester scan. The scans were evaluated according to the CFEF image scoring method (CFEF-ISM), which includes items to measure the quality of the scan for both nuchal translucency and the CRL measurements. The scans were classified into 4 quality groups with the use of the full CFEF-ISM score and then a shortened version of the CFEF-ISM that excluded the item on quality of CRL measurement. The proportion of scans with an inaccurate CRL measurement was compared across the different quality groups. Overall, 21.67% of scans were of insufficient quality for CRL measurement. Among 23,764 "excellent" scans according to the full CFEF-ISM, 965 scans (4.06%) had insufficient CRL quality vs 9.24% of scans with "excellent" quality on the short CFEF-ISM (relative risk, 2.27; 95% confidence interval, 2.11-2.44; P < .001). High scores of the quality of nuchal translucency measurement do not guarantee accurate measurement of crown-rump length. Specific measures are needed to evaluate and to improve the quality of the measurement of crown-lump length. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Digital holography on moving objects: multiwavelength height measurements on inclined surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Annelie; Beckmann, Tobias; Fratz, Markus; Belzer, Dominik; Bertz, Alexander; Carl, Daniel; Buse, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    Multiwavelength digital holography on moving objects enables fast and precise inline-measurements of surface pro files. Due to the use of multiple wavelengths, optically rough surfaces with structure heights in the micrometer range can be mapped unambiguously. In this work we explore the influence of the object velocity on height measurements on inclined surfaces. We show measurements using spatial-phase-shifting holography employing two wavelengths and object velocities of up to 90 mm/s with eye-safe cw-lasers with less than 1 mW of laser light. Despite motion blur exceeding the mean speckle size, reliable height measurements can be conducted at these velocities. The height map of a metal cone with two different slope angles (1° , 10° ) is measured at an exposure time of 2 ms. Using line shaped illumination, each frame yields a height map of approximately 2 x 17 mm2. The overlap between the frames allows averaging as the image is put together, improving data quality. The mean repeatability of the height information in the investigated setup is better than 4.5 µm at a synthetic wavelength of 214 µm.

  4. Shear-Sensitive Liquid Crystal Coating Method: Surface-Inclination Effects on Shear Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating (SSLCC) method is an image-based technique for both visualizing dynamic surface-flow phenomena, such as transition and separation, and for measuring the continuous shear-stress vector distribution acting on an aerodynamic surface. Under proper lighting and viewing conditions (discussed below), the coating changes color in response to an applied aerodynamic shear. This color-change response is continuous and reversible, with a response time of milliseconds, and is a function of both the shear magnitude and the shear vector orientation relative to the observer. The liquid crystal phase of matter is a weakly-ordered, viscous, non-Newtonian fluid state that exists between the nonuniform liquid phase and the ordered solid phase of certain organic compounds. Cholesteric liquid crystal compounds possess a helical molecular arrangement that selectively scatters white light, incident along the helical axis, as a three-dimensional spectrum. This property is linked to the helical pitch length, which is within the range of wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The pitch length, and hence the wavelength of the scattered light, is influenced by shear stress normal to the helical axis. This unique optical property produces a measurable color change in response to an applied shearing force. The full-surface shear stress vector measurement method, developed at NASA-Ames, is schematically illustrated. As with the visualization method, the coated test surface is illuminated from the normal direction with white light and the camera is positioned at an above-plane view angle of approximately 30 deg. Experiments have been initiated at NASA Ames to begin the process of quantifying surface-inclination (surface-curvature) effects on shear vector measurement accuracy. In preliminary experiments, surface-inclination angles theta(sub x), theta(sub y) of 0, +/-5, +/-10, and +/-15 deg were employed. In this arrangement, white-light illumination was

  5. Turbulence Measurements of a High Reynolds Number Inclined Jet in Crossflow using PIV and FRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aga, Vipluv; Feliciani, Claudio; Chokani, Ndaona; Abhari, Reza

    2007-11-01

    The TKE, turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stress for a jet inclined at 30^o to the freestream with a blowing ratio of 2 and Reynolds numbers, based on hole diameter, (Red) of 30000 are measured using 3-D Stereoscopic PIV and a miniature Fast Response Aerodynamic Probe (FRAP). The Maximum Entropy Method is used to compose a spectrum for variance calculations from PIV data, thereby ameliorating the low sampling rate and systematic noise. The PIV measurements are compared with those from the FRAP and found to be within error estimates. TKE contours indicate that the two main sites of turbulence production are the counter rotating vortex pair and the shearing surface of the jet. It is observed that the turbulence within the vortex pair is higher and dissipates slower than that in the jet shear surface. The eddy diffusivities of momentum in different cardinal directions are also compared and found to have an anistropic distribution. The mechanisms of turbulent mixing in this complex flow and their relevance to turbulence modeling are commented upon.

  6. Distinguishable circumferential inclined direction tilt sensor based on fiber Bragg grating with wide measuring range and high accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanchao; Wang, Jing; Sui, Qingmei

    2015-11-01

    One novel distinguishable circumferential inclined direction tilt sensor is demonstrated by incorporating two strain sensitivity fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with two orthogonal triangular cantilever beam and using one fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as temperature compensation element. According to spatial vector and space geometry, theory calculation model of the proposed FBG tilt sensor which can be used to obtain the azimuth and tile angle of the inclined direction is established. To obtain its measuring characteristics, calibration experiment on one prototype of the proposed FBG tilt sensor is carried out. After temperature sensitivity experiment data analysis, the proposed FBG tilt sensor exhibits excellent temperature compensation characteristics. In 2-D tilt angle experiment, tilt measurement sensitivities of these two strain sensitivity FBGs are 140.85°/nm and 101.01°/nm over a wide range of 60º. Further, azimuth and tile angle of the inclined direction can be obtained by the proposed FBG tilt sensor which is verified in circumferential angle experiment. Experiment data show that relative errors of azimuth are 0.55% (positive direction) and 1.14% (negative direction), respectively, and relative errors of tilt angle are all less than 3%. Experiment results confirm that the proposed distinguishable circumferential inclined direction tilt sensor based on FBG can achieve azimuth and tile angle measurement with wide measuring range and high accuracy.

  7. The effect of model inclination during fabrication on mouthguard calliper-measured and CT scan-assessed thickness.

    PubMed

    Farrington, Timothy; Coward, Trevor; Onambele-Pearson, Gladys; Taylor, Rebecca L; Earl, Philip; Winwood, Keith

    2016-06-01

    Excessive material thinning has been observed in the production of custom-made mouthguards in a number of studies, due to production anomalies that may lead to such thinning. This study investigated thinning material patterns of custom-made mouthguards when the anterior angulation of dental model was increased during the thermoforming process. A total of 60 samples of mouthguard blanks were thermoformed on identical maxillary models under four anterior inclination conditions (n = 4 × 15): control 0, 15, 30 and 45°. Each mouthguard sample was measured, using an electronic calliper gauge at three anatomical points (anterior labial sulcus, posterior occlusion and posterior lingual). Mouthguards were then CT scanned to give a visual representation of the surface thickness. Data showed a significant difference (P < 0.005) in the anterior mouthguard thickness between the four levels of anterior inclination, with the 45° inclination producing the thickest mouthguards, increasing the mean anterior thickness by 75% (2.8 mm, SD: 0.16) from the model on a flat plane (1.6 mm, SD: 0.34). Anterior model inclination of 30 and 45° inclinations increased consistencies between the thickest and thinnest mouthguards in the anterior region of these sample groups. This study highlights the importance of standardizing the thermoforming process, as this has a significant effect on the quality and material distribution of the resultant product. In particular, greater model inclination is advised as this optimizes the thickness of the anterior sulcus of the mouthguard which may be more prominently at risk from sport-related impact. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... off when the child loses the baby tooth. Metal crowns: Hold up to chewing and teeth grinding ... porcelain crowns: Wear down opposing teeth more than metal crowns Match the color of other teeth May ...

  9. Root type matters: measurements of water uptake by seminal, crown and lateral roots of maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Roots play a key role in water acquisition and are a significant component of plant adaptation to different environmental conditions. Although maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and types in extracting water from soils. Aim of this study was to investigate the location of root water uptake in mature maize. We used neutron radiography to image the spatial distribution of maize roots and trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maize plants were grown in aluminum containers filled with a sandy soil that was kept homogeneously wet throughout the experiment. When the plants were five weeks-old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions. The transport of D2O was simulated using a diffusion-convection numerical model. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusion coefficient and the water uptake of the different root segments. The model was initially developed and tested with two weeks-old maize (Ahmed et. al. 2015), for which we found that water was mainly taken up by lateral roots and the water uptake of the seminal roots was negligible. Here, we used this method to measure root water uptake in a mature maize root system. The root architecture of five weeks-old maize consisted of primary and seminal roots with long laterals and crown (nodal) roots that emerged from the above ground part of the plant two weeks after planting. The crown roots were thicker than the seminal roots and had fewer and shorter laterals. Surprisingly, we found that the water was mainly taken up by the crown roots and their laterals, while the lateral roots of seminal roots, which were the main location of water uptake of younger plants, stopped to take up water. Interestingly, we also found that in contrast to the seminal roots, the crown roots were able to take up water also from their distal segments. We conclude that for the two weeks

  10. A Comparison of Casual In-Clinic Blood Pressure Measurements to Standardized Guideline-Concordant Measurements in Severely Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Vahidy, Sana; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Padwal, Raj S.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare casual BP taken in a bariatric clinic to standardized guideline-concordant BP. Subjects/Methods. A cross sectional analysis was performed using baseline data from a weight management trial. Patients were recruited from a Canadian bariatric care program. Standardized BP was performed using a Watch BP oscillometric device. Casual in-clinic BP single readings, taken using a Welch Allyn oscillometric device, were chart-abstracted. Paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots, and Pearson's correlations were used for analysis. Results. Data from 134 patients were analyzed. Mean age was 41.5 ± 8.9 y, mean BMI was 46.8 ± 6.5 kg/m2, and 40 (30%) had prior hypertension. Mean casual in-clinic BP was 128.8 ± 14.1/81.6 ± 9.9 mmHg and mean standardized BP was 133.2 ± 15.0/82.0 ± 10.3 mmHg (difference of −4.3 ± 12.0 for systolic (p < 0.0001) and −0.4 ± 10.0 mmHg for diastolic BP (p = 0.6)). Pearson's coefficients were 0.66 (p < 0.0001) for SBP and 0.50 (p < 0.0001) for DBP. 28.4% of casual versus 26.9% of standardized measurements were ≥140/90 mmHg (p < 0.0001). Conclusion. In this bariatric clinic, casual BP was unexpectedly lower than standardized BP. This could potentially lead to the underdiagnosis of hypertension. PMID:26294966

  11. Difficulties in applying laser technique to measure drop sizes in vertical and inclined Annular gas-liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Sohail H.

    1996-11-01

    Annular two phase flow is one of the most common regimes of gas/liquid flow found in industrial equipment. In this regime, the liquid flows in part as a film on the channel walls while the rest of the liquid is carried as drops by the gas flowing in the center of the channel. Detailed knowledge of the liquid drops particularly their sizes and velocities is essential in processes involving heat and mass transfer. This information is of great importance for the oil industry where inclined drilling has recently become a common practice. The effect of inclination on the drop sizes is still unknown and requires further investigation. Laser diffraction is one of the few available techniques which is widely used for the measurement of droplet size distribution. Although the technique is simple to use, it is not free from problems. This paper highlights the practical difficulties encountered when the technique was used to measure the drop size distribution in an inclinable flow column. The laser system was mounted on the rig and the flow column was rotated from vertical to horizontal position. Liquid drops appearing on the optical windows prohibited laser measurements. Other problems included the glass reflections and vibration when the rig was in operation. In this paper some practical suggestions have been made to overcome these problems and some useful results have been included.

  12. Inclination distributions and size measurements of hemlock and red spruce needles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel S.; Smith, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Needle inclination angle distributions were plotted for 5 and 10 deg intervals for two hemlock trees and one red spruce. The distributions for the hemlock and spruce were similar, with the peak normal angle occurring between 10 and 20 deg. These distributions are between two theoretical (planophile and spherical) leaf angle distributions. The results can be used as an input to radiative transfer models that require a distribution of the orientation of the scattering elements of the canopy.

  13. Test of the Angle Detecting Inclined Sensor (ADIS) Technique for Measuring Space Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; McLaughlin, K. R.

    2008-12-01

    In February 2008 we exposed an Angle Detecting Inclined Sensor (ADIS) prototype to beams of 150 MeV/u 78Kr and fragments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's (NSCL) Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF). ADIS is a highly innovative and uniquely simple detector configuration used to determine the angles of incidence of heavy ions in energetic charged particle instruments. Corrections for angle of incidence are required for good charge and mass separation. An ADIS instrument is under development to fly on the GOES-R series of weather satellites. The prototype tested consisted of three ADIS detectors, two of which were inclined at an angle to the telescope axis, forming the initial detectors in a five-detector telescope stack. By comparing the signals from the ADIS detectors, the angle of incidence may be determined and a pathlength correction applied to charge and mass determinations. Thus, ADIS replaces complex position sensing detectors with a system of simple, reliable and robust Si detectors. Accelerator data were taken at multiple angles to both primary and secondary beams with a spread of energies. This test instrument represents an improvement over the previous ADIS prototype in that it used oval inclined detectors and a much lower-mass support structure, thus reducing the number of events passing through dead material. We will present the results of this test. The ADIS instrument development project was partially funded by NASA under the Living With a Star (LWS) Targeted Research and Technology program (grant NAG5-12493).

  14. Inclined cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, N.; Hambleton, W. T.; Marusic, Ivan

    2005-10-01

    This work can be viewed as a reprise of Head & Bandyopadhyay's (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 107, p. 297) original boundary-layer visualization study although in this instance we make use of stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV), techniques to obtain a quantitative view of the turbulent structure. By arranging the laser light-sheet and image plane of a stereo PIV system in inclined spanwise/wall-normal planes (inclined at both 45(°) and 135(°) to the streamwise axis) a unique quantitative view of the turbulent boundary layer is obtained. Experiments are repeated across a range of Reynolds numbers, Re_{tau} {≈} 690-2800. Despite numerous experimental challenges (due to the large out-of-plane velocity components), mean flow and Reynolds stress profiles indicate that the salient features of the turbulent flow have been well resolved. The data are analysed with specific attention to a proposed hairpin eddy model. In-plane two-dimensional swirl is used to identify vortical eddy structures piercing the inclined planes. The vast majority of this activity occurs in the 135(°) plane, indicating an inclined eddy structure, and Biot-Savart law calculations are carried out to aid in the discussion. Conditional averaging and linear stochastic estimation results also support the presence of inclined eddies, arranged about low-speed regions. In the 135(°) plane, instantaneous swirl patterns exhibit a predisposition for counter-rotating vortex pairs (arranged with an ejection at their confluence). Such arrangements are consistent with the hairpin packet model. Correlation and scaling results show outer-scaling to be the correct way to quantify the characteristic spanwise length scale across the log and wake regions of the boundary layers (for the range of Reynolds numbers tested). A closer investigation of two-point velocity correlation contours indicates the occurrence of a distinct two-regime behaviour, in which contours (and hence streamwise velocity fluctuations) either appear

  15. Test of the Angle Detecting Inclined Sensor (ADIS) Technique for Measuring Space Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; McLaughlin, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    In February 2008 we exposed an Angle Detecting Inclined Sensor (ADIS) prototype to beams of 150 MeV/u 78Kr and fragments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's (NSCL) Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF). ADIS is a highly innovative and uniquely simple detector configuration used to determine the angles of incidence of heavy ions in energetic charged particle instruments. Corrections for angle of incidence are required for good charge and mass separation. An ADIS instrument is under development to fly on the GOES-R series of weather satellites. The prototype tested consisted of three ADIS detectors, two of which were inclined at an angle to the telescope axis, forming the initial detectors in a five-detector telescope stack. By comparing the signals from the ADIS detectors, the angle of incidence may be determined and a pathlength correction applied to charge and mass determinations. Thus, ADIS replaces complex position sensing detectors with a system of simple, reliable and robust Si detectors. Accelerator data were taken at multiple angles to both primary and secondary beams with a spread of energies. This test instrument represents an improvement over the previous ADIS prototype in that it used oval inclined detectors and a much lower-mass support structure, thus reducing the number of events passing through dead material. These data show a charge peak resolution of 0.18 ± 0.01 e at Br (Z = 35), excellent for such a simple instrument. We will present the results of this test. The ADIS instrument development project was partially funded by NASA under the Living With a Star (LWS) Targeted Research and Technology program (grant NAG5-12493).

  16. A High-Precision, Optical Polarimeter to Measure Inclinations of High Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Matthews, K.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2007-12-01

    While most astrophysical objects require many parameters in order to be fully described, black holes are unique in that only three parameters are required: mass, spin, and charge. Of these, mass and spin are enough to describe the black hole's gravitational field and event horizon location. Therefore, theory and observation may jointly pursue one or two quantities to uncover the progenitor star's history. Constraints on black hole mass exist for high mass X-ray binaries, such as Cygnus X-1, which is thought to consist of a 40 ± 10 solar mass O9.7Iab star and a 13.5-29 solar mass black hole (Ziolkowski 2005). While the constraints on the mass of the compact object are tight enough to declare that it is a black hole, they are sufficiently loose as to prohibit precise modeling of the progenitor star's mass. We have built an optical polarimeter for the Hale 5-m telescope at Mt. Palomar to provide an independent method for determining black hole mass. Degree of polarization will vary for an edge-on system, while position angle of net polarization will vary for a face-on system. Therefore, by monitoring the linear polarimetric variability of the binary, inclination can be estimated. Coupled with the known mass function of the binary from radial velocity work (Gies et al. 2003), inclination estimates constrain the mass of the black hole. Our polarimeter, POLISH (POLarimeter for Inclination Studies of High mass x-ray binaries), has achieved linear polarimetric precision of less than 10 parts per million on bright, unpolarized standard stars. We will also present results for polarized standard stars and Cygnus X-1 itself. This instrument has been funded by an endowment from the Moore Foundation.

  17. Ground-based remote sensing with long lens video camera for upper-stem diameter and other tree crown measurements

    Treesearch

    Neil A. Clark; Sang-Mook Lee

    2004-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how a digital video camera with a long lens can be used with pulse laser ranging in order to collect very large-scale tree crown measurements. The long focal length of the camera lens provides the magnification required for precise viewing of distant points with the trade-off of spatial coverage. Multiple video frames are mosaicked into a single...

  18. The Angle Detecting Inclined Sensors (ADIS) System: Measuring Particle Angles of Incidence without Position Sensing Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; McKibben, R. B.

    2001-08-01

    We report on a novel system, the Angle Detecting Inclined Sensors (ADIS), for determining the angles of incidence of Solar energetic particles, Galactic cosmic rays and anomalous cosmic rays. This system would be especially applicable to compact high resolution energetic particle telescopes. The response of charged particle detectors varies with particle pathlength, which depends on angle of incidence. Achieving good elemental and isotopic resolution requires correcting for this effect. ADIS consists of three detectors, two of which are inclined at an angle to the telescope axis, forming the first detectors in a multi-element telescope. By comparing the signals from the ADIS detectors, and using the computable angle dependent pathlengths through the detectors, the angle of incidence may be determined. The ADIS system thus can replace hodoscopes using conventional position sensing detectors (PSD's). PSD's add significant complexity and require additional electronics, increasing instrument mass, power usage and, in many cases, telemetry requirements. We derive simple equations for the incident particle charge and trajectory. These calculations are well within the capabilities of even the slowest on-board processors. We present Monte-Carlo modeling of such an instrument to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  19. The angle detecting inclined sensor (ADIS) system: Measuring particle angles of incidence without position sensing detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; McKibben, R. B.

    2003-04-01

    We report on a novel system, the Angle Detecting Inclined Sensors (ADIS), for determining the angles of incidence of Solar energetic particles, Galactic cosmic rays and anomalous cosmic rays. This system would be especially applicable to compact, high-resolution energetic particle telescopes. The response of a charged particle detector to incident particles varies with particle's pathlength, which depends upon its angle of incidence to the detector. Achieving good elemental and isotopic resolution requires correcting for this effect. ADIS consists of three detectors, two of which are inclined at an angle to the telescope axis, forming the first detectors in a multi-element telescope. By comparing the signals from the ADIS detectors, the angle of incidence may be determined. Thus the ADIS system can replace hodoscopes using conventional position sensing detectors (PSD's). PSD's add significant complexity and require additional electronics, increasing instrument mass, power usage and, in many cases, telemetry requirements. Using our ADIS system, we derive simple equations for the incident particle charge and trajectory. These calculations are well within the capabilities of even the slowest on-board processor. We present Monte-Carlo modeling of such an instrument to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  20. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  1. Evaporation of inclined water droplets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-16

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  2. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  3. Investigation of the reproducibility and reliability of sagittal vertebral inclination measurements from MR images of the spine.

    PubMed

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2014-10-01

    In this study, sagittal vertebral inclination (SVI) was systematically evaluated for 28 vertebrae (segments between T4 and L5) in magnetic resonance (MR) images of one normal and one scoliotic subject to compare the performance of manual and computerized measurements, and identify the most reproducible and reliable measurements. Manual measurements were performed by three observers, who identified on two occasions the distinctive anatomical landmarks required to evaluate SVI by six measurement methods, i.e. the superior tangents, inferior tangents, anterior tangents, posterior tangents, mid-endplate lines and mid-wall lines. Computerized measurements were performed by automatically evaluating SVI from the symmetry of vertebral anatomical structures in two-dimensional (2D) sagittal cross-sections and in three-dimensional (3D) volumetric images. The mid-wall lines and posterior tangents proved to be the manual measurements with the lowest intra-observer (standard deviation, SD, of 1.4° and 1.7°, respectively) and inter-observer variability (SD of 1.9° and 2.4°, respectively). The strongest inter-method agreement was found between the mid-wall lines and posterior tangents (SD of 2.0°). Computerized measurements in 2D and in 3D resulted in intra-observer (SD of 2.8° and 3.1°, respectively) and inter-observer variability (SD of 3.8° and 5.2°, respectively) that were comparable to those of the superior tangents (SD of 2.6° and 3.7°) and inferior tangents (SD of 3.2° and 4.5°), which represent standard Cobb angle measurements. It can be concluded that computerized measurements of SVI should be based on the inclination of vertebral body walls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of the arithmetic and geometric means in estimating crown diameter and crown cross-sectional area

    Treesearch

    KaDonna Randolph

    2010-01-01

    The use of the geometric and arithmetic means for estimating tree crown diameter and crown cross-sectional area were examined for trees with crown width measurements taken at the widest point of the crown and perpendicular to the widest point of the crown. The average difference between the geometric and arithmetic mean crown diameters was less than 0.2 ft in absolute...

  5. Ductile cutting of silicon microstructures with surface inclination measurement and compensation by using a force sensor integrated single point diamond tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Cai, Yindi; Shimizu, Yuki; Ito, So; Gao, Wei; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a measurement and compensation method of surface inclination for ductile cutting of silicon microstructures by using a diamond tool with a force sensor based on a four-axis ultra-precision lathe. The X- and Y-directional inclinations of a single crystal silicon workpiece with respect to the X- and Y-motion axes of the lathe slides were measured respectively by employing the diamond tool as a touch-trigger probe, in which the tool-workpiece contact is sensitively detected by monitoring the force sensor output. Based on the measurement results, fabrication of silicon microstructures can be thus carried out directly along the tilted silicon workpiece by compensating the cutting motion axis to be parallel to the silicon surface without time-consuming pre-adjustment of the surface inclination or turning of a flat surface. A diamond tool with a negative rake angle was used in the experiment for superior ductile cutting performance. The measurement precision by using the diamond tool as a touch-trigger probe was investigated. Experiments of surface inclination measurement and ultra-precision ductile cutting of a micro-pillar array and a micro-pyramid array with inclination compensation were carried out respectively to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  6. Crown Gall

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crown gall disease occurs on diverse dicotyledonous and gymnospermous plant species worldwide. Reports of crown gall on hop date back to at least 1929, and the disease has been reported from most countries where hop is or has been grown commercially. The epidemiology of the causal bacterium, Agrob...

  7. Lidar-based measurement of surface roughness features of single tree crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolditz, Melanie; Krahwinkler, Petra M.; Roßmann, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    In remote sensing data, trees have a low interspecies variability and show a high variability within the tree species. Therefore, specific features that distinguish between unique properties of two tree species are required for a single tree based genera classification. To improve classification results, the suitability of seven surface roughness features, calculated on single tree crown regions, is studied. The algorithms developed to provide roughness parameters can be validated and prototyped in a Virtual Forest testbed. The features are extracted from a normalized digital surface model with a resolution of 0.4m per pixel. Within the test area of 340km2 more than 4000 single trees of eleven different species and additionally 200 buildings are available as reference data. Technical standards define several parameters to describe surface properties. These roughness features are evaluated in the context of single tree crowns. All of these features are based on the deviation of the height values of the tree crown to its mean height. As an additional feature the relationship between the crown's surface area and its occupied ground area is used. The evaluation results of these features regarding the discrimination of tree species on different levels - eleven single tree species, seven tree classes, deciduous and coniferous - and also towards discrimination of trees from buildings will be presented.

  8. A multifibre optic sensor to measure the liquid film thickness between a moving bubble and an inclined solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, A.; Kiss, L. I.; Verreault, R.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a multifibre optic sensor is developed to measure the thickness of the liquid film located between a moving bubble and an inclined surface. The sensor takes into account the presence of a second interface independently of its distance from the solid surface. In the first part of the paper, a mathematical model is developed to simulate the behaviour of several configurations of the fibre optic sensor in order to determine the best configuration of the sensor. In the second part, the calibration setup is presented and described in detail. In the last part of the paper, the method is validated. The results showed that the applicability range of the sensor is from 125 µm to 1400 µm. In the operating range, the accuracy of the sensor is around 5%.

  9. Measurement of ulnar variance and radial inclination on X-rays of healed distal radius fractures. With the axis of the distal radius or ulna?

    PubMed

    Thuysbaert, Gilles; Ringburg, Akkie; Petronilia, Steven; Vanden Berghe, Alex; Hollevoet, Nadine

    2015-06-01

    Ulnar variance and radial inclination are radiological parameters frequently used to evaluate displacement of distal radius fractures. In most studies measurements are based on the long central axis of the distal radius, although the axis of the distal ulna can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine which axis is more reliable. Four observers performed measurements on standard anteroposterior digital wrist X-rays of 20 patients taken 1 and 2 months after sustaining an extra-articular distal radius fracture. Intraobserver reliability was similar with both methods. No difference was found in interobserver reliability between both methods for ulnar variance, but for radial inclination it was better with the axis through the radius. Measurements on two X-rays of the same wrist taken at a different moment were similar with both methods. It can be concluded that the central axis of the distal radius can remain the basis to determine ulnar variance and radial inclination.

  10. Crown discoloration induced by endodontic sealers: spectrophotometric measurement of Commission International de I'Eclairage's L*, a*, b* chromatic parameters.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, K; Beltes, P; Lambrianidis, T; Kapagiannidis, D; Karagiannis, V

    2013-01-01

    Despite the improvement of endodontic materials, crown discoloration induced by root canal sealers remains a concerning clinical issue. The aim of this study is the measurement of the alterations in CIE L*, a*, b* chromatic parameters of tooth crowns after placement of commonly used and new-generation endodontic sealers in pulp chambers. Eighty intact, fully developed third mandibular molars were randomly assigned in five groups. Crowns were cross-sectioned from the root complex 1 mm below the cement-enamel junction. The internal axial walls of the pulp chambers were debrided and coated with endodontic sealers (Roth-811, AH-26, Guttaflow, Epiphany SE). The apical access was sealed with glass-ionomer cement. The control group was only debrided. Crowns were stored in individually marked vials in standard conditions (100% humidity, 37°C). The spectral reflectance lines were recorded with a UV-Vis spectrophotometer in the visual spectrum. The CIE L*a*b* parameters were obtained by a linked computer software before sealer placement (baseline), after one week, one, three, and six months, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed with two-way mixed ANOVA models. The level of statistical significance was set at p<0.05. With the exception of the control group, experimental groups presented varying chromatic alterations. Among all experimental groups, Roth-811 sealer induced the most severe alterations in CIE L*, a*, b* chromatic parameters, during all observation periods. After root canal obturation, the clinician should be aware of the presence of remaining root canal filling materials. Thorough debridement of the pulp chamber is essential for the prevention of sealer-induced discoloration.

  11. A technique to determine a desired preparation axial inclination.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Harry; Ivanhoe, John R; Blalock, John S; Frazier, Kevin B; Plummer, Kevin D

    2003-10-01

    The guidelines recommended in the literature for the convergence angle of a crown preparation vary from 3 to 24 degrees. There is a lack of guidelines on techniques to achieve a specific axial inclination. The purpose of this article was to present a practical technique, with a diamond rotary cutting instrument of known axial inclination, to determine the diamond rotary cutting instrument angulations required to achieve the desired axial inclination of a preparation.

  12. Modeling Caribbean tree stem diameters from tree height and crown width measurements

    Treesearch

    Thomas Brandeis; KaDonna Randolph; Mike Strub

    2009-01-01

    Regression models to predict diameter at breast height (DBH) as a function of tree height and maximum crown radius were developed for Caribbean forests based on data collected by the U.S. Forest Service in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and Territory of the U.S. Virgin Islands. The model predicting DBH from tree height fit reasonably well (R2 = 0.7110), with...

  13. Equations to convert compacted crown ratio to uncompacted crown ratio for trees in the Interior West

    Treesearch

    Chris Toney; Matthew C. Reeves

    2009-01-01

    Crown ratio is the proportion of total tree length supporting live foliage. Inventory programs of the US Forest Service generally define crown ratio in terms of compacted or uncompacted measurements. Measurement of compacted crown ratio (CCR) involves envisioning the transfer of lower branches of trees with asymmetric crowns to fill holes in the upper portion of the...

  14. Analysis of the dental morphology of Plio-pleistocene hominids. I. Mandibular molars: crown area measurements and morphological traits.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B A; Abbott, S A

    1983-01-01

    This study has used accurate measurements of crown area and precise assessments of the morphological traits of mandibular molars in an attempt to define the metrical and morphological characteristics of early hominid taxa. A total of 196 Plio-Pleistocene hominid molars were either allocated to one of six informal taxonomic groups or considered as individual cases. Accurate measurements of crown base area made from occlusal photographs have enabled us to estimate the effects of interproximal wear on crown areas. The average correction factor over the three molar types is around 2-4% with a maximum of 6%. The patterns of distribution of extra cusps show interesting differences between taxa. None of the M-1S in the two groups of 'gracile' hominids from East and South Africa bears a C6, but it is common in the two 'robust' taxa. The distribution of a C7 is the reverse of this, it being rare in the robust' taxa, and more common in the 'gracile' groups. There is thus no simple relationship between cusp number and tooth size. Our observations on the protostylid suggest that though it is more common in the 'robust' australopithecines than the 'graciles', when it does occur it is more strongly expressed in the 'gracile' group. The combination of simple metrical data, and the assessment of morphological traits, can help in the classification of enigmatic or incomplete specimens. Some isolated teeth from the collection at Koobi Fora can confidently be assigned to Australopithecus boisei, and useful guides have been provided for taxonomic assessment of the skull KNM-ER 1805, and the mandibles KNM-ER 1506 and 1820. PMID:6403498

  15. A novel device for the rapid in-clinic measurement of haemoglobin A1c.

    PubMed

    Pope, R M; Apps, J M; Page, M D; Allen, K; Bodansky, H J

    1993-04-01

    In order to evaluate a novel technique for measuring haemoglobin A1c using a cassette-based immunoassay method we have undertaken a laboratory evaluation using 48 patient samples and a separate within-clinic prospective study of 59 diabetic patients. Individuals were recruited from general (48 patients), paediatric (19 patients), obstetric (24 patients), and general practice (15 patients) diabetic clinics. Agreement was evaluated between HbA1c results obtained using the new method (AMES DCA 2000) and an established laboratory assay (DIAMAT HPLC system). The mean differences between the two results (AMES DCA 2000-DIAMAT) (95% confidence intervals) were: laboratory -0.69% (-1.42 to 0.04%); paediatric clinic -0.93% (-1.93 to 0.07%); obstetric clinic -0.29% (-1.09 to 0.51%), and general practice clinic -0.77% (-1.3 to -0.24%). For the AMES DCA 2000, the coefficient of variation for HbA1c of 5.2% was 1.6% and for HbA1c of 13%, 2.4%. This instrument was used without difficulty by four different operators. Intra-assay coefficient of variation for each operator was < 3.4%. In 9/18 patients where a specific assessment of clinical utility was made, knowledge of the HbA1c result at the time of consultation lead to a change in treatment. Methodology of this type may be used successfully within a diabetic clinic setting in both primary care and hospital environments.

  16. Tree crown conditions in Missouri, 2000-2003

    Treesearch

    KaDonna C. Randolph; W. Keith Moser

    2009-01-01

    The Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program uses visual assessments of tree crown condition to monitor changes and trends in forest health. This report describes three FIA tree crown condition indicators (crown dieback, crown density, and foliage transparency) and sapling crown vigor measured in Missouri between 2000...

  17. Quantitative Comparison of Mathematical Models to Measure Surface Area of Canine Teeth Prepared to Receive Full Veneer Crowns in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Collins, Caitlyn J; Hetzel, Scott Joseph; Siverling, Sarah; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn; Soukup, Jason W

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed in order to determine if mathematical modeling of the canine teeth in dogs could be utilized to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of crown surface area that could be used in both a research and a clinical setting. Actual surface area (aSA) calculations for 32 stone dies of clinical crown preparations were acquired utilizing a tridimensional (3D) laser scanner and 3D computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software applications. These calculations were used as a control. Seventeen unique mathematical models from eight geometric shapes were used to calculate estimated surface area (eSA) of each stone die. Linear association and agreement between eSA and aSA calculations were assessed with multiple statistical methods. All methods of eSA showed a significant linear association with aSA. Five of the mathematical models [right elliptical frustum (H3), right elliptical cone (G3), right pyramidal cone (A3), right circular frustum (F2), and right circular cone (E1)] were superior to the other 12 models. The H3 mathematical model based on the right elliptical frustum provided the most accurate estimate of crown surface area of dog teeth. However, H3 requires the use of laser scans and a 3D CAD software program. As a result, this model would be recommended for research applications. The E1 mathematical model was similar in accuracy to H3 and, given it requires only two measurements and a comparatively simple equation for calculation, this method would be recommended for clinical chair-side use.

  18. Crown wart

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crown wart has been found widely distributed in Australia, New Zealand, and European countries. It has been recorded sporadically in India (Punjab), South Africa, South America (Ecuador, Chile, Peru), Panama, Mexico, and Canada (British Columbia). In the United States, it has been found more frequ...

  19. Three-dimensional inclination of the dental axes in healthy permanent dentitions--A cross-sectional study in a normal population.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Colombo, A; Ciusa, V; Serrao, G

    2001-08-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) inclination of the facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) and the size of the clinical crowns were measured in 100 white northern Italians. The subjects consisted of 22 girls and 21 boys, ages 13-15 years (adolescents), and 31 women and 26 men, ages 16-26 years (adults), all with a complete permanent dentition and Class I dental relationships. The 3-D coordinates of dental landmarks were obtained with a computerized electromagnetic digitizer. Clinical crowns heights and FACC inclinations in the anatomical frontal and sagittal planes relative to 2 reference planes, maxillary and mandibular (between the incisive papilla and the intersection of the palatal/lingual sulci of the first permanent molars with the gingival margin), were calculated. Ages and sexes were compared by ANOVA. On average, the frontal plane FACCs of most teeth converged toward the midline plane of symmetry. In contrast, the incisors diverged from the midline plane or were nearly vertical. Within each quadrant, the inclinations of the postincisor teeth progressively increased. In the sagittal plane, most teeth had a nearly vertical FACC. FACC inclinations showed sex- and age-related differences (P < .05). In the frontal plane, the canines, premolars, and molars were more inclined in adolescents than in adults. In the sagittal plane, a large within-group variability was observed. Clinical crown height was significantly larger in males than in females in all maxillary and mandibular canines, premolars, second molars, maxillary central incisors, and first molars. With age, some degree of dental eruption was found in maxillary and mandibular canines, maxillary second premolars, and molars. The age-related decrease in FACC inclination may be the effect of a progressive buccal and mesial drift.

  20. Motor Performance Assessment in Parkinson’s Disease: Association between Objective In-Clinic, Objective In-Home, and Subjective/Semi-Objective Measures

    PubMed Central

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Mohler, Jane; Lei, Hong; Parvaneh, Saman; Sherman, Scott; Najafi, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Advances in wearable technology allow for the objective assessment of motor performance in both in-home and in-clinic environments and were used to explore motor impairments in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The aims of this study were to: 1) assess differences between in-clinic and in-home gait speed, and sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit duration in PD patients (in comparison with healthy controls); and 2) determine the objective physical activity measures, including gait, postural balance, instrumented Timed-up-and-go (iTUG), and in-home spontaneous physical activity (SPA), with the highest correlation with subjective/semi-objective measures, including health survey, fall history (fallers vs. non-fallers), fear of falling, pain, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and PD stage (Hoehn and Yahr). Objective assessments of motor performance were made by measuring physical activities in the same sample of PD patients (n = 15, Age: 71.2±6.3 years) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 35, Age: 71.9±3.8 years). The association between in-clinic and in-home parameters, and between objective parameters and subjective/semi-objective evaluations in the PD group was assessed using linear regression-analysis of variance models and reported as Pearson correlations (R). Both in-home SPA and in-clinic assessments demonstrated strong discriminatory power in detecting impaired motor function in PD. However, mean effect size (0.94±0.37) for in-home measures was smaller compared to in-clinic assessments (1.30±0.34) for parameters that were significantly different between PD and healthy groups. No significant correlation was observed between identical in-clinic and in-home parameters in the PD group (R = 0.10–0.25; p>0.40), while the healthy showed stronger correlation in gait speed, sit-to-stand duration, and stand-to-sit duration (R = 0.36–0.56; p<0.03). This suggests a better correlation between supervised and unsupervised motor function assessments in healthy controls

  1. All-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lehner, C R; Schärer, P

    1992-06-01

    Despite the good appearance and biocompatibility of dental porcelains, failures are still of considerable concern because of some limited properties common to all-ceramic crown systems. As in the years before, pertinent scientific articles published between November 1990 and December 1991 focused on strengthening mechanisms and compared fracture toughness for different ceramic systems by using various test methods. Some evaluated the clinical implications thereon for seating and loading crowns and measured wear against different ceramic surface conditions. Recently introduced with pleasing aesthetic qualities, IPS-Empress (Ivoclar, Schaan, Liechtenstein), a new European leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, has finally drawn attention in some journals and has been reviewed with promising in vitro test results. Using a simple press-molding technique, well-fitting crowns, inlays, and veneers can be fabricated without an additional ceramming procedure. Again, only long-term clinical trials will validate achievements compared with other all-ceramic systems and with well-established metal ceramics.

  2. A Dual Conductance Sensor for Simultaneous Measurement of Void Fraction and Structure Velocity of Downward Two-Phase Flow in a Slightly Inclined Pipe

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon-Gun; Won, Woo-Youn; Lee, Bo-An; Kim, Sin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new and improved electrical conductance sensor is proposed for application not only to a horizontal pipe, but also an inclined one. The conductance sensor was designed to have a dual layer, each consisting of a three-electrode set to obtain two instantaneous conductance signals in turns, so that the area-averaged void fraction and structure velocity could be measured simultaneously. The optimum configuration of the electrodes was determined through numerical analysis, and the calibration curves for stratified and annular flow were obtained through a series of static experiments. The fabricated conductance sensor was applied to a 45 mm inner diameter U-shaped downward inclined pipe with an inclination angle of 3° under adiabatic air-water flow conditions. In the tests, the superficial velocities ranged from 0.1 to 3.0 m/s for water and from 0.1 to 18 m/s for air. The obtained mean void fraction and the structure velocity from the conductance sensor were validated against the measurement by the wire-mesh sensor and the cross-correlation technique for the visualized images, respectively. The results of the flow regime classification and the corresponding time series of the void fraction at a variety of flow velocities were also discussed. PMID:28481308

  3. A Dual Conductance Sensor for Simultaneous Measurement of Void Fraction and Structure Velocity of Downward Two-Phase Flow in a Slightly Inclined Pipe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Gun; Won, Woo-Youn; Lee, Bo-An; Kim, Sin

    2017-05-08

    In this study, a new and improved electrical conductance sensor is proposed for application not only to a horizontal pipe, but also an inclined one. The conductance sensor was designed to have a dual layer, each consisting of a three-electrode set to obtain two instantaneous conductance signals in turns, so that the area-averaged void fraction and structure velocity could be measured simultaneously. The optimum configuration of the electrodes was determined through numerical analysis, and the calibration curves for stratified and annular flow were obtained through a series of static experiments. The fabricated conductance sensor was applied to a 45 mm inner diameter U-shaped downward inclined pipe with an inclination angle of 3° under adiabatic air-water flow conditions. In the tests, the superficial velocities ranged from 0.1 to 3.0 m/s for water and from 0.1 to 18 m/s for air. The obtained mean void fraction and the structure velocity from the conductance sensor were validated against the measurement by the wire-mesh sensor and the cross-correlation technique for the visualized images, respectively. The results of the flow regime classification and the corresponding time series of the void fraction at a variety of flow velocities were also discussed.

  4. Clinically acceptable agreement between the ViMove wireless motion sensor system and the Vicon motion capture system when measuring lumbar region inclination motion in the sagittal and coronal planes.

    PubMed

    Mjøsund, Hanne Leirbekk; Boyle, Eleanor; Kjaer, Per; Mieritz, Rune Mygind; Skallgård, Tue; Kent, Peter

    2017-03-21

    Wireless, wearable, inertial motion sensor technology introduces new possibilities for monitoring spinal motion and pain in people during their daily activities of work, rest and play. There are many types of these wireless devices currently available but the precision in measurement and the magnitude of measurement error from such devices is often unknown. This study investigated the concurrent validity of one inertial motion sensor system (ViMove) for its ability to measure lumbar inclination motion, compared with the Vicon motion capture system. To mimic the variability of movement patterns in a clinical population, a sample of 34 people were included - 18 with low back pain and 16 without low back pain. ViMove sensors were attached to each participant's skin at spinal levels T12 and S2, and Vicon surface markers were attached to the ViMove sensors. Three repetitions of end-range flexion inclination, extension inclination and lateral flexion inclination to both sides while standing were measured by both systems concurrently with short rest periods in between. Measurement agreement through the whole movement range was analysed using a multilevel mixed-effects regression model to calculate the root mean squared errors and the limits of agreement were calculated using the Bland Altman method. We calculated root mean squared errors (standard deviation) of 1.82° (±1.00°) in flexion inclination, 0.71° (±0.34°) in extension inclination, 0.77° (±0.24°) in right lateral flexion inclination and 0.98° (±0.69°) in left lateral flexion inclination. 95% limits of agreement ranged between -3.86° and 4.69° in flexion inclination, -2.15° and 1.91° in extension inclination, -2.37° and 2.05° in right lateral flexion inclination and -3.11° and 2.96° in left lateral flexion inclination. We found a clinically acceptable level of agreement between these two methods for measuring standing lumbar inclination motion in these two cardinal movement planes. Further

  5. Reliability and reproducibility of linear mandible measurements with the use of a cone-beam computed tomography and two object inclinations.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, C; Bressan, E; Corazza, B; Mazzoleni, S; Stellini, E; Lith, A

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of inclination of the object on the reliability and reproducibility of linear measurements of anatomic structures of the mandible on images obtained using cone-beam CT (CBCT). Ten linear dimensions between anatomical landmarks were measured in a dry mandible. The measurements were performed with a manual calliper three times by three observers. The mandible was scanned with Planmeca Promax 3D cone-beam CT (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland) with the base of the mandible parallel as well as tilted 45° to the horizontal plane. Computer measurements of the linear dimension were performed by three observers. The radiographic measurements were performed four times for each experimental setting. A total of 240 measurements were performed. Reproducibility was evaluated through comparison of standard deviation (SD) and estimation of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The error was estimated as the absolute difference between the radiographic measurements and the mean manual calliper measurements. The mean SD for the radiographic measurements was 0.36 mm for the horizontally positioned mandible and 0.48 mm for the inclined mandible. The ICC between examiners was 0.996 mm, between sessions was 0.990 mm and between CBCT measurements and calliper was 0.992 mm. The overall absolute mean measurement error was 0.40 mm (SD 0.39 mm). The percentage of errors that exceeded 1 mm was 6.7%. The results revealed high reliability of measurements performed on CBCT images independently from object position, examiner's experience and high reproducibility in repeated measurements settings.

  6. Measuring and modelling seasonal patterns of carbohydrate storage and mobilization in the trunks and root crowns of peach trees

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, David; Qin, Liangchun; DeBuse, Carolyn; DeJong, Theodore M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Developing a conceptual and functional framework for simulating annual long-term carbohydrate storage and mobilization in trees has been a weak point for virtually all tree models. This paper provides a novel approach for solving this problem using empirical field data and details of structural components of simulated trees to estimate the total carbohydrate stored over a dormant season and available for mobilization during spring budbreak. Methods The seasonal patterns of mobilization and storage of non-structural carbohydrates in bark and wood of the scion and rootstock crowns of the trunks of peach (Prunus persica) trees were analysed subsequent to treatments designed to maximize differences in source–sink behaviour during the growing season. Mature peach trees received one of three treatments (defruited and no pruning, severe pruning to 1·0 m, and unthinned with no pruning) in late winter, just prior to budbreak. Selected trees of each treatment were harvested at four times (March, June, August and November) and slices of trunk and root crown tissue above and below the graft union were removed for carbohydrate analysis. Inner bark and xylem tissues from the first to fifth rings were separated and analysed for non-structural carbohydrates. Data from these experiments were then used to estimate the amount of non-structural carbohydrates available for mobilization and to parameterize a carbohydrate storage sub-model in the functional–structural L-PEACH model. Key Results The mass fraction of carbohydrates in all sample tissues decreased from March to June, but the decrease was greatest in the severely pruned and unthinned treatments. November carbohydrate mass fractions in all tissues recovered to values similar to those in the previous March, except in the older xylem rings of the severely pruned and unthinned treatment. Carbohydrate storage sink capacity in trunks was empirically estimated from the mean maximum measured trunk non

  7. Inclined Levitron experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Max M.

    2012-11-01

    An inclined Levitron demonstration serves to illustrate macroscopically the basic non-quantum mechanical principle of nuclear magnetic resonance. By tuning a "rotary driver" to either the precession or the nutation frequency, the levitated top is made to precess or nutate visibly. By reflecting the beam from a laser-pointer off the Levitron, cycloidal pictures of the induced motion are obtained. Steady inclination at a steep angle is demonstrated in contrast to rotating inclination. Levitron traps are analogous to particle traps. Inclined or horizontal axis operation could lead to nearly frictionless bearings.

  8. Internal dynamics of a free-surface viscoplastic flow down an inclined plane: experimental results through PIV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freydier, Perrine; Chambon, Guillaume; Naaim, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows constitute one of the most important natural hazards throughout the mountainous regions of the world, causing significant damages and economic losses. These mass are composed of particles of all sizes from clay to boulders suspended in a viscous fluid. An important goal resides in developing models that are able to accurately predict the hydraulic properties of debris flows. First, these flows are generally represented using models based on a momentum integral approach that consists in assuming a shallow flow and in depth averaging the local conservation equations. These models take into account closure terms depending on the shape of the velocity profile inside the flow. Second, the specific migration mechanisms of the suspended particles, which have a strong influence on the propagation of the surges, also depend on the internal dynamics within the flow. However, to date, few studies concerning the internal dynamics in particular in the vicinity of the front, of such flows have been carried out. The aim of this study is to document the internal dynamics in free-surface viscoplastic flows down an inclined channel. The rheological studies concerning natural muddy debris flows, rich in fine particles, have shown that these materials can be modeled, at least as a first approximation as non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluids. Experiments are conducted in an inclined channel whose bottom is constituted by an upward-moving conveyor belt with controlled velocity. Carbopol microgel has been used as a homogeneous transparent viscoplastic fluid. This experimental setup allows generating and monitoring stationary gravity-driven surges in the laboratory frame. We use PIV technique (Particle Image Velocimetry) to obtain velocity fields both in the uniform zone and within the front zone where flow thickness is variable and where recirculation takes place. Experimental velocity profiles and determination of plug position will be presented and compared to theoretical

  9. Impact of bias in crown-rump length measurement at first-trimester screening for trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Kagan, K O; Hoopmann, M; Baker, A; Huebner, M; Abele, H; Wright, D

    2012-08-01

    To assess the repeatability of crown-rump length (CRL) measurement and examine the effect of its over- and underestimation on first-trimester combined screening. Intra- and interoperator repeatability of CRL measurement at 11-13 weeks of gestation was assessed in 124 cases by two operators. Raw data were transformed into gestational age and intra- and interoperator repeatability was evaluated by within-operator standard deviation (SD) and the SD of differences in measurements between both operators. Modeling techniques were used to assess the impact of CRL measurement error on general population screening and on the operator-specific screening performance. The impact of errors in CRL measurement were investigated by simulating fetal nuchal translucency (NT) measurements and multiple of the median (MoM) values for pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) and free β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) for 500 000 euploid and 500 000 trisomy 21 pregnancies at 12 weeks and 9 weeks of gestation, and adding to or subtracting from each CRL value up to 10 mm and recalculating patient-specific risks. Within-operator SD of the CRL measurement was 1.27 days of gestation. The SD of the differences in CRL measurement between operators was 1.37 days of gestation. Both intra- and interoperator 95% limits of agreement were around ± 5 mm. In general population-based screening, a CRL measurement error SD of 5 mm accounts for an estimated 5% of the SD of log MoM PAPP-A and less than 1% of the SD of log MoM free β-hCG. Modeling the effect of removing this measurement error on overall screening performance showed a minimal impact. For a risk cut-off of 1 in 100, the benefit in terms of overall screening performance would be an increase in detection rate of about 1% and a reduction in false-positive rate of less than 0.1%. With regard to the operator-specific screening performance, a consistent 5-mm underestimation of CRL reduces the detection rate from 84% to 79% and the

  10. Measurements of stellar inclinations for Kepler planet candidates. II. Candidate spin-orbit misalignments in single- and multiple-transiting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.

    2014-03-01

    We present a test for spin-orbit alignment for the host stars of 25 candidate planetary systems detected by the Kepler spacecraft. The inclination angle of each star's rotation axis was estimated from its rotation period, rotational line broadening, and radius. The rotation periods were determined using the Kepler photometric time series. The rotational line broadening was determined from high-resolution optical spectra with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph. Those same spectra were used to determine the star's photospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), which were then interpreted with stellar-evolutionary models to determine stellar radii. We combine the new sample with the seven stars from our previous work on this subject, finding that the stars show a statistical tendency to have inclinations near 90°, in alignment with the planetary orbits. Possible spin-orbit misalignments are seen in several systems, including three multiple-planet systems (KOI-304, 988, 2261). Ideally, these systems should be scrutinized with complementary techniques, such as the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, starspot-crossing anomalies, or asteroseismology, but the measurements will be difficult owing to the relatively faint apparent magnitudes and small transit signals in these systems.

  11. Measurements of Stellar Inclinations for Kepler Planet Candidates. II. Candidate Spin-Orbit Misalignments in Single- and Multiple-transiting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Takeda, Yoichi; Winn, Joshua N.; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.

    2014-03-01

    We present a test for spin-orbit alignment for the host stars of 25 candidate planetary systems detected by the Kepler spacecraft. The inclination angle of each star's rotation axis was estimated from its rotation period, rotational line broadening, and radius. The rotation periods were determined using the Kepler photometric time series. The rotational line broadening was determined from high-resolution optical spectra with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph. Those same spectra were used to determine the star's photospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), which were then interpreted with stellar-evolutionary models to determine stellar radii. We combine the new sample with the seven stars from our previous work on this subject, finding that the stars show a statistical tendency to have inclinations near 90°, in alignment with the planetary orbits. Possible spin-orbit misalignments are seen in several systems, including three multiple-planet systems (KOI-304, 988, 2261). Ideally, these systems should be scrutinized with complementary techniques, such as the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, starspot-crossing anomalies, or asteroseismology, but the measurements will be difficult owing to the relatively faint apparent magnitudes and small transit signals in these systems.

  12. Inclination Distribution of Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragozzine, Darin; K. Team

    2011-09-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope is revealing for the first time valuable constraints on the inclination distribution of planetary systems with the discovery of systems of candidate multiple transiting planets. As an ensemble, the 170 candidate multi-transiting systems discovered by Kepler reveal a large population of 3-4 small nearly-coplanar planets with periods less than 125 days (Lissauer, Ragozzine, et al. 2011). The presence of multiple transiting planets does not measure the true mutual inclinations, but transit timing and duration variations (or lack thereof), multi-Rossiter-McLaughlin, and/or exoplanet mutual events can measure or put good constraints on true mutual inclinations in individual systems (Ragozzine & Holman 2010). I will discuss the recent results from Kepler observations on the inclination distributions of different exoplanet population. I will also discuss a new method for validating candidates in multi-transiting systems that uses the coplanarity of planetary systems to minimize the probability that such candidates are false positives. A summary of our understanding of exoplanetary inclinations and implications for the formation and evolution of planetary systems will also be provided. ESSII SOC: It is possible that I will focus my talk on a detailed analysis of KOI-500, the Kepler system with 5 candidate planets with new results showing that all the candidates are planets and discussing the intricate three-body resonance structure seen in this system. This work is supported by the Institute for Theory and Computation at Harvard University. Kepler was competitively selected as the tenth Discovery mission. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  13. Descriptive statistics of tree crown condition in California, Oregon, and Washington

    Treesearch

    KaDonna C. Randolph; Sally J. Campbell; Glenn Christensen

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program uses visual assessments of tree crown condition to monitor changes and trends in forest health. This report describes four tree crown condition indicators (crown dieback, crown density, foliage transparency, and sapling crown vigor) measured in California, Oregon, and Washington between 1996 and 1999....

  14. Descriptive statistics of tree crown condition in the Northeastern United States

    Treesearch

    KaDonna C. Randolph; Randall S. Morin; Jim Steinman

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program uses visual assessments of tree crown condition to monitor changes and trends in forest health. This report describes four crown condition indicators (crown dieback, crown density, foliage transparency, and sapling crown vigor) measured in Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New...

  15. Descriptive statistics of tree crown condition in the North Central United States

    Treesearch

    KaDonna C. Randolph; Randall S. Morin; Jim Steinman

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program uses visual assessments of tree crown condition to monitor changes and trends in forest health. This report describes four crown condition indicators (crown dieback, crown density, foliage transparency, and sapling crown vigor) measured in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, and Wisconsin...

  16. Descriptive statistics of tree crown condition in the United States Interior West

    Treesearch

    KaDonna C. Randolph; Mike T. Thompson

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program uses visual assessments of tree crown condition to monitor changes and trends in forest health. This report describes four crown condition indicators (crown dieback, crown density, foliage transparency, and sapling crown vigor) measured in Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming between 1996 and...

  17. Evaporation dynamics of water droplets on inclined surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    When a water droplet is gently placed on a flat substrate, particularly which is tilted at an inclined angle, usually there are advancing and receding angles inside the droplet formed by inclination under gravitational force. Evaporation dynamics of an nonspherical inclined droplet at inclinations would deviate from that of a spherical droplet. Here we study on evaporation dynamics rates of inclined droplets by measuring mass changes with time and their lifetimes. We find that the lifetime of an evaporating inclined droplets becomes longer as the gravitational influence becomes stronger. The lifetime depends on the pinning-depinning transitions and the depinning onset times, which are changed by the gravitational influence. This The dependence inclination-induced evaporation behavior would be useful important in understanding evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  18. The 3D Pelvic Inclination Correction System (PICS): A universally applicable coordinate system for isovolumetric imaging measurements, tested in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP).

    PubMed

    Reiner, Caecilia S; Williamson, Tom; Winklehner, Thomas; Lisse, Sean; Fink, Daniel; DeLancey, John O L; Betschart, Cornelia

    2017-07-01

    In pelvic organ prolapse (POP), the organs are pushed downward along the lines of gravity, so measurements along this longitudinal body axis are desirable. We propose a universally applicable 3D coordinate system that corrects for changes in pelvic inclination and that allows the localization of any point in the pelvis at rest or under dynamic conditions on magnetic resonance images (MRI) of pelvic floor disorders in a scanner- and software independent manner. The proposed 3D coordinate system called 3D Pelvic Inclination Correction System (PICS) is constructed utilizing four bony landmark points, with the origin set at the inferior pubic point, and three additional points at the sacrum (sacrococcygeal joint) and both ischial spines, which are clearly visible on MRI images. The feasibility and applicability of the moving frame was evaluated using MRI datasets from five women with pelvic organ prolapse, three undergoing static MRI and two undergoing dynamic MRI of the pelvic floor in a supine position. The construction of the coordinate system was performed utilizing the selected landmarks, with an initial implementation completed in MATLAB. In all cases the selected landmarks were clearly visible, with the construction of the 3D PICS and measurement of pelvic organ positions performed without difficulty. The resulting distance from the organ position to the horizontal PICS plane was compared to a traditional measure based on standard measurements in 2D slices. The two approaches demonstrated good agreement in each of the cases. The developed approach makes quantitative assessment of pelvic organ position in a physiologically relevant 3D coordinate system possible independent of pelvic movement relative to the scanner. It allows the accurate study of the physiologic range of organ location along the body axis ("up or down") as well as defects of the pelvic sidewall or birth-related pelvic floor injuries outside the midsagittal plane, not possible before in a 2D

  19. Crown development: an index of stand density

    Treesearch

    John E. Krajicek; Kenneth A. Brinkman

    1957-01-01

    A study of crown characteristics of several hundred open-grown oak, hickory, and Norway spruce trees in Iowa revealed a high correlation between stem diameter and crown area. Consideration of this relationship led to the idea that perhaps here was a realistic way to measure and evaluate stand density or stocking. If, given unlimited growing space, trees of a certain...

  20. PRECISE TULLY-FISHER RELATIONS WITHOUT GALAXY INCLINATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Obreschkow, D.; Meyer, M.

    2013-11-10

    Power-law relations between tracers of baryonic mass and rotational velocities of disk galaxies, so-called Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs), offer a wealth of applications in galaxy evolution and cosmology. However, measurements of rotational velocities require galaxy inclinations, which are difficult to measure, thus limiting the range of TFR studies. This work introduces a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method for recovering the TFR in galaxy samples with limited or no information on inclinations. The robustness and accuracy of this method is demonstrated using virtual and real galaxy samples. Intriguingly, the MLE reliably recovers the TFR of all test samples, even without using any inclination measurements—that is, assuming a random sin i-distribution for galaxy inclinations. Explicitly, this 'inclination-free MLE' recovers the three TFR parameters (zero-point, slope, scatter) with statistical errors only about 1.5 times larger than the best estimates based on perfectly known galaxy inclinations with zero uncertainty. Thus, given realistic uncertainties, the inclination-free MLE is highly competitive. If inclination measurements have mean errors larger than 10°, it is better not to use any inclinations than to consider the inclination measurements to be exact. The inclination-free MLE opens interesting perspectives for future H I surveys by the Square Kilometer Array and its pathfinders.

  1. FRACTURE-RESISTANT MONOLITHIC DENTAL CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Methods Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Results Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. Significance The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. PMID:26792623

  2. Digital photography for urban street tree crown conditions

    Treesearch

    Neil A. Clark; Sang-Mook Lee; William A. Bechtold; Gregory A. Reams

    2006-01-01

    Crown variables such as height, diameter, live crown ratio, dieback, transparency, and density are all collected as part of the overall crown assessment (USDA 2004). Transparency and density are related to the amount of foliage and thus the photosynthetic potential of the tree. These measurements are both currently based on visual estimates and have been shown to be...

  3. An analytic algorithm to calculate the inclination, ascending node, and semimajor axis of spectroscopic binary orbits using a single speckle measurement and the parallax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docobo, J. A.; Campo, P. P.; Andrade, M.; Horch, E. P.

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that in spectroscopic binary orbits, the inclination, the ascending node, and the semimajor axis remain undetermined, therefore the principal objective of this research is to establish an analytic methodology for the calculation of these parameters for spectroscopic binaries, both single-lined (SB1) and double-lined (SB2). In other words, the goal is to determine their "three-dimensional" orbits using a single speckle measurement ( ρ, θ, t) and the parallax ( π). Moreover, estimates of the individual masses of each system can also be obtained. The proposed algorithm was successfully applied to SB1 systems: YSC 148 (HD 37393) and CHR 225 (HD 34318), and SB2 systems: LSC 1 Aa1,2 (HD 200077) and Mkt 11 Aa, Ab (HD 358). In this late case, previously determined spectroscopic and visual orbits have been used to compare and contrast the results obtained from them with our results. The methodology presented is especially interesting for those cases in which it is only possible to resolve the spectroscopic binary in the zones of maximum angular separation by optical means thereby making it impossible to avail of sufficient observations in order to calculate the visual orbit.

  4. First Results from Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE): Differential Flux Measurements of Energetic Particles in a Highly Inclined Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Palo, S. E.; Kohnert, R.; Gerhardt, D.; Blum, L. W.; Schiller, Q.; Turner, D. L.; Tu, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the National Science Foundation, scheduled for launch into a low-Earth, polar orbit after August 14th, 2012 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. The science objectives of CSSWE are to investigate the relationship of the location, magnitude, and frequency of solar flares to the timing, duration, and energy spectrum of solar energetic particles (SEP) reaching Earth, and to determine the precipitation loss and the evolution of the energy spectrum of radiation belt electrons. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a miniaturization of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). The REPT instrument will fly onboard the NASA/Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft scheduled to launch after August 23rd, 2012 that will go through the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination orbit. CSSWE's REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 10 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3 MeV. Such differential flux measurements have significant science value, and a number of engineering challenges were overcome to enable these clean measurements to be made under the mass and power limits of a CubeSat. The CSSWE is an ideal class project, providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project. We will report the first results from this exciting mission.

  5. Measuring social desirability across language and sex: A comparison of Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale factor structures in English and Mandarin Chinese in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kurz, A Solomon; Drescher, Christopher F; Chin, Eu Gene; Johnson, Laura R

    2016-06-01

    Malaysia is a Southeast Asian country in which multiple languages are prominently spoken, including English and Mandarin Chinese. As psychological science continues to develop within Malaysia, there is a need for psychometrically sound instruments that measure psychological phenomena in multiple languages. For example, assessment tools for measuring social desirability could be a useful addition in psychological assessments and research studies in a Malaysian context. This study examined the psychometric performance of the English and Mandarin Chinese versions of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale when used in Malaysia. Two hundred and eighty-three students (64% female; 83% Chinese, 9% Indian) from two college campuses completed the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale in their language of choice (i.e., English or Mandarin Chinese). Proposed factor structures were compared with confirmatory factor analysis, and multiple indicators-multiple causes models were used to examine measurement invariance across language and sex. Factor analyses supported a two-factor structure (i.e., Attribution and Denial) for the measure. Invariance tests revealed the scale was invariant by sex, indicating that social desirability can be interpreted similarly across sex. The scale was partially invariant by language version, with some non-invariance observed within the Denial factor. Non-invariance may be related to differences in the English and Mandarin Chinese languages, as well as cultural differences. Directions for further research include examining the measurement of social desirability in other contexts where both English and Mandarin Chinese are spoken (i.e., China) and further examining the causes of non-invariance on specific items. © 2016 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Evaluating ceramic crown margins with digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Wahle, William Maxwell; Masri, Radi; Driscoll, Carl; Romberg, Elaine

    2017-09-29

    Radiographs aid in clinically determining crown fit, specifically interproximal margins where tactile and visual methods may be limited. However, investigations of the utility of digital radiographs as a tool for evaluating the marginal openings of ceramic crowns are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess whether marginal adaptation for ceramic crowns and for metal-ceramic crowns with a metal collar can be identified with digital radiographs. One lithium disilicate crown, 1 fluorapatite crown, and 1 metal-ceramic crown were fabricated for a maxillary premolar. The crowns were attached to a custom-designed device that allowed the marginal discrepancy to be changed. A total of 10 increments were measured starting at 0 to 20 μm and increasing every 20 μm to a maximum opening of 180 to 200 μm. At each increment, 2 radiographs were made of the crowns, using a digital sensor, 1 perpendicular to and 1 at 80 degrees to the long axis of the tooth. To test whether digital radiographs could be used to accurately identify "acceptable" and "unacceptable" margins, 21 dentists were asked to rate the radiographs as "acceptable" or "unacceptable." The chi square test was used to analyze differences between the dentists' evaluations and the actual marginal opening (α=.05). For the purposes of this study, a marginal discrepancy greater than 80 μm was considered "unacceptable." Of all marginal discrepancies exceeding 80 μm, 78.6% of the metal-ceramic crown radiographs were incorrectly scored as "acceptable" (P<.001). These radiographs were identified as false positives. Lithium disilicate (66.1%) and fluorapatite (45.8%) crowns were more likely to be incorrectly evaluated as "unacceptable" (P<.001) and identified as false negatives. Using digital radiographs to evaluate marginal adaptation without clinical examination is not by itself an accurate method of evaluating the marginal fit of complete coverage crowns. The marginal fit of the tested metal

  7. Colorimetric values of esthetic stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Omachi, Koichi; Staninec, Michal

    2002-01-01

    The colorimetric values of two different kinds of esthetic stainless steel crowns were measured and compared with the colorimetric values of primary anterior teeth in Japanese children. The colorimetric values of resin composite-faced stainless steel crowns (Kinder Krown) and epoxy-coated stainless steel crowns (White Steel Crown) were measured with a color difference meter. The Commission Internationale de Eclairage L*, a*, b*, and delta E*ab values and Munsell value, chroma, and hue were calculated. The data were compared with previously reported colorimetric values of Japanese primary anterior teeth measured with the same color difference meter used in this study. Compared to Japanese primary anterior teeth, Kinder Krown Pedo I and Pedo II showed much higher L* values and lower hue; on the other hand, White Steel Crown showed much higher L*, a*, b* values, much higher value and chroma, and much lower hue. Color analysis revealed that the colors of the White Steel Crown and Kinder Krown Pedo I were substantially different from the color of Japanese primary anterior teeth. The color difference between Pedo II crowns and Japanese primary anterior teeth was relatively high, but the color of Pedo II might be acceptable for clinical use.

  8. Crown ethers in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I.; ...

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basicmore » structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.« less

  9. Crown ethers in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basic structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.

  10. Crown ethers in graphene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J; Moyer, Bruce A; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers are at their most basic level rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity. Here we present atomic-resolution images of the same basic structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures should also extend to their selectivity towards specific metal cations. Crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be systematically tested and modelled. Thus, we expect that our finding will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.

  11. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    PubMed Central

    Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068–3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only. PMID:27616934

  12. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsaperla, Paolo; Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-08-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068-3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only.

  13. A Tree Taper Model Based on Similar Triangles and Use of Crown Ratio as a Measure of Form in Taper Equations for Longleaf Pine

    Treesearch

    Dennis J. Shaw; Ralph S. Meldahl; John S. Kush; Greg L. Somers

    2003-01-01

    We used data from 322 natural longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) trees to include crown ratio as a continuous variable in taper equations. The data were divided into 10 crown-ratio classes and fitted taper equations into each class to detect trends in the coefficients. For application to longleaf pine, we replaced coefficients that exhibited a...

  14. Inclined, collisional sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    We apply the constitutive relations of kinetic theory of granular gases to the transport of cohesionless sediments driven by a gravitational liquid turbulent stream in steady uniform conditions. The sediment-laden flow forms self-equilibrated mechanisms of resistance at the bed surface, below which the sediments are at rest. This geo-physical process takes place quite often in streams at moderate slope and may be interpreted through tools common to fluid mechanics and particle physics. Taking into account the viscous dissipation of the fluctuation energy of the particles, and using approximate methods of integration of the governing differential equations, permit to obtain a set of simple formulas for predicting how depths and flow rates adjust to the angle of inclination of the bed, without requiring additional tuning parameters besides the particle and fluid properties. The agreement with laboratory experiments performed with either plastic cylinders or gravel in water is remarkable. We also provide quantitative criteria to determine the range of validity of the theory, i.e., the values of the Shields number and the angle of inclination of the bed for which the particle stresses can be mostly ascribed to collisional exchange of momentum.

  15. Use of IQRF technology for detection of construction inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Pies; Radovan, Hajovsky

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the application of wireless measurement of inclination of objects located at mining dumps. Measurement of inclination uses a set of sensors including a gyroscope, an accelerometer and a magnetometer. Measured data is processed by AHRS algorithm that, once applied, allows getting more precise information on rotation of the object in the area compared to unprocessed data from accelerometer or gyroscope. Measurement chain consists of two parts. The first one is a wireless module reading the data from particular sensors via I2C bus and sends it consequently to a computer that performs evaluation and visualization of inclination. Communication among particular devices is ensured by IQRF technology working within ISM band of 868MHz. Application of this approach for measurement of inclination is a reasonable choice in case of measurement of inclination by inclinometers.

  16. First-Trimester Crown-Rump Length and Embryonic Volume of Fetuses with Structural Congenital Abnormalities Measured in Virtual Reality: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Baken, L; Benoit, B; Koning, A H J; van der Spek, P J; Steegers, E A P; Exalto, N

    2017-01-01

    Background. With the introduction of three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound it has become possible to measure volumes. The relative increase in embryonic volume (EV) is much larger than that of the crown-rump length (CRL) over the same time period. We examined whether EV is a better parameter to determine growth restriction in fetuses with structural congenital abnormalities. Study Design, Subjects, and Outcome Measures. CRL and EV were measured using a Virtual Reality (VR) system in prospectively collected 3D ultrasound volumes of 56 fetuses diagnosed with structural congenital abnormalities in the first trimester of pregnancy (gestational age 7(+5) to 14(+5) weeks). Measured CRL and EV were converted to z-scores and to percentages of the expected mean using previously published reference curves of euploid fetuses. The one-sample t-test was performed to test significance. Results. The EV was smaller than expected for GA in fetuses with structural congenital abnormalities (-35%  p < 0.001, z-score -1.44  p < 0.001), whereas CRL was not (-6.43%  p = 0.118, z-score -0.43  p = 0.605). Conclusions. CRL is a less reliable parameter to determine growth restriction in fetuses with structural congenital abnormalities as compared with EV. By measuring EV, growth restriction in first-trimester fetuses with structural congenital abnormalities becomes more evident and enables an earlier detection of these cases.

  17. An experimental study on downward slug flow in inclined pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Roumazeilles, P.M.; Yang, J.; Sarica, C.; Chen, X.T.; Wilson, J.F.; Brill, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    The downward simultaneous flow of gas and liquid is often encountered in hilly terrain pipelines and injection wells. Most of the methods for predicting pressure drop in gas/liquid, two-phase flow in pipes have been developed for either upward vertical or upward inclined pipes. This study experimentally investigated downward cocurrent slug flow in inclined pipes. A new test facility was designed and built to acquire data for the entire range of pipe inclination angles. A series of slug flow experiments was conducted in a 2-in. diameter, 65-ft long clear PVC pipe installed on an inclinable structure. Liquid holdup and pressure drop measurements were obtained for downward inclination angles from 0{degree} to {minus}30{degree} at different flow conditions. Translational velocity and liquid-slug holdup correlations were investigated based on the acquired data for different inclination angles.

  18. The Gothic arch (needle point) tracing and condylar inclination.

    PubMed

    el-Gheriani, A S; Winstanley, R B

    1987-11-01

    The records of 11 patients referred for treatment of TMJ disorders were used to compare condylar inclination found by drawing a tangent and by using a mathematic technique. Needle point tracing angles were also measured for the same patients and were compared with the condylar inclination. It can be concluded that (1) the mathematic technique outlined records a more accurate condylar angulation, and (2) there is a great variation in condylar inclination values between patients and between left and right sides of the same patient, and (3) there is no direct relationship between condylar inclination and the needle point tracing angle.

  19. The Ballistic Cart on an Incline Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serway, Raymond A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents the theory behind the mechanics demonstration that involves projecting a ball vertically upward from a ballistic cart moving along an inclined plane. The measured overshoot is believed to be due, in part, to the presence of rolling friction and the inertial properties of the cart wheels. (JRH)

  20. The Ballistic Cart on an Incline Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serway, Raymond A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents the theory behind the mechanics demonstration that involves projecting a ball vertically upward from a ballistic cart moving along an inclined plane. The measured overshoot is believed to be due, in part, to the presence of rolling friction and the inertial properties of the cart wheels. (JRH)

  1. Relationships between Migration to Urban Settings and Children's Creative Inclinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Baoguo; Lu, Yongli; Dai, David Yun; Lin, Chongde

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 909 5th- and 6th-grade children were recruited as participants, and questionnaires were used to investigate the relationships between migration to urban settings and children's creative inclinations. The study was broken down to 2 parts. Study 1 compared scores on measures of creative inclinations among migrant, rural, and urban…

  2. Relationships between Migration to Urban Settings and Children's Creative Inclinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Baoguo; Lu, Yongli; Dai, David Yun; Lin, Chongde

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 909 5th- and 6th-grade children were recruited as participants, and questionnaires were used to investigate the relationships between migration to urban settings and children's creative inclinations. The study was broken down to 2 parts. Study 1 compared scores on measures of creative inclinations among migrant, rural, and urban…

  3. First-Trimester Crown-Rump Length and Embryonic Volume of Fetuses with Structural Congenital Abnormalities Measured in Virtual Reality: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, B.; Koning, A. H. J.; van der Spek, P. J.; Steegers, E. A. P.; Exalto, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background. With the introduction of three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound it has become possible to measure volumes. The relative increase in embryonic volume (EV) is much larger than that of the crown-rump length (CRL) over the same time period. We examined whether EV is a better parameter to determine growth restriction in fetuses with structural congenital abnormalities. Study Design, Subjects, and Outcome Measures. CRL and EV were measured using a Virtual Reality (VR) system in prospectively collected 3D ultrasound volumes of 56 fetuses diagnosed with structural congenital abnormalities in the first trimester of pregnancy (gestational age 7+5 to 14+5 weeks). Measured CRL and EV were converted to z-scores and to percentages of the expected mean using previously published reference curves of euploid fetuses. The one-sample t-test was performed to test significance. Results. The EV was smaller than expected for GA in fetuses with structural congenital abnormalities (−35%  p < 0.001, z-score −1.44  p < 0.001), whereas CRL was not (−6.43%  p = 0.118, z-score −0.43  p = 0.605). Conclusions. CRL is a less reliable parameter to determine growth restriction in fetuses with structural congenital abnormalities as compared with EV. By measuring EV, growth restriction in first-trimester fetuses with structural congenital abnormalities becomes more evident and enables an earlier detection of these cases. PMID:28421190

  4. Estimating individual tree leaf area in loblolly pine plantations using LiDAR-derived measurments of height and crown dimensions

    Treesearch

    Scott D. Roberts; Thomas J. Dean; David L. Evans; John W. McCombs; Richard L. Harrington; Partick A. Glass

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimates of leaf area index (LAI) could provide useful information to forest managers, but due to difficulties in measurement, leaf area is rarely used in decision-making. A reliable approach to remotely estimating LA1 would greatly facilitate its use in forest management. This study investigated the potential for using small-footprint iDAR, a laser-based...

  5. Critical inclinations in satellite theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deprit, A.

    1978-01-01

    The main problem of satellite theory is described in polar coordinates by a Hamiltonian function. It is proposed to find a solution of the Hamiltonian function with the following properties: (1) the reference orbit is Keplerian; (2) no restriction is imposed on the eccentricity; in particular, it is exempt of singularities - real or apparent - for small eccentricities; and (3) no restriction is imposed on the inclination; in particular, it is exempt of singularities - real or apparent - for small inclinations; also it is valid even in the neighborhood of inclinations at which the perigee is stationary.

  6. Geometric-optical bidirectional reflectance modeling of the discrete crown vegetation canopy - Effect of crown shape and mutual shadowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaowen; Strahler, Alan H.

    1992-01-01

    Many natural vegetation covers can be regarded as assemblages of plant crowns, on a background, which interact with light as discrete objects. On this basis, geometric optics furnish an approach to the modeling of vegetation canopies that captures the most important features of such growths' bidirectional measurements. Attention is presently given to models which approximate these phenomena and relate the size, shape, and count density of plant crowns to viewing and illumination positions and to crown-background reflectance contrasts.

  7. Preformed crowns for decayed primary molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Innes, Nicola P T; Ricketts, David; Chong, Lee Yee; Keightley, Alexander J; Lamont, Thomas; Santamaria, Ruth M

    2015-12-31

    measured in the studies: time to restoration failure or retreatment, patient satisfaction and costs. Crowns versus fillingsAll studies in this comparison used PMCs. One study reported outcomes in the short term and found no reports of major failure or pain in either group. There was moderate quality evidence that the risk of major failure was lower in the crowns group in the long term (risk ratio (RR) 0.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06 to 0.56; 346 teeth in three studies, one conventional and two using Hall Technique). Similarly, there was moderate quality evidence that the risk of pain was lower in the long term for the crown group (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.67; 312 teeth in two studies).Discomfort associated with the procedure was lower for crowns fitted using the Hall Technique than for fillings (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.87; 381 teeth) (moderate quality evidence).It is uncertain whether there is a clinically important difference in the risk of gingival bleeding when using crowns rather than fillings, either in the short term (RR 1.69, 95% CI 0.61 to 4.66; 226 teeth) or long term (RR 1.74, 95% CI 0.99 to 3.06; 195 teeth, two studies using PMCs with conventional technique at 12 months) (low quality evidence). Crowns versus non-restorative caries treatmentOnly one study compared PMCs (fitted with the Hall Technique) with non-restorative caries treatment; the evidence quality was very low and we are therefore we are uncertain about the estimates. Metal crowns versus aesthetic crownsOne split-mouth study (11 participants) compared PMCs versus aesthetic crowns (stainless steel with white veneers). It provided very low quality evidence so no conclusions could be drawn. Crowns placed on primary molar teeth with carious lesions, or following pulp treatment, are likely to reduce the risk of major failure or pain in the long term compared to fillings. Crowns fitted using the Hall Technique may reduce discomfort at the time of treatment compared to fillings. The amount and

  8. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Pablo Santos; Chiarelli, Fabio; Rodrigues, José A.; Shibli, Jamil A.; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey), crown lengthening is the most habitual surgical periodontal treatment. PMID:26609452

  9. Precision porcelain jacket crown technique.

    PubMed

    Riley, E J; Sozio, R B; Casthely, F; Wilcko, M T; Sotera, A J

    1975-09-01

    A simple technique for construction of an aluminous porcelain crown has been described. An aluminous core is fabricated without platinum foil on a ceramic refractory die and, when retrieved, serves as a coping on the master cast. The technique and accuracy of fit are illustrated with the fabrication of an aluminous porcelain crown on the Bureau of Standards' full-crown die.

  10. Investigation of distortions around the cervical area of teeth restored with two kinds of crown materials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chikako; Miura, Hiroyuki; Okada, Daizo; Komada, Wataru; Miyasaka, Munenaga; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Masuoka, David

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify crown materials to decrease the stress concentrated at the cervical area of endodontically treated teeth. To this end, 14 extracted human mandibular premolars were divided into two groups for this study: complete cast crowns versus polymer-based crown and bridge material crowns. Both complete cast crowns (MC) and polymer-based crown and bridge material crowns (HC) were cemented with a glycidyl methacrylate-based resin cement (RC) to composite resin cores with glass fiber posts. Static loading was applied and distortion was measured with four pieces of strain gages attached to the marginal area. Findings showed that there was a large difference in distortion between crown and root in MC. On the other hand, distortions at the cervical area of crown and root were similar in HC.

  11. Migratory blackcaps can use their magnetic compass at 5 degrees inclination, but are completely random at 0 degrees inclination

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, Susanne; Steenken, Friederike; Thiele, Nadine; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Lefeldt, Nele; Dreyer, David; Schneider, Nils-Lasse; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    It is known that night-migratory songbirds use a magnetic compass measuring the magnetic inclination angle, i.e. the angle between the Earth’s surface and the magnetic field lines, but how do such birds orient at the magnetic equator? A previous study reported that birds are completely randomly oriented in a horizontal north-south magnetic field with 0° inclination angle. This seems counter-intuitive, because birds using an inclination compass should be able to separate the north-south axis from the east-west axis, so that bimodal orientation might be expected in a horizontal field. Furthermore, little is known about how shallow inclination angles migratory birds can still use for orientation. In this study, we tested the magnetic compass orientation of night-migratory Eurasian blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) in magnetic fields with 5° and 0° inclination. At 5° inclination, the birds oriented as well as they did in the normal 67° inclined field in Oldenburg. In contrast, they were completely randomly oriented in the horizontal field, showing no sign of bimodality. Our results indicate that the inclination limit for the magnetic compass of the blackcap is below 5° and that these birds indeed seem completely unable to use their magnetic compass for orientation in a horizontal magnetic field. PMID:27667569

  12. Migratory blackcaps can use their magnetic compass at 5 degrees inclination, but are completely random at 0 degrees inclination.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Susanne; Steenken, Friederike; Thiele, Nadine; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Lefeldt, Nele; Dreyer, David; Schneider, Nils-Lasse; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-09-26

    It is known that night-migratory songbirds use a magnetic compass measuring the magnetic inclination angle, i.e. the angle between the Earth's surface and the magnetic field lines, but how do such birds orient at the magnetic equator? A previous study reported that birds are completely randomly oriented in a horizontal north-south magnetic field with 0° inclination angle. This seems counter-intuitive, because birds using an inclination compass should be able to separate the north-south axis from the east-west axis, so that bimodal orientation might be expected in a horizontal field. Furthermore, little is known about how shallow inclination angles migratory birds can still use for orientation. In this study, we tested the magnetic compass orientation of night-migratory Eurasian blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) in magnetic fields with 5° and 0° inclination. At 5° inclination, the birds oriented as well as they did in the normal 67° inclined field in Oldenburg. In contrast, they were completely randomly oriented in the horizontal field, showing no sign of bimodality. Our results indicate that the inclination limit for the magnetic compass of the blackcap is below 5° and that these birds indeed seem completely unable to use their magnetic compass for orientation in a horizontal magnetic field.

  13. Migratory blackcaps can use their magnetic compass at 5 degrees inclination, but are completely random at 0 degrees inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, Susanne; Steenken, Friederike; Thiele, Nadine; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Lefeldt, Nele; Dreyer, David; Schneider, Nils-Lasse; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    It is known that night-migratory songbirds use a magnetic compass measuring the magnetic inclination angle, i.e. the angle between the Earth’s surface and the magnetic field lines, but how do such birds orient at the magnetic equator? A previous study reported that birds are completely randomly oriented in a horizontal north-south magnetic field with 0° inclination angle. This seems counter-intuitive, because birds using an inclination compass should be able to separate the north-south axis from the east-west axis, so that bimodal orientation might be expected in a horizontal field. Furthermore, little is known about how shallow inclination angles migratory birds can still use for orientation. In this study, we tested the magnetic compass orientation of night-migratory Eurasian blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) in magnetic fields with 5° and 0° inclination. At 5° inclination, the birds oriented as well as they did in the normal 67° inclined field in Oldenburg. In contrast, they were completely randomly oriented in the horizontal field, showing no sign of bimodality. Our results indicate that the inclination limit for the magnetic compass of the blackcap is below 5° and that these birds indeed seem completely unable to use their magnetic compass for orientation in a horizontal magnetic field.

  14. In vitro fracture resistance of three commercially available zirconia crowns for primary molars.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Janice A; Knoell, Patrick; Yu, Qingzhao; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yapin; Zhu, Han; Beattie, Sean; Xu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the fracture resistance of primary mandibular first molar zirconia crowns from three different manufacturers-EZ Pedo (EZP), NuSmile (NSZ), and Kinder Krowns (KK)-and compare it with the thickness of the zirconia crowns and the measured fracture resistance of preveneered stainless steel crowns (SSCs). The thickness of 20 zirconia crowns from three manufacturers were measured. The mean force required to fracture the crowns was determined. Preveneered NuSmile (NSW) SSCs were tested as a control. EZP crowns were significantly thicker in three of the six measured locations. The force required to fracture the EZP crown was significantly higher than that required for NSZ and KK. There was a positive correlation between fracture resistance and crown thickness in the mesial, distal, mesioocclusal, and distoocclusal dimensions. None of the zirconia crowns proved to be as resistant to fracture as the preveneered SSCs. Statistically significant differences were found among the forces required to fracture zirconia crowns by three different manufacturers. The increase in force correlated with crown thickness. The forces required to fracture the preveneered stainless steel crowns were greater than the forces required to fracture all manufacturers' zirconia crowns.

  15. Maximum likelihood solution for inclination-only data in paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arason, P.; Levi, S.

    2010-08-01

    We have developed a new robust maximum likelihood method for estimating the unbiased mean inclination from inclination-only data. In paleomagnetic analysis, the arithmetic mean of inclination-only data is known to introduce a shallowing bias. Several methods have been introduced to estimate the unbiased mean inclination of inclination-only data together with measures of the dispersion. Some inclination-only methods were designed to maximize the likelihood function of the marginal Fisher distribution. However, the exact analytical form of the maximum likelihood function is fairly complicated, and all the methods require various assumptions and approximations that are often inappropriate. For some steep and dispersed data sets, these methods provide estimates that are significantly displaced from the peak of the likelihood function to systematically shallower inclination. The problem locating the maximum of the likelihood function is partly due to difficulties in accurately evaluating the function for all values of interest, because some elements of the likelihood function increase exponentially as precision parameters increase, leading to numerical instabilities. In this study, we succeeded in analytically cancelling exponential elements from the log-likelihood function, and we are now able to calculate its value anywhere in the parameter space and for any inclination-only data set. Furthermore, we can now calculate the partial derivatives of the log-likelihood function with desired accuracy, and locate the maximum likelihood without the assumptions required by previous methods. To assess the reliability and accuracy of our method, we generated large numbers of random Fisher-distributed data sets, for which we calculated mean inclinations and precision parameters. The comparisons show that our new robust Arason-Levi maximum likelihood method is the most reliable, and the mean inclination estimates are the least biased towards shallow values.

  16. Models for estimation and simulation of crown and canopy cover

    Treesearch

    John D. Shaw

    2005-01-01

    Crown width measurements collected during Forest Inventory and Analysis and Forest Health Monitoring surveys are being used to develop individual tree crown width models and plot-level canopy cover models for species and forest types in the Intermountain West. Several model applications are considered in the development process, including remote sensing of plot...

  17. Aurora Australis, Red Crown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights (location unknown) shows a spiked band of red airglow called a 'Red Crown' above the Earth Limb. Calculated to be in the 80 - 120 km altitude region, auroral activity is due to exitation of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere by radiation from the van Allen Radiation Belts and is most common above the 65 degree north and south latitude range during the spring and fall of the year.

  18. Bursts in inclined layer convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, F. H.; Clever, R. M.

    2000-08-01

    A new instability of longitudinal rolls in an inclined fluid layer heated from below is analyzed in the case of the Prandtl number P=0.71. The instability assumes the form of subharmonic undulations and evolves into a spatially chaotic pattern when the angle of inclination is of the order of 20°. The chaotic state rapidly decays and longitudinal rolls recover until the next burst of chaotic convection occurs. The theoretical findings closely correspond to recent experimental observations by Daniels et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. (to be published)].

  19. Comparison of crown fire modeling systems used in three fire management applications

    Treesearch

    Joe H. Scott

    2006-01-01

    The relative behavior of surface-crown fire spread rate modeling systems used in three fire management applications-CFIS (Crown Fire Initiation and Spread), FlamMap and NEXUS- is compared using fire environment characteristics derived from a dataset of destructively measured canopy fuel and associated stand characteristics. Although the surface-crown modeling systems...

  20. Stem phototropism of trees: a possible significant factor in determining stem inclination on forest slopes.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Jun; Masumori, Masaya; Tange, Takeshi

    2006-09-01

    The main stems of trees on forest slopes incline down the slope to various extents that are characteristic of the species. The inclination has been explained as an active response to a horizontally asymmetrical light environment, but the contributing physiological mechanisms are unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that stem phototropism, gravitropism, or a combination of the two determines the inclination of tree stems on forest slopes. Cryptomeria japonica, Pinus densiflora, Quercus myrsinaefolia and Q. serrata were studied. Measurements were made of stem inclination of mature trees on forest slopes in uniform plantations of each species, and changes in stem inclination of potted seedlings in response to illumination treatments (unilateral or overhead) and inclination treatments (artificially inclined or erect). Indices of phototropic and gravitropic responsiveness were evaluated for each species, calculated from the change in stem inclination in response to artificial inclination with unilateral or overhead illumination. Stem inclination on forest slopes varied significantly among species: Q. serrata inclined most in the down-slope direction, C. japonica inclined the least, and P. densiflora and Q. myrsinaefolia were intermediate. The change in stem inclination of seedlings in each treatment varied significantly among species. One-year-old stems of Q. serrata and 2-year-old stems of Q. myrsinaefolia bent toward the light source. Interspecific variation in the change in stem inclination in response to the unilateral illumination or that in the index of phototropic responsiveness was strongly correlated with the variation in stem inclination on forest slopes. The orientation of woody stems that have finished elongation can be actively controlled by phototropism. Interspecific variation in phototropic responsiveness of trees is a possible significant determinant of interspecific variation in stem inclination on forest slopes.

  1. Stem Phototropism of Trees: A Possible Significant Factor in Determining Stem Inclination on Forest Slopes

    PubMed Central

    MATSUZAKI, JUN; MASUMORI, MASAYA; TANGE, TAKESHI

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The main stems of trees on forest slopes incline down the slope to various extents that are characteristic of the species. The inclination has been explained as an active response to a horizontally asymmetrical light environment, but the contributing physiological mechanisms are unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that stem phototropism, gravitropism, or a combination of the two determines the inclination of tree stems on forest slopes. • Methods Cryptomeria japonica, Pinus densiflora, Quercus myrsinaefolia and Q. serrata were studied. Measurements were made of stem inclination of mature trees on forest slopes in uniform plantations of each species, and changes in stem inclination of potted seedlings in response to illumination treatments (unilateral or overhead) and inclination treatments (artificially inclined or erect). Indices of phototropic and gravitropic responsiveness were evaluated for each species, calculated from the change in stem inclination in response to artificial inclination with unilateral or overhead illumination. • Key Results Stem inclination on forest slopes varied significantly among species: Q. serrata inclined most in the down-slope direction, C. japonica inclined the least, and P. densiflora and Q. myrsinaefolia were intermediate. The change in stem inclination of seedlings in each treatment varied significantly among species. One-year-old stems of Q. serrata and 2-year-old stems of Q. myrsinaefolia bent toward the light source. Interspecific variation in the change in stem inclination in response to the unilateral illumination or that in the index of phototropic responsiveness was strongly correlated with the variation in stem inclination on forest slopes. • Conclusions The orientation of woody stems that have finished elongation can be actively controlled by phototropism. Interspecific variation in phototropic responsiveness of trees is a possible significant determinant of interspecific

  2. Energetics of ascent: insects on inclines.

    PubMed

    Full, R J; Tullis, A

    1990-03-01

    Small animals use more metabolic energy per unit mass than large animals to run on a level surface. If the cost to lift one gram of mass one vertical meter is constant, small animals should require proportionally smaller increases in metabolic cost to run uphill. To test this hypothesis on very small animals possessing an exceptional capacity for ascending steep gradients, we measured the metabolic cost of locomotion in the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, running at angles of 0, 45 and 90 degrees to the horizontal. Resting oxygen consumption (VO2rest) was not affected by incline angle. Steady-state oxygen consumption (VO2ss) increased linearly with speed at all angles of ascent. The minimum cost of locomotion (the slope of the VO2ss versus speed function) increased with increasing angle of ascent. The minimum cost of locomotion on 45 and 90 degrees inclines was two and three times greater, respectively, than the cost during horizontal running. The cockroach's metabolic cost of ascent greatly exceeds that predicted from the hypothesis of a constant efficiency for vertical work. Variations in stride frequency and contact time cannot account for the high metabolic cost, because they were independent of incline angle. An increase in the metabolic cost or amount of force production may best explain the increase in metabolic cost. Small animals, such as P. americana, can easily scale vertical surfaces, but the energetic cost is considerable.

  3. Two scenarios for avalanche dynamics in inclined granular layers.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2005-05-27

    We report experimental measurements of avalanche behavior of thin granular layers on an inclined plane for low volume flow rate. The dynamical properties of avalanches were quantitatively and qualitatively different for smooth glass beads compared to irregular granular materials such as sand. Two scenarios for granular avalanches on an incline are identified, and a theoretical explanation for these different scenarios is developed based on a depth-averaged approach that takes into account the differing rheologies of the granular materials.

  4. High-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA) of quasistatic contact angles on silanized silicon wafers with different surface topographies during inclining-plate measurements: Influence of the surface roughness on the contact line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heib, F.; Hempelmann, R.; Munief, W. M.; Ingebrandt, S.; Fug, F.; Possart, W.; Groß, K.; Schmitt, M.

    2015-07-01

    Contact angles and wetting of solid surfaces are strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. These influence quantities are difficult to distinguish from each other if contact angle measurements are performed by measuring only the advancing θa and the receding θr contact angle. In this regard, time-dependent water contact angles are measured on two hydrophobic modified silicon wafers with different physical surface topographies. The first surface is nearly atomically flat while the second surface is patterned (alternating flat and nanoscale rough patterns) which is synthesized by a photolithography and etching procedure. The different surface topographies are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The resulting set of contact angle data obtained by the high-precision drop shape analysis approach is further analyzed by a Gompertzian fitting procedure and a statistical counting procedure in dependence on the triple line velocity. The Gompertzian fit is used to analyze overall properties of the surface and dependencies between the motion on the front and the back edge of the droplets. The statistical counting procedure results in the calculation of expectation values E(p) and standard deviations σ(p) for the inclination angle φ, contact angle θ, triple line velocity vel and the covered distance of the triple line dis relative to the first boundary points XB,10. Therefore, sessile drops during the inclination of the sample surface are video recorded and different specific contact angle events in dependence on the acceleration/deceleration of the triple line motion are analyzed. This procedure results in characteristically density distributions in dependence on the surface properties. The used procedures lead to the possibility to investigate influences on contact

  5. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ∼2-2.5 km s{sup –1}. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84{sub −20}{sup +6} deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of ψ=4{sub −4}{sup +18} considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45{sub −19}{sup +9}, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s{sup –1}.

  6. Inclination-Independent Galaxy Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailin, Jeremy; Harris, William E.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new method to classify galaxies from large surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using inclination-corrected concentration, inclination-corrected location on the color-magnitude diagram, and apparent axis ratio. Explicitly accounting for inclination tightens the distribution of each of these parameters and enables simple boundaries to be drawn that delineate three different galaxy populations: early-type galaxies, which are red, highly concentrated, and round; late-type galaxies, which are blue, have low concentrations, and are disk dominated; and intermediate-type galaxies, which are red, have intermediate concentrations, and have disks. We have validated our method by comparing to visual classifications of high-quality imaging data from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue. The inclination correction is crucial to unveiling the previously unrecognized intermediate class. Intermediate-type galaxies, roughly corresponding to lenticulars and early spirals, lie on the red sequence. The red sequence is therefore composed of two distinct morphological types, suggesting that there are two distinct mechanisms for transiting to the red sequence. We propose that intermediate-type galaxies are those that have lost their cold gas via strangulation, while early-type galaxies are those that have experienced a major merger either that consumed their cold gas, or whose merger progenitors were already devoid of cold gas (the "dry merger" scenario).

  7. Marginal and Internal Fit of Conventional Metal-Ceramic and Lithium Disilicate CAD/CAM Crowns.

    PubMed

    Nam, Se-Jin; Yoon, Mi-Jung; Kim, Won-Hee; Ryu, Gil-Ju; Bang, Min-Ki; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate and compare the marginal and internal gap widths of lithium disilicate computer-aided design / computer-assisted manufacture (LDC) crowns and conventionally produced porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) crowns. A convenience sample of 21 patients treated with a single restoration was selected. PFM and LDC crowns were fabricated for each selected abutment tooth, following traditional crown preparation. Silicone replicas were produced, and internal gaps and marginal gaps were measured. Internal gaps were significantly larger for the axial and occlusal surfaces of LDC crowns than for those of PFM crowns (P < .001). Marginal gaps were not significantly different (P > .05). Both LDC crowns and PFM crowns showed clinically acceptable marginal fit.

  8. The Effect of Changes in Lower Incisor Inclination on Gingival Recession

    PubMed Central

    Kamak, Gulen; Kamak, Hasan; Keklik, Hakan; Gurel, Hakan Gurcan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Orthodontic treatment may promote development of recessions. The mechanism by which orthodontic treatment influences occurrence of recessions remains unclear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a change of mandibular incisor inclination promotes development of labial gingival recessions. Materials and Methods. The study sample comprised dental casts and lateral cephalograms obtained from 109 subjects before orthodontic treatment (Tb) and after orthodontic treatment (Ta). Depending on the change of lower incisor inclination during treatment, the subjects were divided into three groups: Retroclination (R), Stable Position (S), and Proclination (P). The presence of gingival recessions of mandibular incisors and clinical crown heights were assessed on plaster models. Results and Conclusions. From Tb to Ta, Inc_Incl showed a statistically significant change in the R, P, and S groups (p < 0.05). Increase of clinical crown heights of the lower incisors (42, 4, and 31) was not statistically significant in any group. The only statistically significant intergroup difference was the greater increase of the clinical crown height of tooth number 32 in the P group in comparison with the R group (p = 0.049). The change of lower incisor inclination during treatment did not lead to development of labial gingival recessions in the study sample. PMID:25961071

  9. Heliospheric current sheet inclinations predicted from source surface maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shodhan, S.; Crooker, N. U.; Hughes, W. J.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    The inclinations of the neutral line at the ecliptic plane derived from source surface model maps of coronal fields are measured for the interval from June 1976 to March 1992. The mean and median values of 53 deg and 57 deg are close to the average inclinations determined earlier from minimum variance analyses of solar wind measurements at sector boundaries, but the mode falls in the 80 deg - 90 deg bin. This result, which is based on the model assumptions implicit in deriving the source surface maps, predicts that the heliospheric current sheet typically intersects the ecliptic plane nearly at right angles, even without steepening by stream interaction regions. High inclinations dominate the solar cycle for about 7 years around solar maximum. Dips to lower inclination occur near solar minimum, but high variance admits a wide range of inclinations throughout the cycle. Compared to the smooth solar cycle variation of the maximum latitudinal excursion of the neutral line, often treated as the tilt angle of a flat heliospheric current sheet, the noisy variation of the inclinations reflects the degree to which the neutral line deviates from a sine wave, implying warps and corrugations in the current sheet. About a third of the time the neutral line so deviates that it doubles back in longitude.

  10. Heliospheric current sheet inclinations predicted from source surface maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shodhan, S.; Crooker, N. U.; Hughes, W. J.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    The inclinations of the neutral line at the ecliptic plane derived from source surface model maps of coronal fields are measured for the interval from June 1976 to March 1992. The mean and median values of 53 deg and 57 deg are close to the average inclinations determined earlier from minimum variance analyses of solar wind measurements at sector boundaries, but the mode falls in the 80 deg - 90 deg bin. This result, which is based on the model assumptions implicit in deriving the source surface maps, predicts that the heliospheric current sheet typically intersects the ecliptic plane nearly at right angles, even without steepening by stream interaction regions. High inclinations dominate the solar cycle for about 7 years around solar maximum. Dips to lower inclination occur near solar minimum, but high variance admits a wide range of inclinations throughout the cycle. Compared to the smooth solar cycle variation of the maximum latitudinal excursion of the neutral line, often treated as the tilt angle of a flat heliospheric current sheet, the noisy variation of the inclinations reflects the degree to which the neutral line deviates from a sine wave, implying warps and corrugations in the current sheet. About a third of the time the neutral line so deviates that it doubles back in longitude.

  11. INCLINATION MIXING IN THE CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu

    2011-07-20

    We investigate the long-term evolution of the inclinations of the known classical and resonant Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This is partially motivated by the observed bimodal inclination distribution and by the putative physical differences between the low- and high-inclination populations. We find that some classical KBOs undergo large changes in inclination over gigayear timescales, which means that a current member of the low-inclination population may have been in the high-inclination population in the past, and vice versa. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the time variability of inclinations are predominantly distant encounters with Neptune and chaotic diffusion near the boundaries of mean motion resonances. We reassess the correlations between inclination and physical properties including inclination time variability. We find that the size-inclination and color-inclination correlations are less statistically significant than previously reported (mostly due to the increased size of the data set since previous works with some contribution from inclination variability). The time variability of inclinations does not change the previous finding that binary classical KBOs have lower inclinations than non-binary objects. Our study of resonant objects in the classical Kuiper Belt region includes objects in the 3:2, 7:4, 2:1, and eight higher-order mean motion resonances. We find that these objects (some of which were previously classified as non-resonant) undergo larger changes in inclination compared to the non-resonant population, indicating that their current inclinations are not generally representative of their original inclinations. They are also less stable on gigayear timescales.

  12. An Investigation Into the Integrity of Fit of Provisional Crowns Using Current Proprietary Temporary Crown Materials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip D; Georgakis, Georgios; Niggli, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Three methods of direct provisional crown construction were investigated for accuracy of marginal fit. A modified proprietary crown coping was compared to Bis GMA and isobutyl methacrylate resin provisional crowns with margins modified by using a flowable composite and 'bead on' isobutyl methacrylate respectively. Measurement was at 50x magnification at seven sites over the fit surface. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13.0.1 and measurement compared using the Mann Whitney test set at a significance level of 0.05. Reliability was checked using the Bland Altman test. Statistical significant differences were found between the three groups. The order of best fit was Bis-GMA and flowable composite > isobutyl methacrylate with 'bead on' margins > Bis-GMA modified implant temporary coping. The clinical significance is that the Bis GMA and flowable composite combination can be used with equal confidence to traditional methods of temporarisation.

  13. The effects of gradually induced backward movement of the mandible by a Twin Inclined Plane Device in rats.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xianming; Xiong, Hui; Han, Guangli; Cheng, Xiangrong

    2012-09-01

    To develop a model of gradually induced backward movement of the mandible under normal masticatory action and to examine morphological changes in the mandible and condylar cartilage in rats. The newly developed Twin Inclined Plane Device (TIPD) was composed of upper and lower posterior metal crowns with a long inclined plane on both sides separately and was applied in experimental groups of 6-week-old male Wister rats. After 3, 14, 30, and 60 days, the rats were euthanatized and samples were collected. Various measurements and hematoxylin-and-eosin stains were performed. From day 30 on, the length of the condylar process was shorter in the TIPD groups than in the control groups (P < .05). The angulation of the condylar process axis to the mandibular plane was greater in the TIPD groups (P < .01). The thickness of the condylar cartilage in the posterior part of the posterior region was thinner in the TIPD groups (P < .05) on day 30 and even thinner (P < .01) on day 60; from day 30 on, the thickness in the anterior part of the posterior region was thicker in the TIPD groups (P < .01). TIPD can successfully induce backward movement of the mandible under normal masticatory action. TIPD can cause region-specific changes in condylar cartilage and leads to a continuous remodeling.

  14. Plume impingement forces on inclined flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, H.

    Plume impingement from spacecraft control thrusters on vehicles in space is simulated in wind tunnel scale experiments. Pressure and shear stress are measured on flat plates inclined to the plume axis between 0 and 90 deg. In addition to a nozzle of a 0.5N thruster, a free jet from a thin plate orifice was used, by which the flow regime from nearly free molecular flow to continuum flow was covered. Simple pressure and shear stress laws are given by which the impingement pressure and shear stress can be estimated for engineering applications.

  15. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Buarque e Silva, Wilkens Aurélio; Andrade e Silva, Frederico; De Souza, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM); Bi-layer crowns (BL). Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37 °C), and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = .05) indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM = 3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM = 3561.5 N ± 991.6), which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6). There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength.

  16. Influence of unilateral maxillary first molar extraction treatment on second and third molar inclination in Class II subdivision patients.

    PubMed

    Livas, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos; Booij, Johan Willem; Halazonetis, Demetrios J; Katsaros, Christos; Ren, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    To assess the maxillary second molar (M2) and third molar (M3) inclination following orthodontic treatment of Class II subdivision malocclusion with unilateral maxillary first molar (M1) extraction. Panoramic radiographs of 21 Class II subdivision adolescents (eight boys, 13 girls; mean age, 12.8 years; standard deviation, 1.7 years) before treatment, after treatment with extraction of one maxillary first molar and Begg appliances and after at least 1.8 years in retention were retrospectively collected from a private practice. M2 and M3 inclination angles (M2/ITP, M2/IOP, M3/ITP, M3/IOP), constructed by intertuberosity (ITP) and interorbital planes (IOP), were calculated for the extracted and nonextracted segments. Random effects regression analysis was performed to evaluate the effect on the molar angulation of extraction, time, and gender after adjusting for baseline measurements. Time and extraction status were significant predictors for M2 angulation. M2/ITP and M2/IOP decreased by 4.04 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -6.93, 1.16; P  =  .001) and 3.67 (95% CI: -6.76, -0.58; P  =  .020) in the extraction group compared to the nonextraction group after adjusting for time and gender. The adjusted analysis showed that extraction was the only predictor for M3 angulation that reached statistical significance. M3 mesial inclination increased by 7.38° (95% CI: -11.2, -3.54; P < .001) and 7.33° (95% CI: -11.48, -3.19; P  =  .001). M2 and M3 uprighting significantly improved in the extraction side after orthodontic treatment with unilateral maxillary M1 extraction. There was a significant increase in mesial tipping of maxillary second molar crowns over time.

  17. INTERNAL ADAPTATION OF CAST TITANIUM CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Sicknan Soares; Adabo, Gelson Luis; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Fonseca, Renata Garcia

    2007-01-01

    As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm). For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height) was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430°C, 515°C and 600°C. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3) for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X) and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm2). The data for each experimental condition (n=8) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05). The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD) of internal misfit were obtained for the 430°C/100%: (7.25 mm2 ±1.59) and 600°C/100% (8.8 mm2 ±2.25) groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit. PMID:19089139

  18. How accurately can the inclination angle, position angle, and location of the dynamic center be measured from the neutral hydrogen disk in the central regions of dwarf galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, John Henry

    Rotation curves measured using HI emission are a powerful tool for probing the mass distribution of galaxies. We investigate the accuracy with which rotation curves can be determined using the tilted-ring model. We have examined the effect of varying the dynamic center on measured rotation velocities within the inner regions of galaxies where the disagreement between theory and observation is the greatest. We examine a sample of dwarf galaxies (and one spiral galaxy) from the THINGS high-resolution survey (Walter et al. 2008). We find that the measured rotation curve is quite sensitive to the location of the dynamic center. This center is difficult to determine for dwarf galaxies. We also find that errors in rotation velocities determined with the tilted-ring method have been underestimated in previous studies.

  19. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified.

  20. The Photometric and Kinematic Structure of Face-on Disk Galaxies. III. Kinematic Inclinations from Hα Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained Hα velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i kin = 23° for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20° and 6% at 30°. Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical "face-on" Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15° and 5% at 30°. This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  1. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above 4×1018 eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-08-26

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding 4×1018 eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above 5.3×1018 eV, the ``ankle'', the flux can be described by a power law E–γ with index γ=2.70 ± 0.02 (stat) ± 0.1 (sys) followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy (Es) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value inmore » the absence of suppression, we find Es=(5.12±0.25 (stat)+1.0–1.2 (sys))×1019 eV.« less

  2. Retention force of secondary crowns to copings after temporary cementation: the effect of crown material and luting agent.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Torsten; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Golecki, Gudrun; Schwahn, Christian; Biffar, Reiner

    2010-12-01

    Tooth-implant supported restorations can be temporarily cemented if the natural abutments are protected by permanently cemented copings. This in vitro study investigated the retention forces of pure titanium crowns to milled titanium alloy copings and of cobalt-chromium crowns to copings made of electroplated gold after cementation with different luting agents. Five specimens per group were cemented with acrylic-urethane cement (inner crown surface preisolated with petroleum jelly) and provisional zinc oxide cement. The retention was measured using a universal testing machine and a dental device for crown removal. The differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance. The pull-off forces for the cobalt-chromium secondary crowns cemented on gold copings using zinc oxide cement were significantly higher (mean=144.5 N) than the other crown-cement combinations (32.2-54.4 N), which showed no significant differences in the retention force. The impulse number and magnitude of the dental device was usually low and showed no substantial differences between the crown-cement combinations. It can be concluded that the results of the clinical removal method for prostheses differ from the results of the pull-off test. The question which luting agent is the better choice for retrievable restorations remains unanswered without further clinical and laboratory studies.

  3. Turner syndrome isochromosome karyotype correlates with decreased dental crown width.

    PubMed

    Rizell, S; Barrenäs, M-L; Andlin-Sobocki, A; Stecksén-Blicks, C; Kjellberg, H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this project was to study possible influences of Turner syndrome (TS) karyotype and the number of X chromosomes with intact short arm (p-arm) on dental crown width. Primary and permanent mesio-distal crown width was measured on plaster casts from 112 TS females. The influence on crown width of four karyotypes: 1. monosomy (45,X), 2. mosaic (45,X/46,XX), 3. isochromosome, and 4. other, and the number of intact X chromosomal p-arms were investigated. In comparisons between karyotypes, statistically significant differences were found for isochromosome karyotype maxillary second premolars, canines, laterals, mandibular first premolars, and canines, indicating that this karyotype was the most divergent as shown by the most reduced crown width. When each karyotype group were compared versus controls, all teeth in the isochromosome group were significantly smaller than controls (P < 0.01-0.001). The 45,X/46,XX karyotype expressed fewer and smaller differences from controls, while 45,X individuals seemed to display an intermediate tooth width compared with 45,X/46,XX and isochromosomes. No significant difference in crown width was found comparing the groups with one or two intact X chromosomal p-arms. Both primary and permanent teeth proved to have a significantly smaller crown width in the entire group of TS females compared to healthy females. We conclude that the isochromosome group deviates most from other karyotypes and controls, exhibiting the smallest dental crown width, while individuals with 45,X/46,XX mosaicism seemed to have a less affected crown width. An influence of the number of intact p-arms on crown width could not be demonstrated in this study.

  4. Crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Dung, S Z; Yang, Y H

    2000-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to characterize the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese; (2) to compare the differences in the deciduous crown diameters between different populations. The results might provide odontometric information in making preformed stainless steel crowns of the Chinese population. Study casts of 90 children (51 boys and 39 girls) of aged 3 to 6 years were used in this study. The maximum mesiodistal crown diameter (the greatest distance between the contact points of the approximal surfaces) and the buccolingual crown diameter (the greatest distance at a right angle to the mesiodistal measurement) were obtained by using an electronic digital caliper. Significant differences between antimeres were found in the mesiodistal diameters of maxillary canine and maxillary molars (p < 0.001) as well as in the buccolingual diameters of mandibular molars (p < 0.05). Excellent correlations between the antimeres of the corresponding teeth were found (r = 0.70 to 0.96). Boys generally had larger crown diameters than girls with the exception of mesiodistal diameters of maxillary and mandibular canines, and mandibular lateral incisor, whereas the statistically significant gender difference was only found in the buccolingual diameter of mandibular second molar (p < 0.05). The higher the percentage of sexual dimorphism, the larger the gender differences. The percentage of sexual dimorphism ranged from 0.09 to 1.94 for mesiodistal diameters and 0.04 to 2.86 for buccolingual diameters. The mandibular second molar was the most dimorphic tooth. Variations in the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth existed among and within different populations. Deciduous mesiodistal crown diameters of Taiwanese were, in general, smaller than those of Australian aborigines, Taiwan Chinese aborigines, and Hong Kong Chinese, but larger than those of American whites. When considering the buccolingual crown diameters, our data were significantly smaller than those

  5. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above 4×1018 eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-08-26

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding 4×1018 eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above 5.3×1018 eV, the ``ankle'', the flux can be described by a power law E–γ with index γ=2.70 ± 0.02 (stat) ± 0.1 (sys) followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy (Es) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find Es=(5.12±0.25 (stat)+1.0–1.2 (sys))×1019 eV.

  6. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above 4 × 10{sup 18} eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration: Pierre Augur Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding 4×10{sup 18} eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above 5.3×10{sup 18} eV, the ''ankle'', the flux can be described by a power law E{sup −γ} with index γ=2.70 ± 0.02 (stat) ± 0.1 (sys) followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy (E{sub s}) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find E{sub s}=(5.12±0.25 (stat){sup +1.0}{sub −1.2} (sys))×10{sup 19} eV.

  7. Evaluation of performance of veterinary in-clinic hematology analyzers.

    PubMed

    Rishniw, Mark; Pion, Paul D

    2016-12-01

    A previous study provided information regarding the quality of in-clinic veterinary biochemistry testing. However, no similar studies for in-clinic veterinary hematology testing have been conducted. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of hematology testing in veterinary in-clinic laboratories using results obtained from testing 3 levels of canine EDTA blood samples. Clinicians prepared blood samples to achieve measurand concentrations within, below, and above their RIs and evaluated the samples in triplicate using their in-clinic analyzers. Quality was assessed by comparison of calculated total error with quality requirements, determination of sigma metrics, use of a quality goal index, and agreement between in-clinic and reference laboratory instruments. Suitability for statistical quality control was determined using adaptations from the computerized program, EZRules3. Evaluation of 10 veterinary in-clinic hematology analyzers showed that these instruments often fail to meet quality requirements. At least 60% of analyzers reasonably determined RBC, WBC, HCT, and HGB, when assessed by most quality goal criteria; platelets were less reliably measured, with 80% deemed suitable for low platelet counts, but only 30% for high platelet counts, and automated differential leukocyte counts were generally considered unsuitable for clinical use with fewer than 40% of analyzers meeting the least stringent quality goal requirements. Fewer than 50% of analyzers were able to meet requirements for statistical quality control for any measurand. These findings reflect the current status of in-clinic hematology analyzer performance and provide a basis for future evaluations of the quality of veterinary laboratory testing. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. Carbohydrate Concentrations in Crown Fractions from Winter Oat during Hardening at Sub-zero Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    LIVINGSTON, DAVID; PREMAKUMAR, R.; TALLURY, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Contradictory results in correlation studies of plant carbohydrates with freezing tolerance may be because whole crown tissue is analysed for carbohydrates while differences exist in the survival of specific tissue within the crown. The aim of this study was to see if carbohydrate changes in tissue within oat crowns during second phase hardening (sub-zero hardening) are tissue specific. • Methods The lower portion of oat (Avena sativa) crowns was exposed to mild grinding in a blender and the remaining crown meristem complex, consisting of tough root-like vessels, was ground in a device developed specifically for grinding cereal crown tissue. Carbohydrates were extracted by water and measured by HPLC. Carbohydrate concentrations were compared in the two regions of the crown before and after hardening at sub-zero temperatures. • Key Results Fructan of all size classes except DP>6 decreased during sub-zero hardening in both stems (base of leaf sheath) and crown meristem complex. Total simple sugar increase, including sucrose, was significantly higher in the crown meristem complex than in the stem. • Conclusions Results support the hypothesis that carbohydrate change in mildly frozen plants is tissue specific within crowns and underscore the need to evaluate specific tissue within the crown when correlating the biochemistry of plants with freezing tolerance. PMID:15894549

  9. Evaluation of marginal fit of 2 CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Park, Ji-Hee; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Oh, Gye-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the marginal fit of two CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems compared to lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shoulder and deep chamfer margin were formed on each acrylic resin tooth model of a maxillary first premolar. Two CAD-CAM systems (Prettau®Zirconia and ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max®press) crowns were made (n=16). Each crown was bonded to stone dies with resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Marginal gap and absolute marginal discrepancy of crowns were measured using a light microscope equipped with a digital camera (Leica DFC295) magnified by a factor of 100. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's HSD test were conducted to analyze the significance of crown marginal fit regarding the finish line configuration and the fabrication system. RESULTS The mean marginal gap of lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) was significantly lower than that of the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) (P<.05). Both fabrication systems and finish line configurations significantly influenced the absolute marginal discrepancy (P<.05). CONCLUSION The lithium disilicate glass ceramic crown (IPS e.max®press) had significantly smaller marginal gap than the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia). In terms of absolute marginal discrepancy, the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) had under-extended margin, whereas the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) had overextended margins. PMID:26330973

  10. Evaluation of marginal fit of 2 CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown.

    PubMed

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Park, Ji-Hee; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2015-08-01

    This study was to evaluate the marginal fit of two CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems compared to lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. Shoulder and deep chamfer margin were formed on each acrylic resin tooth model of a maxillary first premolar. Two CAD-CAM systems (Prettau®Zirconia and ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max®press) crowns were made (n=16). Each crown was bonded to stone dies with resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Marginal gap and absolute marginal discrepancy of crowns were measured using a light microscope equipped with a digital camera (Leica DFC295) magnified by a factor of 100. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's HSD test were conducted to analyze the significance of crown marginal fit regarding the finish line configuration and the fabrication system. The mean marginal gap of lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) was significantly lower than that of the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) (P<.05). Both fabrication systems and finish line configurations significantly influenced the absolute marginal discrepancy (P<.05). The lithium disilicate glass ceramic crown (IPS e.max®press) had significantly smaller marginal gap than the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia). In terms of absolute marginal discrepancy, the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) had under-extended margin, whereas the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) had overextended margins.

  11. ASTER Views California Crown Fire

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-03

    NASA Terra spacecraft captured this image of the wildfire near Palmdale, Calif. on August 1, 2010 called the Crown fire. The burned areas appear in shades of gray in this simulated natural color image.

  12. Legged-locomotion on inclined granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieser, Jennifer; Qian, Feifei; Goldman, Daniel

    Animals traverse a wide variety of complex environments, including situations in which the ground beneath them can yield (e.g. dry granular media in desert dunes). Locomotion strategies that are effective on level granular media can fail when traversing a granular slope. Taking inspiration from successful legged-locomotors in sandy, uneven settings, we explore the ability of a small (15 cm long, 100 g), six-c-shaped legged robot to run uphill in a bed of 1-mm-diameter poppy seeds, using an alternating tripod gait. Our fully automated experiments reveal that locomotor performance can depend sensitively on both environmental parameters such as the inclination angle and volume fraction of the substrate, and robot morphology and control parameters like leg shape, step frequency, and the friction between the feet of the robot and the substrate. We assess performance by measuring the average speed of the robot, and we find that the robot tends to perform better at higher step frequency and lower inclination angles, and that average speed decreases more rapidly with increasing angle for higher step frequency.

  13. Horizontal Roll Vortices and Crown Fires.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Donald A.

    1982-06-01

    Observational evidence from nine crown fires suggests that horizontal roll vortices are a major mechanism in crown-fire spread. Post-burn aerial photography indicates that unburned tree-crown streets are common with crown fire. Investigation of the understory of these crown streets after two fires showed uncharred tree trunks along a center line. This evidence supports a hypothesis of vortex action causing strong downward motion of air along the streets. Additionally, photographs of two ongoing crown fires show apparent horizontal roll vortices. Discussion also includes laboratory and numerical studies in fluid dynamics that may apply to crown fires.

  14. Crown Position and Light Exposure Classification-An Alternative to Field-Assigned Crown Class

    Treesearch

    William A. Bechtold

    2003-01-01

    Crown class, an ordinal tree-level mensuration attribute used extensively by foresters, is difficult to assign in the field because definitions of individual classes are confounded by ambiguous references to the position the tree in the canopy and amount of light received by its crown. When crown class is decomposed into its two elements-crown position and crown light...

  15. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Crown Galls Host Distinct Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Faist, Hanna; Keller, Alexander; Hentschel, Ute; Deeken, Rosalia

    2016-09-15

    species were found to be avirulent, even though they lived together with A. vitis in the same crown gall tumor. As has been reported for human cancer, the crown gall tumor also hosted opportunistic bacteria that are adapted to the tumor microenvironment. Characterization of the microbiota in various diseases using amplicon sequencing may help in early diagnosis, to serve as a preventative measure of disease in the future. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Crown Galls Host Distinct Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Faist, Hanna; Keller, Alexander; Hentschel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    other Agrobacterium species were found to be avirulent, even though they lived together with A. vitis in the same crown gall tumor. As has been reported for human cancer, the crown gall tumor also hosted opportunistic bacteria that are adapted to the tumor microenvironment. Characterization of the microbiota in various diseases using amplicon sequencing may help in early diagnosis, to serve as a preventative measure of disease in the future. PMID:27371584

  17. PEEK Primary Crowns with Cobalt-Chromium, Zirconia and Galvanic Secondary Crowns with Different Tapers—A Comparison of Retention Forces

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Veronika; Schmidlin, Patrick R.; Merk, Susanne; Wagner, Christina; Roos, Malgorzata; Eichberger, Marlis; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-01-01

    In prosthetic dentistry, double crown systems have proved their suitability as retainers for removable partial dentures. However, investigations in this context, regarding polyetheretherketone, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the retention force (RF) between polyetheretherketone (PEEK) primary and cobalt-chromium (CoCr), zirconia (ZrO2) and galvanic (GAL) secondary crowns with three different tapers. Primary PEEK-crowns were milled with the tapers 0°, 1°, and 2° (n = 10/taper, respectively). Afterwards, 90 secondary crowns were fabricated: (i) 30 CoCr-crowns milled from Ceramill Sintron (AmannGirrbach, Koblach, Austria) (n = 10/taper), (ii) 30 ZrO2-crowns milled from Ceramill ZI (AmannGirrbach, Koblach, Austria) (n = 10/taper), and (iii) 30 GAL-crowns made using electroforming (n = 10/taper). RF was measured in a pull-off test (20 pull-offs/specimen) and data were analyzed using 2-/1-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey-Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) post hoc test and linear regression analyses (p < 0.05). The measured mean RF values ranged between 9.6 and 38.2 N. With regard to the 0°, 1°, and 2° tapered crowns, no statistically significant differences between CoCr and ZrO2 were observed (p > 0.141). At 0° taper, no differences in retention forces between GAL, CrCr, and ZrO2 crowns were found (p = 0.075). However, at 1° and 2° taper, lower RF for GAL-crowns were observed (p < 0.009, p < 0.001, respectively). According to this laboratory study, PEEK might be a suitable material for primary crowns, regardless of the taper and the material of secondary crown. Long-term results, however, are still necessary. PMID:28773311

  18. Trajectories of balls on the inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    We view trajectories of projection on the inclined plane. We will see that the inclined throw in the homogeneous field is a special case of the throw on the inclined plane. Here the trajectories of projection are dependent upon throwing angle and initial velocity. First we will treat the frictionless case. Thereafter, it will be easier to understand the friction case. In chapter 2 we take into consideration friction. There is an english and a german edition.

  19. Drop motion due to oscillations of an inclined substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2014-11-01

    A sessile drop on a stationary inclined substrate remains pinned unless the angle of inclination is greater than some critical value. Alternatively, when shaken at even small angles of inclination, the drop undergoes shape deflections which may lead to drop translation. Translation occurs when large contact angle fluctuations, favored by oscillations at resonance, overcome contact angle hysteresis. In this study, resonance is triggered by substrate-normal oscillations. The drop translation is typically observed to be of constant speed for a given set of parameters. The speed is measured experimentally as a function of resonance mode, driving amplitude and drop volume. This technique of activating the motion of drops having a particular volume can be utilized for applications of droplet selection and transport.

  20. Synchrotron radiation computed laminography using an inclined detector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Gang; Yi, Qiru; Chen, Yu; Gao, Zhenhua; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation computed laminography (SR-CL) has been in use in three-dimensional non-destructive imaging of flat objects for several years. A new set-up is proposed based on the traditional SR-CL method but with the detector inclined at the same angle as the sample inclination to collect projections. The results of computer simulations and real-sample experiments demonstrate that reconstructions acquired using an inclined detector are of better quality compared with those acquired using ordinary detecting methods, especially for the situation of few projections and small difference of attenuation ratio of the sample. This method could be applied to obtain high-quality images of weak-contrast samples with short measurement time and mild radiation damage.

  1. Inclination flattening and the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, Lisa

    2005-05-01

    model. The method can be tested using sediments deposited in a known field. Application of the elongation/inclination correction method to two magnetostratigraphic data sets from red beds in Asia and Pakistan brings the inclinations into agreement with those predicted from modern GPS measurements and from global paleomagnetic data. There appears to be no compelling reason at this time to abandon the geocentric dipole hypothesis, which has provided such an excellent working model for so long.

  2. Effects of lumbar extensor fatigue and surface inclination on postural control during quiet stance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dingding; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2012-11-01

    A number of work environments require workers to perform tasks on inclined surfaces. Such tasks, along with muscle fatigue, can impair postural control and increase falling risks. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of surface inclination angle, standing direction, and lumbar extensor fatigue on postural control during quiet standing. A group of 16 young, healthy participants were tested while standing on inclined surfaces before and after lumbar extensor fatigue (induced by repetitive isotonic exercise). Three inclination angles (0°, 18° and 26°) and three standing directions (uphill, downhill, and lateral facing) were examined. Postural control was assessed using several measures derived from center-of-pressure time series and subjectively perceived stability. Significant main and interactive effects of inclination angle and standing direction were found for all dependent measures. The adverse effects of standing on inclined surfaces were found to differ between the three standing directions. In general, dose-response relationships with inclination angle were evident, particularly in the lateral-facing direction. Fatigue-related effects differed between conditions, suggesting that the adverse effect of lumbar extensor fatigue on postural control depend on inclination angle and standing direction. These findings may facilitate the development of fall prevention interventions for work involving inclined surfaces.

  3. Retention of Resin Composite CAM Crowns Following Different Bonding Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat, Amir Hossein

    Objectives: Resin composite CAM materials offer more efficient milling, however, there is a high incidence of clinical debonding when this material is used for full-coverage crowns. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of different surface treat-ments and primers on the crown retention of a new resin composite CAM material. Methods: 120 molars were prepared with a 24 degree taper, 1.5mm height, and axial walls in dentin. Surface area was measured by digital microscopy and preparations were scanned with an intraoral scanner. Crowns were milled from an experimental com-posite material with 4mm occlusal height. Teeth were randomly allocated to 12 groups (n= 10) based on the possible combinations of three surface treatments (Control, Alumina air abrasion [50mum Al2O3 at 0.28MPa], Hydrofluoric acid etch [5% HF acid for 20 sec]), silane application (with or without Kerr Silane), and adhesive application (with or without Optibond XTR adhesive). Optibond XTR adhesive was applied to the tooth preparations and crowns were bonded with MaxCem Elite. Crowns were fatigued for 100,000 cycles at 100N in water. Crowns were debonded in tension in a universal testing machine at 1mm/min. Crown retention strength (maximum load/area of preparation) was analyzed using a three-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc tests. Results: Surface treatment, silane and adhesive applications independently affect the retention force (p<0.05). All interactions were not statistically significant. Alumina airborne abrasion surface treatment, silane and adhesive applications all boost retention strength. Conclusions: Resin composite crowns should be alumina particle abraded and coated with silane and adhesive.

  4. Variation in Crown Light Utilization Characteristics among Tropical Canopy Trees

    PubMed Central

    KITAJIMA, KAORU; MULKEY, STEPHEN S.; WRIGHT, S. JOSEPH

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Light extinction through crowns of canopy trees determines light availability at lower levels within forests. The goal of this paper is the exploration of foliage distribution and light extinction in crowns of five canopy tree species in relation to their shoot architecture, leaf traits (mean leaf angle, life span, photosynthetic characteristics) and successional status (from pioneers to persistent). • Methods Light extinction was examined at three hierarchical levels of foliage organization, the whole crown, the outermost canopy and the individual shoots, in a tropical moist forest with direct canopy access with a tower crane. Photon flux density and cumulative leaf area index (LAI) were measured at intervals of 0·25–1 m along multiple vertical transects through three to five mature tree crowns of each species to estimate light extinction coefficients (K). • Results Cecropia longipes, a pioneer species with the shortest leaf life span, had crown LAI <0·5. Among the remaining four species, crown LAI ranged from 2 to 8, and species with orthotropic terminal shoots exhibited lower light extinction coefficients (0·35) than those with plagiotropic shoots (0·53–0·80). Within each type, later successional species exhibited greater maximum LAI and total light extinction. A dense layer of leaves at the outermost crown of a late successional species resulted in an average light extinction of 61 % within 0·5 m from the surface. In late successional species, leaf position within individual shoots does not predict the light availability at the individual leaf surface, which may explain their slow decline of photosynthetic capacity with leaf age and weak differentiation of sun and shade leaves. • Conclusion Later-successional tree crowns, especially those with orthotropic branches, exhibit lower light extinction coefficients, but greater total LAI and total light extinction, which contribute to their efficient use of light and competitive

  5. Variation in crown light utilization characteristics among tropical canopy trees.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Kaoru; Mulkey, Stephen S; Wright, S Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Light extinction through crowns of canopy trees determines light availability at lower levels within forests. The goal of this paper is the exploration of foliage distribution and light extinction in crowns of five canopy tree species in relation to their shoot architecture, leaf traits (mean leaf angle, life span, photosynthetic characteristics) and successional status (from pioneers to persistent). Light extinction was examined at three hierarchical levels of foliage organization, the whole crown, the outermost canopy and the individual shoots, in a tropical moist forest with direct canopy access with a tower crane. Photon flux density and cumulative leaf area index (LAI) were measured at intervals of 0.25-1 m along multiple vertical transects through three to five mature tree crowns of each species to estimate light extinction coefficients (K). Cecropia longipes, a pioneer species with the shortest leaf life span, had crown LAI <0.5. Among the remaining four species, crown LAI ranged from 2 to 8, and species with orthotropic terminal shoots exhibited lower light extinction coefficients (0.35) than those with plagiotropic shoots (0.53-0.80). Within each type, later successional species exhibited greater maximum LAI and total light extinction. A dense layer of leaves at the outermost crown of a late successional species resulted in an average light extinction of 61% within 0.5 m from the surface. In late successional species, leaf position within individual shoots does not predict the light availability at the individual leaf surface, which may explain their slow decline of photosynthetic capacity with leaf age and weak differentiation of sun and shade leaves. Later-successional tree crowns, especially those with orthotropic branches, exhibit lower light extinction coefficients, but greater total LAI and total light extinction, which contribute to their efficient use of light and competitive dominance.

  6. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fits of complete crowns loaded at the central fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1995-05-01

    In dentistry, a defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry was applied to evaluate the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different materials (Au alloy, Pd-Ag alloy, Ni-Cr alloy, and porcelain fused to metal) were tested. The out-of-plane displacements of the crown specimens were measured by the method of multiple observations. The displacements measured range from 6 to 10 micrometers under normal load (25 N). However, the marginal openings of all four crowns were estimated to be less than 0.2 micrometers . In addition the defect of the crown was examined.

  7. Transient natural convection in heated inclined tubes

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. . Oceanic Div.); Denbow, D.A. ); Murphy, H.D. )

    1990-05-01

    To simulate natural convection flow patterns in directionally drilled wellbores, experiments and analyses were conducted for a circular tube with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 36 at angles of 0{degree}, 20{degree}, and 35{degree} from the vertical. The tube was heated at the bottom and cooled at the top, and the insulation was adjusted so that approximately one- to two-thirds of the power dissipated was transferred through the tube wall to the surroundings. An aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol was employed as the working fluid in order to obtain low Rayleigh numbers corresponding to conditions in geothermal wellbores. Results were primarily qualitative but were useful in providing insight into the phenomena occurring. Steady-state temperature distributions were measured for the three orientations and for several heating rates to demonstrate the effects of tube angle and Rayleigh number. transient measurements of the temperature distribution were obtained during cooling from a higher temperature without a heat source to calibrate the heat losses. With the electrical heat source, temporal data were taken during heating to examine the approach to steady state. Quasi-steady flow conditions were approached rapidly, but the overall time constant of the apparatus was of the order of one-third of a day. Predictions with the three-dimensional TEMPEST code were first tested by comparison with simple conduction analyses. Comparison with actual data showed good agreement of the predicted temperature levels for the maximum inclination, 35{degree}, and slightly poorer agreement for the other limit, a vertical tube. Trends of temperature level and Nusselt number with heating rate or Rayleigh number were reasonable, but the predicted variation of the end Nusselt number versus inclination was in the opposite direction from the experiment. 75 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Lower incisor inclination regarding different reference planes.

    PubMed

    Zataráin, Brenda; Avila, Josué; Moyaho, Angeles; Carrasco, Rosendo; Velasco, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of lower incisor inclination with respect to different reference planes. It was an observational, analytical, longitudinal, prospective study conducted on 100 lateral cephalograms which were corrected according to the photograph in natural head position in order to draw the true vertical plane (TVP). The incisor mandibular plane angle (IMPA) was compensated to eliminate the variation of the mandibular plane growth type with the formula "FMApx.- 25 (FMA) + IMPApx. = compensated IMPA (IMPACOM)". As the data followed normal distribution determined by the KolmogorovSmirnov test, parametric tests were used for the statistical analysis, Ttest, ANOVA and Pearson coefficient correlation test. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical significance of p <0.05. There is correlation between TVP and NB line (NB) (0.8614), Frankfort mandibular incisor angle (FMIA) (0.8894), IMPA (0.6351), Apo line (Apo) (0.609), IMPACOM (0.8895) and McHorris angle (MH) (0.7769). ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the means for the 7 variables with 95% confidence level, P=0.0001. The multiple range test showed no significant difference among means: APoNB (0.88), IMPAMH (0.36), IMPANB (0.65), FMIAIMPACOM (0.01), FMIATVP (0.18), TVPIMPACOM (0.17). There was correlation among all reference planes. There were statistically significant differences among the means of the planes measured, except for IMPACOM, FMIA and TVP. The IMPA differed significantly from the IMPACOM. The compensated IMPA and the FMIA did not differ significantly from the TVP. The true horizontal plane was mismatched with Frankfort plane in 84% of the sample with a range of 19°. The true vertical plane is adequate for measuring lower incisor inclination.

  9. Optimum inclination for shuttle retrieval of inclination non-sensitive satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A study to identify the optimum inclination for a satellite when the satellite is inclination non-sensitive and is to be retrieved is reported. This inclination is such that it provides an opportunity for a retrieval flight at least once each day with minimal on-orbit phasing requirements and minimal ascent performance losses.

  10. Synthesis and fluorescence properties of divalent europium-poly(methacrylate containing crown ether structure) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiyama, N.; Nakamura, H.; Mishima, T.; Shiokawa, J.; Adachi, G. )

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on divalent europium complexes with poly(methacrylate containing crown ether structure)s, poly(crown ether)s, prepared and their fluorescence properties studied. The polymers used were poly(15-crown-5-methyl methacrylate) (PMA15C5), copoly(15- crown-5-methyl methacrylate-X) (copoly(MA15C5-X)); (X = MMA, EMA, BMA, 2-methoxyethyl methacrylate (MAGI) 3,6,9,12,15- pentaoxahexadecyl methacrylate (MAG5)), poly(18-crown-6- methyl methacrylate) (PMA18C6), and copoly(18-crown-6-methyl methacrylate-MMA) (copoly(MA18C6-MMA)), which were obtained by bulk polymerization. The fluorescence properties of Eu{sup 2+} polymers activated by complexing Eu{sup 2+} ions with crown ether groups were measured in powder form. The Eu{sup 2+}-poly (crown ether)s irradiated by UV light generally gave blue bright emission in the region of 420-465 nm. It was Eu{sup 2+}-copoly(Ma15C5-X); (X = MMA, EMA, and MAG1) that showed the largest emission intensity among the Eu{sup 2+} polymers, and its emission intensity was ca. 20% of that for CaWO{sub 4}:Pb (NBS1026) whose quantum efficiency is about 76%. The intensities of emission for the Eu{sup 2+} polymers containing 15-crown-5 were much larger than that for the ones containing 18-crown-6.

  11. A study of intermittent flow in downward inclined pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Sarica, C.; Chen, X.; Brill, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    The downward simultaneous flow of gas and liquid is often encountered in hilly terrain pipelines and steam injection wells. Most of the available methods for predicting the behavior of gas-liquid flow in pipes have been developed for horizontal and upward inclined pipes. In this study, co-current steady state slug flow in downward inclined pipes is investigated, experimentally and theoretically. A series of slug flow experiments are conducted with an air-kerosene system in a 2-in. diameter, 75-ft long pipe installed on an inclinable structure. Liquid holdup and pressure drop measurements are obtained for downward inclination angles from 0{degree} to {minus}90{degree} at different flow conditions. Correlations for slug flow characteristics are obtained based on the experimental data. A mechanistic model based on a unit cell approach has been proposed for the prediction of the detailed slug structure, and subsequently the pressure gradient. Fully developed slug flow could not be observed from {minus}50{degree} to {minus}90{degree}. A correlation was obtained for slug liquid holdup, and an analytical model and a correlation were developed for slug translational velocity. The lognormal distribution was found to best fit all the experimental slug length data. Equations for mean and design slug length were derived from the lognormal distribution function for inclination angles ranging from 0{degree} to {minus}30{degree}. A slug frequency correlation was also developed. The model can be used to predict intermittent flow behavior in downward inclined pipes. The correlations for slug liquid holdup, slug translational velocity, and slug length and frequency are closure relationships applicable to any model. Slug frequency information is also imperative for erosion and corrosion rate predictions.

  12. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  13. 46 CFR 28.535 - Inclining test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inclining test. 28.535 Section 28.535 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.535 Inclining test. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this...

  14. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  15. Removal of failed crown and bridge

    PubMed Central

    Rahul, G R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    Crown and bridge have life span of many years but they fail for a number of reasons. Over the years, many devices have been designed to remove crowns and bridges from abutment teeth. While the removal of temporary crowns and bridges is usually very straightforward, the removal of a definitive cast crown with unknown cement is more challenging. Removal is often by destructive means. There are a number of circumstances, however, in which conservative disassembly would aid the practitioner in completing restorative/endodontic procedures. There are different mechanisms available to remove a failed crown or bridge. But there is no information published about the classification of available systems for crown and bridge removal. So it is logical to classify these systems into different groups which can help a clinician in choosing a particular type of system depending upon the clinical situation. The aim of this article is to provide a classification for various crown and bridge removal systems; describe how a number of systems work; and when and why they might be used. A PubMed search of English literature was conducted up to January 2010 using the terms: Crown and bridge removal, Crown and bridge disassembly, Crown and bridge failure. Additionally, the bibliographies of 3 previous reviews, their cross references as well as articles published in various journals like International Endodontic Journal, Journal of Endodontics and were manually searched. Key words:Crown and bridge removal, Crown and bridge disassembly, Crown and bridge failure. PMID:24558549

  16. Removal of failed crown and bridge.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G R; Poduval, Soorya T; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-07-01

    Crown and bridge have life span of many years but they fail for a number of reasons. Over the years, many devices have been designed to remove crowns and bridges from abutment teeth. While the removal of temporary crowns and bridges is usually very straightforward, the removal of a definitive cast crown with unknown cement is more challenging. Removal is often by destructive means. There are a number of circumstances, however, in which conservative disassembly would aid the practitioner in completing restorative/endodontic procedures. There are different mechanisms available to remove a failed crown or bridge. But there is no information published about the classification of available systems for crown and bridge removal. So it is logical to classify these systems into different groups which can help a clinician in choosing a particular type of system depending upon the clinical situation. The aim of this article is to provide a classification for various crown and bridge removal systems; describe how a number of systems work; and when and why they might be used. A PubMed search of English literature was conducted up to January 2010 using the terms: Crown and bridge removal, Crown and bridge disassembly, Crown and bridge failure. Additionally, the bibliographies of 3 previous reviews, their cross references as well as articles published in various journals like International Endodontic Journal, Journal of Endodontics and were manually searched. Key words:Crown and bridge removal, Crown and bridge disassembly, Crown and bridge failure.

  17. Effects of photographic distance on tree crown atributes calculated using urbancrowns image analysis software

    Treesearch

    Mason F. Patterson; P. Eric Wiseman; Matthew F. Winn; Sang-mook Lee; Philip A. Araman

    2011-01-01

    UrbanCrowns is a software program developed by the USDA Forest Service that computes crown attributes using a side-view digital photograph and a few basic field measurements. From an operational standpoint, it is not known how well the software performs under varying photographic conditions for trees of diverse size, which could impact measurement reproducibility and...

  18. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fit of complete crowns loaded at central fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1993-07-01

    In dentistry, the defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry is applied to study the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different casting materials (Au, Pd-Ag, Ni-Cr, and PFM) were tested. The horizontal displacements of two points near the margin, measured by the method of multiple observations, could be as large as 15 micrometers under normal load (25 kgw). However, the marginal discrepancy of all four crowns estimated were quite small (< 0.2 micrometers ). This also indicates that the cementation between the crown and the tooth is quite good. Nevertheless, when the load was increased to 45 kgw, a defect of cementation was found on the Pd-Ag crown.

  19. Assessing crown fire potential by linking models of surface and crown fire behavior

    Treesearch

    Joe H. Scott; Elizabeth D. Reinhardt

    2001-01-01

    Fire managers are increasingly concerned about the threat of crown fires, yet only now are quantitative methods for assessing crown fire hazard being developed. Links among existing mathematical models of fire behavior are used to develop two indices of crown fire hazard-the Torching Index and Crowning Index. These indices can be used to ordinate different forest...

  20. Extracting oil palm crown from WorldView-2 satellite image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korom, A.; Phua, M.-H.; Hirata, Y.; Matsuura, T.

    2014-02-01

    Oil palm (OP) is the most commercial crop in Malaysia. Estimating the crowns is important for biomass estimation from high resolution satellite (HRS) image. This study examined extraction of individual OP crown from a WorldView-2 image using twofold algorithms, i.e., masking of Non-OP pixels and detection of individual OP crown based on the watershed segmentation of greyscale images. The study site was located in Beluran district, central Sabah, where matured OPs with the age ranging from 15 to 25 years old have been planted. We examined two compound vegetation indices of (NDVI+1)*DVI and NDII for masking non-OP crown areas. Using kappa statistics, an optimal threshold value was set with the highest accuracy at 90.6% for differentiating OP crown areas from Non-OP areas. After the watershed segmentation of OP crown areas with additional post-procedures, about 77% of individual OP crowns were successfully detected in comparison to the manual based delineation. Shape and location of each crown segment was then assessed based on a modified version of the goodness measures of Möller et al which was 0.3, indicating an acceptable CSGM (combined segmentation goodness measures) agreements between the automated and manually delineated crowns (perfect case is '1').

  1. Extracting Oil Palm Crown from WorldView-2 Satellite Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korom, A.; Phua, M.-H.; Hirata, Y.; Matsuura, T.

    2014-02-01

    Oil palm (OP) is the most commercial crop in Malaysia. Estimating the crowns is important for biomass estimation from high resolution satellite (HRS) image. This study examined extraction of individual OP crown from a WorldView-2 image using twofold algorithms, i.e., masking of Non-OP pixels and detection of individual OP crown based on the watershed segmentation of greyscale images. The study site was located in Beluran district, central Sabah, where matured OPs with the age ranging from 15 to 25 years old have been planted. We examined two compound vegetation indices of (NDVI+1)*DVI and NDII for masking non-OP crown areas. Using kappa statistics, an optimal threshold value was set with the highest accuracy at 90.6% for differentiating OP crown areas from Non-OP areas. After the watershed segmentation of OP crown areas with additional post-procedures, about 77% of individual OP crowns were successfully detected in comparison to the manual based delineation. Shape and location of each crown segment was then assessed based on a modified version of the goodness measures of [14] which was 0.3, indicating an acceptable CSGM (combined segmentation goodness measures) agreements between the automated and manually delineated crowns (perfect case is '1').

  2. Inclination Excitation in Compact Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Adams, Fred C.

    2015-05-01

    The Kepler Mission has detected dozens of compact planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of close-packed planetary systems with relatively little spread in the inclination angles of the inferred orbits. We have explored the effectiveness of dynamical mechanisms in exciting orbital inclination in this class of solar systems. The two mechanisms we discuss are self-excitation of orbital inclination in initially (nearly) coplanar planetary systems and perturbations by additional unseen larger bodies in the outer regions of the solar systems. For both of these scenarios, we determine the regimes of parameter space for which orbital inclination can be effectively excited. For compact planetary systems with the observed architectures, we find that the orbital inclination angles are not spread out appreciably through self-excitation, resulting in a negligible scatter in impact parameter and a subsequently stable transiting system. In contrast, companions in the outer solar system can be effective in driving variations of the inclination angles of the inner planetary orbits, leading to significant scatter in impact parameter and resultantly non-transiting systems. We present the results of our study, the regimes in which each excitation method - self-excitation of inclination and excitation by a perturbing secondary - are relevant, and the magnitude of the effects.

  3. The effect of finish line curvature on marginal fit of all-ceramic CAD/CAM crowns and metal-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianxiang; Han, Dongwei

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the effect of abutment finish line curvature on the fit of all-ceramic CAD/CAM crowns and metal-ceramic crowns. Three types of finish line curvature abutments (1-, 3-, and 5-mm curvature) were prepared on typodont maxillary central incisors. For each type of abutment, 5 all-ceramic crowns (Cercon system, DeguDent) and 5 metal-ceramic crowns were fabricated. The marginal gaps of copings and veneered crowns were measured on a profile projector. The data were calculated and analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (alpha = .05). The mean labial, lingual, mesial, and distal marginal gaps (SD) of all-ceramic crowns were similar: respectively, 54 (10), 51 (11), 47 (13), and 49 (9) microm for 1-mm curvature; 49 (12), 53 (11), 54 (10), and 55 (12) microm for 3-mm curvature; and 57 (12), 54 (11), 53 (10), and 52 (9) microm for 5-mm curvature. The mean labial, lingual, mesial, and distal marginal gaps (SD) of metal-ceramic crowns were 36 (7), 41 (9), 26 (8), and 28 (10) microm, respectively, for 1-mm curvature. The mean labial and lingual marginal gaps (SD) of metal-ceramic crowns for 3-mm curvature were 45 (8) and 48 (9) microm, respectively-significantly larger than mesial (P = .01 and .007) and distal (P = .03 and .02) gaps. The mean labial and lingual marginal gaps (SD) of metal-ceramic crowns for 5-mm curvature were 76 (10) and 74 (15) microm, respectively-significantly larger than mesial (P = .001 and .001) and distal (P = .001 and .001) gaps. The abutment finish line curvature had no significant effect on the marginal fit of all-ceramic crowns, but had a significant effect on the marginal fit of metal-ceramic crowns.

  4. Digital photo monitoring for tree crown

    Treesearch

    Neil Clark; Sang-Mook Lee

    2007-01-01

    Assessing change in the amount of foliage within a tree’s crown is the goal of crown transparency estimation, a component in many forest health assessment programs. Many sources of variability limit analysis and interpretation of crown condition data. Increased precision is needed to detect more subtle changes that are important for detection of health problems....

  5. Changes in posture through the use of simple inclines with notebook computers placed on a standard desk.

    PubMed

    Asundi, Krishna; Odell, Dan; Luce, Adam; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the use of simple inclines as a portable peripheral for improving head and neck postures during notebook computer use on tables in portable environments such as hotel rooms, cafés, and airport lounges. A 3D motion analysis system measured head, neck and right upper extremity postures of 15 participants as they completed a 10 min computer task in six different configurations, all on a fixed height desk: no-incline, 12° incline, 25° incline, no-incline with external mouse, 25° incline with an external mouse, and a commercially available riser with external mouse and keyboard. After completion of the task, subjects rated the configuration for comfort and ease of use and indicated perceived discomfort in several body segments. Compared to the no-incline configuration, use of the 12° incline reduced forward head tilt and neck flexion while increasing wrist extension. The 25° incline further reduced head tilt and neck flexion while further increasing wrist extension. The 25° incline received the lowest comfort and ease of use ratings and the highest perceived discomfort score. For portable, temporary computing environments where internal input devices are used, users may find improved head and neck postures with acceptable wrist extension postures with the utilization of a 12° incline.

  6. Comparison of the COM-FCP inclination angle and other mediolateral stability indicators for turning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Wang, Xin; Yang, Jiajia; He, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhou, Peng; Ming, Dong

    2017-03-24

    Studies have shown that turning is associated with more instability than straight walking and instability increases with turning angles. However, the precise relationship of changes in stability with the curvature and step length of turning is not clear. The traditional center of mass (COM)-center of pressure (COP) inclination angle requires the use of force plates. A COM-foot contact point (FCP) inclination angle derived from kinematic data is proposed in this study as a measure of the stability of turning. In order to generate different degrees of stability, we designed an experiment of walking with different curvatures and step lengths. Simultaneously, a novel method was proposed to calculate the COM-FCP inclination angles of different walking trajectories with different step lengths for 10 healthy subjects. The COM-FCP inclination angle, the COM acceleration, the step width and the COM-ankle inclination angles were statistically analyzed. The statistical results showed that the mediolateral (ML) COM-FCP inclination angles increased significantly as the curvature of the walking trajectories or the step length in circular walking increased. Changes in the ML COM acceleration, the step width and the ML COM-ankle inclination angle verified the feasibility and reliability of the proposed method. Additionally, the ML COM-FCP inclination angle was more sensitive to the ML stability than the ML COM-ankle inclination angle. The work suggests that it is more difficult to keep balance when walking in a circular trajectory with a larger curvature or in a larger step length. Essentially, turning with a larger angle in one step leads to a lower ML stability. A novel COM-FCP inclination angle was validated to indicate ML stability. This method can be applied to complicated walking tasks, where the force plate is not applicable, and it accounts for the variability of the base of support (BOS) compared to the COM-ankle inclination angle.

  7. Experimental investigation of the abrasive crown dynamics in orbital atherectomy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yihao; Belmont, Barry; Shih, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Orbital atherectomy is a catheter-based minimally invasive procedure to modify the plaque within atherosclerotic arteries using a diamond abrasive crown. This study was designed to investigate the crown motion and its corresponding contact force with the vessel. To this end, a transparent arterial tissue-mimicking phantom made of polyvinyl chloride was developed, a high-speed camera and image processing technique were utilized to visualize and quantitatively analyze the crown motion in the vessel phantom, and a piezoelectric dynamometer measured the forces on the phantom during the procedure. Observed under typical orbital atherectomy rotational speeds of 60,000, 90,000, and 120,000rpm in a 4.8mm caliber vessel phantom, the crown motion was a combination of high-frequency rotation at 1000, 1500, and 1660.4-1866.1Hz and low-frequency orbiting at 18, 38, and 40Hz, respectively. The measured forces were also composed of these high and low frequencies, matching well with the rotation of the eccentric crown and the associated orbital motion. The average peak force ranged from 0.1 to 0.4N at different rotational speeds.

  8. Analysis of aerodynamic noise generated from inclined circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haramoto, Yasutake; Yasuda, Shouji; Matsuzaki, Kazuyoshi; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2000-06-01

    Making clear the generation mechanism of fluid dynamic noise is essential to reduce noise deriving from turbomachinery. The analysis of the aerodynamic noise generated from circular cylinder is carried out numerically and experimentally in a low noise wind tunnel. In this study, aerodynamic sound radiated from a circular cylinder in uniform flow is predicted numerically by the following two step method. First, the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved using the high order accurate upwind scheme. Next, the sound pressure level at the observed point is calculated from the fluctuating surface pressure on the cylinder, based on modified Lighthill-Curl’s equation. It is worth to note that the noise generated from the model is reduced rapidly when it is inclined against the mean flow. In other words, the peak level of the radiated noise decreases rapidly with inclination of the circular cylinder. The simulated SPL for the inclined circular cylinder is compared with the measured value, and good agreement is obtained for the peak spectrum frequency of the sound pressure level and tendency of noise reduction. So we expect that the change of flow structures makes reduction of the aerodynamic noise from the inclined models.

  9. Experimental free convection heat transfer from inclined square cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Natural convection from axisymmetric objects such as vertical or horizontal cylinders and spheres are two dimensional. However, for inclined circular or noncircular cylinders the flow and heat transfer is three dimensional and hence more complex and needs more attention. This study investigates the steady state mechanism of natural convection from inclined square cylinders in air. Five different cylinders of 1 m length, 8 × 8, 7 × 7, 6 × 6, 4 × 4 and 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 cross sections are used. The cylinders are heated using inserted heating element of 6 mm in diameter. Self-adhesive thermocouples are used at the upper, bottom and at one side of the cylinders for temperature measurement. Three inclination angles to the horizontal 30, 45 and 60o are used for each cylinder with uniform heat flux boundary conditions. For each cylinder, about ten heat fluxes are used to generate the heat transfer data. Local and average heat transfer coefficient is determined for each cylinder at each inclination angle for each uniform heat flux. Laminar and transition to turbulent regimes are obtained and characterized. Local critical axial distance where heat transfer coefficient changes the mode is obtained for each heat flux. Local and averaged Nusselt numbers are correlated with the modified Rayleigh numbers for all angles.

  10. Experimental free convection heat transfer from inclined square cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    Natural convection from axisymmetric objects such as vertical or horizontal cylinders and spheres are two dimensional. However, for inclined circular or noncircular cylinders the flow and heat transfer is three dimensional and hence more complex and needs more attention. This study investigates the steady state mechanism of natural convection from inclined square cylinders in air. Five different cylinders of 1 m length, 8 × 8, 7 × 7, 6 × 6, 4 × 4 and 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 cross sections are used. The cylinders are heated using inserted heating element of 6 mm in diameter. Self-adhesive thermocouples are used at the upper, bottom and at one side of the cylinders for temperature measurement. Three inclination angles to the horizontal 30, 45 and 60o are used for each cylinder with uniform heat flux boundary conditions. For each cylinder, about ten heat fluxes are used to generate the heat transfer data. Local and average heat transfer coefficient is determined for each cylinder at each inclination angle for each uniform heat flux. Laminar and transition to turbulent regimes are obtained and characterized. Local critical axial distance where heat transfer coefficient changes the mode is obtained for each heat flux. Local and averaged Nusselt numbers are correlated with the modified Rayleigh numbers for all angles.

  11. Slip Potential for Commonly Used Inclined Grated Metal Walkways

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Jonisha P.; Heberger, John R.; Dempsey, Patrick G.

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific guidelines or regulations are provided by the Mine Safety and Health Administration for the use of inclined grated metal walkways in mining plants. Mining and other companies may be using walkway materials that do not provide sufficient friction, contributing to slip and fall injuries. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there are significant differences in the required friction for different grated metal walkways during walking in diverse conditions. Methods The normalized coefficients of friction were measured for 12 participants while walking up and down an instrumented walkway with different inclinations (0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°) and with and without the presence of a contaminant (glycerol). Self-reported slip events were recorded and the required coefficients of friction were calculated considering only the anterior/posterior components of the shear forces. Additionally, the available coefficients of friction for these walkway materials were measured at the 0° orientation using a tribometer, with and without the presence of the contaminant, using a boot heel as well as Neolite as the test feet. Results The number of slips increased when the inclination angle reached 10° and above. Of all materials tested, the diamond weave grating was found to have the best performance at all inclines and when contaminated or dry. A high number of slips occurred for the perforated grating and serrated bar grating at 20° when contaminated. Conclusions Results of this study suggest that the diamond weave grating provides significantly better friction compared to serrated bar and perforated gratings, especially at inclines greater than 10°. PMID:26779388

  12. Inclination of Nations to Control Press and Attitudes on Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, John C.

    1988-01-01

    Interviews official representatives of 58 nations to investigate their "inclination to control" the press. Finds the region most inclined to control the press is the Middle East, whereas regions least inclined are Western Europe and North America. (RS)

  13. Comparison of retention forces with various fabrication methods and materials in double crowns.

    PubMed

    Çelik Güven, Melahat; Tuna, Meral; Bozdağ, Ergun; Öztürk, Gizem Nur; Bayraktar, Gulsen

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the retention force changes and wear behaviours of double-crown systems over long-term use. Ten groups, each consisting of six samples, were evaluated. Specifically, casting gold alloy primary crown - casting gold alloy secondary crown (AA), laser sintering primary crown - laser sintering secondary crown (LL), casting Cr alloy primary crown - casting Cr alloy secondary crown, (CC) zirconia primary crown - electroformed secondary crown (ZA), and CAD/CAM titanium alloy primary crown - CAD/CAM titanium alloy secondary crown (TT) groups were evaluated at cone angles of 4° and 6°. The samples were subjected to 5,000 insertion-separation cycles in artificial saliva, and the retention forces were measured every 500 cycles. The wear levels were analyzed via SEM at the beginning and end of the 5,000 cycles. In all samples, the retention forces increased when the conus angle decreased. The highest initial and final retention force values were found in the LL-4° group (32.89 N-32.65 N), and the lowest retention force values were found in the ZA6° group (5.41 N-6.27 N). The ZA groups' samples showed the least change in the retention force, and no wear was observed. In the other groups, wear was observed mostly in the primary crowns. More predictable, clinically relevant, and less excursive retention forces can be observed in the ZA groups. The retention force values of the LL groups were statically similar to those of the other groups, except the ZA groups.

  14. Comparison of retention forces with various fabrication methods and materials in double crowns

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Meral; Bozdağ, Ergun; Öztürk, Gizem Nur; Bayraktar, Gulsen

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to analyze the retention force changes and wear behaviours of double-crown systems over long-term use. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten groups, each consisting of six samples, were evaluated. Specifically, casting gold alloy primary crown - casting gold alloy secondary crown (AA), laser sintering primary crown - laser sintering secondary crown (LL), casting Cr alloy primary crown - casting Cr alloy secondary crown, (CC) zirconia primary crown - electroformed secondary crown (ZA), and CAD/CAM titanium alloy primary crown - CAD/CAM titanium alloy secondary crown (TT) groups were evaluated at cone angles of 4° and 6°. The samples were subjected to 5,000 insertion-separation cycles in artificial saliva, and the retention forces were measured every 500 cycles. The wear levels were analyzed via SEM at the beginning and end of the 5,000 cycles. RESULTS In all samples, the retention forces increased when the conus angle decreased. The highest initial and final retention force values were found in the LL-4° group (32.89 N-32.65 N), and the lowest retention force values were found in the ZA6° group (5.41 N-6.27 N). The ZA groups' samples showed the least change in the retention force, and no wear was observed. In the other groups, wear was observed mostly in the primary crowns. CONCLUSION More predictable, clinically relevant, and less excursive retention forces can be observed in the ZA groups. The retention force values of the LL groups were statically similar to those of the other groups, except the ZA groups. PMID:28874999

  15. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Silva, Wilkens Aurélio Buarque e; Silva, Frederico Andrade e; De Souza, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM); Bi-layer crowns (BL). Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37°C), and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = .05) indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM = 3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM = 3561.5 N ± 991.6), which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6). There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength. PMID:26576423

  16. In-cylinder flows of a motored four-stroke engine with flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.F.; Yang, H.S.; Yeh, C.-N.

    2008-04-15

    The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the in-cylinder flow structures and turbulence intensities in the symmetry and offset planes of a motored four-valve, four-stroke engine during the intake and compression strokes are diagnosed by using a particle image velocimeter. Two pistons of different crown shapes (flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons) are studied. The inception, establishment, and evolution of the tumbling vortical flow structures during the intake and compression strokes are clearly depicted. Quantitative strengths of the rotating vortical flow motions are presented by a dimensionless parameter, the tumble ratio, which can represent the mean angular velocity of the vortices in the target plane. The turbulence intensity of the in-cylinder flow is also calculated by using the measured time-varying velocity data. The results show that the flat-crown piston induces higher bulk-averaged tumble ratio and turbulence intensity than the slightly concave-crown piston does because the tumble ratio and turbulence generated by the flat-crown piston in the offset planes during the compression stroke are particularly large. The engine with the flat-crown piston also presents larger torque and power outputs and lower hydrocarbon emission than that with the slightly concave-crown piston. This might be caused by the enhanced combustion in the engine cylinder due to the stronger tumble ratio and turbulence intensity. (author)

  17. [An automatic extraction algorithm for individual tree crown projection area and volume based on 3D point cloud data].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Heng; Feng, Zhong-Ke; Su, Zhi-Fang; Xu, Hui; Jiao, You-Quan; Deng, Ou

    2014-02-01

    Tree crown projection area and crown volume are the important parameters for the estimation of biomass, tridimensional green biomass and other forestry science applications. Using conventional measurements of tree crown projection area and crown volume will produce a large area of errors in the view of practical situations referring to complicated tree crown structures or different morphological characteristics. However, it is difficult to measure and validate their accuracy through conventional measurement methods. In view of practical problems which include complicated tree crown structure, different morphological characteristics, so as to implement the objective that tree crown projection and crown volume can be extracted by computer program automatically. This paper proposes an automatic untouched measurement based on terrestrial three-dimensional laser scanner named FARO Photon120 using plane scattered data point convex hull algorithm and slice segmentation and accumulation algorithm to calculate the tree crown projection area. It is exploited on VC+6.0 and Matlab7.0. The experiments are exploited on 22 common tree species of Beijing, China. The results show that the correlation coefficient of the crown projection between Av calculated by new method and conventional method A4 reaches 0.964 (p<0.01); and the correlation coefficient of tree crown volume between V(VC) derived from new method and V(C) by the formula of a regular body is 0.960 (p<0.001). The results also show that the average of V(C) is smaller than that of V(VC) at the rate of 8.03%, and the average of A4 is larger than that of A(V) at the rate of 25.5%. Assumed Av and V(VC) as ture values, the deviations of the new method could be attributed to irregularity of the crowns' silhouettes. Different morphological characteristics of tree crown led to measurement error in forest simple plot survey. Based on the results, the paper proposes that: (1) the use of eight-point or sixteen-point projection with

  18. UrbanCrowns: an assessment and monitoring tool for urban trees

    Treesearch

    Matthew F. Winn; Philip A. Araman; Sang-Mook. Lee

    2011-01-01

    UrbanCrowns is a Windows®-based computer program used to assess the crown characteristics of urban trees. The software analyzes side-view digital photographs of trees to compute several crown metrics, including crown height, crown diameter, live crown ratio, crown volume, crown density, and crown transparency. Potential uses of the UrbanCrowns program include...

  19. How do the substrate reaction forces acting on a gecko's limbs respond to inclines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhouyi; Dai, Zhendong; Li, Wei; Ji, Aihong; Wang, Wenbao

    2015-02-01

    Locomotion is an essential character of animals, and excellent moving ability results from the delicate sensing of the substrate reaction forces (SRF) acting on body and modulating the behavior to adapt the motion requirement. The inclined substrates present in habitats pose a number of functional challenges to locomotion. In order to effectively overcome these challenges, climbing geckos execute complex and accurate movements that involve both the front and hind limbs. Few studies have examined gecko's SRF on steeper inclines of greater than 90°. To reveal how the SRFs acting on the front and hind limbs respond to angle incline changes, we obtained detailed measurements of the three-dimensional SRFs acting on the individual limbs of the tokay gecko while it climbed on an inclined angle of 0-180°. The fore-aft forces acting on the front and hind limbs show opposite trends on inverted inclines of greater than 120°, indicating propulsion mechanism changes in response to inclines. When the incline angles change, the forces exerted in the normal and fore-aft directions by gecko's front and hind limbs are reassigned to take full advantage of limbs' different roles in overcoming resistance and in propelling locomotion. This also ensures that weight acts in the angle range between the forces generated by the front and hind limbs. The change in the distribution of SRF with a change in the incline angle is directly linked to the favorable trade-off between locomotive maneuverability and stability.

  20. Radium separation through complexation by aqueous crown ethers and ion exchange or solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Burnett, W.C.

    1997-11-01

    The effect of three water-soluble, unsubstituted crown ethers (15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6) and 21-crown-7 (21C7)) on the uptake of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra cations by a sulfonic acid cation exchange resin, and on the extraction of the same cations by xylene solutions of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) from aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions has been investigated. The crown ethers enhance the sorption of the larger cations by the ion exchange resin, thereby improving the resin selectivity over calcium, a result of a synergistic interaction between the crown ether and the ionic functional groups of the resin. Similarly, the extraction of the larger alkaline earth cations into xylene by HDNNS is strongly synergized by the presence of the crown ethers in the aqueous phase. Promising results for intra-Group IIa cation separations have been obtained using each of the three crown ethers as the aqueous ligands and the sulfonic acid cation exchange resin. Even greater separation factors for the radium-calcium couple have been measured with the crown-ethers and HDNNS solutions in the solvent extraction mode. The application of the uptake and extraction results to the development of radium separation schemes is discussed and a possible flowchart for the determination of {sup 226}Ra/{sup 228}Ra in natural waters is presented.

  1. Wear of posterior metal-free polymer crowns after 2 years.

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, B; Trame, J-P; Dreyhaupt, J; Gabbert, O; Koob, A; Rammelsberg, P

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical wear behaviour of posterior, metal-free polymer crowns and to compare it with that of metal-ceramic crowns. After randomization, a total of 120 single crowns were set in posterior teeth. These 120 crowns were divided into three groups: 40 polymer crowns with a glass-fibre framework (group 1), 40 polymer crowns without framework stabilization (group 2) and 40 metal-ceramic crowns (control group). Wear was measured by use of gypsum replicas and a 3D laser scanner at baseline and after 2 years. Statistical analysis was performed by use of a mixed-effects regression model. The mean total wear of posterior single crowns was -19.0 mum (+/- 18.5 microm) in group 1, -24.3 microm (+/- 31.5 microm) in group 2 and -7.0 microm (+/- 8.8 microm) in the control group. Statistical analysis revealed the mean total wear of the polymer crowns in groups 1 (P < or = 0.01) and 2 (P < or = 0.01) was significantly greater than in the control group. No significant difference was detected between groups 1 and 2 (P = 0.58). Age, gender and opposing teeth had no significant effect on wear behaviour.

  2. [The influence of gilt to the retention of the complete metal crown].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-jun; Shi, Lian-shui; Zhu, Hong-shui

    2008-10-01

    To research the influence of gilt to the retention of the complete metal crown. Sixty Ni-Cr alloy complete metal crown were divided into three groups, control group (common Ni-Cr alloy complete metal crown), whole gold-plating group (whole gilding on the tissue surface of the inner Ni-Cr alloy complete metal crown), partial gold-plating group (gilding on the tissue surface of 1/3 cervical inner Ni-Cr alloy complete metal crown). The retention force of complete metal crown was measured by tensile force/pressure ergograph. The retention force of control group, partial gold-plating group, whole gold-plating group were (657 +/- 151) N, (632 +/- 139) N, (569 +/- 103) N, respectively. There were significant differences between control group and whole gold-plating group, whole gold-plating group and partial gold-plating group (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between control group and partial gold-plating group (P > 0.05). The force of retention would decrease after gilding on the tissue surface of the inner Ni-Cr alloy complete metal crown, but have no influence to normal retention requirement of complete crown. Although the retention of partial gold-plating complete metal crown had somewhat decrease, it could be ignored.

  3. 23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL BRACING DETAIL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  4. Inclination Excitation in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Adams, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has detected dozens of planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of planetary systems with little or no excited inclination between the inferred orbits. This present study examines the magnitude and efficacy of three potential mechanisms for exciting orbital inclination in these systems: self-excitation of orbital inclination in initially coplanar planetary systems, perturbations by larger bodies within the planetary systems, and perturbations by massive bodies external to the systems. For each of these mechanisms, we determine the regime(s) of parameter space for which orbital inclination excitation is effective. This work provides constraints on the properties (masses and orbital elements) of possible additional bodies in observed planetery systems, and on their dynamical history. One interesting application is to consider the relative size of the external perturbations both in and out of clusters.

  5. Interrelationships among light, photosynthesis and nitrogen in the crown of mature Pinus contorta ssp. latifolia

    Treesearch

    A. W. Schoettle; W. K. Smith

    1999-01-01

    Scaling leaf-level measurements to estimate carbon gain of entire leaf crowns or canopies requires an understanding of the distribution of photosynthetic capacity and corresponding light microenvironments within a crown. We have compared changes in the photosynthetic light response and nitrogen (N) content (per unit leaf area) of Pinus contorta Dougl. ssp. latifolia...

  6. Crown characteristics of juvenile loblolly pine 6 years after application of thinning and fertilization

    Treesearch

    Shufang Yu; Jim L. Chambers; Zhenmin Tang; James P. Barnett

    2003-01-01

    Total foliage dry mass and leaf area at the canopy hierarchical level of needle, shoot, branch and crown were measured in 48 trees harvested from a 14-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation, six growing seasons after thinning and fertilization treatments. In the unthinned treatment, upper crown needles were heavier and had more leaf area...

  7. The Relationship of Bole Diameters and Crown Widths of Seven Bottomland Hardwood Species

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis

    1988-01-01

    Diameters, heights, and eight crown radii per tree were measured on 75 individuals from each of seven bottomland hardwood species in Mississippi. It was determined that the seven species could not be described by a single regression equation. Crown class was tested to see whether it significantly influenced the slope or intercept of the linear relationship. Three of...

  8. Estimation of crown cover in interior ponderosa pine stands: Effects of thinning and prescribed fire

    Treesearch

    Nicholas Vaughn; Martin W. Ritchie

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between crown cover measured with a vertical sight tube and stand basal area per acre in treated (thinned, burned, and thinned and burned) and untreated interior ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson) stands in northeastern California. Crown cover was significantly related to basal area at the plot level and...

  9. Forest inventory predictions from individual tree crowns: regression modeling within a sample framework

    Treesearch

    James W. Flewelling

    2009-01-01

    Remotely sensed data can be used to make digital maps showing individual tree crowns (ITC) for entire forests. Attributes of the ITCs may include area, shape, height, and color. The crown map is sampled in a way that provides an unbiased linkage between ITCs and identifiable trees measured on the ground. Methods of avoiding edge bias are given. In an example from a...

  10. Rainfall interception by tree crown and leaf litter: an interactive process

    Treesearch

    Xiang Li; Qingfu Xiao; Jianzhi Niu; Salli Dymond; E. Gregory McPherson; Natalie van Doorn; Xinxiao Yu; Baoyuan Xie; Kebin Zhang; Jiao Li

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall interception research in forest ecosystems usually focuses on interception by either tree crown or leaf litter, although the 2 components interact when rainfall occurs. A process-based study was conducted to jointly measure rainfall interception by crown and litter and the interaction between the 2 interception processes for 4 tree species (...

  11. Seasonal Shoot and Needle Growth of Loblolly Pine Responds to Thinning, Fertilization, and Crown Position

    Treesearch

    Zhenmin Tang; Jim L. Chambers; Suresh Guddanti; Shufang Yu; James P. Barnett

    1999-01-01

    The impacts of thinning, fertilization and crown position on seasonal growth of current-year shoots and foliage were studied in a 13-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation in the sixth post-treatment year (1994). Length of new flushes, and their needle length, leaf area, and oven-dry weight were measured in the upper and lower crown...

  12. Capillary Penetration into Inclined Circular Glass Tubes.

    PubMed

    Trabi, Christophe L; Ouali, F Fouzia; McHale, Glen; Javed, Haadi; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I

    2016-02-09

    The spontaneous penetration of a wetting liquid into a vertical tube against the force of gravity and the imbibition of the same liquid into a horizontal tube (or channel) are both driven by capillary forces and described by the same fundamental equations. However, there have been few experimental studies of the transition from one orientation to the other. We report systematic measurements of capillary penetration of polydimethylsiloxane oils of viscosities 9.6, 19.2, and 48.0 mPa·s into glass capillary tubes. We first report the effect of tube radii R between 140 and 675 μm on the dynamics of spontaneous imbibition. We show that the data can be fitted using the exact numerical solution to the governing equations and that these are similar to fits using the analytical viscogravitational approximation. However, larger diameter tubes show a rate of penetration slower than expected using an equilibrium contact angle and the known value of liquid viscosity. To account for the slowness, an increase in viscosity by a factor (η/ρ)(scaling) is needed. We show full agreement with theory requires the ratio R/κ(-1) ∼ 0.1 or less, where κ(-1) is the capillary length. In addition, we propose an experimental method that enables the determination of the dynamic contact angle during imbibition, which gives values that agree with the literature values. We then report measurements of dynamic penetration into the tubes of R = 190 and 650 μm for a range of inclination angles to the horizontal, φ, from 5 to 90°. We show that capillary penetration can still be fitted using the viscogravitational solution, rather than the Bosanquet solution which describes imbibition without gravity, even for inclination angles as low as 10°. Moreover, at these low angles, the effect of the tube radius is found to diminish and this appears to relate to an effective capillary length, κ(-1)(φ) = (γ(LV)/ρg sin φ)(1/2).

  13. Avalanche dynamics on a rough inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    The avalanche behavior of gravitationally forced granular layers on a rough inclined plane is investigated experimentally for different materials and for a variety of grain shapes ranging from spherical beads to highly anisotropic particles with dendritic shape. We measure the front velocity, area, and height of many avalanches and correlate the motion with the area and height. We also measure the avalanche profiles for several example cases. As the shape irregularity of the grains is increased, there is a dramatic qualitative change in avalanche properties. For rough nonspherical grains, avalanches are faster, bigger, and overturning in the sense that individual particles have down-slope speeds u p that exceed the front speed uf as compared with avalanches of spherical glass beads that are quantitatively slower and smaller and where particles always travel slower than the front speed. There is a linear increase of three quantities: (i) dimensionless avalanche height, (ii) ratio of particle to front speed, and (iii) the growth rate of avalanche speed with increasing avalanche size with increasing tan theta r where theta r is the bulk angle of repose, or with increasing beta P, the slope of the depth averaged flow rule, where both theta r and beta P reflect the grain shape irregularity. These relations provide a tool for predicting important dynamical properties of avalanches as a function of grain shape irregularity. A relatively simple depth-averaged theoretical description captures some important elements of the avalanche motion, notably the existence of two regimes of this motion.

  14. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping.

    PubMed

    Kannas, Theodoros M; Kellis, Eleftherios; Amiridis, Ioannis G

    2011-12-01

    Kannas, TM, Kellis, E, and Amiridis, IG. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3334-3341, 2011-The need for the generation of higher joint power output during performance of dynamic activities led us to investigate the force-length relationship of the plantar flexors during consecutive stretch-shortening cycles of hopping. The hypothesis of this study was that hopping (consecutive jumps with the knee as straight as possible) on an inclined (15°) surface might lead to a better jumping performance compared with hopping on a plane surface (0°). Twelve active men performed 3 sets of 10 consecutive hops on both an incline and plane surface. Ground reaction forces; ankle and knee joint kinematics; electromyographic (EMG) activity from the medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA); and architectural data from the MG were recorded. The results showed that participants jumped significantly higher (p < 0.05) when hopping on an inclined surface (30.32 ± 8.18 cm) compared with hopping on a plane surface (27.52 ± 4.97 cm). No differences in temporal characteristics between the 2 types of jumps were observed. Incline hopping induced significantly greater ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension at takeoff compared with plane hopping (p < 0.05). The fascicle length of the MG was greater at initial contact with the ground during incline hopping (p < 0.05). Moreover, the EMG activities of Sol and TA during the propulsion phase were significantly higher during incline compared with that during plane hopping (p < 0.05). It does not seem unreasonable to suggest that, if the aim of hopping plyometrics is to improve plantar flexor explosivity, incline hopping might be a more effective exercise than hopping on a plane surface.

  15. Fitting accuracy and fracture resistance of crowns using a hybrid zirconia frame made of both porous and dense zirconia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Sugano, Tsuyoshi; Usami, Hirofumi; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Sekino, Tohru; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the fitting accuracy and fracture resistance of crowns using a hybrid zirconia frame made of both porous and dense zirconia. Commercial semi-sintered zirconia, sintered dense zirconia and sintered hybrid zirconia were used. Sintered zirconia was milled using the CAD/CAM system, and semi-sintered zirconia was milled and sintered to fabricate molar crown frames. Completed frames were veneered with tooth-colored porcelain. The marginal and internal gaps between frames/crowns and abutments were measured. Each crown specimen was subjected to a fracture test. There were no significant differences in marginal and internal gap among all the frames and crowns. The crown with the hybrid zirconia frame had a 31-35% greater fracture load than that with the commercial or dense zirconia frame (p<0.01). This suggests that the all-ceramic crowns with a hybrid zirconia frame have a high fracture resistance.

  16. Evolution of Vortex Rings Exiting Inclined Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Webster, D. R.; Reetz, M.; Gefroh, D.

    1996-11-01

    Vortex rings initiated in cylinders with exit incline lengths of 0, D/4, and D/2 were investigated for Reynolds numbers up to 30,000. The fluid exiting each cylinder was visualized with an ionized bromothymol blue solution, and velocity fields were obtained with PIV. In each inclined case, vortex rings form at angles smaller than the cylinder incline angle. Entrainment of ambient fluid on the short side of the cylinder is much stronger than that on the long side. This results in a larger circulation about the short side of the ring and a greater propagation velocity on that side. The incline angle of the ring thus decreases as it moves downstream. Behind the ring core, an impulsive wave of entrained ambient fluid flows parallel to the cylinder exit plane. Some of this fluid is wrapped into the core, while the rest is ejected outward past the long cylinder edge. The vortex ring dynamics differ significantly from those observed in jets from inclined nozzles where neighboring rings are connected by straining zones, and ring incline angles increase with downstream distance.

  17. Influence of firing cycles on the margin distortion of 3 all-ceramic crown systems.

    PubMed

    Balkaya, Mehmet Cudi; Cinar, Aynur; Pamuk, Selim

    2005-04-01

    Although all-ceramic restorations are widely used, there is a lack of information about how the fit is affected by fabrication procedures. The adequacy of the fit of all-ceramic restorations has been questioned. This study examined the effect of porcelain and glaze firing cycles on the fit of 3 types of all-ceramic crowns. Ten standardized all-ceramic crowns were fabricated on a metal die from each of 3 systems: conventional In-Ceram, copy-milled In-Ceram, and copy-milled feldspathic crowns. Copings of the conventional and copy-milled In-Ceram crowns and nonglazed copy-milled feldspathic crowns served as the control. A device was used to apply a uniform load on specimens during measurement and to reposition the specimens on the measurement device after each manufacturing process. The specimens were not cemented and were measured on the metal die using a profile projector. Measurements were recorded at 18 points selected along horizontal and vertical planes. The crown systems were compared by use of the Student t test and 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Data of measurements repeated at identical locations were analyzed with a multivariate repeated-measures ANOVA. The Bonferroni post hoc test was used for multiple comparisons (alpha=.05). The conventional In-Ceram (57 +/- 24 microm) and copy-milled In-Ceram (57 +/- 32 microm) crowns demonstrated nearly identical marginal discrepancy values, followed by the copy-milled feldspathic crowns with a mean of 17 +/- 12 microm in the vertical plane. The copy-milled In-Ceram crowns had a mean horizontal discrepancy value of -12 +/- 4 microm, followed by the copy-milled feldspathic crowns with a mean of -4 +/- 5 microm and the conventional In-Ceram crowns with a mean of -6 +/- 4 microm. Statistical analyses demonstrated no significant differences in the marginal discrepancy values among the 3 all-ceramic crown systems, except for the horizontal discrepancy values between the conventional and copy-milled In-Ceram crowns

  18. Chipping resistance of graded zirconia ceramics for dental crowns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Chai, H; Lee, J J-W; Lawn, B R

    2012-03-01

    A serious drawback of veneering porcelains is a pronounced susceptibility to chipping. Glass-infiltrated dense zirconia structures can now be produced with esthetic quality, making them an attractive alternative. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that such infiltrated structures are much more chip-resistant than conventional porcelains, and at least as chip-resistant as non-infiltrated zirconia. A sharp indenter was used to produce chips in flat and anatomically correct glass-infiltrated zirconia crown materials, and critical loads were measured as a function of distance from the specimen edge (flat) or side wall (crown). Control data were obtained on zirconia specimens without infiltration and on crowns veneered with porcelains. The results confirmed that the resistance to chipping in graded zirconia is more than 4 times higher than that of porcelain-veneered zirconia and is at least as high as that of non-veneered zirconia.

  19. Crown dimensions of the maxillary molars in Tupaia glis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Hanamura, H; Wakatsuki, E

    1994-03-01

    The crown dimensions of the maxillary molars in Tupaia glis were measured, and the most common molar size sequence was M1 > M2 > M3. The M2 and M3 molars were smaller than the M1 in the mesiodistal crown diameters. With regard to the buccolingual diameters, the distal part of M1 and mesial part of M2 were relatively larger and less variable in size. This stable area corresponded to the inflection point of the maxillary arch curve. These results could be explained from a functional morphological standpoint.

  20. Analysis of width/length ratios of normal clinical crowns of the maxillary anterior dentition: correlation between dental proportions and facial measurements.

    PubMed

    Zlatarić, Dubravka Knezović; Kristek, Ela; Celebić, Asja

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to determine how facial measurements explain the variability of dental proportions. The following measurements were obtained from 90 subjects: width and length of each maxillary anterior tooth, length of the nose, length of the upper lip, facial length (including the lengths of the facial thirds), intercanthal width, interalar width, intercommisural width while smiling, and maximum central incisor exposure while smiling. The combination of all facial measurements explained the variability of maxillary anterior teeth width/length ratios by only 20% to 38% in men and 16% to 27% in women. Within the population tested, the results suggest that the use of facial measurements for the selection of artificial denture teeth is generally inaccurate.

  1. THE PHOTOMETRIC AND KINEMATIC STRUCTURE OF FACE-ON DISK GALAXIES. III. KINEMATIC INCLINATIONS FROM H{alpha} VELOCITY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A. E-mail: mab@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained H{alpha} velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i{sub kin} = 23 Degree-Sign for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20 Degree-Sign and 6% at 30 Degree-Sign . Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical ''face-on'' Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15 Degree-Sign and 5% at 30 Degree-Sign . This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  2. [Sunrise gold foil jacket crown].

    PubMed

    Lecardonnel, A

    1989-09-01

    This technique permits the preparation of ceramic jacket crowns made on Sunrise laminated precious metal alloy. The Sunrise foil is gold-colored, made of 99% of precious metals and is 50 microns thick. The die is prepared in order to display a moderate and regular undercut beyond the cervical limit. The margin will be underlined with a red pencil. The Sunrise foil is cut according to predetermined templates. Then the foil is applied without burnishing, according to the technique of jacket crowns on platinum foil only by finger pressure. The double folding on closure is preferably done distally or mesially. Then, the metal base is disinserted, sandblasted with 100 microns aluminum oxide, replaced on its die, and placed in a rubber casing before being placed in the isostatic press, to be subjected to a pressure of 2,000 TSI (14 kg par cm2). Sunrise's orange color reinforces rather subtetly the overall color, making these reconstructions particularly esthetic. The color of the Sunrise metal does not require, therefore a too thick opaque. Any ceramic intended to be fired on a metal base, may be used in respecting its firing protocol. Sunrise, as any other technique of this type, require a careful preparation with a shoulder that has a rounded gingivoaxial line angle. Bridges may be built on the "thimbles" crowns, fitted on Sunrise cores, the pontics being made as a ceramo-metal framework.

  3. On 3D flow-structures behind an inclined plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruba, Václav; Pavlík, David; Procházka, Pavel; Skála, Vladislav; Kopecký, Václav

    Stereo PIV measurements has been performed behind the inclined plate, angle of attack 5 and 10 deg. Occurrence and dynamics of streamwise structures behind the plate trailing edge have been studied in details using POD method. The streamwise structures are represented by vortices and low- and highvelocity regions, probably streaks. The obtained results support the hypothesis of an airfoil-flow force interaction by Hoffman and Johnson [1,2].

  4. Aurora Australis, Red Crown

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-23-036 (28 April-6 May 1991) --- A 35mm frame of the Aurora Australis, also known as the Southern Lights, photographed from the Space Shuttle Discovery's flight deck by one of its seven crew members. One of the mission objectives was to measure the spectral and spatial characteristics of auroral emissions. While passing over the sunlit portion of Earth, the crew was able to take a number of photos of the various geographic points on the planet; much of the time on nightside passes was devoted to a thorough study and documentation of auroral displays.

  5. The cost of incline locomotion in ghost crabs (Ocypode quadrata) of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Alexa; Andrus, Scott C

    2011-10-01

    It is well established that the metabolic cost of horizontal locomotion decreases as a regular function of animal body mass, regardless of body form and phylogeny. How body size affects the cost of incline exercise remains much less clear. Studies on vertebrates have led to the hypotheses that the cost of vertical work is independent of body mass and that the added cost of locomoting on inclines is lower for small animals. Studies on vertebrates and a few invertebrates provide evidence both for and against these hypotheses. To gain further insight into the cost of incline exercise, we measured oxygen consumption of small (2.33 ± 0.07 g) and large (46.66 ± 5.33 g) ghost crabs (Ocypode quadrata) locomoting horizontally and up a 20° incline. The slope of the oxygen consumption versus speed relationship (= minimum cost of transport) was not significantly different for small crabs exercising horizontally and on an incline. However, the intercept for incline exercise was significantly higher, indicating that small crabs used more energy during incline exercise than during horizontal exercise. Incline had no effect on the slope or intercept of the oxygen consumption versus speed relationship for large crabs. Our results suggest that the cost of incline locomotion may be large for small animals and that the cost is not independent of body size. Our results add to the growing body of research indicating that body mass is but one factor that determines the cost of incline locomotion and efficiency of vertical work.

  6. New installation for inclined EAS investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadeba, E. A.; Ampilogov, N. V.; Barbashina, N. S.; Bogdanov, A. G.; Borisov, A. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Dushkin, L. I.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Kozhin, A. S.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Ovechkin, A. S.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Volkov, N. S.; Vorobjev, V. S.; Yashin, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The large-scale coordinate-tracking detector TREK for registration of inclined EAS is being developed in MEPhI. The detector is based on multiwire drift chambers from the neutrino experiment at the IHEP U-70 accelerator. Their key advantages are a large effective area (1.85 m2), a good coordinate and angular resolution with a small number of measuring channels. The detector will be operated as part of the experimental complex NEVOD, in particular, jointly with a Cherenkov water detector (CWD) with a volume of 2000 cubic meters and the coordinate detector DECOR. The first part of the detector named Coordinate-Tracking Unit based on the Drift Chambers (CTUDC), representing two coordinate planes of 8 drift chambers in each, has been developed and mounted on opposite sides of the CWD. It has the same principle of joint operation with the NEVOD-DECOR triggering system and the same drift chambers alignment, so the main features of the TREK detector will be examined. Results of the CTUDC development and a joint operation with NEVOD-DECOR complex are presented.

  7. Effects of using an unstable inclined board on active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The present study assessed the effects of using an unstable inclined board on the active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness. [Subjects] The study included 10 young female patients with ankle stiffness. [Methods] The patients were divided into the following two groups: a group that performed ankle dorsiflexion stretching exercises using a wooden inclined board and a group that performed stretching exercises using an air-cushioned inclined board (unstable inclined board). Active and passive ankle dorsiflexion angles were measured bilaterally using a goniometer. [Results] Both inclined boards significantly increased active and passive ankle dorsiflexion. After performing ankle stretching exercises, active dorsiflexion significantly increased the unstable inclined board compared to that using the wooden inclined board. However, the passive dorsiflexion angles did not differ significantly between the two groups after ankle stretching exercises. [Conclusion] The use of an unstable inclined board might stimulate activation of the ankle dorsiflexors in addition to stretching muscle or tissue. Active ankle dorsiflexion was more effectively improved with stretching exercises using an unstable inclined board than with exercises using a wooden inclined board.

  8. Modeling hardwood crown radii using circular data analysis

    Treesearch

    Paul F. Doruska; Hal O. Liechty; Douglas J. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    Cylindrical data are bivariate data composed of a linear and an angular component. One can use uniform, first-order (one maximum and one minimum) or second-order (two maxima and two minima) models to relate the linear component to the angular component. Crown radii can be treated as cylindrical data when the azimuths at which the radii are measured are also recorded....

  9. Dense granular flows down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Borzsonyi, Tamas

    2006-03-01

    Granular flow on a rough inclined plane is an important model system in which to study the basic rules of the dynamics of granular materials. Despite intensive study, many features of such flows are still incompletely understood. For uniformly flowing layers at relatively shallow inclination, we consider experimentally the the basic flow rheology of the granular media and propose new scalings to collapse our data for glass beads and rough sand as a function of inclination angle and particle diameter. At steep inclinations above some angle θs (θs/θr 1.3-1.5, where θr stands for the angle of repose) for flowing grains, numerics and theory predict that the surface roughness is inadequate to dissipate energy gained in the gravitational field, and the flow should continue to accelerate. We report on our experimental results on the properties of granular flows on a steeply inclined plane and define the domains of steady flows. We also discuss the instabilities of such flows leading to spatial patterns.

  10. Cooperativity of dynamics of 18-crown-6 molecule forming one-dimensional chain in Cs2(18-crown-6)3[Ni(dmit)2]2.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Satoaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Takeda, Sadamu; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Sadafumi; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Saito, Kazuya

    2005-07-22

    Heat capacity of Cs2(18-crown-6)3[Ni(dmit)2]2 was measured by adiabatic calorimetry. A broad thermal anomaly was observed around 225 K. The entropy gain (about 52 J K(-1) mol(-1)) is much larger than that expected for twofold disordering of 18-crown-6 assumed in the previous structure analysis. The shape of thermal anomaly was qualitatively explained by a linear Ising model developed for cooperative disordering in polymers. The 18-crown-6 molecules forming a one-dimensional chain in the crystal are orientationally disordered with moderate cooperativity.

  11. Recognizing the threshold magnetic anisotropy for inclination shallowing: Implications for correcting inclination errors of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiang; Wang, Shipeng; Fu, Shaoying; Jiao, Wenjun

    2014-05-01

    Post-depositional compaction is an integral part of sedimentary rock formation and thus has been reasonably deemed as a major culprit for the long-recognized inclination-shallowing problem in sedimentary rocks. Although theoretical treatment elegantly envisions magnetic anisotropy (or oblate fabrics) to correspond to the degree of compaction and the magnitude of inclination flattening, such correspondence has rarely been seen in nature quantitavely, which leaves the possibility of misidentification and/or over-correction for inclination shallowing using magnetic anisotropy. This is because the extent to which oblate magnetic fabrics are developed strongly enough for inclination to start becoming shallow is not yet known. Here, we present sedimentary paleomagnetic data from two ~6 m long gravity cores GHE24L and GHE27L from the northern slope of the South China Sea to examine the down-core changes in magnetic anisotropy and inclinations, and to explore the possible connection between the two parameters. The results show that oblate fabrics are dominantly developed at depths >~2m and the degree of anisotropy displays an overall gradual increase with depth. Inclination shallowing occurs in the > 5m segment of the relatively distal core GHE27L and the amount of shallowing largely correlates with the degree of anisotropy, suggesting a causal relation between the development of magnetic anisotropy and the degree of inclination shallowing. Examination of down-core changes in inclination and magnetic anisotropy suggests that a threshold anisotropy of PAMS~1.04 and PAAR~1.10 exists for inclination shallowing in the cores. For PAAR<1.10, over-correction is mostly negligible, but can amount >10° if particle anisotropy is <1.4. This study provides strong field evidence that complements and substantiates the theoretical model and suggests that the threshold anisotropy can be used as a first-order criterion to identify inclination errors of some sedimentary rocks.

  12. [Artificial crowns influence upon edge parodontium status].

    PubMed

    Zhulev, E N; Serov, A B

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of prosthetic treatment efficacy increase study of edge parodontium tissue reaction upon different types of artificial crowns was done and methods of chronic localized parodontitis prevention were developed. Changes of the main gingival fluid characteristics (amount, acidity, interleukine-1beta concentration) and indicators of microcirculation in edge parodontium of the teeth under the artificial crowns influence were disclosed. There were developed methods of chronic localized parodontitis prevention produced by artificial crowns edge.

  13. Classifying bed inclination using pressure images.

    PubMed

    Baran Pouyan, M; Ostadabbas, S; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is one of the most prevalent problems for bed-bound patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Pressure ulcers are painful for patients and costly for healthcare systems. Accurate in-bed posture analysis can significantly help in preventing pressure ulcers. Specifically, bed inclination (back angle) is a factor contributing to pressure ulcer development. In this paper, an efficient methodology is proposed to classify bed inclination. Our approach uses pressure values collected from a commercial pressure mat system. Then, by applying a number of image processing and machine learning techniques, the approximate degree of bed is estimated and classified. The proposed algorithm was tested on 15 subjects with various sizes and weights. The experimental results indicate that our method predicts bed inclination in three classes with 80.3% average accuracy.

  14. Influence of dental chair backrest inclination on the registration of the mandibular position.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Mariana Freire; Cavalcanti, Bruno das Neves; Claro Neves, Ana Christina; Jóias, Renata Pilli; Rode, Sigmar de Mello

    2015-11-01

    Varying the inclination of the dental chair backrest might alter the distribution of occlusal contact points. The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of backrest inclination on the registration of the mandibular position. Ten participants aged between 18 and 30 years with a complete permanent dentition, uncompromised motor function, no tooth mobility, and no temporomandibular disorders were selected. To register interocclusal contacts, an autopolymerizing methylmethacrylate device was adapted to the maxillary anterior teeth and a composite resin increment was added to the mandibular central incisors. Contacts were registered with the following variations in the inclination of the dental chair backrest: 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 180 degrees. A standardized digital photograph was made of each mark in each backrest position, and the images were superimposed to measure the distances in registration from 90 to 120 and from 90 to 180 degrees. Data were analyzed with the Student paired t test (α=.05). When the chair was inclined from the 90-degree to the 120-degree position, the mandible was repositioned posteriorly by a mean of 0.67 mm, but the difference was not statistically significant. When the chair was inclined from the 90-degree to the 180-degree position, however, the mandible was repositioned posteriorly by a statistically significant mean of 1.41 mm. Mandibular position is influenced by increasing inclination, and this influence was statistically significant at a 180-degree incline. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A method of evaluating crown fuels in forest stands.

    Treesearch

    Rodney W. Sando; Charles H. Wick

    1972-01-01

    A method of describing the crown fuels in a forest fuel complex based on crown weight and crown volume was developed. A computer program is an integral part of the method. Crown weight data are presented in graphical form and are separated into hardwood and coniferous fuels. The fuel complex is described using total crown weight per acre, mean height to the base of...

  16. Optimizing snake locomotion on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Osborne, Matthew T; Alben, Silas

    2014-01-01

    We develop a model to study the locomotion of snakes on inclined planes. We determine numerically which snake motions are optimal for two retrograde traveling-wave body shapes, triangular and sinusoidal waves, across a wide range of frictional parameters and incline angles. In the regime of large transverse friction coefficients, we find power-law scalings for the optimal wave amplitudes and corresponding costs of locomotion. We give an asymptotic analysis to show that the optimal snake motions are traveling waves with amplitudes given by the same scaling laws found in the numerics.

  17. Moments of inclination error distribution computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program is described which calculates orbital inclination error statistics using a closed-form solution. This solution uses a data base of trajectory errors from actual flights to predict the orbital inclination error statistics. The Scott flight history data base consists of orbit insertion errors in the trajectory parameters - altitude, velocity, flight path angle, flight azimuth, latitude and longitude. The methods used to generate the error statistics are of general interest since they have other applications. Program theory, user instructions, output definitions, subroutine descriptions and detailed FORTRAN coding information are included.

  18. Flow through very porous inclined screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muramoto, K. K.; Durbin, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The steady, inviscid flow through and around a screen inclined at a uniform angle to the incoming flow was investigated. For a screen placed in an infinite flow field, an asymptotic analysis for small resistance coefficients was performed, and the effects of inclination were determined. The velocity at first order in the asymptotic expansion was nonuniform along the screen. This nonuniformity caused the wake behind the screen to contain distributed vorticity at second order. These effects therefore occurred at one order lower than for normal screens.

  19. Effects of crown retrieval on implants and the surrounding bone: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozkir, Serhat Emre; Unal, Server Mutluay; Yurekli, Emel; Güven, Sedat

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to observe stress concentration in the implant, the surrounding bone, and other components under the pull-out force during the crown removal. Two 3-dimensional models of implant-supported conventional metal ceramic crowns were digitally constructed. One model was designed as a vertically placed implant (3.7 mm × 10 mm) with a straight abutment, and the other model was designed as a 30-degree inclined implant (3.7 mm × 10 mm) with an angled abutment. A pull-out force of 40 N was applied to the crown. The stress values were calculated within the dental implant, the abutment, the abutment screw, and the surrounding bone. The highest stress concentration was observed at the coronal portion of the straight implant (9.29 MPa). The stress concentrations at the cortical bone were lower than at the implants, and maximum stress concentration in bone structure was 1.73 MPa. At the abutment screws, the stress concentration levels were similiar (3.09 MPa and 3.44 MPa), but the localizations were different. The stress at the angled abutment was higher than the stress at the straight abutment. The pull-out force, applied during a crown removal, did not show an evident effect in bone structure. The higher stress concentrations were mostly observed at the implant and the abutment collar. In addition, the abutment screw, which is the weakest part of an implant system, also showed stress concentrations. Implant angulation affected the stress concentration levels and localizations. These results will help clinicians understand the mechanical behavior of cement-retained implant-supported crowns during crown retrieval.

  20. Effects of crown retrieval on implants and the surrounding bone: a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Server Mutluay; Yurekli, Emel; Güven, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to observe stress concentration in the implant, the surrounding bone, and other components under the pull-out force during the crown removal. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two 3-dimensional models of implant-supported conventional metal ceramic crowns were digitally constructed. One model was designed as a vertically placed implant (3.7 mm × 10 mm) with a straight abutment, and the other model was designed as a 30-degree inclined implant (3.7 mm × 10 mm) with an angled abutment. A pull-out force of 40 N was applied to the crown. The stress values were calculated within the dental implant, the abutment, the abutment screw, and the surrounding bone. RESULTS The highest stress concentration was observed at the coronal portion of the straight implant (9.29 MPa). The stress concentrations at the cortical bone were lower than at the implants, and maximum stress concentration in bone structure was 1.73 MPa. At the abutment screws, the stress concentration levels were similiar (3.09 MPa and 3.44 MPa), but the localizations were different. The stress at the angled abutment was higher than the stress at the straight abutment. CONCLUSION The pull-out force, applied during a crown removal, did not show an evident effect in bone structure. The higher stress concentrations were mostly observed at the implant and the abutment collar. In addition, the abutment screw, which is the weakest part of an implant system, also showed stress concentrations. Implant angulation affected the stress concentration levels and localizations. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS These results will help clinicians understand the mechanical behavior of cement-retained implant-supported crowns during crown retrieval. PMID:27141257

  1. Equations for predicting uncompacted crown ratio based on compacted crown ratio and tree attributes.

    Treesearch

    Vicente J. Monleon; David Azuma; Donald. Gedney

    2004-01-01

    Equations to predict uncompacted crown ratio as a function of compacted crown ratio, tree diameter, and tree height are developed for the main tree species in Oregon, Washington, and California using data from the Forest Health Monitoring Program, USDA Forest Service. The uncompacted crown ratio was modeled with a logistic function and fitted using weighted, nonlinear...

  2. Sagittal osteotomy inclination in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Lim, Hong-Chul; Bae, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jae Gyoon; Yun, Se-Hyeok; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Yoon, Jung-Ro

    2017-03-01

    Unlike postoperative changes in posterior tibial slope after medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy, sagittal osteotomy inclination has not been examined. It has been recommended that the osteotomy line in the sagittal plane be parallel to the medial posterior tibial slope. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of parallel osteotomy in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy. To determine the sagittal osteotomy inclination, the angle between the medial joint line and the osteotomy line was measured in the lateral radiograph. A positive angle value indicates that the osteotomy is anteriorly inclined relative to the medial posterior tibial slope. Correlation between the sagittal osteotomy inclination and posterior tibial slope was also evaluated. The mean sagittal osteotomy inclination was 15.1 ± 7.5°. The majority 87.1 % of knees showed an anterior-inclined osteotomy. There was a significantly positive correlation between the postoperative posterior tibial slope and the sagittal osteotomy inclination (r, 0.33; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.19-0.46; P < 0.001). The postoperative change in posterior tibial slope also showed a significantly positive correlation with the sagittal osteotomy inclination (r, 0.35; 95 % CI 0.21-0.47; P < 0.001). Although parallel osteotomy in the sagittal plane relative to the medial joint line was planned, only 12.9 % of cases achieved osteotomy parallel to the medial posterior tibial slope in the sagittal plane. Because of high rate of the anterior-inclined osteotomy and their correlations with posterior tibial slope, surgeons should make all efforts to perform parallel osteotomy relative to medial posterior tibial slope. IV.

  3. ARTICULATOR-RELATED REGISTRATION AND ANALYSIS OF SAGITTAL CONDYLAR INCLINATION.

    PubMed

    Cimić, Samir; Simunković, Sonja Kraljević; Suncana Simonić Kocijan; Matijević, Jurica; Dulcić, Niksa; Catić, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study sagittal condylar inclination values within a uniform sample (Angle class I occlusion) using 'articulator-related registration' and Camper's plane as a reference plane. The study was performed on a sample of 58 Angle class I subjects (mean age 25.1, SD 3.1). Measurements were performed with an ultrasonic jaw tracking device with six degrees of freedom. After a paraocclusal tray was fixed in the mouth, each subject had to make three protrusive movements and three right and left laterotrusive movements. From protrusive movements the software of the device automatically calculated the left and the right sagittal condylar inclination values used for setting of the articulator. The mean sagittal condylar inclinationvalue was 41.0° (SD 10.5) for the right joint and 40.7° (SD 9.8) for the left joint. The maximum value was 65.0° for the right and 68.6° for the left joint, and the minimum value was 13.7° for the right and 21.7° for the left joint. The results of this study suggested the average articulator setting for sagittal condylar inclination for fully dentate adult subjects to be 40° in relation to Camper's plane. This is especially important for the articulators that are set up in relation to Camper's plane.

  4. Applicability of the polysulphone horizontal calibration to differently inclined dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Casale, Giuseppe R; Siani, Anna Maria; Diémoz, Henri; Kimlin, Michael G; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Polysulphone (PS) dosimetry has been a widely used technique for more than 30 years to quantify the erythemally effective UV dose received by anatomic sites (personal exposure). The calibration of PS dosimeters is an important issue as their spectral response is different from the erythemal action spectrum. It is performed exposing a set of PS dosimeters on a horizontal plane and measuring the UV doses received by dosimeters using calibrated spectroradiometers or radiometers. In this study, data collected during PS field campaigns (from 2004 to 2006), using horizontal and differently inclined dosimeters, were analyzed to provide some considerations on the transfer of the horizontal calibration to differently inclined dosimeters, as anatomic sites usually are. The role of sky conditions, of the angle of incidence between the sun and the normal to the slope, and of the type of surrounding surface on the calibration were investigated. It was concluded that PS horizontal calibrations apply to differently inclined dosimeters for incidence angles up to approximately 70° and for surfaces excluding ones with high albedo. Caution should be used in the application of horizontal calibrations for cases of high-incidence angle and/or high albedo surfaces.

  5. ASSEMBLY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND INCLINATIONS OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Foucart, Francois; Lai, Dong

    2013-02-10

    The Kepler satellite has discovered a number of transiting planets around close binary stars. These circumbinary systems have highly aligned planetary and binary orbits. In this paper, we explore how the mutual inclination between the planetary and binary orbits may reflect the physical conditions of the assembly of protoplanetary disks and the interaction between protostellar binaries and circumbinary disks. Given the turbulent nature of star-forming molecular clouds, it is possible that the gas falling onto the outer region of a circumbinary disk and the central protostellar binary have different axes of rotation. Thus, the newly assembled circumbinary disk can be misaligned with respect to the binary. However, the gravitational torque from the binary produces a warp and twist in the disk, and the back-reaction torque tends to align the disk and the binary orbital plane. We present a new, analytic calculation of this alignment torque and show that the binary-disk inclination angle can be reduced appreciably after the binary accretes a few percent of its mass from the disk. Our calculation suggests that in the absence of other disturbances, circumbinary disks and planets around close (sub-AU) stellar binaries, for which mass accretion onto the proto-binary is very likely to have occurred, are expected to be highly aligned with the binary orbits, while disks and planets around wide binaries can be misaligned. Measurements of the mutual inclinations of circumbinary planetary systems can provide a clue to the birth environments of such systems.

  6. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

    1992-11-24

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels. 2 figs.

  7. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device that provides for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  8. Pipe weld crown removal device

    DOEpatents

    Sword, Charles K.; Sette, Primo J.

    1992-01-01

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  9. The role of speed and incline in the spontaneous choice of technique in classical roller-skiing.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Gertjan; Kveli, Espen; Øksnes, Magne; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2017-10-01

    Cross-country skiers change technique depending on terrain (incline) and effort (work rate; speed at a particular incline or resistance). The literature is not unequivocal about the influence of incline or speed on the choice of technique, i.e., which of these act as a 'control parameter'. Identifying task related control parameters for spontaneous technique shifts assists elucidating which mechanisms are active for triggering technique transitions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether speed or incline acted as such control parameter for technique shifts during classic style roller skiing. In this study, we kept the exercise intensity constant while changing two potential control parameters (speed and incline). Thus, any effect of work rate was excluded. Eight male competitive cross-country skiers performed roller skiing on a treadmill while incline was altered from 3 to 11% and back to 3% each minute by 1% and speed changed accordingly to obtain a constant work rate. This protocol was performed at three submaximal work rates (170, 200, and 230W) to obtain various combinations of speed and incline. The athletes were free to choose their technique (double poling, double poling with kick and diagonal stride), which was identified using continuous phase analysis on the motion of the skis. Physiological response (heart rate, oxygen uptake) was recorded continuously. The incline seemed to affect choice of technique shift more than speed: the ANOVA for repeated measures on all work rates showed no significant effect of incline (p>0.2) and an effect for speed (p<0.001). No effect of protocol order (increasing versus decreasing incline) was found for transitions. The physiological response was lowest for conditions of steep incline-low speed and was affected by protocol order. Cycle rate was affected by incline only in the double poling technique. Possible mechanisms related to the triggering of technique transitions are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  10. Penning trap with an inclined magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yaremko, Yurij; Przybylska, Maria; Maciejewski, Andrzej J

    2016-08-01

    A modified Penning trap with a spatially uniform magnetic field B inclined with respect to the axis of rotational symmetry of the electrodes is considered. The inclination angle can be arbitrary. Canonical transformation of phase variables transforming the Hamiltonian of the considered system into a sum of three uncoupled harmonic oscillators is found. We determine the region of stability in space of two parameters controlling the dynamics: the trapping parameter κ and the squared sine of the inclination angle ϑ0. If the angle ϑ0 is smaller than 54°, a charge occupies a finite spatial volume within the processing chamber. A rigid hierarchy of trapping frequencies is broken if B is inclined at the critical angle: the magnetron frequency reaches the modified cyclotron frequency while the axial frequency exceeds them. Apart from this resonance, we reveal the family of resonant curves in the region of stability. In the relativistic regime, the system is not linear. We show that it is not integrable in the Liouville sense. The averaging over the fast variable allows to reduce the system to two degrees of freedom. An analysis of the Poincaré cross-sections of the averaged systems shows the regions of effective stability of the trap.

  11. Particle Sliding on a Rough Incline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study a particle sliding on a rough inclined plane as an example of a mechanical problem with nonholonomic constraint. The particle is launched in an arbitrary direction so that its motion has both a horizontal and a "vertical" (i.e., up- and downhill) direction. The friction force acts along the instantaneous velocity, so that the horizontal…

  12. Airborne LIDAR point cloud tower inclination judgment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    liang, Chen; zhengjun, Liu; jianguo, Qian

    2016-11-01

    Inclined transmission line towers for the safe operation of the line caused a great threat, how to effectively, quickly and accurately perform inclined judgment tower of power supply company safety and security of supply has played a key role. In recent years, with the development of unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with a laser scanner, GPS, inertial navigation is one of the high-precision 3D Remote Sensing System in the electricity sector more and more. By airborne radar scan point cloud to visually show the whole picture of the three-dimensional spatial information of the power line corridors, such as the line facilities and equipment, terrain and trees. Currently, LIDAR point cloud research in the field has not yet formed an algorithm to determine tower inclination, the paper through the existing power line corridor on the tower base extraction, through their own tower shape characteristic analysis, a vertical stratification the method of combining convex hull algorithm for point cloud tower scarce two cases using two different methods for the tower was Inclined to judge, and the results with high reliability.

  13. 46 CFR 28.535 - Inclining test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... section, each vessel for which the lightweight displacement and centers of gravity must be determined in... of the vessel which was inclined and the location of the longitudinal center of gravity differs less... characteristics can be made and the precise location of the position of the vessel's vertical center of gravity is...

  14. 46 CFR 28.535 - Inclining test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... section, each vessel for which the lightweight displacement and centers of gravity must be determined in... of the vessel which was inclined and the location of the longitudinal center of gravity differs less... characteristics can be made and the precise location of the position of the vessel's vertical center of gravity is...

  15. Particle Sliding on a Rough Incline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study a particle sliding on a rough inclined plane as an example of a mechanical problem with nonholonomic constraint. The particle is launched in an arbitrary direction so that its motion has both a horizontal and a "vertical" (i.e., up- and downhill) direction. The friction force acts along the instantaneous velocity, so that the horizontal…

  16. Well productivity for arbitrarily inclined well

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, S.

    1995-12-31

    This work extends Peaceman`s equation to a well areally and vertically inclined at arbitrary angles with respect to grid lines in anisotropic reservoirs. The method is based on the transformation of the anisotropic flow equation to a homogeneous equation, and interpolating the effective well block radius, wellbore radius, and equivalent well length as a function of angles.

  17. Penning trap with an inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaremko, Yurij; Przybylska, Maria; Maciejewski, Andrzej J.

    2016-08-01

    A modified Penning trap with a spatially uniform magnetic field B inclined with respect to the axis of rotational symmetry of the electrodes is considered. The inclination angle can be arbitrary. Canonical transformation of phase variables transforming the Hamiltonian of the considered system into a sum of three uncoupled harmonic oscillators is found. We determine the region of stability in space of two parameters controlling the dynamics: the trapping parameter κ and the squared sine of the inclination angle ϑ 0 . If the angle ϑ 0 is smaller than 54°, a charge occupies a finite spatial volume within the processing chamber. A rigid hierarchy of trapping frequencies is broken if B is inclined at the critical angle: the magnetron frequency reaches the modified cyclotron frequency while the axial frequency exceeds them. Apart from this resonance, we reveal the family of resonant curves in the region of stability. In the relativistic regime, the system is not linear. We show that it is not integrable in the Liouville sense. The averaging over the fast variable allows to reduce the system to two degrees of freedom. An analysis of the Poincaré cross-sections of the averaged systems shows the regions of effective stability of the trap.

  18. The importance of crown dimensions to improve tropical tree biomass estimates.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Rosa C; Phillips, Oliver L; Baker, Timothy R

    2014-06-01

    Tropical forests play a vital role in the global carbon cycle, but the amount of carbon they contain and its spatial distribution remain uncertain. Recent studies suggest that once tree height is accounted for in biomass calculations, in addition to diameter and wood density, carbon stock estimates are reduced in many areas. However, it is possible that larger crown sizes might offset the reduction in biomass estimates in some forests where tree heights are lower because even comparatively short trees develop large, well-lit crowns in or above the forest canopy. While current allometric models and theory focus on diameter, wood density, and height, the influence of crown size and structure has not been well studied. To test the extent to which accounting for crown parameters can improve biomass estimates, we harvested and weighed 51 trees (11-169 cm diameter) in southwestern Amazonia where no direct biomass measurements have been made. The trees in our study had nearly half of total aboveground biomass in the branches (44% +/- 2% [mean +/- SE]), demonstrating the importance of accounting for tree crowns. Consistent with our predictions, key pantropical equations that include height, but do not account for crown dimensions, underestimated the sum total biomass of all 51 trees by 11% to 14%, primarily due to substantial underestimates of many of the largest trees. In our models, including crown radius greatly improves performance and reduces error, especially for the largest trees. In addition, over the full data set, crown radius explained more variation in aboveground biomass (10.5%) than height (6.0%). Crown form is also important: Trees with a monopodial architectural type are estimated to have 21-44% less mass than trees with other growth patterns. Our analysis suggests that accounting for crown allometry would substantially improve the accuracy of tropical estimates of tree biomass and its distribution in primary and degraded forests.

  19. Linking ice accretion and crown structure: towards a model of the effect of freezing rain on tree canopies

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Charles A.; Lecigne, Bastien; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Greene, David F.; Dauzat, Jean; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite a longstanding interest in variation in tree species vulnerability to ice storm damage, quantitative analyses of the influence of crown structure on within-crown variation in ice accretion are rare. In particular, the effect of prior interception by higher branches on lower branch accumulation remains unstudied. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intra-crown ice accretion can be predicted by a measure of the degree of sheltering by neighbouring branches. Methods Freezing rain was artificially applied to Acer platanoides L., and in situ branch-ice thickness was measured directly and from LiDAR point clouds. Two models of freezing rain interception were developed: ‘IceCube’, which uses point clouds to relate ice accretion to a voxel-based index (sheltering factor; SF) of the sheltering effect of branch elements above a measurement point; and ‘IceTree’, a simulation model for in silico evaluation of the interception pattern of freezing rain in virtual tree crowns. Key Results Intra-crown radial ice accretion varied strongly, declining from the tips to the bases of branches and from the top to the base of the crown. SF for branches varied strongly within the crown, and differences among branches were consistent for a range of model parameters. Intra-crown variation in ice accretion on branches was related to SF (R2 = 0·46), with in silico results from IceTree supporting empirical relationships from IceCube. Conclusions Empirical results and simulations confirmed a key role for crown architecture in determining intra-crown patterns of ice accretion. As suspected, the concentration of freezing rain droplets is attenuated by passage through the upper crown, and thus higher branches accumulate more ice than lower branches. This is the first step in developing a model that can provide a quantitative basis for investigating intra-crown and inter-specific variation in freezing rain damage. PMID:27107412

  20. Thinning, Fertilization, and Crown Position Interact to Control Physiological Responses of Loblolly Pine

    Treesearch

    Zhenmin Tang; Jim L. Chambers; Suresh Guddanti; James P. Barnett

    1999-01-01

    Summary To examine physiological responses to thinning, fertilization, and crown position, we measured net photosynthesis (Pn), transpiration (E), vapor pressure difference (VPD), stomatal conductance (gs), and xylem pressure potential (Yl) between 0930 and 1130 h under ambient conditions in the...

  1. Coast redwood live crown and sapwood

    Treesearch

    John-Pascal Berrill; Jesse L. Deffress; Jessica M. Engle

    2012-01-01

    Understanding crown rise and sapwood taper will help meet management objectives such as producing long branch-free boles for clear wood and old-growth restoration, or producing sawlogs with a high proportion of heartwood. Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) tree crown ratio data were collected 20 years after partial harvesting in a 65-year-old second growth stand....

  2. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed crown. 872.3330 Section 872.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3330 Preformed crown. (a) Identification. A preformed...

  3. Polymeric Electrolyte Containing 12-Crown-4 Ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesa; Distefano, Salvador

    1992-01-01

    Experiments show incorporation of 12-crown-4 ether into solid electrolytes based on polyethylene oxide enhances their electrochemical properties. More specifically, 12-crown-4 ether increases Faradaic efficiency for Li+ ions in low-power secondary Li cells and enables operation of these cells at lower temperatures with higher efficiencies.

  4. Numerical and experimental study of transient natural convection in an inclined wall cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, J.; Avila, F.

    1995-09-01

    Transient natural convection in an open cavity with one inclined wall is analyzed both numerically and experimentally. The fluid and the cavity are in thermal equilibrium at the onset of the experiment. The inclined wall is heated in such a way that the wall temperature increases uniformly according to an hyperbolic tangent function. The transport equations are solved using a 2-D transient model with a non-orthogonal body fitted coordinate system and an exponential grid distribution for better spatial resolution near the inclined wall. Measurements of velocity and temperature are performed at some key points of the boundary layer and intrusion layer. The fluid motion and heat transfer are analyzed from the time at which heat is applied though the inclined wall to the time at which its effect is detected at the opposite sidewall. The main patterns of the fluid flow and heat transfer are well predicted as comparisons against experimental results indicate.

  5. Fracture resistance of zirconia-composite veneered crowns in comparison with zirconia-porcelain crowns.

    PubMed

    Alsadon, Omar; Patrick, David; Johnson, Anthony; Pollington, Sarah; Wood, Duncan

    2017-02-11

    The objectives were to evaluate the fracture resistance and stress concentration in zirconia/composite veneered crowns in comparison to zirconia/porcelain crowns using occlusal fracture resistance and by stress analysis using finite element analysis method. Zirconia substructures were divided into two groups based on the veneering material. A static load was applied occlusally using a ball indenter and the load to fracture was recorded in Newtons (N). The same crown design was used to create 3D crown models and evaluated using FEA. The zirconia/composite crowns subjected to static occlusal load showed comparable results to the zirconia/porcelain crowns. Zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress on the zirconia substructure at 63.6 and 50.9 MPa on the zirconia substructure veneered with porcelain. In conclusion, zirconia/composite crowns withstood high occlusal loads similar to zirconia/porcelain crowns with no significant difference. However, the zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress values than the zirconia/porcelain crowns at the zirconia substructure.

  6. A comparison of the marginal fit of crowns fabricated with digital and conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jonathan; Ruse, Dorin; Wyatt, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Little evidence is available with regard to the marginal fit of crowns fabricated with digital impressions and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology in comparison with crowns fabricated from conventional techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the marginal fit of crowns fabricated with digital and conventional methods. The maxillary right second premolar was prepared for a ceramic crown in a typodont. The typodont was then digitized with a laboratory scanner, and the digital file was used to mill a replica of the maxillary arch from a monolithic block of yttria-stabilized zirconia to serve as the master model. Digital impressions of the prepared maxillary right second premolar were recorded with a scanning unit. Scan files were exported as .STL files and sent by e-mail to a dental laboratory. The files were input into a digital design workflow for digital articulation, digital waxing, and design of the definitive crown. Fifteen crowns were produced by milling computer-aided designed lithium disilicate glass ceramic blocks with a 5-axis milling. Fifteen lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns were produced with a conventional impression and a laboratory fabrication method. The original zirconia die was removed from the zirconia master model to evaluate the crown margins. Circumferential marginal gap measurements were made at 8 measurement locations: mescal, distal, buccal, palatal and associated line angles (mesiobuccal, mesiolingual, distobuccal, and distolingual). Measurements were made to determine the vertical component of the marginal gap according to the definition of marginal fit. A total of 240 images (2 groups, 15 crowns per group, 8 sites per crown) were recorded and measured. The overall mean ±SD vertical gap measurement for the digitally made crowns was 48 ±25 μm, which was significantly smaller than that for the conventionally made crowns (74 ±47 μm). The fully digital fabrication method

  7. Marginal and internal fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated with two different CAD/CAM systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Bok; Park, Charn-Woon; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2008-05-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of marginal and internal fit between the all-ceramic crowns manufactured by a conventional double-layer computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and a single-layer system. Ten standardized crowns were fabricated from each of these two systems: conventional double-layer CAD/CAM system (Procera) and a single-layer system (Cerec 3D). The copings and completed crowns were seated on the abutments by a special device that facilitated uniform loading, and the marginal discrepancies were measured. Internal gaps were also measured using a low-viscosity silicone material. Marginal discrepancies of Procera copings were significantly smaller than those of Procera crowns and Cerec 3D crowns (p < 0.05), but Procera crowns and Cerec 3D crowns did not differ significantly from each other (p > 0.05). On internal gaps, Cerec 3D crowns showed significantly larger internal gaps than Procera copings and crowns (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, the single-layer system demonstrated acceptable marginal and internal fit.

  8. Inclination of magnetic fields and flows in sunspot penumbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, K.; Scharmer, G. B.; Kiselman, D.; Löfdahl, M. G.; Berger, T. E.

    2005-06-01

    An observational study of the inclination of magnetic fields and flows in sunspot penumbrae at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec is presented. The analysis is based on longitudinal magnetograms and Dopplergrams obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope on La Palma using the Lockheed Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter birefringent filter. Data from two sunspots observed at several heliocentric angles between 12 ° and 39 ° were analyzed. We find that the magnetic field at the level of the formation of the Fe i-line wing (630.25 nm) is in the form of coherent structures that extend radially over nearly the entire penumbra giving the impression of vertical sheet-like structures. The inclination of the field varies up to 45 ° over azimuthal distances close to the resolution limit of the magnetograms. Dark penumbral cores, and their extensions into the outer penumbra, are prominent features associated with the more horizontal component of the magnetic field. The inclination of this dark penumbral component - designated B - increases outwards from approximately 40 ° in the inner penumbra such that the field lines are nearly horizontal or even return to the solar surface already in the middle penumbra. The bright component of filaments - designated A - is associated with the more vertical component of the magnetic field and has an inclination with respect to the normal of about 35 ° in the inner penumbra, increasing to about 60 ° towards the outer boundary. The magnetogram signal is lower in the dark component B regions than in the bright component A regions of the penumbral filaments. The measured rapid azimuthal variation of the magnetogram signal is interpreted as being caused by combined fluctuations of inclination and magnetic field strength. The Dopplergrams show that the velocity field associated with penumbral component B is roughly aligned with the magnetic field while component A flows are more horizontal than the magnetic field. The observations give

  9. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. In the context of exoplanets, this allows us to derive the true obliquity of a system if the projected stellar spin-planetary orbit angle can measured via the Rossiter-Mclaughlin effect. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than 2-2.5 km.s-1. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 that can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit the activity variation of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. The case of the equator-on star HD189733 will be presented, as well as the case of Alpha Centauri B, which present an inclination of 45+9-19 degrees, implying that the earth-mass orbiting planet is not transiting if aligned with its host star. Other exemples will also demonstrate the power of the technique, that can infer a stellar inclination, even for slow rotators like Alpha Centauri B, that present a projected rotational velocity smaller than 1.15 km.s-1. In addition, the SOAP 2.0 simulation can be used to correct for the effect of activity when one major active region is dominating the RV signal. This could enhance the detection of small mass exoplanets orbiting slightly active stars.This project is funded by ETAEARTH (European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n. 313014), a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of

  10. Enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns after 6 months of clinical use.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Rammelsberg, P; Schmitter, M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia crowns were placed in 20 patients requiring full molar crowns. For measurement of wear, impressions of both jaws were made at baseline after crown cementation and at 6-month follow-up. Mean and maximum wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists and of the two contralateral natural antagonists were measured by the use of plaster replicas and 3D laser scanning methods. Wear differences were investigated by the use of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and by linear regression analysis. Mean vertical loss (maximum vertical loss in parentheses) was 10 (43) μm for the zirconia crowns, 33 (112) μm for the opposing enamel, 10 (58) μm for the contralateral teeth and 10 (46) μm for the contralateral antagonists. Both mean and maximum enamel wear were significantly different between the antagonists of the zirconia crowns and the contralateral antagonists. Gender and activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were identified as possible confounders which significantly affected wear. Under clinical conditions, monolithic zirconia crowns seem to be associated with more wear of opposed enamel than are natural teeth. With regard to wear behaviour, clinical application of monolithic zirconia crowns is justifiable because the amount of antagonistic enamel wear after 6 months is comparable with, or even lower than, that caused by other ceramic materials in previous studies.

  11. Optical effects of different colors of artificial gingiva on ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Jin; Gil, Mindy; Da Silva, John D; Wright, Robert; Ishikawa-Nagai, Shigemi

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between gingival color and the shade of ceramic restorations has never been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the optical effects of altering artificial gingival color on the ceramic crown shade in the cervical area. Thirty-one all-ceramic crowns of different shades were used in this study with six different artificial gingival colors. Using a spectrophotometer (Crystaleye(®) Olympus, Japan), we measured the shade of crowns in cervical areas with each of six different artificial gingiva. The crown color measured in the presence of pink artificial gingiva (control) was compared with the crown color with five other artificial gingiva. color difference values ΔE* were calculated and compared between the control group and test groups and the correlation of the artificial gingival color with the crown color was also assessed. Significant differences were found in the mean L* and a* values of all-ceramic crowns at the cervical regions in all six gingival color groups (p<0.001) and significant Pearson correlations were also found for the mean L* (r=0.987, p<0.001) and a* (r=0.856, p=0.03) values between the artificial gingiva and the ceramic crowns. The mean ΔE* values between the control group and each of the five other gingival groups were all significantly larger than the clinical perceptual threshold of ΔE* 1.6 (p<0.001). Different colors of artificial gingiva generated clinically detectable shade differences in the cervical region of ceramic crowns. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. 5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ABUTMENT, FILL CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  13. 2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  14. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  15. 6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MIDSLOPE VICINITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MID-SLOPE VICINITY, CUT CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  16. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-40 Machinery, angles of inclination. (a... angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions (rolling...

  17. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-40 Machinery, angles of inclination. (a... angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions (rolling...

  18. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... designed to operate when the vessel is upright, when the vessel is inclined under static conditions at any angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions...

  19. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... designed to operate when the vessel is upright, when the vessel is inclined under static conditions at any angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions...

  20. 46 CFR 58.01-40 - Machinery, angles of inclination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... designed to operate when the vessel is upright, when the vessel is inclined under static conditions at any angle of list up to and including 15°, and when the vessel is inclined under dynamic conditions...

  1. Fringes of equal tangential inclination by curvature-induced birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; Hendawy, N. I.; Zaki, A. A.

    2003-02-01

    A new kind of interference fringes, fringes of equal tangential inclination by curvature-induced birefringence, is presented. These are two-beam interference fringes produced by bending a thin sheet of birefringent material into a part of an exact cylinder such that the curvature is constant. Due to this curvature there is a uniform birefringence being induced. The change in birefringence induced by applying different radii of curvatures to a Fortepan sheet is measured. The stored (fixed) or natural birefringence of this sheet is deduced.

  2. Granular flow down a flexible inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonar, Prasad; Sharma, Ishan; Singh, Jayant

    2017-06-01

    Discrete and continuous systems are commonly studied individually, but seldom together. Indeed, granular flows are typically studied through flows over a rigid base. Here, we investigate the behaviour of granular flows over an inclined, flexible base. The flexible base is modeled as a rigid platform mounted on springs and has one degree of freedom. The base vibrations are introduced by the flow. We simulate such flows through a discrete element method and compare with experiments. We find that a flexible base increased the upper limit of the inclination up to which a steady flow is possible by at least 3 degrees. This stabilized zone may have important implications in applications such as conveyor belts and chutes.

  3. Ion selectivity of crown ethers investigated by UV and IR spectroscopy in a cold ion trap.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kusaka, Ryoji; Haino, Takeharu; Ebata, Takayuki; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2012-04-26

    Electronic and vibrational spectra of benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) and benzo-18-crown-6 (B18C6) complexes with alkali metal ions, M(+)•B15C5 and M(+)•B18C6 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), are measured using UV photodissociation (UVPD) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in a cold, 22-pole ion trap. We determine the structure of conformers with the aid of density functional theory calculations. In the Na(+)•B15C5 and K(+)•B18C6 complexes, the crown ethers open the most and hold the metal ions at the center of the ether ring, demonstrating an optimum matching in size between the cavity of the crown ethers and the metal ions. For smaller ions, the crown ethers deform the ether ring to decrease the distance and increase the interaction between the metal ions and oxygen atoms; the metal ions are completely surrounded by the ether ring. In the case of larger ions, the metal ions are too large to enter the crown cavity and are positioned on it, leaving one of its sides open for further solvation. Thermochemistry data calculated on the basis of the stable conformers of the complexes suggest that the ion selectivity of crown ethers is controlled primarily by the enthalpy change for the complex formation in solution, which depends strongly on the complex structure.

  4. An inclined plane system with microcontroller to determine limb motor function of laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Wen; Young, Ming-Shing; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2008-02-15

    This study describes a high-accuracy inclined plane test system for quantitative measurement of the limb motor function of laboratory rats. The system is built around a microcontroller and uses a stepping motor to drive a ball screw, which changes the angle of the inclined plane. Any of the seven inclination speeds can be selected by the user. Two infrared (IR) LED/detector pairs function as interrupt sensors for objective determination of the moment that the rat loses its grip on the textured flooring of the starting area and slips down the plane. Inclination angle at the moment of IR interrupt (i.e. rat slip) is recorded. A liquid crystal display module shows the inclination speed and the inclination angle. The system can function as a stand alone device but a RS232 port allows connection to a personal computer (PC), so data can be sent directly to hard disk for storage and analysis. Experiments can be controlled by a local keypad or by the connected PC. Advantages of the presented system include easy operation, high accuracy, non-dependence on human observation for determination of slip angle, stand-alone capability, low cost and easy modification of the controlling software for different types of experiments. A fully functional prototype of the system is described. The prototype was used experimentally by a hospital group testing traumatic brain injury experiments, and some of their results are presented for system verification. It is found that the system is stable, accurate and easily used by investigators.

  5. Simulations of Seasonal and Latitudinal Variations in Leaf Inclination Angle Distribution: Implications for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huemmrich, Karl F.

    2013-01-01

    The leaf inclination angle distribution (LAD) is an important characteristic of vegetation canopy structure affecting light interception within the canopy. However, LADs are difficult and time consuming to measure. To examine possible global patterns of LAD and their implications in remote sensing, a model was developed to predict leaf angles within canopies. Canopies were simulated using the SAIL radiative transfer model combined with a simple photosynthesis model. This model calculated leaf inclination angles for horizontal layers of leaves within the canopy by choosing the leaf inclination angle that maximized production over a day in each layer. LADs were calculated for five latitude bands for spring and summer solar declinations. Three distinct LAD types emerged: tropical, boreal, and an intermediate temperate distribution. In tropical LAD, the upper layers have a leaf angle around 35 with the lower layers having horizontal inclination angles. While the boreal LAD has vertical leaf inclination angles throughout the canopy. The latitude bands where each LAD type occurred changed with the seasons. The different LADs affected the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) with similar relationships between fAPAR and leaf area index (LAI), but different relationships between NDVI and LAI for the different LAD types. These differences resulted in significantly different relationships between NDVI and fAPAR for each LAD type. Since leaf inclination angles affect light interception, variations in LAD also affect the estimation of leaf area based on transmittance of light or lidar returns.

  6. The effects of forward and backward walking according to treadmill inclination in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Hyo; Kim, Won-Bok; Yun, Chang-Kyo

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward and backward walking using different treadmill incline positions on lower muscle activity in children with cerebral palsy, to provide baseline data for gait training intensity. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen subjects with cerebral palsy walked forward and backward at a self-selected pace on a treadmill with inclines of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%. Activation of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialisanterior, and lateral gastrocnemius was measured using surface electromyography during the stance phase. [Results] As treadmill incline increased during forward walking, muscle activation of the paralyzed lower limbs did not significantly change. However, as treadmill incline increased during backward walking, rectus femoris activation significantly increased and a significant difference was found between treadmill inclines of 0% and 10%. A comparison of backward and forward walking showed a significant difference in rectus femoris activation at treadmill inclines of 0%, 5%, and 10%. Activation of the tibialis anterior was only significantly higher for backward walking at the 10% gradient. [Conclusion] Backward walking may strengthen the rectus femoris and tibialis anterior in walking training for cerebral palsy. Gradient adjustment of the treadmill can be used to select the intensity of walking training.

  7. A Comparison of Kinematic and Photometric Inclinations in the RESOLVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, Ryan William; Kannappan, Sheila; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Hall, Kirsten; Resolve

    2015-01-01

    Using standard prescriptions relating axial ratios to inclinations, the inferred distribution of inclinations for galaxies in the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey departs from theoretical expectations for a complete volume-limited sample. We compare kinematic inclinations from velocity fields of ˜200 disk galaxies in RESOLVE with their respective photometric inclinations to examine the origin of this discrepancy. We further investigate which galaxy properties may correlate with differences between inclination estimates, considering morphology, mass, optical size, and rotation curve asymmetry. Our test sample spans galaxy masses between 109 and 1011 M⊙, axial ratios between 0.2 and 0.9, rotation curve asymmetries between 0% and 30%, and the full range of morphological types, which are representative of the distribution for the parent survey, RESOLVE. However, the test sample does not represent the optically largest or smallest galaxies in RESOLVE, denoted by 90% r-band light radii greater than 70" or less than 6". The kinematic data for our sample galaxies were acquired with our custom image slicer on the SOAR telescope/Goodman spectrograph, and inclinations were measured using DiskFit. This analysis will contribute to the RESOLVE kinematic database in preparation. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under an REU supplement to CAREER award AST-0955368.

  8. The variation of large-scale structure inclination angles in high Reynolds number atmospheric surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-You; Bo, Tian-Li; Liang, Yi-Rui

    2017-03-01

    Field observations were performed to explore the variation of large-scale structure inclination angles in the high Reynolds number atmospheric surface layer (ASL). The high Reynolds number flow measurements [Reτ ˜ Ο (106)] were acquired at the Qingtu Lake observation array site. The structure inclination angles inferred from two-point correlations of the fluctuating streamwise velocity were obtained for different friction velocities in the neutral regime and different thermal stability conditions. Results indicate that, in addition to the Monin- Obukhov stability parameter, the structure inclination angle varies systematically with the friction velocity in the neutral surface layer. An empirical model is proposed to parametrize the variation of the inclination angle with the normalized friction velocity. The empirical formula agrees well with both the current ASL results and the previously documented results. Further analysis suggests that the inclination angle is dominated by the vertical velocity gradient (vertical wind shear) for both neutral and non-neutral regimes. The present work contributes to a better understanding of the inclination angle for the large-scale structures and may be used to improve the existing wall-models in the large-eddy simulation of the ASL.

  9. A new inclination instability in planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madigan, Ann-Marie

    2015-08-01

    I describe a new instability in Keplerian disks of massive particles on eccentric orbits. Gravitational torques between the orbits align their angles of pericenter and drive exponential growth in orbital inclination. This instability implies specific ratios for Kepler elements of the orbits, similar to what is seen in the inner Oort Cloud of our solar system. I also discuss implications for extra-solar planetary systems and for nuclear star clusters in the centers of galaxies.

  10. Vortex-induced vibrations of a flexibly-mounted inclined cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anil; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2013-11-01

    The majority of studies on vortex-induced vibrations of a flexibly-mounted rigid cylinder are for the cases where the flow direction is perpendicular to the long axis of the structure. However, in many engineering applications, such as cable stays in bridges and mooring lines of floating offshore wind turbines, the flow direction may not be perpendicular to the structure. To understand the vortex shedding behind a fixed inclined cylinder, the Independence Principle (IP) has been used. The IP assumes that an inclined cylinder behaves similarly to a normal-incidence case, if only the component of the free stream velocity normal to the cylinder axis is considered. The IP neglects the effect of the axial component of the flow, which seems reasonable for small angles of inclination, but not for large angles. In the present study, a series of experiments have been conducted on a flexibly-mounted rigid cylinder placed inclined to the oncoming flow with various angles of inclination (0°<θ<75°) in a range of Reynolds numbers from 500 to 4000 to investigate how the angle of inclination affects VIV. A rigid cylinder was mounted on springs, and air bearings were used to reduce the structural damping of the system. The system was placed in the test-section of a recirculating water tunnel and the crossflow displacements were measured at each flow velocity. Even at high angles of inclination, large-amplitude oscillations were observed. As the angle of inclination was increased, the lock-in range (the range of reduced flow velocities for which the cylinder oscillates with a large amplitude) started at a higher reduced velocity. When only the normal component of the oncoming flow was considered, the onset of lock-in was observed to be at the same normalized flow velocity for all angles of inclination except for 75°. However, the width of the lock-in region, its pattern, the maximum amplitude of oscillations and its corresponding normalized reduced velocity were not following

  11. Fracture strength of monolithic all-ceramic crowns made of high translucent yttrium oxide-stabilized zirconium dioxide compared to porcelain-veneered crowns and lithium disilicate crowns.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Camilla; Kmet, Gratiela; Rivera, Johnny; Larsson, Christel; Vult Von Steyern, Per

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to provide data on the fracture strength of monolithic high translucent Y-TZP crowns and porcelain-veneered high translucent Y-TZP crown cores and to compare that data with the fracture strength of porcelain-veneered Y-TZP crown cores and monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. Sixty standardized crowns divided into six groups (n = 10) were fabricated: monolithic high translucent Y-TZP crowns, brand A, monolithic high translucent Y-TZP crowns, brand B, veneered high translucent Y-TZP crown cores, brand A, veneered high translucent Y-TZP crown cores, brand B, heat-pressed monolithic lithium disilicate crowns and veneered Y-TZP crown cores. All crowns were thermocycled, cemented onto dies, cyclically pre-loaded and finally loaded to fracture. The monolithic Y-TZP groups showed significantly higher fracture strength (2795 N and 3038 N) compared to all other groups. The fracture strength in the veneered Y-TZP group (2229 N) was significantly higher than the monolithic lithium disilicate group (1856 N) and the veneered high translucent Y-TZP groups (1480 N and 1808 N). The fracture strength of monolithic high translucent Y-TZP crowns is considerably higher than that of porcelain-veneered Y-TZP crown cores, porcelain-veneered high translucent Y-TZP crown cores and monolithic lithium disilicate crowns. The fracture strength of a crown made of monolithic high translucent Y-TZP is, with a large safety margin, sufficient for clinical use for the majority of patients. Porcelain-veneered Y-TZP crown cores show higher fracture resistance than monolithic lithium disilicate crowns.

  12. Granular avalanches down inclined and vibrated planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudel, Naïma; Kiesgen de Richter, Sébastien; Louvet, Nicolas; Jenny, Mathieu; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we study granular avalanches when external mechanical vibrations are applied. We identify conditions of flow arrest and compare with the ones classically observed for nonvibrating granular flows down inclines [Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999), 10.1063/1.869928]. We propose an empirical law to describe the thickness of the deposits with the inclination angle and the vibration intensity. The link between the surface velocity and the depth of the flow highlights a competition between gravity and vibrations induced flows. We identify two distinct regimes: (a) gravity-driven flows at large angles where vibrations do not modify dynamical properties but the deposits (scaling laws in this regime are in agreement with the literature for nonvibrating granular flows) and (b) vibrations-driven flows at small angles where no flow is possible without applied vibrations (in this last regime, the flow behavior can be properly described by a vibration induced activated process). We show, in this study, that granular flows down inclined planes can be finely tuned by external mechanical vibrations.

  13. Granular avalanches down inclined and vibrated planes.

    PubMed

    Gaudel, Naïma; Kiesgen de Richter, Sébastien; Louvet, Nicolas; Jenny, Mathieu; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we study granular avalanches when external mechanical vibrations are applied. We identify conditions of flow arrest and compare with the ones classically observed for nonvibrating granular flows down inclines [Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999)PHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.869928]. We propose an empirical law to describe the thickness of the deposits with the inclination angle and the vibration intensity. The link between the surface velocity and the depth of the flow highlights a competition between gravity and vibrations induced flows. We identify two distinct regimes: (a) gravity-driven flows at large angles where vibrations do not modify dynamical properties but the deposits (scaling laws in this regime are in agreement with the literature for nonvibrating granular flows) and (b) vibrations-driven flows at small angles where no flow is possible without applied vibrations (in this last regime, the flow behavior can be properly described by a vibration induced activated process). We show, in this study, that granular flows down inclined planes can be finely tuned by external mechanical vibrations.

  14. Drop impact on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonjae; Leclear, Sani; Leclear, Johnathon; Abhijeet, .; Park, Kyoo-Chul

    We report an empirical study and dimensional analysis on the impact patterns of water drops on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces. While the classic Weber number determines the spreading and recoiling dynamics of a water drop on a horizontal / smooth surface, for a superhydrophobic surface, the dynamics depends on two distinct Weber numbers, each calculated using the length scale of the drop or of the pores on the surface. Impact on an inclined superhydrophobic surface is even more complicated, as the velocity that determines the Weber number is not necessarily the absolute speed of the drop but the velocity components normal and tangential to the surface. We define six different Weber numbers, using three different velocities (absolute, normal and tangential velocities) and two different length scales (size of the drop and of the texture). We investigate the impact patterns on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces with three different types of surface texture: (i) posts, (ii) ridges aligned with and (iii) ridges perpendicular to the impact direction. Results suggest that all six Weber numbers matter, but affect different parts of the impact dynamics, ranging from the Cassie-Wenzel transition, maximum spreading, to anisotropic deformation. We acknowledge financial support from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through Contract 3002453812.

  15. Tooth Wear Inclination in Great Ape Molars.

    PubMed

    Knight-Sadler, Jordan; Fiorenza, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Primate dietary diversity is reflected in their dental morphology, with differences in size and shape of teeth. In particular, the tooth wear angle can provide insight into a species' ability to break down certain foods. To examine dietary and masticatory information, digitized polygon models of dental casts provide a basis for quantitative analysis of wear associated with tooth attrition. In this study, we analyze and compare the wear patterns of Pongo pygmaeus, Gorilla gorillagorilla and Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii lower molars, focusing on the degree of inclination of specific wear facets. The variation in wear angles appears to be indicative of jaw movements and the specific stresses imposed on food during mastication, reflecting thus the ecology of these species. Orangutans exhibit flatter wear angles, more typical of a diet consisting of hard and brittle foods, while gorillas show a wear pattern with a high degree of inclination, reflecting thus their more leafy diet. Chimpanzees, on the other hand, show intermediate inclinations, a pattern that could be related to their highly variable diet. This method is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for better understanding the relationship between food, mastication and tooth wear processes in living primates, and can be potentially used to reconstruct the diet of fossil species. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Clinical Acceptability of the Internal Gap of CAD/CAM PD-AG Crowns Using Intraoral Digital Impressions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Gyung; Kim, Sungtae; Choi, Hyunmin; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hong; Moon, Hong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the internal gap between CAD/CAM palladium-silver crowns and cast gold crowns generated from intraoral digital versus conventional impressions and to determine the clinical acceptability. Nickel-chrome master dies were made from the prepared resin tooth with the conventional impression method (n = 40). For ICC (Intraoral, CAD/CAM) group, 10 intraoral digital impressions were made, and 10 CAD/CAM crowns of a PD-AG (palladium-silver) machinable alloy were generated. For IC (Intraoral, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were cast from ten intraoral digital impressions. For CCC (Conventional, CAD/CAM) group, 10 CAD/CAM PD-AG crowns were made using the conventional impression method. For CC (Conventional, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were fabricated from 10 conventional impressions. One hundred magnifications of the internal gaps of each crown were measured at 50 points with an optical microscope and these values were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05). The internal gap of the intraoral digital impression group was significantly larger than in the conventional impression group (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the CAD/CAM group and the cast group (P > 0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, crowns from intraoral digital impressions showed larger internal gap values than crowns from conventional impressions.

  17. Clinical Acceptability of the Internal Gap of CAD/CAM PD-AG Crowns Using Intraoral Digital Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Gyung; Kim, Sungtae; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the internal gap between CAD/CAM palladium-silver crowns and cast gold crowns generated from intraoral digital versus conventional impressions and to determine the clinical acceptability. Nickel-chrome master dies were made from the prepared resin tooth with the conventional impression method (n = 40). For ICC (Intraoral, CAD/CAM) group, 10 intraoral digital impressions were made, and 10 CAD/CAM crowns of a PD-AG (palladium-silver) machinable alloy were generated. For IC (Intraoral, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were cast from ten intraoral digital impressions. For CCC (Conventional, CAD/CAM) group, 10 CAD/CAM PD-AG crowns were made using the conventional impression method. For CC (Conventional, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were fabricated from 10 conventional impressions. One hundred magnifications of the internal gaps of each crown were measured at 50 points with an optical microscope and these values were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05). The internal gap of the intraoral digital impression group was significantly larger than in the conventional impression group (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the CAD/CAM group and the cast group (P > 0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, crowns from intraoral digital impressions showed larger internal gap values than crowns from conventional impressions. PMID:28018914

  18. Precession of a Spinning Ball Rolling down an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    A routine problem in an introductory physics course considers a rectangular block at rest on a plane inclined at angle a to the horizontal. In order for the block not to slide down the incline, the coefficient of sliding friction, µ, must be at least tan a. The situation is similar for the case of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. In order…

  19. 4. VIEW EAST, PERSPECTIVE DOWN INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW EAST, PERSPECTIVE DOWN INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ABUTMENT TO CONEMAUGH RIVER AND AREA OF LOWER INCLINE - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  20. 30 CFR 57.19135 - Rollers in inclined shafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rollers in inclined shafts. 57.19135 Section 57... Hoisting Inspection and Maintenance § 57.19135 Rollers in inclined shafts. Rollers used in operating inclined shafts shall be lubricated, properly aligned, and kept in good repair....

  1. 30 CFR 56.19135 - Rollers in inclined shafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rollers in inclined shafts. 56.19135 Section 56.19135 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Inspection and Maintenance § 56.19135 Rollers in inclined shafts. Rollers used in operating inclined...

  2. Precession of a Spinning Ball Rolling down an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    A routine problem in an introductory physics course considers a rectangular block at rest on a plane inclined at angle a to the horizontal. In order for the block not to slide down the incline, the coefficient of sliding friction, µ, must be at least tan a. The situation is similar for the case of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. In order…

  3. 30 CFR 56.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 56.11017 Section 56.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL....11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not incline backwards. ...

  4. 30 CFR 56.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 56.11017 Section 56.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL....11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not incline backwards. ...

  5. 30 CFR 56.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 56.11017 Section 56.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL....11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not incline backwards. ...

  6. 30 CFR 56.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 56.11017 Section 56.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL....11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not incline backwards. ...

  7. 30 CFR 56.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 56.11017 Section 56.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL....11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not incline backwards. ...

  8. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  9. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  10. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  11. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  12. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  13. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  14. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  15. 30 CFR 56.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 56... Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to prevent...

  16. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  17. 30 CFR 57.14113 - Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. 57... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14113 Inclined conveyors: backstops or brakes. Backstops or brakes shall be installed on drive units of inclined conveyors to...

  18. How the inclination of Earth's orbit affects incoming solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, L. E. A.; Norton, A.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Kretzschmar, M.; Schmidt, G. A.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2012-08-01

    The variability in solar irradiance, the main external energy source of the Earth's system, must be critically studied in order to place the effects of human-driven climate change into perspective and allow plausible predictions of the evolution of climate. Accurate measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) variability by instruments onboard space platforms during the last three solar cycles indicate changes of approximately 0.1% over the sunspot cycle. Physics-based models also suggest variations of the same magnitude on centennial to millennia time-scales. Additionally, long-term changes in Earth's orbit modulate the solar irradiance reaching the top of the atmosphere. Variations of orbital inclination in relation to the Sun's equator could potentially impact incoming solar irradiance as a result of the anisotropy of the distribution of active regions. Due to a lack of quantitative estimates, this effect has never been assessed. Here, we show that although observers with different orbital inclinations experience various levels of irradiance, modulations in TSI are not sufficient to drive observed 100 kyr climate variations. Based on our model we find that, due to orbital inclination alone, the maximum change in the average TSI over timescales of kyrs is ˜0.003 Wm-2, much smaller than the ˜1.5 Wm-2 annually integrated change related to orbital eccentricity variations, or the 1-8 Wm-2 variability due to solar magnetic activity. Here, we stress that out-of-ecliptic measurements are needed in order to constrain models for the long-term evolution of TSI and its impact on climate.

  19. Influence of crown class, diameter, and sprout rank on red maple (Acer rubrum L.) development during forest succession in Connecticut

    Treesearch

    Jeffery S. Ward; George R. Stephens

    1993-01-01

    Crown class, stem diameter, and sprout rank of 2067 red maples on medium quality sites were measured at 10-yr intervals between 1927-1987. Nominal stand age was 25 yrs in 1927. There was a progressive increase in the probability of an individual red maple ascending into the upper canopy and persisting in the upper canopy from suppressed through dominant crown classes...

  20. Extracting forest canopy structure from spatial information of high resolution optical imagery: tree crown size versus leaf area index

    Treesearch

    C. Song; M.B. Dickinson

    2008-01-01

    Leaves are the primary interface where energy, water and carbon exchanges occur between the forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. Leaf area index (LAI) is a measure of the amount of leaf area in a stand, and the tree crown size characterizes how leaves are clumped in the canopy. Both LAI and tree crown size are of essential ecological and management value. There is a...

  1. The Relationship of Diameter at Breast Height and Crown Diameter for Four Species Groups in Hardin County, Tennessee

    Treesearch

    Lawrence R. Gering; Dennis M. May

    1995-01-01

    A set of simple linear regression models for predicting diameter at breast height (dbh) from crown diamter and a set of similar models for predicting crown diamter from dbh were developed for four species groups in Harding County, TN. Data were obtained from 557 trees measured during hte 1989 USDA Southern Forest Experiment Station survey of the forest of Tennessee,...

  2. Propagating and incorporating the error in anisotropy-based inclination corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Jezek, Josef; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2011-10-01

    Sedimentary rock palaeomagnetic inclinations that are too shallow with respect to the ambient field inclination may be restored using anisotropy-based inclination corrections or techniques that rely on models of the past geomagnetic field. One advantage of the anisotropy technique is that it relies on measured parameters (declinations, inclinations, bulk rock magnetic fabrics and particle magnetic anisotropy) that have measurement errors associated with them, rather than relying on a geomagnetic field model and statistical treatment of the data. So far, however, the error associated with the measurements has not been propagated through the corrections and the reported uncertainties are simply the α95 95 per cent confidence circles of the corrected directions. In this paper we outline different methodologies of propagating the error using bootstrap statistics and analytic approximations using the case example of the Shepody Formation inclination correction. Both techniques are in good agreement and indicate a moderate, ˜15 per cent, uncertainty in the determination of the flattening factor (f) used in the correction. Such uncertainty corresponds to an ˜0.31° increase of the confidence cone and a bias that steepens the mean inclination by 0.32°. For other haematite-bearing formations realistic uncertainties for f ranging from 0 and 30 per cent were used (together with an intermediate value of 15 per cent) yielding a maximum expected increase in the confidence cones and steepening of the inclinations of ˜1°. Such results indicate that for moderate errors of f the inclination correction itself does not substantially alter the uncertainty of a typical palaeomagnetic study. We also compare the uncertainties resulting from anisotropy-based corrections to those resulting from the elongation/inclination (E/I) technique. Uncertainties are comparable for studies with a large sample number (>100), otherwise the anisotropy-based technique gives smaller uncertainties

  3. Alcohol-approach inclinations and drinking identity as predictors of behavioral economic demand for alcohol.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Jason J; Dennhardt, Ashley A; Baldwin, Scott A; Murphy, James G; Lindgren, Kristen P

    2016-10-01

    Behavioral economic demand curve indices of alcohol consumption reflect decisions to consume alcohol at varying costs. Although these indices predict alcohol-related problems beyond established predictors, little is known about the determinants of elevated demand. Two cognitive constructs that may underlie alcohol demand are alcohol-approach inclinations and drinking identity. The aim of this study was to evaluate implicit and explicit measures of these constructs as predictors of alcohol demand curve indices. College student drinkers (N = 223, 59% female) completed implicit and explicit measures of drinking identity and alcohol-approach inclinations at 3 time points separated by 3-month intervals, and completed the Alcohol Purchase Task to assess demand at Time 3. Given no change in our alcohol-approach inclinations and drinking identity measures over time, random intercept-only models were used to predict 2 demand indices: Amplitude, which represents maximum hypothetical alcohol consumption and expenditures, and Persistence, which represents sensitivity to increasing prices. When modeled separately, implicit and explicit measures of drinking identity and alcohol-approach inclinations positively predicted demand indices. When implicit and explicit measures were included in the same model, both measures of drinking identity predicted Amplitude, but only explicit drinking identity predicted Persistence. In contrast, explicit measures of alcohol-approach inclinations, but not implicit measures, predicted both demand indices. Therefore, there was more support for explicit, versus implicit, measures as unique predictors of alcohol demand. Overall, drinking identity and alcohol-approach inclinations both exhibit positive associations with alcohol demand and represent potentially modifiable cognitive constructs that may underlie elevated demand in college student drinkers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Alcohol-Approach Inclinations and Drinking Identity as Predictors of Behavioral Economic Demand for Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Jason J.; Dennhardt, Ashley A.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Murphy, James G.; Lindgren, Kristen P.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral economic demand curve indices of alcohol consumption reflect decisions to consume alcohol at varying costs. Although these indices predict alcohol-related problems beyond established predictors, little is known about the determinants of elevated demand. Two cognitive constructs that may underlie alcohol demand are alcohol-approach inclinations and drinking identity. The aim of this study was to evaluate implicit and explicit measures of these constructs as predictors of alcohol demand curve indices. College student drinkers (N = 223, 59% female) completed implicit and explicit measures of drinking identity and alcohol-approach inclinations at three timepoints separated by three-month intervals, and completed the Alcohol Purchase Task to assess demand at Time 3. Given no change in our alcohol-approach inclinations and drinking identity measures over time, random intercept-only models were used to predict two demand indices: Amplitude, which represents maximum hypothetical alcohol consumption and expenditures, and Persistence, which represents sensitivity to increasing prices. When modeled separately, implicit and explicit measures of drinking identity and alcohol-approach inclinations positively predicted demand indices. When implicit and explicit measures were included in the same model, both measures of drinking identity predicted Amplitude, but only explicit drinking identity predicted Persistence. In contrast, explicit measures of alcohol-approach inclinations, but not implicit measures, predicted both demand indices. Therefore, there was more support for explicit, versus implicit, measures as unique predictors of alcohol demand. Overall, drinking identity and alcohol-approach inclinations both exhibit positive associations with alcohol demand and represent potentially modifiable cognitive constructs that may underlie elevated demand in college student drinkers. PMID:27379444

  5. PROGRAM HTVOL: The Determination of Tree Crown Volume by Layers

    Treesearch

    Joseph C. Mawson; Jack Ward Thomas; Richard M. DeGraaf

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program calculates, from a few field measurements, the volume of tree crowns. This volume is in layers of a specified thickness of trees or large shrubs. Each tree is assigned one of 15 solid forms, formed by using one of five side shapes (a circle, an ellipse, a neiloid, a triangle, or a parabolalike shape), and one of three bottom shapes (a...

  6. Crown condition dynamics of oak in southern Sweden 1988-1999.

    PubMed

    Drobyshev, Igor; Anderson, Stefan; Sonesson, Kerstin

    2007-11-01

    Crown defoliation of oak (Quercus robur and Q. petraea) was analysed in 808 trees during three forest condition surveys (1988, 1993, and 1999) in the southern Sweden. From 1988 to 1999 crown defoliation increased by more than 20%. Changes in crown defoliation were related to the pH in the upper 20-30 cm of the mineral soils, which was closely connected to other measures of soil fertility (cation exchange capacity, CEC and C/N ratio). Trees growing on soils with a high pH (> or =4.00, in BaCl2 filtrate), high CEC and low C/N ratio had significantly lower crown defoliation than trees growing on more acid soils (pH <4.00), indicating that less favourable soil conditions may further enhance oak decline. Age did not differentiate trees with respect to crown defoliation, indicating that decline in crown condition was not due to an age-related increase in crown transparency. Considering only trees younger than 100 years, a significant interaction was observed between changes in crown defoliation and soil pH. Trees younger than 100 years old growing on more acidic soils had a greater increase in crown transparency than trees on more basic soils between 1988 and 1999. Trees > or =100 years old had significantly higher defoliation on more acidic than on more basic soils, however defoliation dynamics of these trees over 1988-99 was not related to soil acidity. Two biotic agents (insect and fungal leaf infections) evaluated in this study did not prove to be important drivers of defoliation dynamics.

  7. Tooth inclination in elderly with many remaining teeth observed by 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Fukagawa, Hiroko; Motegi, Etsuko; Fuma, Asuka; Nomura, Mayumi; Kano, Masataka; Sueishi, Kenji; Okano, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    Tooth inclination has been discussed many times in terms of esthetics and functionality, but reports related to aging are extremely rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tooth inclination in the elderly from the orthodontic point of view. The dental casts of twenty elderly persons with many remaining teeth were digitized with a 3-D laser scanner (VMS-100F,UNISN INC., Osaka, Japan) for reconstruction into 3-D images. Inclination of each tooth was then measured with an analytical software (SURFLACER, UNISN INC. and IMAGEWARE 12, UGS PLM Solutions, MO, USA). The occlusal plane formed by the incisal edge of the central incisor and distal buccal cusp tip of the first molar on either side was used as a reference plane to measure tooth inclination, and the complementary angle as tooth inclination was measured. The average tooth inclinations (degrees) of the maxillary teeth were 8.08 for central incisors, 8.10 for lateral incisors, 4.85 for canines, -6.68 for first premolars, -5.58 for second premolars, -5.15 for first molars, and -5.41 for second molars. The corresponding values for the mandibular teeth were 6.78 for central incisors, 4.87 for lateral incisors, -5.73 for canines, -13.74 for first premolars, -19.21 for second premolars, -23.76 for first molars, and -28.63 for second molars. There was no statistical difference between men and women, except for in the maxillary lateral incisors (p<0.05). Tooth inclination showed a progressive decrease from anterior to posterior. The decrease in the mandibular teeth was more regular than that of the maxillary teeth.

  8. The quality of veterinary in-clinic and reference laboratory biochemical testing.

    PubMed

    Rishniw, Mark; Pion, Paul D; Maher, Tammy

    2012-03-01

    Although evaluation of biochemical analytes in blood is common in veterinary practice, studies assessing the global quality of veterinary in-clinic and reference laboratory testing have not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of biochemical testing in veterinary laboratories using results obtained from analyses of 3 levels of assayed quality control materials over 5 days. Quality was assessed by comparison of calculated total error with quality requirements, determination of sigma metrics, use of a quality goal index to determine factors contributing to poor performance, and agreement between in-clinic and reference laboratory mean results. The suitability of in-clinic and reference laboratory instruments for statistical quality control was determined using adaptations from the computerized program, EZRules3. Reference laboratories were able to achieve desirable quality requirements more frequently than in-clinic laboratories. Across all 3 materials, > 50% of in-clinic analyzers achieved a sigma metric ≥ 6.0 for measurement of 2 analytes, whereas > 50% of reference laboratory analyzers achieved a sigma metric ≥ 6.0 for measurement of 6 analytes. Expanded uncertainty of measurement and ± total allowable error resulted in the highest mean percentages of analytes demonstrating agreement between in-clinic and reference laboratories. Owing to marked variation in bias and coefficient of variation between analyzers of the same and different types, the percentages of analytes suitable for statistical quality control varied widely. These findings reflect the current state-of-the-art with regard to in-clinic and reference laboratory analyzer performance and provide a baseline for future evaluations of the quality of veterinary laboratory testing. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  9. Wear of double crown systems - electroplated vs. casted female part

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Stefan; KRAUS, Dominik; KEILIG, Ludger; GÖLZ, Lina; STARK, Helmut; ENKLING, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The wear of telescopic crowns is a common problem often reducing the patient's satisfaction with the denture and resulting in a renewal of the denture. The study aims to compare the wear behavior of conical crowns using electroplated copings (group E) with standard telescopic crowns with cast female parts (group C). Material and Methods 10 conical crowns were milled for each group of a cast gold alloy. The specimen of group E had a conicity of 2º. The cast secondary crowns of group C had a 0º design. The electroplated coping was established by direct electroforming. An apparatus accomplishing 10,000 wear cycles performed the wear test. The retentive forces and the correlating distance during insertion and separation were measured. The wear test was separated in a start phase, an initial wear phase and the long term wear period. The retention force value and the force-distance integral of the first 0.33 mm of each cycle were calculated. Results The retentive forces were significantly higher for group E and the integrals were significantly lower for this group except the integral at cycle 10,000. The changes of retention force and integral did not differ significantly between both groups in all phases. The change of the integrals as well as the integral at the particular cycles showed higher interquartile distances for group C. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study the tested conical crowns showed clinically acceptable retentive properties. The values reached a range comparable to retentive elements tested in recent literature. The values of group C showed higher ranges. The force measured for group E was significantly higher than for group C but the integrals showed an opposite tendency. The results indicate that an exclusive analysis of the force is not sufficient as the integral is not equivalent to the force although it describes the retentive property of the system in a better way than the force over a distance is described. Both systems

  10. Crown-rise and crown-length dynamics: applications to loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    Harry T. Valentine; Ralph L. Amateis; Jeffrey H. Gove; Annikki. Makela

    2013-01-01

    The original crown-rise model estimates the average height of a crown-base in an even-aged mono-species stand of trees. We have elaborated this model to reduce bias and prediction error, and to also provide crown-base estimates for individual trees. Results for the latter agree with a theory of branch death based on resource availability and allocation.We use the...

  11. A numerical rating system for crown classes of southern hardwoods

    Treesearch

    James S. Meadows; E.C. Burkhardt; Robert L. Johnson; John D. Hodges

    2001-01-01

    A numerical rating system to delineate crown classes of southern hardwoods is described. The system is based on four criteria: (1) amount of direct sunlight from above, (2) amount of direct sunlight from the sides, (3) crown balance, and (4) relative crown size. The total point value assigned places the tree within one of the four crown classes. The rating system can...

  12. Experimental and numerical modeling of shrub crown fire initiation

    Treesearch

    Watcharapong Tachajapong; Jesse Lozano; Shakar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; David Weise

    2009-01-01

    The transition of fire from dry surface fuels to wet shrub crown fuels was studied using laboratory experiments and a simple physical model to gain a better understanding of the transition process. In the experiments, we investigated the effects of varying vertical distances between surface and crown fuels (crown base height), and of the wind speed on crown fire...

  13. A simplified Red Bed Inclination Correction: Case Study from the Permian Esterel Group of France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, D.; Kodama, K. P.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic anisotropy-based inclinations corrections have been performed in the paleomagnetic laboratory at Lehigh University, on both hematite and magnetite-bearing sedimentary rocks. Results of these corrections indicate a latitudinal variation of inclination shallowing with the formations initially located at mid latitudes suffering from more shallowing than those initially closer to the equator, consistent with the tan (Im)= f * tan (If) relationship observed by King (1955) for inclination shallowing, where Im is the measured inclination and If is the field inclination during deposition. Shallowing of the paleomagnetic vectors can be expressed in terms of the flattening factor f, that relates tan (Im) to tan (If). Anisotropy- derived hematite f factors from the Maritime Provinces of Canada and Northwest China were combined with f factors derived from corrections that use models of geomagnetic field secular variation (the EI technique of Tauxe and Kent, 2004) on red bed Formations from North America, Greenland and Europe. The dataset was used to derive a probability density function for f. The mean f value will allow a simplified inclination correction for hematite-bearing red bed formations that are suspected to be affected by inclination shallowing. This approach was tested by correcting the Permian Esterel Group red beds from France: using the distribution mean f factor of 0.64 (±0.11, ±1 standard deviation), the corrected red bed paleopole becomes statistically indistinguishable from the paleopole measured for the Esterel Group volcanic rocks that have not suffered from inclination shallowing. f data was also compiled for magnetite-bearing sedimentary rocks from the Perforada Formation and the Valle Group from Baja California, Mexico, the Pigeon Point Formation of Central California, the Ladd and the Point Loma Formations from Southern California, the Nanaimo Group of British Columbia and the Deer Lake Group of Newfoundland that have been corrected for

  14. Light-trapping properties of the Si inclined nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaopeng; Huangfu, Huichao; He, Long; Wang, Jiazhuang; Yang, Dong; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    The light trapping performance of Si nanowire with different inclination angles were systematically studied by COMSOL Multiphysics. The inclined nanowires with inclination angles smaller than 60° show greater light trapping ability than their counterparts of the vertical nanowires. The Si solar cell with the inclined nanowires of the optimal parameters, whose θ=30°, P=400 nm, D=140 nm, can achieve a 32.395 mA/cm2 short circuit photocurrent density and a 35.655% conversion efficiency. The study of the inclined nanowire provides an effective way for further utilization of the incoming light.

  15. Induction of Crown Gall on Carrot Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, H.; Fox, K. D.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the transfer of plasmid from a bacterium to a plant cell has received little attention. Presents an experiment for studying this type of genetic transformation using the causative agent of crown gall, a malignant plant tumor. (DDR)

  16. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... crown is a prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after...

  17. Success of Hall technique crowns questioned.

    PubMed

    Nainar, S M Hashim

    2012-01-01

    Hall technique is a method of providing stainless steel crowns for primary molars without tooth preparation and requires no local anesthesia. Literature review showed inconclusive evidence and therefore this technique should not be used in clinical practice.

  18. Induction of Crown Gall on Carrot Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, H.; Fox, K. D.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the transfer of plasmid from a bacterium to a plant cell has received little attention. Presents an experiment for studying this type of genetic transformation using the causative agent of crown gall, a malignant plant tumor. (DDR)

  19. Rock magnetic evidence for inclination shallowing in the early Carboniferous Deer Lake Group red beds of western Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2010-04-01

    A paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of the Carboniferous Deer Lake Group red beds of Newfoundland was performed to detect and correct for inclination shallowing. Results indicate a primary remanence carried by magnetite, with a mean direction of D = 179.7°, I = 33.7°, α95 = 7.2° which corresponds to a paleopole position of 22.2°N, 122.3°E, A95 = 7.6°. Correcting the inclination using anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence and the measured individual particle anisotropy gives a corrected direction of D = 178.8°, I = 50.9°, α95 = 6.3° corresponding to a paleopole position at 8.4°N, 122.7°E, A95 = 7.2°. This correction is larger than that of other red beds from the Maritime Provinces of Canada, but is consistent with paleoenvironmental reconstructions, placing North America in a more arid climate zone. Our inclination-corrected results have important implications for this portion of North America's apparent polar wander path and suggest a correction is needed for other red bed-derived APWPs. We have determined the range of flattening factors f, defined as the proportionality constant between the tangents of the measured (Im) and field (Io) inclinations, tan(Im) = ftan(I0), from this study and previous inclination correction studies to estimate inclination corrections. Using the range of haematite f factors observed in this study to correct the Neogene red bed inclinations from the Vallès-Penedès Basin (NE Spain) yields inclinations consistent with the known geomagnetic field inclination in the Neogene, thus indicating that the range of f factors reported here may be used to estimate the magnitude of inclination shallowing in red beds.

  20. Classifying stages of third molar development: crown length as a predictor for the mature root length.

    PubMed

    Altalie, Salem; Thevissen, Patrick; Willems, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Multiple tooth development staging techniques were reported based on arbitrarily set borderlines between succeeding stages. Anatomic tooth features or predictions of future tooth part dimensions were described to identify the thresholds between the established stages. The need to predict mature tooth dimensions, while the tooth considered is still in development, is a drawback to use this staging technique for dental age estimations. Using the fully mature crown length as a predictor for the future root length could provide a tool for undisputable staging. The aim of this study was first to measure the crown and root length of fully mature third molars and second to investigate whether the crown length could be used as a predictor of the root length, in order to classify the observed root length as a proportion of the future mature root. The crown and root lengths of all present third molars were digitally measured on dental panoramic radiographs of 1,000 subjects. The included subjects were equally distributed in gender, and their age ranged between 22 and 40 years. Two occlusal borders, the cement enamel junction and the root apices, were defined as landmarks for standardized measurements. Regression models with root length as response and crown length as predictor were established and revealed low R (2) and high RMSE values. Due to the small explained variance by the prediction models and the high variation in prediction errors, the observed crown length cannot be used to predict the final root length of a developing third molar.

  1. The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst.

    PubMed

    Owen, Reuel

    2003-01-01

    The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst Appliance is evaluated and combined with Straight Wire Arch Fixed Orthodontics in treatment of Class II, Division I malocclusions. This article will evaluate a combined orthodontic approach of "straightening teeth" and an orthognathic approach of "moving jaws or making skeletal changes." Orthodontic treatment cannot be accomplished well without establishing a healthy temporomandibular joint. This is defined by Keller as a joint that is "noiseless, painless and has a normal range of motion without deviation and deflection." It is not prudent to separate orthodontic treatment as its own entity without being aware of the changes in the temporomandibular joint before, during and after treatment. In other words, "If you're doing orthodontics you're doing TMJ treatment." One should treat toward a healthy, beautiful face asking, "Will proposed treatment achieve this goal?" Treatment should be able to be carried out in an efficient manner, minimizing treatment time, be comfortable and affordable for the patient, and profitable for the dentist. The finished treatment should meet Andrews' Six Keys of Occlusion, or Loudon's Twelve Commandments. Above all, do no harm to the patient. We think that a specific treatment plan can embrace these tenets. The focus will be to show Class II treatment using a modified Herbst Appliance and fixed straight wire orthodontics.

  2. Model-based conifer crown surface reconstruction from multi-ocular high-resolution aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yongwei

    2000-12-01

    Tree crown parameters such as width, height, shape and crown closure are desirable in forestry and ecological studies, but they are time-consuming and labor intensive to measure in the field. The stereoscopic capability of high-resolution aerial imagery provides a way to crown surface reconstruction. Existing photogrammetric algorithms designed to map terrain surfaces, however, cannot adequately extract crown surfaces, especially for steep conifer crowns. Considering crown surface reconstruction in a broader context of tree characterization from aerial images, we develop a rigorous perspective tree image formation model to bridge image-based tree extraction and crown surface reconstruction, and an integrated model-based approach to conifer crown surface reconstruction. Based on the fact that most conifer crowns are in a solid geometric form, conifer crowns are modeled as a generalized hemi-ellipsoid. Both the automatic and semi-automatic approaches are investigated to optimal tree model development from multi-ocular images. The semi-automatic 3D tree interpreter developed in this thesis is able to efficiently extract reliable tree parameters and tree models in complicated tree stands. This thesis starts with a sophisticated stereo matching algorithm, and incorporates tree models to guide stereo matching. The following critical problems are addressed in the model-based surface reconstruction process: (1) the problem of surface model composition from tree models, (2) the occlusion problem in disparity prediction from tree models, (3) the problem of integrating the predicted disparities into image matching, (4) the tree model edge effect reduction on the disparity map, (5) the occlusion problem in orthophoto production, and (6) the foreshortening problem in image matching, which is very serious for conifer crown surfaces. Solutions to the above problems are necessary for successful crown surface reconstruction. The model-based approach was applied to recover the

  3. a Modified Method for Image Triangulation Using Inclined Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsadik, Bashar

    2016-06-01

    The ongoing technical improvements in photogrammetry, Geomatics, computer vision (CV), and robotics offer new possibilities for many applications requiring efficient acquisition of three-dimensional data. Image orientation is one of these important techniques in many applications like mapping, precise measurements, 3D modeling and navigation. Image orientation comprises three main techniques of resection, intersection (triangulation) and relative orientation, which are conventionally solved by collinearity equations or by using projection and fundamental matrices. However, different problems still exist in the state - of -the -art of image orientation because of the nonlinearity and the sensitivity to proper initialization and spatial distribution of the points. In this research, a modified method is presented to solve the triangulation problem using inclined angles derived from the measured image coordinates and based on spherical trigonometry rules and vector geometry. The developed procedure shows promising results compared to collinearity approach and to converge to the global minimum even when starting from far approximations. This is based on the strong geometric constraint offered by the inclined angles that are enclosed between the object points and the camera stations. Numerical evaluations with perspective and panoramic images are presented and compared with the conventional solution of collinearity equations. The results show the efficiency of the developed model and the convergence of the solution to global minimum even with improper starting values.

  4. An investigation of crown fuel bulk density effects on the dynamics of crown fire initiation in shrublands

    Treesearch

    Watcharapong Tachajapong; Jesse Lozano; Shankar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; David R. Weise

    2008-01-01

    Crown fire initiation is studied by using a simple experimental and detailed physical modeling based on Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Experiments conducted thus far reveal that crown fuel ignition via surface fire occurs when the crown base is within the continuous flame region and does not occur when the crown base is located in the hot plume gas region of the surface...

  5. [Computer aided design and manufacture of the porcelain fused to metal crown].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Dai, Ning; Yu, Qing; Hao, Guodong; Sun, Quanping

    2009-04-01

    In order to satisfy the current demand for fast and high-quality prosthodontics, we have carried out a research in the fabrication process of the porcelain fused to metal crown on molar with CAD/CAM technology. Firstly, we get the data of the surface mesh on preparation teeth through a 3D-optical grating measuring system. Then, we reconstruct the 3D-model crown with the computer-aided design software which was developed by ourselves. Finally, with the 3D-model data, we produce a metallic crown on a high-speed CNC carving machine. The result has proved that the metallic crown can match the preparation teeth ideally. The fabrication process is reliable and efficient, and the restoration is precise and steady in quality.

  6. The speed of an inclined ruck.

    PubMed

    Balmforth, N J; Craster, R V; Hewitt, I J

    2015-01-08

    Steady rucks in an elastic beam can roll at constant speed down an inclined plane. We examine the dynamics of these travelling-wave structures and argue that their speed can be dictated by a combination of the physical conditions arising in the vicinity of the 'contact points' where the beam is peeled off the underlying plane and stuck back down. We provide three detailed models for the contact dynamics: viscoelastic fracture, a thermodynamic model for bond formation and detachment and adhesion mediated by a thin liquid film. The results are compared with experiments.

  7. Braiding patterns on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Keith; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Vorobieff, Peter

    2004-07-08

    A jet of fluid flowing down a partially wetting, inclined plane usually meanders but--by maintaining a constant flow rate--meandering can be suppressed, leading to the emergence of a beautiful braided structure. Here we show that this flow pattern can be explained by the interplay between surface tension, which tends to narrow the jet, and fluid inertia, which drives the jet to widen. These observations dispel misconceptions about the relationship between braiding and meandering that have persisted for over 20 years.

  8. Circular Waveguide Slotted Antenna with Inclined Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekretarov, S. S.; Vavriv, D. M.

    2009-03-01

    The novel design of a Ku-band circular waveguide slotted antenna is proposed. In contrast to standard antennas of this type, the main beam of the developed antenna is inclined from its surface normal by the value noticeably exceeding the beam width, which is necessary e.g. to reduce the radar cross section of the antenna in the direction towards an illuminated target. The design features of such antennas are considered. The practical desing of the antenna developed is presented along with the comparison of the simulation and experimental results.

  9. The speed of an inclined ruck

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, N. J.; Craster, R. V.; Hewitt, I. J.

    2015-01-01

    Steady rucks in an elastic beam can roll at constant speed down an inclined plane. We examine the dynamics of these travelling-wave structures and argue that their speed can be dictated by a combination of the physical conditions arising in the vicinity of the ‘contact points’ where the beam is peeled off the underlying plane and stuck back down. We provide three detailed models for the contact dynamics: viscoelastic fracture, a thermodynamic model for bond formation and detachment and adhesion mediated by a thin liquid film. The results are compared with experiments. PMID:25568622

  10. Experimental investigation of the effect of multimodal inclined interface on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghar, Mohammad; Carter, John; Musci, Benjamin; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    In the Georgia Tech Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory, the evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) which arises from two initial conditions, namely, a predominantly single mode, inclined interface between two gases, and a perturbed, multimodal, inclined interface are studied. The gas combination of nitrogen-acetone as light gas and carbon dioxide as heavy gas (Atwood number of 0.23) with an inclination angle of 80 degrees (η/ λ = 0.097) was chosen in this set of experiments. The interface is visualized using planar laser diagnostics (simultaneous PLIF/PIV measurements), once impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.55. The ensemble-averaged turbulence measurements of the density, velocity and density-velocity cross-statistics are used to investigate the effects of added secondary modes to the interface on the correlation between turbulence and mixing quantities.

  11. Comparative analysis of trunk muscle activities in climbing of during upright climbing at different inclination angles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung-Joon; Kim, Joong-Hwi; Kim, Jang-Hwan; Choi, Byeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to provide evidence for the therapeutic exercise approach through a compative analysis of muscle activities according to climbing wall inclination. [Subjects and Methods] Twentyfour healthy adult subjects without climbing experience performed static exercises at a therapeutic climbing at with various inclination angles (0°, 10°, 20°), and the activities of the trunk muscles (rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, erector spinae) were measured using surface electromyography (EMG) for 7 seconds. [Results] Significant differences were found between the inclination angles of 10° and 0°, as well as 20° in the rectus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, right obliquus externus abdominis, and right erector spinae. [Conclusion] Based on measurements of trunk muscle activity in a static climbing standing position at different angles, significant changes in muscle activity appear to be induced at 10 degrees. Therefore, the results appear to provide clinically relevant evidence. PMID:26644661

  12. In-Clinic Blood Pressure Prediction of Normal Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Pediatric Hypertension Referrals.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip K; Ferguson, Michael A; Zachariah, Justin P

    2016-07-01

    Since younger patients have low pretest probability of hypertension and are susceptible to reactive and masked hypertension, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) can be useful. To better target use in referred patients, we sought to define in-clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP) measures that predicted normal ABPM and target end organ damage. Data were collected on consecutive patients referred for high BP undergoing an ambulatory BP monitor from 2010 to 2013 (n = 248, 33.9% female, mean age 15.5 ± 3.6 years). Candidate in-clinic predictors were systolic maximum, minimum, or average BPs obtained by auscultative, oscillometric, or both. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the prediction of normal ABPM by in-clinic BP predictors. Separate models considered predicting left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) by in-clinic SBP vs. ABPM-defined hypertension. Identified predictor utility was tested with receiver operator characteristic curves. Maximum (OR 0.97 [95% CI 0.94-0.99]; P = .047), minimum (0.96 [0.94-0.99]; P = .002), and average (0.97 [0.95-1.00]; P = .04) in-clinic auscultative SBP predicted normal ABPM. Each had a c-statistic of 0.58. LVH was associated with in-clinic auscultative minimum SBP treated continuously (1.05, [1.01-1.10], P = .01) or dichotomized at the 90th percentile (8.23, [1.48-45.80], P = .02), as well as ABPM-defined hypertension (3.31, [1.23-8.91], P = .02). Both predictors had poor sensitivity and specificity. In youth, normal auscultative in-clinic systolic blood pressure indices weakly predicted normal ambulatory blood pressure and target end organ damage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Three-dimensional finite element analysis on half of the structure defect with post core and all-ceramic crown restoration of mandibular first molar].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Geng, Haixia; Rong, Qiguo; Liu, Jianzhang

    2015-09-01

    To make a mechanical analysis on three-dimensional finite element models of the mandibular first molar defect restored with post core and all-ceramic crown, and to provide a guideline for planning restoration for such kind of tooth structure defect. Cone-beam CT based three dimensional finite element models of post and core restored first mandibular molars were established, with 6 different ferrule designs (the ferrule with only 180 axial wall on different locations). The von Misses criterion was applied for comparing the maximum von Misses stress value of dentin and stress concentration areas in six models which restored with fiber post or cast NiGr alloy post core or Au alloy post core under the maximum, vertical, inclined and horizontal direct loads. The restoration effects in six models were compared, and the maximum von Misses stress concentration areas were not obviously different. The maximum von Misses stress value of NiCr alloy post core and crown was 62.81 MPa. Under horizontal load, the maximum von Misses stress value of dentin increased remarkably. The location of residual dentin has little influence on the stress distribution, when restored by post core and crown. Au alloy post core and crown or fiber post core and crown are superior to NiCr alloy post core and crown.

  14. Vortex Formation Behind an Inclined 2-Dimensional Thin Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebi, Meraj; Wood, David H.; Martinuzzi, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry was used to measure the turbulent wake of a 2D flat plate inclined relative to a uniform stream as a heuristic model for airfoils and wind turbine blades at high incidence. Phase Averaging was performed to study the vortex dynamics and relate these to the force characteristics. Below 90°, immediately behind the plate, rounder and more organized trailing edge vortices form which possess higher circulation and are associated with higher Reynolds stresses than the counter-rotating, weaker and elongated leading edge vortices. The quasi-periodically shed vortices on the sides of the wake decay in strength at different rates to reach a circulation ratio of -1 within a distance less than 5 chords downstream of the plate for all angles. This equalization of vortex strength is related to an increase in turbulence diffusion, due to mostly-incoherent 3-dimensionality which progressively increases as the inclination angle is reduced, and convective transfer of vorticity between counter-rotating vortices. The wake experiences a sudden change in vortex formation mechanism at around 40°. At this angle, the frequency analysis on the signals of a pair of micro-pressure transducers in the wake also shows a discontinuity in the trends. This work was supported by NSERC Discovery grants to R. J. Martinuzzi and D. H. Wood.

  15. Urban Crowns: crown analysis software to assist in quantifying urban tree benefits

    Treesearch

    Matthew F. Winn; Sang-Mook Lee Bradley; Philip A. Araman

    2010-01-01

    UrbanCrowns is a Microsoft® Windows®-based computer program developed by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station. The software assists urban forestry professionals, arborists, and community volunteers in assessing and monitoring the crown characteristics of urban trees (both deciduous and coniferous) using a single side-view digital photograph. Program output...

  16. Sound radiation from a flanged inclined duct.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Alan; Daymond-King, Alex P; Kempton, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    A simple method to calculate sound radiation from a flanged inclined duct is presented. An inclined annular duct is terminated by a rigid vertical plane. The duct termination is representative of a scarfed exit. The concept of a scarfed duct has been examined in turbofan aero-engines as a means to, potentially, shield a portion of the radiated sound from being transmitted directly to the ground. The sound field inside the annular duct is expressed in terms of spinning modes. Exterior to the duct, the radiated sound field owing to each mode can be expressed in terms of its directivity pattern, which is found by evaluating an appropriate form of Rayleigh's integral. The asymmetry is shown to affect the amplitude of the principal lobe of the directivity pattern, and to alter the proportion of the sound power radiated up or down. The methodology detailed in this article provides a simple engineering approach to investigate the sound radiation for a three-dimensional problem.

  17. An inclined α2ω dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Anthony M. K.

    A model of the Earth's deep interior has previously been proposed (Szeto & Smylie 1984a,b) where the inner core is inclined to the rest of the Earth. That model is a mechanical one involving no MHD dynamo action. For it to be valid the fluid core must be capable of producing, or maintaining against ohmic decay, a magnetic field which is inclined to the rotation axis of the bulk of the Earth. In this paper we develop a numerical scheme for a kinematic dynamo incorporating two boundaries around the fluid core (namely the core-mantle and inner core-cuter core interfaces), differential rotation at both boundaries, and the α effect. Assumption of a spatially constant α allows a straight forward analysis in terms of spherical Bessel functions, resulting in an eigenvalue problem for the critical magnetic Reynolds number. This work represents the first effort in constructing an α2ω dynamo in a "realistic" geometry, which is an extension of a recent calculation by St Pierre (1987).

  18. Tenebrio beetles use magnetic inclination compass.

    PubMed

    Vácha, Martin; Drstková, Dana; Půzová, Tereza

    2008-08-01

    Animals that guide directions of their locomotion or their migration routes by the lines of the geomagnetic field use either polarity or inclination compasses to determine the field polarity (the north or south direction). Distinguishing the two compass types is a guideline for estimation of the molecular principle of reception and has been achieved for a number of animal groups, with the exception of insects. A standard diagnostic method to distinguish a compass type is based on reversing the vertical component of the geomagnetic field, which leads to the opposite reactions of animals with two different compass types. In the present study, adults of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor were tested by means of a two-step laboratory test of magnetoreception. Beetles that were initially trained to memorize the magnetic position of the light source preferred, during the subsequent test, this same direction, pursuant geomagnetic cues only. In the following step, the vertical component was reversed between the training and the test. The beetles significantly turned their preferred direction by 180 degrees. Our results brought until then unknown original findings that insects, represented here by the T. molitor species, use-in contrast to another previously researched Arthropod, spiny lobster-the inclination compass.

  19. Nonlocal modeling of granular flows down inclines.

    PubMed

    Kamrin, Ken; Henann, David L

    2015-01-07

    Flows of granular media down a rough inclined plane demonstrate a number of nonlocal phenomena. We apply the recently proposed nonlocal granular fluidity model to this geometry and find that the model captures many of these effects. Utilizing the model's dynamical form, we obtain a formula for the critical stopping height of a layer of grains on an inclined surface. Using an existing parameter calibration for glass beads, the theoretical result compares quantitatively to existing experimental data for glass beads. This provides a stringent test of the model, whose previous validations focused on driven steady-flow problems. For layers thicker than the stopping height, the theoretical flow profiles display a thickness-dependent shape whose features are in agreement with previous discrete particle simulations. We also address the issue of the Froude number of the flows, which has been shown experimentally to collapse as a function of the ratio of layer thickness to stopping height. While the collapse is not obvious, two explanations emerge leading to a revisiting of the history of inertial rheology, which the nonlocal model references for its homogeneous flow response.

  20. Tenebrio beetles use magnetic inclination compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vácha, Martin; Drštková, Dana; Půžová, Tereza

    2008-08-01

    Animals that guide directions of their locomotion or their migration routes by the lines of the geomagnetic field use either polarity or inclination compasses to determine the field polarity (the north or south direction). Distinguishing the two compass types is a guideline for estimation of the molecular principle of reception and has been achieved for a number of animal groups, with the exception of insects. A standard diagnostic method to distinguish a compass type is based on reversing the vertical component of the geomagnetic field, which leads to the opposite reactions of animals with two different compass types. In the present study, adults of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor were tested by means of a two-step laboratory test of magnetoreception. Beetles that were initially trained to memorize the magnetic position of the light source preferred, during the subsequent test, this same direction, pursuant geomagnetic cues only. In the following step, the vertical component was reversed between the training and the test. The beetles significantly turned their preferred direction by 180°. Our results brought until then unknown original findings that insects, represented here by the T. molitor species, use—in contrast to another previously researched Arthropod, spiny lobster—the inclination compass.

  1. Retrospective Study of Retention of Stainless Steel Crowns and Pre-veneered Crowns on Primary Anterior Teeth.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Loverich, Angela M; Garcia, Maria Minerva; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective chart review was to explore the retention of anterior pre-veneered stainless steel crowns (NuSmile) and conventional stainless steel crowns (3M ESPE) placed on primary anterior teeth. Records for children were reviewed over four years using the electronic record system axiUm. Data collected included child's age at time of crown placement, date of placement, tooth number, type of crown, patient behavior, treatment environment, provider type, crown presence, absence, and cementation success or failure at subsequent recall visits. A total of 637 anterior crowns in children treated with either or both crown types met this study's inclusion criteria. Of these crowns, 483 were NuSmile Signature crowns and 154 were stainless steel crowns. There was a nine percent failure rate for the NuSmile Signature crowns and a seven percent failure rate for the stainless steel crowns. There was no statistically significant difference in crown retention rates between the two groups (P<0.05). A full-coverage restoration that can follow the lifespan of the primary anterior dentition in high-risk children is needed. The results from this study indicate good crown retention rates for both crown types with no statistically significant difference between them (P<0.05).

  2. In vitro study of fracture strength of provisional crown materials

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Gulsum; Kara, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this report was to evaluate the effect of the fabrication method and material type on the fracture strength of provisional crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS A master model with one crown (maxillary left second premolar) was manufactured from Cr-Co alloy. The master model was scanned, and the data set was transferred to a CAD/CAM unit (Yenamak D50, Yenadent Ltd, Istanbul, Turkey) for the Cercon Base group. For the other groups, temporary crowns were produced by direct fabrication methods (Imident, Temdent, Structur Premium, Takilon, Systemp c&b II, and Acrytemp). The specimens were subjected to water storage at 37℃ for 24 hours, and then they were thermocycled (TC, 5000×, 5-55℃) (n=10). The maximum force at fracture (Fmax) was measured in a universal test machine at 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed by non-parametric statistics (α=.05). RESULTS Fmax values varied between 711.09-1392.1 N. In the PMMA groups, Takilon showed the lowest values (711.09 N), and Cercon Base showed the highest values (959.59 N). In the composite groups, Structur Premium showed the highest values (1392.1 N), and Acrytemp showed the lowest values (910.05 N). The composite groups showed significantly higher values than the PMMA groups (P=.01). CONCLUSION Composite-based materials showed significantly higher fracture strengths than PMMA-based materials. The CAD-CAM technique offers more advantages than the direct technique. PMID:25722834

  3. Materials design in the performance of all-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Brian R; Pajares, Antonia; Zhang, Yu; Deng, Yan; Polack, Mariano A; Lloyd, Isabel K; Rekow, E Dianne; Thompson, Van P

    2004-06-01

    Results from a systematic study of damage in material structures representing the basic elements of dental crowns are reported. Tests are made on model flat-layer specimens fabricated from various dental ceramic combinations bonded to dentin-like polymer substrates, in bilayer (ceramic/polymer) and trilayer (ceramic/ceramic/polymer) configurations. The specimens are loaded at their top surfaces with spherical indenters, in simulation of occlusal function. The onset of fracture is observed in situ using a video camera system mounted beneath the transparent polymer substrate. Critical loads to induce fracture and deformation at the ceramic top and bottom surfaces are measured as functions of layer thickness and contact duration. Radial cracking at the ceramic undersurface occurs at relatively low loads, especially in thinner layers. Fracture mechanics relations are used to confirm the experimental data trends, and to provide explicit dependencies of critical loads in terms of key variables: material-elastic modulus, hardness, strength and toughness; geometric-layer thicknesses and contact radius. Tougher, harder and (especially) stronger materials show superior damage resistance. Critical loads depend strongly (quadratically) on crown net thickness. The analytic relations provide a sound basis for the materials design of next-generation dental crowns.

  4. In vitro study of fracture strength of provisional crown materials.

    PubMed

    Karaokutan, Isil; Sayin, Gulsum; Kara, Ozlem

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the effect of the fabrication method and material type on the fracture strength of provisional crowns. A master model with one crown (maxillary left second premolar) was manufactured from Cr-Co alloy. The master model was scanned, and the data set was transferred to a CAD/CAM unit (Yenamak D50, Yenadent Ltd, Istanbul, Turkey) for the Cercon Base group. For the other groups, temporary crowns were produced by direct fabrication methods (Imident, Temdent, Structur Premium, Takilon, Systemp c&b II, and Acrytemp). The specimens were subjected to water storage at 37℃ for 24 hours, and then they were thermocycled (TC, 5000×, 5-55℃) (n=10). The maximum force at fracture (Fmax) was measured in a universal test machine at 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed by non-parametric statistics (α=.05). Fmax values varied between 711.09-1392.1 N. In the PMMA groups, Takilon showed the lowest values (711.09 N), and Cercon Base showed the highest values (959.59 N). In the composite groups, Structur Premium showed the highest values (1392.1 N), and Acrytemp showed the lowest values (910.05 N). The composite groups showed significantly higher values than the PMMA groups (P=.01). Composite-based materials showed significantly higher fracture strengths than PMMA-based materials. The CAD-CAM technique offers more advantages than the direct technique.

  5. Changes in the Relative Balance of Approach and Avoidance Inclinations to Use Alcohol Following Cue Exposure Vary in Low and High Risk Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Hollett, Ross C.; Stritzke, Werner G. K.; Edgeworth, Phoebe; Weinborn, Michael

    2017-01-01

    According to the ambivalence model of craving, alcohol craving involves the dynamic interplay of separate approach and avoidance inclinations. Cue-elicited increases in approach inclinations are posited to be more likely to result in alcohol consumption and risky drinking behaviors only if unimpeded by restraint inclinations. Current study aims were (1) to test if changes in the net balance between approach and avoidance inclinations following alcohol cue exposure differentiate between low and high risk drinkers, and (2) if this balance is associated with alcohol consumption on a subsequent taste test. In two experiments (N = 60; N = 79), low and high risk social drinkers were exposed to alcohol cues, and pre- and post- approach and avoidance inclinations measured. An ad libitum alcohol consumption paradigm and a non-alcohol exposure condition were also included in Study 2. Cue-elicited craving was characterized by a predominant approach inclination only in the high risk drinkers. Conversely, approach inclinations were adaptively balanced by equally strong avoidance inclinations when cue-elicited craving was induced in low risk drinkers. For these low risk drinkers with the balanced craving profile, neither approach or avoidance inclinations predicted subsequent alcohol consumption levels during the taste test. Conversely, for high risk drinkers, where the approach inclination predominated, each inclination synergistically predicted subsequent drinking levels during the taste test. In conclusion, results support the importance of assessing both approach and avoidance inclinations, and their relative balance following alcohol cue exposure. Specifically, this more comprehensive assessment reveals changes in craving profiles that are not apparent from examining changes in approach inclinations alone, and it is this shift in the net balance that distinguishes high from low risk drinkers. PMID:28533759

  6. Machining accuracy of CAD/CAM ceramic crowns fabricated with repeated machining using the same diamond bur.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiko; Shin-Ya, Akiyoshi; Gomi, Harunori; Matsuda, Tetsuji; Katagiri, Shingo; Shin-Ya, Akikazu; Suzuki, Hitosi; Yara, Atsushi; Ogura, Hideo; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Yuuki

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated machining up to 51 times using the same diamond bur on machining accuracy of inner and outer surfaces of CAD/CAM (computer-aided designing and computer-aided manufacturing) machined ceramic crowns. The surface topography of machined crowns was examined using photographs. It was found that machining accuracy was not affected by the number of machining times. In all measuring points, the inner surface was machined to a dimension larger than the die model (i.e., increased gap), whereas the outer surface was machined to a dimension smaller than the crown model (i.e., smaller crown). Photo observation showed that cervical contour was machined in a clear, rounded form from 1st to 11th crowns.

  7. Comparison of Amount of Primary Tooth Reduction Required for Anterior and Posterior Zirconia and Stainless Steel Crowns.

    PubMed

    Clark, Larkin; Wells, Martha H; Harris, Edward F; Lou, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    To determine if aggressiveness of primary tooth preparation varied among different brands of zirconia and stainless steel (SSC) crowns. One hundred primary typodont teeth were divided into five groups (10 posterior and 10 anterior) and assigned to: Cheng Crowns (CC); EZ Pedo (EZP); Kinder Krowns (KKZ); NuSmile (NSZ); and SSC. Teeth were prepared, and assigned crowns were fitted. Teeth were weighed prior to and after preparation. Weight changes served as a surrogate measure of tooth reduction. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference in tooth reduction among brand/type for both the anterior and posterior. Tukey's honest significant difference test (HSD), when applied to anterior data, revealed that SSCs required significantly less tooth removal compared to the composite of the four zirconia brands, which showed no significant difference among them. Tukey's HSD test, applied to posterior data, revealed that CC required significantly greater removal of crown structure, while EZP, KKZ, and NSZ were statistically equivalent, and SSCs required significantly less removal. Zirconia crowns required more tooth reduction than stainless steel crowns for primary anterior and posterior teeth. Tooth reduction for anterior zirconia crowns was equivalent among brands. For posterior teeth, reduction for three brands (EZ Pedo, Kinder Krowns, NuSmile) did not differ, while Cheng Crowns required more reduction.

  8. Misfit and fracture load of implant-supported monolithic crowns in zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rafael Soares; Souza, Caroline Mathias Carvalho de; Bergamo, Edmara Tatiely Pedroso; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2017-01-01

    In this study, marginal and internal misfit and fracture load with and without thermal-mechanical aging (TMA) of monolithic ZLS and lithium disilicate (LDS) crowns were evaluated. Crowns were milled using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system. Marginal gaps (MGs), absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD), axial gaps, and occlusal gaps were measured by X-ray microtomography (n=8). For fracture load testing, crowns were cemented in a universal abutment, and divided into four groups: ZLS without TMA, ZLS with TMA, LDS without TMA, and LDS with TMA (n=10). TMA groups were subjected to 10,000 thermal cycles (5-55°C) and 1,000,000 mechanical cycles (200 N, 3.8 Hz). All groups were subjected to compressive strength testing in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. Student's t-test was used to examine misfit, two-way analysis of variance was used to analyze fracture load, and Pearson's correlation coefficients for misfit and fracture load were calculated (α=0.05). The materials were analyzed according to Weibull distribution, with 95% confidence intervals. Average MG (p<0.001) and AMD (p=0.003) values were greater in ZLS than in LDS crowns. TMA did not affect the fracture load of either material. However, fracture loads of ZLS crowns were lower than those of LDS crowns (p<0.001). Fracture load was moderately correlated with MG (r=-0.553) and AMD (r=-0.497). ZLS with TMA was least reliable, according to Weibull probability. Within the limitations of this study, ZLS crowns had lower fracture load values and greater marginal misfit than did LDS crowns, although these values were within acceptable limits.

  9. INFLUENCE OF APPLICATION SITE OF PROVISIONAL CEMENT ON THE MARGINAL ADAPTATION OF PROVISIONAL CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mayra; Torres, Marcelo Ferreira; Rego, Mariana Ribeiro de Moraes; Santiago, Luiz Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Marginal discrepancies may lead to cement washout and marginal leakage, damaging periodontal and pulp tissues or causing premature loss of the restoration. Purpose: This study evaluated the influence of application site of provisional cement on the marginal adaptation of provisional crowns. Material and Methods: Four different application sites of provisional cement (Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corporation) were used for cementation of provisional crowns on phantom teeth prepared for full crown restorations, performing 4 experimental groups (n=10): cement applied to all internal surfaces of the crown (CAO); cement applied to all internal surfaces of the crown, except for the occlusal surface (CA); cement applied to the cervical crown margin (CM); and cement applied to the cervical tooth margin (TM). A comparison microscope (Mitutoyo America Corporation) was used to measure the distances between the internal tangents of two circular marks, one made on the provisional crown and one made apical to the tooth preparation margin, in areas corresponding to buccal, lingual, mesial and distal surfaces. Marginal adaptation was determined before and after cementation, with 0.0001-mm accuracy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Results: Mean values of marginal opening obtained for each group were: CAO: 145 μm; CA: 67 μm; CM: 46 μm; TM: 34 μm. CA, CM and TM presented significantly lower marginal openings than CAO (p<0.05). Conclusion: complete filling of the crown with provisional cement, including the occlusal surface, provided grater marginal discrepancies when compared to the other methods evaluated. PMID:19089221

  10. The cost-effectiveness of large amalgam and crown restorations over a 10-year period.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Justine L; Damiano, Peter C; Flach, Stephen D; Bentler, Suzanne E; Armstrong, Steven R; Caplan, Daniel J; Kuthy, Raymond A; Warren, John J; Jones, Michael P; Dawson, Deborah V

    2006-01-01

    To assist clinical decision making for an individual patient or on a community level, this study was done to determine the differences in costs and effectiveness of large amalgams and crowns over 5 and 10 years when catastrophic subsequent treatment (root canal therapy or extraction) was the outcome. Administrative data for patients seen at the University of Iowa, College of Dentistry for 1735 large amalgam and crown restorations in 1987 or 1988 were used. Annual costs and effectiveness values were calculated. Costs of initial treatment (large amalgam or crown), and future treatments were determined, averaged and discounted. The effectiveness measure was defined as the number of years a tooth remained in a state free of catastrophic subsequent treatment. Years free of catastrophic treatment were averaged, and discounted. The years free of catastrophic treatment accounted for individuals who dropped out or withdrew from the study. Teeth with crowns had higher effectiveness values at a much higher cost than teeth restored with large amalgams. The cost of an addition year free of catastrophic treatment for crowns was 1088.41 dollars at 5 years and 500.10 dollars at 10 years. Teeth in women had more favorable cost-effectiveness ratios than those in men, and teeth in the maxillary arch had more favorable cost-effectiveness ratios than teeth in the mandibular arch. Neither the large amalgam or crown restoration had both the lowest cost and the highest effectiveness. The higher incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for crowns should be considered when making treatment decisions between large amalgam and crown restorations.

  11. Effects of clasp retention forces and abrasion on different cast crowns.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Gao, Wei-Min; Zhang, Hai; Zheng, Dong-Xiang

    2014-06-01

    Dental alloys have different mechanical properties compared with enamel. However, few studies have been conducted to determine the effects of the retention forces of clasps when applied on different cast crowns. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the retention forces of cast circumferential clasps made of cobalt-chromium alloy on complete cast crowns made of cobalt-chromium (CC group) and gold-silver-palladium (AC group) alloys, and to observe their abrasion patterns. Two groups of specimens were fabricated (n=5) and subjected to repeated insertion-removal tests (100 to 15,000 cycles). The mean values of removal forces at 100, 400, 800, 1500, 4500, 7500, 10,000, and 15,000 cycles, and their corresponding change rates compared with the initial 100 cycles' retention were determined. The differences between the 2 groups were analyzed by 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance at 100, 7500, and 15,000 cycles. The surfaces of specimens were observed with scanning electron microscopy. There were significant differences between the CC and AC groups in retention forces (P<.05). Clasp retention showed a descending trend for cobalt-chromium alloy crowns from the initial value, which decreased by 29.9% after 15,000 insertion-removal cycles. A sharp increase in retention could be observed in the AC group, which rose by 99.7% ultimately. The worn surfaces of the gold-silver-palladium crowns showed different wear patterns compared with the cobalt-chromium alloy crowns. The results indicate that cobalt-chromium alloy crowns and gold-silver-palladium alloy crowns perform differently when cobalt-chromium alloy clasps are designed as retainers for partial removable dental prostheses. Crown designs should be changed, depending on the retainer and clasp materials for partial removable dental prostheses abutment teeth. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Temporal matching among diurnal photosynthetic patterns within the crown of the evergreen sclerophyll Olea europaea L.

    PubMed

    Granado-Yela, C; García-Verdugo, C; Carrillo, K; Rubio DE Casas, R; Kleczkowski, L A; Balaguer, L

    2011-05-01

    Trees are modular organisms that adjust their within-crown morphology and physiology in response to within-crown light gradients. However, whether within-plant variation represents a strategy for optimizing light absorption has not been formally tested. We investigated the arrangement of the photosynthetic surface throughout one day and its effects on the photosynthetic process, at the most exposed and most sheltered crown layers of a wild olive tree (Olea europaea L.). Similar measurements were made for cuttings taken from this individual and grown in a greenhouse at contrasted irradiance-levels (100 and 20% full sunlight). Diurnal variations in light interception, carbon fixation and carbohydrate accumulation in sun leaves were negatively correlated with those in shade leaves under field conditions when light intensity was not limiting. Despite genetic identity, these complementary patterns were not found in plants grown in the greenhouse. The temporal disparity among crown positions derived from specialization of the photosynthetic behaviour at different functional and spatial scales: architectural structure (crown level) and carbon budget (leaf level). Our results suggest that the profitability of producing a new module may not only respond to construction costs or light availability, but also rely on its spatio-temporal integration within the productive processes at the whole-crown level.

  13. Effect of disjoining pressure on terminal velocity of a bubble sliding along an inclined wall.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Lorena A; Ohnishi, Satomi; White, Lee R; Carnie, Steven L; Horn, Roger G

    2011-12-15

    The influence of salt concentration on the terminal velocities of gravity-driven single bubbles sliding along an inclined glass wall has been investigated, in an effort to establish whether surface forces acting between the wall and the bubble influence the latter's mobility. A simple sliding bubble apparatus was employed to measure the terminal velocities of air bubbles with radii ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 mm sliding along the interior wall of an inclined Pyrex glass cylinder with inclination angles between 0.6 and 40.1°. Experiments were performed in pure water, 10 mM and 100 mM KCl solutions. We compared our experimental results with a theory by Hodges et al. which considers hydrodynamic forces only, and with a theory developed by two of us which considers surface forces to play a significant role. Our experimental results demonstrate that the terminal velocity of the bubble not only varies with the angle of inclination and the bubble size but also with the salt concentration, particularly at low inclination angles of ∼1-5°, indicating that double-layer forces between the bubble and the wall influence the sliding behavior. This is the first demonstration that terminal velocities of sliding bubbles are affected by disjoining pressure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of disjoining pressure on terminal velocity of a bubble sliding along an inclined wall

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo, Lorena A.; Ohnishi, Satomi; White, Lee R.; Carnie, Steven L.; Horn, Roger G.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of salt concentration on the terminal velocities of gravity-driven single bubbles sliding along an inclined glass wall has been investigated, in an effort to establish whether surface forces acting between the wall and the bubble influence the latter’s mobility. A simple sliding bubble apparatus was employed to measure the terminal velocities of air bubbles with radii ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 mm sliding along the interior wall of an inclined Pyrex glass cylinder with inclination angles between 0.6 and 40.1°. Experiments were performed in pure water, 10 mM and 100 mM KCl solutions. We compared our experimental results with a theory by Hodges et al. [1] which considers hydrodynamic forces only, and with a theory developed by two of us [2] which considers surface forces to play a significant role. Our experimental results demonstrate that the terminal velocity of the bubble not only varies with the angle of inclination and the bubble size but also with the salt concentration, particularly at low inclination angles of ∼1–5°, indicating that double-layer forces between the bubble and the wall influence the sliding behavior. This is the first demonstration that terminal velocities of sliding bubbles are affected by disjoining pressure. PMID:21924429

  15. Treadmill exercise testing with increasing inclination as exercise protocol for wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, B; Köpfli, W

    2001-12-01

    Treadmill testing on a progressive incline of 11 wheelchair athletes. To determine if a novel treadmill exercise protocol which uses increments in inclination, rather than the standard increments in velocity, can be used to effectively determine maximum oxygen uptake VO2max for elite wheelchair athletes. Nottwil, Switzerland. Eleven elite wheelchair basketball players (29.3+/-6.3 years, 72.7+/-16.9 kg and 177+/-9.6 cm) performed an exercise protocol with increasing inclination on the treadmill. Eight players had a spinal cord injury (SCI), two had no lesion of the central nervous system and one had poliomyelitis. VO2max and heart rate were measured continuously, while serum lactate was determined immediately after the exercise protocol. Athletes reached a maximal heart rate of 185+/-11.4 bpm and maximal lactate of 10.2+/-2.1 mmol/l. VO2max was 35.1+/-4.9 ml/min/kg. The correlation between heart rate and VO(2) at different inclinations was statistically significant and comparable to able-bodied subjects. An exercise protocol with increasing inclination is a valid alternative to an exercise protocol with increasing velocity.

  16. Protonation of calix[4]arene-(2,3-naphthylene-crown-6,crown-6): Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvíčalová, Magdalena; Makrlík, Emanuel; Böhm, Stanislav; Vaňura, Petr; Asfari, Zouhair

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the extraction constant corresponding to the equilibrium H3O+ (aq) + 1·Na+ (nb) ⇄1·H3O+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) occurring in the two-phase water-nitrobenzene system (1 = calix[4]arene-(2,3-naphthylene-crown-6,crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) was determined as log Kex(H3O+,1·Na+) = -0.2 ± 0.1. Further, the stability constant of the 1·H3O+ complex in nitrobenzene saturated with water was calculated for a temperature of 25 °C: log βnb(1·H3O+) = 5.9 ± 0.2. Finally, applying quantum chemical DFT calculations, the most probable structure of the cationic complex species 1·H3O+ was derived. In the resulting complex, the "central" cation H3O+ is bound by three strong hydrogen bonds to two phenoxy oxygen atoms and to one ethereal oxygen from the crown-6 moiety of the parent ligand 1. The interaction energy, E(int), of the considered 1·H3O+ complex was found to be -416.0 kJ/mol, confirming the formation of this cationic species as well.

  17. Periodontal tissue responses after insertion of artificial crowns and fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Knoernschild, K L; Campbell, S D

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this review was, first, to critically evaluate published evidence on the effects of artificial crowns and fixed partial dentures (FPDs) on adjacent periodontal tissue health, and second to synthesize this evidence into meaningful summaries. Restoration qualities that contribute to inflammatory responses were identified based on strength of evidence, and variables that should be controlled in future investigations were outlined. Such information is necessary to accurately predict the prognosis of periodontal tissues adjacent to crowns or FPDs. Clinical trial and epidemiologic evidence published in English was collected. The effects of crowns or FPDs on gingival inflammation, probing depths, and bone loss were evaluated based on accuracy of measurement, reliability of measurement, and/or appropriateness of data analysis. Crowns and FPDs increased the incidence of advanced gingival inflammation adjacent to restorations, particularly if restorations had intracrevicular finish line placement, poor marginal adaptation, or rough surfaces. However, because of the limitation in the accuracy and reliability of probing depth measurements, reports of greater mean probing depths of crowned teeth, which tended to be less than 1 mm greater than control teeth, should be questioned. Finally, crowns and FPDs in general did not accelerate the rate of adjacent bone loss. Clinically deficient restorations, as well as clinically acceptable restorations, can contribute to gingival inflammation. However, with the limitations of the applied methods of measurement, current evidence has not shown an increased attachment loss adjacent to crowns or FPDs. Future trials should document periodontal health before therapy and periodically after restoration insertion so that each tooth serves as its own control. In future studies, the periodontal disease history of the patient, the influence of the restoration on plaque formation, and the composition of the crevicular microflora must

  18. Effect of the shades of background substructures on the overall color of zirconia-based all-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Tulapornchai, Chantana; Mamani, Jatuphol; Kamchatphai, Wannaporn; Thongpun, Noparat

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the color of a background substructure on the overall color of a zirconia-based all-ceramic crown. Twenty one posterior zirconia crowns were made for twenty subjects. Seven premolar crowns and six molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with metal post and core in the first and second group. In the third group, eight molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with a prefabricated post and composite core build-up. The color measurements of all-ceramic crowns were made before try-in, before and after cementation. A repeated measure ANOVA was used for a statistical analysis of a color change of all-ceramic crowns at α=.05. Twenty four zirconia specimens, with different core thicknesses (0.4-1 mm) were also prepared to obtain the contrast ratio of zirconia materials after veneering. L(*) , a(*) , and b(*) values of all-ceramic crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or on a prefabricated post did not show significant changes (P>.05). However, the slight color changes of zirconia crowns were detected and represented by ΔE(*) ab values, ranging from 1.2 to 3.1. The contrast ratios of zirconia specimens were 0.92-0.95 after veneering. No significant differences were observed between the L(*) , a(*) , and b(*) values of zirconia crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or a prefabricated post and composite core. However, the color of a background substructure could affect the overall color of posterior zirconia restorations with clinically recommended core thickness according to ΔE(*) ab values.

  19. Effect of the shades of background substructures on the overall color of zirconia-based all-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Tulapornchai, Chantana; Mamani, Jatuphol; Kamchatphai, Wannaporn; Thongpun, Noparat

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the color of a background substructure on the overall color of a zirconia-based all-ceramic crown. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty one posterior zirconia crowns were made for twenty subjects. Seven premolar crowns and six molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with metal post and core in the first and second group. In the third group, eight molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with a prefabricated post and composite core build-up. The color measurements of all-ceramic crowns were made before try-in, before and after cementation. A repeated measure ANOVA was used for a statistical analysis of a color change of all-ceramic crowns at α=.05. Twenty four zirconia specimens, with different core thicknesses (0.4-1 mm) were also prepared to obtain the contrast ratio of zirconia materials after veneering. RESULTS L*, a*, and b* values of all-ceramic crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or on a prefabricated post did not show significant changes (P>.05). However, the slight color changes of zirconia crowns were detected and represented by ΔE*ab values, ranging from 1.2 to 3.1. The contrast ratios of zirconia specimens were 0.92-0.95 after veneering. CONCLUSION No significant differences were observed between the L*, a*, and b* values of zirconia crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or a prefabricated post and composite core. However, the color of a background substructure could affect the overall color of posterior zirconia restorations with clinically recommended core thickness according to ΔE*ab values. PMID:24049574

  20. A Compaction-Corrected Inclination for the Middle Cretaceous Valle Group in Vizcaino Terrane, Baja California, Mexico: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Kodama, K. P.; Smith, D. P.

    2001-12-01

    A recent paleomagnetic re-study of the middle-Cretaceous Valle Group of Baja California, Mexico has observed inclinations about 15° shallower than previously reported anomalously shallow inclinations. We have conducted compaction experiments and made remanence anisotropy measurements to determine if burial compaction is a cause of the shallowing. In the laboratory compaction experiments, one sample of coarse-grained sandstone was carefully disaggregated and made into a slurry with an initial water content of 82%. The sediment slurry was then compacted in our water tank consolidometer in the Earth's field which has an inclination of 60° in the laboratory. This inclination is close to the expected Cretaceous geomagnetic field direction for the Valle Group at its present position with respect to North America. The experiments indicated that the inclination of the Valle Group sandstone shallowed by 9.6° corresponding to a volume loss of 16.6% during compaction. The experiment was also used to determine the individual magnetic particle anisotropy, a, of 1.494, which allows us to use Jackson et al.'s (1991) model for correcting inclination. Eleven samples lithologically similar to the one disaggregated were chosen for a preliminary inclination correction. A sample by sample correction yielded corrected inclinations (Inc =24.5° , Dec=347.1° , \\alpha95=5.7° ) higher than the uncorrected 11 sample mean (Inc=19° , Dec=347.2° , \\alpha95=5.7° ), but statistically indistinguishable from the uncorrected site mean (Inc=20.5° , Dec=341.3° , \\alpha95=4° ) for all 12 sites of our samples from the middle Cenomanian section of Valle Fm.. Therefore, burial compaction could account for only about 6° of inclination shallowing of the coarse-grained samples. The compaction-corrected inclinations for these samples are still about 30° shallower than the expected inclination for Cretaceous North America. However, given the small number of samples and limited lithology of

  1. Crown cover chart for oak savannas. Forest Service technical brief

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.R.; Johnson, P.S.; Houf, G.

    1994-07-01

    Although oak savannas have been defined in many ways, they are characterized by scattered trees, largely comprised of oaks, and a sparse ground layer rich in grasses and forbs. The crown cover chart can be used to estimate the crown cover of trees as a percent of total area. Potential applications of the chart include monitoring changes in savanna crown cover, determining needed reductions in crown cover, and defining the savanna state. in restoring savannas that have grown into closed canopy stands, one can use the chart to estimate initial crown cover before restoration work is begun and again after crown cover has been reduced.

  2. Alveolar bone thickness around maxillary central incisors of different inclination assessed with cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu-Lou; Liu, Fang; Sun, Hong-Jing; Lv, Pin; Cao, Yu-Ming; Yu, Mo; Yue, Yang

    2015-09-01

    To assess the labial and lingual alveolar bone thickness in adults with maxillary central incisors of different inclination by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Ninety maxillary central incisors from 45 patients were divided into three groups based on the maxillary central incisors to palatal plane angle; lingual-inclined, normal, and labial-inclined. Reformatted CBCT images were used to measure the labial and lingual alveolar bone thickness (ABT) at intervals corresponding to every 1/10 of the root length. The sum of labial ABT and lingual ABT at the level of the root apex was used to calculate the total ABT (TABT). The number of teeth exhibiting alveolar fenestration and dehiscence in each group was also tallied. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference test were applied for statistical analysis. The labial ABT and TABT values at the root apex in the lingual-inclined group were significantly lower than in the other groups (p < 0.05). Lingual and labial ABT values were very low at the cervical level in the lingual-inclined and normal groups. There was a higher prevalence of alveolar fenestration in the lingual-inclined group. Lingual-inclined maxillary central incisors have less bone support at the level of the root apex and a greater frequency of alveolar bone defects than normal maxillary central incisors. The bone plate at the marginal level is also very thin.

  3. An investigation of the surface chemistry of crown ethers: the adsorption and reaction of 12-crown-4 on palladium ( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, S.; Laack, B.; Tysoe, W. T.

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of 12-crown-4 on Pd(1 1 1) is investigated using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption. Analysis of the infrared spectrum of 12-crown-4 suggests that it adsorbs in a flat-lying geometry with C 4v symmetry with a saturation coverage of 0.073±0.008 monolayers. This implies that the crown ether bonds to the surface via the lone pair orbitals on the ether oxygen atoms. Estimating the saturation coverage for this geometry using Van der Waals' radii yields a value of 0.088 monolayers in good agreement with the measured value. 12-crown-4 thermally decomposes to leave predominantly CO and ethylidyne species on the surface where the desorbing CO removes three of the four crown ether oxygen atoms, the fourth remaining on the surface. Small amounts of ethylene are also found to desorb along with a high molecular weight product which is tentatively assigned to the formation of C 2H 5OCH 2CHO.

  4. Experimental study on wave force of anti-L-shaped parapet of inclined breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xingkai; Gui, Jingsong; Chen, Ding

    2017-08-01

    The stability of the parapet of the inclined breakwater directly determines whether the project can run safely. In recent years, people have studied the wave force of L-shaped parapet of inclined breakwater. The distribution of wave force is clear and the calculation method is relatively mature. However, there is little research on the distribution and calculation method of wave force on the surface of anti-L-shaped parapet. Through the physical model test, the distribution law of the wave force of the anti-L-shaped parapet is explored, and the calculated value of the wave force is compared with the measured value. The stress mode of the parapet inclined breakwater in the actual project is summarized, which can provide reference for the engineering application.

  5. PHASES differential astrometry and the mutual inclination of the V819 Herculis triple star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, M. W.; Lane, B. F.; Konacki, M.; Burke, B. F.; Colavita, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Shao, M.

    2006-02-01

    V819 Herculis is a well-studied triple star system consisting of a "wide" pair with 5.5 year period, one component of which is a 2.2-day period eclipsing single-line spectroscopic binary. Differential astrometry measurements from the Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) are presented and used to determine a relative inclination between the short- and long-period orbits of 23.6 ± 4.9 degrees. This represents only the sixth unambiguous determination of the mutual inclination of orbits in a hierarchical triple system. This result is combined with those for the other five systems for analysis of the observed distribution of mutual inclinations in nearby triple systems. It is found that this distribution is different than that which one would expect from random orientations with statistical significance at the 94% level; implications for studying the spatial distribution of angular momentum in star forming regions is discussed.

  6. Fiber optic inclination detector system having a weighted sphere with reference points

    DOEpatents

    Cwalinski, Jeffrey P.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic inclination detector system for determining the angular displacement of an object from a reference surface includes a simple mechanical transducer which requires a minimum number of parts and no electrical components. The system employs a single light beam which is split into two light beams and provided to the transducer. Each light beam is amplitude modulated upon reflecting off the transducer to detect inclination. The power values associated with each of the reflected light beams are converted by a pair of photodetectors into voltage signals, and a microprocessor manipulates the voltage signals to provide a measure of the angular displacement between the object and the reference surface.

  7. Detection of very inclined showers with the Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Nellen, Lukas; /Mexico U., ICN

    2005-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory can detect air showers with high efficiency at large zenith angles with both the fluorescence and surface detectors. Since half the available solid angle corresponds to zeniths between 60 and 90 degrees, a large number of inclined events can be expected and are indeed observed. In this paper, we characterize the inclined air showers detected by the Observatory and we present the aperture for inclined showers and an outlook of the results that can be obtained in future studies of the inclined data set.

  8. Impact of flow inclination on downwind turbine loads and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, C.; Chokani, N.; Abhari, R. S.; Hashimoto, T.; Watanabe, M.; Sano, T.; Saeki, M.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbines frequently operate under situations of pronounced flow inclinations, such as in complex terrain. In the present work the performance and rotor thrust of downwind and upwind turbines in upward and downward flow inclinations are experimentally investigated. In an upward flow inclination of +13°, downwind turbines are shown to have a 29% larger power output than a corresponding upwind turbine, whereas the relative increase in rotor thrust is only 9%. Furthermore, it is also shown that the performance of downwind turbines is less sensitive to changes in the flow inclination, as the upstream nacelle on downwind turbines beneficially redirects and accelerates the flow around the nacelle into the rotor plane.

  9. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of an inclined nanowire array solar cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-11-30

    An innovative solar cell based on inclined p-i-n nanowire array is designed and analyzed. The results show that the inclined geometry can sufficiently increase the conversion efficiency of solar cells by enhancing the absorption of light in the active region. By tuning the nanowire array density, nanowire diameter, nanowire length, as well as the proportion of intrinsic region of the inclined nanowire solar cell, a remarkable efficiency in excess of 16% can be obtained in GaAs. Similar results have been obtained in InP and Si nanowire solar cells, demonstrating the universality of the performance enhancement of inclined nanowire arrays.

  10. Unsteady granular flows down an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Parez, Stanislav; Aharonov, Einat; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The continuum description of granular flows is still a challenge despite their importance in many geophysical and industrial applications. We extend previous works, which have explored steady flow properties, by focusing on unsteady flows accelerating or decelerating down an inclined plane in the simple shear configuration. We solve the flow kinematics analytically, including predictions of evolving velocity and stress profiles and the duration of the transient stage. The solution shows why and how granular materials reach steady flow on slopes steeper than the angle of repose and how they decelerate on shallower slopes. The model might facilitate development of natural hazard assessment and may be modified in the future to explore unsteady granular flows in different configurations.

  11. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap

  12. Unsteady granular flows down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parez, Stanislav; Aharonov, Einat; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The continuum description of granular flows is still a challenge despite their importance in many geophysical and industrial applications. We extend previous works, which have explored steady flow properties, by focusing on unsteady flows accelerating or decelerating down an inclined plane in the simple shear configuration. We solve the flow kinematics analytically, including predictions of evolving velocity and stress profiles and the duration of the transient stage. The solution shows why and how granular materials reach steady flow on slopes steeper than the angle of repose and how they decelerate on shallower slopes. The model might facilitate development of natural hazard assessment and may be modified in the future to explore unsteady granular flows in different configurations.

  13. Transverse Bursts in Inclined Layer Convection: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Wiener, Richard; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2002-03-01

    We report experimental results on inclined layer convection in a fluid of Prandtl number σ ≈ 1. A codimension-two point divides regions of buoyancy-driven convection (longitudinal rolls) at lower angles from shear-driven convection (transverse rolls) at higher angles (Daniels et al. PRL 84: 5320, 2000). In the region of buoyancy-driven convection, near the codimension-two point, we observe longitudinal rolls with intermittent, localized, subharmonic transverse bursts. The patterns are spatiotemporally chaotic. With increasing temperature difference the bursts increase in duration and number. We examine the details of the bursting process (e.g. the energy of longitudinal, transverse, and mixed modes) and compare our results to bursting processes in other systems. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant DMR-0072077 and the IGERT program in nonlinear systems, grant DGE-9870631.

  14. Clinical Marginal and Internal Fit of Crowns Fabricated Using Different CAD/CAM Technologies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuoli; Zhang, Lu; Zhu, Jingwei; Zhao, Yiwei; Zhang, Xiuyin

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this in vivo investigation were to compare the marginal and internal fit of single-unit crowns fabricated using a selective laser melting (SLM) procedure with two CAD/CAM grinding procedures, and to evaluate the influence of tooth type on the parameters measured. A total of 270 crowns were evaluated, including 90 SLM metal-ceramic crowns (group B), 90 zirconium-oxide-based ceramic crowns (group L), and 90 lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group C). The marginal and internal gaps of the crowns were recorded using a replica technique with a silicone indicator paste stabilized with a light-body silicone. The gap replica specimen were sectioned buccolingually and mesiodistally and then examined using a stereomicroscope at 30× magnification. Ten reference points were measured on each anterior and premolar specimen, and 20 reference points were measured on each molar specimen. Two-way ANOVA was performed to identify the significant differences between the groups. The mean marginal fit of group B was significantly better than those of group C and group L (p < 0.005), but a significant difference was not found between group C and group L (p > 0.05). The mean axial gap of group B was significantly smaller than those of group C and group L (p < 0.01), while group C was not different from group L (p > 0.05). The mean occlusal gap of group B was significantly higher than those of group C and group L (p < 0.05), and no difference was found between group C and group L (p > 0.05). The marginal and internal gaps of crowns varying according to tooth type were not significantly different (p > 0.05). The SLM system demonstrated better marginal and internal fit compared to the two CAD/CAM grinding systems examined. Tooth type did not significantly influence the marginal or internal fit. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Influence of tooth preparation taper and cement type on recementation strength of complete metal crowns.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Johnston, William M; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2009-12-01

    Clinical studies have shown that lack of retention is one of the major causes of fixed dental prosthesis failure. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the convergence angle of a complete metal crown tooth preparation and the recementation strength for restorations cemented with conventional and adhesive cements. One hundred twenty artificial crowns were cast for standardized complete metal crown tooth preparations accomplished with the use of a milling machine on extracted human teeth. Three different tapers, 5, 12, and 25 degrees, were used (n=40). The crowns in each group were subdivided into 4 subgroups (n=10) according to the luting cement: zinc phosphate cement (Fleck's), glass ionomer cement (Ketac-Cem), and adhesive resin cements (Panavia 21 and C&B-Metabond). Retention was evaluated by measuring the tensile force required to dislodge the crowns from the tooth preparations in a universal testing machine. Subsequently, the tooth preparations were scraped clean and polished with prophylaxis paste, and the intaglio surfaces of the artificial crowns were ultrasonically cleaned and airborne-particle abraded with 50-mum aluminum oxide powder prior to recementation. The data were analyzed with 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (alpha=.05). Analysis of measurements disclosed a significant difference for taper and luting cement (P<.001); however, their interaction was not significant. Also, there was a statistically significant difference between the retention of the first cementation and the second cementation (P<.001). However, the interaction was not significant with taper or cement. Regardless of the taper used, Panavia 21 cement exhibited the highest mean initial retention, but the difference was not significantly different from the recementation retentive strength. Tooth preparation taper and type of luting cement had a direct effect on the recementation strength of complete metal crowns.

  16. Assessment of oral hygiene and periodontal health around posterior primary molars after their restoration with various crown types.

    PubMed

    Beldüz Kara, Nihal; Yilmaz, Yucel

    2014-07-01

    To compare the time-dependent changes in oral hygiene and periodontal health after restoring primary posterior molars with a traditional stainless steel crown (SSC) or an aesthetic crown using various measures of periodontal health and oral hygiene. This investigation was a randomized, non-blinded prospective controlled clinical trial in which 264 crowns of different types were fitted onto the first and/or second primary molars of 76 children. The oral hygiene and the gingival health of the restored teeth and the antagonistic teeth were evaluated clinically and radiographically at 3- and 6-month intervals for 18 months after fitting the crowns. The periodontal health of the control teeth was better than that of the remaining 215 restored teeth. The oral hygiene, as measured by the simplified oral hygiene index, and gingival health, as measured by the gingival index and the volume of gingival crevicular fluid, of the restored teeth, irrespective of crown type, progressively increased during the 18-month study period. Oral hygiene and gingival health around a restored primary tooth deteriorate with time. Our results suggest that SSC, an open-faced SSC, or a NuSmile(®) pediatric crown should be the preferred crown type for restoring posterior primary teeth. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Detecting and correcting for paleomagnetic inclination shallowing of sedimentary rocks: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Kodama, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic anisotropy and the elongation/inclination (E-I) approaches have been increasingly employed as two important means for detecting and correcting the paleomagnetic inclination shallowing in sedimentary rocks that was first recognized sixty years ago. Both approaches are based on certain assumptions, and thus have advantages and intrinsic limitations in investigating shallow inclinations in sedimentary rocks. The E-I approach is relatively easy to use, but it needs a large dataset to adequately sample paleomagnetic directions due to paleosecular variation of the geomagnetic field. Also, slow sediment accumulation rates and local tectonics could lead to under- or over-corrections using the E-I approach. For the magnetic anisotropy technique, labor-intensive, sophisticated laboratory rock magnetic experiments are required in order to accurately determine both bulk magnetic anisotropy of remanence-carrying grains and magnetic anisotropy of an individual particle, i.e., "a" factor, of samples. Our review shows that, despite the intensive laboratory work necessary for applying anisotropy-based inclination corrections, it is worth investing the effort. In addition, the joint use of magnetic susceptibility and remanence anisotropy measurements as well as detailed rock magnetic measurements for determining the particle anisotropy "a" factor have the advantage of retrieving direct evidence of inclination shallowing and correcting for it with high confidence. We caution against use of either of the two approaches without full appreciation of the underlying assumptions and intrinsic limitations of each technique. The use and comparison of both techniques could provide the most robust inclination shallowing correction for sedimentary rocks.

  18. Differences in articular-eminence inclination between medieval and contemporary human populations.

    PubMed

    Kranjčić, Josip; Vojvodić, Denis; Žabarović, Domagoj; Vodanović, Marin; Komar, Daniel; Mehulić, Ketij

    2012-08-01

    The articular-eminence inclination is an important element in the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint and the entire masticatory system; however, very little is known about this inclination in archaeological human populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the values of, in addition to the differences between, the articular-eminence inclination in medieval and contemporary human populations. The study was carried out on two dry skull groups. The first group consisted of 14 dry skulls from the medieval culture group Bijelo Brdo (BB) of East Croatia, and the other consisted of 137 recent dry skulls from the osteologic collection of the Institute of Anatomy (IA) in Zagreb. All BB skulls were dentulous, whereas the IA skulls were divided into dentulous and edentulous groups. The articular-eminence inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal plane on digital images of the skull's two lateral views using AutoCAD computer software. The mean value of the articular-eminence inclination in the BB sample group (49.57°) was lower, with a statistical significance (p<0.01), than those of the IA dentulous (61.56°), the IA edentulous (62.54°), and all the combined IA (61.99°) specimens. Because the values of the articular-eminence inclination can vary a lot with reference to the number of specimens and the different methods used for measuring, the obtained values yield only orientational information. Further investigations including a larger number of medieval specimens are needed to confirm the results obtained from this study.

  19. Optimal photosynthetic use of light by tropical tree crowns achieved by adjustment of individual leaf angles and nitrogen content.

    PubMed

    Posada, Juan M; Lechowicz, Martin J; Kitajima, Kaoru

    2009-03-01

    Theory for optimal allocation of foliar nitrogen (ONA) predicts that both nitrogen concentration and photosynthetic capacity will scale linearly with gradients of insolation within plant canopies. ONA is expected to allow plants to efficiently use both light and nitrogen. However, empirical data generally do not exhibit perfect ONA, and light-use optimization per se is little explored. The aim was to examine to what degree partitioning of nitrogen or light is optimized in the crowns of three tropical canopy tree species. Instantaneous photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) incident on the adaxial surface of individual leaves was measured along vertical PPFD gradients in tree canopies at a frequency of 0.5 Hz over 9-17 d, and summed to obtain the average daily integral of PPFD for each leaf to characterize its insolation regime. Also measured were leaf N per area (N(area)), leaf mass per area (LMA), the cosine of leaf inclination and the parameters of the photosynthetic light response curve [photosynthetic capacity (A(max)), dark respiration (R(d)), apparent quantum yield (phi) and curvature (theta)]. The instantaneous PPFD measurements and light response curves were used to estimate leaf daily photosynthesis (A(daily)) for each leaf. Leaf N(area) and A(max) changed as a hyperbolic asymptotic function of the PPFD regime, not the linear relationship predicted by ONA. Despite this suboptimal nitrogen partitioning among leaves, A(daily) did increase linearly with PPFD regime through co-ordinated adjustments in both leaf angle and physiology along canopy gradients in insolation, exhibiting a strong convergence among the three species. The results suggest that canopy tree leaves in this tropical forest optimize photosynthetic use of PPFD rather than N per se. Tropical tree canopies then can be considered simple 'big-leaves' in which all constituent 'small leaves' use PPFD with the same photosynthetic efficiency.

  20. Clinical Evaluation and Parental Satisfaction with Pediatric Zirconia Anterior Crowns.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, Daniel M; Wells, Martha H; Scarbecz, Mark; Donaldson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical success of and parental satisfaction with anterior pediatric zirconia crowns. A retrospective analysis of maxillary anterior pediatric zirconia crowns was performed. Crowns were evaluated for retention, gingival health, color match, contour, marginal integrity, and opposing tooth wear. Parental satisfaction regarding the esthetics of the crowns and parental perception of the impact of treatment on the child's appearance and oral health were evaluated by questionnaire. Fifty-seven crowns were evaluated in 18 children. Eight teeth were lost to exfoliation, three were extracted due to pathology, and two crowns debonded, leaving 44 available for examination. The average crown age at time of examination was 20.8 months. Sixteen crowns (36 percent) displayed gingival inflammation and color mismatch. No recurrent caries or opposing tooth wear was noted. Parents reported high satisfaction with the color, size, and shape of the crowns. The majority of parents reported that crowns improved the appearance and oral health of their child (78 percent and 83 percent, respectively). Eight-nine percent of parents reported that they would highly recommend these crowns. Zirconia crowns are clinically acceptable restorations in the primary maxillary anterior dentition. Parental satisfaction with zirconia crowns is high.

  1. Forest management manual for Crown lands 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The forest management plan describes the objectives for which Crown lands and the resources of Crown lands are used by the licensee and sublicensees. The operating plan describes all the proposed activities of the licensee, constituting an implementation plan for the management plan. This document describes the contents of the operating plan in relation to roads, harvest, silviculture, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, required letters of agreement, and DNR amendments; operating plan approval and maintenance; and annual report requirements for each operating plan element.

  2. Favorable pressure gradient turbulent flow over straight and inclined ribs on both channel walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachie, Mark F.; Shah, Mohammad K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports on experimental study of turbulent flows over straight and inclined transverse ribs of square and triangular cross sections attached to the bottom and top walls of an asymmetric converging channel. The pitch-to-height ratio of the ribs was 10. A particle image velocimetry technique was used to conduct extensive velocity measurements at channel midspan and in planes close to the leading and trailing edges of the inclined ribs. From these measurements, spatial averaged profiles of the mean velocity and higher order statistics were obtained to study the effects of rib geometry, pressure gradient, spanwise plane, and rib inclination on the flow characteristics. The results show that rib geometry has no significant effects on the mean flow and turbulent quantities. The roughness effects produced by the straight ribs outweighed pressure gradient effects in the inner region of the flow. As a result, the skin friction coefficient is nearly independent of pressure gradient. The Reynolds shear stress and turbulent transport of the shear stress are also independent of pressure gradient. On the contrary, favorable pressure gradient decreased the Reynolds normal stresses in the outer region and increased the magnitudes of the triple velocity correlations and transport of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The three-dimensional secondary motion produced by the inclined ribs distorted the mean flow pattern and substantially diminished the ribs' effectiveness to augment skin friction and turbulence. For example, the skin friction over the inclined ribs is only 50%-70% of the value measured over the straight ribs. Furthermore, the size of equivalent sand grain required to produce the same amount of drag is one-tenth to one-third of the rib height for the inclined ribs compared to two- to fourfold for the straight ribs. The inclined ribs also reduced the level of the Reynolds stresses, triple velocity correlations, and transport of both the turbulent kinetic energy

  3. [The method of esthetic crown restoration with composite resin jacket crown in primary molars].

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Shibui, N; Suda, M; Uehara, M; Karibe, H; Kondou, K

    1990-10-01

    The term "esthetics" has recently been also used in the dental field, and a field called esthetic dentistry is increasingly being noted. The number of not only adult but also pediatric patients who visit for treatment aiming at esthetic recovery is being increased. Inpedodontics, composite resin of the coronal color is generally used in the restoration of deciduous incisors. However, the method using metal crowns for the deciduous teeth is used for the deciduous molars at present. We applied a composite resin jacket crown to the deciduous molar in a way similar to that of esthetic crown restoration for the anterior teeth. The surgical procedure before crown preparation varied slightly according to the presence or absence of pulpal treatment of vital teeth and with non-vital teeth, but the application was performed as follows: 1) Desensitization of pulp, pulpal treatment and core construction. 2) Preparation of crown. 3) Selection, trial set and occlusal equilibration of a metal crown for the deciduous tooth. 4) Precision impression with a silicone impression material. 5) Removal of the metal crown for the deciduous tooth from the impression material. 6) Making of an under-cut to the abutment tooth on the buccal lingual side. 7) Filling of the impression with chemical polymerization resin. 8) Application of pressure in the oral cavity. 9) Adjustment of edge and crown forms. Thus, the preparation method for the composite resin jacket crown was relatively simple. Since this surgery, the patient has been followed up for 1 year and 6 months, and no specifically troublesome points have been observed clinically. The patient and her parents are satisfied with the results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Inclination Dependence of Estimated Galaxy Masses and Star Formation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Betsy; Maller, Ariyeh; McKernan, Barry; Ford, Saavik

    2016-01-01

    We examine the inclination dependence of inferred star formation rates and galaxy mass estimates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by combining the disk/bulge de-convolved catalog of Simard et al 2011 with stellar mass estimates catalog of Mendel et al 2014 and star formation rates measured from spectra by Brinchmann et al 2004. We know that optical star formation indicators are reddened by dust, but calculated star formation rates and stellar mass estimates should account for this. However, we find that face-on galaxies have a higher calculated average star formation rates than edge-on galaxies. We also find edge-on galaxies have ,on average, slightly smaller but similar estimated masses to face-on galaxies, suggesting that there are issues with the applied dust corrections for both models.

  5. Oil spill fluorosensing lidar for inclined onshore or shipboard operation.

    PubMed

    Karpicz, Renata; Dementjev, Andrej; Kuprionis, Zenonas; Pakalnis, Saulius; Westphal, Rainer; Reuter, Rainer; Gulbinas, Vidmantas

    2006-09-01

    An oil spill detection fluorosensing lidar for onshore or shipboard operation is described. Some difficulties for its operation arise from the inclined path of rays. This is due to the increased reflection of the laser beam at the air-water interface, the decreased fluorescence signal, and the increased background light when compared with other instruments having a close-to-nadir measuring geometry. The analysis of these problems shows that they significantly reduce the detection distance in the presence of a flat water surface. However, waves on the water surface weaken the influence of the laser beam reflections but at the same time cause a variable fluorescence signal, which makes specific signal processing necessary for increased detection ranges. A fluorescence data processing method is proposed that efficiently eliminates the background water column fluorescence from signals such as yellow substance. This enables oil fluorescence to be distinguished from variable natural water fluorescence.

  6. Oil spill fluorosensing lidar for inclined onshore or shipboard operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpicz, Renata; Dementjev, Andrej; Kuprionis, Zenonas; Pakalnis, Saulius; Westphal, Rainer; Reuter, Rainer; Gulbinas, Vidmantas

    2006-09-01

    An oil spill detection fluorosensing lidar for onshore or shipboard operation is described. Some difficulties for its operation arise from the inclined path of rays. This is due to the increased reflection of the laser beam at the air-water interface, the decreased fluorescence signal, and the increased background light when compared with other instruments having a close-to-nadir measuring geometry. The analysis of these problems shows that they significantly reduce the detection distance in the presence of a flat water surface. However, waves on the water surface weaken the influence of the laser beam reflections but at the same time cause a variable fluorescence signal, which makes specific signal processing necessary for increased detection ranges. A fluorescence data processing method is proposed that efficiently eliminates the background water column fluorescence from signals such as yellow substance. This enables oil fluorescence to be distinguished from variable natural water fluorescence.

  7. Standing jumps in shallow granular flows down smooth inclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faug, Thierry; Childs, Philippa; Wyburn, Edward; Einav, Itai

    2015-07-01

    The shapes of standing jumps formed in shallow granular flows down an inclined smooth-based chute are analysed in detail, by varying both the slope and mass discharge. Laboratory tests and analytic jump solutions highlight two important transitions. First, for dense flows at high mass discharge, we observe a transition between steep jumps and more diffuse jumps. The traditional shallow-water equation offers a valid prediction for the thickness of the steep water-like jumps. Diffuse frictional jumps require a more general equation accounting for the forces acting inside the jump volume. Second, moving from dense to dilute flows produces another transition between incompressible and compressible jumps. The observed jump height decrease may be reproduced for a more dilute incoming flow by including experimentally measured density variation in the jump equation. Finally, we briefly discuss the likely relevance to avalanche protection dam design that currently utilises traditional shock equations for incompressible frictionless fluids.

  8. Correlation between accuracy of crowns fabricated using CAD/CAM and elastic deformation of CAD/CAM materials.

    PubMed

    Yara, Atsushi; Goto, Shin-ichi; Ogura, Hideo

    2004-12-01

    Full crowns were fabricated from three different materials (titanium, ceramic, and resin composite) at different rest diameters using a dental CAD/CAM system, and then their marginal discrepancy measured. The deflection of cylindrical specimens at 500 gf was measured using the same materials and diameters as for the accuracy measurement. Marginal discrepancy decreased as rest diameter increased, and at the same rest diameter the titanium crown had lower marginal discrepancy than ceramic and composite crowns. A significant correlation was found between marginal discrepancy of the crowns and deflection of the materials. This correlation was aptly expressed in the regression equation, MG = 4.54DF+53.9, where MG represented marginal discrepancy and DF represented deflection. This equation can be used as a good measure for new materials which have different modulus of elasticity.

  9. Crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness of mandibular second bicuspids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sérgio Augusto; Vellini-Ferreira, Flávio; Scavone-Junior, Helio; Ferreira, Rívea Inês

    2011-01-01

    To achieve proper recontouring of anterior and posterior teeth, to obtain optimal morphology during enamel stripping, it is important to be aware of dental anatomy. This study aimed at evaluating crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness in a sample of 40 extracted sound, human, mandibular, second bicuspids (20 right and 20 left). Mesiodistal, cervico-occlusal and buccolingual crown dimensions were measured using a digital caliper, accurate to 0.01 mm. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and cut along their long axes through the proximal surfaces to obtain 0.7 mm-thick central sections. Enamel thickness on the cut sections was measured using a perfilometer. Comparative analyses were carried out using the Student's-t test (α= 5%). The mean mesiodistal crown widths for right and left teeth were 7.79 mm (± 0.47) and 7.70 mm (± 0.51), respectively. Mean cervico-occlusal heights ranged from 8.31 mm (± 0.75) on the right to 8.38 mm (± 0.85) on the left teeth. The mean values for the buccolingual dimension were 8.67 mm (± 0.70) on the right and 8.65 mm (± 0.54) on the left teeth. The mean enamel thickness on the mesial surfaces ranged from 1.35 mm (± 0.22) to 1.40 mm (± 0.17), on the left and right sides, respectively. On the distal surfaces, the corresponding values were 1.44 mm (± 0.21) and 1.46 mm (± 0.12). No significant differences were found between measurements for right and left teeth. However, enamel thickness was significantly greater on the distal surfaces, compared with the mesial surfaces.

  10. Fit of lithium disilicate crowns fabricated from conventional and digital impressions assessed with micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jin-Han; Cho, Hye-Won

    2016-10-01

    Although the number of lithium disilicate crowns fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology has increased, the accuracy of the prostheses produced by using digital pathways remains unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare marginal and internal discrepancies of lithium disilicate crowns fabricated from digital and conventional impressions. A typodont mandibular first molar was prepared for a lithium disilicate crown, and 20 duplicate dies were fabricated by milling poly(methyl methacrylate) resin blocks from laboratory scans. Four groups of 5 lithium disilicate crowns each were created by using a CS3500 (Carestream Dental) intraoral digital impression; Trios (3shape) intraoral digital impression; Ceramill Map400 (Amann Girrbach) extraoral digital impression; and a heat-press technique as a control group. All of the IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent AG) crowns were produced using a 5-axis milling engine (Ceramill Motion2). The lithium disilicate crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement under finger pressure. Marginal and internal discrepancies were measured using micro-computed tomography (SkyScan1172). One-way ANOVAs with the Tukey honest significant differences test were used for statistical analysis of the data (α=.05). The mean marginal discrepancies of CS3500 lithium disilicate crowns were 129.6 μm, 200.9 μm for Ceramill Map400, and 207.8 μm 176.1 μm for the heat-press technique; and the internal discrepancy volumes for CS3500 were 25.3 mm(3), 40.7 mm(3) for Trios, 29.1 mm(3) for Ceramill Map400, and 29.1 and 31.4 mm(3) for the heat-press technique. The CS3500 group showed a significantly better marginal discrepancy than the other 3 groups and a smaller internal discrepancy volume than the Trios group (P<.05). Significant differences were found between IPS e.max CAD crowns produced using 2 intraoral digital impressions, whereas no differences were found between IPS e.max CAD crowns

  11. Effect of cement space on the marginal fit of CAD-CAM-fabricated monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Kale, Ediz; Seker, Emre; Yilmaz, Burak; Özcelik, Tuncer Burak

    2016-12-01

    Monolithic zirconia crowns fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) have recently become a common practice for the restoration of posterior teeth. The marginal fit of monolithic zirconia crowns may be affected by different cement space parameters set in the CAD software. Information is scarce regarding the effect of cement space on the marginal fit of monolithic zirconia crowns fabricated with CAD-CAM technology. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of cement space on the marginal fit of CAD-CAM-fabricated monolithic zirconia crowns before cementation. Fifteen right maxillary first molar typodont teeth with standardized anatomic preparations for complete-coverage ceramic crowns were scanned with a 3-dimensional laboratory scanner. Crowns were designed 3-dimensionally using software and then milled from presintered monolithic zirconia blocks in a computer numerical control dental milling machine. The cement space was set at 25 μm around the margins for all groups, and additional cement space starting 1 mm above the finish lines of the teeth was set at 30 μm for group 25-30, 40 μm for group 25-40, and 50 μm for group 25-50 in the CAD software. A total of 120 images (3 groups, 5 crowns per group, 8 sites per crown) were measured for vertical marginal discrepancy under a stereoscopic zoom microscope and the data were statistically analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance, followed by the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α=.05). The results showed that different cement space values had statistically significant effect on the mean vertical marginal discrepancy value of tested crowns (P<.001). The mean marginal discrepancy was 85 μm for group 25-30, 68 μm for group 25-40, and 53 μm for group 25-50. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that the cement space had a significant effect on the marginal fit of CAD-CAM-fabricated monolithic zirconia crowns. The

  12. Gaining Momentum: Re-Creating Galileo's Inclined Plane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

    1998-01-01

    Provides an excerpt of Galileo's description of his inclined plane experiment. Describes the replication of Galileo's inclined plane experiment by students at Rice University (Texas) using an Internet site called the Galileo Project; then describes the authors' replication of the Project. (AEF)

  13. A New Dynamics Cart on an Inclined Plane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodorsson, Pall

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experiment to study the acceleration of a cart moving up and down an inclined plane. Demonstrates how multitiming and the study of the movement in both directions allows the determination of the component of gravitational force along an inclined plane without any assumptions about friction. (JRH)

  14. 3. Inclined Plane 10, 1970. Track bed at left. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Inclined Plane 10, 1970. Track bed at left. View some what similar to that of NJ-30-2. Stone track bed is visible under cable system of NJ-30-2. - Morris Canal, Inclined Plane 10 West, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  15. 7. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF TOP OF INCLINED PLANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF TOP OF INCLINED PLANE AND EAST FACE OF CUT STONE TOWER - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  16. 40. CONSTRUCTION OF GALLERY NO. 3, SHOWING INCLINED PLANE USED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. CONSTRUCTION OF GALLERY NO. 3, SHOWING INCLINED PLANE USED TO TRANSPORT MATERIALS, ALSO SPOIL FROM TUNNEL INTERIOR. POWDER HOUSE AND TOOL SHED VISIBLE TO RIGHT OF BASE INCLINE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Tunnel, Two miles east of Zion Canyon Scenic Drive, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  17. 46 CFR 111.01-19 - Inclination of the vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inclination of the vessel. 111.01-19 Section 111.01-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-19 Inclination of the vessel. (a) All electrical equipment must...

  18. Gaining Momentum: Re-Creating Galileo's Inclined Plane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

    1998-01-01

    Provides an excerpt of Galileo's description of his inclined plane experiment. Describes the replication of Galileo's inclined plane experiment by students at Rice University (Texas) using an Internet site called the Galileo Project; then describes the authors' replication of the Project. (AEF)

  19. A New Dynamics Cart on an Inclined Plane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodorsson, Pall

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experiment to study the acceleration of a cart moving up and down an inclined plane. Demonstrates how multitiming and the study of the movement in both directions allows the determination of the component of gravitational force along an inclined plane without any assumptions about friction. (JRH)

  20. Operational Experiences in Planning and Reconstructing Aqua Inclination Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, David; Reilly, Jacqueline; Schiff, Conrad

    2004-01-01

    As the lead satellite in NASA's growing Earth Observing System (EOS) PM constellation, it is increasingly critical that Aqua maintain its various orbit requirements. The two of interest for this paper are maintaining an orbit inclination that provides for a consistent mean local time and a semi-major Axis (SMA) that allows for ground track repeatability. Maneuvers to adjust the orbit inclination involve several flight dynamics constraints and complexities which make planning such maneuvers challenging. In particular, coupling between the orbital and attitude degrees of freedom lead to changes in SMA when changes in inclination are effected. A long term mission mean local time trend analysis was performed in order to determine the size and placement of the required inclination maneuvers. Following this analysis, detailed modeling of each burn and its Various segments was performed to determine its effects on the immediate orbit state. Data gathered from an inclination slew test of the spacecraft and first inclination maneuver uncovered discrepancies in the modeling method that were investigated and resolved. The new modeling techniques were applied and validated during the second spacecraft inclination maneuver. These improvements should position Aqua to successfully complete a series of inclination maneuvers in the fall of 2004. The following paper presents the events and results related

  1. 30 CFR 56.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 56.11026 Section 56.11026 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... § 56.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders 70 degrees to 90 degrees from the...

  2. 30 CFR 57.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 57.11017 Section 57.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not...

  3. 30 CFR 57.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 57.11026 Section 57.11026 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... and Escapeways Travelways-Surface Only § 57.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders...

  4. 30 CFR 57.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 57.11026 Section 57.11026 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... and Escapeways Travelways-Surface Only § 57.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders...

  5. 30 CFR 57.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 57.11017 Section 57.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not...

  6. 30 CFR 57.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 57.11017 Section 57.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not...

  7. 30 CFR 57.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 57.11026 Section 57.11026 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... and Escapeways Travelways-Surface Only § 57.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders...

  8. 30 CFR 56.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 56.11026 Section 56.11026 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... § 56.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders 70 degrees to 90 degrees from the...

  9. 30 CFR 56.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 56.11026 Section 56.11026 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... § 56.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders 70 degrees to 90 degrees from the...

  10. 30 CFR 57.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 57.11017 Section 57.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not...

  11. 30 CFR 57.11017 - Inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inclined fixed ladders. 57.11017 Section 57.11017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11017 Inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders shall not...

  12. 30 CFR 57.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 57.11026 Section 57.11026 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... and Escapeways Travelways-Surface Only § 57.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders...

  13. 30 CFR 56.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 56.11026 Section 56.11026 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... § 56.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders 70 degrees to 90 degrees from the...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after removal of, or breakage of, the natural crown (that portion of the tooth that normally protrudes above the...) tooth until the adult tooth erupts. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after removal of, or breakage of, the natural crown (that portion of the tooth that normally protrudes above the...) tooth until the adult tooth erupts. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is...

  16. Crown ratio influences allometric scaling in trees

    Treesearch

    Annikki Makela; Harry T. Valentine

    2006-01-01

    Allometric theories suggest that the size and shape of organisms follow universal rules, with a tendency toward quarter-power scaling. In woody plants, however, structure is influenced by branch death and shedding, which leads to decreasing crown ratios, accumulation of heartwood, and stem and branch tapering. This paper examines the impacts on allometric scaling of...

  17. Crowning achievement: a case of dental aspiration.

    PubMed

    Mark, Nicholas M; Lessing, Juan N; Çoruh, Başak

    2015-12-01

    Aspiration of foreign bodies during dental procedures is a rare but potentially serious complication. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who aspirated a dental crown requiring flexible bronchoscopic retrieval. We discuss the risk factors for aspiration, the radiographic features of diagnosis, and the techniques for management and retrieval.

  18. Crowning achievement: a case of dental aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Nicholas M.; Lessing, Juan N.; Çoruh, Başak

    2015-01-01

    Aspiration of foreign bodies during dental procedures is a rare but potentially serious complication. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who aspirated a dental crown requiring flexible bronchoscopic retrieval. We discuss the risk factors for aspiration, the radiographic features of diagnosis, and the techniques for management and retrieval. PMID:26649115

  19. PREFORMED METAL CROWNS FOR THE PERMANENT DENTITION.

    PubMed

    Millar, Lynsey M; Cairns, Alison M; Fowler, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    Preformed metal crowns have a range of uses in paediatric dentistry in both the primary and permanent dentition. This article provides an overview of their use in permanent teeth, including teeth that have been affected by molar incisor hypomineralisation, caries, developmental defects and tooth surface loss. The indications for use are described, along with the clinical technique for placement

  20. Aspergillosis in a red-crowned crane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroud, R.K.; Duncan, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    An unusual form of pulmonary aspergillosis in a red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) is described in this report. The major lesion is unique because it closely resembles a lesion referred to as an aspergilloma. An aspergilloma is a single large granulomatous lesion that resembles a tumor and is caused by fungi of the genus Aspergillus.

  1. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed crown. 872.3330 Section 872.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after removal...

  2. Evaluation of wild juglans species for crown gall resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A. tumefaciens is a soil-borne Gram-negative bacterium which causes crown gall on many dicotyledonous plant species including walnut. Crown gall symptoms on walnut are characterized by large tumors located near the crown of the tree but can occur near wounds caused by bleeding cuts or at the graft u...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such as...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such as...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such as...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such as...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such as...

  8. Using crown condition variables as indicators of forest health

    Treesearch

    Stanley J. Zarnoch; William A. Bechtold; K.W. Stolte

    2004-01-01

    Indicators of forest health used in previous studies have focused on crown variables analyzed individually at the tree level by summarizing over all species. This approach has the virtue of simplicity but does not account for the three-dimensional attributes of a tree crown, the multivariate nature of the crown variables, or variability among species. To alleviate...

  9. Thinning guidelines from crown area relationships for young hardwood plantations

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey W. Stringer; Luke Cecil

    2010-01-01

    Crown closure in hardwood plantations signals the first opportunity to apply density control treatments such as thinning or release. The proper timing of these treatments is a function of stocking levels and is generally scheduled within several years after initial crown closure. Predicting crown closure for a plantation provides practitioners with the ability to plan...

  10. 28. Photocopy of Crown Roller Mill illustration; originally published in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of Crown Roller Mill illustration; originally published in The Crown Roller Mill, Northwestern Miller 9 (May 21, 1880): 321; SHOWING WEST SIDE, LOOKING EAST - Crown Roller Mill, 105 Fifth Avenue, South, West Side Milling District, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  11. Evaluation of sampling strategies to estimate crown biomass

    Treesearch

    Krishna P Poudel; Hailemariam Temesgen; Andrew N Gray

    2015-01-01

    Depending on tree and site characteristics crown biomass accounts for a significant portion of the total aboveground biomass in the tree. Crown biomass estimation is useful for different purposes including evaluating the economic feasibility of crown utilization for energy production or forest products, fuel load assessments and fire management strategies, and wildfire...

  12. An in vivo evaluation of fit of zirconium-oxide based ceramic single crowns, generated with two CAD/CAM systems, in comparison to metal ceramic single crowns.

    PubMed

    Biscaro, Leonello; Bonfiglioli, Roberto; Soattin, Massimo; Vigolo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess in vivo the marginal fit of single crowns produced using two CAD/CAM all-ceramic systems, in comparison to more traditional metal ceramic crowns. Thirty vital, caries-free, and previously untreated teeth were chosen in five patients who needed extraction for implant placement and therefore were included in this study. In the control group (C), 10 regular metal ceramic crowns with porcelain occlusal surfaces were fabricated. In the other two groups (Z and E), CAD/CAM technology was used for the fabrication of 20 zirconium-oxide-based ceramic single crowns with two systems. All zirconia crowns were cemented with glass-ionomer cement, always following the manufacturer's instructions. The same dentist carried out all clinical phases. The teeth were extracted 1 month later. Marginal gaps along vertical planes were measured for each crown, using a total of four landmarks for each tooth by means of a microscope at a magnification of 50×. On completion of microscopic evaluation, representative specimens from each group were prepared for ESEM evaluation. Mean and standard deviations of the four landmarks (mesial, distal, buccal, palatal) at each single crown were calculated for each group. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was performed to determine whether the four landmarks, taken into consideration together, differed between groups. Two-way ANOVA was performed to study in detail, for each landmark, how the three systems used to produce the FPDs affected the gap measurements. Differences were considered to be significant at p < 0.05. MANOVA revealed no quantitative differences of the four landmarks, when taken into consideration together, between the three groups (p < 0.0001). Two-way ANOVA, performed at each landmark, revealed no quantitative differences between the three groups (p < 0.0001 for each landmark). Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that the two zirconium-oxide-based ceramic CAD/CAM systems

  13. Movement strategies for head stabilization during incline walking.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Ronita L

    2003-06-01

    Changes in body orientation with respect to space during incline walking can alter vestibular information requiring a different solution to the problem of head stabilization. Eleven young adults walked along a level walkway, and ascended and descended an inclined surface. Head, neck and trunk angular positions in space were collected. Changes in the gravitoinertial vector imposed by the inclined surface, produced concomitant changes in body segment orientation that decreased head stability during the inclined walking tasks. Head, neck and trunk segments were least stable while ascending the incline creating the greatest challenge to head stability during this task. Movement strategies reflected adjustments of head-neck and neck-trunk patterns to accommodate changes in the gravitoinertial vector and insure balance of the head over the trunk.

  14. A basic study on the production of enriched isotope {}^{48}Ca by using crown-ether resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Kakubata, H.; Nomura, M.; Kaneshiki, T.; Suzuki, T.; Fujii, Y.; Nemoto, S.

    2015-05-01

    The use of enriched ^{48}Ca is expected to improve the sensitivity of ^{48}Ca double beta decay measurements. We have studied the enrichment of ^{48}Ca with chemical exchange isotope separation using benzo-18-crown-6-ether resin. Chromatographic migrations of the calcium adsorption band were carried out at different migration lengths, 1 m, 20 m, and 200 m, using glass columns. Separation coefficients were observed as approximately 3 × 10^{-3}. Efforts have been made towards the production of benzo-18-crown-6-ether monomer at reasonable cost for the production of crown-ether resin for the separation of ^{48}Ca.

  15. Updating histological data on crown initiation and crown completion ages in southern Africans.

    PubMed

    Reid, Donald J; Guatelli-Steinberg, Debbie

    2017-04-01

    To update histological data on crown initiation and completion ages in southern Africans. To evaluate implications of these data for studies that: (a) rely on these data to time linear enamel hypoplasias (LEHs), or, (b) use these data for comparison to fossil hominins. Initiation ages were calculated on 67 histological sections from southern Africans, with sample sizes ranging from one to 11 per tooth type. Crown completion ages for southern Africans were calculated in two ways. First, actual derived initiation ages were added to crown formation times for each histological section to obtain direct information on the crown completion ages of individuals. Second, average initiation ages from this study were added to average crown formation times of southern Africans from the Reid and coworkers previous studies that were based on larger samples. For earlier-initiating tooth types (all anterior teeth and first molars), there is little difference in ages of initiation and crown completion between this and previous studies. Differences increase as a function of initiation age, such that the greatest differences between this and previous studies for both initiation and crown completion ages are for the second and third molars. This study documents variation in initiation ages, particularly for later-initiating tooth types. It upholds the use of previously published histological aging charts for LEHs on anterior teeth. However, this study finds that ages of crown initiation and completion in second and third molars for this southern African sample are earlier than previously estimated. These earlier ages reduce differences between modern humans and fossil hominins for these developmental events in second and third molars. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hmaidouch, Rim; Weigl, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to assess tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region in vitro and in vivo. An electronic PubMed search was conducted to identify studies on tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region. The selected studies were analyzed in regard to type of crowns, natural antagonist, measuring protocol and outcome. From a yield of 1 000 titles, 43 articles were selected for full-text analysis; finally, no in vitro and only five in vivo studies met the inclusion criteria. As there is heterogeneity in design, used measuring method, ceramics and analysis-form, a meta-analysis was not possible. Results of these studies are very controversial which makes a scientifically valid comparison impossible. This review indicated that some all-ceramic crowns are as wear friendly as metal-ceramic crowns. Up to now, it has been impossible to associate tooth wear with any specific causal agent. The role of ceramic surface treatment that might be responsible for the changing in rate of tooth wear seems undetermined as yet through clinical trials. The literature reveals that studies on this topic are subject to a substantial amount of bias. Therefore, additional clinical studies, properly designed to diminish bias, are warranted. PMID:24136675

  17. Growth rates of great egret, snowy egret and black-crowned night-heron chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Growth rates of Great Erget (Casmerodius albus), Snowy Erget (Egretta thula), and Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) chicks to 18 days-of-age were estimated from repeated measurements of chicks in broods of three young. Weight gain (g/day) or increase in length (mm/day) of forearm, tarsus, or culmen did not between Black-crowned Night-Heron chicks at a colony in Rhode Island and a colony in Texas (USA). In Black-crowned night-Herons and Great Egrets, the last chick (C-chick) to hatch had lower growth rates than the first (A-) or second (B-) hatched chick. Black-crowned Night-Heron and Great Egret A-chicks gained weight faster than Snowy Egret A-chicks; however growth rates of the forearm, tarsus, or culmen each were not different among the three species. Equations based on the growth rate of culmen, forearm, or tarsus for repeatedly measured A-chicks estimated age of Great Egret, Snowy Egret, and Black-crowned Night-Heron chicks collected elsewhere to within two days of known age.

  18. The effects of post-core and crown material and luting agents on stress distribution in tooth restorations.

    PubMed

    Oyar, Perihan

    2014-08-01

    Cement microfracture, post-and-core dislodgement, and tooth fracture are related to the mechanical properties and deformation of restorations. The purpose of this study was to determine which combinations of post-and-core cements provide the most favorable stress distribution upon loading. Three-dimensional models of teeth were created with the ANSYS program to simulate the different materials used for metal ceramic crowns (nickel-chromium, gold-palladium), posts and cores (Ti, Ni-Cr, Au-Pd), and cement (glass ionomer, composite resin, zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, Panavia). Models were divided into 2 groups according to the alloys used in the crown restorations. A simulated masticatory force of 400 N was applied to the occlusal surface at a 45-degree inclination in the linguolabial direction to the long axis of the tooth, and von Mises equivalent stress values were calculated. The Ni-Cr metal ceramic crown/Au-Pd post-and-core/glass ionomer cement had the highest residual root von Mises equivalent stress value, whereas the Ni-Cr metal ceramic crown/Ni-Cr post-and-core/glass ionomer cement had the highest post stress value and the Ni-Cr metal ceramic crown/Au-Pd post-and-core/zinc phosphate cement had the highest cement stress value. For each post-and-core alloy, the stress values in the post and core were higher with Au-Pd metal ceramic crowns than with Ni-Cr metal ceramic crowns. The post-and-core material affected the amount of deformation. The use of a post-and-core material with a lower elastic modulus and a cement with a higher elastic modulus led to a reduction in deformation in the residual root, cement, and post and core, and a reduction in stress in the post and core. The Ni-Cr metal ceramic crown/Au-Pd post-and-core/zinc phosphate cement or Panavia may therefore be favorable for post-and-core restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. UNBIASED INCLINATION DISTRIBUTIONS FOR OBJECTS IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Adams, E. R.; Benecchi, S. D.; Buie, M. W.; Trilling, D. E.; Wasserman, L. H. E-mail: jle@mit.ed E-mail: lhw@lowell.ed E-mail: buie@boulder.swri.ed

    2010-08-15

    Using data from the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES), we investigate the inclination distributions of objects in the Kuiper Belt. We present a derivation for observational bias removal and use this procedure to generate unbiased inclination distributions for Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) of different DES dynamical classes, with respect to the Kuiper Belt plane. Consistent with previous results, we find that the inclination distribution for all DES KBOs is well fit by the sum of two Gaussians, or a Gaussian plus a generalized Lorentzian, multiplied by sin i. Approximately 80% of KBOs are in the high-inclination grouping. We find that Classical object inclinations are well fit by sin i multiplied by the sum of two Gaussians, with roughly even distribution between Gaussians of widths 2.0{sup +0.6}{sub -0.5}{sup 0} and 8.1{sup +2.6}{sub -2.1}{sup 0}. Objects in different resonances exhibit different inclination distributions. The inclinations of Scattered objects are best matched by sin i multiplied by a single Gaussian that is centered at 19.1{sup +3.9}{sub -3.6}{sup 0} with a width of 6.9{sup +4.1}{sub -2.7}{sup 0}. Centaur inclinations peak just below 20{sup 0}, with one exceptionally high-inclination object near 80{sup 0}. The currently observed inclination distribution of the Centaurs is not dissimilar to that of the Scattered Extended KBOs and Jupiter-family comets, but is significantly different from the Classical and Resonant KBOs. While the sample sizes of some dynamical classes are still small, these results should begin to serve as a critical diagnostic for models of solar system evolution.

  20. Accuracy of CAD/CAM crown fit with infrared and LED cameras.

    PubMed

    Cook, K T; Fasbinder, D J

    2012-01-01

    The intraoral recording of digital images is a critical component of fabricating accurate Cerec restorations. This study evaluated the marginal fit and internal adaptation of Cerec ceramic crowns fabricated using different cameras, alternative powdering materials, and multiple image capture sequences. A master epoxy resin model was fabricated using a polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) impression of a typodont with an all-ceramic crown preparation on tooth 14. A titanium dioxide powder/mechanical sprayer and an aerosol contrast spray were used to create a uniformly reflective surface. An infrared laser Cerec 3/RedCam unit and LED Cerec AC/BlueCam unit were used to record images for crown fabrication. Three different image capture sequences were performed to record the data. Crowns were made for each test group using a Cerec AC unit with V3.80 software. The crowns were milled from blocks of IPS EmpressCAD. Marginal fit and internal adaptation of the crowns to the master model of the preparation was assessed with a measuring microscope at 20X. The data was analyzed using a two-way ANOVA. No significant differences were found in the marginal fit, axial wall adaptation, or occlusal wall adaptation between any of the test groups (p < 0.05). Within the confines of this in vitro study, there were no significant differences between the marginal fit and internal adaptation of Cerec CAD/CAM ceramic crowns fabricated with: 1) the infrared laser camera (RedCam) and the LED camera (BlueCam), 2) titanium dioxide powder or aerosol contrast spray, or 3) multiple imaging sequences for recording the preparation and adjacent teeth.

  1. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Kiran Kumar; Patil, Veena Ashok; John, Jiji

    2012-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20) patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening) and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI) & (GI), Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS), Probing depth (PD), and Biologic Width (BW). Statistical Analysis Used. Student "t" Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group) and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group) and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening.

  2. Influence of surface finishing on fracture load and failure mode of glass ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Mores, Rafael Tagliari; Borba, Márcia; Corazza, Pedro Henrique; Della Bona, Álvaro; Benetti, Paula

    2017-03-23

    Ceramic restorations often require adjustments using diamond rotary instruments, which damage the glazed surface. The effect of these adjustments on the fracture behavior of these restorations is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of induced surface defects on the fracture load and mode of failure of lithium disilicate-based (LDS) glass ceramic restorations. Premolar crowns were obtained from LDS computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing blocks (n=60) and glazed. The crowns were bonded to dentin analog dies and divided into 5 groups (n=12), as follows: glaze; abrasion (diamond rotary instrument 2135); abrasion and reglaze; abrasion and polishing (diamond rotary instrument 2135F, 2135 FF, and polishing devices); and polishing. The topography of the crowns was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and roughness was measured. A compressive load (0.5 mm/min) was applied by a piston to the center of the lingual cusp until fracture. The fracture load was recorded and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). Fractured crowns were examined to determine the fracture origin. Polishing and/or reglazing resulted in lower roughness than for the abraded group (P<.05), which did not affect the fracture loads (P=.696). Catastrophic fracture with origin at the intaglio surface was the mode of failure for all the crowns. The experiment design successfully submitted the crowns to a clinical stress state, resulting in a clinically relevant failure. Reglazing or polishing were effective in reducing surface defects. Surface treatments had no effect on the immediate catastrophic failure of LDS crowns. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of cement film thickness on the retention of implant-retained crowns.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Christian; Harder, Sönke; Steiner, Martin; Vollrath, Oliver; Kern, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of this study was to establish a new, high precision procedure to evaluate the influence of cement film thickness on the retention of cemented implant-retained crowns. Ninety-six tapered titanium abutments (6° taper, 4.3 mm diameter, Camlog) were shortened to 4 mm. Computer-aided design was used to design the crowns, and selective laser sintering, using a cobalt-chromium alloy, was used to produce the crowns. This method used a focused high-energy laser beam to fuse a localized region of metal powder to build up the crowns gradually. Before cementing, preset cement film thicknesses of 15, 50, 80, or 110 μm were established. Glass ionomer, polycarboxylate, or resin cements were used for cementation. After 3 days storage in demineralized water, the retention of the crowns was measured in tension using a universal testing machine. The cement film thicknesses could be achieved with a high level of precision. Interactions between the factors cement and cement film thickness could be found (p ≤ 0.001). For all cements, crown retention decreased significantly between a cement film thickness of 15 and 50 μm (p ≤ 0.001). At 15 μm cement film thickness, the resin cement was the most retentive cement, followed by the polycarboxylate and then the glass ionomer cement (p ≤ 0.05). The results suggest that cement film thickness has an influence on the retentive strength of cemented implant-retained crowns. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Sexual dimorphism in deciduous crown traits of a European derived Australian sample.

    PubMed

    Adler, C J; Donlon, D

    2010-06-15

    Sex determination of juvenile skeletal remains is a problematic area affecting physical anthropology, forensic science and archaeology. Sexual dimorphism in the morphometric crown traits of the deciduous dentition may be used to help resolve this issue. Dental stone casts from a European derived Australian sample (n=151) were used to investigate variation within crown traits of the deciduous canine and molars. The metric traits investigated were crown size, trigonid size and talonid size. The morphological features included Carabelli's trait and molar cusp number. Metric crown traits were significantly larger in males (p<0.05). The morphological crown traits were not significantly different between the sexes. The largest degree of sexual dimorphism was 11.11% in the trigonid mesiodistal diameter of the first deciduous molar. This is the first recording of the measurement in a European derived sample. Two multivariate statistics, linear functional discriminant analysis and binary logistic regression, were used to determine the success rate of sex classification from the crown traits. The most suitable was linear functional discriminant analysis, however similar results were found when using binary logistic regression. When using all variables investigated in this study, sex could be classified with accuracy of 70.2% from linear functional discriminant analysis (cross validated). The mandibular teeth had greater sexual dimorphism, classifying sex correctly 74.8% of the time compared to maxillary variables that had a success rate of 55.6%. Our results have shown that morphometric crown traits in the deciduous dentition can be used to classify sex of juvenile skeletons (11 months to 12 years) of European descent from linear functional discriminant analysis with accuracy between 70.2% and 74.8%.

  5. Comparison of Field Methods and Models to Estimate Mean Crown Diameter

    Treesearch

    William A. Bechtold; Manfred E. Mielke; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2002-01-01

    The direct measurement of crown diameters with logger's tapes adds significantly to the cost of extensive forest inventories. We undertook a study of 100 trees to compare this measurement method to four alternatives-two field instruments, ocular estimates, and regression models. Using the taping method as the standard of comparison, accuracy of the tested...

  6. Comparison of marginal fit between all-porcelain margin versus alumina-supported margin on Procera Alumina crowns.

    PubMed

    Limkangwalmongkol, Penwadee; Kee, Edwin; Chiche, Gerard J; Blatz, Markus B

    2009-02-01

    Procera Alumina crowns are widely used; however, the effect of crown margin design on marginal fit is unknown. This study measured and compared the precision of fit of Procera Alumina crowns with two crown margin designs: all-porcelain versus alumina-supported margins. Sixteen noncarious extracted human premolars were prepared for Procera((R)) Alumina crowns with an internally rounded shoulder preparation. Impressions were made from all teeth, and master dies were poured with type IV dental stone. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups. Procera Alumina crowns were fabricated: eight crowns with circumferential porcelain-butt (all-porcelain) margins and eight crowns with coping (alumina-supported) margins (control). Precision of fit was measured at six points on each crown with a profilometer (profile projector). The data were statistically analyzed with an independent-samples t-test (alpha < 0.05). The mean marginal gap size (microm) of coping margins was 68.07 +/- 16.08 and of porcelain-butt margins was 101.29 +/- 43.71. There was no statistically significant difference (p= 0.065) of the marginal gap size between coping margins and porcelain-butt margins. The results of this study demonstrate that there was no statistically significant difference in the marginal fit of coping and porcelain-butt margins. Both margin designs are within clinically acceptable ranges. Therefore, clinicians may choose to use a coping margin, as it is less labor intensive and requires less time for fabrication, unless there is a specific high esthetic need for a porcelain-butt margin.

  7. Estimating the weight of crown segments for old-growth Douglas-fir and western hemlock.

    Treesearch

    J.A. Kendall Snell; Timothy A. Max

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate estimators to predict total crown weight and weight of any segment of crown for old-growth felled and bucked Douglas-fir and western hemlock trees. Equations were developed for predicting weight of continuous live crown, total live crown, dead crown, any segment of live crown, and individual branches for old-growth...

  8. Debris dynamics under evection and inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Santos, M. T.; Celestino, C. C.; Winter, O. C.; Neto, E. V.; Cordeiro, R. R.

    The human activity in exploring the space has generated undesirable artificial debris Unfortunately the number of them is increasing so fast that a tremendous problem is arising The natural and artificial debris are distributed in a very large range of altitude and according to the semi major axis of the orbit the particle may survive for very long time For low altitude less than 200 km the life time of the particles is mostly dominated by the atmospheric drag while for more distant debris different disturbing forces should be considered and the dynamics is slight more complicated Although the maximum concentration of the debris is not at high altitude the problem at high altitudes is important since the mitigation mechanism to clean these regions is very slow Usually Poynting Robertson P-R effect and similar other forces are not efficient to remove rapidly the particles at high altitudes in opposition to human activities which are always feeding more rapidly almost any region of the space Therefore since the debris survive for very long time it is important to increase our theoretical knowledge on the dynamics of these regions In this work we show the existence of some important resonances which may give significant variations in the inclination and eccentricity of the particle In the case of the Earth they occur at about 10128 5 km and 12309 8 km and are related to a commensurability involving the mean longitude of the sun and

  9. Transverse Bursts in Inclined Layer Convection: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Brink, Jeandrew; Pesch, Werner

    2002-03-01

    We report theoretical and computational results on thermally driven inclined layer convection. For small Prandtl number fluids, experiments have reported bursting phenomena at both small angles, strong driving and high angles, weak driving (Daniels et al. PRL 84: 5320, 2000). Theoretically, the small angle, strong driving case was described by Clever and Busse (Physics of Fluids 12: 2137, 2000) and was connected to a subharmonic instability. At large angles, close to the codimension-two point, intermittent, localized, transverse subharmonic bursts occur at weak driving. Qualitatively, the bursts draw energy from the roll modes, exhaust them while growing, and die out when they are unable to find a new attractor. We investigate a connection between the small- and large-angle bursts. Using Galerkin methods and direct simulations of the underlying Boussinesq equations, we examine the extent to which they are related to a linear instability of the roll pattern. We address a possible connection to the shear flow turbulent bursts observed in Taylor-Couette flow. In addition, we present a theoretical analysis of the small Prandtl number case, for which the codimension-two point moves to zero angle. This work is supported by a Cornell Graduate Student Fellowship and by the National Science Foundation under grant DMR-0072077.

  10. Vaulting mechanics successfully predict decrease in walk-run transition speed with incline.

    PubMed

    Hubel, Tatjana Y; Usherwood, James R

    2013-04-23

    There is an ongoing debate about the reasons underlying gait transition in terrestrial locomotion. In bipedal locomotion, the 'compass gait', a reductionist model of inverted pendulum walking, predicts the boundaries of speed and step length within which walking is feasible. The stance of the compass gait is energetically optimal-at walking speeds-owing to the absence of leg compression/extension; completely stiff limbs perform no work during the vaulting phase. Here, we extend theoretical compass gait vaulting to include inclines, and find good agreement with previous observations of changes in walk-run transition speed (approx. 1% per 1% incline). We measured step length and frequency for humans walking either on the level or up a 9.8 per cent incline and report preferred walk-run, walk-compliant-walk and maximum walk-run transition speeds. While the measured 'preferred' walk-run transition speed lies consistently below the predicted maximum walking speeds, and 'actual' maximum walking speeds are clearly above the predicted values, the onset of compliant walking in level as well as incline walking occurs close to the predicted values. These findings support the view that normal human walking is constrained by the physics of vaulting, but preferred absolute walk-run transition speeds may be influenced by additional factors.

  11. Development and characterization of an inclined quad-vortex range hood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Lee, Ji-Heng

    2013-11-01

    In order to increase containment efficiency and reduce energy consumption, an inclined quad-vortex range hood (IQV range hood) was developed and tested by experimental methods. The flow structure was observed by a laser-assisted flow visualization technique and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Leakage characteristics were measured by the tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) detection method. By arranging a narrow suction slot on the bottom face of the hood and two side plates hanging under lateral faces of the hood, a flow field featuring four backwards-inclined vortical flow structures was formed at suction velocities of larger than about 10 m s(-1) (suction flow rate 7.2 m(3) min(-1)). Oil mists were coherently contained in the vortical flow structures without observable dispersion out of the vortices; they rose up spirally with inclination towards the rear wall and were inducted into the suction slot. The backwards inclination of the oil-mist-containing vortical flow structures, caused by the backwards offset arrangement of the suction slot and the Coanda effect, benefited from the reduction in pollutant leakage induced by the influence of a mannequin's presence. Experimental results using the tracer gas concentration detection method showed a close correlation with the results from the flow visualization and LDV measurements. Under both occupied and unoccupied conditions, in which the mannequin was either present or not present, the IQV range hood provided low SF6 leakage concentration levels.

  12. Linking ice accretion and crown structure: towards a model of the effect of freezing rain on tree canopies.

    PubMed

    Nock, Charles A; Lecigne, Bastien; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Greene, David F; Dauzat, Jean; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Despite a longstanding interest in variation in tree species vulnerability to ice storm damage, quantitative analyses of the influence of crown structure on within-crown variation in ice accretion are rare. In particular, the effect of prior interception by higher branches on lower branch accumulation remains unstudied. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intra-crown ice accretion can be predicted by a measure of the degree of sheltering by neighbouring branches. Freezing rain was artificially applied to Acer platanoides L., and in situ branch-ice thickness was measured directly and from LiDAR point clouds. Two models of freezing rain interception were developed: 'IceCube', which uses point clouds to relate ice accretion to a voxel-based index (sheltering factor; SF) of the sheltering effect of branch elements above a measurement point; and 'IceTree', a simulation model for in silico evaluation of the interception pattern of freezing rain in virtual tree crowns. Intra-crown radial ice accretion varied strongly, declining from the tips to the bases of branches and from the top to the base of the crown. SF for branches varied strongly within the crown, and differences among branches were consistent for a range of model parameters. Intra-crown variation in ice accretion on branches was related to SF (R(2) = 0·46), with in silico results from IceTree supporting empirical relationships from IceCube. Empirical results and simulations confirmed a key role for crown architecture in determining intra-crown patterns of ice accretion. As suspected, the concentration of freezing rain droplets is attenuated by passage through the upper crown, and thus higher branches accumulate more ice than lower branches. This is the first step in developing a model that can provide a quantitative basis for investigating intra-crown and inter-specific variation in freezing rain damage. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of

  13. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-01-01

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns. PMID:27023532

  14. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-03-25

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  15. An in vitro evaluation of the integrity of stainless steel crown margins cemented with different luting agents.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, R L; Kambhu, P P; Asmussen, C M; Damiano, P C

    1998-01-01

    The elderly population is retaining more teeth which require extensive restorations. The purpose of this study was to identify a luting agent which had the least marginal breakdown when used with stainless steel crowns. Thirty-six caries-free molars were selected, prepared for stainless steel crowns, and embedded in acrylic to support the crown and tooth. The crowns (Unitek/3M) were cemented with 4 different luting agents: (A) Fleck's Cement, (B) Ketac-Cem, (C) All-Bond C & B Cement, and (D) Panavia EX Cement. All the restored teeth were thermocycled and divided into 3 experimental groups. Twelve teeth were stained. The remaining teeth were occlusally loaded and stained. The remaining 12 teeth were thermocycled and stained again. The stainless steel crowns were then sectioned and photographed at 7.5x mag. The dye penetration was evaluated by measurement of the percentage of dye penetration from the crown margin to the cusp tip on each side. Statistical analysis found that the least dye penetration was with All-Bond C & B Cement (p = 0.0001). The most extensive penetration was observed in Ketac-Cem Occlusal loading was a significant factor (p = 0.0001) increasing the dye penetration, but the crown-tooth gap was not.

  16. Influence of cementation and cement type on the fracture load testing methodology of anterior crowns made of different materials.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Beuer, Florian; Ender, Andreas; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Wimmer, Timea

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of cementation on fracture load of anterior crowns made of CAD/CAM-resin-blocks (ART), leucite-reinforced glass-ceramics (LRG), lithium disilicate ceramics (LIT), veneered zirconia (ZRO) and veneered alloy (DEG). Each crown group (n=15/subgroup) was cemented on the metal abutment as follows: i. using glass ionomer, ii. using self-adhesive resin cement, and iii. not cemented. Crowns were tested and analyzed with 2-way and 1-way ANOVA (Scheffé test), and Weibull statistics (p<0.05). Within LRG, self-adhesive cemented subgroup showed higher fracture load compared to other groups (p<0.001). Among DEG, lower results were measured for non-cemented crowns than for cemented (p<0.001). For ART, LIT and ZRO no influence of cementation was observed. For fracture load test methodology, metal ceramic crowns should be generally cemented. Glass-ceramic crowns should be cemented using adhesive cement. Cementation and cement type did not have an influence on the fracture load results for resin, zirconia or lithium disilicate crowns.

  17. Movements of a Sphere Moving Over Smooth and Rough Inclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Chyan-Deng

    1992-01-01

    The steady movements of a sphere over a rough incline in air, and over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid were studied theoretically and experimentally. The principle of energy conservation was used to analyze the translation velocities, rolling resistances, and drag coefficients of a sphere moving over the inclines. The rolling resistance to the movement of a sphere from the rough incline was presumed to be caused by collisions and frictional slidings. A varnished wooden board was placed on the bottom of an experimental tilting flume to form a smooth incline and a layer of spheres identical to the sphere moving over them was placed on the smooth wooden board to form a rough incline. Spheres used in the experiments were glass spheres, steel spheres, and golf balls. Experiments show that a sphere moving over a rough incline with negligible fluid drag in air can reach a constant translation velocity. This constant velocity was found to be proportional to the bed inclination (between 11 ^circ and 21^circ) and the square root of the sphere's diameter, but seemingly independent of the sphere's specific gravity. Two empirical coefficients in the theoretical expression of the sphere's translation velocity were determined by experiments. The collision and friction parts of the shear stress exerted on the interface between the moving sphere and rough incline were determined. The ratio of collision to friction parts appears to increase with increase in the bed inclination. These two parts seem to be of the same order of magnitude. The rolling resistances and the relations between the drag coefficient and Reynolds number for a sphere moving over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid, such as water or salad oil, were determined by a regression analysis based on experimental data. It was found that the drag coefficient for a sphere over the rough incline is larger than that for a sphere over the smooth incline, and both of which are much larger than that for a sphere in free

  18. Tree Crown Mapping in Managed Woodlands (Parklands) of Semi-Arid West Africa Using WorldView-2 Imagery and Geographic Object Based Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karlson, Martin; Reese, Heather; Ostwald, Madelene

    2014-01-01

    Detailed information on tree cover structure is critical for research and monitoring programs targeting African woodlands, including agroforestry parklands. High spatial resolution satellite imagery represents a potentially effective alternative to field-based surveys, but requires the development of accurate methods to automate information extraction. This study presents a method for tree crown mapping based on Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) that use spectral and geometric information to detect and delineate individual tree crowns and crown clusters. The method was implemented on a WorldView-2 image acquired over the parklands of Saponé, Burkina Faso, and rigorously evaluated against field reference data. The overall detection rate was 85.4% for individual tree crowns and crown clusters, with lower accuracies in areas with high tree density and dense understory vegetation. The overall delineation error (expressed as the difference between area of delineated object and crown area measured in the field) was 45.6% for individual tree crowns and 61.5% for crown clusters. Delineation accuracies were higher for medium (35–100 m2) and large (≥100 m2) trees compared to small (<35 m2) trees. The results indicate potential of GEOBIA and WorldView-2 imagery for tree crown mapping in parkland landscapes and similar woodland areas. PMID:25460815

  19. White ash (Fraxinus americana) health in the Allegheny plateau region, Pennsylvania: Evaluating the relationship between FIA phase 3 crown variables and a categorical rating system

    Treesearch

    Alejandro A. Royo; Kathleen S. Knight; Jamie M. Himes; Ashley N. Will

    2012-01-01

    Following the detection of white ash (Fraxinus americana) decline in the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) of Pennsylvania, we established an intensified white ash monitoring network throughout the ANF. We rated crowns using both a categorical system as well as Forest Inventory and Analyses (FIA) Phase 3 measures of uncompacted live crown ratio,...

  20. Distribution of Planetary Inclinations as Inferred from Kepler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragozzine, Darin; Kepler Team

    2011-05-01

    The true mutual inclination between orbits in a planetary system is a key indicator of dominant planet formation mechanisms. It is, therefore, unfortunate that the vast majority of current exoplanet observations are only sensitive to line-of-sight inclinations, at best. Even in systems with multiple transiting planets, arguably the best observational case, the line-of-sight inclinations are a weak constraint on the mutual inclination between planetary orbits. However, the large and homogeneous observations from the Kepler Space Telescope provide a population that can be assessed statistically in order to estimate the typical mutual inclination of exoplanetary systems. Lissauer et al. 2011b use the Quarter 0-2 Kepler observations presented in Borucki et al. 2011 to show that there is a population of planetary systems with multiple, small (radii between 1.5 and 6 Earth radii), short-period planets and that the typical mutual inclination in these systems is only a few degrees. Based on these new Kepler results and other observations, I will present the current best understanding of the inclination distribution of planetary systems and prospects for future progress. Kepler was competitively selected as the tenth Discovery mission. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.