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Sample records for crust geochemical evidence

  1. Geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic evidence for ancient lower continental crust beneath the Xi Ujimqin area of NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaofeng; Guo, Feng; Xiao, Peixi; Kang, Lei; Xi, Rengang

    2016-05-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is the largest Phanerozoic accretionary orogen on Earth. The role that Precambrian continental microblocks played in its formation, however, remains a highly controversial topic. New zircon U-Pb age data and whole-rock geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic studies on Permian (253-251 Ma) andesites from the Xi Ujimqin area provide the first evidence for the existence of a continental lower mafic crust in the eastern segment of the CAOB. These Permian lavas generally have chemical compositions similar to experimental melts of garnet pyroxenites. Based on Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositional differences, they can be further subdivided into two groups. Group 1 has moderately radiogenic Sr (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7060-0.7062) and nonradiogenic Nd (εNd(t) = - 9.0-8.3) and Pb (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 17.18-17.23) isotopic compositions similar to the ancient lower mafic crust beneath the North China Craton (NCC). Compared with Group 1, Group 2 has less radiogenic Sr (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7051-0.7055), and more radiogenic Nd (εNd(t) = - 0.2-+1.4) and Pb (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 18.04-18.20) isotopic compositions as observed in the Phanerozoic granitoids and felsic lavas of the CAOB. The combined geochemical and isotopic data indicate that Group 1 was derived from ancient lower mafic crust of the NCC affinity, with a residual assemblage of pyroxene + plagioclase + amphibole. The source for Group 2 was a mixture of ancient lower mafic crust and a juvenile crustal component, and melting left a residue of orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + plagioclase + garnet + amphibole. Generation of these two types of late Permian andesites favors a model whereby breakoff of a subducted slab and subsequent lithospheric extension triggered extensive asthenospheric upwelling and melting of the continental mafic lower crust of the eastern CAOB. The discovery of ancient lower continental crust of the NCC affinity in the CAOB implies that the NCC experienced continental breakup during

  2. Experimental and geochemical evidence for derivation of the El Capitan Granite, California, by partial melting of hydrous gabbroic lower crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratajeski, K.; Sisson, T.W.; Glazner, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Partial melting of mafic intrusions recently emplaced into the lower crust can produce voluminous silicic magmas with isotopic ratios similar to their mafic sources. Low-temperature (825 and 850??C) partial melts synthesized at 700 MPa in biotite-hornblende gabbros from the central Sierra Nevada batholith (Sisson et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol 148:635-661, 2005) have major-element and modeled trace-element (REE, Rb, Ba, Sr, Th, U) compositions matching those of the Cretaceous El Capitan Granite, a prominent granite and silicic granodiorite pluton in the central part of the Sierra Nevada batholith (Yosemite, CA, USA) locally mingled with coeval, isotopically similar quartz diorite through gabbro intrusions (Ratajeski et al. in Geol Soc Am Bull 113:1486-1502, 2001). These results are evidence that the El Capitan Granite, and perhaps similar intrusions in the Sierra Nevada batholith with lithospheric-mantle-like isotopic values, were extracted from LILE-enriched, hydrous (hornblende-bearing) gabbroic rocks in the Sierran lower crust. Granitic partial melts derived by this process may also be silicic end members for mixing events leading to large-volume intermediate composition Sierran plutons such as the Cretaceous Lamarck Granodiorite. Voluminous gabbroic residues of partial melting may be lost to the mantle by their conversion to garnet-pyroxene assemblages during batholithic magmatic crustal thickening. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  3. Small scale heterogeneity of Phanerozoic lower crust: evidence from isotopic and geochemical systematics of mid-Cretaceous granulite gneisses, San Gabriel Mountains, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; May, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    An elongate belt of mid-Cretaceous, compositionally banded gneisses and granulites is exposed in Cucamonga terrane, in the southeastern foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains of southern California. Banded gneisses include mafic granulites of two geochemical types: type 1 rocks are similar to high Al arc basalts and andesites but have higher HFSE (high-field-strength-element) abundances and extremely variable LILE (largeion-lithophile-element) abundances, while type 2 rocks are relatively low in Al and similar to alkali rich MOR (midocean-ridge) or intraplate basalts. Intercalated with mafic granulites are paragneisses which include felsic granulites, aluminous gneisses, marble, and calc-silicate gneisses. Type 1 mafic granulites and calcic trondhjemitic pegmatites also oceur as cross-cutting, synmetamorphic dikes or small plutons. Small-scale heterogeneity of deep continental crust is indicated by the lithologic and isotopic diversity of intercalated ortho-and paragneisses exposed in Cucamonga terrane. Geochemical and isotopic data indicate that K, Rb, and U depletion and Sm/Nd fractionation were associated with biotite +/- muscovite dehydration reactions in type 1 mafic granulites and aluminous gneisses during high-grade metamorphism. Field relations and model initial isotopic ratios imply a wide range of protolith ages, ranging from Early Proterozoic to Phanerozoic. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Archean crust-mantle geochemical differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope measurements on carbonatite complexes and komatiites can provide information on the geochemical character and geochemical evolution of the mantle, including the sub-continental mantle. Measurements on young samples establish the validity of the method. These are based on Sr, Nd and Pb data from the Tertiary-Mesozoic Gorgona komatiite and Sr and Pb data from the Cretaceous Oka carbonatite complex. In both cases the data describe a LIL element-depleted source similar to that observed presently in MORB. Carbonatite data have been used to study the mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield one billion years (1 AE) ago. The framework for this investigation was established by Bell et al., who showed that large areas of the province appear to be underlain by LIL element-depleted mantle (Sr-85/Sr-86=0.7028) at 1 AE ago. Additionally Bell et al. found four complexes to have higher initial Sr ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86=0.7038), which they correlated with less depleted (bulk earth?) mantle sources, or possibly crustal contamination. Pb isotope relationships in four of the complexes have been studied by Bell et al.

  5. Molybdenum mineralization related to the Yangtze's lower crust and differentiation in the Dabie Orogen: Evidence from the geochemical features of the Yaochong porphyry Mo deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing-Quan; Li, Bin; Shao, Yong-Jun; Lu, An-Huai; Lai, Jian-Qing; Li, Yong-Feng; Luo, Zheng-Zhuan

    2017-06-01

    The Dabie Orogen is a world-class case for large amounts of Mo mineralization in that it contains at least 10 porphyry Mo deposits with Mo metal reserves over 3 Mt from the time period of 156-110 Ma. However, the principal mechanism for the Mo mineralization remains controversial due to the lack of a precise definition of its source and shallow ore-forming process, which is essential to understand these rare large Mo deposits. Detailed geochronology, geochemistry, and isotopic data for ore-related granites and minerals were analyzed in order to place constraints on the massive Mo mineralization in the Dabie Orogen in eastern China. The Yaochong molybdenum orebodies were hosted in the transition belt and alteration zone between the granitic stocks and the Dabie Complex and were characterized as numerous veinlets with potassic, phyllic and propylitic alterations. The buried Yaochong granitic intrusions and associated molybdenum mineralization yield Early Cretaceous ages of magmatic activities at ca. 138 Ma and extremely similar Re-Os isotope ages for the corresponding Mo metallogenic event at ca. 137 Ma. The Yaochong monzogranite and granite porphyry belong to the highly fractionated I-type granites, which are believed to be derived from the dominantly Yangtze's lower crust mixed with the Northern Dabie Complex due to their geochemical and isotope features. The elemental diversity and isotopic homogeneity suggest that the formation of the Yaochong monzogranite involved the fractionation of biotite, garnet and minor feldspar and accessory minerals combined with a weak crustal assimilation process. In contrast, the granite porphyry was possibly generated by the partial melting of the same mixed lower continental crust via the differentiation process involving the fractionation of feldspar, apatite, and/or titanite. Fractional crystallization processes can significantly elevate the molybdenum concentration in the residual melts. The biotite fractional crystallization

  6. Melting of subducted continental crust: Geochemical evidence from Mesozoic granitoids in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt, east-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Syn-collisional and postcollisional granitoids are common in collisional orogens, and they were primarily produced by partial melting of subducted continental crust. This is exemplified by Mesozoic granitoids from the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt in east-central China. These granitoids were emplaced in small volumes in the Late Triassic (200-206 Ma) and the Late Jurassic (146-167 Ma) but massively in the Early Cretaceous (111-143 Ma). Nevertheless, all of them exhibit arc-like trace element distribution patterns and are enriched in Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions, indicating their origination from the ancient continental crust. They commonly contain relict zircons with Neoproterozoic and Triassic U-Pb ages, respectively, consistent with the protolith and metamorphic ages for ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metaigneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt. Some granitoids show low zircon δ18O values, and SIMS in-situ O isotope analysis reveals that the relict zircons with Neoproterozoic and Triassic U-Pb ages also commonly exhibit low δ18O values. Neoproterozoic U-Pb ages and low δ18O values are the two diagnostic features that distinguish the subducted South China Block from the obducted North China Block. Thus, the magma source of these Mesozoic granitoids has a genetic link to the subducted continental crust of the South China Block. On the other hand, these granitoids contain relict zircons with Paleoproterozoic and Archean U-Pb ages, which are present in both the South and North China Blocks. Taken together, the Mesozoic granitoids in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its hanging wall have their magma sources that are predominated by the continental crust of the South China Block with minor contributions from the continental crust of the North China Block. The Triassic continental collision between the South and North China Blocks brought the continental crust into the thickened orogen, where they underwent the three episodes of partial melting in the Late Triassic, Late

  7. Geochemical, oxygen, and neodymium isotope compositions of metasediments from the Abitibi greenstone belt and Pontiac Subprovince, Canada: Evidence for ancient crust and Archean terrane juxtaposition

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R.; Kerrich, R. ); Maas, R. )

    1993-02-01

    The Abitibi greenstone belt (AGB) and Pontiac Subprovince (PS) in the southwestern Superior Province are adjacent greenstone-plutonic and metasedimentary-dominated terranes, respectively, separated by a major fault zone. Metasediments from these two contrasting terranes are compared in terms of major- and trace-element and O- and Nd-isotope compositions, and detrital zircon ages. The following two compositional populations of metasediments are present in the low-grade, Abitibi southern volcanic zone: (1) a mafic-element-enriched population (MEP) characterized by flat, depleted REE patterns; enhanced Mg, Cr, Co, Ni, and Sc; low-incompatible-element contents; and minor or absent normalized negative troughs at Nb, Ta, and Ti; and (2) a low-mafic-element population (LMEP) featuring LREE-enriched patterns; enhanced Rb, Cs, Ba, Th, and U contents; and pronounced normalized negative troughs at Nb, Ta, and Ti. These geochemical features are interpreted to indicate that the MEP sediments were derived from an ultramafic- and mafic-dominated oceanic provenance, whereas the LMEP sediments represent mixtures of mafic and felsic are source rocks. The PS metasediments are essentially indistinguishable from Abitibi LMEP on the basis of major-element and transition metal abundances, suggesting comparable types of source rocks and degrees of maturity, but are distinct in terms of some trace elements and O-isotope compositions. The Pontiac metasediments are depleted in [sup 18]O and enriched in Cs, Ba, Pb, Th, U, Nb, Ta, Hf, Zr, and total REE and also have higher ratios of Rb/K, Cs/Rb, Ba/Rb, Ta/Nb, Th/La, and Ba/La relative to the Abitibi LMEP. Two subtypes of REE patterns have been identified in PS metasediments. The first subtype is interpreted to be derived from provenances of mixed mafic and felsic volcanic rocks, whereas the Eu-depleted type has features that are typical of post-Archean sediments or Archean K-rich granites and volcanic equivalents. 100 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Isotope-geochemical Nd-Sr evidence of Palaeoproterozoic plume magmatism in Fennoscandia and mantle-crust interaction on stages of layered intrusions formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Pavel; Bayanova, Tamara; Kunakkuzin, Evgeniy; Steshenko, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    Palaeoproterozoic Fennoscandian layered intrusions belong to the pyroxenite-gabbronorite-anorthosite formation and spread on a vast area within the Baltic Shield. Based on isotope U-Pb, Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr and Re-Os data the duration of this formation can be to 100-130 Ma (2.53-2.40 Ga) [Serov et. al., 2008; Bayanova et. al., 2009]. We have studied rocks of layered PGE-bearing Fedorovo-Pansky, Monchetundra, Burakovsky, Olanga group intrusions and Penikat intrusion. According to recent and new complex Nd-Sr-REE data magma source of the vast majority of these intrusions was a mantle reservoir with unusual characteristics: negative values of ɛNd (from 0 to -4) and ISr = 0.702-0.706, flat spectra of REE (value of (La/Yb)N ~ 1.0-5.8) with positive Eu-anomalies [Bayanova et. al., 2009; Bayanova et. al., 2014]. However, the distribution of REE for ore-bearing gabbronorite intrusions Penikat (Sm-Nd age is 2426 ± 38 Ma [Ekimova et. al., 2011]) has a negative Eu-anomalies. This may be due to the formation of plagioclase and its removal from the magma chamber. One of the aims of isotope geochemical investigations is to establish the contribution of mantle components in the formation of layered intrusions rocks and the degrees of contamination of the magma source by crustal material. To calculate the proportion of mantle component model binary mixture was used [Jahn et. al., 2000]. As the mantle components we used data for CHUR: ɛNd = 0, [Nd] = 1.324 [Palm, O'Neil, 2003] and for crustal components were used host-rocks Nd-data. The proportion of mantle component for the studied intrusions was 77-99%. Also, data were obtained for the Monchetundra dike complex and amphibolized gabbro, for which the proportion of mantle material was 20-40%. For these rocks a significant crustal contamination is most likely. This process resulted in low values of ɛNd, a direct relationship between ɛNd and Nd concentration, and significant differences between the U-Pb and Sm-Nd model ages. A

  9. Isotope-geochemical Nd-Sr evidence of Palaeoproterozoic plume magmatism in Fennoscandia and mantle-crust interaction on stages of layered intrusions formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, P.; Ekimova, N.; Bayanova, T.

    2012-04-01

    Palaeoproterozoic Fennoscandian layered intrusions belong to the pyroxenite-gabbronorite-anorthosite formation and spread on a vast area within the Baltic Shield. Based on isotope Sm-Nd and U-Pb data the duration of this formation can be to 130 Ma (2.53-2.40 Ga) [Serov et. al., 2008]. We have studied rocks of layered PGE-bearing Fedorovo-Pansky, Monchetundra, Burakovsky, Olanga group intrusions and Penikat intrusion. According to recent and new complex Nd-Sr-REE data magma source of the vast majority of these intrusions was a mantle reservoir with unusual characteristics: negative values of ɛNd (from 0 to -4) and ISr = 0.702-0.706, flat spectra of REE (value of (La/Yb)N ~ 1.0-5.8) with positive Eu-anomalies. However, the distribution of REE for ore-bearing gabbronorite intrusions Penikat (Sm-Nd age is 2426 ± 38 Ma [Ekimova et. al., 2011]) has a negative Eu-anomalies. This may be due to the formation of plagioclase and its removal from the magma chamber. One of the aims of isotope geochemical investigations is to establish the contribution of mantle components in the formation of layered intrusions rocks and the degrees of contamination of the magma source by crustal material. To calculate the proportion of mantle component model binary mixture was used [Jahn et. al., 2000]. As the mantle components we used data for CHUR: ɛNd = 0, [Nd] = 1.324 [Palm, O'Neil, 2003]. The proportion of mantle component for the studied intrusions was 77-99%. Also, data were obtained for the Monchetundra dike complex and amphibolized gabbro, for which the proportion of mantle material was 20-40%. For these rocks a significant crustal contamination is most likely. This process resulted in low values of ɛNd, a direct relationship between ɛNd and Nd concentration, and significant differences between the U-Pb and Sm-Nd model ages. A characteristic feature is that in most cases, the proportion of mantle component decreases from the central parts of intrusions to their boundary zones

  10. Hydrothermal hydration of Martian crust: illustration via geochemical model calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, L. L.; Shock, E. L.

    1997-01-01

    If hydrothermal Systems existed on Mars, hydration of crustal rocks may have had the potential to affect the water budget of the planet. We have conducted geochemical model calculations to investigate the relative roles of host rock composition, temperature, water-to-rock ratio, and initial fluid oxygen fugacity on the mineralogy of hydrothermal alteration assemblages, as well as the effectiveness of alteration to store water in the crust as hydrous minerals. In order to place calculations for Mars in perspective, models of hydrothermal alteration of three genetically related Icelandic volcanics (a basalt, andesite, and rhyolite) are presented, together with results for compositions based on SNC meteorite samples (Shergotty and Chassigny). Temperatures from 150 degrees C to 250 degrees C, water-to-rock ratios from 0.1 to 1000, and two initial fluid oxygen fugacities are considered in the models. Model results for water-to-rock ratios less than 10 are emphasized because they are likely to be more applicable to Mars. In accord with studies of low-grade alteration of terrestrial rocks, we find that the major controls on hydrous mineral production are host rock composition and temperature. Over the range of conditions considered, the alteration of Shergotty shows the greatest potential for storing water as hydrous minerals, and the alteration of Icelandic rhyolite has the lowest potential.

  11. Hydrothermal hydration of Martian crust: illustration via geochemical model calculations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, L L; Shock, E L

    1997-04-25

    If hydrothermal Systems existed on Mars, hydration of crustal rocks may have had the potential to affect the water budget of the planet. We have conducted geochemical model calculations to investigate the relative roles of host rock composition, temperature, water-to-rock ratio, and initial fluid oxygen fugacity on the mineralogy of hydrothermal alteration assemblages, as well as the effectiveness of alteration to store water in the crust as hydrous minerals. In order to place calculations for Mars in perspective, models of hydrothermal alteration of three genetically related Icelandic volcanics (a basalt, andesite, and rhyolite) are presented, together with results for compositions based on SNC meteorite samples (Shergotty and Chassigny). Temperatures from 150 degrees C to 250 degrees C, water-to-rock ratios from 0.1 to 1000, and two initial fluid oxygen fugacities are considered in the models. Model results for water-to-rock ratios less than 10 are emphasized because they are likely to be more applicable to Mars. In accord with studies of low-grade alteration of terrestrial rocks, we find that the major controls on hydrous mineral production are host rock composition and temperature. Over the range of conditions considered, the alteration of Shergotty shows the greatest potential for storing water as hydrous minerals, and the alteration of Icelandic rhyolite has the lowest potential.

  12. Evolution of the earth's crust: Evidence from comparative planetology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Geochemical data and orbital photography from Apollo, Mariner, and Venera missions were combined with terrestrial geologic evidence to study the problem of why the earth has two contrasting types of crust (oceanic and continental). The following outline of terrestrial crustal evolution is proposed. A global crust of intermediate to acidic composition, high in aluminum, was formed by igneous processes early in the earth's history; portions survive in some shield areas as granitic and anorthositic gneisses. This crust was fractured by major impacts and tectonic processes, followed by basaltic eruptions analogous to the lunar maria and the smooth plains of the north hemisphere of Mars. Seafloor spreading and subduction ensued, during which portions of the early continental crust and sediments derived therefrom were thrust under the remaining continental crust. The process is exemplified today in regions such as the Andes/Peru-Chile trench system. Underplating may have been roughly concentric, and the higher radioactive element content of the underplated sialic material could thus eventually cause concentric zones of regional metamorphism and magmatism.

  13. Geochemical Evidence for a Terrestrial Magma Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agee, Carl B.

    1999-01-01

    The aftermath of phase separation and crystal-liquid fractionation in a magma ocean should leave a planet geochemically differentiated. Subsequent convective and other mixing processes may operate over time to obscure geochemical evidence of magma ocean differentiation. On the other hand, core formation is probably the most permanent, irreversible part of planetary differentiation. Hence the geochemical traces of core separation should be the most distinct remnants left behind in the mantle and crust, In the case of the Earth, core formation apparently coincided with a magma ocean that extended to a depth of approximately 1000 km. Evidence for this is found in high pressure element partitioning behavior of Ni and Co between liquid silicate and liquid iron alloy, and with the Ni-Co ratio and the abundance of Ni and Co in the Earth's upper mantle. A terrestrial magma ocean with a depth of 1000 km will solidify from the bottom up and first crystallize in the perovskite stability field. The largest effect of perovskite fractionation on major element distribution is to decrease the Si-Mg ratio in the silicate liquid and increase the Si-Mg ratio in the crystalline cumulate. Therefore, if a magma ocean with perovskite fractionation existed, then one could expect to observe an upper mantle with a lower than chondritic Si-Mg ratio. This is indeed observed in modern upper mantle peridotites. Although more experimental work is needed to fully understand the high-pressure behavior of trace element partitioning, it is likely that Hf is more compatible than Lu in perovskite-silicate liquid pairs. Thus, perovskite fractionation produces a molten mantle with a higher than chondritic Lu-Hf ratio. Arndt and Blichert-Toft measured Hf isotope compositions of Barberton komatiites that seem to require a source region with a long-lived, high Lu-Hf ratio. It is plausible that that these Barberton komatiites were generated within the majorite stability field by remelting a perovskite

  14. No evidence for Hadean continental crust within Earth's oldest evolved rock unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimink, J. R.; Davies, J. H. F. L.; Chacko, T.; Stern, R. A.; Heaman, L. M.; Sarkar, C.; Schaltegger, U.; Creaser, R. A.; Pearson, D. G.

    2016-10-01

    Due to the acute scarcity of very ancient rocks, the composition of Earth's embryonic crust during the Hadean eon (>4.0 billion years ago) is a critical unknown in our search to understand how the earliest continents evolved. Whether the Hadean Earth was dominated by mafic-composition crust, similar to today's oceanic crust, or included significant amounts of continental crust remains an unsolved question that carries major implications for the earliest atmosphere, the origin of life, and the geochemical evolution of the crust-mantle system. Here we present new U-Pb and Hf isotope data on zircons from the only precisely dated Hadean rock unit on Earth--a 4,019.6 +/- 1.8 Myr tonalitic gneiss unit in the Acasta Gneiss Complex, Canada. Combined zircon and whole-rock geochemical data from this ancient unit shows no indication of derivation from, or interaction with, older Hadean continental crust. Instead, the data provide the first direct evidence that the oldest known evolved crust on Earth was generated from an older ultramafic or mafic reservoir that probably surfaced the early Earth.

  15. Geochemical characteristics and metal element enrichment in crusts from seamounts of the Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Kechao; Du, Yong; Zhang, Fuyuan; Zhang, Weiyan; Ren, Xiangwen; Jiang, Binbin; Huang, Dasong

    2016-03-01

    Elemental geochemistry is an essential part of understanding mineralization mechanisms. In this paper, a data set of 544 cobalt crust samples from seamounts of the Western Pacific are used to study the enrichment characteristics of metal elements. REE normalization is utilized to reveal the origin of the crusts; effects of water depth on Co enrichment and impacts of phosphatization on mineral quality are discussed to obtain the evolution of these marine mineral deposits, which gives support to further resource assessment. Conclusions are reached as follows: 1) Elemental abundances, inter-element relationships, and shale-normalized REE patterns for phosphate-poor crusts from different locations reflect hydrogenetic origin of the crusts. EFs (enrichment coefficients) of REE exhibit exponential increase from surface sediments to phosphorite to polymetallic nodules to crusts, suggesting that the improved degree of hydrogeneous origin induces the enrichment of REE. 2) The crusts in the Western Pacific, formed through hotspot produced guyots trails, have relatively lower REE than those in the Mid-Pacific. The latter could be attributed to the peculiar submarine topography of seamounts formed by intraplate volcanism. 3) The non-phosphatized younger crust layers have 40% higher Co than the phosphatized older layers. This indicates the modification of the elemental composition in these crusts by phosphatization. A general depletion of hydroxide-dominated elements such as Co, Ni, and Mn and enrichment of P, Ca, Ba, and Sr is evident in phosphatized crusts, whereas non-phosphatized younger generation crusts are rich in terrigenous aluminosilicate detrital matter. 4) Co increases above the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) from less than 0.53% to over 0.65% in seamount regions with water depth of less than 2,500 m, suggesting the significance of the dissolution of carbonate in the sea water column to the growth and composition of crusts.

  16. Geochemical study of black crusts as a diagnostic tool in cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Russa, Mauro F.; Belfiore, Cristina M.; Comite, Valeria; Barca, Donatella; Bonazza, Alessandra; Ruffolo, Silvestro A.; Crisci, Gino M.; Pezzino, Antonino

    2013-12-01

    This contribution focuses on spectrometric analyses carried out on crust samples covering the stone surface of the boundary walls of the Tower of London. The main goal of this research is to investigate the degradation processes related to the environmental impact on cultural heritage. Specifically, the chemical contamination of stone substrate in the Tower of London due to the crust formation was examined through laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique allowed us to achieve a complete characterization of the damage layers in terms of trace elements. In addition, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and infrared spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR) were also used for an exhaustive characterization of the examined samples. Results obtained demonstrated that such a geochemical approach represents a powerful diagnostic tool in the study of black crusts, since it represents a reliable indicator of the environmental pollution. The higher concentrations of most heavy metals in black crusts with respect to the underlying stone suggest that crusts were greatly influenced by atmospheric inputs in their formation, mainly represented by mobile combustion sources. In addition, the possibility of analyzing in some samples the portion of altered substrate allowed us to hypothesize that some specific heavy metals tend to migrate from the crust to the unaltered substrate over time, becoming catalysts for the formation of new crust. Therefore, this research focuses on the role of diagnostics in order to plan suitable cleaning and consolidation intervention aimed at a better protection of the monument.

  17. Anatexis in Himalayan Crust: Evidences and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Ma, J.

    2004-12-01

    Here we present results of chemical features of migmatites in Higher Himalayan Crystallines (HHC) and K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of the leucosomes (type-I and type-II) in the migmatites. The mass leucosomes distributed in HHC were generated by partial melting and consequently they are ideal specimens to determine the timing of anatexis, to study the relationship between migmatization and leucogranite formation, and to understand the role of partial melting in crustal evolution in continental collision orogenic belt. Mass balance relationship among mesosome, type-I leucosome and melanosome implies that they are likely generated in the same process. The compositions of Type-I leucosome are identical with those of melt produced by dehydration melting of biotite-plagioclase gneiss but different from those of type-II leucosome which compositions are similar to HHL. These compositional characteristics of leucosomes reflect that Type-I leucosome is the product of crystallization from melt generated by partial melting of mesosome in the source region, but Type-II leucosome and HHL probably underwent crystallization differentiation of plagioclase during melt aggregation and migration. Prime partial melting occurred at 22.7-24.7 Ma based on the date of type-I leucosome. The ages of type-II leucosomes (ranging from 14.82 to 18.37 Ma) are consistent with that of HHL. Very young age of 6.2-8.3 Ma of type-II leucosome provides a new time constraint on magma activity in the central segment of Higher Himalayas. These ages reveal some dynamic correlation summarized as follows. (1) The age of about 24 Ma (the beginning of anatexis), which is a little younger than that of MCT movement, does not support the view that anatexis was derived from MCT movement; on the contrary, but rather, the anatexis may have played an important role in the formation of MCT and Southern Tibetan Detachment System. (2) Decompression melting associated with STDS movement and crust uplifting contributed greatly to

  18. A Detailed Geochemical Study of Island Arc Crust: The Talkeetna Arc Section, South-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, A. R.; Debari, S. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Clift, P. D.; Blusztajn, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Talkeetna arc section in south-central Alaska is recognized as the exposed upper mantle and crust of an accreted, Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic island arc. Detailed geochemical studies of layered gabbronorite from the middle and lower crust of this arc and a diverse suite of volcanic and plutonic rocks from the middle and upper crust provide crucial data for understanding arc magma evolution. We also present new data on parental magma compositions for the arc. The deepest level of the arc section consists of residual mantle and ultramafic cumulates adjacent to garnet gabbro and basal gabbronorite interlayered with pyroxenite. The middle crust is primarily layered gabbronorite, ranging from anorthosite to pyroxenite in composition, and is the most widespread plutonic lithology. The upper mid crust is a heterogenous assemblage of dioritic to tonalitic rocks mixed with gabbro and intruded by abundant mafic dikes and chilled pillows. The upper crust of the arc is comprised of volcanic rocks of the Talkeetna Formation ranging from basalt to rhyolite. Most of these volcanic rocks have evolved compositions (<5% MgO, Mg# <60) and overlap the composition of intermediate to felsic plutonic rocks (<3.5% MgO, Mg# <45). However, several chilled mafic rocks and one basalt have primitive characteristics (>8% MgO, Mg# >60). Ion microprobe analyses of clinopyroxene in mid-crustal layered gabbronorites have parallel REE patterns with positive-sloping LREE segments (La/Sm(N)=0.05-0.17; mean 0.11) and flat HREE segments (5-25xchondrite; mean 10xchondrite). Liquids in REE equilibrium with the clinopyroxene in these gabbronorite cumulates were calculated in order to constrain parental magmas. These calculated liquids(La/Sm(N)=0.77-1.83; mean 1.26) all fall within the range of dike and volcanic rock(La/Sm(N)=0.78-2.12; mean 1.23) compositions. However, three lavas out of the 44 we have analyzed show strong HREE depletion, which is not observed in any of the liquid compositions

  19. Petrologic, Geochemical and Isotopic Study of 3.1Ga Peridotite-Chromitite Suite from the Western Dharwar Craton, India: Evidence for Recycling of Oceanic Crust in the Mesoarchean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, S. K.; Mukherjee, R.; Rosing, M. T.; Frei, R.; Waight, T.

    2008-12-01

    0.50880±0.000171 with a corresponding average ɛNd value of +3.7 (range from -0.63 to +10.75). For these rocks this is consistent with an origin from a long-term depleted source region. The peridotitic rocks have nearly flat REE patterns with slight LREE enrichment whereas the mafic suites from the schist belts are variably enriched in LREE relative to HREE. Most of the samples display positive HFSE (Ta, Nb, Zr, Hf, Ti)-anomalies with negative Th-anomalies. The HFSE character together with positive ɛNd values strongly suggest derivation of the parental komatiitic magma from a long term depleted mantle source that was enriched by recycled oceanic crust due to early subduction processes. Our study suggests suprasubduction processes were important during early crustal evolution of the Earth. Reference: Bidyananda M., Deomurari M. P., Goswami J. N. (2003) Current Science, v.85, pp.1482-1485.

  20. Geochemical processes during long-distance lateral magma transport within upper crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Geshi, N.; Mochizuki, N.; Taylor, R. N.

    2013-12-01

    Recent geophysical observations demonstrate that magma is transported long distances from volcanic centers by dyke propagation (e.g., Miyakejima volcano: Geshi et al., 2002; Hachijojima volcano: Ishizuka et al., 2008). However, studying the physical and chemical properties of upper crustal fissures and intrusions in active volcanic systems is difficult. We have chosen to utilize the extensive dyke networks of the British Tertiary Volcanic Province that are exposed within the upper crust to investigate the processes occurring during magma transport. Lineations within dykes formed by bubble and crystal alignment indicate that the direction of magma flow gradually changed with distance from the volcanic center. Adjacent to the Mull volcanic center the dominant flow direction is near vertical to high-angle, while beyond c. 50km the flow direction is essentially horizontal. These observations indicate that the dykes extending southeast from Mull were fed by laterally-transported magma from this volcanic center. Geochemically, the dykes show two distinct trends: one representing magmatic differentiation and the other crustal assimilation. Assimilation is most clearly recognized in the correlations between radiogenic isotopes and major elements (e.g., SiO2 vs. 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd), and in the relationships between trace element ratios or ΔNb. Potential assimilants in the studied area are the lower crust, which is likely to be dominated by Lewisian gneiss, and the upper crust, featuring schists of sedimentary origin. Most of the dykes lie along a distinct isotopic trend from the Mull Plateau Group (MPG) lavas; these being a likely equivalent composition to the initial magmas before displacement along the fissures. Isotopically, these lavas reflect a contribution of lower crustal material (with low143Nd/144Nd, 206Pb/204Pb and Th/Ce) to the MORB-type asthenospheric mantle. In contrast, the dykes, except for some proximal samples, can be explained by addition of upper

  1. Deep mantle cycling of oceanic crust: evidence from diamonds and their mineral inclusions.

    PubMed

    Walter, M J; Kohn, S C; Araujo, D; Bulanova, G P; Smith, C B; Gaillou, E; Wang, J; Steele, A; Shirey, S B

    2011-10-07

    A primary consequence of plate tectonics is that basaltic oceanic crust subducts with lithospheric slabs into the mantle. Seismological studies extend this process to the lower mantle, and geochemical observations indicate return of oceanic crust to the upper mantle in plumes. There has been no direct petrologic evidence, however, of the return of subducted oceanic crustal components from the lower mantle. We analyzed superdeep diamonds from Juina-5 kimberlite, Brazil, which host inclusions with compositions comprising the entire phase assemblage expected to crystallize from basalt under lower-mantle conditions. The inclusion mineralogies require exhumation from the lower to upper mantle. Because the diamond hosts have carbon isotope signatures consistent with surface-derived carbon, we conclude that the deep carbon cycle extends into the lower mantle.

  2. Deep Mantle Cycling of Oceanic Crust: Evidence from Diamonds and Their Mineral Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. J.; Kohn, S. C.; Araujo, D.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Gaillou, E.; Wang, J.; Steele, A.; Shirey, S. B.

    2011-10-01

    A primary consequence of plate tectonics is that basaltic oceanic crust subducts with lithospheric slabs into the mantle. Seismological studies extend this process to the lower mantle, and geochemical observations indicate return of oceanic crust to the upper mantle in plumes. There has been no direct petrologic evidence, however, of the return of subducted oceanic crustal components from the lower mantle. We analyzed superdeep diamonds from Juina-5 kimberlite, Brazil, which host inclusions with compositions comprising the entire phase assemblage expected to crystallize from basalt under lower-mantle conditions. The inclusion mineralogies require exhumation from the lower to upper mantle. Because the diamond hosts have carbon isotope signatures consistent with surface-derived carbon, we conclude that the deep carbon cycle extends into the lower mantle.

  3. Assessment of the effects of air pollution on european monuments through a geochemical characterization of black crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comite, Valeria; Barca, Donatella; Belfiore, Cristina Maria; Bonazza, Alessandra; La Russa, Mauro Francesco; Ruffolo, SIlvestro Antonio; Pezzino, Antonino; Sabbioni, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    This contribution focuses on spectrometric analyses carried out on black crust samples, collected from buildings and churches belonging to the European built Heritage, i.e., the Corner Palace in Venice (Italy), the Cathedral of St. Rombouts in Mechelen (Belgium), the Church of St. Eustache in Paris (France) and the Tower of London (United Kingdom). Such monuments, all built in carbonate stones, were selected for their historic and artistic relevance, as well as for their location in different urban environments. For an exhaustive account of the sampled black crusts, an approach integrating complementary techniques was used, including OM, SEM-EDS, FT-IR and LA-ICP-MS. The complete characterization of the damage layers provided information on their chemical composition, the state of conservation of the underlying substrates and the interactions between crusts and stones. In particular, the geochemical study in terms of trace elements revealed that all crusts are enriched in heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, Ti, V, and Zn) compared to substrates. The different concentrations of such elements in all analyzed crust samples can be ascribed to several factors, such as: height of sampling, morphology of the sampled surfaces (vertical or horizontal), exposure to atmospheric agents as well as to direct (road or boat traffic) or indirect (industries) sources of pollution, accumulation time of pollutants on the surface, wash out and particulate air pollution. Specifically, the crusts collected at lower heights (Corner Palace, Cathedral of St. Rombouts, Tower of London) resulted to be mainly influenced by mobile sources of pollution (vehicular or boat traffic), while samples taken at higher heights (Church of St. Eustache and Corner Palace) are generally mostly affected by stationary combustion sources. In some cases, the detailed analysis of multilayered crusts (Palazzo Corner) contributed to recognize the variation of combustion sources responsible

  4. Predictions of hydrothermal alteration within near-ridge oceanic crust from coordinated geochemical and fluid flow models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetzel, L.R.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Shock, E.L.

    2001-01-01

    Coordinated geochemical and hydrological calculations guide our understanding of the composition, fluid flow patterns, and thermal structure of near-ridge oceanic crust. The case study presented here illustrates geochemical and thermal changes taking place as oceanic crust ages from 0.2 to 1.0 Myr. Using a finite element code, we model fluid flow and heat transport through the upper few hundred meters of an abyssal hill created at an intermediate spreading rate. We use a reaction path model with a customized database to calculate equilibrium fluid compositions and mineral assemblages of basalt and seawater at 500 bars and temperatures ranging from 150 to 400??C. In one scenario, reaction path calculations suggest that volume increases on the order of 10% may occur within portions of the basaltic basement. If this change in volume occurred, it would be sufficient to fill all primary porosity in some locations, effectively sealing off portions of the oceanic crust. Thermal profiles resulting from fluid flow simulations indicate that volume changes along this possible reaction path occur primarily within the first 0.4 Myr of crustal aging. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Titanite evidence for Triassic thickened lower crust along southeastern margin of North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing-Liang; Gao, Shan; Wu, Yuan-Bao; Hu, Zhao-Chu; Xu, Wen-Liang; Zong, Ke-Qing; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Yuan, Hong-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Titanite U-Pb isotopic and major and trace element compositions of one mafic garnet granulite from a rare suite of lower crustal xenoliths (e.g., eclogite, garnet pyroxenite, and mafic garnet granulite) hosted in Early Cretaceous dioritic porphyries in the Xu-Huai area along the southeastern margin of the North China Craton (NCC) were analyzed by laser ablation ICP-MS. Titanite occurs as granular grains or coronary rims on rutile. The coronary titanite is clearly a secondary product of rutile decomposition. The granular titanite exhibits zonation in U-Pb age and chemical composition. Petrographic and geochemical evidence suggests that the zonation was formed by thermal diffusion and later fluid-assisted recrystallization. Occurrences of granular titanite between garnet grains point to a pressure of > 10 kbar, while inclusions of rutile inside granular titanite rims imply that the pressure might have reached 15 kbar. Granular titanite cores give U-Pb ages of 237-241 Ma and Zr-temperatures of 794-831 °C at 10 kbar and 850-892 °C at 15 kbar, indicating high-pressure granulite-facies metamorphism. Together with previous P-T estimates of coeval eclogite-facies xenoliths, a geotherm of above 60 mW m- 2 is implied. The geotherm plots below the temperature field of amphibole dehydration melting, consistent with presence of abundant amphibole. This geotherm is similar to that of the Kohistan arc, which has preserved a 12-km-thick dense lower crust, but significantly cooler than the geotherm of the Talkeetna arc, where most of the dense lower crust has been foundered. Our results provide new evidence for Triassic thickened dense lower crust along the southeastern margin of the NCC. By comparison with the Kohistan and Talkeetna arc crusts, we suggest that this dense lower crust was not hot enough to be foundered in the Triassic. Foundering must have occurred in the Jurassic-Cretaceous in order to explain the present-day seismic velocity structure characterized by a sharp

  6. Geochemical investigation of Gabbroic Xenoliths from Hualalai Volcano: Implications for lower oceanic crust accretion and Hualalai Volcano magma storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruohan; Lassiter, John C.; Barnes, Jaime D.; Clague, David A.; Bohrson, Wendy A.

    2016-05-01

    The patterns of axial hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges both affect and are influenced by the styles of magma plumbing. Therefore, the intensity and distribution of hydrothermal alteration in the lower oceanic crust (LOC) can provide constraints on LOC accretion models (e.g., ;gabbro glacier; vs. ;multiple sills;). Gabbroic xenoliths from Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii include rare fragments of in situ Pacific lower oceanic crust. Oxygen and strontium isotope compositions of 16 LOC-derived Hualalai gabbros are primarily within the range of fresh MORB, indicating minimal hydrothermal alteration of the in situ Pacific LOC, in contrast to pervasive alteration recorded in LOC xenoliths from the Canary Islands. This difference may reflect less hydrothermal alteration of LOC formed at fast ridges than at slow ridges. Mid-ocean ridge magmas from slow ridges also pond on average at greater and more variable depths and undergo less homogenization than those from fast ridges. These features are consistent with LOC accretion resembling the ;multiple sills; model at slow ridges. In contrast, shallow magma ponding and limited hydrothermal alteration in LOC at fast ridges are consistent with the presence of a long-lived shallow magma lens, which limits the penetration of hydrothermal circulation into the LOC. Most Hualalai gabbros have geochemical and petrologic characteristics indicating derivation from Hualalai shield-stage and post-shield-stage cumulates. These xenoliths provide information on the evolution of Hawaiian magmas and magma storage systems. MELTS modeling and equilibration temperatures constrain the crystallization pressures of 7 Hualalai shield-stage-related gabbros to be ∼2.5-5 kbar, generally consistent with inferred local LOC depth. Therefore a deep magma reservoir existed within or at the base of the LOC during the shield stage of Hualalai Volcano. Melt-crust interaction between Hawaiian melts and in situ Pacific crust during magma storage partially

  7. Arc-continent collision and the formation of continental crust: A new geochemical and isotopic record from the Ordovician Tyrone Igneous Complex, Ireland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Schouten, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Collisions between oceanic island-arc terranes and passive continental margins are thought to have been important in the formation of continental crust throughout much of Earth's history. Magmatic evolution during this stage of the plate-tectonic cycle is evident in several areas of the Ordovician Grampian-Taconic orogen, as we demonstrate in the first detailed geochemical study of the Tyrone Igneous Complex, Ireland. New U-Pb zircon dating yields ages of 493 2 Ma from a primitive mafic intrusion, indicating intra-oceanic subduction in Tremadoc time, and 475 10 Ma from a light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched tonalite intrusion that incorporated Laurentian continental material by early Arenig time (Early Ordovician, Stage 2) during arc-continent collision. Notably, LREE enrichment in volcanism and silicic intrusions of the Tyrone Igneous Complex exceeds that of average Dalradian (Laurentian) continental material that would have been thrust under the colliding forearc and potentially recycled into arc magmatism. This implies that crystal fractionation, in addition to magmatic mixing and assimilation, was important to the formation of new crust in the Grampian-Taconic orogeny. Because similar super-enrichment of orogenic melts occurred elsewhere in the Caledonides in the British Isles and Newfoundland, the addition of new, highly enriched melt to this accreted arc terrane was apparently widespread spatially and temporally. Such super-enrichment of magmatism, especially if accompanied by loss of corresponding lower crustal residues, supports the theory that arc-continent collision plays an important role in altering bulk crustal composition toward typical values for ancient continental crust. ?? 2009 Geological Society of London.

  8. Evolution of continental crust and mantle heterogeneity: Evidence from Hf isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jonathan, Patchett P.; Kouvo, O.; Hedge, C.E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1982-01-01

    We present initial 176Hf/177 Hf ratios for many samples of continental crust 3.7-0.3 Gy old. Results are based chiefly on zircons (1% Hf) and whole rocks: zircons are shown to be reliable carriers of essentially the initial Hf itself when properly chosen on the basis of U-Pb studies. Pre-3.0 Gy gneisses were apparently derived from an unfractionated mantle, but both depleted and undepleted mantle are evident as magma sources from 2.9 Gy to present. This mantle was sampled mainly from major crustal growth episodes 2.8, 1.8 and 0.7 Gy ago, all of which show gross heterogeneity of 176Hf/177Hf in magma sources from ??Hf=0 to +14, or about 60% of the variability of the present mantle. The approximate ??Hf=2??Nd relationship in ancient and modern igneous rocks shows that 176Lu/177Hf fractionates in general twice as much as 147Sm/144Nd in mantle melting processes. This allows an estimation of the relative value of the unknown bulk solid/liquid distribution coefficient for Hf. DLu/DHf=??? 2.3 holds for most mantle source regions. For garnet to be an important residual mantle phase, it must hold Hf strongly in order to preserve Hf-Nd isotopic relationships. The ancient Hf initials are consistent with only a small proportion of recycled older cratons in new continental crust, and with quasi-continuous, episodic growth of the continental crust with time. However, recycling of crust less than 150 My old cannot realistically be detected using Hf initials. The mantle shows clearly the general positive ??Hf resulting from a residual geochemical state at least back to 2.9 Gy ago, and seems to have repeatedly possessed a similar degree of heterogeneity, rather than a continuously-developing depletion. This is consistent with a complex dynamic disequilibrium model for the creation, maintenance and destruction of heterogeneity in the mantle. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Genomic evidence for the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation in warm basaltic ocean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Fisk, M. R.; Mueller, R.; Colwell, F. S.; Mason, O. U.; Popa, R.

    2016-12-01

    Microbial life in the deep suboceanic aquifer can harness geochemical energy resulting from water-rock reactions and contribute to carbon cycling in the ocean via primary production, or chemosynthesis. Iron-bearing minerals such as olivine in oceanic crust can produce molecular hydrogen, small molecular weight hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide as they react with seawater. Although this generally occurs in serpentinizing systems at very high temperatures deep in the subsurface, it has also been hypothesized to drive the subseafloor microbial ecosystems present in shallower basaltic aquifers. We present genome-based evidence for chemolithoautotrophic microbes present on the surface of olivine incubated in Juan de Fuca Ridge basaltic ocean crust for a 4-year period. These metagenome-derived genomes show dominant taxa capable of using both branches of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation and energy generation. This pathway uses molecular hydrogen potentially derived from the olivine surface as it reacts with seawater and CO2 which is inherent to seawater. These taxa were not reported from aquifer fluid samples, but have been found only in association with mineral surfaces in this study location. Most taxa in this simple community are distant relatives of cultured taxa; therefore this genome information is crucial to understanding how the subseafloor aquifer community is structured, how it obtains energy, how it cycles carbon, and gives us keys to help cultivate these organisms in the laboratory. Our findings also support the Subsurface Lithoautotrophic Microbial Ecosystem (SLiME) hypothesis and have implications for understanding life on early Earth and the potential for life in the Martian subsurface.

  10. Continental basalts record the crust-mantle interaction in oceanic subduction channel: A geochemical case study from eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2017-09-01

    Continental basalts, erupted in either flood or rift mode, usually show oceanic island basalts (OIB)-like geochemical compositions. Although their depletion in Sr-Nd isotope compositions is normally ascribed to contributions from the asthenospheric mantle, their enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) is generally associated with variable enrichments in the Sr-Nd isotope compositions. This indicates significant contributions from crustal components such as igneous oceanic crust, lower continental crust and seafloor sediment. Nevertheless, these crustal components were not incorporated into the mantle sources of continental basalts in the form of solidus rocks. Instead they were processed into metasomatic agents through low-degree partial melting in order to have the geochemical fractionation of the largest extent to achieve the enrichment of LILE and LREE in the metasomatic agents. Therefore, the mantle sources of continental basalts were generated by metasomatic reaction of the depleted mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) mantle with hydrous felsic melts. Nevertheless, mass balance considerations indicate differential contributions from the mantle and crustal components to the basalts. While the depleted MORB mantle predominates the budget of major elements, the crustal components predominate the budget of melt-mobile incompatible trace elements and their pertinent radiogenic isotopes. These considerations are verified by model calculations that are composed of four steps in an ancient oceanic subduction channel: (1) dehydration of the subducting crustal rocks at subarc depths, (2) anataxis of the dehydrated rocks at postarc depths, (3) metasomatic reaction of the depleted MORB mantle peridotite with the felsic melts to generate ultramafic metasomatites in the lower part of the mantle wedge, and (4) partial melting of the metasomatites for basaltic magmatism. The composition of metasomatites is quantitatively dictated by

  11. Pb isotopic evidence for early Archaean crust in South Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, P. N.; Kalsbeek, F.

    1986-01-01

    The results of an isotopic remote sensing study focussed on delineating the extent of Early Archean crust north and south of the Nuuk area and in south Greenland is presented. Contamination of the Late Archean Nuk gneisses and equivalents by unradiogenic Pb uniquely characteristic of Amitsoq gneiss was detected as far south as Sermilik about 70 km south of Nuuk and only as far north as the mouth of Godthabsfjord. This study was extended to the southern part of the Archean craton and the adjoining Early Proterozoic Ketilidian orogenic belt where the Pb isotopes suggest several episodes of reworking of older uranium depleted continental crust. The technique of using the Pb isotope character of younger felsic rocks, in this case Late Archean and Early Proterozoic gneisses and granites to sense the age and isotopic character of older components, is a particularly powerful tool for reconstructing the evolutionary growth and development of continental crust.

  12. Geochemical and Nd-Sr-Pb isotope characteristics of synorogenic lower crust-derived granodiorites (Central Damara orogen, Namibia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, I.; Jung, S.; Romer, R. L.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Berndt, J.

    2017-03-01

    The 547 ± 7 Ma old Achas intrusion (Damara orogen, Namibia) includes magnesian, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous, calcic to calc-alkalic granodiorites and ferroan, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous, calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic leucogranites. For the granodiorites, major and trace element variations show weak if any evidence for fractional crystallization whereas some leucogranites are highly fractionated. Both, granodiorites and leucogranites are isotopically evolved (granodiorites: εNdinit: - 12.4 to - 20.5; TDM: 2.4-1.9; leucogranites: εNdinit: - 12.1 to - 20.6, TDM: 2.5-2.0), show similar Pb isotopic compositions, and may be derived from late Archean to Paleoproterozoic crustal source rocks. Comparison with melting experiments and simple partial melting modeling indicate that the granodiorites may be derived by extensive melting (> 40%) at 900-950 °C under water-undersaturated conditions (< 5 wt.% H2O) of felsic gneisses. Al-Ti and zircon saturation thermometry of the most primitive granodiorite sample yielded temperatures of ca. 930 °C and ca. 800 °C. In contrast to other lower crust-derived granodiorites and granites of the Central Damara orogen, the composition of the magma source is considered the first-order cause of the compositional diversity of the Achas granite. Second-order processes such as fractional crystallization at least for the granodiorites were minor and evidence for coupled assimilation-fractional crystallization processes is lacking. The most likely petrogenetic model involves high temperature partial melting of a Paleoproterozoic felsic source in the lower crust ca. 10-20 Ma before the first peak of regional high-temperature metamorphism. Underplating of the lower crust by magmas derived from the lithospheric mantle may have provided the heat for melting of the basement to produce anhydrous granodioritic melts.

  13. Plutonic xenoliths from Martinique, Lesser Antilles: evidence for open system processes and reactive melt flow in island arc crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, George F.; Davidson, Jon P.; Blundy, Jon D.

    2016-10-01

    The Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc is remarkable for the abundance and variety of erupted plutonic xenoliths. These samples provide a window into the deeper crust and record a more protracted crystallisation history than is observed from lavas alone. We present a detailed petrological and in situ geochemical study of xenoliths from Martinique in order to establish their petrogenesis, pre-eruptive storage conditions and their contribution to construction of the sub-volcanic arc crust. The lavas from Martinique are controlled by crystal-liquid differentiation. Amphibole is rarely present in the erupted lavas, but it is a very common component in plutonic xenoliths, allowing us to directly test the involvement of amphibole in the petrogenesis of arc magmas. The plutonic xenoliths provide both textural and geochemical evidence of open system processes and crystal `cargos'. All xenoliths are plagioclase-bearing, with variable proportions of olivine, spinel, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and amphibole, commonly with interstitial melt. In Martinique, the sequence of crystallisation varies in sample type and differs from other islands of the Lesser Antilles arc. The compositional offset between plagioclase (~An90) and olivine (~Fo75), suggests crystallisation under high water contents and low pressures from an already fractionated liquid. Texturally, amphibole is either equant (crystallising early in the sequence) or interstitial (crystallising late). Interstitial amphibole is enriched in Ba and LREE compared with early crystallised amphibole and does not follow typical fractionation trends. Modelling of melt compositions indicates that a water-rich, plagioclase-undersaturated reactive melt or fluid percolated through a crystal mush, accompanied by the breakdown of clinopyroxene, and the crystallisation of amphibole. Geothermobarometry estimates and comparisons with experimental studies imply the majority of xenoliths formed in the mid-crust. Martinique cumulate xenoliths are

  14. Geochemical Evidence of Microbially-Mediated Subglacial Mineral Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montross, S. N.; Skidmore, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Interactions between dilute meltwater and fine-grained, freshly comminuted debris at the bed of temperate glaciers liberate significant solute. The proportions of solute produced in the subglacial environment via biotic and abiotic processes remains unknown, however, this work suggests the biotic contribution is substantial. Laboratory analyses of microbiological and geochemical properties of sediment and meltwater from the Haut Glacier d'Arolla (HGA) indicates that a metabolically active microbial community exists in water-saturated sediments at the ice-bedrock interface. Basal sediment slurries and meltwater were incubated in the laboratory for 100 days under near in situ subglacial conditions. Relative proportions of solute produced via abiotic v. biotic mineral weathering were analyzed by comparing the evolved aqueous chemistry of biologically active "live" sediment slurries with sterilized controls. Aqueous chemical analyses indicate an increase in solute produced from mineral weathering coupled with nitrate depletion in the biologically active slurries compared with the killed controls. These results infer that microbial activity at HGA is likely an important contributor to chemical weathering associated solute fluxes from the glaciated catchment. Due to the magnitude of past glaciations throughout geologic time (e.g., Neoproterozoic and Late-Pleistocene), and evidence that subglacial microbial activity impacts mineral weathering, greater consideration needs to be given to cold temperature biogeochemical weathering and its impact on global geochemical cycles.

  15. The Origin of Andesite in the Deep Crust: Evidence from the West-Central Mexican Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.; Ownby, S.; Delgado Granados, H.; Hall, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    by the crystal-poor examples, and (2) minimal plagioclase accumulation affects the bulk composition of the crystal-rich andesites, which is consistent with the absence of any Eu anomalies. No dacite or rhyolite has erupted, and there is thus no evidence of crystal fractionation of andesite, including segregation of interstitial liquid from crystal-rich andesites in the upper crustal chamber feeding V. Tancítaro. Magma mixing between dacite/rhyolite and basalt/basaltic andesite to make andesite can be ruled out on two counts: (1) the absence of any dacite or rhyolite as a requisite end-member for mixing, and (2) such mixing could not produce crystal-poor (1-5%) andesite. Although hornblende is absent from the phenocryst assemblage of the basalts and basaltic andesites, rare-earth element patterns among the andesites, basaltic andesites, and basalts show that crystal-liquid separation of up to 40% hornblende is required to form the andesites from the basalts. Therefore, the primary mechanism to form crystal-poor andesite in this arc segment appears to be partial melting of hornblende-rich (~40%) gabbronorite in the lowermost crust. No other mechanisms satisfy all the geochemical and petrological constraints.

  16. Geochemical Evidence for Crustal Assimilation at Mid-Ocean Ridges Using Major and Trace Elements, Volatiles and Oxygen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, V.; Perfit, M. R.; Ridley, W. I.; Wallace, P. J.; Valley, J. W.; Grimes, C. B.; Klein, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical analyses and petrologic modeling of dacites erupted at three spreading centers suggest that crustal melting and assimilation may be an important process in the petrogenesis of high-silica lavas on mid-ocean ridges (MOR). Experimental results and textural observations of ophiolites suggest that assimilation could be important at MOR, but observational and geochemical evidence of this process are obscured at MOR because of lack of exposure and similar wall rock and magma compositions. Although most geochemical variability on MOR is consistent with low-pressure fractional crystallization of various mantle-derived parental melts, our geochemical investigations of MOR dacitic glasses suggest that there is a seawater-altered component involved in their petrogenesis. If assumed to reflect primary magmatic compositions, the measured high Cl, H2O and relatively low oxygen isotope ratios (~5.6 vs. expected values ~7) in MOR dacite glasses can be explained by assimilation of altered ocean crust, which has lower oxygen isotope ratios, and elevated Cl and H2O concentrations due to alteration/metamorphism by hydrothermal fluids. Petrologic modeling of MOR dacites also suggests assimilation of an altered crustal component. During AFC processes, ascending MORB magma undergoes extreme crystal fractionation (Ol+Plag+Cpx+Fe-oxides) coupled with melting and assimilation of altered ocean crust. Crystallization of silicate phases and Fe-oxides causes an increase in delta18O in the residual magma but assimilation of material altered at high temperatures causes a decrease in delta18O. Lower delta18O values have been observed in evolved volcanics at the East Pacific Rise, Juan de Fuca Ridge, and Galapagos Spreading Center, but coexisting refractory minerals have not yet been analyzed. These dacitic glasses support the hypothesis that crustal assimilation is an important process in the formation of highly evolved MOR lavas.

  17. Secular variations of iron isotopes in ferromanganese crusts: evidences for deeply sourced iron in the Pacific Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, O. J.; Gueguen, B.

    2016-12-01

    Ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts are potential archive of the Fe isotope composition of deep seawater through time. Here, we report Fe isotope composition of two pairs of Fe-Mn crusts collected on two volcanic seamounts from the Northern Pacific Ocean (Apuupuu Seamount, Hawaii) and the Southern Pacific Ocean (near Rurutu Island, Austral archipelago of French Polynesia). This approach allows (a) a direct comparison of the Fe isotope record in Fe-Mn crusts from the same seamount in order to address local effects, and (b) a comparison of geochemical composition of crusts between North and South Pacific in order to address the effect of more global geochemical processes. The results show that, despite different growth rates, diagenetic history, textures and geochemical patterns, Fe-Mn crusts from both North and South Pacific Oceans have fairly homogenous Fe isotope compositions over the last 17 Ma, yielding average δ56Fe values of -0.22 ± 0.20‰ (1sd, n = 54). The results also show striking correlations between Fe and Pb isotope ratios, indicating that local mixing between water masses is the main factor controlling Fe isotope composition in FeMn crusts. Recently, Horner et al. (2015) reported a range of δ56Fe values from -1.12‰ to 1.54‰ along a 76 Ma-old FeMn crust from the central pacific. However, secular variations of Fe isotopes inferred from other FeMn crusts in the Central North Pacific and Western Pacific (Yang and Rouxel, unpublished) show different patterns over the last 40 Ma, with δ56Fe ranging from -0.07 to -0.61‰ (n=81). Hence, the application of Fe isotopes as paleoceanographic proxies to trace deeply sourced iron at the scale of oceanic basins should be used with caution, prompting for an integrative approach combining diverse yet complimentary geochemical proxies.

  18. Magnetism of the oceanic crust: Evidence from ophiolite complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.K.

    1980-07-10

    The magnetic properties of six ophiolite complexes from around the world, ranging in age from Jurassic to Miocene, are presented. An emphasis is placed in our study on the petrologic and isotopic data from these ophiolite complexes in order to determine first whether the rock samples presently available represent the pristine ocean crust or whether they have been altered subaerially since their formation. Five of the ophiolites are found to be acceptable, and the conclusion is overwhelmingly in favor of a marine magnetic source layer that includes not only the pillow lavas but also the underlying dikes and gabbro. At the moment, however, our observations do not suggest that the magnetic contributions of the basaltic dikes should be overlooked in favor of gabbro. A second important conclusion is that nearly pure magnetite could indeed be a magnetic carrier which contributes to marine magnetic anomanies. It only awaits discovery by deeper ocean crustal penetration by future Deep Sea Drilling Project legs.

  19. Evidence for oceanic crust in the Herodotus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Roi

    2016-04-01

    Some of the fundamental tectonic problems of the Eastern Mediterranean remain unresolved due to the extremely thick sedimentary cover (10 to 15 km) and the lack of accurate magnetic anomaly data. I have collected 7,000 km of marine magnetic profiles (2012-2014) across the Herodotus and Levant Basins, Eastern Mediterranean, to study the nature and age of the underlying igneous crust. The towed magnetometer array consisted of two Overhauser sensors recording the total magnetic anomaly field in a longitudinal gradiometer mode, and a fully oriented vector magnetometer. The total field data from the Herodotus Basin reveal a newly detected short sequence of long-wavelength NE-SW lineated anomalies that straddle the entire basin suggesting a deep two-dimensional magnetic source layer. The three components of the magnetic vector data indicate that an abrupt transition from a 2D to 3D magnetic structure occurs east of the Herodotus Basin, along where a prominent NE-SW gravity feature is found. Altogether, these new findings confirm that the Herodotus Basin preserves remnants of oceanic crust that formed along the Neotethyan mid-ocean ridge system. The continuous northward and counterclockwise motion of the African Plate during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic allow predicting the evolution of remanent magnetization directions, which in-turn dictate that shape of the anomalies. The shape of the Herodotus anomalies best fit Late Carboniferous to Early Permian (300±20 Myr old) magnetization directions. Finally, I will discuss the implications of these results on the tectonic architecture of the region as well as on various geodynamic processes.

  20. Geophysical and geochemical nature of relaminated arc-derived lower crust underneath oceanic domain in southern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Alexandra; Schulmann, Karel; Janoušek, Vojtech; Štípská, Pavla; Armstrong, Robin; Belousova, Elena; Dolgopolova, Alla; Seltmann, Reimar; Lexa, Ondrej; Jiang, Yingde; Hanžl, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) in southern Mongolia consists of E-W trending Neoproterozoic cratons and Silurian-Devonian oceanic tectonic zones. Previous study revealed that the Early Paleozoic accretionary wedge and the oceanic tectonic zone are underlain by a layer giving a homogeneous gravity signal. Forward gravity modelling suggests that this layer is not formed of high-density material typical of lower oceanic crust but is composed of low- to intermediate-density rocks resembling continental crust. The nature of this lower crust is constrained by the whole-rock geochemistry and zircon Hf isotopic signature of abundant Late Carboniferous high-K calc-alkaline and Early Permian A-type granitoids intruding the two Early Paleozoic domains. It is possible to explain the genesis of these granitoids by anatexis of juvenile, metaigneous (tonalitic-gabbroic) rocks of Late Cambrian age, the source of which is presumed to lie in the "Khantaishir" arc (520-495Ma) further north. In order to test this hypothesis, the likely modal composition and density of Khantaishir arc-like protoliths are thermodynamically modelled at granulite- and higher amphibolite-facies conditions. It is shown that the current average density of the lower crust inferred by gravity modelling (2730 ±20kg/m3) matches best metamorphosed leucotonalite to diorite. Based on these results, it is now proposed that Mongolian CAOB has an architecture in which the accretionary wedge and oceanic upper crust is underlain by allochthonous lower crust that originated in a Cambrian arc. A tectonic model explaining relamination of allochthonous felsic to intermediate lower crust beneath mafic upper crust is proposed.

  1. The Crust Has Changed: Evidence for and implications of age dependent Sm/Nd ratios in juvenile continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    The Nd isotope systematics of crustal granites and their presumed source materials are used to reconstruct the Sm/Nd ratios of the continental crust with distinct mantle extraction ages (based on DePaolo, 1988 EPSL and Bennett and DePaolo, 1987 GSA Bull). A more extensive, literature-derived data set for the western USA supports the isotopic mapping of Bennett and DePaolo. Calculated Sm/Nd ratios of the crust show a secular increase from the Archean to approximately 1.5 Ga. Modern island arc lavas, analogs for juvenile continental crust have the lowest Sm/Nd, consistent with the inferred trend from the granites. Possible reasons for the increasing Sm/Nd include changes in the Sm/Nd ratio of the mantle reservoir and/or changes in the mineralogy of the reservoir from which the crust was extracted. It is postulated that the primary control of Sm/Nd in the continental crust is the residual mineralogy in the reservoirs from which the crust was extracted. This is possible because changes in the geothermal gradient through Earth's history affect the residual mineralogy during the extraction of continental crust. Recent phase equilibria studies relevant to modern island arcs suggest that accessory minerals such as allanite buffer the LREE budget from the subducting sediment and basaltic slab, the primary source of REE in island arc lavas. Crust production early in Earth's history likely occurred at temperatures too high for allanite stability, meaning Sm/Nd ratios were likely controlled by garnet and/or amphibole in either subducted crust or the mantle reservoir. Modeling results will show how changing residual mineralogy during crust extractions can produce the observed changes in Sm/Nd ratios. More broadly the inferred time dependence for Sm/Nd may relate to the silica content of juvenile crust throughout Earth's history.

  2. The geochemical stratigraphy and bulk composition of the lower oceanic crust in the Wadi Khafifah section the Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    It has long been known that mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are not the direct result of mantle melting, but rather have experienced some degree of crystal fractionation and mixing prior to eruption. Yet fundamental questions as to where this fractionation occurs within the lower oceanic crust and upper mantle, what degree of fractionation they undergo, and how much magma mixing occurs, remain to be answered. There are two ways of constraining the composition of the oceanic crust; and thus, the degree of fractional crystallization and other processes occurring in both the mantle and crust at spreading ridges: (1) from the bottom-up, investigating the nature and extent of mantle melting, or (2) from the top-down, quantifying the composition of the erupted and intruded oceanic crust. The first of these has been the most common approach to-date. This study is concerned with the top-down approach to constraining the composition and nature of the oceanic crust. We present a detailed, stratigraphically-constrained, bulk composition for the lower crust of the Wadi Khafifah section of the Oman ophiolite. Together with sheeted dikes and lavas having trace element contents similar to MORB, the bulk crustal composition meets two fundamental criteria for a mantle-derived melt: (1) It has Mg# in equilibrium with Fo90 mantle olivine; (2) it is multiply saturated in ol+aug+opx±plag/sp at shallow mantle pressures. In addition, clinopyroxene crystallizes early, eliminating the so-called `pyroxene paradox'. The parent magma represents an aggregate produced by polybaric decompression melting of depleted MORB mantle (DMM), which has crystallized approximately 5% olivine - probably by reactive fractionation (e.g., Collier & Kelemen, J Petrol 2010) in the crust-mantle transition zone - prior to emplacement within the crust. An additional 40-60% fractional crystallization (ol+aug+ plag) in the lower crust is required to produce the observed sheeted dike and lava compositions. Where data

  3. Geochemical evidence for pre- and syn-rifting lithospheric foundering in the East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. R.; Furman, T.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2015-12-01

    The East African Rift System (EARS) is the archetypal active continental rift. The rift branches cut through the elevated Ethiopian and Kenyan domes and are accompanied by a >40 Myr volcanic record. This record is often used to understand changing mantle dynamics, but this approach is complicated by the diversity of spatio-temporally constrained, geochemically unique volcanic provinces. Various sources have been invoked to explain the geochemical variability across the EARS (e.g. mantle plume(s), both enriched and depleted mantle, metasomatized or pyroxenitic lithosphere, continental crust). Mantle contributions are often assessed assuming adiabatic melting of mostly peridotitic material due to extension or an upwelling thermal plume. However, metasomatized lithospheric mantle does not behave like fertile or depleted peridotite mantle, so this model must be modified. Metasomatic lithologies (e.g. pyroxenite) are unstable compared to neighboring peridotite and can founder into the underlying asthenosphere via ductile dripping. As such a drip descends, the easily fusible metasomatized lithospheric mantle heats conductively and melts at increasing T and P; the subsequent volcanic products in turn record this drip magmatism. We re-evaluated existing data of major mafic volcanic episodes throughout the EARS to investigate potential evidence for lithospheric drip foundering that may be an essential part of the rifting process. The data demonstrate clearly that lithospheric drip melting played an important role in pre-flood basalt volcanism in Turkana (>35 Ma), high-Ti "mantle plume-derived" flood basalts and picrites (HT2) from NW Ethiopia (~30 Ma), Miocene shield volcanism on the E Ethiopian Plateau and in Turkana (22-26 Ma), and Quaternary volcanism in Virunga (Western Rift) and Chyulu Hills (Eastern Rift). In contrast, there is no evidence for drip melting in "lithosphere-derived" flood basalts (LT) from NW Ethiopia, Miocene volcanism in S Ethiopia, or Quaternary

  4. Geochemical evidence from the Sudbury structure for crustal redistribution by large bolide impacts.

    PubMed

    Mungall, James E; Ames, Doreen E; Hanley, Jacob J

    2004-06-03

    Deformation and melting of the crust during the formation of large impact craters must have been important during the Earth's early evolution, but such processes remain poorly understood. The 1.8-billion-year-old Sudbury structure in Ontario, Canada, is greater than 200 km in diameter and preserves a complete impact section, including shocked basement rocks, an impact melt sheet and fallback material. It has generally been thought that the most voluminous impact melts represent the average composition of the continental crust, but here we show that the melt sheet now preserved as the Sudbury Igneous Complex is derived predominantly from the lower crust. We therefore infer that the hypervelocity impact caused a partial inversion of the compositional layering of the continental crust. Using geochemical data, including platinum-group-element abundances, we also show that the matrix of the overlying clast-laden Onaping Formation represents a mixture of the original surficial sedimentary strata, shock-melted lower crust and the impactor itself.

  5. Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex: Stable isotope evidence for shallow emplacement into Archean ocean crust

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, W.H.; Valley, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios indicate that unusual rocks at the upper contact of the Archean Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex at Fiskenaesset Harbor (southwest Greenland) are the products of hydrothermal alteration by seawater at the time of anorthosite intrusion. Subsequent granulite-facies metamorphism of these Ca-poor and Al- and Mg-rich rocks produced sapphirine- and kornerupine-bearing assemblages. Because large amounts of surface waters cannot penetrate to depths of 30 km during granulite-facies metamorphism, the isotopic signature of the contact rocks must have been obtained prior to regional metamorphism. The stable isotope and geochemical characteristics of the contact rocks support a model of shallow emplacement into Archean ocean crust for the Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex. 45 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Seawater osmium isotope evidence for a middle Miocene flood basalt event in ferromanganese crust records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klemm, V.; Frank, M.; Levasseur, S.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Three ferromanganese crusts from the northeast, northwest and central Atlantic were re-dated using osmium (Os) isotope stratigraphy and yield ages from middle Miocene to the present. The three Os isotope records do not show evidence for growth hiatuses. The reconstructed Os isotope-based growth rates for the sections older than 10??Ma are higher than those determined previously by the combined beryllium isotope (10Be/9Be) and cobalt (Co) constant-flux methods, which results in a decrease in the maximum age of each crust. This re-dating does not lead to significant changes to the interpretation of previously determined radiogenic isotope neodymium, lead (Nd, Pb) time series because the variability of these isotopes was very small in the records of the three crusts prior to 10??Ma. The Os isotope record of the central Atlantic crust shows a pronounced minimum during the middle Miocene between 15 and 12??Ma, similar to a minimum previously observed in two ferromanganese crusts from the central Pacific. For the other two Atlantic crusts, the Os isotope records and their calibration to the global seawater curve for the middle Miocene are either more uncertain or too short and thus do not allow for a reliable identification of an isotopic minimum. Similar to pronounced minima reported previously for the Cretaceous/Tertiary and Eocene/Oligocene boundaries, possible interpretations for the newly identified middle Miocene Os isotope minimum include changes in weathering intensity and/or a meteorite impact coinciding with the formation of the No??rdlinger Ries Crater. It is suggested that the eruption and weathering of the Columbia River flood basalts provided a significant amount of the unradiogenic Os required to produce the middle Miocene minimum. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Seawater osmium isotope evidence for a middle Miocene flood basalt event in ferromanganese crust records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Veronika; Frank, Martin; Levasseur, Sylvain; Halliday, Alex N.; Hein, James R.

    2008-08-01

    Three ferromanganese crusts from the northeast, northwest and central Atlantic were re-dated using osmium (Os) isotope stratigraphy and yield ages from middle Miocene to the present. The three Os isotope records do not show evidence for growth hiatuses. The reconstructed Os isotope-based growth rates for the sections older than 10 Ma are higher than those determined previously by the combined beryllium isotope (10Be/9Be) and cobalt (Co) constant-flux methods, which results in a decrease in the maximum age of each crust. This re-dating does not lead to significant changes to the interpretation of previously determined radiogenic isotope neodymium, lead (Nd, Pb) time series because the variability of these isotopes was very small in the records of the three crusts prior to 10 Ma. The Os isotope record of the central Atlantic crust shows a pronounced minimum during the middle Miocene between 15 and 12 Ma, similar to a minimum previously observed in two ferromanganese crusts from the central Pacific. For the other two Atlantic crusts, the Os isotope records and their calibration to the global seawater curve for the middle Miocene are either more uncertain or too short and thus do not allow for a reliable identification of an isotopic minimum. Similar to pronounced minima reported previously for the Cretaceous/Tertiary and Eocene/Oligocene boundaries, possible interpretations for the newly identified middle Miocene Os isotope minimum include changes in weathering intensity and/or a meteorite impact coinciding with the formation of the Nördlinger Ries Crater. It is suggested that the eruption and weathering of the Columbia River flood basalts provided a significant amount of the unradiogenic Os required to produce the middle Miocene minimum.

  8. Geochemical evidence for a brooks range mineral belt, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsh, S.P.; Cathrall, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    Geochemical studies in the central Brooks Range, Alaska, delineate a regional, structurally controlled mineral belt in east-west-trending metamorphic rocks and adjacent metasedimentary rocks. The mineral belt extends eastward from the Ambler River quadrangle to the Chandalar and Philip Smith quadrangles, Alaska, from 147?? to 156??W. longitude, a distance of more than 375 km, and spans a width from 67?? to 69??N. latitude, a distance of more than 222 km. Within this belt are several occurrences of copper and molybdenum mineralization associated with meta-igneous, metasedimentary, and metavolcanic rocks; the geochemical study delineates target areas for additional occurrences. A total of 4677 stream-sediment and 2286 panned-concentrate samples were collected in the central Brooks Range, Alaska, from 1975 to 1979. The -80 mesh ( 2.86) nonmagnetic fraction of the panned concentrates from stream sediment were analyzed by semiquantitative spectrographic methods. Two geochemical suites were recognized in this investigation; a base-metal suite of copper-lead-zinc and a molybdenum suite of molybdenum-tin-tungsten. These suites suggest several types of mineralization within the metamorphic belt. Anomalies in molybdenum with associated Cu and W suggest a potential porphyry molybdenum system associated with meta-igneous rocks. This regional study indicates that areas of metaigneous rocks in the central metamorphic belt are target areas for potential mineralized porphyry systems and that areas of metavolcanic rocks are target areas for potential massive sulfide mineralization. ?? 1981.

  9. Constraining the development of the upper martian crust using orbital and in-situ thermophysical, mineralogical, and geochemical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, J. L.; Rogers, A. D.; Edwards, C. S.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements from the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) indicate distinct compositional differences between rock interiors, rock surfaces, and soil that may indicate a close relationship between mechanical and chemical weathering [Hurowitz et al., 2006, Ming et al., 2006, Morris et al., 2006]. This is most clearly indicated by olivine-rich Adirondack Class basalts and relatively olivine-poor dark soils in the plains of Gusev crater, consistent with aqueous alteration in an water-limited acidic environment [e.g. Tosca et al., 2004; Hurowitz et al., 2006]. Similar spectral and thermophysical relationships can be observed from orbit with the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) [ Bandfield and Rogers, 2008]. The detailed rover observations combined with the large spatial coverage of the orbital observations are highly complimentary, allowing for global inferences to be made from more detailed local observations. The combined set of observations may give an indication of the extent of chemical and mechanical weathering of the martian crust. Mafic, olivine-rich compositions are highly correlated with high inertia rocky surfaces and are rare elsewhere. Because olivine is highly sensitive to dissolution with limited amounts of liquid water, its presence or absence may be a proxy for the amount of chemical weathering that has occurred. This is the case even where spectroscopic measurements do not otherwise show clear evidence for significant alteration throughout martian dark regions. High thermal inertia surfaces, consistent with relatively unprocessed rocky materials, are not common on Mars [Edwards et al., 2005]. Even where several kilometers of canyon or crater wall are exposed, high inertia materials are commonly absent except in isolated layers. This is also the case for materials exposed at the MER landing sites [Fergason et al., 2006]. The high inertia materials that are present are relatively unaltered blocks. Materials

  10. The Hf-Nd Isotopic Record of Southwest - no Evidence for Early Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    evidence for early mantle depletion, and that major production of continental crust did not occur until after ~3.5 Ga.

  11. Rare-Earth minerals in Martian Meteorite NWA 7034/7533: Evidence for Fluid-Rock Interaction in Martian Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Ma, C.; Chen, Y.; Beckett, J.; Guan, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Previously, we reported finding of monazite, chevikinite-perrierite and xenotime in the ‘Black Beauty’ meteorite (NWA 7034/7533). Here, we show textural and compositional evidence of these minerals that suggest hydrothermal fluids in martian crust.

  12. Drift pumice in the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattan, J. N.; Mudholkar, A. V.; Jai Sankar, S.; Ilangovan, D.

    2008-03-01

    Abundant white to light grey-coloured pumice without ferromanganese oxide coating occurs within the Quaternary sediments of the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Two distinct groups of pumice are identified from their geochemical composition, which allow one to define two different origins linked to two separate eruptions. One group of pumice is a dacitic type characterized by high Fe, Ti, Mg, Al and Ca with comparatively low contents of Si, rare-earth elements (∑REE, 69 ppm), Rb, Sr, U, Th, Ba, V, Nb, Sc, Mo and Co, which strongly suggest an origin from the 1883 Krakatau eruption. The other group is rhyolitic and is characterized by low contents of Fe, Ti, Mg and Ca and high Si, ∑REE content (121 ppm), Rb, Sr, U, Th, Ba, V, Nb, Mo, Co, and Sc and correlates well with the composition of the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) eruption of ˜74 ka from Northern Sumatra and is being reported for the first time. Therefore, correlation of the pumice to the 1883 Krakatau and YTT eruptions indicates that the pumice drifted to the CIOB and eventually sank when it became waterlogged. However, physical properties such as density, specific gravity, porosity and degree of saturation required for sinking of pumice for both 1883 Krakatau and YTT are almost similar.

  13. From Magma Formation to Hydrothermal Alteration: an Integrated Study of the Martian Crust Using Thermodynamic Modeling of Geochemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Laura Lee

    Hydrothermal systems have undoubtedly occurred on Mars. These systems are of interest for a number of reasons. Hydrothermal alteration of host rocks can have effects on the atmosphere of the planet, the volatile budget, local hydrologic patterns, the rheology of the rocks, their ability to resist weathering, and even lower the melting temperature of crustal rocks. In addition, there is a connection between hydrothermal systems and the origin of life on earth that raises questions about life on Mars. The approach taken used theoretical geochemical modeling techniques to model hypothetical hydrothermal systems on Mars. The initial phase of the research involved understanding terrestrial systems that were used as analogs for Martian systems. Compositions of Icelandic host rocks were used as input for extensive modeling calculations. These calculations investigated the roles of initial rock composition, fluid temperature, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the fluid, water to rock ratio, and oxygen fugacity of the fluid on alteration assemblages. The second phase utilized the data available on the SNC meteorites (they are suspected to come from Mars) as the basis for hydrothermal system modeling. The focus of this investigation was the variability of alteration assemblages that could be produced from the SNC meteorites. The final investigation broadened the scope of possible substrates for hydrothermal systems by using theoretical geochemical modeling of igneous processes to produce likely Martial crustal rock compositions from a possible Martial mantle composition. A variety of variables (depth of initial melting, amount of initial melt, cooling rate during ascent, and depth of final emplacement) were examined to determine their effects on compositions of the calculated melts. Several rock compositions produced by the igneous modeling were used as input for hydrothermal modeling calculations. These calculations examined possible differences in alteration

  14. Geochronologic and isotopic evidence for early Proterozoic crust in the eastern Arabian Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, J.S.; Hedge, C.E.

    1984-05-01

    The authors report zircon U-Pb, feldspar common Pb, whole-rock Sm-Nd, and Rb-Sr data from sample Z-103, a fine-grained granodiorite from the Jabal Khida region of the Saudi Arabian Shield (lat 21/sup 0/19'N; long 44/sup 0/50'W). The measurements yield conclusive evidence for continental crust of early Proterozoic age (approx.1630 Ma) at that locality. Furthermore, lead-isotope data indicate an even earlier, perhaps Archean, crustal history for the source of the lower Proterozoic rocks. 17 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  15. Neodymium and lead isotope evidence for enriched early Archean crust in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowring, Samuel A.; Housh, Todd B.; Isachsen, Clark E.; Podosek, Frank A.; King, Janet E.

    1989-01-01

    Neodymium and lead isotope measurements and uranium-lead zircon geochronology from Archaean gneisses of the Slave Province in the Northwest Territories of Canada are reported. The gneisses contain zircons with cores older than 3.842 Gyr and an epsilon(Nd) (3.7 Gyr) of - 4.8. This is the oldest reported chondritic model age for a terrestrial sample and provides evidence for strongly enriched pre-3.8-Gyr crust, a reservoir complementary to the depleted mantle already in existence by 3.8 Gyr before the present.

  16. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  17. Mantle CO2 degassing through the Icelandic crust: Evidence from carbon isotopes in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný E.; Heinemeier, Jan; Arnórsson, Stefán; Kjartansdóttir, Ríkey; Kristmannsdóttir, Hrefna

    2016-10-01

    Carbon isotopes of groundwater in Iceland were studied in order to determine the source and reactions of carbon at divergent plate boundaries not associated with active volcanic systems. All the waters were of meteoric origin, with temperatures of 1-130 °C, pH of ∼4.5-10.5 and dissolved inorganic carbon (∑CO2) between 1.8 and 4100 ppm. The measured range of δ13CO2 and 14CO2 in these waters was large, -27.4 to +2.0‰ and 0.6-118 pMC, respectively. The sources and reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon were studied by comparing the measured chemical and isotope composition with those simulated using isotope geochemical models. Three major sources of CO2 were identified: (1) dissolution of partially degassed basaltic rocks formed at the surface or shallow depths, (2) atmospheric CO2 through air-water exchange at surface, and (3) input of gas at depth into the groundwater systems that has similar carbon and isotope composition as the pre-erupted melt of the upper mantle and lower crust beneath Iceland. In the groundwater systems the CO2 chemistry and isotope content are modified due to carbonate mineral precipitation and changes in aqueous species distribution upon progressive water-rock interaction; these changes needed to be quantified in order to reveal the various CO2 sources. The CO2 flux of the Icelandic crust was estimated to be ∼5-10 · 1010 mol/yr with as high as 50% of the flux not associated with active volcanic centers but placed off-axis where a significant proportion of the CO2 may originate from the mantle. The mantle input of the groundwater off-axis corresponds to CO2 partial pressures of ∼10-6-1 bar and to a mantle CO2 flux of <5 · 105 mol/km2/yr for most areas and up to 125 · 105 and 1600 · 105 for the Southern Lowlands and Snæfellsnes Peninsula, respectively. The CO2 flux from active volcanic geothermal systems in Iceland was estimated to be ∼500-3000 · 105 mol CO2/km2/yr, considerably greater than the highest values observed off-axis.

  18. Geochemical evidence for mélange melting in global arcs.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Sune G; Marschall, Horst R

    2017-04-01

    In subduction zones, sediments and hydrothermally altered oceanic crust, which together form part of the subducting slab, contribute to the chemical composition of lavas erupted at the surface to form volcanic arcs. Transport of this material from the slab to the overlying mantle wedge is thought to involve discreet melts and fluids that are released from various portions of the slab. We use a meta-analysis of geochemical data from eight globally representative arcs to show that melts and fluids from individual slab components cannot be responsible for the formation of arc lavas. Instead, the data are compatible with models that first invoke physical mixing of slab components and the mantle wedge, widely referred to as high-pressure mélange, before arc magmas are generated.

  19. Constraints on the Composition and Hydrothermal Alteration History of the Pacific Lower Crust beneath the Hawaiian Islands: Geochemical Investigation of Gabbroic Xenoliths from Hualalai Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Lassiter, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the composition and hydrothermal alteration history of the lower oceanic crust (LOC) can help constrain deep hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, which may have a substantial impact on the thermal regime and magmatic processes at spreading centers. Previous studies of LOC primarily examined ophiolites or layer-3 gabbros exposed at the seafloor through faulting. These potentially have experienced secondary hydrothermal alteration in response to faulting, uplift and exposure. We examined major and trace element and isotopic compositions of a suite of gabbroic xenoliths derived from the 1800-1801 Kapulehu flow, Hualalai, Hawaii to constrain the composition and 'primary' hydrothermal alteration history of the in situ Pacific crust beneath the Hawaiian Islands (HI). Although most Hualalai gabbros have trace element and isotopic compositions consistent with derivation from Hualalai magmas, a subset has characteristics indicative of an origin from MORB-related melts. These gabbros contain LREE-depleted clinopyroxene, have Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions that overlap the range of EPR basalts, and are geochemically distinct from Hualalai-related xenoliths and lavas. Despite the limited range recorded, plagioclase and clinopyroxene oxygen isotope compositions correlate well for both MORB-related and Hualalai-related gabbroic xenoliths. This suggests clinopyroxene and plagioclase are in equilibrium. The △plag-cpx (~0.6-0.9‰) is consistent with closure temperatures of ~1170-1220 C.δ18Ocpx (+4.9-5.3‰) of the MORB-related gabbros are negatively correlated with cpx 87Sr/86Sr, but not with 143Nd/144Nd or La/Sm. In contrast, δ18Oplag does not correlate with plag 87Sr/86Sr. Cpx Sr-isotopes may be affected by seawater alteration, which is not as apparent in plag due to higher Sr concentrations. However, the MORB-related gabbros have δ18O values that are largely in the range for normal, fresh MORB (δ18Omelt/NMORB = +5.7-6.0‰, △melt-cpx~0.7‰). This

  20. Blocks in the Europan Crust Provide More Evidence of Subterranean Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The image on the left shows a region of Europa's crust made up of blocks which are thought to have broken apart and 'rafted' into new positions. These features are the best geologic evidence to date that Europa may have had a subsurface ocean at some time in its past. Combined with the geologic data, the presence of a magnetic field leads scientists to believe an ocean is most likely present at Europa today. In this false color image, reddish-brown areas represent non-ice material resulting from geologic activity. White areas are rays of material ejected during the formation of the 25-km diameter impact crater Pwyll (see global view). Icy plains are shown in blue tones to distinguish possibly coarse-grained ice (dark blue) from fine-grained ice (light blue). Long, dark lines are ridges and fractures in the crust, some of which are more than 3,000 kilometers (1,850 miles) long. These images were obtained by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during September 7, 1996, December 1996, and February 1997 at a distance of 677,000 kilometers (417,489 miles).

  1. Blocks in the Europan Crust Provide More Evidence of Subterranean Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The image on the left shows a region of Europa's crust made up of blocks which are thought to have broken apart and 'rafted' into new positions. These features are the best geologic evidence to date that Europa may have had a subsurface ocean at some time in its past. Combined with the geologic data, the presence of a magnetic field leads scientists to believe an ocean is most likely present at Europa today. In this false color image, reddish-brown areas represent non-ice material resulting from geologic activity. White areas are rays of material ejected during the formation of the 25-km diameter impact crater Pwyll (see global view). Icy plains are shown in blue tones to distinguish possibly coarse-grained ice (dark blue) from fine-grained ice (light blue). Long, dark lines are ridges and fractures in the crust, some of which are more than 3,000 kilometers (1,850 miles) long. These images were obtained by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during September 7, 1996, December 1996, and February 1997 at a distance of 677,000 kilometers (417,489 miles).

  2. Seismic evidence for overpressured subducted oceanic crust and megathrust fault sealing.

    PubMed

    Audet, Pascal; Bostock, Michael G; Christensen, Nikolas I; Peacock, Simon M

    2009-01-01

    Water and hydrous minerals play a key part in geodynamic processes at subduction zones by weakening the plate boundary, aiding slip and permitting subduction-and indeed plate tectonics-to occur. The seismological signature of water within the forearc mantle wedge is evident in anomalies with low seismic shear velocity marking serpentinization. However, seismological observations bearing on the presence of water within the subducting plate itself are less well documented. Here we use converted teleseismic waves to obtain observations of anomalously high Poisson's ratios within the subducted oceanic crust from the Cascadia continental margin to its intersection with forearc mantle. On the basis of pressure, temperature and compositional considerations, the elevated Poisson's ratios indicate that water is pervasively present in fluid form at pore pressures near lithostatic values. Combined with observations of a strong negative velocity contrast at the top of the oceanic crust, our results imply that the megathrust is a low-permeability boundary. The transition from a low- to high-permeability plate interface downdip into the mantle wedge is explained by hydrofracturing of the seal by volume changes across the interface caused by the onset of crustal eclogitization and mantle serpentinization. These results may have important implications for our understanding of seismogenesis, subduction zone structure and the mechanism of episodic tremor and slip.

  3. Geochemical evidence for a comet shower in the late Eocene.

    PubMed

    Farley, K A; Montanari, A; Shoemaker, E M; Shoemaker, C S

    1998-05-22

    Analyses of pelagic limestones indicate that the flux of extraterrestrial helium-3 to Earth was increased for a 2.5-million year (My) period in the late Eocene. The enhancement began approximately 1 My before and ended approximately 1.5 My after the major impact events that produced the large Popigai and Chesapeake Bay craters approximately 36 million years ago. The correlation between increased concentrations of helium-3, a tracer of fine-grained interplanetary dust, and large impacts indicates that the abundance of Earth-crossing objects and dustiness in the inner solar system were simultaneously but only briefly enhanced. These observations provide evidence for a comet shower triggered by an impulsive perturbation of the Oort cloud.

  4. Geochemical evidence for a comet shower in the late Eocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farley, K.A.; Montanari, A.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Shoemaker, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of pelagic limestones indicate that the flux of extraterrestrial helium-3 to Earth was increased for a 2.5-million year (My) period in the late Eocene. The enhancement began ~1 My before and ended ~1.5 My after the major impact events that produced the large Popigai and Chesapeake Bay craters ~36 million years ago. The correlation between increased concentrations of helium-3, a tracer of fine-grained interplanetary dust, and large impacts indicates that the abundance of Earth-crossing objects and dustiness in the inner solar system were simultaneously but only briefly enhanced. These observations provide evidence for a comet shower triggered by an impulsive perturbation of the Oort cloud.

  5. Geochemical evidence for the melting of subducting oceanic lithosphere at plate edges.

    PubMed

    Yogodzinski, G M; Lees, J M; Churikova, T G; Dorendorf, F; Wöerner, G; Volynets, O N

    2001-01-25

    Most island-arc magmatism appears to result from the lowering of the melting point of peridotite within the wedge of mantle above subducting slabs owing to the introduction of fluids from the dehydration of subducting oceanic crust. Volcanic rocks interpreted to contain a component of melt (not just a fluid) from the subducting slab itself are uncommon, but possible examples have been recognized in the Aleutian islands, Baja California, Patagonia and elsewhere. The geochemically distinctive rocks from these areas, termed 'adakites, are often associated with subducting plates that are young and warm, and therefore thought to be more prone to melting. But the subducting lithosphere in some adakite locations (such as the Aleutian islands) appears to be too old and hence too cold to melt. This implies either that our interpretation of adakite geochemistry is incorrect, or that our understanding of the tectonic context of adakites is incomplete. Here we present geochemical data from the Kamchatka peninsula and the Aleutian islands that reaffirms the slab-melt interpretation of adakites, but in the tectonic context of the exposure to mantle flow around the edge of a torn subducting plate. We conclude that adakites are likely to form whenever the edge of a subducting plate is warmed or ablated by mantle flow. The use of adakites as tracers for such plate geometry may improve our understanding of magma genesis and thermal structure in a variety of subduction-zone environments.

  6. Geochemical evidence for widespread euxinia in the later Cambrian ocean.

    PubMed

    Gill, Benjamin C; Lyons, Timothy W; Young, Seth A; Kump, Lee R; Knoll, Andrew H; Saltzman, Matthew R

    2011-01-06

    Widespread anoxia in the ocean is frequently invoked as a primary driver of mass extinction as well as a long-term inhibitor of evolutionary radiation on early Earth. In recent biogeochemical studies it has been hypothesized that oxygen deficiency was widespread in subsurface water masses of later Cambrian oceans, possibly influencing evolutionary events during this time. Physical evidence of widespread anoxia in Cambrian oceans has remained elusive and thus its potential relationship to the palaeontological record remains largely unexplored. Here we present sulphur isotope records from six globally distributed stratigraphic sections of later Cambrian marine rocks (about 499 million years old). We find a positive sulphur isotope excursion in phase with the Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE), a large and rapid excursion in the marine carbon isotope record, which is thought to be indicative of a global carbon cycle perturbation. Numerical box modelling of the paired carbon sulphur isotope data indicates that these isotope shifts reflect transient increases in the burial of organic carbon and pyrite sulphur in sediments deposited under large-scale anoxic and sulphidic (euxinic) conditions. Independently, molybdenum abundances in a coeval black shale point convincingly to the transient spread of anoxia. These results identify the SPICE interval as the best characterized ocean anoxic event in the pre-Mesozoic ocean and an extreme example of oxygen deficiency in the later Cambrian ocean. Thus, a redox structure similar to those in Proterozoic oceans may have persisted or returned in the oceans of the early Phanerozoic eon. Indeed, the environmental challenges presented by widespread anoxia may have been a prevalent if not dominant influence on animal evolution in Cambrian oceans.

  7. Ultra-deep Subduction of Continental Crust: Evidence from Natural Rocks and Experimental Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzhinetskaya, L.; Green, H. W.

    2005-12-01

    Much of what we know about the deep subduction of continental crust is gained from study of the mineralogy of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) rocks incorporated within continent-continent collision belts. UHPM rocks of metasedimentary origin were only recently recognized due to discovery of coesite, diamond, titanite inferred to have contained six-fold coordinated Si before exsolution of coesite, and TiO2 with alpha-PbO2 structure. Modern seismic tomography provides remarkable images that suggest lithospheric plates are subducted to the core-mantle boundary and may remain there stagnated during long geological times; the presence of continental material within such plates cannot be excluded. The mineral phase transformations possible within deeply subducted continental crust have been the subject of intensive laboratory experimentation during the last decade. Though many new UHP minerals were synthesized at P~ 6 to >20 GPa (e.g., wadeite, topaz-OH, phase Egg, K- and Na-hollandite) in the KNASH, KASH and ASH chemical systems, none except topaz-OH has yet been identified in UHPM rocks. The microstructural evidence of former majoritic garnet decompression is proven only for garnet peridotite, whereas no evidence of such structures has been reported yet from diamondiferous felsic rocks. It is not clear if this is because the UHPM minerals of felsic rocks are easily lost during retrograde metamorphism, or if this is because garnets crystallized in the felsic systems do not contain a large majoritic component at high pressures. There is no clear indication of what portion of subducted continental crust is returned back to Earth's surface, and what fraction may have become more dense than mantle rocks and sunk down to the mantle transition zone and even deeper. Is there any connection between mantle plumes and deeply subducted continental rocks? The UHPM discipline would also benefit from new experiments designed to reproduce decompression structures of UHP minerals

  8. Upper Paleozoic oceanic crust in the Polish Sudetes: NdSr isotope and trace element evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, C.; Majerowicz, A.; Wojciechowska, I.

    1988-03-01

    The two main mafic-ultramafic complexes outcropping in the Polish Sudetes around the Sowie Góry high-grade massif (Mt. Sleza and Nowa Ruda) have been studied for trace elements and NdSr isotopes. Upper Paleozoic SmNd whole-rock isochron ages are obtained for both massifs: 353 ± 21 Ma (2σ) with ɛi = + 8.8 ± 0.1 (Mt. Sleza) and 351 ± 16 Ma with ɛi = 8.5 ± 0.1 (Nowa Ruda). The high initial ɛNd point to a source characterized by a strong time-integrated LREE depletion and, along with incompatible trace-element patterns, they substantiate the oceanic derivation of these massifs. Although a subduction-related marginal basin setting cannot be totally precluded, trace-element and isotopic data rather suggest a normal mid-ocean ridge origin for the Sudetic ophiolites. While these results are in marked contrast with previously inferred Precambrian or early Paleozoic ages, remnants of oceanic crust as young as the Early Carboniferous are consistent with the local sedimentary record of pelagic facies from the Frasnian to the Tournaisian, and they may provide a suitable explanation for the contrasted evolution displayed by different domains of the Sudetes. The Sudetic ophiolites might tentatively be correlated with the upper Paleozoic "prasinites" of the Saxon Lineament if a Late Hercynian ca. 150 km dextral offset is assumed along the Elbe Fracture. In that case, they might represent the latest-stage remnants of an oceanic suture zone between the Saxo-Thuringian and Moldanubian zones. Together with several other examples throughout Europe, these ophiolites provide compelling evidence for the involvement of oceanic crust and plate-tectonic processes in the Variscan belt.

  9. Pb-isotopic evidence for an early, enriched crust on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, J. J.; Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Humayun, M.; Hewins, R.; Zanda, B.

    2015-01-01

    Martian meteorite NWA 7533 is a regolith breccia that compositionally resembles the Martian surface measured by orbiters and landers. NWA 7533 contains monzonitic clasts that have zircon with U-Pb ages of 4.428 Ga. The Pb isotopic compositions of plagioclase and alkali feldspars, as well as U-Pb isotopic compositions of chlorapatite in the monzonitic clasts of NWA 7533 have been measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The U-Pb isotopic compositions measured from the chlorapatite in NWA 7533 yield an age of 1.357 ± 81 Ga (2σ). The least radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions measured in plagioclase and K-feldspar lie within error of the 4.428 Ga Geochron. These data indicate that the monzonitic clasts in NWA 7533 are a product of a differentiation history that includes residence in a reservoir that formed prior to 4.428 Ga with a μ-value (238U/204Pb) of at least 13.4 ± 1.7 (2 σ) and a κ-value (232Th/238U) of ∼4.3. This μ-value is more than three times higher than any other documented Martian reservoir. These results indicate either the Martian mantle is significantly more heterogeneous than previously thought (μ-value of 1-14 vs. 1-5) and/or the monzonitic clasts formed by the melting of Martian crust with a μ-value of at least 13.4. Therefore, NWA 7533 may contain the first isotopic evidence for an enriched, differentiated crust on Mars.

  10. The Agoudal (High Atlas Mountains, Morocco) Shattered Limestone: Petrographical and Geochemical Studies and Additional Evidence of Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kerni, H.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.; Marjanac, T.

    2016-08-01

    Agoudal impact structure shattered limestone and breccia are well studied and described using petrographical observations and geochemical analyses, and a new discovery of the magnesiwustite mineral as a further evidence of impact event.

  11. Andesite Magmas are Produced along Oceanic Arcs where the Crust is Thin: Evidence from Nishinoshima Volcano, Ogasawara Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Sato, T.; Nichols, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The incentive for this study is the ongoing explosive eruption of Nishinoshima volcano, located about 1,000 km south of Tokyo along the Ogasawara (Bonin) Arc. The straightforward but unexpected relationship presented here relates crustal thickness and magma type in the Izu-Ogasawara Oceanic Arc. Volcanoes along the Ogasawara segment of the arc, which include Nishinoshima, are underlain by thin crust (16-21 km)—in contrast to those along the Izu segment, where the crust is ~35 km thick. Interestingly, andesite magmas are dominant products from the former volcanoes and mostly basaltic lavas erupt from the latter. Why and how do volcanoes on the thin crust erupt andesite magmas? An introductory petrology textbook might answer this question by suggesting that, under decreasing pressure and hydrous conditions, the liquidus field of forsterite expands relative to that of enstatite, with the result that, at some point, enstatite melts incongruently to produce primary andesite melt. According to the hypothesis presented here, however, rising mantle diapirs stall near the base of the oceanic arc crust at depths controlled by the thickness of the overlying crust. Where the crust is thin, as along the Ogasawara segment of the arc, pressures are relatively low, and magmas produced in the mantle wedge tend to be andesitic. Where the crust is thick, as along the Izu segment, pressures are greater, and only basaltic magmas tend to be produced. To examine this hypothesis, JAMSTEC cruise NT15-E02 on the R/V Natsushima took place from 11 June to 21 June 2015 to Nishinoshima. It's present island has an elevation of only ~150 m, but its submarine flanks extend to ocean depths of 2,000-3,000 m, so the great bulk of the volcano is submarine and yet-to-be explored. We present the new hypothesis and its evidence from Nishinoshima based on the primitive lavas collected from the submarine parts of the volcano.

  12. Evidence for mechanical coupling and strong Indian lower crust beneath southern Tibet.

    PubMed

    Copley, Alex; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Wernicke, Brian P

    2011-04-07

    How surface deformation within mountain ranges relates to tectonic processes at depth is not well understood. The upper crust of the Tibetan Plateau is generally thought to be poorly coupled to the underthrusting Indian crust because of an intervening low-viscosity channel. Here, however, we show that the contrast in tectonic regime between primarily strike-slip faulting in northern Tibet and dominantly normal faulting in southern Tibet requires mechanical coupling between the upper crust of southern Tibet and the underthrusting Indian crust. Such coupling is inconsistent with the presence of active 'channel flow' beneath southern Tibet, and suggests that the Indian crust retains its strength as it underthrusts the plateau. These results shed new light on the debates regarding the mechanical properties of the continental lithosphere, and the deformation of Tibet. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  13. Geochemical evidence for invasion of Kilauea's plumbing system by Mauna Loa magma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, J.M.; Wenz, K.P.; Neal, C.A.; Sparks, J.W.; Lockwood, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    From the beginning of the study of Hawaiian volcanism there has been controversy over possible relationships between the neighbouring active volcanoes Mauna Loa and Kilauea1-5. Seismic activity, thought to reflect upward migration of magma, reveals that the magmatic plumbing systems apparently converge at depth to form a broad funnel within the mantle6. Although on rare occasions they have erupted concurrently, the brief historical eruptive record appears to show that when Kilauea is most active, Mauna Loa is in repose and vice versa, suggesting that they may be competing for the same magma supply5,7. Petrological, geochemical and isotope data, however, require a diametrically opposite conclusion. Distinct differences in major-element, trace-element and isotope compositions of lavas are regarded as compelling evidence that the two volcanoes have separate magmatic plumbing systems, supplied by parental magmas from physically and geochemically distinct mantle sources8-13. Here we present preliminary geochemical data which show that in the past 2,000 years Kilauea has erupted a spectrum of lava compositions resembling historical Kilauea lavas at one end and Mauna Loa lavas at the other. We discuss the cause of this diversity, and speculate that magma from Mauna Loa may have invaded Kilauea's 'high-level' magmatic plumbing system. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Geochemical evidence of multiple isolated magma batches in the paired Mamaku and Ohakuri eruption, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, F.; Deering, C. D.; Gravley, D.; kennedy, B.; Chambefort, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    same type pumice fragments), suggesting that these magma batches did not interact with each other. Based on our comprehensive geochemical analysis, the pre-eruptive geometry of the magmatic reservoirs can be deduced and a possible origin for triggering of the eruption proposed. First, the region most likely included five different magma batches, extracted from the same source region (i.e. a continuous intermediate mush zone beneath the Mamaku-Ohakuri region). These magma batches were juxtaposed and isolated from each other in the upper crust and evolved separately until eruption. Minor geochemical differences in the batches are likely to be generated because of different extraction conditions of the rhyolites, from a slight heterogeneous mush. Second, the lack of evidence in melt compositions for recharge prior to eruption, and from quartz-cathodoluminescence imaging, suggests that a magmatic input is unlikely to be an eruption trigger. However, tectonic activity, already suggested as a potential trigger by previous authors, could be an efficient way to activate these isolated magma batches. The evacuation of one magma batch could adjust regional tectonics sufficiently to trigger earthquakes and erupt the other isolated batches. Collateral subsidence features between the calderas may indicate lateral magma withdrawal of one or more of the batches.

  15. Along and across arc geochemical variations in NW Central America: Evidence for involvement of lithospheric pyroxenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydolph, Ken; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; Bogaard, Paul van den; Portnyagin, Maxim; Bindeman, Ilya; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2012-05-01

    The Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) has been the subject of intensive research over the past few years, leading to a variety of distinct models for the origin of CAVA lavas with various source components. We present a new model for the NW Central American Volcanic Arc based on a comprehensive new geochemical data set (major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-O isotope ratios) of mafic volcanic front (VF), behind the volcanic front (BVF) and back-arc (BA) lava and tephra samples from NW Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. Additionally we present data on subducting Cocos Plate sediments (from DSDP Leg 67 Sites 495 and 499) and igneous oceanic crust (from DSDP Leg 67 Site 495), and Guatemalan (Chortis Block) granitic and metamorphic continental basement. We observe systematic variations in trace element and isotopic compositions both along and across the arc. The data require at least three different endmembers for the volcanism in NW Central America. (1) The NW Nicaragua VF lavas require an endmember with very high Ba/(La, Th) and U/Th, relatively radiogenic Sr, Nd and Hf but unradiogenic Pb and low δ18O, reflecting a largely serpentinite-derived fluid/hydrous melt flux from the subducting slab into a depleted N-MORB type of mantle wedge. (2) The Guatemala VF and BVF mafic lavas require an enriched endmember with low Ba/(La, Th), U/Th, high δ18O and radiogenic Sr and Pb but unradiogenic Nd and Hf isotope ratios. Correlations of Hf with both Nd and Pb isotopic compositions are not consistent with this endmember being subducted sediments. Granitic samples from the Chiquimula Plutonic Complex in Guatemala have the appropriate isotopic composition to serve as this endmember, but the large amounts of assimilation required to explain the isotope data are not consistent with the basaltic compositions of the volcanic rocks. In addition, mixing regressions on Nd vs. Hf and the Sr and O isotope plots do not go through the data. Therefore, we propose that this

  16. Pervasive Layering in the Lunar Highland Crust: Evidence from Apollos 15, 16,and 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Yang, Tiffany

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results of a photogeologic reconnaissance of 70 mm photographs taken on the lunar surface during the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions, whose primary objective was to investigate the lunar highland crust. Photographs at all three sites, notably the Apennine Front, show pervasive layered structure. These layers are easily distinguished from lighting artifacts, and are considered genuine crustal structures. Their number, thickness, and extent implies that they are lava flows, not ejecta blankets or intrusive features. They appear to be the upper part of the earliest lunar crust, possibly forming a layer tens of kilometers thick. Remote sensing studies (X-ray fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy), indicate that the highland crust is dominantly a feldspathic basalt. It is concluded that the highland layers represent a global crust formed by eruptions of high-alumina basalt in the first few hundred million years of the Moon's history.

  17. Geochemical evidence for anoxic deep water in the Arabian Sea during the last glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Bhattacharya, S.K.; Sarin, M.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Various paleoceanographic studies have indicated that the deep ocean was probably depleted in dissolved oxygen during the last glacial period ([approximately]18 kyr B.P.; [delta][sup 18]O, stage 2) compared to present time. However, direct evidence of low oxygen content in the deep waters has been lacking. Here, the authors report geochemical evidence of near anoxic conditions in the deep Arabian Sea during the entire last glacial cycle ([delta][sup 18]O; stages 2, 3, and 4). Anoxia is inferred from the concomitant enrichment of organic carbon and authigenic uranium in the glacial sections of a core from the deep eastern Arabian Sea. The anoxic conditions during the last glacial period, probably caused by a change in deep water circulation, evidently enhanced preservation of organic matter and simultaneous removal of uranium from seawater. 57 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Evidence for micronutrient limitation of biological soil crusts: Importance to arid-lands restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Belnap, J.; Davidson, D.W.; Phillips, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Desertification is a global problem, costly to national economies and human societies. Restoration of biological soil crusts (BSCs) may have an important role to play in the reversal of desertification due to their ability to decrease erosion and enhance soil fertility. To determine if there is evidence that lower fertility may hinder BSC recolonization, we investigated the hypothesis that BSC abundance is driven by soil nutrient concentrations. At a regional scale (north and central Colorado Plateau, USA), moss and lichen cover and richness are correlated with a complex water-nutrient availability gradient and have approximately six-fold higher cover and approximately two-fold higher species richness on sandy soils than on shale-derived soils. At a microscale, mosses and lichens are overrepresented in microhabitats under the north sides of shrub canopies, where water and nutrients are more available. At two spatial scales, and at the individual species and community levels, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that distributions of BSC organisms are determined largely by soil fertility. The micronutrients Mn and Zn figured prominently and consistently in the various analyses, strongly suggesting that these elements are previously unstudied limiting factors in BSC development. Structural-equation modeling of our data is most consistent with the hypothesis of causal relationships between the availability of micronutrients and the abundance of the two major nitrogen (N) fixers of BSCs. Specifically, higher Mn availability may determine greater Collema tenax abundance, and both Mn and Zn may limit Collema coccophorum; alternative causal hypotheses were less consistent with the data. We propose experimental trials of micronutrient addition to promote the restoration of BSC function on disturbed lands. Arid lands, where BSCs are most prevalent, cover ???40% of the terrestrial surface of the earth; thus the information gathered in this study is potentially useful

  19. Evidence for ocean-continent crust boundary beneath the abyssal plain of the East Central Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storetvedt, K. M.

    1987-09-01

    A survey of geophysical results and basalt characteristics of the East Central Atlantic suggests that such data are at present unable to define the seaward limit of the thinned continental crust. The combined evidence from margin sedimentation, deep-sea diapirism, salinity concentration in DSDP-IPOD cores, and the distribution of deep-sea barite and palygorskite-sepiolite assemblages indicate that the Central Atlantic developed from a wide rift basin within a normal continental setting. The notion of an extensive pre-drift basin gains additional support from the occurrences of Lower Cretaceous black shales which are interpreted as resulting from a tectonomagmatic forerunner phase to the actual continental separation process. Seafloor spreading which appears to have commenced at around 90 Ma B.P. (Cenomanian-Turonian), following major phases of subsidence and crustal attenuation in Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous, is identified by an apparently sharp change-over from reducing to oxygenated deep-sea environment as well as by the 'onset' of a major sedimentary hiatus. The new development model of the East Central Atlantic is regarded as a representative example of a global pattern; commencement of seafloor spreading in the Upper Cretaceous probably explains the world wide 'Cenomanian' transgression as well as the formation of extensive Upper Cretaceous sedimentary basins in the interior of the major continental blocks. A consequence of this model is that vertical crustal dynamics seem to be as important as seafloor spreading in the development of the oceanic lithosphere. Thus, in the Central Atlantic spreading is probably confined only to the region of the elevated Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  20. Geochemical Evidence for Calcification from the Drake Passage Time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, D. R.; Lovenduski, N. S.; Takahashi, T.; Stephens, B. B.; Newberger, T.; Dierssen, H. M.; Randolph, K. L.; Freeman, N. M.; Bushinsky, S. M.; Key, R. M.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Sweeney, C.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite imagery suggests high particulate inorganic carbon within a circumpolar region north of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF), but in situ evidence for calcification in this region is sparse. Given the geochemical relationship between calcification and total alkalinity (TA), seasonal changes in surface concentrations of potential alkalinity (PA), which accounts for changes in TA due to variability in salinity and nitrate, can be used as a means to evaluate satellite-based calcification algorithms. Here, we use surface carbonate system measurements collected from 2002 to 2016 for the Drake Passage Time-series (DPT) to quantify rates of calcification across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. We also use vertical PA profiles collected during two cruises across the Drake Passage in March 2006 and September 2009 to estimate the calcium carbonate to organic carbon export ratio. We find geochemical evidence for calcification both north and south of the APF with the highest rates observed north of the APF. Calcification estimates from the DPT are compared to satellite-based estimates and estimates based on hydrographic data from other regions around the Southern Ocean.

  1. Evidence for Buried "Pre-Noachian" Crust Pre-Dating the Oldest Observed Surface Units on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.; Frey, E. L.; Hartmann, W. K.; Tanaka, K. L. T.

    2003-01-01

    Even though the Early Noachian (EN) used in geologic mapping is undefined at the early end, it is often assumed in absolute chronologies to extend back to 4.6 BYA. We explored this assumption by searching for evidence of buried impact basins, in the largest occurrences of Early Noachian terrain. The hypothesis is that if such basins exist, they indicate crust which must predate the surface units mapped as the oldest on Mars, and those units must then be less than 4.6 BY old. Alternatively, if no such buried features are seen, then the surface units may represent crust of the same age below, which could in principle be as old as Mars. Here we show the former alternative is true. There must be crust older than the oldest mapped surface units. We also show that a number of Noachian terrains on Mars appear to have a common total (visible + buried) crater retention age. This might be either the age of the original (planet-wide?) crust of Mars, or may indicate crater saturation.

  2. Geochemical Evidence for Recent Hydrothermal Alteration of Marine Sediments in Mid-Okinawa Trough, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Abe, G.; Yamaguchi, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that submarine hydrothermal system supports diverse microbial life. Bio-essential metals supporting such microbial communities were released from basalts by high-temperature water-rock interaction in deeper part of the oceanic crust and carried by submarine fluid flow. Its total quantity in global hydrothermal settings has been estimated to be on the order of ~1019 g/yr, which is surprisingly on the same order of the total river flows (Urabe et al., 2011). Therefore, it is important to explore how submarine river system works, i.e., to understand mechanism and extent of elemental transport, which should lead to understanding of the roles of hydrothermal circulation in oceanic crust in controlling elemental budget in the global ocean and geochemical conditions to support deep hot biosphere.  We performed REE analysis of marine sediments influenced by submarine hydrothermal activity in Mid-Okinawa Trough. The sediment samples used in this study are from IODP site at Iheya North region and JADE site at Izena region. The samples show alternation between volcanic and clastic sediments. Hydrothermal fluids of this area contain elevated concentrations of volatile components such as H2, CO2, CH4, NH4+, and H2S, supporting diverse chemoautotrophic microbial community (Nakagawa et al., 2005). The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of hydrothermal activity on the REE signature of the sediments. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of the samples show relative enrichment of light over heavy REEs, weak positive Ce anomalies, and variable degrees of negative Eu anomalies. The REE patterns suggest the sediments source was mainly basalt, suggesting insignificant input of continental materials. Negative Eu anomalies found in the IODP site become more pronounced with increasing depth, suggesting progressive increase of hydrothermal alteration where Eu was reductively dissolved into fluids by decomposition of feldspars. Contrary, at the JADE site

  3. Geochemical evidence for airborne dust additions to soils in Channel Islands National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Johnson, D.L.; Reheis, M.; Beann, J.; Skipp, G.; Fisher, E.; Jones, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that dust plays important roles in climate change, biogeochemical cycles, nutrient supply to ecosystems, and soil formation. In Channel Islands National Park, California, soils are clay-rich Vertisols or Alfisols and Mollisols with vertic properties. The soils are overlain by silt-rich mantles that contrast sharply with the underlying clay-rich horizons. Silt mantles contain minerals that are rare or absent in the volcanic rocks that dominate these islands. Immobile trace elements (Sc-Th-La and Ta-Nd-Cr) and rare-earth elements show that the basalt and andesite on the islands have a composition intermediate between upper-continental crust and oceanic crust. In contrast, the silt fractions and, to a lesser extent, clay fractions of the silt mantle have compositions closer to average upper-continental crust and very similar to Mojave Desert dust. Island shelves, exposed during the last glacial period, could have provided a source of eolian sediment for the silt mantles, but this is not supported by mineralogical data. We hypothesize that a more likely source for the silt-rich mantles is airborne dust from mainland California and Baja California, either from the Mojave Desert or from the continental shelf during glacial low stands of sea. Although average winds are from the northwest in coastal California, easterly winds occur numerous times of the year when "Santa Ana" conditions prevail, caused by a high-pressure cell centered over the Great Basin. The eolian silt mantles constitute an important medium of plant growth and provide evidence that abundant eolian silt and clay may be delivered to the eastern Pacific Ocean from inland desert sources. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  4. Heterogeneous Hadean hafnium: evidence of continental crust at 4.4 to 4.5 ga.

    PubMed

    Harrison, T M; Blichert-Toft, J; Müller, W; Albarede, F; Holden, P; Mojzsis, S J

    2005-12-23

    The long-favored paradigm for the development of continental crust is one of progressive growth beginning at approximately 4 billion years ago (Ga). To test this hypothesis, we measured initial 176Hf/177Hf values of 4.01- to 4.37-Ga detrital zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia. epsilonHf (deviations of 176Hf/177Hf from bulk Earth in parts per 10(4)) values show large positive and negative deviations from those of the bulk Earth. Negative values indicate the development of a Lu/Hf reservoir that is consistent with the formation of continental crust (Lu/Hf approximately 0.01), perhaps as early as 4.5 Ga. Positive epsilon(Hf) deviations require early and likely widespread depletion of the upper mantle. These results support the view that continental crust had formed by 4.4 to 4.5 Ga and was rapidly recycled into the mantle.

  5. How to identify oceanic crust-Evidence for a complex break-up in the Mozambique Channel, off East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, Jennifer; Franke, Dieter; Gaedicke, Christoph; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Schnabel, Michael; Stollhofen, Harald; Rose, Jens; Chaheire, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    The identification of oceanic crust at rifted margins plays a crucial role in academic research understanding rifting mechanisms and the architecture of continent-ocean boundaries, and is also important for hydrocarbon exploration extending into deeper water. In this paper, we provide a workflow for the determination of the crustal nature in the Mozambique Channel, east of Davie Ridge, by presenting a compilation of several geophysical attributes of oceanic crust at divergent margins. Previous reconstructions locate the Davie Ridge at the trace of a transform fault, along which Madagascar drifted to the south during the breakup of Gondwana. This implies a sharp transition from continental to oceanic crust seaward of Davie Ridge. Using new multichannel seismic profiles offshore northern Mozambique, we are able to identify distinct portions of stretched basement east of Davie Ridge. Two phases of deformation affecting the basement are observed, with the initial phase resulting in the formation of rotated fault blocks bounded by listric faults. Half-grabens are filled with wedge-shaped, syn-extensional sediments overlain by a prominent unconformity that northward merges with the top of highly reflective, mildly deformed basement, interpreted as oceanic crust. The second phase of deformation is associated with wrench faulting and probably correlates with the southward drift of Madagascar, which implies that the preceding phase affected basement generated or modified prior to the opening of the West Somali Basin. We conclude that the basement is unlikely to consist of normal oceanic crust and suggest that the first extensional phase corresponds to rifting between Madagascar and Africa. We find evidence for a wide area affected by strike-slip deformation, in contrast to the earlier proposed major single transform fault in the vicinity of Davie Ridge and suggest that the Mozambique Channel area to the north of Madagascar may be classified as an oblique rather than sheared

  6. Evidence for gas accumulation beneath the surface crust driving cyclic rise and fall of the lava surface at Halema`uma`u, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Wilson, D.; Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.; Fee, D.; Nadeau, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The ongoing eruption in Halema`uma`u crater, at the summit of Kilauea Volcano, has surpassed the two-year mark and is characterized by lava lake activity in the vent. As of August 2010, the lava lake is about 70 m in diameter and 180 m below the rim of a narrow vent cavity. Although the explosive events that typified the first year of activity have abated, episodic rise and fall of the lava surface remains common. Cycles of rise and fall range from several minutes to eight hours in duration and are characterized by a quiescent rise phase and violent, gas-charged fall, spanning a height change of 20-30 m. Several models have been proposed to explain the cyclic rise and fall of lava surfaces at basaltic volcanoes, which in some cases is referred to as “gas pistoning”. In one model, episodic rise and fall is driven by the ascent of gas slugs from depth. In another, the cyclic behavior is driven by gas accumulation beneath the surface crust, with each cycle terminated by an abrupt failure of the crust, resulting in gas release. Seismic and infrasound data, as well as gas and webcam monitoring, at Halema`uma`u over the past two years strongly support the gas accumulation model, based on several lines of evidence. First, gas emission rates drop significantly below background levels during the rise phase, and increase dramatically during the fall phase, suggesting a process of gas buildup and release as opposed to slug flow. Second, the rise phases can last several hours, which is longer than reasonable slug ascent times. Third, the rise rate decreases over time, and in many cases plateaus, as the lava reaches its high stand, which is contrary to the exponential increase expected for gas slugs. Fourth, webcam video has captured numerous instances where rockfalls piercing the surface crust initiate gas release and lava level drop, suggestive of gas accumulation at shallow levels. Lastly, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) data reveal changes in gas

  7. The geochemical signature of Neogene Eastern Mediterranean sediment: evidence for temporal and spatial variations in provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, Martijn; Vroon, Pieter; Wijbrans, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Subducted sediment is one of the main geochemical components in arc magmas. Although an east-west gradient in Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) sediment composition has been evoked to explain the along-arc geochemical variations in Aegean arc magmas [1], solid evidence for E-W changes in EMS sediment composition is lacking. The EMS sediment dataset is limited to Holocene samples, while the sediment currently underneath the volcanic arc has an age of at least 6 Ma. In order to characterise EMS sediment, we have used a combination of thermogravimetric and geochemical analyses of 45 Neogene DSDP and ODP drill core samples. Thermogravimetric dissociation curves provide a rapid way to determine carbonate-content and relative abundance of clay mineral groups in mixed sediment samples. Clear clay mineral distribution patterns are observed in the EMS: smectite is dominant in Nile sediment, aeolian dust consist mainly of kaolinite while illite is present in coarser (shelf) sediment. Four distinct provenance areas can be recognised on the basis of radiogenic isotope and trace element ratios of the EMS sediment samples. In line with previous studies [e.g. 2], we conclude that Sahara dust and Nile sediment are main constituents of EMS sediment. However, we recognize two additional source areas. Sediment derived from Cyprus and/or SW Turkey, characterised by high Ni/Nb ratios, is an important component in Quaternary EMS sediment. Sediment from the Aegean region has an arc signature (e.g. high La/Nb) and is distinguishable only in the Hellenic Trench. During the Neogene, an increase in aeolian dust input to the EMS is observed, which is consistent with the progressive aridification of the Sahara region. The geochemical characterisation of Neogene EMS sediment and the recognition of distinct provenance areas can be used to assess the contribution of subducted sediment to magmas in the Aeolian and Aegean volcanic arcs. In addition, it allows further high-resolution investigation of

  8. Composition and origin of ferromanganese crusts from equatorial western Pacific seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guozhi; Jansa, Luba; Chu, Fengyou; Zou, Can; Sun, Guosheng

    2015-04-01

    In the equatorial western Pacific, iron-manganese oxyhydroxide crusts (Fe-Mn crusts) and nodules form on basaltic seamounts and on the top of drowned carbonate platform guyots that have been swept free of pelagic sediments. To date, the Fe-Mn crusts have been considered to be almost exclusively of abiotic origin. However, it has recently been suggested that these crusts may be a result of biomineralization. Although the Fe-Mn crust textures in the equatorial western Pacific are similar to those constructed by bacteria and algae, and biomarkers also document the existence of bacteria and algae dispersed within the Fe-Mn crusts, the precipitation, accumulation and distribution of elements, such as Fe, Mn, Ni and Co in Fe-Mn crusts are not controlled by microbial activity. Bacteria and algae are only physically incorporated into the crusts when dead plankton settle on the ocean floor and are trapped on the crust surface. Geochemical evidence suggests a hydrogenous origin of Fe-Mn crusts in the equatorial western Pacific, thus verifying a process for Fe-Mn crusts that involves the precipitation of colloidal phases from seawater followed by extensive scavenging of dissolved trace metals into the mineral phase during crust formation.

  9. Geochemical evidence for Paleozoic oil in Lower Cretaceous O Sandstone, northern Denver basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clayton, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Organic geochemical properties of the oil produced from the Lower Cretaceous O sandstone on the eastern flank of the Denver basin indicate that this oil has been derived from a different source rock than other Cretaceous oils in the basin. O sandstone oil is characterized by low pristane/phytane ratio, high isoprenoid/n-alkane ratios, high asphaltene content, high sulfur content, and slight predominance of even-carbon numbered n-alkanes in the C25+ fraction. These features are evidence of a Paleozoic source and indicate a carbonate rock is the likely source. Preliminary source rock evaluation and correlation data suggest that calcareous black shales and marls of Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) age are the source of the O sandstone oil. This is the first reported occurrence of oil from Paleozoic source rocks in a Cretaceous reservoir in the Denver basin. -from Author

  10. Detrital zircon evidence for Hf isotopic evolution of granitoid crust and continental growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Komiya, Tsuyoshi; Rino, Shuji; Maruyama, Shigenori; Hirata, Takafumi

    2010-04-01

    We have determined U-Pb ages, trace element abundances and Hf isotopic compositions of approximately 1000 detrital zircon grains from the Mississippi, Congo, Yangtze and Amazon Rivers. The U-Pb isotopic data reveal the lack of >3.3 Ga zircons in the river sands, and distinct peaks at 2.7-2.5, 2.2-1.9, 1.7-1.6, 1.2-1.0, 0.9-0.4, and <0.3 Ga in the accumulated age distribution. These peaks correspond well with the timing of supercontinent assembly. The Hf isotopic data indicate that many zircons, even those having Archean U-Pb ages, crystallized from magmas involving an older crustal component, suggesting that granitoid magmatism has been the primary agent of differentiation of the continental crust since the Archean era. We calculated Hf isotopic model ages for the zircons to estimate the mean mantle-extraction ages of their source materials. The oldest zircon Hf model ages of about 3.7 Ga for the river sands suggest that some crust generation had taken place by 3.7 Ga, and that it was subsequently reworked into <3.3 Ga granitoid continental crust. The accumulated model age distribution shows peaks at 3.3-3.0, 2.9-2.4, and 2.0-0.9 Ga. The striking attribute of our new data set is the non-uniformitarian secular change in Hf isotopes of granitoid crusts; Hf isotopic compositions of granitoid crusts deviate from the mantle evolution line from about 3.3 to 2.0 Ga, the deviation declines between 2.0 and 1.3 Ga and again increases afterwards. Consideration of mantle-crust mixing models for granitoid genesis suggests that the noted isotopic trends are best explained if the rate of crust generation globally increased in two stages at around (or before) 3.3 and 1.3 Ga, whereas crustal differentiation was important in the evolution of the continental crust at 2.3-2.2 Ga and after 0.6 Ga. Reconciling the isotopic secular change in granitoid crust with that in sedimentary rocks suggests that sedimentary recycling has essentially taken place in continental settings rather than

  11. Hydrological behaviour of microbiotic crusts on sand dunes of NW China: Experimental evidences and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin Ping; Tedeschi, Anna; Orefice, Nadia; de Mascellis, Roberto; Menenti, Massimo

    2010-05-01

    Large ecological engineering projects were established to reduce and combat the hazards of sandstorms and desertification in northern China. An experiment to evaluate the effects of dunes stabilization by vegetation was carried out at Shapotou in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region at the southeast edge of the Tengger Desert using xerophyte shrubs (Caragana korshinskii, Hedysarum scoparium and Artemisia ordosica) planted in straw checkerboard plots in 1956, 1964, 1981, 1987, 1998, and 2002. The fixed sand surface led to the formation of biotic soil crusts. Biotic crusts formed at the soil surface in the interspaces between shrubs and contribute to stabilization of soil surfaces. Previous results on the area have showed that: i) straw checkerboards enhance the capacity of the dune system to trap dust, leading to the accumulation of soil organic matter and nutrients; ii) the longer the period of dune stabilization, the greater the soil clay content in the shallow soil profile (0-5 cm), and greater the fractal dimension of soil particle size distribution. Benefit apart, one should be aware that the formation of a crusted layer at the soil surface is generally characterized by an altered pore-size distribution, with a frequent decrease of hydraulic conductivity which can induce changes of the water regime of the whole soil profile. Accordingly, the main objective of the paper is to evaluate the equivalent (from a hydraulic point of view) geometry of the crusted layer and to verify if the specific characteristics of the crusted soil layer, although local by nature, affect the hydrological behaviour of the whole soil profile. In fact, it is expected that, due to the formation of an upper, impeding soil layer, the lower soil layers do not reach saturation. Such behaviour has important consequences on both water flow and storages in soils. The final aim will be to understand how the crust at the surface of the artificially stabilized sand dune affects the infiltration capacity

  12. Seismic evidence of hyper-stretched crust and mantle exhumation offshore Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savva, D.; Meresse, F.; Pubellier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Lavier, L.; Po, K. Wong; Franke, D.; Steuer, S.; Sapin, F.; Auxietre, J. L.; Lamy, G.

    2013-11-01

    We study the evolution of the Eocene-Recent Phu Khanh Basin opened during the rifting of the South China Sea (SCS). This sub-basin formed when continental crust ruptured along the East-Vietnam Boundary Fault (EVBF) at the western edge of the SCS. Using high quality long-streamer seismic lines we interpret structures that highlight the different phases of the SCS rifting and processes related to crustal boudinage. Extreme crustal thinning and mantle uplift that sometimes places sediments in contact with the Moho discontinuity mark the central part of the basin. The mantle is shallowest there and marks the final rupture of the continental crust during an intense phase of mantle upwelling. There, a low-angle detachment fault separates several crustal blocks from the Moho. The cylindrical axis of the Moho rise is roughly parallel to the trend of the South China Sea propagator. Above the mantle, the upper and lower crusts form large crustal boudins. The network of normal faults is dense in the upper crust and occasionally propagates into the lower crust. However, the lower crust is missing at some places. The seismic facies above the Moho rise is poorly stratified and might have been affected by a certain degree of metamorphism. At the apex of mantle uplift, there are frequent indications of fluid circulations, including volcanic edifices and gas escapes features. Three stages of extension are clearly identifiable, with ages of the two youngest constrained by well calibration: the first and oldest rift sequence is situated between the tilted pre-rift basement and the Oligocene horizons (32 Ma); the second is delimited by the Oligocene to the Mid Miocene (15.5 Ma) horizons, and the third is bound by the Mid Miocene and the Upper Miocene (before 10.5 Ma) horizons. These three rift episodes formed in at least two extension directions, the first N-S and the second NW-SE. The distinct Mid Miocene (15.5 Ma) horizon is tilted and the above layers show a diverging reflection

  13. Surface wave dispersion across Tibet: Direct evidence for radial anisotropy in the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duret, F.; Shapiro, N. M.; Cao, Z.; Levin, V. L.; Molnar, P. H.; Roecker, S.

    2010-12-01

    We analyze broadband records of May 12, 2008 Sichuan earthquake aftershocks from stations in western Tibet, to develop an average 1D shear-wave velocity model of the Tibetan crust. Previous study (Shapiro et al. (2004)) has revealed 10% to 20% radial anisotropy throughout the middle crust, suggesting that the Tibetan plateau has been deformed consistent with the notion of channel flow within the crust. However, this result was based on using a data set sampling large areas outside Tibet. In our study, we use records of selected strong aftershocks from May 12, 2008 Sichuan earthquake by seismic stations of an ongoing western Tibet PASSCAL experiment. This dataset samples exclusively the Tibetan plateau along an area extending ˜1500 km East-West, and ˜300 km North-South. We selected a set of 60 traces for Rayleigh waves and 53 traces for Love waves and applied the Frequency-Time Analysis to measure surface wave group velocities between 10 and 100 s, and combined them together to obtain average Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion curves, and their standard deviation. Rayleigh waves exhibit a clear Airy phase, with a marked minimum at ˜35 s, suggesting that the vertically polarized S-wave velocities in upper and middle crust are relatively low. Such minimum is not observed for Love waves, implying that horizontally polarized S-waves propagate faster than vertically polarized ones, and therefore suggesting that radial anisotropy characterizes the Tibetan plateau. We simultaneously inverted Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves using a Monte-Carlo method, to deduce an average 1D shear-wave velocity profile of the Tibetan crust and upper-mantle. When we did not introduce radial anisotropy, we found a relatively thick crust, with the Moho at ˜65 km, but were unable to fit both Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves within their error bars. Predicted Rayleigh waves were systematically faster than measured, and Love waves slower. To resolve this

  14. Thin crust as evidence for depleted mantle supporting the Marion Rise.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huaiyang; Dick, Henry J B

    2013-02-14

    The global ridge system is dominated by oceanic rises reflecting large variations in axial depth associated with mantle hotspots. The little-studied Marion Rise is as large as the Icelandic Rise, considering both length and depth, but has an axial rift (rather than a high) nearly its entire length. Uniquely along the Southwest Indian Ridge systematic sampling allows direct examination of crustal architecture over its full length. Here we show that, unlike the Icelandic Rise, peridotites are extensively exposed high on the rise, revealing that the crust is generally thin, and often missing, over a rifted rise. Therefore the Marion Rise must be largely an isostatic response to ancient melting events that created low-density depleted mantle beneath the Southwest Indian Ridge rather than thickened crust or a large thermal anomaly. The origin of this depleted mantle is probably the mantle emplaced into the African asthenosphere during the Karoo and Madagascar flood basalt events.

  15. Titanium isotopic evidence for felsic crust and plate tectonics 3.5 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Greber, Nicolas D; Dauphas, Nicolas; Bekker, Andrey; Ptáček, Matouš P; Bindeman, Ilya N; Hofmann, Axel

    2017-09-22

    Earth exhibits a dichotomy in elevation and chemical composition between the continents and ocean floor. Reconstructing when this dichotomy arose is important for understanding when plate tectonics started and how the supply of nutrients to the oceans changed through time. We measured the titanium isotopic composition of shales to constrain the chemical composition of the continental crust exposed to weathering and found that shales of all ages have a uniform isotopic composition. This can only be explained if the emerged crust was predominantly felsic (silica-rich) since 3.5 billion years ago, requiring an early initiation of plate tectonics. We also observed a change in the abundance of biologically important nutrients phosphorus and nickel across the Archean-Proterozoic boundary, which might have helped trigger the rise in atmospheric oxygen. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Evidence for a seismogenic upper mantle and lower crust in the Baikal rift

    SciTech Connect

    Deverchere, J.; Houdry, F. ); Diament, M. ); Solonenko, N.V.; Solonenko, A.V. )

    1991-06-01

    The high level seismicity of the Baikal rift zone and its spatial distribution in dense swarms and belts provide an opportunity to study the seismogenic behavior of a continental lithosphere submitted to extension in an early stage. Using data from a regional seismological network, the authors analyze a significantly large set of events from an earthquake swarm located east of the nearly aseismic northern Baikal lake. They find that at least 10% of the well-constrained events are located in the lower crust or the uppermost mantle. The fault plane solutions of earthquakes within the crust define a NW-SE extensional stress regime perpendicular to the rift axis. Results confirm the idea that zones of continental extension may exhibit significant rigidity. The authors propose to infer a migration of deformation from the northern Baikal lake to an initially stronger part of the lithosphere, i.e. the Barguzin rift and its extension to the east.

  17. Revisiting diagenesis on the Ontong Java Plateau: Evidence for authigenic crust precipitation in Globorotalia tumida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branson, Oscar; Read, Elizabeth; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Rau, Christoph; Elderfield, Henry

    2015-11-01

    The calcite tests of foraminifera lie in marine sediments for thousands to millions of years, before being analyzed to generate trace element and isotope paleoproxy records. These sediments constitute a distinct physio-chemical environment from the conditions in which the tests formed. Storage in sediments can modify the trace element and isotopic content of foraminiferal calcite through diagenetic alteration, which has the potential to confound their paleoceanographic interpretation. A previous study of Globorotalia tumida from the Ontong Java Plateau, western equatorial Pacific, found that preferential dissolution of higher-Mg chamber calcite and the preservation of a low-Mg crust on the tests significantly reduced whole-test Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca. Here we revisit specimens with a combination of synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (sXCT) and electron probe microanalyses to reevaluate the nature of their diagenetic alteration. The dissolution of higher-Mg calcite with depth was directly observed in the sXCT data, confirming the inference of the previous study. The sXCT data further reveal a thickening of the chemically and structurally distinct calcite crust with depth. We propose that these crusts have a diagenetic origin, driven by the simultaneous dissolution of high-Mg chamber calcite and precipitation of low-Mg crust from the resulting modified pore water solution. While the breadth of the study is limited by the nature of the techniques, the observation of both dissolution and reprecipitation of foraminiferal calcite serves to demonstrate the action of two simultaneous diagenetic alteration processes, with significant impacts on the resulting paleoproxy signals.

  18. Yin of birthing and the Yang of destroying continental crust at ocean-margin and crust-suturing subduction zones—exploring evidence about processes, amounts, and the Phanerozoic balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, D. W.; Stern, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    INTRODUCTION: Field evidence implies that the creation of juvenile continental crust by mantle melting is paired with the destruction of older crust and its recycling to the mantle. The tectonic notion of birthing and annihilation is philosophically expressed by the Chinese concept of the twained and inseparable processes of yin-yang. Since at least the Phanerozoic these opposing processes appear to have been most active at the subduction zones (SZs) of ocean margins (i.e., Peru-Chile margin) and suture-building collision zones (i.e. closing of Tethys). Crust is also created and destroyed by non-plate tectonic processes, in particular additions by hotspot melting and losses by foundering of lower crust. BASIC OBSERVATIONS: Evidence exists that the creation of juvenile crust is impressively voluminous at newly formed SZs, in particular those that build the massifs of offshore arcs. Modern intra-oceanic arcs (e.g., the Aleutian and IBM arcs) have since the early Tertiary grown at a rate of 100-150 km3/Myr/km of SZ, thus adding to the inventory of continental crust at a global rate of about 1.5 km3/yr (= 1.5 Armstrong units or AU). The arc massifs forming along continental margin (e.g., Andean arc) compile at a much slower rate (30 km3/Myr/km of SZ) but globally account for about +1.0 AU of juvenile growth. An additional +0.7 AU is estimated supplied by continental rift and hotspot volcanism. The opposite or destructive Yang processes of sediment subduction and subduction erosion remove and transport crustal material toward and into the mantle at modern ocean-margin SZs. The global rate is evidentially estimated at about -2.5 AU. Similar observations of missing material estimate that a large volume, at least -0.7 AU or greater, of continental crust is loss at the SZs of colliding or suturing crustal blocks. The greater volume of the loss is effected by the detachment and en-mass sinking of deeply underthrust continental edges. THE BALANCE: During the Phanerozoic

  19. Seismic evidence for hyper-stretched crust and mantle exhumation offshore Vietnam.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savva, D.; Meresse, F.; Pubellier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Franke, D.; Steuer, S.; Sapin, F.; Auxietre, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    The Phu Khan basin is one of the sub-basins opened during the rifting of the South China Sea during the Eocene. The basin is located against the East-Vietnam Boundary Fault (EVBF) to the west and the oceanic crust to the east. Good quality seismic lines allow us to observe structures which highlight the rifting history of the South China Sea margin and the processes of crustal boudinage. A Moho rise is the prominent feature of the Central part of the basin. The mantle is shallowest in the center of the basin and at places is directly in contact with the sediments, via a large low-angle detachment fault which separates several crustal blocks. The axis of the Moho rise is roughly parallel to the South China Sea propagator direction. As a consequence, the upper and lower crusts are strongly extended by large crustal boudins. The network of normal fault is dense in the upper crust and propagates into the lower crust occasionally. However, the lower crust seems to be missing at some places. At the apex of the Moho rise, several indicators of fluids circulations have been observed, including volcanic edifices and gas escapes features. The seismic facies just above this Moho rise looks poorly stratified and might be affected by a certain degree of metamorphism. Three stages of extension are clearly identifiable, with age constrained by wells calibration of the horizons: the oldest rift sequence is identified from basement to Oligocene horizons; a second from Oligocene to Mid Miocene (15.5 Ma), and a third from Mid-Miocene to Upper Miocene (10.5 Ma). These three rifts have been formed with at least two directions of extension, a first which is North-South and a second NW - SE The well imaged 15.5 Ma horizon is tilted, as well as part of the subsequent in-filling which is fan-shaped. These are in turn sealed by the 10.5Ma unconformity. Although tectonic activity appears diachronous from north to south, we suggest that cessation of rifting and opening did not occur before 12

  20. Paleoproterozoic gabbro-diorite-granite magmatism of the Batomga Rise (NE Aldan Shield): Sm-Nd isotope geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. K.; Bogomolov, E. S.; Glebovitskii, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    The geochemical similarity and almost simultaneous (2055-2060 Ma) formation of Utakachan gabbro-amphibolite, Jagdakin granodiorite-diorite, Khoyunda granitoid, and Tygymyt leucogranite complexes, which inruded metamorphic formations of the Batomga Group are evidence of their formaton from unified magmatic source. All this makes it possibble to combine aforementioned complexes into the unified Early Proterozoic diferentiated gabbro-diorite-granite complex.

  1. Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Warner, Nathaniel R; Jackson, Robert B; Darrah, Thomas H; Osborn, Stephen G; Down, Adrian; Zhao, Kaiguang; White, Alissa; Vengosh, Avner

    2012-07-24

    The debate surrounding the safety of shale gas development in the Appalachian Basin has generated increased awareness of drinking water quality in rural communities. Concerns include the potential for migration of stray gas, metal-rich formation brines, and hydraulic fracturing and/or flowback fluids to drinking water aquifers. A critical question common to these environmental risks is the hydraulic connectivity between the shale gas formations and the overlying shallow drinking water aquifers. We present geochemical evidence from northeastern Pennsylvania showing that pathways, unrelated to recent drilling activities, exist in some locations between deep underlying formations and shallow drinking water aquifers. Integration of chemical data (Br, Cl, Na, Ba, Sr, and Li) and isotopic ratios ((87)Sr/(86)Sr, (2)H/H, (18)O/(16)O, and (228)Ra/(226)Ra) from this and previous studies in 426 shallow groundwater samples and 83 northern Appalachian brine samples suggest that mixing relationships between shallow ground water and a deep formation brine causes groundwater salinization in some locations. The strong geochemical fingerprint in the salinized (Cl > 20 mg/L) groundwater sampled from the Alluvium, Catskill, and Lock Haven aquifers suggests possible migration of Marcellus brine through naturally occurring pathways. The occurrences of saline water do not correlate with the location of shale-gas wells and are consistent with reported data before rapid shale-gas development in the region; however, the presence of these fluids suggests conductive pathways and specific geostructural and/or hydrodynamic regimes in northeastern Pennsylvania that are at increased risk for contamination of shallow drinking water resources, particularly by fugitive gases, because of natural hydraulic connections to deeper formations.

  2. Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Nathaniel R.; Jackson, Robert B.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Osborn, Stephen G.; Down, Adrian; Zhao, Kaiguang; White, Alissa; Vengosh, Avner

    2012-01-01

    The debate surrounding the safety of shale gas development in the Appalachian Basin has generated increased awareness of drinking water quality in rural communities. Concerns include the potential for migration of stray gas, metal-rich formation brines, and hydraulic fracturing and/or flowback fluids to drinking water aquifers. A critical question common to these environmental risks is the hydraulic connectivity between the shale gas formations and the overlying shallow drinking water aquifers. We present geochemical evidence from northeastern Pennsylvania showing that pathways, unrelated to recent drilling activities, exist in some locations between deep underlying formations and shallow drinking water aquifers. Integration of chemical data (Br, Cl, Na, Ba, Sr, and Li) and isotopic ratios (87Sr/86Sr, 2H/H, 18O/16O, and 228Ra/226Ra) from this and previous studies in 426 shallow groundwater samples and 83 northern Appalachian brine samples suggest that mixing relationships between shallow ground water and a deep formation brine causes groundwater salinization in some locations. The strong geochemical fingerprint in the salinized (Cl > 20 mg/L) groundwater sampled from the Alluvium, Catskill, and Lock Haven aquifers suggests possible migration of Marcellus brine through naturally occurring pathways. The occurrences of saline water do not correlate with the location of shale-gas wells and are consistent with reported data before rapid shale-gas development in the region; however, the presence of these fluids suggests conductive pathways and specific geostructural and/or hydrodynamic regimes in northeastern Pennsylvania that are at increased risk for contamination of shallow drinking water resources, particularly by fugitive gases, because of natural hydraulic connections to deeper formations. PMID:22778445

  3. Evidence for Buried "Pre-Noachian" Crust Pre-Dating the Oldest Observed Surface Units on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.; Frey, E. L.; Hartmann, W. K.; Tanaka, K. L. T.

    2004-01-01

    MOLA gridded data shows clear evidence for Quasi-Circular Depressions not visible on images in Early Noachian (EN) terrain units on Mars. We suggest these are buried impact basins that pre-date the superimposed craters whose high density makes these EN units the oldest visible at the surface of Mars. There is crust older than the oldest visible terrain units on Mars, and these EN units cannot date from 4.6 BYA. These and other Noachian units have similar total (visible + buried) crater retention ages, suggesting a common "pre-Noachian" crustal age OR crater saturation beyond which we cannot see.

  4. Evidence for the Buried "Pre-Noachian" Crust Pre-Dating the Oldest Observed Surface Units on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.; Frey, E. L.; Hartmann, W. K.; Tanaka, K. L. T.

    2003-01-01

    MOLA gridded data shows clear evidence for Quasi-Circular Depressions not visible on images in Early Noachian (EN) terrain units on Mars. We suggest these are buried impact basins that pre-date the superimposed craters whose high density makes these EN units the oldest visible at the surface of Mars. There is crust older than the oldest visible terrain units on Mars, and these EN units cannot date from 4.6 BYA. These and other Noa-chian units have similar total (visible + buried) crater retention ages, suggesting a common "pre-Noachian" crustal age OR crater saturation beyond which we cannot see.

  5. Evidence for the Buried "Pre-Noachian" Crust Pre-Dating the Oldest Observed Surface Units on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.; Frey, E. L.; Hartmann, W. K.; Tanaka, K. L. T.

    2003-01-01

    MOLA gridded data shows clear evidence for Quasi-Circular Depressions not visible on images in Early Noachian (EN) terrain units on Mars. We suggest these are buried impact basins that pre-date the superimposed craters whose high density makes these EN units the oldest visible at the surface of Mars. There is crust older than the oldest visible terrain units on Mars, and these EN units cannot date from 4.6 BYA. These and other Noa-chian units have similar total (visible + buried) crater retention ages, suggesting a common "pre-Noachian" crustal age OR crater saturation beyond which we cannot see.

  6. Deucalionis Regio, Mars: Evidence for a unique mineralogic endmember and a crusted surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merenyi, E.; Edgett, K. S.; Singer, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    A small equatorial region south of Sinus Meridiani, Deucalionis Regio, has been found spectrally distinct from other regions as seen in a high spectral resolution telescopic image of the meridian hemisphere of Mars. Analysis of Viking IRTM and other related data suggest that Deucalionis Regio has a crusted surface. The crust-bonding minerals may contribute to the spectral uniqueness of this region. Two independent analyses of spectral images, linear spectral mixing and supervised classification based on the spectral shapes, showed that in addition to the well-known spectral endmember regions in this image (western Arabia, south Acidalia, and Sinus Meridiani), Deucalionis Regio has spectral properties that are unique enough to make it a principle endmember unit. In those earlier works, Deucalionis Regio was referred to as 'Meridiani Border.' Analysis of thermal inertia, rock abundance, and albedo information derived from Viking images and Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data obtained 1977-80 also indicate that Deucalionis Regio has a surface of distinctly different physical properties when compared to Arabia, Sinus Meridiani, and Acidalia. Deucalionis Regio has a thermal inertia equivalent to the Martian average, a low rock abundance (less than 5 percent), and an intermediate albedo and color. Considerable effort by previous investigators has revealed a consistent model for the surface (upper few cm) properties of the endmember reigons Arabia, Sinus Meridiani, and Acidalia. Compared with these regions, we consider that Deucalionis Regio is not a region of either (1) unconsolidated, fine bright dust like Arabia, (2) considerable windblown unconsolidated sand like Sinus Meridiani, or (3) a rocky-and-sandy surface like Acidalia. Thus, we are forced to consider that either the surface of Deucalionis Regio is made of unconsolidated fine to medium sand (about 250 microns) of an unusual and previously unreported color and albedo, or that the surface is crusted, fine

  7. Crust beneath the northwestern Deccan Volcanic Province, India: Evidence for uplift and magmatic underplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Madhusudhan; Kumar, M. Ravi; Rastogi, B. K.

    2015-05-01

    The northwestern Deccan Volcanic Province of India and its pericratonic rift basins were reactivated during different stages after the breakup of India from the Gondwanaland and collision with the Asian plate. In this study, we present results of crustal thickness and average crustal Vp/Vs ratios beneath this plume-affected region using common conversion point imaging and H-k stacking analysis of 6893 receiver functions using data from a network comprising 58 broadband seismic stations sited on diverse tectonic terrains. We find large variations in crustal thickness, with the Moho depths varying from 28 to 43 km in the Kachchh rift, 28 to 38 km in the Cambay rift, 39.5-41.5 km in the north and eastern parts of the Cambay rift, and 29 to 39 km in the Saurashtra region and South Gujarat. A Moho upwarp of 6 to 7 km in the Saurashtra region can be attributed to positive buoyancy and uplift due to thermal influx affected by the Reunion plume. High crustal Vp/Vs ratios beneath the Kachchh rift (1.8 to 2.05), coastal areas of Saurashtra (1.75 to 2.06), and North Gujarat (1.81 to 1.85) indicate dominance of a mafic/ultramafic crust. High regional heat flow, high electrical conductivity, large intracrustal S wave velocity reduction, and high average crustal Poisson's ratios are consistent with partial melt related to the process of magmatic underplating in the lower crust. At other stations, the crust appears to be felsic with Vp/Vs ratios in the range of 1.57 to 1.76.

  8. Evidence from xenoliths for a dynamic lower crust, eastern Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanchar, John M.; Miller, Calvin F.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Bennett, Victoria C.; Staude, John-Mark G.

    1994-01-01

    Garnet-rich xenoliths in a Tertiary dike in the eastern Mojave Desert, California, preserve information about the nature and history of the lower crust. These xenoliths record pressures of ∼ 10–12 kbar and temperatures of ∼ 750–800°C. Approximately 25% have mafic compositions and bear hornblende + plagioclase + clinopyroxene + quartz in addition to garnet. The remainder, all of which contain quartz, include quartzose, quartzofeldspathic, and aluminous (kyanite±sillimanite-bearing) varieties. Most xenoliths have identifiable protoliths—mafic from intermediate or mafic igneous rocks, quartzose from quartz-rich sedimentary rocks, aluminous from Al-rich graywackes or pelites, and quartzofeldspathic from feldspathic sediments and/or intermediate to felsic igneous rocks. However, many have unusual chemical compositions characterized by high FeO(t), FeO(t)/MgO, Al2O3, and Al2O3/CaO, which correspond to high garnet abundance. The mineralogy and major-and trace-element compositions are consistent with the interpretation that the xenoliths are the garnet-rich residues of high-pressure crustal melting, from which granitic melt was extracted. High 87Sr/86Sr and low 143Nd/144Nd, together with highly discordant zircons from a single sample with Pb/Pb ages of ∼ 1.7 Ga, demonstrate that the crustal material represented by the xenoliths is at least as old as Early Proterozoic. This supracrustal-bearing lithologic assemblage may have been emplaced in the lower crust during either Proterozoic or Mesozoic orogenesis, but Sr and Nd model ages> 4 Ga require late Phanerozoic modification of parent/daughter ratios, presumably during the anatectic event. Pressures of equilibration indicate that peak metamorphism and melting occurred before the Mojave crust had thinned to its current thickness of <30 km. The compositions of the xenoliths suggest that the lower crust here is grossly similar to estimated world-wide lower-crustal compositions in terms of silica and mafic content

  9. Evidence for Constructing Continental Crust by Deep Accretion of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourigan, J. K.; Brandon, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The ultimate fate of sediment in subduction zones is not completely understood. The mass balance of continental crust, and thus the growth history thereof, requires better quantification of the fraction of sediment that is subducted into the mantle vs. that which is ultimately underplated or otherwise reincorporated into the continents. Microanalytical zircon U-Th-Pb chronometry has been critical for revealing the age and origin of metasedimentary rocks. We highlight three recent examples from the literature and our own work in the Sredinniy Range of Kamchatka which demonstrate that ultimate fate substantial volumes of sediment that are deeply accreted and become otherwise indistinguishable from average continental crust. These examples are: (1) the Pelona-Orucopia-Rand-Sierra de Salinas schist (e.g., Grove et al, 2009); (2) the Swakane gneiss (Matzel et al, 2004); (3) Pamir xenoliths (Ducea et al.,2003; ); and our work in (4) the Sredinniy Range, Kamchatka (Hourigan et al.,2009); and (5) the Olympic Mtns of Washington. Each of these suites of rocks exhibit a range of detrital zircon ages with young peak that is similar to the age of sediment subduction. The range implies incorporation of isotopically evolved (continental) and relatively juvenile (volcanic arc) source regions. In these cases, subduction, attendant metamorphic transformation and deep accretion of these metasedimentary sequences resulted in reincorporation large volumes of sediment to the base of the crust. In this contribution we summarize the salient features of the literature examples and detail the results of our own work from Kamchatka. There within an Eocene-age arc-continent collision zone Cretaceous and Paleocene sedimentary rocks belonging to the margin of northeastern Russia were deeply buried and subjected to metamorphism at upper amphibolite to granulite facies. Statisitcal similarity of detrital zircon grain-age spectra from these high grade metasediments and Paleogene strata of the NE

  10. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.S.; Frost, T.P.; Glazner, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  11. Thorium isotope evidence for melting of the mafic oceanic crust beneath the Izu arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymuth, Heye; Ivko, Ben; Gill, James B.; Tamura, Yoshihiko; Elliott, Tim

    2016-08-01

    We address the question of whether melting of the mafic oceanic crust occurs beneath ordinary volcanic arcs using constraints from U-Series (238U/232Th, 230Th/232Th and 226Ra/230Th) measurements. Alteration of the top few hundred meters of the mafic crust leads to strong U enrichment. Via decay of 238U to 230Th, this results in elevated (230Th/232Th) (where brackets indicate activity ratios) over time-scales of ∼350 ka. This process leads to the high (230Th/232Th), between 2.6 and 11.0 in the mafic altered oceanic crust (AOC) sampled at ODP Sites 801 and 1149 near the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc. Th activity ratios in the Izu arc lavas range from (230Th/232Th) = 1.2-2.0. These values are substantially higher than those in bulk sediment subducting at the Izu trench and also extend to higher values than in mid-ocean ridge basalts and the Mariana arc. We show that the range in Th isotope ratios in the Izu arc lavas is consistent with the presence of a slab melt from a mixed source consisting of AOC and subducted sediments with an AOC mass fraction of up to approximately 80 wt.% in the component added to the arc lava source. The oceanic plate subducting at the Izu arc is comparatively cold which therefore indicates that temperatures high enough for fluid-saturated melting of the AOC are commonly achieved beneath volcanic arcs. The high ratio of AOC/sediments of the slab melt component suggested for the Izu arc lavas requires preferential melting of the AOC. This can be achieved when fluid-saturated melting of the slab is triggered by fluids derived from underlying subducted serpentinites. Dehydration of serpentinites and migration of the fluid into the overlying crust causes melting to start within the AOC. The absence of a significant sediment melt component suggests there was insufficient water to flux both AOC and overlying sediments.

  12. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in california.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D S; Glazner, A F; Frost, T P

    1992-12-18

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  13. Zircon U-Pb dating, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic characteristics of the Jintonghu monzonitic rocks in western Fujian Province, South China: Implication for Cretaceous crust-mantle interactions and lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Lu, An-Huai; Zhao, Hai-Xiang; Yang, Tang-Li; Hou, Ming-Lan

    2016-09-01

    Comprehensive petrological, in situ zircon U-Pb dating, Ti-in-zircon temperature and Hf isotopic compositions, whole rock geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data are reported for the Jintonghu monzonitic intrusions in the western Fujian Province (Interior Cathaysia Block), South China. The Jintonghu monzonitic intrusions were intruded at 95-96 Ma. Their Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions are similar to the coeval and nearby enriched lithospheric mantle-derived mafic and syenitic rocks, indicating that the Jintonghu monzonitic rocks were likely derived from partial melting of the enriched mantle sources. Their high Nb/Ta ratios (average 21.6) suggest that the metasomatically enriched mantle components were involved, which was attributed to the modification of slab-derived fluid and melt by the subduction of the paleo-Pacific Plate. The presence of mafic xenoliths, together with geochemical and isotopic features indicates a mafic-felsic magma mixing. Furthermore, the Jintonghu intrusions may have experienced orthopyroxene-, biotite- and plagioclase-dominated crystallization. Crust-mantle interaction can be identified as two stages, including that the Early Cretaceous mantle metasomatism and lithospheric extension resulted from the paleo-Pacific slab subduction coupled with slab rollback, and the Late Cretaceous crustal activation and enhanced extension induced by dip-angle subduction and the underplating of mantle-derived mafic magma.

  14. Two stage melt-rock interaction in the lower oceanic crust of the Parece Vela basin (Philippine sea), evidence from the primitive troctolites from the Godzilla Megamullion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfilippo, A.; Dick, H. J.; Ohara, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Godzilla Megamullion is a giant oceanic core complex exposed in an extinct slow- to intermediate-spreading segment of the Parece Vela Basin (Philippine sea) [1; 2]. It exposes lower crust and mantle rocks on the sea-floor, offering a unique opportunity to unravel the architecture and the composition of the lower oceanic lithosphere of an extinct back arc basin. Here we present data on primitive troctolites and associated olivine-gabbros from the breakaway area of the Godzilla Megamullion. On the basis of the olivine/plagioclase volume ratio, the troctolites are subdivided into Ol-troctolites (Ol/Pl >1) and Pl-troctolites (Ol/Pl<1), which show evident textural differences. Ol-troctolites have rounded to polygonal olivine, subhedral plagioclase, and poikilitic clinopyroxene. This texture suggests chemical disequilibrium between the olivine and a melt crystallizing plagioclase and clinopyroxene. We interpret these rocks as reaction products of a dunite matrix with transient basaltic melts [e.g. 3; 4]. Pl-troctolites have euhedral plagioclase and poikilitic olivine and clinopyroxene. Irregular shapes and inverse zoning of the plagioclase chadacrysts within the olivine indicate disequilibrium between existing plagioclase and an olivine-clinopyroxene saturated melt. The occurrence of plagioclase chadacrysts within clinopyroxene ranging from irregular to euhedral in shape suggests crystallization of new lower-Na plagioclase with the clinopyroxene. Olivine oikocrysts in the Pl-troctolites have low-NiO olivine in equilibrium with a high-MgO melt. The Pl-troctolites, then, may be the product of reaction between a plagioclase cumulate and a basaltic melt produced by mixing the high-MgO melt residual to the formation of the Ol-troctolites with new magma. The effect of melt-rock reaction in the Pl- and Ol- troctolites explains the sharp decrease in plagioclase An with respect to Mg# in clinopyroxene and olivine. Furthermore, the melt is shifted towards lower Na, which is

  15. Recycling of oceanic crust from a stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone: Evidence from Cenozoic continental basalts in Zhejiang Province, SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Qing; Ma, Chang-Qian; Robinson, Paul T.; Zhou, Qin; Liu, Ming-Liang

    2015-08-01

    Cenozoic continental basalts from Zhejiang Province, southeast China are tholeiitic to weakly alkalic in composition, with moderate MgO contents (6-11 wt.%) and an average Mg# of 62. They display typical OIB-like trace element features, including enrichment in most incompatible elements, both LILE and LREE, and negative K, Pb, Zr, Hf anomalies. In particular, they are characterized by high Fe/Mn (73 ± 5), La/Yb (19 ± 6) and Nb/Ta (18.8 ± 0.4) ratios, which can be attributed to the presence of residual clinopyroxene, garnet and rutile in the mantle source. Based on these minerals, the following hybrid source rocks are hypothesized: garnet pyroxenite/eclogite and peridotite. Clinopyroxene-liquid thermobarometry indicates clinopyroxene crystallization temperatures of > 1257 °C. This is higher than the assumed temperature at the base of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) ( 1220 °C) beneath Zhejiang, thus the magmas were presumably derived from the asthenosphere. Some typical geochemical features such as negative K, Pb anomalies, positive Ba, Sr, Nb, Ta anomalies and the extremely high Os isotopic signatures, suggest participation of EM-like mantle sources, indicative of ancient subducted oceanic crust. (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7037-0.7046) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512832-0.512990) isotope ratios point to the presence of mixed components in the source region, i.e., DMM, EM1 and EM2. Recent seismic tomographic images of the mantle beneath Zhejiang suggest the presence of a subducted slab of oceanic lithosphere in the transition zone. Based on the combined geophysical and geochemical evidence, we propose that the major source of the Zhejiang basaltic magmas was the ancient subducted oceanic slab in the transition zone with an EM-like signature. The other magma sources include depleted asthenospheric peridotite possessing a DMM-like signature. The dynamics of this upwelling hybrid magma was apparently related to westward subduction of the Pacific plate underneath the

  16. Evidence from detrital zircons for the existence of continental crust and oceans on the Earth 4.4 Gyr ago.

    PubMed

    Wilde, S A; Valley, J W; Peck, W H; Graham, C M

    2001-01-11

    No crustal rocks are known to have survived since the time of the intense meteor bombardment that affected Earth between its formation about 4,550 Myr ago and 4,030 Myr, the age of the oldest known components in the Acasta Gneiss of northwestern Canada. But evidence of an even older crust is provided by detrital zircons in metamorphosed sediments at Mt Narryer and Jack Hills in the Narryer Gneiss Terrane, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, where grains as old as approximately 4,276 Myr have been found. Here we report, based on a detailed micro-analytical study of Jack Hills zircons, the discovery of a detrital zircon with an age as old as 4,404+/-8 Myr--about 130 million years older than any previously identified on Earth. We found that the zircon is zoned with respect to rare earth elements and oxygen isotope ratios (delta18O values from 7.4 to 5.0%), indicating that it formed from an evolving magmatic source. The evolved chemistry, high delta18O value and micro-inclusions of SiO2 are consistent with growth from a granitic melt with a delta18O value from 8.5 to 9.5%. Magmatic oxygen isotope ratios in this range point toward the involvement of supracrustal material that has undergone low-temperature interaction with a liquid hydrosphere. This zircon thus represents the earliest evidence for continental crust and oceans on the Earth.

  17. Origin of enriched components in the South Atlantic: Evidence from 40 Ma geochemical zonation of the Discovery Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindrofska, Antje; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul; Werner, Reinhard; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Spatial geochemical zonation is being increasingly recognized in Pacific and Atlantic hotspot tracks and is believed to reflect zonation within plumes upwelling from the margins of the Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of Earth's mantle. We present new 40Ar/39Ar age data for the Discovery Rise (South Atlantic Ocean) that show an age progression in the direction of plate motion from 23 Ma in the southwest to 40 Ma in the northeast of the Rise, consistent with formation of the Rise above a mantle plume. The lavas have incompatible element and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf radiogenic isotope characteristics similar to the enriched DUPAL anomaly occurring in the southern hemisphere. The northern chain of seamounts is compositionally similar to the adjacent Gough subtrack of the bilaterally-zoned Tristan-Gough hotspot track, whereas the southern chain has some of the most extreme DUPAL compositions found in South Atlantic intraplate lavas thus far. The nearby southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, believed to interact with the Discovery hotspot, shows a similar spatial geochemical distribution, consistent with the Discovery hotspot being zoned over its entire 40 Ma history. Our study implies a deep origin for the DUPAL anomaly, suggesting recycling of subcontinental lithospheric mantle (± lower crust) and oceanic crust through the lower mantle. The presence of an additional (Southern Discovery) DUPAL-like component, in addition to the Tristan and Gough/Northern Discovery components, in long-term zoned South Atlantic hotspots, points to the presence of a third lower mantle reservoir and thus is not consistent with the simple model that bilaterally-zoned plumes sample a chemically distinct LLSVP and the ambient mantle outside of the LLSVP.

  18. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE PAGES

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; ...

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore » new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for

  19. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    SciTech Connect

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a

  20. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    PubMed Central

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.

    2015-01-01

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for fossil

  1. Coils and polygonal crust in the Athabasca Valles region, Mars, as evidence for a volcanic history.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Andrew J; Christensen, Philip R

    2012-04-27

    Athabasca Valles is a near-equatorial martian outflow channel that contains many well-preserved features whose formation and composition have been a point of contention. Large plates of terrain that have clearly fractured and drifted may have once been ice rafts or the rocky solidification crust of a large lava flow. We have identified 269 spiral coils ranging from 5 to 30 meters wide on the polygonally patterned interplate terrain that are morphologically consistent with terrestrial lava coils that form in zones of flow shear. This patterned terrain also exhibits signs of fracture and drift, indicating that it is platelike as well. The coils in the Athabasca region are inconsistent with ice rheology, and the plates, spirals, and polygons are interpreted to be of volcanic origin.

  2. Processes of lithosphere evolution: New evidence on the structure of the continental crust and uppermost mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Perchuc, E.; Thybo, H.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the structure of the continental lithosphere, its physical properties, and the mechanisms that formed and modified it since the early Archean. The structure of the upper mantle and the crust is derived primarily from global and regional seismic tomography studies of Eurasia and from global and regional data on seismic anisotropy. These data as documented in the papers of this special issue of Tectonophysics are used to illustrate the role of different tectonic processes in the lithospheric evolution since Archean to present. These include, but are not limited to, cratonization, terrane accretion and collision, continental rifting (both passive and active), subduction, and lithospheric basal erosion due to a relative motion of cratonic keels and the convective mantle. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Seismic reflection character of the Cameroon volcanic line: Evidence for uplifted oceanic crust

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, J.B.; Rosendahl, B.R. )

    1991-11-01

    Deep-imaging multifold seismic lines across submarine parts of the Cameroon volcanic line (west Africa-Gulf of Guinea) show asymmetric uplift of oceanic crust associated with extensive magmatism. The main pulse of uplift occurred after creation of a regional sequence boundary believed to be Miocene in age. The apparent synchroneity of uplift argues against the Cameroon line being a simple hotspot trace, as previously inferred. One plausible theory of origin for the seaward part of the Cameroon volcanic line and its asymmetric uplift geometry combines regional asthenospheric upwelling with restriction of magmatic egress to regularly spaced weak spots, corresponding to fracture-zone crossings. Horizontal motion and buckling also may have occurred along the Cameroon volcanic line.

  4. Erosion by flowing lava: Geochemical evidence in the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.A.; Kadel, S.D.; Greeley, R.; Lesher, C.M.; Clynne, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We sampled basaltic lava flows and underlying dacitic tuff deposits in or near lava tubes of the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington to determine whether the Cave Basalt lavas contain geochemical evidence of substrate contamination by lava erosion. The samples were analyzed using a combination of wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results indicate that the oldest, outer lava tube linings in direct contact with the dacitic substrate are contaminated, whereas the younger, inner lava tube linings are uncontaminated and apparently either more evolved or enriched in residual liquid. The most heavily contaminated lavas occur closer to the vent and in steeper parts of the tube system, and the amount of contamination decreases with increasing distance downstream. These results suggest that erosion by lava and contamination were limited to only the initially emplaced flows and that erosion was localized and enhanced by vigorous laminar flow over steeper slopes. After cooling, the initial Cave Basalt lava flows formed an insulating lining within the tubes that prevented further erosion by later flows. This interpretation is consistent with models of lava erosion that predict higher erosion rates closer to sources and over steeper slopes. A greater abundance of xenoliths and xenocrysts relative to xenomelts in hand samples indicates that mechanical erosion rather than thermal erosion was the dominant erosional process in the Cave Basalt, but further sampling and petrographic analyses must be performed to verify this hypothesis. ?? Springer-Verlag 2003.

  5. Partial melting of the South Qinling orogenic crust, China: Evidence from Triassic migmatites and diorites of the Foping dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Ye, Ri-Sheng; Liu, Bing-Xiang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yuan-Shuo; Siebel, Wolfgang; Chen, Fukun

    2016-09-01

    The Qinling orogen was ultimately formed by suturing of the South Qinling and Yangtze blocks, but the exact timing of the final amalgamation of the two blocks has not been well established so far. Partial melting of the Qinling orogenic continental crust resulted in the generation of migmatites, and such rocks may help to decipher the chronology of such event. In this paper, we report U-Pb ages, trace element, and Hf isotopic compositions of zircons from migmatites and diorite gneisses of the Foping dome, South Qinling. Zircons from migmatites form anhedral grains of variable sizes that are characterized by complex trace element compositions. Based on zircon U-Pb ages, the migmatites can be subdivided into two groups: Group 1 migmatites mainly retain Triassic zircons with U-Pb ages of 214-211 Ma and Hf model ages of 1.46 Ga in core and rim domains; zircons from Group 2 migmatites record both Triassic ( 210 Ma) and Neoproterozoic U-Pb ages, analogous to igneous rocks of the Wudang and Yaolinghe Groups exposed in South Qinling. Zircons from the diorite gneisses yield U-Pb ages of 216-210 Ma with Hf isotopic composition (TDM2 ages of 1.46 Ga) similar to the migmatites. Evidence from whole-rock Nd isotopic analyses also points to a similar genesis between migmatites and diorite gneisses. It is proposed that Group 1 migmatites were derived by melting of Triassic diorites, while Group 2 migmatites were derived from Neoproterozoic igneous rocks, a major basement lithology of South Qinling. Partial melting of the orogenic crust took place at 214-210 Ma, approximately consistent with the retrograde metamorphism of granulites exposed along the suture zone between the South Qinling and Yangtze blocks. We suggest that the collision of these two blocks occurred prior to 215 Ma and that the Foping dome resulted from rapid collapse of an overthickened crust followed by partial melting enhanced by asthenospheric influx.

  6. Geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope evidences of the suprasubduction nature of mesozoic magmatism in the Mongol-Okhotsk Sector of the Pacific Fold Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbeko, I. M.; Chugaev, A. V.; Oleinikova, T. I.; Bortnikov, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this article we present geochemical and isotope characteristics of rocks of the Unerikan, Selitkan and Aezop-Yamalin volcano-plutonic zones of the eastern termination of the Mongol-Okhotsk Orogenic Belt. The obtained data demonstrate that the Mesozoic igneous rocks of the Mongol-Okhotsk sector of the Pacific Folded Belt were formed due to the melting of the continental crust in a tectonic setting corresponding to a suprasubduction one.

  7. Geochemical homogeneity of a long-lived, large silicic system; evidence from the Cerro Galán caldera, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, Chris B.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Wright, Heather M.; Cas, Raymond A. F.

    2011-12-01

    place during the upper-crustal evolution of these larger volume magmas. We attribute this relationship to variations in magma chamber geometry; the younger, largest volume ignimbrites came from flat sill-like magma chambers, reducing the relative proportion of sidewall crystallization and fractionation compared to the older, smaller-volume ignimbrite eruptions. The grey pumice clasts also show evidence of silicic recharge throughout the history of the Cerro Galán system, and recharge days prior to eruption has previously been suggested based on reversely zoned (OH and Cl) apatite phenocrysts. A rare population of plagioclase phenocrysts with thin An-rich rims in juvenile clasts in many ignimbrites supports the importance of recharge in the evolution and potential triggering of eruptions. This study extends the notion that large volumes of nearly identical silicic magmas can be generated repeatedly, producing prolonged geochemical homogeneity from a long-lived magma source in a subduction zone volcanic setting. At Cerro Galán, we propose that there is a zone between mantle magma input and upper crustal chambers, where magmas are geochemically "buffered", producing the underlying geochemical and isotopic signatures. This produces the same parental magmas that are delivered repeatedly to the upper crust. A lower-crustal MASH (melting, assimilation, storage, and homogenization) zone is proposed to act as this buffer zone. Subsequent upper crustal magmatic processes serve only to slightly modify the geochemistry of the magmas.

  8. Geochemical evidence for a Cretaceous oil sand (Bima oil sand) in the Chad Basin, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bata, Timothy; Parnell, John; Samaila, Nuhu K.; Abubakar, M. B.; Maigari, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Paleogeographic studies have shown that Earth was covered with more water during the Cretaceous than it is today, as the global sea level was significantly higher. The Cretaceous witnessed one of the greatest marine transgressions in Earth's history, represented by widespread deposition of sands directly on underlying basement. These sand bodies hold much of the world's heavy oil. Here, we present for the first time, geochemical evidence of a Cretaceous oil sand (Bima oil sand) in the Chad Basin, Nigeria. Bima oil sand is similar to other Cretaceous oil sands, predominantly occurring at shallow depths on basin flanks and generally lacking a seal cover, making the oil susceptible to biodegradation. The bulk properties and distribution of molecular features in oils from the Bima oil sand suggest that they are biodegraded. Sterane maturity parameters and the trisnorhopane thermal indicator for the oils suggest thermal maturities consistent with oils generated as conventional light oils, which later degraded into heavy oils. These oils also show no evidence of 25-norhopane, strongly suggesting that biodegradation occurred at shallow depths, consistent with the shallow depth of occurrence of the Bima Formation at the study locality. Low diasterane/sterane ratios and C29H/C30H ratios greater than 1 suggest a carbonate source rock for the studied oil. The Sterane distribution further suggests that the oils were sourced from marine carbonate rocks. The C32 homohopane isomerization ratios for the Bima oil sand are 0.59-0.60, implying that the source rock has surpassed the main oil generation phase, consistent with burial depths of the Fika and Gongila Formations, which are both possible petroleum source rocks in the basin.

  9. Mineralogical Evidence for the Bulk Transformation of Continental Crust to Ultrahigh-Pressure Conditions in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, E. M.; Hacker, B. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2005-12-01

    Evidence for (ultra)high-pressure --(U)HP-- metamorphism in modern orogenic belts and the preservation of exhumed (U)HP terranes around the world suggest that subduction and exhumation of continental crust plays an important role in Phanerozoic plate tectonics. The Western Gneiss region (WGR) of Norway, a major (U)HP province extending over 60,000 km2, provides an excellent opportunity to study how subduction to depths >100 km affects continental crust. By studying a ~60 km wide transect bounded to the north by Vartdalsfjorden and Rovdefjorden and the south by the Möre og Romsdal county boundary, we are able to examine mineralogical changes that occurred during subduction and exhumation within a rock composed predominantly of orthogneiss and variably transformed mafic bodies, which indicate the depths to which these rocks were subducted. Previous studies (e.g. Hacker et al., 2005) have suggested that Caledonian deformation in WGR host gneisses is primarily limited to brittle-ductile fabrics characterized by greenschist to lower-amphibolite facies metamorphism; the majority of the deformation in the rocks, including the pervasive foliation and foliation-parallel isoclinal folds, occurred between 1200 and 900 Ma. On the northern half of our study area, however, locally occurring neoblastic garnet crosscuts the foliation in the gneiss. The boundary of this garnet zone coincides with the local HP-UHP boundary, as determined by the presence of coesite in eclogite. Because garnet can retain information about changes in pressure and temperature, as well as the availability of water within the crust to catalyze chemical reactions, our findings suggest that 1) portions of the orthogneiss did transform at high pressures, 2) the presence of garnet within the orthogneiss may indicate conditions that approximate UHP and can therefore be useful in defining the boundaries between UHP and HP conditions, and 3) the growth of garnet during (U)HP metamorphism may be controlled by

  10. Geochemical evidence for waning magmatism and polycyclic volcanism at Crater Flat, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V.; Crowe, B.M.

    1991-12-31

    Petrologic and geochemical studies of basaltic rocks in the Yucca Mountain region are currently focused on understanding the evolution of volcanism in the Crater Flat volcanic field and the mechanisms of polycyclic volcanism at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, the youngest center in the Crater Flat volcanic field. Geochemical and petrologic data indicate that the magma chambers which supplied the volcanic centers in Crater Flat became situated at greater crustal depths as the field evolved. Deep magma chambers may be related to a waning magma flux that was unable to sustain upper crystal magma conduits and chambers. Geochemical data from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center indicate that eruptive units identified from field and geomorphic relationships are geochemically distinct. The geochemical variations cannot be explained by fractional crystallization of a single magma batch, indicating that several magma batches were involved in the formation of the Lathrop Wells center. Considering the low magma flux in the Yucca Mountain region in the Quaternary, the probability of several magma batches erupting essentially simultaneously at Lathrop Wells in considered remote. It is more likely that the Lathrop Wells center was formed by a series of eruptions that took place over many thousands of years. The geochemical data from Lathrop Wells is consistent with the concept of a complex, polycyclic volcano, which was originally proposed based on geomorphic and soil-development data.

  11. Featureless spectra on the Moon as evidence of residual lunar primordial crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Nakamura, R.; Matsunaga, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Ishihara, Y.; Morota, T.; Hirata, N.; Ohtake, M.; Hiroi, T.; Yokota, Y.; Haruyama, J.

    2015-12-01

    We report the global distribution of areas exhibiting no absorption features (featureless or FL) on the lunar surface, based on the reflectance spectral data set obtained by the Spectral Profiler onboard Kaguya/SELENE. We found that FL sites are located in impact basins and large impact craters in the Feldspathic Highlands Terrane, while there are no FL sites in the Procellarum regions nor the South Pole-Aitken basin. FL sites in each impact basin/crater are mainly found at the peak rings or rims, where the purest anorthosite (PAN) sites are also found. At the local scale, most of the FL and PAN points are associated with impact craters and peaks. Most of the FL spectra show a steeper (redder) continuum than the PAN spectra, suggesting the occurrence of space weathering effects. We propose that most of the material exhibiting a FL spectrum originate from space weathered PAN. Taking into account all the occurrence trends of FL sites on the Moon, we propose that both the FL and PAN materials were excavated from the primordial lunar crust during ancient basin formations below the megaregolith in the highlands. Since the FL and PAN sites are widely distributed over the lunar surface, our new data may support the existence of a massive PAN layer below the lunar surface.

  12. Continental crust generated in oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hayes, Jorden L.; Hoernle, Kaj; Kelemen, Peter; Everson, Erik; Holbrook, W. Steven; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul; Vance, Eric A.; Chu, Shuyu; Calvert, Andrew J.; Carr, Michael J.; Yogodzinski, Gene M.

    2015-04-01

    Thin oceanic crust is formed by decompression melting of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges, but the origin of the thick and buoyant continental crust is enigmatic. Juvenile continental crust may form from magmas erupted above intra-oceanic subduction zones, where oceanic lithosphere subducts beneath other oceanic lithosphere. However, it is unclear why the subduction of dominantly basaltic oceanic crust would result in the formation of andesitic continental crust at the surface. Here we use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American land bridge, which formed above an intra-oceanic subduction system over the past 70 Myr. We find that the geochemical signature of erupted lavas evolved from basaltic to andesitic about 10 Myr ago--coincident with the onset of subduction of more oceanic crust that originally formed above the Galápagos mantle plume. We also find that seismic P-waves travel through the crust at velocities intermediate between those typically observed for oceanic and continental crust. We develop a continentality index to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust globally. We conclude that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone--a process probably more common in the Archaean--can produce juvenile continental crust.

  13. Continental growth through time by underplating of subducted oceanic crust: Evidence from kimberlites in South Africa and SW Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Neal, Clive R.

    1988-01-01

    In the dynamic model of plate tectonics, it is evident that crustal components are returned to the mantle by subduction. Chemical signatures of these subducted components were identified in ocean island volcanics and in island arc volcanics. Indeed, an origin involving a subducted protolith was postulated for certain types of xenoliths in kimberlite, including diamonds. Recent studies of eclogite xenoliths in kimberlite from southern Africa and megacrysts form the Malaitan alnoite, Solomon islands, indicate that lithospheric underplating by subducted oceanic crust has occurred in these two contrasting areas. The results of new eclogite studies from the Bellsbank kimberlite, South Africa, and isotopic data from the Malaitan alnoite megacryst suite. This forms the basis for discerning the role of lithospheric underplating in the growth of cratons and in the evolution of mantle-derived magma.

  14. Geochemical characterisation of gases along the dead sea rift: Evidences of mantle-co2 degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inguaggiato, C.; Censi, P.; D'Alessandro, W.; Zuddas, P.

    2016-06-01

    The Dead Sea Transform (DST) fault system, where a lateral displacement between the African and Arabian plates occurs, is characterised by anomalous heat flux in the Israeli area close to the border with Syria and Jordan. The concentration of He and CO2, and isotopic composition of He and total dissolved inorganic carbon were studied in cold and thermal waters collected along the DST, in order to investigate the source of volatiles and their relationship with the tectonic framework of the DST. The waters with higher temperature (up to 57.2 °C) are characterised by higher amounts of CO2 and helium (up to 55.72 and 1.91 ∗ 10- 2 cc l- 1, respectively). Helium isotopic data (R/Ra from 0.11 to 2.14) and 4He/20Ne ratios (0.41-106.86) show the presence of deep-deriving fluids consisting of a variable mixture of mantle and crust end-members, with the former reaching up to 35%. Carbon isotope signature of total dissolved carbon from hot waters falls within the range of magmatic values, suggesting the delivery of deep-seated CO2. The geographical distribution of helium isotopic data and isotopic carbon (CO2) values coupled with (CO2/3He ratios) indicate a larger contribution of mantle-derived fluids affecting the northern part of the investigated area, where the waters reach the highest temperature. These evidences suggest the occurrence of a favourable tectonic framework, including a Moho discontinuity up-rise and/or the presence of a deep fault system coupled with the recent magmatic activity recognised in the northern part of Israel.

  15. Cretaceous alkaline intra-plate magmatism in the Ecuadorian Oriente Basin: Geochemical, geochronological and tectonic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Roberto; Baby, Patrice; Duncan, Robert

    2005-08-01

    Small volumes of Cretaceous alkaline basaltic magmas have been identified in the sedimentary infill of the Ecuadorian Oriente foreland basin. They are characterized by a restricted range of compositional variation, low LILE/HFSE ratios and Sr-Nd isotope values within the range of oceanic island basalts (OIB). Reflection seismic data show that a pre-existing NNE-SSW Triassic and Jurassic rift controls the location and occurrence of these alkaline eruptive sites. Radiometric ages ( 40Ar- 39Ar, incremental heating method) and the biostratigraphic record of their surrounding sediments indicate a NNE-SSW systematic age variation for the emplacement of this alkaline volcanism: from Albian (110 ± 5.2 Ma) in the northern part of the Oriente Basin, to Campanian (82.2 ± 2.0 Ma) in the west-central part. The geochemical, geochronological and tectonic evidences suggest that asthenospheric mantle has upwelled and migrated to the SSW, into the region underlying the pre-existing Triassic and Jurassic rift (thin-spot?). We propose that subduction was abandoned, subsequent to the accretion of allochthonous terranes onto the Ecuadorian and Colombian margin in the latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, causing the relict slab material, corresponding to the eastwards-directed leading plate, to roll-back. Unmodified asthenospheric mantle migrated into the region previously occupied by the slab. This resulted in partial melting and the release of magmatic material to the surface in the northern part of the Oriente Basin since at least Aptian times. Then, magmatism migrated along the SSW-trending Central Wrench Corridor of the Oriente Basin during the Upper Cretaceous, probably as a consequence of the lateral propagation of the transpressive inversion of the Triassic-Jurassic rift. Eventually, the Late Cretaceous east-dipping Andean subduction system was renewed farther west, and the development of the compressional retro-foreland Oriente Basin system halted the Cretaceous alkaline

  16. Geochemical evidence of hydrothermal recharge in Lake Baringo, central Kenya Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarits, Corinne; Renaut, Robin W.; Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques; Le Hérissé, Alain; Cotten, Jo; Cabon, Jean-Yves

    2006-06-01

    Lake Baringo, a freshwater lake in the central Kenya Rift Valley, is fed by perennial and ephemeral rivers, direct rainfall, and hot springs on Ol Kokwe Island near the centre of the lake. The lake has no surface outlet, but despite high evaporation rates it maintains dilute waters by subsurface seepage through permeable sediments and faulted lavas. New geochemical analyses (major ions, trace elements) of the river, lake, and hot spring waters and the suspended sediments have been made to determine the main controls of lake water quality. The results show that evaporative concentration and the binary mixing between two end members (rivers and thermal waters) can explain the hydrochemistry of the lake waters.Two zones are recognized from water composition. The southern part of the lake near sites of perennial river inflow is weakly influenced by evaporation, has low total dissolved species (TDS), and has a seasonally variable load of mainly detrital suspended sediments. In contrast, waters of the northern part of the lake show evidence for strong evaporation (TDS of up to eight times inflow). Authigenic clay minerals and calcite may be precipitating from those more concentrated fluids.The subaerial hot-spring waters have a distinctive chemistry and are enriched in some elements that are also present in the lake water. Comparison of the chemical composition of the inflowing surface waters and lake water shows (1) an enrichment of some species (HCO3-, Cl, SO42-, F, Na, B, V, Cr, As, Mo, Ba and U) in the lake, (2) a depletion in SiO2 in the lake, and (3) a possible hydrothermal origin for most F. The rare earth element distribution and the F/Cl and Na/Cl ratios give valuable information on the rate of mixing of the river and hydrothermal fluids in the lake water. Calculations imply that thermal fluids may be seeping upward locally into the lake through grid-faulted lavas, particularly south of Ol Kokwe Island.

  17. The genesis of glaucony in the Oligo Miocene Torquay Group, southeastern Australia: petrographic and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Jonathan C.; Webb, John A.

    1999-04-01

    The Oligo-Miocene Torquay Group at Bird Rock, in southeastern Australia, comprises a sequence of fine-grained skeletal carbonates and argillaceous and glauconitic sandstones, which were deposited in a cool-water, mid-shelf environment. The Bird Rock glaucony consists predominantly of randomly interstratified glauconitic smectite, which constitutes bioclast infills and faecal pellet replacements. Petrographic and geochemical evidence indicates that the glaucony is autochthonous and comprises chemical components derived primarily from argillaceous matrix material; seawater is unlikely to be a significant source of ions. The glauconitization of the Bird Rock sediments occurred under sub-oxic partially reducing conditions, in the very shallow burial environment, and involved local iron redistribution. Sub-oxic conditions favour glauconitization because iron is stable in the soluble ferrous state and can be fixed in authigenic silicates due to the negligible concentrations of hydrogen sulphide. It is likely that localised acidic conditions were initiated during the glauconitization process; this acidity appears to have been buffered by the dissolution of bioclastic carbonate. The fact that glaucony predominantly occurs as bioclast infills and faecal pellet replacements implies that the physico-chemical conditions appropriate for glauconitization develop preferentially in such biogenic detritus. The development of appropriate micro-environments within such sediments probably relates to their physical confinement and/or high organic matter content. The Bird Rock glaucony developed during intervals of slow sedimentation and environmental quiescence associated with marine flooding events. These conditions facilitated glauconitization by allowing the favoured clay-rich sediments to accumulate and remain in the appropriate physico-chemical regime sufficiently long for the complex glauconitic structures to form.

  18. A hybrid origin for two Cretaceous monzonitic plutons in eastern Zhejiang Province, Southeast China: Geochronological, geochemical, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang; Qiu, Jian-Sheng; Zhao, Jiao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Monzonites can provide important information about the nature of the mantle sources and the mechanism of crust-mantle interactions. However, details on the origin of Late Mesozoic monzonites in the Southeastern China remain poorly constrained. This paper presents whole-rock geochemical, Sr-Nd isotopic and zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data for two monzonitic plutons (Huangtanyang and Kanggu) in eastern Zhejiang Province, with the aim of elucidating their petrogenesis, and providing important insights into the process of crust-mantle interaction. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating results imply that the Huangtanyang and Kanggu quartz monzonites were emplaced in Cretaceous (104-109 Ma). All quartz monzonites are intermediate to acidic, metaluminous to weakly peraluminous, subalkaline, and K-rich in composition. They are enriched in large ion lithophile (e.g., Rb, Ba and Pb) and light rare earth elements, depleted in high-field strength elements (e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), and show weakly negative or no Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.78-1.02). All quartz monzonites have homogeneous initial ISr values (0.7084-0.7090) and εNd(t) values (-7.50 to -6.84). They are characterised by highly variable zircon Hf isotopic compositions, with εHf(t) values ranging from -13.3 to -5.7. The combined geochemical evidences (such as high Mg# values, low Nb/U and Ta/U ratios, and variable zircon Hf isotopic compositions) suggests that both depleted asthenospheric and metasomatically enriched mantle components were involved in the formation of the monzonites. The existence of some zircons with unusually low εHf(t) values (low to -13.3) and Palaeoproterozoic two-stage Hf model ages from the Huangtanyang and Kanggu quartz monzonites also argues strongly for Palaeoproterozoic crustal involvement. Magma mixing played a dominated role in the genesis of these monzonites, as indicated by their wide range in zircon Hf isotopic compositions and the occurrence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs). The MMEs show

  19. Zircon Lu-Hf isotopes and granite geochemistry of the Murchison Domain of the Yilgarn Craton: Evidence for reworking of Eoarchean crust during Meso-Neoarchean plume-driven magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanic, Timothy J.; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Wyche, Stephen; Wingate, Michael T. D.; Belousova, Elena A.

    2012-09-01

    New in situ Lu-Hf data on zircons from GSWA geochronology samples has provided a unique isotopic dataset with a high temporal resolution for the Murchison Domain of the Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia. These data identify extended periods of juvenile mantle input (positive ɛHf values) into the crust firstly at c. 2980 Ma and then from c. 2820 Ma to c. 2640 Ma with significant pulses of crustal recycling at c. 2750 Ma and c. 2620 Ma (highly negative ɛHf values). Geochemical data from well-characterised granitic suites of the Murchison Domain provide additional constraints on the crustal evolution of the area and indicate a prolonged period of crustal melting and remelting at progressively shallower depths from c. 2750 to c. 2600 Ma. At c. 2760-2753 Ma, widespread calc-alkaline, intermediate to silicic volcanic rocks of the Polelle Group were erupted, accompanied by intrusion of felsic to intermediate melts derived from a variety of crustal sources that likely formed by partial mixing with basaltic melts. The intrusive rocks include a wide geochemical array of rocks in the Cullculli and Eelya suites that were sourced over a wide range of crustal depths. At this time a major departure to negative ɛHf values (<-5) occurred, indicating sampling of c. 3.80 Ga model aged source rocks as well as continued juvenile input. Post-volcanic granitic rocks emplaced between c. 2710 and c. 2600 Ma show geochemical evidence for progressive fractionation through time and derivation from an evolving crustal source. We interpret the driving force for this protracted history of mantle and crustal melting to be two mantle plumes at 2.81 and 2.72 Ga. These data document the process of cratonization through progressive melt depletion of the lower crust, progressively fractionating and shallower melts, culminating with a final phase of crustal recycling (ɛHf < - 5) and the cessation of juvenile input at c. 2630-2600 Ma during intrusion of the Bald Rock Supersuite, resulting in

  20. Xenoliths in ultrapotassic volcanic rocks in the Lhasa block: direct evidence for crust-mantle mixing and metamorphism in the deep crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Collins, William J.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Li, Jin-xiang; Li, Qiu-yun; He, Wen-yan; Richards, Jeremy P.; Hou, Zengqian; Zhou, Li-min; Stern, Richard A.

    2016-07-01

    δ18O (+6 to 7.5 ‰), intermediate (δ18O +8.5 to 9.0 ‰), and high δ18O (+11.0 to 12.0 ‰). The fourth is almost pure andradite with δ18O 10-12 ‰. Both the low and intermediate δ18O groups show significant variation in Fe content, whereas the two high δ18O groups are compositionally homogeneous. We interpret these features to indicate that the low and intermediate δ18O group garnets grew in separate fractionating magmas that were brought together through magma mixing, whereas the high δ18O groups formed under high-grade metamorphic conditions accompanied by metasomatic exchange. The garnets record complex, open-system magmatic and metamorphic processes in a single rock. Based on these features, we consider that ultrapotassic magmas interacted with juvenile 35-20 Ma crust after they intruded in the deep crust (>50 km) at ~13 Ma to form hybridized Miocene granitoid magmas, leaving a refractory residue. The ~13 Ma zircons retain the original, evolved isotopic character of the ultrapotassic magmas, and the garnets record successive stages of the melting and mixing process, along with subsequent high-grade metamorphism followed by low-temperature alteration and brecciation during entrainment and ascent in a late UPV dyke. This is an excellent example of in situ crust-mantle hybridization in the deep Tibetan crust.

  1. Mantle-crust interactions in a paleosubduction zone: Evidence from highly siderophile element systematics of eclogite and related rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penniston-Dorland, Sarah C.; Walker, Richard J.; Pitcher, Lynnette; Sorensen, Sorena S.

    2012-02-01

    Substantial differences in 187Os/188Os and absolute and relative abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) in mantle peridotites compared to oceanic crust indicate that this suite of elements may prove useful in assessing mechanisms and pathways of mantle and slab mass transfer within the subduction channel. Currently, however, information regarding the mobility of the HSE in subduction zone environments is limited. To better understand the systematics of highly siderophile elements in subduction settings, we measured Os isotopic compositions and HSE abundances of cores and rinds of meter-scale blocks of eclogite, blueschist and garnet amphibolite from subduction-related mélanges within 1) the Franciscan Complex, CA, and a related terrane in Oregon; 2) the Catalina Schist, CA; and 3) the Samana Metamorphic Complex, Samana Peninsula, Dominican Republic. Rinds composed of amphibole, chlorite, ± phengite, talc, titanite and rutile partly enclose blocks at each location. Mineralogic, petrologic and geochemical data suggest that these rinds are metasomatic features that formed by fluid-mediated interaction between mafic blocks and an ultramafic matrix. The cores of high-grade blocks are characterized by high (Pt + Pd)/(Os + Ir + Ru), and variably radiogenic Os; initial 187Os/188Os ranges from 0.197 to 4.30. These characteristics are consistent with the HSE compositions of subducted basalts. In contrast, (Pt + Pd)/(Os + Ir + Ru) of rinds are generally much lower than cores, approaching values typical of mantle peridotites. The initial 187Os/188Os of most rinds are also typical of upper mantle peridotites; values for most rinds fall between 0.125 and 0.14. The similarities of the 187Os/188Os and HSE abundances between rinds and mantle peridotites indicate that the HSE contained within rinds reflect a contribution by mantle peridotite, whether by fluid-mediated transfer or through mechanical processes. If the HSE signatures of the rinds were

  2. Geochemical evidence concerning the nature of the source region to the Middle Proterozoic Granite-Rhyolite Province

    SciTech Connect

    Shuster, R.D. . Dept. Geography Mueller, P.A.; Heatherington, A.L. . Dept. Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The mostly buried 1.5--1.3 Ga old Granite-Rhyolite Province of the midcontinent of North America, is characterized by extensive, undeformed silicic volcanic rocks and related epizonal granitic plutons. Thirty-three previously dated samples from a wide geographic range (Michigan to Colorado) have been analyzed to determine their chemical and Nd and Pb isotopic compositions in order to constrain source regions and processes involved in the formation of these rocks. Major and trace element analyses of these rocks indicate their anorogenic nature, with relatively high Ce/Nb and Y/Nb ratios, as well as relatively high Ga/Al ratios. Geochemically, these rocks are similar to the A2 granites of Eby (1992), which are thought to be generated from the melting of crust which has experienced at least one cycle of subduction-related magmatism. Rare earth element and Pb isotopic data suggest melting at middle to shallow depths. The isotopic data (Nd and Pb) indicate little to no contribution of Archean crust to the source of these rocks. Initial Pb isotopic ratios (208Pb/204Pb) suggest a low Th/U ratio in the source, which contrasts strongly with high Th/U ratios of the Wyoming Province. The Pb isotopic ratios for these rocks are variable, but cluster about the orogene plumbotectonics curve. The variability in the data suggest sources which are variable in their U/Pb ratios and/or ages. The isotopic data are consistent with the existence of a proposed lithospheric boundary which trend NE-SW through the Granite-Rhyolite Province and separates 1.65 Ga old lithosphere (to the NW) from 1.5 Ga old lithosphere (to the SE). Samples analyzed from either side of this boundary have different isotopic signatures. Many of the samples appear to be derived from sources which are only slightly older than the crystallization ages of the granites themselves.

  3. Magmatic Processes in Monogenetic Eruptions, Procida Island, Campi Flegrei, Italy: Geochemical Evidence From Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severs, M. J.; Fedele, L.; Esposito, R.; Bodnar, R.; Petrosino, P.; Lima, A.; de Vivo, B.; Shimizu, N.

    2008-12-01

    Campi Flegrei is an active volcanic complex located in the greater Naples area, which has produced more than 50 eruptions over the past 60,000 years. These have ranged from small eruptions such as Monte Nuovo eruption of 1538 CE to extremely large eruptions such as the Campanian Ignimbrite (150-200 DRE; Barbieri et al., 1978). The volcanic field includes the mainland area located to the west of Naples and also the two islands of Ischia and Procida. The volcanic products range from basalts to shoshonitic phonolites and trachytes, with the more evolved magmas being more abundant. Three eruptive units from Procida Island have been studied to observe geochemical trends over time within a small area and to better understand magmatic processes between monogenetic eruptions. Juvenile samples from Pozzo Vecchio, Breccia Museo, and Solchiara were collected to examine the geochemistry of the mineral phases present and melt inclusions (MIs) found within the phenocrysts. Solchiara contained phenocrysts of olivine and clinopyroxene, whereas Breccia Museo and Pozzo Vecchio samples contained clinopyroxene and sanidine as the dominant phenocryst phases. Melt inclusions from Solchiara have narrow compositional ranges in major and trace elements (i.e., CaO, TiO2, Zr, Dy, La) over a large range in SiO2 contents (47 to 55 wt%) while MI from the Breccia Museo have a limited range of SiO2 contents (57 to 61 wt%) with a wider range for major and trace elements (i.e., FeO, Al2O3, CaO, La, Th, Rb). Pozzo Vecchio MI from clinopyroxene and sanidine define different chemical compositions, but petrographic evidence does not suggest a xenocrystic origin for either mineral phase. This suggests that Pozzo Vecchio is the result of magma mixing. Modeling of fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, and sanidine are capable of producing most of the trends in major and trace elements between the most primitive samples to the most evolved samples. Volatile concentrations between the

  4. Geochronological and isotopic evidence for early Proterozoic crust in the eastern Arabian Shield.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Hedge, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Zircon U/Pb, feldspar common Pb, whole-rock Sm/Nd, and Rb/Sr data indicate that the fine-grained granodiorite (Z103) has yielded conclusive evidence for rocks of early Proterozoic age in the eastern Arabian Shield (21o19' N, 44o50' W). Z103 may have been emplaced approx 1630 m.y. ago and subsequently was severely deformed or perhaps even remobilized at approx 660 m.y. Furthermore, lead isotope data, along with other evidence, show that the 1630 m.y. crustal rocks inherited material from an older, probably Archaean, source at the time of their formation. At that time addition of mantle material considerably modified the Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd systems so that they now yield similar, or only slightly older apparent ages (1600-1800 m.y.).-L.diH.

  5. Primary carbonatite melt from deeply subducted oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Walter, M J; Bulanova, G P; Armstrong, L S; Keshav, S; Blundy, J D; Gudfinnsson, G; Lord, O T; Lennie, A R; Clark, S M; Smith, C B; Gobbo, L

    2008-07-31

    Partial melting in the Earth's mantle plays an important part in generating the geochemical and isotopic diversity observed in volcanic rocks at the surface. Identifying the composition of these primary melts in the mantle is crucial for establishing links between mantle geochemical 'reservoirs' and fundamental geodynamic processes. Mineral inclusions in natural diamonds have provided a unique window into such deep mantle processes. Here we provide experimental and geochemical evidence that silicate mineral inclusions in diamonds from Juina, Brazil, crystallized from primary and evolved carbonatite melts in the mantle transition zone and deep upper mantle. The incompatible trace element abundances calculated for a melt coexisting with a calcium-titanium-silicate perovskite inclusion indicate deep melting of carbonated oceanic crust, probably at transition-zone depths. Further to perovskite, calcic-majorite garnet inclusions record crystallization in the deep upper mantle from an evolved melt that closely resembles estimates of primitive carbonatite on the basis of volcanic rocks. Small-degree melts of subducted crust can be viewed as agents of chemical mass-transfer in the upper mantle and transition zone, leaving a chemical imprint of ocean crust that can possibly endure for billions of years.

  6. Primary carbonatite melt from deeply subducted oceanic crust

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.J.; Bulanova, G.P.; Armstrong, L.S.; Keshav, S.; Blundy, J.D.; Gudfinnesson, G.; Lord, O.T.; Lennie, A.R.; Clark, S.M.; Smith, C.B.; Gobbo, L.

    2008-07-01

    Partial melting in the Earth's mantle plays an important part in generating the geochemical and isotopic diversity observed in volcanic rocks at the surface. Identifying the composition of these primary melts in the mantle is crucial for establishing links between mantle geochemical 'reservoirs' and fundamental geodynamic processes. Mineral inclusions in natural diamonds have provided a unique window into such deep mantle processes. Here they provide exper8imental and geochemical evidence that silicate mineral inclusions in diamonds from Juina, Brazil, crystallized from primary and evolved carbonatite melts in the mantle transition zone and deep upper mantle. The incompatible trace element abundances calculated for a melt coexisting with a calcium-titanium-silicate perovskite inclusion indicate deep melting of carbonated oceanic crust, probably at transition-zone depths. Further to perovskite, calcic-majorite garnet inclusions record crystallization in the deep upper mantle from an evolved melt that closely resembles estimates of primitive carbonatite on the basis of volcanic rocks. Small-degree melts of subducted crust can be viewed as agents of chemical mass-transfer in the upper mantle and transition zone, leaving a chemical imprint of ocean crust that can possibly endure for billions of years.

  7. Melt extraction and enrichment processes in the New Caledonia lherzolites: Evidence from geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchiari, Arianna; Montanini, Alessandra; Bosch, Delphine; Macera, Patrizia; Cluzel, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    asthenospheric mantle source that experienced a recent MORB-producing depletion event. This evolution was most likely accomplished in a spreading ridge. However, geochemical trace element modelling and Nd isotopes do not support a genetic mantle-crust link between the lherzolites and enriched-MOR-type basalts from the Poya Terrane.

  8. Depth variations in seismic velocity in the subducting crust: Evidence for fluid-related embrittlement for intermediate-depth earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Takahiro; Nakajima, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Toru; Toyokuni, Genti; Kita, Saeko

    2017-01-01

    We investigated seismic wave velocity in the subducting crust of the Pacific slab beneath eastern Hokkaido, northern Japan. To detect depth-dependent properties of the seismic velocities in the crust, we analyzed guided waves that propagate in the crust and estimated P wave velocity (Vp) of 6.5-7.5 km/s and S wave velocity (Vs) of 3.6-4.2 km/s at depths of 50-100 km. The results show that the obtained Vp and Vs are 10-15% lower than those expected for the fully hydrated mid-ocean ridge basalt, suggesting the existence of aqueous fluids by 1 vol % in the crust at this depth range. Our observations suggest that overpressurized fluids channeled in the subducting crust plays as a dominant factor for facilitating the genesis of crustal earthquakes at intermediate depths.

  9. The Cool Early Earth: Oxygen Isotope Evidence for Continental Crust and Oceans on Earth at 4.4 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, J. W.; King, E. M.; Peck, W. H.; Graham, C. M.; Wilde, S. A.

    2001-05-01

    oceans at that time. The evidence for liquid water and possibly oceans at 4.4 Ga suggests a Cool Early Earth. This contrasts with the Hot Early Earth and global magma oceans envisioned at 4.5-4.3 Ga based on: an impact origin of the Moon (4.45-4.50 Ga), core formation, higher Hadean radioactive heat production, and intense early meteorite bombardment. Magma on the surface of the Earth cools quickly by radiation to form a crust, but a magma ocean caused by these processes might persist beneath the initially thin crust for up to 400 m.y. and might erupt as massive flood basalts in response to major meteorite impacts, boiling surface waters. The thermal contrasts presented by these lines of evidence are minimized if the Moon and core formed earlier (\\sim4.5 Ga), if the Moon formed by a process not involving a Mars-size impactor, or if the early meteorite bombardment was less intense or irregular in timing. It is possible that periods of Cool vs. Hot Early Earth alternated, with boiling of early oceans after major impact events followed by periods of cooler surface conditions. If life evolved in these seas, multiple extinctions before 3.9 Ga are suggested.

  10. Geologic history of Martian regolith breccia Northwest Africa 7034: Evidence for hydrothermal activity and lithologic diversity in the Martian crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, Francis M.; Boyce, Jeremy W.; Novák-Szabó, Tímea; Santos, Alison R.; Tartèse, Romain; Muttik, Nele; Domokos, Gabor; Vazquez, Jorge; Keller, Lindsay P.; Moser, Desmond E.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Shearer, Charles K.; Steele, Andrew; Elardo, Stephen M.; Rahman, Zia; Anand, Mahesh; Delhaye, Thomas; Agee, Carl B.

    2016-10-01

    The timing and mode of deposition for Martian regolith breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 were determined by combining petrography, shape analysis, and thermochronology. NWA 7034 is composed of igneous, impact, and brecciated clasts within a thermally annealed submicron matrix of pulverized crustal rocks and devitrified impact/volcanic glass. The brecciated clasts are likely lithified portions of Martian regolith with some evidence of past hydrothermal activity. Represented lithologies are primarily ancient crustal materials with crystallization ages as old as 4.4 Ga. One ancient zircon was hosted by an alkali-rich basalt clast, confirming that alkalic volcanism occurred on Mars very early. NWA 7034 is composed of fragmented particles that do not exhibit evidence of having undergone bed load transport by wind or water. The clast size distribution is similar to terrestrial pyroclastic deposits. We infer that the clasts were deposited by atmospheric rainout subsequent to a pyroclastic eruption(s) and/or impact event(s), although the ancient ages of igneous components favor mobilization by impact(s). Despite ancient components, the breccia has undergone a single pervasive thermal event at 500-800°C, evident by groundmass texture and concordance of 1.5 Ga dates for bulk rock K-Ar, U-Pb in apatite, and U-Pb in metamict zircons. The 1.5 Ga age is likely a thermal event that coincides with rainout/breccia lithification. We infer that the episodic process of regolith lithification dominated sedimentary processes during the Amazonian Epoch. The absence of pre-Amazonian high-temperature metamorphic events recorded in ancient zircons indicates source domains of static southern highland crust punctuated by episodic impact modification.

  11. Geologic history of Martian regolith breccia Northwest Africa 7034: Evidence for hydrothermal activity and lithologic diversity in the Martian crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCubbin, Francis M.; Boyce, Jeremy W.; Novak-Szabo, Timea; Santos, Alison; Tartese, Romain; Muttik, Nele; Domokos, Gabor; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Moser, Desmond E.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Shearer, Charles K.; Steele, Andrew; Elardo, Stephen M.; Rahman, Zia; Anand, Mahesh; Delhaye, Thomas; Agee, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    The timing and mode of deposition for Martian regolith breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 were determined by combining petrography, shape analysis, and thermochronology. NWA 7034 is composed of igneous, impact, and brecciated clasts within a thermally annealed submicron matrix of pulverized crustal rocks and devitrified impact/volcanic glass. The brecciated clasts are likely lithified portions of Martian regolith with some evidence of past hydrothermal activity. Represented lithologies are primarily ancient crustal materials with crystallization ages as old as 4.4 Ga. One ancient zircon was hosted by an alkali-rich basalt clast, confirming that alkalic volcanism occurred on Mars very early. NWA 7034 is composed of fragmented particles that do not exhibit evidence of having undergone bed load transport by wind or water. The clast size distribution is similar to terrestrial pyroclastic deposits. We infer that the clasts were deposited by atmospheric rainout subsequent to a pyroclastic eruption(s) and/or impact event(s), although the ancient ages of igneous components favor mobilization by impact(s). Despite ancient components, the breccia has undergone a single pervasive thermal event at 500–800°C, evident by groundmass texture and concordance of ~1.5 Ga dates for bulk rock K-Ar, U-Pb in apatite, and U-Pb in metamict zircons. The 1.5 Ga age is likely a thermal event that coincides with rainout/breccia lithification. We infer that the episodic process of regolith lithification dominated sedimentary processes during the Amazonian Epoch. The absence of pre-Amazonian high-temperature metamorphic events recorded in ancient zircons indicates source domains of static southern highland crust punctuated by episodic impact modification.

  12. A geochemical study of the winonaites: Evidence for limited partial melting and constraints on the precursor composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Alison C.; Benedix, Gretchen K.; Hammond, Samantha J.; Bland, Philip A.; Rehkämper, Mark; Kreissig, Katharina; Strekopytov, Stanislav

    2017-02-01

    The winonaites are primitive achondrites which are associated with the IAB iron meteorites. Textural evidence implies heating to at least the Fe, Ni-FeS cotectic, but previous geochemical studies are ambiguous about the extent of silicate melting in these samples. Oxygen isotope evidence indicates that the precursor material may be related to the carbonaceous chondrites. Here we analysed a suite of winonaites for modal mineralogy and bulk major- and trace-element chemistry in order to assess the extent of thermal processing as well as constrain the precursor composition of the winonaite-IAB parent asteroid. Modal mineralogy and geochemical data are presented for eight winonaites. Textural analysis reveals that, for our sub-set of samples, all except the most primitive winonaite (Northwest Africa 1463) reached the Fe, Ni-FeS cotectic. However, only one (Tierra Blanca) shows geochemical evidence for silicate melting processes. Tierra Blanca is interpreted as a residue of small-degree silicate melting. Our sample of Winona shows geochemical evidence for extensive terrestrial weathering. All other winonaites studied here (Fortuna, Queen Alexander Range 94535, Hammadah al Hamra 193, Pontlyfni and NWA 1463) have chondritic major-element ratios and flat CI-normalised bulk rare-earth element patterns, suggesting that most of the winonaites did not reach the silicate melting temperature. The majority of winonaites were therefore heated to a narrow temperature range of between ∼1220 (the Fe, Ni-FeS cotectic temperature) and ∼1370 K (the basaltic partial melting temperature). Silicate inclusions in the IAB irons demonstrate partial melting did occur in some parts of the parent body (Ruzicka and Hutson, 2010), thereby implying heterogeneous heat distribution within this asteroid. Together, this indicates that melting was the result of internal heating by short-lived radionuclides. The brecciated nature of the winonaites suggests that the parent body was later disrupted by

  13. Steady State Growth of Continental Crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, S. A.; Bauer, A.; Dudas, F. O.; Schoene, B.; McLean, N. M.

    2012-12-01

    any age. If one accepts that the probability of preserving old crust decreases with increasing age, the few exposures of rocks older than 3.5 Ga should not be surprising. The thickness and compositional differences between Archean and younger lithospheric mantle are not fully understood nor is the role of thicker buoyant mantle in preserving continental crust; these lead to the question of whether the preserved rock record is representative of what formed. It is notable that the oldest known rocks, the ca. 4.0 Ga Acasta Gneisses, are tonalities-granodiorites-granites with evidence for the involvement of even older crust and that the oldest detrital zircons from Australia (ca. 4.0-4.4 Ga) are thought to have been derived from granitoid sources. The global Hf and Nd isotope databases are compatible with both depleted and enriched sources being present from at least 4.0 Ga to the present and that the lack of evolution of the MORB source or depleted mantle is due to recycling of continental crust throughout earth history. Using examples from the Slave Province and southern Africa, we argue that Armstrong's concept of steady state crustal growth and recycling via plate tectonics still best explains the modern geological and geochemical data.

  14. Paleoproterozoic accretionary and collisional processes and the build-up of the Borborema Province (NE Brazil): Geochronological and geochemical evidence from the Central Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Sérgio P.; Lages, Geysson A.; Brasilino, Roberta G.; Miranda, Alan W. A.

    2015-03-01

    Several Brasiliano-Pan-African belts consist of large areas of reworked Paleoproterozoic rocks. Characterization of these rocks is needed to place better controls on Precambrian paleogeographic reconstructions. The Borborema Province, northeastern Brazil, occupies a central position in West Gondwana configuration, and knowledge of its geological evolution is crucial to infer relationships between Paleoproterozoic units in South America and Africa. Here, we report U-Pb ages, major- and trace-elements analyses and Sm-Nd isotopic data for orthogneisses in the eastern portion of Central Domain. The dominant basement units in the study area are banded gneisses of intermediate composition and relatively juvenile character, and migmatitic gneisses of granitic composition with Archean Nd TDM model ages. One sample of the banded gneiss yielded a weighted 207Pb/206Pb age of 2096 ± 23 Ma and an upper intercept age of 2044 ± 27 Ma, which we interpret, respectively, as ages of crystallization and metamorphism. Two large units of migmatitic gneiss in the southern and central parts of the area gave ages of, respectively, 2057 ± 20 Ma and 2055 ± 23 Ma; an orthoamphibolite associated with the latter yielded crystallization age of 2042 ± 11 Ma and metamorphic age of 1996 ± 13 Ma. All these rocks have geochemical signatures typical of subduction zone-related magmas. Combined with evidence provided by previous studies, we suggest that the evolution of the study area starts with island arc construction around 2.2 Ga, leading to an expressive volcanic arc edifice by 2.13-2.10 Ga. By 2.06 Ga, the crust had evolved enough to become intruded by magmas formed at the mantle wedge of the now largely continental magmatic arc, which continued to be intruded by mantle melts until at least 2.04 Ga. An augen gneiss in the northern part of the area, with an age of 2109 ± 15 Ma, and a migmatitic gneiss with a much older age (2183 ± 9 Ma), both of which have geochemical characteristics akin

  15. Late Precambrian Balkan-Carpathian ophiolite — a slice of the Pan-African ocean crust?: geochemical and tectonic insights from the Tcherni Vrah and Deli Jovan massifs, Bulgaria and Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savov, Ivan; Ryan, Jeff; Haydoutov, Ivan; Schijf, Johan

    2001-10-01

    The Balkan-Carpathian ophiolite (BCO), which outcrops in Bulgaria, Serbia and Romania, is a Late Precambrian (563 Ma) mafic/ultramafic complex unique in that it has not been strongly deformed or metamorphosed, as have most other basement sequences in Alpine Europe. Samples collected for study from the Tcherni Vrah and Deli Jovan segments of BCO include cumulate dunites, troctolites, wehrlites and plagioclase wehrlites; olivine and amphibole-bearing gabbros; anorthosites; diabases and microgabbros; and basalts representing massive flows, dikes, and pillow lavas, as well as hyaloclastites and umbers (preserved sedimentary cover). Relict Ol, Cpx and Hbl in cumulate peridotites indicate original orthocumulate textures. Plagioclase in troctolites and anorthosites range from An 60 to An 70. Cumulate gabbro textures range from ophitic to poikilitic, with an inferred crystallization order of Ol-(Plag+Cpx)-Hbl. The extrusive rocks exhibit poikilitic, ophitic and intersertal textures, with Cpx and/or Plag (Oligoclase-Andesine) phenocrysts. The major opaques are Ti-Magnetite and Ilmenite. The metamorphic paragenesis in the mafic samples is Chl-Trem-Ep, whereas the ultramafic rocks show variable degrees of serpentinization, with lizardite and antigorite as dominant phases. Our samples are compositionally and geochemically similar to modern oceanic crust. Major element, trace element and rare earth element (REE) signatures in BCO basalts are comparable to those of MORB. In terms of basalt and dike composition, the BCO is a 'high-Ti' or 'oceanic' ophiolite, based on the classification scheme of Serri [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 52 (1981) 203]. Our petrologic and geochemical results, combined with the tectonic position of the BCO massifs (overlain by and in contact with Late Cambrian island arc and back-arc sequences), suggest that the BCO may have formed in a mid-ocean ridge setting. If the BCO records the existence of a Precambrian ocean basin, then there may be a relationship

  16. Geochronologic and isotopic evidence for involvement of pre-Pan-African crust in the Nubian shield, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Sultan, M.; Chamberlain, K.R.; Bowring, S.A.; Arvidson, R.E. ); Abuzied, H. ); El Kaliouby, B. )

    1990-08-01

    Two Late Proterozoic granitic bodies from the Eastern Desert of Egypt, the ca. 578 Ma Nakhil and the ca. 595 Ma Aswan granites, provide insights into processes of crust formation in the Arabian-Nubian shield. Evidence for involvement of an older crustal component in the formation of the Nakhil granite includes (1) U/Pb zircon data that establish a crystallization age of 578 {plus minus} 15 Ma and indicate the presence of inherited zircons possibly as old as 1.6 Ga; (2) an elevated model initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr (0.7136); and (3) an elevated initial {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb (15.561) relative to model mantle compositions at 578 Ma. Evidence for involvement of an older crustal component in the Aswan granite comes from the elevated initial {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb (15.611). In contrast, extensive crustal contamination is not reflected in the high initial {epsilon}{sub Nd} (+5.7) for the Nakhil and the low initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr (0.7029) for the Aswan granite. The contrasting inferences from the different isotopic systems can be explained by the high whole-rock Nd and Sr concentration for the the Nakhil (87 ppm Nd) and the Aswan (173 ppm Sr) granites, respectively, that suggest that the Nd and Sr isotopic composition of the older component has been overshadowed by the more primitive material. Similar contrasts in Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic data from the eastern and western shield margins can be interpreted in the same manner and might suggest widespread involvement of older crustal components in the formation of the Late Proterozoic Arabian-Nubian shield.

  17. Termination time of peak decratonization in North China: Geochemical evidence from mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Geophysical and petrological data indicate destruction of the cratonic lithosphere in North China in the Mesozoic, resulting in replacement of the ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) by the juvenile SCLM. However, it remains to be answered when the craton destruction would have been terminated in the Mesozoic. This question is resolved by studying the two types of mafic igneous rocks with contrasting geochemical compositions from North China. The first type of mafic igneous rock shows arc-like trace element distribution patterns and enriched radiogenic Sr-Nd isotope compositions, with emplacement ages spanning from the Triassic to Early Cretaceous. The mafic magmatism is absent in a period from 200 Ma to 135 Ma, recording the thinning of cratonic lithosphere due to the westward flat subduction of the Paleo-Pacific slab beneath the North China Craton. In contrast, the second type of mafic igneous rocks exhibits oceanic island basalts (OIB)-like trace element distribution patterns and relatively depleted radiogenic Sr-Nd isotope compositions, with emplacement ages spanning from the Early Cretaceous to Cenozoic. Zircon U-Pb dating yields an age of 121 Ma for the geochemical transformation between the two types of mafic igneous rocks. This age marks a dramatic demarcation in the composition of their mantle sources. As such, the nature of mantle lithosphere in North China was changed from the ancient SCLM to the juvenile SCLM at 121 Ma. Thus, this age not only signifies the tectonic transition from the enriched mantle to the depleted mantle in the Early Cretaceous, but also dates the termination of peak decratonization in North China. Therefore, the craton destruction in the Early Cretaceous is temporally and spatially associated with the dramatic changes in the geochemical composition of mantle lithosphere.

  18. The growth and contamination mechanism of the Cana Brava layered mafic-ultramafic complex: new field and geochemical evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanardi, Tommaso; Girardi, Vicente A. V.; Correia, Ciro T.; Sinigoi, Silvano; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    The Cana Brava complex is the northernmost of three layered complexes outcropping in the Goiás state (central Brasil). New field and geochemical evidences suggest that Cana Brava underwent hyper- to subsolidus deformation during its growth, acquiring a high-temperature foliation that is generally interpreted as the result of a granulite-facies metamorphic event. The increase along the stratigraphy of the incompatible elements abundances (LREE, Rb, Ba) and of the Sr isotopic composition, coupled with a decrease in ɛNd(790), indicate that the complex was contaminated by the embedded xenoliths from the Palmeirópolis Sequence. The geochemical data suggest that the contamination occurred along the entire magma column during the crystallization of the Upper Mafic Zone, with in situ variations determined by the abundance and composition of the xenoliths. These features of the Cana Brava complex point to an extremely similarity with the Lower Sequence of the most known Niquelândia intrusion (the central of the three complexes). This, together with the evidences that the two complexes have the same age (c.a. 790 Ma) and their thickness and units decrease northwards suggests that Cana Brava and Niquelândia are part of a single giant Brasilia body grown through several melt impulses.

  19. Morphological and Geochemical Evidence of Eumelanin Preservation in the Feathers of the Early Cretaceous Bird, Gansus yumenensis

    PubMed Central

    Barden, Holly E.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Li, Daqing; Manning, Phillip L.; Edwards, Nicholas P.; van Dongen, Bart E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for the preservation of colour in fossilized soft tissues by imaging melanosomes, melanin pigment containing organelles. This study combines geochemical analyses with morphological observations to investigate the preservation of melanosomes and melanin within feathers of the Early Cretaceous bird, Gansus yumenensis. Scanning electron microscopy reveals structures concordant with those previously identified as eumelanosomes within visually dark areas of the feathers but not in lighter areas or sedimentary matrices. Fourier transform infrared analyses show different spectra for the feathers and their matrices; melanic functional groups appear in the feather including carboxylic acid and ketone groups that are not seen in the matrix. When mapped, the carboxylic acid group absorption faithfully replicates the visually dark areas of the feathers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy of one specimen demonstrates the presence of organic signals but proved too insensitive to resolve melanin. Pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry shows a similar distribution of aliphatic material within both feathers that are different from those of their respective matrices. In combination, these techniques strongly suggest that not only do the feathers contain endogenous organic material, but that both geochemical and morphological evidence supports the preservation of original eumelanic pigment residue. PMID:22022404

  20. The end-Permian regression in the western Tethys: sedimentological and geochemical evidence from offshore the Persian Gulf, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Naderi-Khujin, Mehrangiz; Seyedmehdi, Zahra

    2017-08-01

    Detailed sedimentological and geochemical records across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) in five offshore wells of the central Persian Gulf served to interpret the end-Permian sea-level change in this region. A decrease in sea level at the PTB was established by petrographical and geochemical study of the boundary. Thin sections showed that Upper Permian strata are composed of dolomite with minor anhydrite, changing into limestone in Lower Triassic sediments. Brine dilution toward the boundary supports sea-level fall in the Permian-Triassic transition, reflected by a decrease in anhydrite content and a shallowing-upward trend from lagoonal to peritidal facies. Isotopic changes at the boundary are in favor of sea-level fall. Changes in both carbon (from about 4 to -1‰) and oxygen (from 2 to -5‰) stable isotopes show negative excursions. The shift in carbon isotope values is a global phenomenon and is interpreted as resulting from carbonate sediment interaction with 12C-rich waters at the end-Permian sea-level fall. However, the oxygen isotope shift is attributed to the effect of meteoric waters with negative oxygen isotope values. The increase in strontium isotope ratios is also consistent with the high rate of terrestrial input at the boundary. The effect of meteoric conditions during diagenesis is evident from vuggy and moldic porosities below the PTB. The following transgression at the base of the Triassic is evident from the presence of reworked fossils and intraclasts resulting from deposition from agitated water.

  1. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  2. Trace element systematics in the plutonic section of fast-spread oceanic crust - evidence from the Wadi Gideah reference profile (Wadi Tayin Massif, Oman ophiolite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbe-Schoenberg, C. D.; Koepke, J.; Mueller, T.; Wolff, P. E.; Strauss, H.

    2014-12-01

    The crystallization processes during the accretion of fast spreading oceanic crust are still not well constrained and a continous geochemical profile through recent oceanic crust that could provide deeper insights into such processes is still missing. We sampled a complete section of gabbros, dikes, and basalts along the Wadi Gideah in the Cretaceous ophiolite of Oman that is regarded as the best example of fast-spread oceanic lithosphere on land. Here we present trace element data displaying systematic compositional trends that are correlated with stratigraphic depth (distance to MOHO) in the plutonic suite. Concentrations of incompatible trace elements Th, Nb, Ta, REE, Zr, Hf show little variation in the layered gabbro section but display a continuous increase from foliated to varitextured gabbros. In contrast, Nb/Ta, Nb/La, Zr/Hf, La/Yb, La/Nd show significant fractionation in the layered and foliated gabbros suggesting in situ crystallization in a lower crustal filter layer and formation of small portions of highly evolved interstitial melt also favoring crystallization of zircon. Further up, fractional crystallization processes in a well-mixed magma chamber control the composition of isotropic gabbros and sheeted dikes where fractionation of HFSE element ratios is minor.

  3. Neodymium isotopic evidence for decreasing crustal contributions to cenozoic ignimbrites of the western United States. Implications for the thermal evolution of the Cordilleran crust

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V. ); DePaolo, D.J. ); Baldridge, W.S. )

    1993-07-01

    We have estimated the crustal contributions to 12 early Oligocene to Pleistocene rhyolite systems located throughout the Cordillera. We have determined that (1) crustal contributions to large-volume rhyolite systems decrease from the Oligocene to the Miocene, and (2) rhyolite systems younger than 20 Ma are dominated by mantle components. The crustal contributions to rhyolite systems may be controlled by system size and duration, crustal thickness, tectonic setting, crustal composition, crustal density, and crustal temperature. We conclude that regional cooling of the lower crust, which progressively limited the amount of crustal wallrock assimilated by rhyolite systems, is the only parameter that is consistent with geologic and geochemical data for rhyolite systems and the geologic evolution of the Cordillera. A quantitative model that relates the amount of crustal contribution to assimilation/recharge rates and the temperature of the crust indicates that lower-crustal temperatures would have to decrease about 300[degrees]C between early Oligocene and early Miocene time to account for the decrease in crustal contributions. 57 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Geochemical evidence for diversity of dust sources in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Budahn, J.R.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Several potential dust sources, including generic sources of sparsely vegetated alluvium, playa deposits, and anthropogenic emissions, as well as the area around Owens Lake, California, affect the composition of modern dust in the southwestern United States. A comparison of geochemical analyses of modern and old (a few thousand years) dust with samples of potential local sources suggests that dusts reflect four primary sources: (1) alluvial sediments (represented by Hf, K, Rb, Zr, and rare-earth elements, (2) playas, most of which produce calcareous dust (Sr, associated with Ca), (3) the area of Owens (dry) Lake, a human-induced playa (As, Ba, Li, Pb, Sb, and Sr), and (4) anthropogenic and/or volcanic emissions (As, Cr, Ni, and Sb). A comparison of dust and source samples with previous analyses shows that Owens (dry) Lake and mining wastes from the adjacent Cerro Gordo mining district are the primary sources of As, Ba, Li, and Pb in dusts from Owens Valley. Decreases in dust contents of As, Ba, and Sb with distance from Owens Valley suggest that dust from southern Owens Valley is being transported at least 400 km to the east. Samples of old dust that accumulated before European settlement are distinctly lower in As, Ba, and Sb abundances relative to modern dust, likely due to modern transport of dust from Owens Valley. Thus, southern Owens Valley appears to be an important, geochemically distinct, point source for regional dust in the southwestern United States. Copyright ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Shear wave velocity structure of the lower crust in southern Africa: Evidence for compositional heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kgaswane, Eldridge M.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Juliã, Jordi; Dirks, Paul H. G. M.; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of the lower crust across the southern African shield has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations located in Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. For large parts of both Archaean and Proterozoic terrains, the velocity models obtained from the inversions show shear wave velocities ≥4.0 km/s below ˜20-30 km depth, indicating a predominantly mafic lower crust. However, for much of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain in South Africa, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain in Zimbabwe, shear wave velocities of ≤3.9 km/s are found below ˜20-30 km depth, indicating an intermediate-to-felsic lower crust. The areas of intermediate-to-felsic lower crust in South Africa coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, suggesting that the more evolved composition of the lower crust may have resulted from crustal reworking and extension during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga.

  6. SEISMIC AND GEOCHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR SHALLOW GAS IN SEDIMENT ON NAVARIN CONTINENTAL MARGIN, BERING SEA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, Paul R.; Golan-Bac, Margaret; Karl, Herman A.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.

    1985-01-01

    Marine sesmic studies coupled with geochemical investigations demonstrate tha hydrocarbon gases are ubiquitous in the near-surface sediment of the Navarin continental margin in the northern Bering Sea. Three types of acoustic anomalies appear to be related to the presence of gas in the sediment. These anomalies are most prevalent in the northern half of the Navarin basin. Acoustic anomalies attributed to gas hydrates and to diagenetic boundaries are present on seismic records of the lower slope between Navarinsky and Zhemchug Canyons. Hydrocarbon gases, methane through butanes, are common in the surface sediment of the Navarin continental margin. The source of methane is mainly biogenic, but the hydrocarbon gas compositions in 17 of 141 cores suggest the presence of thermogenic gas. No direct correlation could be found between acoustic anomalies and gas concentrations in the sediment. Refs.

  7. Geochemical evidence for mixing of three components in martian orthopyroxenite ALH 84001. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    ALH 84001, a ferroan martian orthopyroxenite, originally consisted of three petrographically defined components: a cumulus assemblage of orthopyroxene + chromite, a trapped melt assemblage of orthopyroxene(?) + chromite + maskelynite + apatite + augite +/- pyrite, and a metasomatic assemblage of carbonate +/- pyrite. We present the results of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) study of five bulk samples of ALH 84001, combined with Scanning Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) data on the orthopyroxene, in order to attempt to set limits on the geochemical characteristics of the latter two components, and therefore on the petrogenesis of ALH 84001. The INAA data support the petrographic observations, suggesting that there are at least three components in ALH 84001. We will assume that each of the three geochemically required components can be equated with one of the petrographically observed components. Both trapped melt and metasomatic components in ALH 84001 have higher Na than orthopyroxene based on compositions of maskelynite, apatite, and carbonate. For the metasomatic component, we will assume its Na content is that of carbonate, while for a trapped melt component, we will use a typical Na content inferred for martian meteorite parent melts, approximately 1 wt% Na2O. Under these assumptions, we can set limits on the Light Rare Earth Elements/Heavy Rare Earth Elements (LREE/HREE) ratios of the components, and use this information to compare the petrogenesis of ALH 84001 with other martian meteorites. The above calculations assume that the bulk samples are representative of different portions of ALH 84001. We will also evaluate the possible heterogeneous distribution of mineral phases in the bulk samples as the cause of compositional heterogeneity in our samples.

  8. Geochemical evidence for active tropical serpentinization in the Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica: An analog of a humid early Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Gazel, Esteban; Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Crespo-Medina, Melitza; Schrenk, Matthew O.; Boll, Jan; Gill, Ben C.

    2014-05-01

    Serpentinization is a planetary process that has important consequences on geochemical cycles, supporting microbial activity through the formation of H2 and CH4 and having the potential to sequester atmospheric CO2. We present geochemical evidence of active serpentinization in the Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica which is sustained by peridotites with a degree of serpentinization less than 50% with no evidence of an internal heat source. Average spring water temperatures are 29.1°C. Two hyperalkaline spring systems were discovered, with a spring fluid pH up to 11.18. The fluids are characterized by low Mg (1.0-5.9 mg/L) and K (1.0-5.5 mg/L) and relative high Ca (29-167 mg/L), Na (16-27 mg/L), Cl (26-29 mg/L), hydroxide (41-63 mg/L), and carbonate (31-49 mg/L). Active CH4 (24.3% v/v) vents coupled with carbonate deposits (δ13CCO2 =-27 to -14‰; δ18OCO2 =-17 to - 6‰) also provide evidence for active serpentinization and carbonation. Isotope ratios of the alkaline fluids (δ18O = -7.9‰, δ2H = -51.4‰) and groundwater (δ18O = -7.6‰; δ2H = -48.0‰) suggests that, during base flow recession, springs are fed by groundwater circulation. Methanogenic Archaea, which comprises a relatively high percentage of the 16S rRNA gene tag sequences, suggests that biological methanogenesis may play a significant role in the system. Santa Elena's extreme varying weather results in a scenario that could be of significant importance for (a) improving the knowledge of conditions on a humid early Earth or Mars that had periodic changes in water supply, (b) revealing new insights on serpentinizing solute transport, and (c) modeling hydrogeochemical responses as a function of recharge.

  9. Evidence for strong lateral seismic velocity variation in the lower crust and upper mantle beneath the California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Voon; Graves, Robert; Wei, Shengji; Helmberger, Don

    2017-01-01

    Regional seismograms from earthquakes in Northern California show a systematic difference in arrival times across Southern California where long period (30–50 seconds) SH waves arrive up to 15 seconds earlier at stations near the coast compared with sites towards the east at similar epicentral distances. We attribute this time difference to heterogeneity of the velocity structure at the crust-mantle interface beneath the California margin. To model these observations, we propose a fast seismic layer, with thickness growing westward from the San Andreas along with a thicker and slower continental crust to the east. Synthetics generated from such a model are able to match the observed timing of SH waveforms better than existing 3D models. The presence of a strong upper mantle buttressed against a weaker crust has a major influence in how the boundary between the Pacific plate and North American plate deforms and may explain the observed asymmetric strain rate across the boundary.

  10. Evidence for strong lateral seismic velocity variation in the lower crust and upper mantle beneath the California margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Voon Hui; Graves, Robert W.; Wei, Shengji; Helmberger, Don

    2017-04-01

    Regional seismograms from earthquakes in Northern California show a systematic difference in arrival times across Southern California where long period (30-50 s) SH waves arrive up to 15 s earlier at stations near the coast compared with sites towards the east at similar epicentral distances. We attribute this time difference to heterogeneity of the velocity structure at the crust-mantle interface beneath the California margin. To model these observations, we propose a fast seismic layer, with thickness growing westward from the San Andreas along with a thicker and slower continental crust to the east. Synthetics generated from such a model are able to match the observed timing of SH waveforms better than existing 3D models. The presence of a strong upper mantle buttressed against a weaker crust has a major influence in how the boundary between the Pacific plate and North American plate deforms and may explain the observed asymmetric strain rate across the boundary.

  11. Late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean: geochronological and geochemical evidence from granitoids in the northern margin of Alxa, Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Xin; Wang, Jinrong; Chen, Wanfeng; Liu, Zheng; Zhai, Xinwei; Ma, Jinlong; Wang, Shuhua

    2017-03-01

    The Paleo-Asian Ocean (Southern Mongolian Ocean) ophiolitic belts and massive granitoids are exposed in the Alxa block, in response to oceanic subduction processes. In this work, we report petrographic, geochemical, and zircon U-Pb age data of some granitoid intrusions from the northern Alxa. Zircon U-Pb dating for the quartz diorite, tonalite, monzogranite, and biotite granite yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 302±9.2 Ma, 246.5±4.6 Ma, 235±4.4 Ma, and 229.5±5.6 Ma, respectively. The quartz diorites ( 302 Ma) exhibit geochemical similarities to adakites, likely derived from partial melting of the initially subducted Chaganchulu back-arc oceanic slab. The tonalites ( 246.5 Ma) display geochemical affinities of I-type granites. They were probably derived by fractional crystallization of the modified lithospheric mantle-derived basaltic magmas in a volcanic arc setting. The monzogranites ( 235 Ma) are characterized by low Al2O3, but high Y and Yb with notably negative Eu anomalies. In contrast, the biotite granites ( 229.5 Ma) show high Al2O3 but low Y and Yb with steep HREE patterns and the absence of negative Eu anomalies. Elemental data suggested that the biotite granites were likely derived from a thickened lower crust, but the monzogranites originated from a thin crust. Our data suggested that the initial subduction of the Chaganchulu oceanic slab towards the Alxa block occurred at 302 Ma. This subduction process continued to the Early Triassic ( 246 Ma) and the basin was finally closed before the Middle Triassic ( 235 Ma). Subsequently, the break-off of the subducted slab triggered asthenosphere upwelling (240-230 Ma).

  12. Geochemical and biochemical evidence of lake overturn and fish kill at Lake Averno, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliro, S.; Chiodini, G.; Izzo, G.; Minopoli, C.; Signorini, A.; Avino, R.; Granieri, D.

    2008-12-01

    Lake Averno is situated in the homonymous crater in the northwestern sector of the Campi Flegrei active volcanic system in Campania region, Italy. In February 2005 a fish kill event was observed in the lake, prompting a geochemical survey to ascertain the possible cause. In February 2005 a geochemical survey revealed that the lake water was unstratified chemically and isotopically, presumably, as a result of lake overturn. This fish kill phenomenon was recorded at least two other times in the past. In contrast to the February 2005 results, data collected in October 2005, shows the Lake Averno to be stratified, with an oxic epilimnion (surface to 6 m) and an anoxic hypolimnion (6 m to lake bottom at about 33 m). Chemical and isotopic compositions of Lake Averno waters suggest an origin by mixing of shallow waters with a Na-Cl hydrothermal component coupled with an active evaporation process. The isotopic composition of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon, as well as the composition of the non-reactive dissolved gas species again supports the occurrence of this mixing process. Decreasing levels of SO 4 and increasing levels of H 2S and CH 4 contents in lake water with depth, strongly suggests anaerobic bacterial processes are occurring through decomposition of organic matter under anoxic conditions in the sediment and in the water column. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis processes coexist and play a pivotal role in the anaerobic environment of the Lake Averno. The sulfate reducing bacterial activity has been estimated in the range of 14-22 μmol m - 2 day - 1 . Total gas pressure of dissolved gases ranges between 800 and 1400 mbar, well below the hydrostatic pressure throughout the water column, excluding the possibility, at least at the survey time, of a limnic eruption. Vertical changes in the density of lake waters indicate that overturn may be triggered by cooling of epilimnetic waters below 7 °C. This is a possible phenomenon in winter periods if atmospheric

  13. Geochemical evidence of mantle reservoir evolution during progressive rifting along the western Afar margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Tyrone O.; Mohr, Paul; Dosso, Laure; Hall, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The Afar triple junction, where the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and African Rift System extension zones converge, is a pivotal domain for the study of continental-to-oceanic rift evolution. The western margin of Afar forms the southernmost sector of the western margin of the Red Sea rift where that margin enters the Ethiopian flood basalt province. Tectonism and volcanism at the triple junction had commenced by ˜31 Ma with crustal fissuring, diking and voluminous eruption of the Ethiopian-Yemen flood basalt pile. The dikes which fed the Oligocene-Quaternary lava sequence covering the western Afar rift margin provide an opportunity to probe the geochemical reservoirs associated with the evolution of a still active continental margin. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology reveals that the western Afar margin dikes span the entire history of rift evolution from the initial Oligocene flood basalt event to the development of focused zones of intrusion in rift marginal basins. Major element, trace element and isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf) data demonstrate temporal geochemical heterogeneities resulting from variable contributions from the Afar plume, depleted asthenospheric mantle, and African lithosphere. The various dikes erupted between 31 Ma and 22 Ma all share isotopic signatures attesting to a contribution from the Afar plume, indicating this initial period in the evolution of the Afar margin was one of magma-assisted weakening of the lithosphere. From 22 Ma to 12 Ma, however, diffuse diking during continued evolution of the rift margin facilitated ascent of magmas in which depleted mantle and lithospheric sources predominated, though contributions from the Afar plume persisted. After 10 Ma, magmatic intrusion migrated eastwards towards the Afar rift floor, with an increasing fraction of the magmas derived from depleted mantle with less of a lithospheric signature. The dikes of the western Afar margin reveal that magma generation processes during the evolution of this continental rift margin

  14. Icelandic-type crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foulger, G.R.; Du, Z.; Julian, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous seismic studies, in particular using receiver functions and explosion seismology, have provided a detailed picture of the structure and thickness of the crust beneath the Iceland transverse ridge. We review the results and propose a structural model that is consistent with all the observations. The upper crust is typically 7 ?? 1 km thick, heterogeneous and has high velocity gradients. The lower crust is typically 15-30 ?? 5 km thick and begins where the velocity gradient decreases radically. This generally occurs at the V p ??? 6.5 km s-1 level. A low-velocity zone ??? 10 000 km2 in area and up to ??? 15 km thick occupies the lower crust beneath central Iceland, and may represent a submerged, trapped oceanic microplate. The crust-mantle boundary is a transition zone ???5 ?? 3 km thick throughout which V p increases progressively from ???7.2 to ???8.0 km s-1. It may be gradational or a zone of alternating high- and low-velocity layers. There is no seismic evidence for melt or exceptionally high temperatures in or near this zone. Isostasy indicates that the density contrast between the lower crust and the mantle is only ???90 kg m-3 compared with ???300 kg m-3 for normal oceanic crust, indicating compositional anomalies that are as yet not understood. The seismological crust is ???30 km thick beneath the Greenland-Iceland and Iceland-Faeroe ridges, and eastern Iceland, ???20 km beneath western Iceland, and ???40 km thick beneath central Iceland. This pattern is not what is predicted for an eastward-migrating plume. Low attenuation and normal V p/V s ratios in the lower crust beneath central and southwestern Iceland, and normal uppermost mantle velocities in general, suggest that the crust and uppermost mantle are subsolidus and cooler than at equivalent depths beneath the East Pacific Rise. Seismic data from Iceland have historically been interpreted both in terms of thin-hot and thick-cold crust models, both of which have been cited as supporting the plume

  15. Further X-Ray Observations of EXO 0748-676 in Quiescence: Evidence for a Cooling Neutron Star Crust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    accretion rate of the system, as well as the rate of neutrino emissions from the stellar core (e.g., Brown et al. 1998; Colpi et al. 2001). The latter cools...crust and results in a low con- ductivity. In addition, Rutledge et al. (2002) explore stan- dard (i.e., slow) and enhanced neutrino cooling mech

  16. Geochemical evidence for magmatic water within Mars from pyroxenes in the Shergotty meteorite.

    PubMed

    McSween, H Y; Grove, T L; Lentz, R C; Dann, J C; Holzheid, A H; Riciputi, L R; Ryan, J G

    2001-01-25

    Observations of martian surface morphology have been used to argue that an ancient ocean once existed on Mars. It has been thought that significant quantities of such water could have been supplied to the martian surface through volcanic outgassing, but this suggestion is contradicted by the low magmatic water content that is generally inferred from chemical analyses of igneous martian meteorites. Here, however, we report the distributions of trace elements within pyroxenes of the Shergotty meteorite--a basalt body ejected 175 million years ago from Mars--as well as hydrous and anhydrous crystallization experiments that, together, imply that water contents of pre-eruptive magma on Mars could have been up to 1.8%. We found that in the Shergotty meteorite, the inner cores of pyroxene minerals (which formed at depth in the martian crust) are enriched in soluble trace elements when compared to the outer rims (which crystallized on or near to the martian surface). This implies that water was present in pyroxenes at depth but was largely lost as pyroxenes were carried to the surface during magma ascent. We conclude that ascending magmas possibly delivered significant quantities of water to the martian surface in recent times, reconciling geologic and petrologic constraints on the outgassing history of Mars.

  17. Imaging The Flat Slab Beneath The Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina, Using Receiver Function Analysis: Evidence For Overthickened Subducted Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Gilbert, H. J.; Alvarado, P. M.; Linkimer, L.; Porter, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    The western margin of the South American continent between 30°and 32° S is characterized by the flat slab subduction of the ~43 Ma oceanic Nazca plate beneath the continental South American plate. Several arrays of broadband seismic instruments have been deployed in Chile and western Argentina to study this phenomenon (e.g., CHARGE, 2000-2002; SIEMBRA, 2007-2009; ESP, 2008-2010). The low angle subduction has prevented magmatism in the area since the late Miocene due to reduced mantle flow above the subducting slab, and spatially correlates with the formation of both thick-skinned (Sierras Pampeanas) and thin-skinned (Andean Precordillera) thrust belts within the region. In order to better constrain the crust and upper mantle structure in the transition region between flat slab and normal subduction to the south and east, we have calculated receiver functions (RFs) from teleseismic earthquakes. Using our dense SIEMBRA array, combined with the broader CHARGE and ESP arrays, we are able to image in detail the flat slab, which contains a distinct negative arrival (indicative of a low velocity zone) at the top of the flat slab, followed by a strong positive P-to-S conversion. While the exact causes of flat slab subduction continue to be debated, one overriding theme is the necessity of having an overthickened crust in order to increase the buoyancy of the subducting slab. In this region, the hotspot seamount chain of the Juan Fernandez Ridge (JFR) is thought to provide such a mechanism. Kopp et al. (2004), however, did not find overthickened crust in the offshore portion of the JFR, but rather moderately thick oceanic crust. Preliminary results from our receiver functions, compared with synthetic RFs containing either a normal (7 km) or an overthickened (17km) crust, indicate that the oceanic crust at the top of the slab (the low velocity zone) must be at least ~15 km thick. Our results support the idea of an overthickened crust in the subducted flat slab beneath

  18. Isotopic evidence from the eastern Canadian shield for geochemical discontinuity in the proterozoic mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashwal, L.D.; Wooden, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Most workers agree that Proterozoic anorthosite massifs represent the crystallization products of mantle-derived magmas1,2, although the composition of the parental melts is a major unsolved petrological problem 3. As mantle-derived rocks, the massifs can be used as geochemical probes of their late Precambrian upper mantle sources. We report here Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of anorthosites and related rocks from the Grenville and Nain Provinces of the eastern Canadian shield. Here 75% of the Earth's known anorthosite is found in a 1,600-km belt from the Adirondack Mountains of northern New York State to the eastern coast of Labrador4 (Fig. 1). The results indicate that the massifs were derived from at least two distinct mantle source regions which were established before 1,650 Myr ago, and were episodically involved in magmatism over ???500 Myr. One reservoir, below the Grenville Province, and probably below much of the eastern Superior Province, was isotopically similar to the depleted, modern-day mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source. The other reservoir was chondritic to moderately enriched, and is most easily identified in the Nain Province, but may have occurred scattered throughout the Superior Province. ?? 1983 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. The Trace-Component Trapping Effect: Experimental Evidence, Theoretical Interpretation, and Geochemical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urusov, Vadim S.; Dudnikova, Valentina B.

    1998-04-01

    Experimental data indicating increase of crystal-melt (fluid) partition coefficients in the range of microconcentrations of trace elements are reviewed and analyzed in detail. This concentration dependence of partition coefficients has been referred to as either deviations from Henry's law or the trace-component trapping effect. A critical review of a variety of models proposed to explain this phenomenon is also given. It is shown that the most reasonable and developed of these models relate changes in trace element partition coefficient at low concentrations to interactions between the trace element ions and metastable lattice defects (i.e., linear and planar defects) at low temperatures or intrinsic point defects of thermal origin at higher temperatures. The mechanism of interaction between trace element substituent atoms and intrinsic defects is considered in detail, with particular consideration given to the creation of pair associates, coupled substitutions, and the influence of other impurities on the trace element dissolution. The models developed are fit to the available experimental data to provide descriptions of the dependence of partition coefficients on composition and to estimate the concentrations and free energies of formation of the intrinsic defects (i.e., vacancies and interstitial atoms) in a matrix crystal. Some probable geochemical applications and manifestations of the trapping effect are discussed. This leads to the conclusion that there is an urgent need for further consideration of the problem.

  20. A petrogenetic study of anorogenic felsic magmatism in the Cretaceous Paresis ring complex, Namibia: evidence for mixing of crust and mantle-derived components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingram, B.; Trumbull, R. B.; Littman, S.; Gerstenberger, H.

    2000-10-01

    Paresis is one of a group of Cretaceous ring complexes extending from the coast some 350 km NE across the Damara Belt. It consists of over 90% rhyolites and comendites, with subordinate intrusions of quartz syenite and alkali-feldspar syenite. These felsic units are accompanied by very minor amounts of silica-undersaturated basalt, phonolite and lamprophyre. Located near the edge of the Congo Craton, Paresis is the farthest inland of any felsic complex in the Cretaceous ring complex group. The other ring complexes in the vicinity consist of carbonatites and undersaturated alkaline rocks (e.g., Okorusu, Kalkfeld, Etaneno, Ondurakorume). Geochemical and isotopic data provide evidence for both mantle and crustal components in the sources of the Paresis magmas. The alkaline basalts, phonolite and lamprophyre have overlapping Sr and Nd isotopic initial ratios which plot within the mantle array close to bulk-earth values ( ɛNd=-0.9 to -2.8 and 87Sr/ 86Sr(i)=0.7042-0.7054) and may indicate a mantle plume component. The rhyolite units comprise metaluminous feldspar rhyolites and peraluminous, more differentiated quartz-feldspar rhyolites. Both units show prominent negative Nb and Ta anomalies on mantle-normalized multielement diagrams and have extremely nonradiogenic Nd ratios ( ɛNd=-21) and Sr initial ratios of 0.7117-0.7138. These isotopic values suggest a crustal origin from pre-Damara (Early Precambrian) gneisses and granitoids, which are exposed in the Congo craton and related inliers in northern Namibia. The comendites are peralkaline, highly differentiated rocks. In contrast to the rhyolites, comendites lack mantle-normalized Nb and Ta anomalies, have higher HFSE and LREE contents, extreme negative Eu anomalies and ɛNd values of -11. Like the comendites, alkali-feldspar syenites are peralkaline, lack Nb and Ta anomalies, have negative Eu anomalies and high HFSE concentrations. Their ɛNd values are -6.5 to -8. The quartz syenites overlap with the peralkaline

  1. Evidence for Archean inheritance in the pre-Panafrican crust of Central Cameroon: Insight from zircon internal structure and LA-MC-ICP-MS Usbnd Pb ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganwa, Alembert Alexandre; Klötzli, Urs Stephan; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    sources. It is likely that erosion, transport and deposition took place between 2116 and 821 Ma. Geochemical data show that the REE, Y, Yb, Sr/Y of some samples are similar to the known Archean craton formations (depletion in REE, Y ≤ 10 ppm, Yb ≤ 1 ppm, Sr/Y ≥ 30). These characteristics are known as specific for the Archean TTG (Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite). It means that: i) Archean TTG contribute significantly to the detritus of the sedimentary basin, ii) The depositional basin and the source rock were close and the detritus was immature. Our results show that the Pre-Panafrican history of central Cameroon includes Meso- to Neo-Archean crustal accretion and associated magmatism prior to the Paleoproterozoic event of the West Central African Belt. In respect to this new insight, any evolutionary reconstruction of the area should integrate the presence of Archean crust.

  2. First Geochemical Evidences for Existence of Slow-Spreading Ridges in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnova, E. A.; Portnyagin, M.; Silantyev, S.; Werner, R.; Hoernle, K.

    2012-12-01

    Stalemate Fracture Zone (SFZ) is a 500 km long SE-NW trending transverse ridge between the northernmost Emperor Seamounts and the Aleutian Trench which originated by flexural uplift of Cretaceous (?) oceanic lithosphere along a transform fault at the Kula-Pacific plate boundary [1]. Sampling at the SFZ and the fossil Kula-Pacific Rift valley was carried out during the R/V SONNE cruise SO201 Leg 1b in July 2009. These rocks are thought to represent a complete section of oceanic lithosphere formed at the fossil Kula-Pacific Spreading Center. A broad spectrum of mantle peridotites ranging from spinel lherzolites to dunites were dredged at station DR37 at the northern bend of SFZ. Spinel in lherzolites has Mg#=0.65-0.68, NiO=0.26-0.34 wt%, Cr#=0.26-0.33, Fe3+#=0.021-0.030 and TiO2=0.04-0.09 wt%. Clinopyroxene has Mg#=91.7-92.4, Cr#=0.12-0.16, TiO2=0.06- 0.15 wt%, Na2O=0.19-0.41 wt%, NiO=0.06-0.09 wt% and is moderately depleted in HREE and extremely depleted in MREE and Zr (C1-normalized YbN=4.0- 5.6, [Sm/Yb]N=0.05-0.14, [Zr/Y]N=0.001-0.009) [2,3]. In terms of spinel and clinopyroxene Cr# and absolute concentrations of HREE, Ti and Na, these compositions are less depleted than those from the Hess Deep peridotites [4] formed at the fast spreading East-Pacific Rise. The SFZ peridotites are more similar to abyssal peridotites from slow-spreading ridges [e.g., 5]. Geochemical modeling suggests that the SFZ peridotites can be formed by 10-12% of near-fractional partial melting of depleted MORB mantle. We used the correlation between degree of partial mantle melting and full spreading rate [6] to estimate the spreading rate of 4-5 cm/year at the formation of the SFZ residual lherzolites (Fig.1). These results agree well with paleomagnetic data [1] suggesting asymmetric spreading at the ancient Kula-Pacific Center with the full rate of ~6 cm/year. Thus both geochemical and paleomagnetic data suggest the existence of slow-spreading ridges in the Pacific Basin during the Old

  3. Geochemical Consequences of Lithospheric Delamination in the Eastern Mediterranean: Evidence From Young Turkish Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, T.; Kurkcuoglu, B.; Plummer, C.

    2007-12-01

    Magmatism associated with continental collision is increasingly attributed to major disturbance of or within the lithosphere. Geochemical and isotopic data on post-collisional primitive mafic lavas from across the Anatolian plate enable us to assess the effects of lithospheric delamination (slab rollback and breakoff) as indicated by geophysical studies. The Anatolian province displays geodynamically complex manifestations of the closure of neo-Tethys and the collision between Africa and Europe that commenced circa 30 Ma. The current south- southwestward motion of Anatolia, a.k.a. "Turkish escape", is accommodated by slab rollback along the Hellenic trench and orogenic collapse along both the eastern and western margins of the microplate. Volcanism occurs primarily along the fault zones that border and cross-cut Anatolia, and major element characteristics of the lavas vary with both space and time. In Western Anatolia, early Miocene collisional calc- alkaline magmatism was followed by Quaternary alkaline volcanism (Alici et al. 1998, 2002; Aldanmaz et al. 2000, 2006) related to orogenic collapse, presumably resulting from slab rollback. Orogenic collapse in Eastern Anatolia is facilitated by slab breakoff as determined by geophysical studies (Zor et al. 2003; Angus et al. 2006; Lei & Zhao 2007). This transition was accompanied a change from mid-Miocene calc-alkaline to Quaternary alkaline volcanism (e.g., Yilmaz 1990; Pearce et al. 1990). Central Anatolia displays calc-alkaline and tholeiitic volcanism, including alkali olivine basalts; plate tectonic reconstructions (Lyberis et al. 1992) indicate that the African slab did not reach Central Anatolia. Sr-Nd isotope values from each volcanic province define linear arrays that converge upon a common unradiogenic value typical of global depleted mantle. We suggest that mafic volcanism throughout Anatolia is supported by a common asthenospheric component, modified by identifiable, location-specific additions. In areas

  4. Evidence for a long-term geochemical zonation of the Tristan-Gough Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppe, Joana; Hauff, Folkmar; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; O`Connor, John; Jokat, Wilfried

    2010-05-01

    The Walvis aseismic ridge and associated Guyot Province in the South Atlantic connect the Etendeka continental flood basalts (CFB) in Namibia with the volcanically active islands of Tristan da Cunha and Gough. Available age data indicate age progressive magmatism along this volcanic lineament consistent with a hotspot track origin (O'Connor and Duncan 1990). The Walvis aseismic ridge and guyots may also serve as a textbook example for the life cycle of a mantle plume: from vigorous, widespread CFB volcanism during the initial plume-head stage to generation of an aseismic ridge above the plume stem during the hotspot stage to production of discrete volcanic edifices during melting of a diffuse upwelling (possibly small blobs) during the final stages. Here we report new geochemical data for volcanic rocks from the Guyot Province where two distinct and spatially separated seamount chains can be identified - the Tristan and the Gough tracks. A total of 22 samples from these volcanic subtracks and the Walvis Ridge have been analyzed for major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios in order to map out possible compositional differences between the two seamount chains. Notably trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data indicate distinct source compositions for the two seamount tracks, suggesting a long-term spatial zonation of the Tristan-Gough mantle source. While the Gough source seems to be most strongly influenced by the EMI mantle endmember and possibly by EMII and FOZO, the Tristan source shows a stronger influence of the FOZO-type component. The lavas from the Walvis ridge at DSDP Site 525 commonly serve as the Atlantic EMI-type endmember, a component that continues to be present within the Gough track. Furthermore, the Gough source seems to melt to a lower degree and/or is generally more trace element or garnet enriched than the Tristan source. These different geochemical signatures can be traced back for at least the past 60 Ma, the time when volcanism

  5. Geochemical evidence for the hydrology of a Tamarack-peat bog, Brimfield Township, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.P.; Miller, L.A. . Dept. of Geology and Water Resources)

    1992-01-01

    Peat Bogs and wetlands represent unique environmental settings what are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic stresses involving inputs of water and chemicals. This study used geochemical and hydrologic monitoring to determine the inputs and fates of elements of the Kent-Brimfield bog located in Portage County, Ohio. Based on physical and chemical information collected over one year, a model is proposed here describing the hydrologic connection between a bog and shallow ground water surrounding the bog. The chemical composition of precipitation, soil water and ground water in the bog vicinity were monitored for one year. Field measurements included water levels, pH, Eh, alkalinity and temperature. Trace metal content of the peat, the pore waters, soil water and ground waters were determined by GFAA, ICP and LIC methods. This bog was found to function as part of a perched water table aquifer. Water in the upper 3 m of the bog is found to be chemically similar to precipitation, but modified by reactions involving dissolution of mineral matter and biologic processes. The chemistry of water deeper in the bog (> 3m) resembles shallow ground water surrounding the bog, modified by weathering of underlying geologic materials and sulfate reduction. This similarity, along with ground water elevations within and outside of the bog, supports that shallow ground water interacts with, and helps maintain water levels in the upper surface of the bog. From these results, a model is proposed for the seasonal variations in hydrologic processes operating in the wetland and surrounding basin, and describes how wetlands may change seasonally from being influent to effluent systems.

  6. Source of the Columbia-Snake-Yellowstone Melting Anomaly (COSYMA): geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ramos, F. C.; Patterson, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    The Columbia River flood Basalts (CRB) constitute the major early manifestation of COSYMA. As part of a project to understand isotopic variations in the CRB at the micro-scale (see abstract by Eckberg et al.), we are re-evaluating new and existing whole-rock trace element and isotope data from the CRB lavas. Peak CRB activity at ca. 17 - 15 Ma is represented by the Steens, Imnaha, Grande Ronde, and Picture Gorge basalts. Later waning activity from ca. 15 Ma to the present day resulted in the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains flows, and, further eastwards, basalts associated with the time-transgressive volcanism of the Snake River Plain. In Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic space, Imnaha basalts lie at the apex of radiating trends and represent a component that is present in all CRB lavas, with the possible exception of some Saddle Mountains flows. Picture Gorge basalts, erupted in north-central Oregon from vents that lie westward of the main vent region for the rest of the CRB, have isotopic compositions between those of Imnaha and Pacific MORB and represent mixtures of components derived from Imnaha- and MORB-sources. Grande Ronde and Wanapum lavas typically form a single trend representing a mixture of Imnaha-like and lithospheric components; at least some of this mixing occurred in crustal magma chambers. The isotopic compositions of Saddle Mountains flows are more scattered, but most are dominated by lithospheric components including those that are present in Grande Ronde and Wanapum basalts. The simplest explanation of these observations is that the Imnaha basalt captures the COSYMA mantle plume composition, and other formations contain variable amounts of MORB and continental lithospheric components. The COSYMA plume is isotopically similar to other Pacific hotspots. The geochemical data for the CRB are consistent with the slab-affected plume model of Geist and Richards (1993). Reference: Geist D, Richards MA (1993) Geology 21, 789.

  7. Geochemical evidence for seasonal controls on the transportation of Holocene loess, Matanuska Valley, southern Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel; Budahn, James R.; Skipp, Gary L.; McGeehin, John

    2016-01-01

    Loess is a widespread Quaternary deposit in Alaska and loess accretion occurs today in some regions, such as the Matanuska Valley. The source of loess in the Matanuska Valley has been debated for more than seven decades, with the Knik River and the Matanuska River, both to the east, being the leading candidates and the Susitna River, to the west, as a less favorable source. We report here new stratigraphic, mineralogic, and geochemical data that test the competing hypotheses of these river sources. Loess thickness data are consistent with previous studies that show that a source or sources lay to the east, which rules out the Susitna River as a source. Knik and Matanuska River silts can be distinguished using Sc–Th–La, LaN/YbN vs. Eu/Eu∗, Cr/Sc, and As/Sb. Matanuska Valley loess falls clearly within the range of values for these ratios found in Matanuska River silt. Dust storms from the Matanuska River are most common in autumn, when river discharge is at a minimum and silt-rich point bars are exposed, wind speed from the north is beginning to increase after a low-velocity period in summer, snow depth is still minimal, and soil temperatures are still above freezing. Thus, seasonal changes in climate and hydrology emerge as critical factors in the timing of aeolian silt transport in southern Alaska. These findings could be applicable to understanding seasonal controls on Pleistocene loess accretion in Europe, New Zealand, South America, and elsewhere in North America.

  8. Late Quaternary paleoceanographic changes in the southwestern Okhotsk Sea: Evidence from geochemical, radiolarian, and diatom records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Yusuke; Takahashi, Kozo; Katsuki, Kota; Ono, Ayumu; Hori, Joichi; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Ikehara, Minoru; Aoki, Kaori

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution analyses of geochemical parameters (biogenic opal, calcium carbonate, organic carbon, and nitrogen) and microfossil assemblages (diatoms and radiolarians) on Core MD01-2412 clarified detailed paleoceanographic changes such as sea-ice cover and biological production in the southwestern Okhotsk Sea during the last 115 kyr. An age model of Core MD01-2412 was established based on δ 18O stratigraphy, accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) 14C, and tephrochronology. Sea-ice history reconstructed by siliceous microplankton records indicated that the present sea-ice condition was formed during the last 8 kyr. Only during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 was the duration of sea-ice cover in this region much longer than that of today (4-5 months a year). Two diatom species, Thalassionema nitzschioides and Fragilariopsis doliolus, revealed that the Soya Warm Current Water (SWCW) flowed into the Okhotsk Sea near the site of Core MD01-2412 during the last 12-14 kyr and during MIS 5a, and was associated with sea-level rise. Biological productivity rapidly increased during MIS 1, associated with sea-ice retreat. Two major increases of organic carbon (OC) contents (wt%) and C org/N ratios were observed, and the timings of these events were 15.8-16.7 ka (Event 1) and 13.1-13.6 ka (Event 2). Corresponding to these events, the abundance of Cycladophora davisiana, an intermediate water dwelling radiolarian species, increased. This high C. davisiana abundance can be correlated to the input of terrestrial organic matter from the submerged shelf to the intermediate water. Apart from the radiolarians, the production of diatoms in the surface waters was suppressed by the development of well-stratified surface water along with sea-ice melting during the early Holocene. Diatom production increased gradually during the last 10 kyr with enhanced vertical mixing.

  9. Provenance study of the Yellow Sea sediment: geochemical evidence from Chinese and Korean rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. Y.; Li, C. X.; Lee, C. B.; Jung, H. S.

    2003-04-01

    The Yellow Sea is a world-famous epicontinental sea, semi-enclosed by landmass of China and Korea. It has held great fascination for marine geologists by offering itself as a world-class laboratory in which to study the interplay among sea-level change, terrigeneous sediment input, and hydrology for the typical epicontinental sea. Although the Yellow Sea sediment has been extensively characterized for the understanding of dispersal patterns and limits of terrestrial sediments from two gigantic rivers from China, Changjiang and Huanghe, and from several small Korean rivers (Han, Keum and Yeongsan), the intractable source problem remains unsolved so far because of poor knowledge on compositions of the Chinese and Korean river sediments and instability of source indicators for discrimination. Compositions of major, trace and rare earth elements in bulk and acid-leached sediments of Chinese and Korean rivers were measured by ICP-MS and compared, in order to characterize different source sediments. Source rock composition and chemical weathering intensity are two most important factors constraining distinct elemental compositions of river sediments, whereas grain size effect and human impact are minor. On the basis of element mobility and difference in compositions, chemical parameters, including Ti content, (La/Yb)N, GdN, ratios of Ti/Nb and Cr/Th, are suggested as source indicators to discriminate Changjiang and Huanghe sediments from Korean river matters. These source indicators, therefore, create the opportunity to decipher the provenance of the Yellow Sea sediment. Surface sediment samples from the Yellow Sea were determined for elemental compositions, and the provenance was identified by a discrimination model on the basis of the above geochemical indicators. The Huanghe river matter governs major part of the Yellow Sea, while the Changjiang and Korean river sediments contribute considerably to the southern and eastern parts of the Yellow Sea, respectively. The

  10. The geochemical proxies for the eutrophic and hypoxia in the Changjiang estuary: evidence from sedimentary records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuwen, F.

    2013-12-01

    Three cores were selected in the Changjiang Estuary to study potential hundrend-years eutrophication and hypoxia. The sediment record in the Changjiang Estuary mud area (CEMA) within the region of pronounced hypoxia showed that an increase in TOC (21%), biomarkers (141%) and δ13 Corg (1.6‰PDB ) occurred since 1950s and a marked increase since 1970s. Some redox sensitive elements (RSEs) have been enriched significantly since the late 1960s to 1970s, the rates of Mo/Al, Cd/Al and As/Al increased about 83%, 73% and 50% respectively. And the contents of some biogenic elements also increased since the late 1960s, e.g. Ca(129%), Sr(65%) and P(38%) respectively. For the core sediment in the Cheju Island mud area (SCIMA) outside the hypoxia region, the organic geochemical indicators (TOC, biomarkers and δ13Corg ) increased in difference degrees before 1950s~1970s and then were almost the constant. The RSEs were controlled by 'grain size effects' which indicated no hypoxia occurred. For the core sediment in the Zhejiang coastal mud area (ZCMA) within the region of milder hypoxia, the distribution of biomarkers is highly similar to the CEMA, but the other indictactors such as δ13 Corg et al.were different from the above two cores. Productivity in the SCIMA have been mainly influenced by climate ocean circulation changes over the last 100 years. Productivities in the hypoxia areas were corresponding with the fertilizer consumption and high nutrient inputs from the Changjiang River, which stimulated the algae (e g. brassicasterol, dinosterol) blooming and resulted an enrichment of organic matter. Hypoxia invoked organic matter preserved in the sediment. This study concluded that biomarkers in sediment could be as the eutrophic proxies in the Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent region, and δ13 Corg, RSEs and biogenic elements could be as the proxies to trace or reconstruct history of eutrophication and hypoxia in the CEMA.

  11. Seismic and geochemical evidence for shallow gas in sediment on Navarin continental margin, Bering Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, P.R.; Golan-Bac, M.; Karl, H.A.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-03-01

    Marine seismic studies coupled with geochemical investigations demonstrate that hydrocarbon gases are ubiquitous in the near-surface (less than or equal to 250 m or 820 ft depth) sediment of the Navarin continental margin in the northern Bering Sea. Three types of acoustic anomalies appear to be related to the presence of gas in the sediment. These anomalies are most prevalent in the northern half of the Navarin basin. Acoustic anomalies attributed to gas hydrates and to diagenetic boundaries are present on seismic records of the lower slope between Navarinsky and Zhemchug Canyons. Hydrocarbon gases, methane through butanes, are common in the surface sediment of the Navarin continental margin. Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon gas, is present in amounts ranging from 84,000 to 1 ..mu..L/L of wet sediment. These concentrations are two to three orders of magnitude greater than the other hydrocarbon gases. The highest concentrations of methane (greater than 1,000 ..mu..L/L) were measured in sediment of Navarinsky Canyon and over the central part of the Navarin basin. The source of methane is mainly biogenic, but the hydrocarbon gas compositions in 17 of 141 cores suggest the presence of thermogenic gas. Most of these 17 cores are from the continental slope at water depths greater than 150 m (490 ft). No direct correlation could be found between acoustic anomalies and gas concentrations in the sediment. This lack of correlation is probably due to the limited penetration of the gravity corer and the spotty distribution of hydrocarbon concentrations.

  12. Geochemical evidence for seasonal controls on the transportation of Holocene loess, Matanuska Valley, southern Alaska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Skipp, Gary L.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-06-01

    Loess is a widespread Quaternary deposit in Alaska and loess accretion occurs today in some regions, such as the Matanuska Valley. The source of loess in the Matanuska Valley has been debated for more than seven decades, with the Knik River and the Matanuska River, both to the east, being the leading candidates and the Susitna River, to the west, as a less favorable source. We report here new stratigraphic, mineralogic, and geochemical data that test the competing hypotheses of these river sources. Loess thickness data are consistent with previous studies that show that a source or sources lay to the east, which rules out the Susitna River as a source. Knik and Matanuska River silts can be distinguished using Sc-Th-La, LaN/YbN vs. Eu/Eu∗, Cr/Sc, and As/Sb. Matanuska Valley loess falls clearly within the range of values for these ratios found in Matanuska River silt. Dust storms from the Matanuska River are most common in autumn, when river discharge is at a minimum and silt-rich point bars are exposed, wind speed from the north is beginning to increase after a low-velocity period in summer, snow depth is still minimal, and soil temperatures are still above freezing. Thus, seasonal changes in climate and hydrology emerge as critical factors in the timing of aeolian silt transport in southern Alaska. These findings could be applicable to understanding seasonal controls on Pleistocene loess accretion in Europe, New Zealand, South America, and elsewhere in North America.

  13. Early Mesozoic deep-crust reworking beneath the central Lhasa terrane (South Tibet): Evidence from intermediate gneiss xenoliths in granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Xiong, Qing; Yang, Jing-Sui; Wu, Yuan-Bao; Zhao, Jun-Hong; Griffin, William L.; Dai, Hong-Kun

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the rheological behavior of the Tibetan Plateau and its response to geodynamic processes requires a clear knowledge of the composition, evolution and lithological properties of the deep crust. Here we present U-Pb-Hf isotopes of zircons, bulk-rock geochemistry and mineral compositions for seven intermediate gneiss xenoliths and their host Early Mesozoic granites (205 ± 6 Ma) in the central Lhasa terrane to probe the deep crust beneath Southern Tibet. The xenoliths contain plagioclase, amphibole, titanite, allanite, quartz, biotite and muscovite, with accessory Fe-Ti oxides, apatite and zircon. Bulk-rock and mineral geochemistry suggests that these xenoliths have a magmatic origin and experienced deformation and amphibolite-facies metamorphism (equilibration at pressures of 0.46-0.83 GPa and temperatures of 650 °C), before they were captured by the host granite at 205 Ma. Zircons in these xenoliths show complex microstructures, including inherited cores, magmatic or metamorphic bands, and high U-Th hydrothermal rims. Inherited zircon cores record U-Pb ages from 2277 Ma to 517 Ma. Igneous zircons show a range of concordant U-Pb ages, suggesting a protracted magmatism from 236 Ma to 203 Ma. Metamorphic zircon zones record the timing of amphibolite-facies metamorphism from 224 to 192 Ma, while the high U-Th hydrothermal rims show a subsequent fluid activity until 150 Ma. Unradiogenic Hf isotopic compositions of both xenoliths and host granites [xenolith εHf(t) = - 11.2 to 0; host granite εHf(t) = - 17.3 to - 3.3] indicate that the Early Mesozoic deep crust in the central Lhasa terrane originated mainly from ancient (i.e., Proterozoic) crust, with little or no interaction with juvenile magmas. This study suggests a possible continental differentiation mechanism during crustal reworking; progressive melting may initiate from the lower mafic crust (at ca. 236 Ma) and gradually migrate into the sediment-rich upper crust (until ca. 203 Ma). The reworking

  14. Short episodes of crust generation during protracted accretionary processes: Evidence from Central Asian Orogenic Belt, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gong-Jian; Chung, Sun-Lin; Hawkesworth, Chris J.; Cawood, P. A.; Wang, Qiang; Wyman, Derek A.; Xu, Yi-Gang; Zhao, Zhen-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Accretionary orogens are major sites of generation of continental crust but the spatial and temporal distribution of crust generation within individual orogens remains poorly constrained. Paleozoic (∼540-270 Ma) granitic rocks from the Alati, Junggar and Chinese Tianshan segments of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) have markedly bimodal age frequency distributions with peaks of ages at ∼400 Ma and 280 Ma for the Altai segment, and ∼430 Ma and 300 Ma for the Junggar and Chinese Tianshan segments. Most of the magma was generated in short time intervals (∼20-40 Ma), and variations in magma volumes and in Nd-Hf isotope ratios are taken to reflect variable rates of new crust generation within a long-lived convergent plate setting. The Junggar segment is characterized by high and uniform Nd-Hf isotope ratios (εNd (t) = + 5 to + 8; zircon εHf (t) = + 10 to + 16) and it appears to have formed in an intra-oceanic arc system. In the Altai and Chinese Tianshan segments, the Nd-Hf isotope ratios (εNd (t) = - 7 to + 8; zircon εHf (t) = - 16 to + 16) are lower, although they increase with decreasing age of the rock units. The introduction of a juvenile component into the Chinese Tianshan and Altai granitic rocks appears to have occurred in continental arc settings and it reflects a progressive reduction in the contributions from old continental lower crust and lithospheric mantle. Within the long-lived convergent margin setting (over ∼200 Ma), higher volumes of magma, and greater contributions of juvenile material, were typically emplaced over short time intervals of ∼20-40 Ma. These intervals were associated with higher Nb/La ratios, coupled with lower La/Yb ratios, in both the mafic and granitic rocks, and these episodes of increased magmatism from intraplate-like sources are therefore thought to have been in response to lithospheric extension. The trace element and Nd-Hf isotope data, in combination with estimates of granitic magma volumes, highlight

  15. The Cleft revealed: Geologic, magnetic, and morphologic evidence for construction of upper oceanic crust along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stakes, Debra S.; Perfit, Michael R.; Tivey, Maurice A.; Caress, David W.; Ramirez, Tony M.; Maher, Norman

    2006-04-01

    The geology and structure of the Cleft Segment of the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) have been examined using high-resolution mapping systems, observations by remotely operated vehicle (ROV), ROV-mounted magnetometer, and the geochemical analysis of recovered lavas. Bathymetric mapping using multibeam (EM300) coupled with in situ observations that focused on near-axis and flank regions provides a detailed picture of 0 to 400 ka upper crust created at the southern terminus of the JdFR. A total of 53 rock cores and 276 precisely located rock or glass samples were collected during three cruises that included sixteen ROV dives. Our observations of the seafloor during these dives suggest that many of the unfaulted and extensive lava flows that comprise and/or cap the prominent ridges that flank the axial valley emanate from ridge parallel faults and fissures that formed in the highly tectonized zone that forms the walls of the axial valley. The geochemically evolved and heterogeneous nature of these near-axis and flank eruptions is consistent with an origin within the cooler distal edges of a crustal magma chamber or mush zone. In contrast, the most recent axial eruptions are more primitive (higher MgO), chemically homogeneous lobate, sheet, and massive flows that generate a distinct magnetic high over the axial valley. We suggest that the syntectonic capping volcanics observed off-axis were erupted from near-axis and flank fissures and created a thickened extrusive layer as suggested by the magnetic and seismic data. This model suggests that many of the lavas that comprise the elevated ridges that bound the axial valley of the Cleft Segment were erupted during the collapse of a magmatic cycle not during the robust phase that established a new magmatic cycle.

  16. Isotopic evidence for the dependence of recurrent felsic magmatism on new crust formation: An example from the Georgetown region of Northeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, L. P.; McCulloch, M. T.

    1990-01-01

    U-Pb zircon, Sm-Nd, and Rb-Sr isotopic data, together with previously accumulated geological and chemical evidence show that the Georgetown inlier of northeast Queensland and its immediate environs were subjected to three widespread, temporally discrete episodes of felsic magmatism. The earliest of these, at about 1550 Ma, produced widespread anatexis within the metasedimentary rocks of the inlier, which have a poorly constrained depositional age, but which were derived by the degradation of ca. 2000-2500 Ma crust. Contemporaneous I-type (trondhjemitic) magmas contained more radiogenic Nd ( ɛ = -0.1 compared with - 1.9 to -4.7), and are thought to have formed from mixing of newly formed crustal material with the igneous precursors of the metasediments. A 420 Ma event was also characterised by two isotopically distinct magmas (with ɛ Nd = -5.6 and about -16), but in this case both were of I-type. The more radiogenic magma is represented by the Dido Granodiorite, which is likely to have formed by the melting of ca. 1550 Ma crust, whereas the other magma type (which includes three different granitoids) was apparently derived from the same (2000-2500 Ma) igneous crust from which the metasediments were formed. I-type 300 Ma igneous rocks had a uniform isotopic composition ( ɛNd = -7.5, 87Sr /86Sr = 0.710 ) consistent with their formation by different degrees of partial melting (perhaps combined with fractional crystallisation) from a Dido Granite-like precursor. A younger source component was at least partially involved in the origin of spatially associated A-type volcanics, which are about 30 Ma younger and have more primitive Nd compositions. Most of the Palaeozoic igneous rocks reflect at least two episodes of intracrustal melting. The data are best explained in terms of successive addition from below of new crustal material (via underplating or emplacement into the lower crust) at about 1550 Ma, 420 Ma, and 300 Ma. The model requires that such newly accreted

  17. Geochemical evidence for Late Cretaceous marginal arc-to-backarc transition in the Sabzevar ophiolitic extrusive sequence, northeast Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalatbari Jafari, Morteza; Babaie, Hassan A.; Gani, Moslem

    2013-07-01

    The ophiolitic extrusive sequence, exposed in an area north of Sabzevar, has three major parts: a lower part, with abundant breccia, hyaloclastic tuff, and sheet flow, a middle part with vesicular, aphyric pillow lava, and an upper part with a sequence of lava and volcanic-sedimentary rocks. Pelagic limestone interlayers contain Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian-Late Maastrichtian) microfauna. The supra-ophiolitic series includes a sequence of turbidititic and volcanic-sedimentary rocks with lava flow, aphyric and phyric lava, and interlayers of pelagic limestone and radiolarian chert. Paleontological investigation of the pelagic limestone and radiolarite interlayers in this series gives a Late Cretaceous age, supporting the idea that the supra-ophiolitic series formed in a trough, synchronous with the Sabzevar oceanic crust during the Late Cretaceous. Geochemical data indicate a relationship between lava in the upper part of the extrusive sequence and lava in the supra-ophiolitic series. These lavas have a calc-alkaline to almost alkaline characteristic, and show a clear depletion in Nb and definite depletions in Zr and Ti in spider diagrams. Data from these rocks plot in the subduction zone field in tectonomagmatic diagrams. The concentration and position of the heavy rare earth elements in the spider diagrams, and their slight variation, can be attributed to partial melting of the depleted mantle wedge above the subducted slab, and enrichment in the LILE can be attributed to subduction components (fluid, melt) released from the subducting slab. In comparison, the sheet flow and pillow lava of the lower and middle parts of the extrusive sequence show OIB characteristics and high potassium magmatic and shoshonitic trends, and their spider diagram patterns show Nb, Zr, and Ti depletions. The enrichment in the LILE in the spider diagram patterns suggest a low rate of partial melting of an enriched, garnet-bearing mantle. It seems that the marginal arc basin, in which

  18. Dyke Swarms in Southeastern British Columbia: Mineralogical and Geochemical Evidence for Emplacement of Multiple Magma Types During Orogenic Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M.; Owen, J. P.; Hoskin, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Eocene dyke swarms in southeastern British Columbia provide an important record of the tectonic and magmatic history of the Cordillera following orogenic collapse. New field mapping, petrographic, and geochemical data is presented for a swarm of more than thirty dykes located near the mining town of Trail, B.C. Detailed field mapping revealed that individual dykes are highly diverse, both in composition and morphology. As a group, the dykes trend northwest (average strike of 338 degrees) and dip steeply to the southwest. Their average thickness is approximately 1.5m, with a range from 4.5m to less than 1cm. Three sub-parallel dykes were mapped for a length of 2km, and exhibit irregularities in their form such as branching and offshoots that follow fractures in the country rock. Thin-section analysis shows a wide variety of rock types within the swarm, including: micro-quartz syenite, micro-syenite, micro-monzonite, latite, basalt, basaltic andesite, and lamprophyre. Texturally, these samples are consistently porphyritic and partially altered to chlorite and sericite. This alteration commonly occurs in concentric rims around phenocrysts. The samples are typically intergranular, although some display trachytic texture. Whole-rock geochemistry shows that the dykes have a wide range in composition, with SiO2 between 76.45 wt.% and 45.15 wt.% and MgO between 0.13 wt.% and 13.16 wt.%. The results also revealed that one dyke has very high values of Ni (430 ppm), Cr (1420 ppm), and Co (50 ppm), giving it a fairly primitive composition. Harker diagrams and trace element plots show three distinct groups: mafic calc-alkaline dykes, felsic calc- alkaline dykes, and minette lamprophyres. The felsic dykes are characterized by negative Eu and Sr anomalies suggesting fractionation of plagioclase feldspar, as well as pronounced negative P and Ti anomalies. The minettes are enriched in LILE and depleted in HSFE relative to the mafic dykes. The three groups do not appear to be

  19. Comment on "Heterogeneous Hadean hafnium: evidence of continental crust at 4.4 to 4.5 Ga".

    PubMed

    Valley, John W; Cavosie, Aaron J; Fu, Bin; Peck, William H; Wilde, Simon A

    2006-05-26

    Harrison et al. (Reports, 23 December 2005, p. 1947) proposed that plate tectonics and granites existed 4.5 billion years ago (Ga), within 70 million years of Earth's formation, based on geochemistry of >4.0 Ga detrital zircons from Australia. We highlight the large uncertainties of this claim and make the more moderate proposal that some crust formed by 4.4 Ga and oceans formed by 4.2 Ga.

  20. Negative ä98Mo in Basalts from La Palma - Evidence for Recycling of Fe-Mn Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willbold, M.; Elliott, T.; Archer, C.

    2008-12-01

    Enrichment of 187Os and 186Os in some plume-related ocean island basalts have been interpreted in terms of chemical interaction between the Earths core and mantle or recycling of Fe-Mn crusts [1, 2]. Here, we further explore this unresolved debate using samples from La Palma with some of the most radiogenic primary 187Os/188Os isotope ratios in ocean island basalts. We use radiogenic 182W (expressed as ɛ182W) and stable Mo (expressed as δ98Mo) isotope measurements as highly diagnostic tracers of the two potential components (core and Fe-Mn crusts, respectively). The average ɛ182W value of the La Palma basalts (0.06 ± 0.08; 2σ) is indistinguishable from that of bulk silicate Earth in keeping with measurements from Hawaii [2]. However, the samples show negative δ98Mo values (-0.01 to -0.12 ± 0.07 permil; 2σ). Such negative values are unlike those found in other oceanic basalts with unradiogenic Os isotope ratios (δ98Mo > 0 permil). This suggests that a striking low-δ98Mo component must be present in the mantle source of La Palma basalts. So far, negative δ98Mo values have only been identified in Fe-Mn crusts and associated pelagic sediments (δ98Mo < -0.5 permil; [3]). We therefore suggest that the low δ98Mo values and the radiogenic Os isotopes in the La Palma samples have been caused by recycling and long-term storage of Fe-Mn crusts in the mantle. [1] A. D. Brandon et al. (1998), Science 280, 1570. [2] A. Scherstén et al. (2004), Nature 427, 234. [3] C. Siebert et al. (2003), EPSL 211, 159.

  1. Evidence for partial melt in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu (Changbaishan), Democratic People's Republic of Korea and China.

    PubMed

    Kyong-Song, Ri; Hammond, James O S; Chol-Nam, Ko; Hyok, Kim; Yong-Gun, Yun; Gil-Jong, Pak; Chong-Song, Ri; Oppenheimer, Clive; Liu, Kosima W; Iacovino, Kayla; Kum-Ran, Ryu

    2016-04-01

    Mt. Paektu (also known as Changbaishan) is an enigmatic volcano on the border between the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) and China. Despite being responsible for one of the largest eruptions in history, comparatively little is known about its magmatic evolution, geochronology, or underlying structure. We present receiver function results from an unprecedented seismic deployment in the DPRK. These are the first estimates of the crustal structure on the DPRK side of the volcano and, indeed, for anywhere beneath the DPRK. The crust 60 km from the volcano has a thickness of 35 km and a bulk V P/V S of 1.76, similar to that of the Sino-Korean craton. The V P/V S ratio increases ~20 km from the volcano, rising to >1.87 directly beneath the volcano. This shows that a large region of the crust has been modified by magmatism associated with the volcanism. Such high values of V P/V S suggest that partial melt is present in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu. This region of melt represents a potential source for magmas erupted in the last few thousand years and may be associated with an episode of volcanic unrest observed between 2002 and 2005.

  2. Evidence for partial melt in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu (Changbaishan), Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and China

    PubMed Central

    Kyong-Song, Ri; Hammond, James O. S.; Chol-Nam, Ko; Hyok, Kim; Yong-Gun, Yun; Gil-Jong, Pak; Chong-Song, Ri; Oppenheimer, Clive; Liu, Kosima W.; Iacovino, Kayla; Kum-Ran, Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Mt. Paektu (also known as Changbaishan) is an enigmatic volcano on the border between the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) and China. Despite being responsible for one of the largest eruptions in history, comparatively little is known about its magmatic evolution, geochronology, or underlying structure. We present receiver function results from an unprecedented seismic deployment in the DPRK. These are the first estimates of the crustal structure on the DPRK side of the volcano and, indeed, for anywhere beneath the DPRK. The crust 60 km from the volcano has a thickness of 35 km and a bulk VP/VS of 1.76, similar to that of the Sino-Korean craton. The VP/VS ratio increases ~20 km from the volcano, rising to >1.87 directly beneath the volcano. This shows that a large region of the crust has been modified by magmatism associated with the volcanism. Such high values of VP/VS suggest that partial melt is present in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu. This region of melt represents a potential source for magmas erupted in the last few thousand years and may be associated with an episode of volcanic unrest observed between 2002 and 2005. PMID:27152343

  3. Evidence for partial melt in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu (Changbaishan), Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyong-Song, Ri; Hammond, James O. S.; Chol-Nam, Ko; Hyok, Kim; Yong-Gun, Yun; Gil-Jong, Pak; Chong-Song, Ri; Oppenheimer, Clive; Liu, Kosima W.; Iacovino, Kayla D.; Kum-Ran, Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Mt. Paektu (also known as Changbaishan) is an enigmatic volcano on the border between the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) and China. Despite being responsible for one of the largest eruptions in history, comparatively little is known about its magmatic evolution, geochronology, or underlying structure. We present receiver function results from an unprecedented seismic deployment in the DPRK. These are the first estimates of the crustal structure on the DPRK side of the volcano and, indeed, for anywhere beneath the DPRK. The crust 60 km from the volcano has a thickness of 35 km and a bulk VP/VS of 1.76, similar to that of the Sino-Korean craton. The VP/VS ratio increases ~20 km from the volcano, rising to >1.87 directly beneath the volcano. This shows that a large region of the crust has been modified by magmatism associated with the volcanism. Such high values of VP/VS suggest that partial melt is present in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu. This region of melt represents a potential source for magmas erupted in the last few thousand years and may be associated with an episode of volcanic unrest observed between 2002 and 2005.

  4. Geochemical evidence for a complex origin for the Kelso dunes, Mojave National Preserve, California USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel; Lancaster, Nicholas; Skipp, Gary L.

    2017-01-01

    The Kelso Dune field in southern California is intriguing because although it is of limited areal extent (~ 100 km2), it has a wide variety of dune forms and contains many active dunes (~ 40 km2), which is unusual in the Mojave Desert. Studies over the past eight decades have concluded that the dunes are derived primarily from a single source, Mojave River alluvium, under a dominant, westerly-to-northwesterly wind regime. The majority of these studies did not, however, present data to support the Mojave River as the only source. We conducted mineralogical and geochemical studies of most of the 14 geomorphically defined dune groups of the Kelso Dune field as well as potential sand sources, alluvial sediments from the surrounding mountain ranges. Results indicate that sands in the nine western dune groups have K/Rb and K/Ba (primarily from K-feldspar) compositions that are indistinguishable from Mojave River alluvium (westerly/northwesterly winds) and Budweiser Wash alluvium (southwesterly winds), permitting an interpretation of two sources. In contrast, sands from the five eastern dune groups have K/Rb and K/Ba values that indicate significant inputs from alluvial fan deposits of the Providence Mountains. This requires either rare winds from the east or southeast or, more likely, aeolian reworking of distal Providence Mountain fan sediments by winds from the west, at a rate greater than input from the Mojave River or other western sources. The results indicate that even a small dune field can have a complex origin, either from seasonally varying winds or complex alluvial-fan-dune interaction. Application of K/Rb and K/Ba in K-feldspar as a provenance indicator could be used in many of the world's ergs or sand seas, where dune origins are still not well understood or are controversial. Four examples are given from Africa and the Middle East where such an approach could yield useful new information about dune sand provenance.

  5. Geochemical Evidence for Gas Hydrates at Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, M.; Claypool, G.; Robertson, G.; Schultheiss, P.; Holland, M.

    2005-12-01

    Geochemical analyses of pore fluids of both pressurized and non-pressurized cores provide important constraints on the main objective of the 2005 Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Joint Industry Program (JIP) cruise: to calibrate geophysical estimates of methane hydrate distribution and concentration with downhole logs and measurements on cores. Cores were recovered in two deepwater (1300 meter) lease areas of the GOM (Atwater Valley 13/14 and Keathley Canyon 151). Selected intervals were cored to a maximum depth of 390 meters beneath the seafloor, as indicated in prior logging while drilling boreholes. Methane hydrate is associated with sediment intrusions and seafloor mounds at Atwater Valley 13/14, and with a bottom simulating reflection (BSR) (i.e., possible base of methane hydrate stability) at KC 151. Pore fluid samples were analyzed from both conventional cores and pressure cores; the hydrates in the conventional cores decomposed prior to sampling. The former presence and distribution of methane hydrates in the some of the conventional cores was inferred by indirect methods: from infra-red scanning of cold core temperatures that correlated with pore fluids having lower salinity and chlorinity and mouse-like textures. Cores that were successfully collected under in situ pressure retained methane quantities consistent with 1-5% methane hydrate in the sediment pore volume. Overall, similar proportions were indicated by pore water salinity/chlorinity anomalies, assuming dilution by fresh water released from decompose methane hydrate. In some specific horizons, however, at the Atwater Valley 14 mound sites, the pore fluid salinity/chlorinity data suggest up to 7-9% methane hydrate in the sediment pore volume. Significant variations in sulfate gradients were observed. The steepest gradients, with the sulfate/methane interface (SMI) at or just below the seafloor, were found at the Atwater Valley 14 mound sites. Away from the mound the SMI occurs at a depth of about 7-10 m below

  6. Geochemical evidence of water source characterization and hydrodynamic responses in a karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano Bicalho, C.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.; Seidel, J. L.; Van Exter, S.; Jourde, H.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThe Lez karst spring, the main perennial outlet of the Lez karst system in southern France, plays an important role in supplying drinking water to the Montpellier metropolitan region. In order to investigate the origin of groundwater, its circulation patterns, and to understand the connectivity and compartmentalization of a karst system, a multi-tracer approach was used to describe the hydrogeology of the Lez karst system. Groundwater samples were collected from Lez karst during a range of hydrologic conditions (between March 2006 and August 2009) and analyzed for major and trace elements, total organic carbon, fecal, and total coliform. During the first recharge event of autumn, highly-mineralized water was observed at Lez Spring during the studied years. Multiple parameters of water during this rise were monitored with a fine time-step in 2008. Discriminate Factorial Analyses revealed the existence of different water-types discharging at Lez Spring. During high stage periods, highly mineralized water initially discharges from the spring, followed by rapid infiltration water. This behavior suggests that hydrodynamics affect groundwater circulation by soliciting different endmembers. These characteristics were observed on a larger scale when monitoring three intermittent springs connected to Lez Spring. A detailed analysis using bivariate diagrams of major, trace elements and elemental ratios provided insight into different water origins, associated lithologies, and mineral-solution reactions related to hydrodynamic responses. From the five identified water-types, the two more contrasting ones are emphasized: the first one corresponds to the most geochemically evolved waters, issued from deep layers where evaporite chemical fingerprinting has been identified. They are characterized by high mineralization and high concentrations in Cl, Na, Mg, Li, B and Br elements, and high Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca and Cl/Br ratios. The second water-type corresponds to the most diluted

  7. Post-collisional high-Mg granitoids from the Paleoproterozoic East Sarmatian Orogen (East European Craton): Evidence for crust-mantle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentiev, R. A.; Santosh, M.

    2017-03-01

    The East Sarmatian Orogen (ESO) is located along the southwestern domain of the East European Craton and occupies a key tectonic link between the Sarmatian and Volgo-Uralian domains. Here we investigate the Paleoproterozoic Novaya Melovatka pluton and its mafic-ultramafic xenoliths to gain insights into the role of interaction between intermediate-felsic crustal melt with mantle rocks as a mechanism for the generation of high-Mg granitoids at crustal pressures. The pluton is composed of biotite-orthopyroxene quartz dioritic and monzodioritic porphyrites (Phase 1) and medium-grained biotite-amphibole quartz diorite, tonalite and granodiorite and commingled Phase 1 mafic magmatic enclaves (MME) (Phase 2). The general geochemical characteristics of these rocks are similar to those of Late-Archean high-Mg sanukitoids. The TDM (model) ages for intermediate Phase 1 and granitoid Phase 2 are similar and show a range of 2324-2439 and 2284-2519 M, respectively. The εNd(t) values are grouped around subchondritic values (=+1.4-+1.9 and + 1.1-+2.2) and the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios are in the range of 0.70202-0.70390. The complex compositional zoning of minerals suggests that the rocks crystallized as synchronous but discrete magma pulses, with limited to significant mixing. Based on the geochemical features we infer that the Phase 1 rocks formed from partial melting of a mantle wedge metasomatized to different degrees by fluids/melts. The presence of MMEs, compositional zoning of minerals including reversely zoned amphiboles, plagioclases with thin calcic overgrowths, and acicular apatite, as well as the whole-rock geochemical features are consistent with a hybrid origin of the high-Mg granitoids belonging to Phase 2. Geobarometry indicates crystallization at upper-crustal depths (i.e. 1.7-2.4 kbar). The igneous suite evolved by fractional crystallization of orthopyroxene, hornblende, plagioclase and biotite. Here we propose a tectonic model involving partial melting of the

  8. Crustal contamination and crystal entrapment during polybaric magma evolution at Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy: Geochemical and Sr isotope evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piochi, M.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Somma, R.

    2006-01-01

    New major and trace element analyses and Sr-isotope determinations of rocks from Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano produced from 25 ky BP to 1944 AD are part of an extensive database documenting the geochemical evolution of this classic region. Volcanic rocks include silica undersaturated, potassic and ultrapotassic lavas and tephras characterized by variable mineralogy and different crystal abundance, as well as by wide ranges of trace element contents and a wide span of initial Sr-isotopic compositions. Both the degree of undersaturation in silica and the crystal content increase through time, being higher in rocks produced after the eruption at 472 AD (Pollena eruption). Compositional variations have been generally thought to reflect contributions from diverse types of mantle and crust. Magma mixing is commonly invoked as a fundamental process affecting the magmas, in addition to crystal fractionation. Our assessment of geochemical and Sr-isotopic data indicates that compositional variability also reflects the influence of crustal contamination during magma evolution during upward migration to shallow crustal levels and/or by entrapment of crystal mush generated during previous magma storage in the crust. Using a variant of the assimilation fractional crystallization model (Energy Conservation-Assimilation Fractional Crystallization; [Spera and Bohrson, 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes I: General model and energy-constrained assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) formulation. J. Petrol. 999-1018]; [Bohrson, W.A. and Spera, F.J., 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic process II: application of energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) model to magmatic systems. J. Petrol. 1019-1041]) we estimated the contributions from the crust and suggest that contamination by carbonate rocks that underlie the volcano (2 km down to 9-10 km) is a fundamental process controlling magma compositions at Mt. Somma

  9. Modeling geochemical across-arc variations in the Kamchatka subduction zone - evidence for slab mantle dehydration from thermodynamic and trace element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Halama, Ralf; Manea, Vlad

    2014-05-01

    Along and across arc variations in B/Nb and boron isotopic compositions in volcanic rocks are generally interpreted to reflect fluid release from the subducting plate. Decreasing boron concentrations and decreasing δ11B values with increasing slab depth are thought to reflect continuous slab dehydration and decreasing fluid flux from the downgoing plate. However, in some subduction zones, such as in Kamchatka, the across arc B trends are more complex and show reversals in both parameters at slab depths greater than 150 km, which have not yet been satisfactorily explained. In Kamchatka, three distinct volcanic zones occur with increasing distance from the trench. In the first volcanic front arc lavas show decreasing B/Nb and δ11B values with increasing slab depth, as observed in many subduction zones. This trend is reversed in the second front where B/Nb and δ11B values increase drastically. In the third volcanic chain B/Nb and δ11B is at low values again. Here we present combined thermomechanical, thermodynamic and geochemical models of the Kamchatka subduction zone that simulates fluid release, fluid migration, boron transport and boron isotope fractionation in a subducted slab passing through a steady state thermal pattern. The model successfully predicts the complex B and δ11B patterns as well as the spatial distribution of arc volcanoes that are both determined by dehydration of the oceanic slab beneath Kamchatka. In the sub-arc region, at slab depth between 100 and 150 km, water is delivered by continuous chlorite dehydration in the hydrated oceanic crust and the wedge mantle that causes characteristic decreasing B and δ11B across-arc trends. The most important finding of our work is that serpentine breakdown in the slab mantle leads to a focused water release at slab depth of 175 km, which coincides with the position of the second volcanic chain. Moreover, the fluids liberated from the slab mantle are responsible for the increasing B contents and δ11B

  10. Geochemical evidence for groundwater mixing in the western Great Artesian Basin and recognition of deep inputs in continental-scale flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Love, A.; Priestley, S.; Shand, P.

    2010-12-01

    Mound springs of the western Great Artesian Basin (GAB), Australia, represent a significant proportion of the discharge of the continental-scale confined aquifers of the region. They also provide unique ecological niches, and they are important historical and cultural sites in an austere landscape. Fed by confined aquifers within the GAB, these spring systems are at risk due to anthropogenic drawdown and increasing demand on scarce hydrologic resources. New water and gas geochemical data indicate that they record hydrologic mixing and complex, fault-influenced flow paths within the western GAB. Elevated 3He/4He gas values, termed “xenowhiffs”, with RA up to 0.09 (Bubbler Spring) provide evidence for mantle-derived fluids introduced through fault conduits into the groundwater system in the last several million years and hence an active mantle-to-groundwater fluid linkage. We apply multiple tracers to understand mixing. Major and trace element data show distinctly different water chemistries for Dalhousie versus southern mound springs suggesting different flow paths and mixing proportions. The source of the C for the CO2 -rich springs is evaluated using water chemistry and C-isotope data. Carbon isotope values range from -9 (Bubbler) to -16 (Strangways). Mixing models allow us to distinguish contributions from dissolution of carbonate in the aquifer (Ccarb=Ca+Mg-SO4 and δ13C= 0), from biological/organic sources (δ13C= -28), and from endogenic sources (deeply derived; δ13C= -3). Results show that all of the springs contain appreciable (many > 50%) endogenic CO2, with Dalhousie showing less endogenic CO2 than the southern mound springs and Paralana hot spring system. CO2/3He values of 4 to 8 x 109 (Bubbler and Jersey Springs) are close to MORB end member values of 2 x 109 whereas other springs have values strongly enriched in CO2 (up to 1013 at Elizabeth Spring). Elevated but highly variable 87Sr/86Sr values up to 0.718 at Dalhousie and up to 0.76 at Paralana

  11. Crusts: biological

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Elias, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts, a community of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, and fungi, are an essential part of dryland ecosystems. They are critical in the stabilization of soils, protecting them from wind and water erosion. Similarly, these soil surface communities also stabilized soils on early Earth, allowing vascular plants to establish. They contribute nitrogen and carbon to otherwise relatively infertile dryland soils, and have a strong influence on hydrologic cycles. Their presence can also influence vascular plant establishment and nutrition.

  12. Granitic rocks and metasediments in Archean crust, Rainy Lake area, Ontario: ND isotope evidence for mantle-like SM/ND sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirey, S. B.; Hanson, G. N.

    1983-01-01

    Granitoids, felsic volcanic rocks and clastic metasediments are typical rocks in Archean granite-greenstone belts that could have formed from preexisting continentasl crust. The petrogenesis of such rocks is assessed to determine the relative roles of new crust formation or old crust formation or old crust recycling in the formation of granite-greenstone belts.

  13. Moho depths and Poisson's ratios of Precambrian crust in East Africa: Evidence for similarities in Archean and Proterozoic crustal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugume, Fred; Nyblade, Andrew; Julià, Jordi

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the structure of Precambrian crust in East Africa by using estimates of Moho depth and Poisson's ratio for 37 new seismic stations in Uganda and Tanzania and for 32 previously deployed seismic stations in Kenya and Tanzania. The dataset includes estimates of crustal structure distributed between all of the major Archean and Proterozoic terrains obtained from modeling P-wave receiver functions. The average crustal thickness for the Ubendian belt is 42 km and between 37 and 39 km for all of the terrains. The average Poisson's ratio for all of the terrains is either 0.25 or 0.26, indicating a felsic to intermediate bulk crustal composition. A similar composition and thickness of the crust in East Africa for terrains spanning some 4 byr of Earth history is different than in many other Precambrian regions. Our results suggest that there may have been few changes over Earth's history in the processes that formed the East African crust, or else that processes have been at play to homogenize crustal structure, such as the flow of lower crustal material in orogenic systems or through the foundering of eclogites into the mantle. The finding that crustal structure is similar between the Archean and Proterozoic terrains indicates that crustal structure, through its influence on lithospheric rheology and strength, has not had a first-order effect on the location of rifting. We also find that there is little correlation between Moho depth and elevation across the East African Plateau, indicating that variations in crustal thickness exert few, if any, influences on topography in East Africa. This conclusion lends support to many studies arguing that mantle structure and processes provide the primary buoyant support for the plateau.

  14. The Khida terrane - Geochronological and isotopic evidence for Paleoproterozoic and Archean crust in the eastern Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitehouse, M.J.; Stoeser, D.B.; Stacey, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The Khida terrane of the eastern Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia has been proposed as being underlain by Paleoproterozoic to Archean continental crust (Stoeser and Stacey, 1988). Detailed geological aspects of the Khida terrane, particularly resulting from new fieldwork during 1999, are discussed in a companion abstract (Stoeser et al., this volume). We present conventional and ion- microprobe U-Pb zircon geoenronology, Nd whole-rock, and feldspar Pb isotopic data that further elucidate the pre-Pan-African evolution of the Khida terrane. Locations for the Muhayil samples described below are shown in figure 2 of Stoeser et al. (this volume). 

  15. Rate of growth of the preserved North American continental crust: Evidence from Hf and O isotopes in Mississippi detrital zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Christina Yan; Campbell, Ian H.; Allen, Charlotte M.; Williams, Ian S.; Eggins, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    Detrital zircons from the Mississippi River have been analyzed for U-Th-Pb, Lu-Hf and O isotopes to constrain the rate of growth of the preserved North American continental crust. One hundred and forty two concordant zircon U/Pb dates on grains mounted in epoxy, obtained by Excimer laser ablation ICP-MS method, resolved six major periods of zircon crystallization: 0-0.25, 0.3-0.6, 0.95-1.25, 1.3-1.5, 1.65-1.95 and 2.5-3.0 Ga. These age ranges match the ages of the recognized lithotectonic units of the North American continent in the hinterland of the Mississippi River. Ninety-six zircons mounted on tape, which show no age zonation and were within 7.5% of concordance, were selected to represent the six U/Pb age time intervals and analyzed for Lu-Hf and O isotope by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS and SHRIMP II, respectively. The δ 18O values of the zircons show a small step increase in the maximum δ 18O values at the Archean-Proterozoic boundary from 7.5‰ in the Archean to 9.5‰, and rarely 13‰, in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. However, the average value of δ 18O in zircons changes little with time, showing that the increase in the maximum δ 18O values between 2.5 and 2.0 Ga, which can be attributed to an increase in the sediment content of the source regions of younger granitoids, is largely balanced by an increase in zircons with anomalously low δ 18O, which can be attributed to hydrothermally altered crust in the granitoid source region. ɛHf i values for the zircons range from 13.1 to -26.9. Zircons derived from juvenile crust, which we define as having mantle δ 18O (4.5-6.5‰) and lying within error of the Hf depleted mantle growth curve, are rare or absent in the Mississippi basin. The overwhelming majority of zircons crystallized from melted pre-existing continental crust, or mantle-derived magmas that were contaminated by continental crust. The average time difference between primitive crust formation and remelting for each of the recognized

  16. Geochemical Interpretation of Collision Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Collision volcanism can be defined as volcanism that takes place during an orogeny from the moment that continental subduction starts to the end of orogenic collapse. Its importance in the Geological Record is greatly underestimated as collision volcanics are easily misinterpreted as being of volcanic arc, extensional or mantle plume origin. There are many types of collision volcanic province: continent-island arc collision (e.g. Banda arc); continent-active margin collision (e.g. Tibet, Turkey-Iran); continent-rear-arc collision (e.g. Bolivia); continent-continent collision (e.g. Tuscany); and island arc-island arc collision (e.g. Taiwan). Superimposed on this variability is the fact that every orogeny is different in detail. Nonetheless, there is a general theme of cyclicity on different time scales. This starts with syn-collision volcanism resulting from the subduction of an ocean-continent transition and continental lithosphere, and continues through post-collision volcanism. The latter can be subdivided into orogenic volcanism, which is related to thickened crust, and post-orogenic, which is related to orogenic collapse. Typically, but not always, collision volcanism is preceded by normal arc volcanism and followed by normal intraplate volcanism. Identification and interpretation of collision volcanism in the Geologic Record is greatly facilitated if a dated stratigraphic sequence is present so that the petrogenic evolution can be traced. In any case, the basis of fingerprinting collision terranes is to use geochemical proxies for mantle and subduction fluxes, slab temperatures, and depths and degrees of melting. For example, syn-collision volcanism is characterized by a high subduction flux relative to mantle flux because of the high input flux of fusible sediment and crust coupled with limited mantle flow, and because of high slab temperatures resulting from the decrease in subduction rate. The resulting geochemical patterns are similar regardless of

  17. Geochemical evidence for combustion of hydrocarbons during the K-T impact event

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Claire M.; Finch, Paul; Collinson, Margaret E.; Scott, Andrew C.; Grassineau, Nathalie V.

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that extensive wildfires occurred after the Cretaceous–Tertiary (K-T) impact event. An abundance of soot and pyrosynthetic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAHs) in marine K-T boundary impact rocks (BIRs) have been considered support for this hypothesis. However, nonmarine K-T BIRs, from across North America, contain only rare occurrences of charcoal yet abundant noncharred plant remains. pPAHs and soot can be formed from a variety of sources, including partial combustion of vegetation and hydrocarbons whereby modern pPAH signatures are traceable to their source. We present results from multiple nonmarine K-T boundary sites from North America and reveal that the K-T BIRs have a pPAH signature consistent with the combustion of hydrocarbons and not living plant biomass, providing further evidence against K-T wildfires and compelling evidence that a significant volume of hydrocarbons was combusted during the K-T impact event. PMID:19251660

  18. Seismic-reflection evidence that the hayward fault extends into the lower crust of the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    1998-01-01

    This article presents deep seismic-reflection data from an experiment across San Francisco Peninsula in 1995 using large (125 to 500 kg) explosive sources. Shot gathers show a mostly nonreflective upper crust in both the Franciscan and Salinian terranes (juxtaposed across the San Andreas fault), an onset of weak lower-crustal reflectivity beginning at about 6-sec two-way travel time (TWTT) and bright southwest-dipping reflections between 11 and 13 sec TWTT. Previous studies have shown that the Moho in this area is no deeper than 25 km (~8 to 9 sec TWTT). Three-dimensional reflection travel-time modeling of the 11 to 13 sec events from the shot gathers indicates that the bright events may be explained by reflectors 15 to 20 km into the upper mantle, northeast of the San Andreas fault. However, upper mantle reflections from these depths were not observed on marine-reflection profiles collected in San Francisco Bay, nor were they reported from a refraction profile on San Francisco Peninsula. The most consistent interpretation of these events from 2D raytracing and 3D travel-time modeling is that they are out-of-plane reflections from a high-angle (dipping ~70??to the southwest) impedance contrast in the lower crust that corresponds with the surface trace of the Hayward fault. These results suggest that the Hayward fault truncates the horizontal detachment fault suggested to be active beneath San Francisco Bay.

  19. Geochemical and Sr Nd Pb isotopic evidence for a combined assimilation and fractional crystallisation process for volcanic rocks from the Huichapan caldera, Hidalgo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.

    2001-03-01

    This study reports new geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data for Miocene to Quaternary basaltic to andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic volcanic rocks from the Huichapan caldera, located in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). The initial Sr and Nd isotopic ratios, except for one rhyolite, range as follows: 87Sr/ 86Sr 0.70357-0.70498 and 143Nd/ 144Nd 0.51265-0.51282. The Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios are generally similar to those for volcanic rocks from other areas of the central and eastern parts of the MVB. The isotopic ratios of one older pre-caldera rhyolite (HP30) from the Huichapan area, particularly its high 87Sr/ 86Sr, are significantly different from rhyolitic rocks from this and other areas of the MVB, but are isotopically similar to some felsic rocks from the neighbouring geological province of Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), implying an origin as a partial melt of the underlying crust. The evolved andesitic to rhyolitic magmas could have originated from a basaltic magma through a combined assimilation and fractional crystallisation (AFC) process. Different compositions, representing lower crust (LC) and upper crust (UC) as well as a hypothetical crust similar to the source of high 87Sr/ 86Sr rhyolite HP30, were tested as plausible assimilants for the AFC process. The results show that the UC represented by granitic rocks from a nearby Los Humeros area or by Cretaceous limestone (L) rocks outcropping in the northern part of the study area, and the LC represented by granulitic xenoliths from a nearby San Luis Potosı´ (SLP) area are not possible assimilants for Huichapan magmas, whereas a hypothetical crust (HA) similar in isotopic compositions to rhyolite HP30 could be considered a possible assimilant for the AFC process. Chemical composition of assimilant HA, although not well constrained at present, was inferred under the assumption that HP30 type partial melts could be generated from its partial melting. These data were then used to evaluate

  20. Petrographic, geochemical and isotopic evidence of crustal assimilation processes in the Ponte Nova alkaline mafic-ultramafic massif, SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzone, Rogério Guitarrari; Montecinos Munoz, Patricio; Enrich, Gaston Eduardo Rojas; Alves, Adriana; Ruberti, Excelso; Gomes, Celsode Barros

    2016-09-01

    Crustal assimilation plus crystal fractionation processes of different basanite magma batches control the evolution of the Ponte Nova cretaceous alkaline mafic-ultramafic massif in SE Brazil. This massif is composed of several intrusions, the main ones with a cumulate character. Disequilibrium features in the early-crystallized phases (e.g., corrosion and sieve textures in cores of clinopyroxene crystals, spongy-cellular-textured plagioclase crystals, gulf corrosion texture in olivine crystals) and classical hybridization textures (e.g., blade biotite and acicular apatite crystals) provide strong evidence of open-system behavior. All samples are olivine- and nepheline-normative rocks with basic-ultrabasic and potassic characters and variable incompatible element enrichments. The wide ranges of whole-rock 87Sr/86Sri and 143Nd/144Ndi ratios (0.70432-0.70641 and 0.512216-0.512555, respectively) are indicative of crustal contribution from the Precambrian basement host rocks. Plagioclase and apatite 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70422-0.70927) obtained for the most primitive samples of each intrusion indicate disequilibrium conditions from early- to principal-crystallization stages. Isotope mixing-model curves between the least contaminated alkaline basic magma and heterogeneous local crustal components indicate that each intrusion of the massif is differentiated from the others by varied degrees of crustal contribution. The primary mechanisms of crustal contribution to the Ponte Nova massif involve the assimilation of host rock xenoliths during the development of the chamber environment and the assimilation of partial melts from the surrounding host rocks. Thermodynamic models using the melts algorithm indicate that parental alkaline basic magmas can be strongly affected by contamination processes subsequently to their initial stages of crystallization when there is sufficient energy to assimilate partial melts of crustal host rocks. The assimilation processes are considered to

  1. The metamorphic sole of New Caledonia ophiolite: 40Ar/39Ar, U-Pb, and geochemical evidence for subduction inception at a spreading ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, Dominique; Jourdan, Fred; Meffre, SéBastien; Maurizot, Pierre; Lesimple, StéPhane

    2012-06-01

    Amphibolite lenses that locally crop out below the serpentinite sole at the base of the ophiolite of New Caledonia (termed Peridotite Nappe) recrystallized in the high-temperature amphibolite facies and thus sharply contrast with blueschists and eclogites of the Eocene metamorphic complex. Amphibolites mostly display the geochemical features of MORB with a slight Nb depletion and thus are similar to the youngest (Late Paleocene-Eocene) BABB components of the allochthonous Poya Terrane. Thermochronological data from hornblende (40Ar/39Ar), zircon, and sphene (U-Pb) suggest that these mafic rocks recrystallized at ˜56 Ma. Using various geothermobarometers provides a rough estimate of peak recrystallization conditions of ˜0.5 GPa at ˜800-950°C. The thermal gradient inferred from the metamorphic assemblage (˜60°C km-1), geometrical relationships, and geochemical similarity suggest that these mafic rocks belong to the oceanic crust of the lower plate of the subduction/obduction system and recrystallized when they subducted below young and hot oceanic lithosphere. They were detached from the down-going plate and finally thrust onto unmetamorphosed Poya Terrane basalts. This and the occurrence of slab melts at ˜53 Ma suggest that subduction inception occurred at or near to the spreading ridge of the South Loyalty Basin at ˜56 Ma.

  2. 3.30 Ga high-silica intraplate volcanic-plutonic system of the Gavião Block, São Francisco Craton, Brazil: Evidence of an intracontinental rift following the creation of insulating continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zincone, Stefano A.; Oliveira, Elson P.; Laurent, Oscar; Zhang, Hong; Zhai, Mingguo

    2016-12-01

    High-silica rhyolites having U-Pb zircon ages of 3303 ± 11 Ma occur along the eastern border of the Gavião Block (Brazil) associated with the Contendas-Mirante and Mundo Novo supracrustal belts. Unlike many Archean greenstone sequences, they are not interlayered with mafic to intermediate units. Instead, they belong to an inter-related plutonic-volcanic system, together with granitic massifs having similar zircon crystallization ages of ca. 3293 ± 3 Ma and 3328 ± 3 Ma and plotting along the same geochemical trends as the rhyolites. The rhyolites show well-preserved primary volcanic features such as magma flow textures and euhedral phenocrysts. High emplacement temperatures are indicated by petrographic evidence (β-quartz phenocrysts), zircon saturation temperatures (915-820 °C) and geochemical data, especially high SiO2 (74-79 wt.%) together with elevated Fe2O3(T) ( 3 wt.%), MgO (0.5-1.5 wt.%) and low Al2O3 (< 11 wt.%). The rhyolites show homogeneous trace element ratios (La/YbN 4.8 ± 1.8; EuN/Eu* 0.55; Sr/Y 0.7) and negative ԐHf(3.3 Ga) from 0 to - 7, indicating derivation from a single crustal source for both occurrences. Specifically, the rhyolites would have derived from extraction and eruption of highly silicic residual liquid formed by crystallization of granitic magma in a relatively shallow (< 10 km) reservoir, now represented by the granite massifs. The granite magma was formed by melting or differentiation of material similar to the diorite gneiss that occurs regionally. The 3.30 Ga volcanic-plutonic systems formed after a period of crustal growth and stabilization of a thick continental lithosphere, represented by massive 3.40-3.33 Ga TTG and medium to high-K calk-alkaline magmatism in the Gavião Block. The 3.30 Ga-old rhyolites and granites would therefore have formed in an intracontinental tectonic setting after the formation and stabilization of new continental crust, and accordingly would represent the first stages of rifting and continental

  3. Coupling of oceanic and continental crust during Eocene eclogite-facies metamorphism: evidence from the Monte Rosa nappe, western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapen, Thomas J.; Johnson, Clark M.; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Piaz, Giorgio V. Dal; Skora, Susanne; Beard, Brian L.

    2007-02-01

    High precision U Pb geochronology of rutile from quartz carbonate white mica rutile veins that are hosted within eclogite and schist of the Monte Rosa nappe, western Alps, Italy, indicate that the Monte Rosa nappe was at eclogite-facies metamorphic conditions at 42.6 ± 0.6 Ma. The sample area [Indren glacier, Furgg zone; Dal Piaz (2001) Geology of the Monte Rosa massif: historical review and personal comments. SMPM] consists of eclogite boudins that are exposed inside a south-plunging overturned synform within micaceous schist. Associated with the eclogite and schist are quartz carbonate white mica rutile veins that formed in tension cracks in the eclogite and along the contact between eclogite and surrounding schist. Intrusion of the veins at about 42.6 Ma occurred at eclogite-facies metamorphic conditions (480 570°C, >1.3 1.4 GPa) based on textural relations, oxygen isotope thermometry, and geothermobarometry. The timing of eclogite-facies metamorphism in the Monte Rosa nappe determined in this study is identical to that of the Gran Paradiso nappe [Meffan-Main et al. (2004) J Metamorphic Geol 22:261 281], confirming that these two units have shared the same Alpine metamorphic history. Furthermore, the Gran Paradiso and Monte Rosa nappes underwent eclogite-facies metamorphism within the same time interval as the structurally overlying Zermatt-Saas ophiolite [˜50 40 Ma; e.g., Amato et al. (1999) Earth Planet Sci Lett 171:425 438; Mayer et al. (1999) Eur Union Geosci 10:809 (abstract); Lapen et al. (2003) Earth Planet Sci Lett 215:57 72]. The nearly identical P T t histories of the Gran Paradiso, Monte Rosa, and Zermatt-Saas units suggest that these units shared a common Alpine tectonic and metamorphic history. The close spatial and temporal associations between high pressure (HP) ophiolite and continental crust during Alpine orogeny indicates that the HP internal basement nappes in the western Alps may have played a key role in exhumation and preservation of the

  4. Geochemical and Textural Evidence for Transitions in Degassing Regimes at Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genareau, K. D.; Cronin, S. J.; Lube, G.

    2013-12-01

    Transitions in degassing regimes at erupting volcanoes can cause significant changes in magma rheology and the intensity of eruptive activity. The October/November 2010 events at Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia began with an intrusive stage (Phase 1), followed by an explosion on October 26th (Phase 2) that removed the pre-existing dome causing deadly pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). This led to rapid ascent of juvenile magma that progressively degassed and crystallized until a large-scale collapse (Phase 3) of the new lava dome on November 5th and associated explosions produced even larger PDCs, killed more citizens, and destroyed several more distal villages. PDC deposits from the two main surge events on October 26th and November 5th, in addition to tephras generated by intermediate explosions, were sampled from numerous locations on the edifice. Secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) depth profiling analyses were performed on free feldspar phenocrysts from the PDC deposits to examine the behavior of volatile elements during the eruptive events of 2010. Phenocrysts were mounted in indium and depth profiled with an O2+ primary ion beam for 2-14 hours. Profiles encounter glass and groundmass on the surface of the crystals before the feldspar is reached, determined from the point at which the B/Si and F/Si signals fall below detection limits. For all samples, the H/Si signal decreases from the glass into the crystal, but the Li/Si signal behaves differently between samples from Phase 2 and Phase 3. In Phase 2 samples, Li/Si ratios are higher in the glass compared to the crystal, revealing a build-up of Li in the groundmass not observed in Phase 3 samples. These observations suggest that Li was able to successfully diffuse out of both the feldspar and the surrounding groundmass in the Phase 3 products, but remained trapped in the groundmass of the Phase 2 products. The build-up of Li in the groundmass, coupled with textural evidence of a late-stage vesiculation

  5. Seismic cycles recorded in late Quaternary calcite veins: Geochronological, geochemical and microstructural evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, I. Tonguç; Feng, Yue-xing; Zhao, Jian-xin; Bolhar, Robert; Işik, Veysel; Baublys, Kim A.; Yago, Anya; Golding, Suzanne D.

    2011-02-01

    Southwest Turkey is seismically active as a result of the Hellenic subduction process in the Eastern Mediterranean. We conducted high-resolution micro-sampling, high-precision U-series dating and microchemical analysis on an extensional vein system in a tectonically active but non-hydrothermal area. U/Th age data and microscopic observations provide evidence of repeated fracturing of a previously sealed crack system followed by a new increment of veining. Repeated injection of veinlets suggests that the vein system was formed by the crack-seal mechanism. Four major U/Th age groups for the emplacement of the vein system fall between 23.9 ± 0.2 ka and 23.2 ± 0.4 ka, 21.7 ± 0.4 ka and 19.2 ± 0.2 ka, 17.3 ± 0.1 ka and 16.2 ± 0.3 ka, and at 11.8 ± 0.2 ka. Stable and Sr isotope geochemistry of the calcite vein samples indicates that surface water interacting with the soil cover was the major component of the groundwater system from which the extensional veins precipitated. Trace element and O isotope data of the vein system are interpreted to reflect carbonate precipitation associated with seismic cycles involving fluids with different trace element compositions and CO 2 contents. Initial carbonate precipitation during a single seismic cycle occurred from CO 2-dominated fluids that were degassed from the original CO 2-water mixture. This was followed consecutively by carbonate precipitation from the remaining water, which was relatively impure with higher trace element contents. Millimetre to submillimetre-scale U-series dating in conjunction with geochemistry of carbonate veins related to active tectonism offers an innovative means of constraining the absolute timing of late Quaternary seismic and inter-seismic events.

  6. Early Archean crust in the northern Wyoming province Evidence from U-Pb ages of detrital zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, P.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Nutman, A.P.; Mogk, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    U-Pb ages of individual detrital and metamorphic zircons from 12 Archean metasedimentary rocks, including quartzites, from the Beartooth, Ruby, and Tobacco Root uplifts of the northern Wyoming province indicate that they were deposited between 2.7 and 3.2 Ga. Younger, metamorphic zircons are found as overgrowths and new grains in some samples, and yield ages between 2.7 and 1.9 Ga. They are, however, much less abundant than detrital grains, which constitute >75% of the 355 grains analyzed. The majority of the detrital grains have ages between 3.2 and 3.4 Ga; none are younger than 2.9 Ga. Grains with 207Pb/206Pb ages between 3.4 and 4.0 Ga constituted approximately 15% of all grains with analyses within 10% of concordia, but are concentrated in samples from the eastern Beartooth Mountains. Comparison of the average of the Pb-Pb ages of individual zircons within 10% of concordia with previously published Lu-Hf chondritic model ages for some individual samples suggests that the age distribution recorded by the U-Pb system in these zircons has not been significantly disturbed by pre- or post-depositional Pb-loss. Collectively, these data suggest that the individual metasedimentary rocks did not completely share a common provenance and that a major crust-forming cycle occurred 3.2 to 3.4 Ga. In conjunction with previously published U-Th-Pb whole-rock data, these results suggest that rocks with a relatively high proportion of > 3.4 Ga grains may have had crust of comparable age in their provenance. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Isotopic evidence for microbial production and consumption of methane in the upper continental crust throughout the Phanerozoic eon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Henrik; Heim, Christine; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Zack, Thomas; Tillberg, Mikael; Broman, Curt; Ivarsson, Magnus; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Åström, Mats E.

    2017-07-01

    Microorganisms produce and consume methane in terrestrial surface environments, sea sediments and, as indicated by recent discoveries, in fractured crystalline bedrock. These processes in the crystalline bedrock remain, however, unexplored both in terms of mechanisms and spatiotemporal distribution. Here we have studied these processes via a multi-method approach including microscale analysis of the stable isotope compositions of calcite and pyrite precipitated in bedrock fractures in the upper crust (down to 1.7 km) at three sites on the Baltic Shield. Microbial processes have caused an intriguing variability of the carbon isotopes in the calcites at all sites, with δ13C spanning as much as -93.1‰ (related to anaerobic oxidation of methane) to +36.5‰ (related to methanogenesis). Spatiotemporal coupling between the stable isotope measurements and radiometric age determinations (micro-scale dating using new high-spatial methods: LA-ICP-MS U-Pb for calcite and Rb-Sr for calcite and co-genetic adularia) enabled unprecedented direct timing constraints of the microbial processes to several periods throughout the Phanerozoic eon, dating back to Devonian times. These events have featured variable fluid salinities and temperatures as shown by fluid inclusions in the calcite; dominantly 70-85 °C brines in the Paleozoic and lower temperatures (<50-62 °C) and salinities in the Mesozoic. Preserved organic compounds, including plant signatures, within the calcite crystals mark the influence of organic matter in descending surficial fluids on the microbial processes in the fracture system, thus linking processes in the deep and surficial biosphere. These findings substantially extend the recognized temporal and spatial range for production and consumption of methane within the upper continental crust.

  8. Spatial variability in hydrothermal systems in fast-spreading crust: evidence from tectonic windows exposed at Pito and Hess Deeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    Tectonic windows of the oceanic crust provide views of the internal structure of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Targeted exploration of escarpments that formed at the fast- to very fast-spreading East Pacific Rise exposed at Pito and Hess Deeps have allowed us to address questions that 1-D "pinpricks" afforded by ocean drilling cannot. Outcrop imaging along closely spaced submersible and ROV tracks document the geological context of hydrothermal alteration in 3-dimensions. These broad views reveal how and why the conditions and products of fluid-rock reaction were spatially and temporally variable. Alteration characteristics in the sheeted dike complexes at Pito and Hess Deeps are similar. The dikes are relatively fresh (average extent of alteration is 27%, ranging from 0 to >80%) and the background alteration is amphibole- dominated. At Hess Deep chlorite dominates within a few hundred metre wide zones, whereas at Pito Deep chlorite-rich dikes are sporadically distributed throughout. Mineral assemblages and compositions, and distributed Cu and Zn depletion, indicate that peak temperatures ranged from <300 to >400° C and did not vary systematically with depth. Vein systems are rare at Hess Deep, whereas amphibole and chlorite veins are ubiquitous and quartz-filled fractures are only locally present at Pito Deep. Regional variability in alteration characteristics is found on a scale of <1 to 2 km, illustrating the diversity of fluid-rock interaction that can be expected at fast-spreading ridges. Migration of circulating cells along ridges and local evolution of fluid compositions produce sections of the upper crust with a distinctive character of alteration, on time scales of <5-20 kyr. It is interesting to note that the time-integrated fluid fluxes, calculated from Sr-isotopic mass balance, are comparable between areas, despite the distinctive character of alteration.

  9. Geochemical evidence in the northeast Lau Basin for subduction of the Cook-Austral volcanic chain in the Tonga Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Allison A.; Jackson, Matthew G.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Conatser, Christopher S.; Konter, Jasper G.; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Kurz, Mark D.

    2016-05-01

    Lau Basin basalts host an array of geochemical signatures that suggest incorporation of enriched mantle source material often associated with intraplate hotspots, but the origin of these signatures remain uncertain. Geochemical signatures associated with mantle material entrained from the nearby Samoan hotspot are present in northwest Lau Basin lavas, and subducted seamounts from the Louisville hotspot track may contribute geochemical signatures to the Tonga Arc. However, lavas in the northeast Lau Basin (NELB) have unique enriched geochemical signatures that cannot be related to these hotspots, but can be attributed to the subduction of seamounts associated with the Cook-Austral volcanic lineament. Here we present geochemical data on a new suite of NELB lavas—ranging in 40Ar/39Ar age from 1.3 Ma to 0.365 ka—that have extreme signatures of geochemical enrichment, including lavas with the highest 206Pb/204Pb (19.580) and among the lowest 143Nd/144Nd (0.512697) encountered in the Lau Basin to date. These signatures are linked to the canonical EM1 (enriched mantle 1) and HIMU (high-μ = 238U/204Pb) mantle end-members, respectively. Using a plate reconstruction model, we show that older portions of the traces of two of the Cook-Austral hotspots that contributed volcanism to the Cook-Austral volcanic lineament—the Rarotonga and Rurutu hotspots—were potentially subducted in the Tonga Trench beneath the NELB. The geochemical signatures of the Rarotonga, Rurutu, and Samoan hotspots provide a compelling match to the extreme geochemical components observed in the new NELB lavas.

  10. Generation of Palaeoproterozoic tonalites and associated high-K granites in southwestern Tanzania by partial melting of underplated mafic crust in an intracontinental setting: Constraints from geochemical and isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manya, Shukrani; Maboko, Makenya A. H.

    2016-09-01

    The southwestern part of the 2.0-1.8 Ga Palaeoproterozoic Usagaran Belt in the Njombe area of SW Tanzania is intruded by two types of synchronous granitic rocks with different chemical and petrological characteristics. The first type consists of hornblende-rich tonalites that have major element compositions similar to those of Archaean TTG but differ significantly in their trace element composition. The tonalites are spatially and closely associated with felsic, high-K, I-type granites, some of which are gneissic and/or aplitic. U-Pb zircon geochronology shows that the emplacement of tonalites at 1887 ± 11 Ma was largely contemporaneous with emplacement of high-K granitic gneisses at 1877 ± 15 Ma and aplitic granites at 1857 ± 19 Ma. The data also reveal the presence of Archaean crust of 2648 ± 25 Ma in the zircon cores of some samples in the otherwise Palaeoproterozoic terrane. The tonalites are characterized by MgO contents of 1.60-4.11 wt.% at a SiO2 range of 58.1-67.9 wt.%, the Mg# of 34-55, lower Sr contents (220-462 ppm) and less fractionated REE patterns (La/YbCN = 3.55-12.9) compared to Archaean TTG (Sr > 500 ppm, La/YbCN > 20). These features, coupled with the εNd (1887 Ma) values of + 0.37 to - 0.66 as well as the associated mafic enclaves are suggestive of derivation of the tonalites by low pressure (below the garnet stability) partial melting of a mantle-derived mafic underplate that was subsequently contaminated with small amounts of pre-existing igneous crustal rocks. The evolved nature of the high-K granites (MgO = 0.20-1.30 wt.%, SiO2 = 65.5-73.9 wt.%, Mg# = 25-42, εNd = - 3.20 to - 4.75) coupled with old TDM ages which are 200-1000 Ma older than their emplacement age requires a higher degree of assimilation of older crustal material by the magma derived from partial melting of the underplated mafic crust which was subsequently followed by crystal fractionation involving plagioclase, pyroxene and amphibole. The close spatial and temporal

  11. Composition of the Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Gao, S.

    2003-12-01

    continental crust, the methods employed to derive these estimates, and the implications of the continental crust composition for the formation of the continents, Earth differentiation, and its geochemical inventories.

  12. Mechanical and statistical evidence of the causality of human-made mass shifts on the Earth's upper crust and the occurrence of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Christian D.

    2013-01-01

    A global catalog of small- to large-sized earthquakes was systematically analyzed to identify causality and correlatives between human-made mass shifts in the upper Earth's crust and the occurrence of earthquakes. The mass shifts, ranging between 1 kt and 1 Tt, result from large-scale geoengineering operations, including mining, water reservoirs, hydrocarbon production, fluid injection/extractions, deep geothermal energy production and coastal management. This article shows evidence that geomechanical relationships exist with statistical significance between (a) seismic moment magnitudes M of observed earthquakes, (b) lateral distances of the earthquake hypocenters to the geoengineering "operation points" and (c) mass removals or accumulations on the Earth's crust. Statistical findings depend on uncertainties, in particular, of source parameter estimations of seismic events before instrumental recoding. Statistical observations, however, indicate that every second, seismic event tends to occur after a decade. The chance of an earthquake to nucleate after 2 or 20 years near an area with a significant mass shift is 25 or 75 %, respectively. Moreover, causative effects of seismic activities highly depend on the tectonic stress regime in which the operations take place (i.e., extensive, transverse or compressive). Results are summarized as follows: First, seismic moment magnitudes increase the more mass is locally shifted on the Earth's crust. Second, seismic moment magnitudes increase the larger the area in the crust is geomechanically polluted. Third, reverse faults tend to be more trigger-sensitive than normal faults due to a stronger alteration of the minimum vertical principal stress component. Pure strike-slip faults seem to rupture randomly and independently from the magnitude of the mass changes. Finally, mainly due to high estimation uncertainties of source parameters and, in particular, of shallow seismic events (<10 km), it remains still very difficult to

  13. Palaeoproterozoic high-pressure granulite overprint of the Archaean continental crust: evidence for homogeneous crustal thickening (Man Rise, Ivory Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitra, Pavel; Kouamelan, Alain N.; Ballèvre, Michel; Peucat, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    The character of mountain building processes in the Palaeoproterozoic times is subject to much debate. The local observation of Barrovian-type assemblages and high-pressure granulite relics in the Man Rise (Côte d'Ivoire), led some authors to argue that Eburnean (Palaeoproterozoic) reworking of the Archaean basement was achieved by modern-style thrust-dominated tectonics (e.g., Feybesse & Milési, 1994). However, it has been suggested that crustal thickening and subsequent exhumation of high-pressure crustal rocks can be achieved by virtue of homogeneous, fold-dominated deformation of hot crustal domains even in Phanerozoic orogenic belts (e.g., Schulmann et al., 2002; 2008). We describe a mafic granulite of the Kouibli area (Archaean part of the Man Rise, western Ivory Coast) that displays a primary assemblage (M1) containing garnet, diopsidic clinopyroxene, red-brown pargasitic amphibole, plagioclase (andesine), rutile, ilmenite and quartz. This assemblage is associated with a subvertical regional foliation. Symplectites that develop at the expense of the M1 assemblage contain orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, plagioclase (bytownite), green pargasitic amphibole, ilmenite and magnetite (M2). Multiequilibrium thermobarometric calculations and P-T pseudosections calculated with THERMOCALC suggest granulite-facies conditions of ca. 13 kbar, 850°C and <7 kbar, 700-800°C for M1 and M2, respectively. In agreement with the qualitative information obtained from reaction textures and chemical zoning of minerals, this suggests an evolution dominated by decompression accompanied by moderate cooling. A Sm-Nd garnet - whole-rock age of 2.03 Ga determined on this sample indicates that this evolution occurred during the Palaeoproterozoic. We argue that from the geodynamic point of view the observed features are best explained by homogeneous thickening of the margin of the Archaean craton, re-heated and softened due to the accretion of hot, juvenile Palaeoproterozoic crust, as

  14. Pyroxenite and granulite xenoliths from beneath the Scottish Northern Highlands Terrane: evidence for lower-crust/upper-mantle relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, B. G. J.; Aspen, P.; Hinton, R. W.

    2001-08-01

    Xenolith suites from Permian host rocks in Orkney and the extreme NE of the Scottish mainland (Duncansby Ness) are described and compared to those from elsewhere in the Northern Highlands Terrane. Those from the Tingwall dyke, Orkney, comprise roughly equal proportions of ultramafic rocks (wehrlites, clinopyroxenites, websterites, hornblendites) and mafic to felsic rocks (gabbroic, noritic and dioritic granulites, with subordinate tonalites and trondhjemites). Those from Duncansby (45 km to the south) are dominantly olivine-poor ultramafic rocks (clinopyroxenites, pargasite pyroxenites, biotite-pyroxenites), together with granulites grading from gabbroic through to tonalites and trondhjemites. Most of the granulites are meta-igneous, comprising plagioclase and one- or two-pyroxene species with equilibration temperatures of 810-710 °C, and are regarded as samples of the lower crust. Absence of garnet and olivine, together with the association of relatively sodic plagioclase and aluminous pyroxenes, is consistent with derivation from depths corresponding to 5-10 kbar. Positive Eu anomalies in the granulites imply that most originated as plagioclase-rich cumulates from basaltic magmas. Scarce peraluminous quartzo-feldspathic xenoliths, such as a garnet-sillimanite-bearing sample from Duncansby, are regarded as metasedimentary in origin. Pyroxenes (and biotites) in the ultramafic xenoliths tend to have higher mg numbers than those of the granulites, reflecting higher temperatures of formation. Whereas the pyroxene-rich ultramafic rocks may be partly interleaved with the granulites in the lower crust, it is concluded that they also constitute a zone of substantial thickness at or around Moho level, separating the granulites from underlying peridotites, and that they originated as cumulates cognate to the granulites. They have, however, been variably metasomatised with formation of amphibole. This zone may constitute a density trap at which melt fractions, rich in K, Fe

  15. Coesite-bearing Assemblages as The Direct Evidence For The Involvement of Subducted Crust in The Deep Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2006-12-01

    As a SiO2 phase could not originate in ultramafic environment at pressures higher than around 2.8 MPa (O'Hara and Yoder, 1967, Scott. J. of Geology 3, 67), presence of coesite (Cs) in the deep mantle may directly indicate recycling of subducted crust. Here we review available data on the compositions of Cs bearing assemblages in eclogite xenoliths and diamonds from kimberlites and lamproites. The isolated Cs inclusions in two diamonds (Harris, Ind. Dia. Rev., 1968, 28, 402) and a full set of eclogitic minerals [Cs, Grt, Cpx] in two Yakutian diamonds (Sobolev et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 1976, 230,1442) followed by find of Cs-grospydite (Smyth and Hatton, EPSL, 1977, 34, 284) testify to the importance of coesite as a constituent of a part of diamond forming environment, in particular, eclogitic rocks in subcratonic mantle. Since these earlier times, coesite has been documented in more than 300 natural diamonds from 30 localities worldwide. Some 50 xenoliths of Cs-eclogites were found both in South African and Yakutian kimberlites. All documented DIs with coesite are from wide range of assemblages: websterites, eclogites, kyanite eclogites, grospydites and calcsilicate assemblages with an extremely broad range in Grt [3.7 to 28.7 wt. percent CaO] and Cpx [0.2 to 8.8 wt. percent Na2O] compositions. Diamonds with coesite inclusions have a wide range in carbon isotopic composition [0.5 permile to minus 24.5 permile 13C, PDB], however, most of them are depleted in 13C (e.g. Sobolev et al., Dokl. Nauk SSSR, 1979, 249, 1217). The anomalously high oxygen isotope values are observed in coesite from such diamonds (Schulze et al., Nature, 2003, 423, 68). Fossilized high pressure [up to 5.5 GPa] in coesite inclusions from some diamonds have been identified and measured by using laser Raman and synchrotron X-ray microanalytical techniques (e.g. Sobolev et al., PNAS, 200, 97, 11875). Thus the depth of formation of diamonds containing coesite inclusions exceeds 150 km. The wide

  16. Channelling of hydrothermal fluids during the accretion and evolution of the upper oceanic crust: Sr isotope evidence from ODP Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michelle; Coggon, Rosalind M.; Smith-Duque, Christopher E.; Cooper, Matthew J.; Milton, James A.; Teagle, Damon A. H.

    2015-04-01

    ODP Hole 1256D in the eastern equatorial Pacific is the first penetration of a complete section of fast spread ocean crust down to the dike-gabbro transition, and only the second borehole to sample in situ sheeted dikes after DSDP Hole 504B. Here a high spatial resolution record of whole rock and mineral strontium isotopic compositions from Site 1256 is combined with core observations and downhole wireline geophysical measurements to determine the extent of basalt-hydrothermal fluid reaction and to identify fluid pathways at different levels in the upper ocean crust. The volcanic sequence at Site 1256 is dominated by sheet and massive lava flows but the Sr isotope profile shows only limited exchange with seawater. However, the upper margins of two anomalously thick (>25 m) massive flow sequences are strongly hydrothermally altered with elevated Sr isotope ratios and appear to be conduits of lateral low-temperature off-axis fluid flow. Elsewhere in the lavas, high 87Sr/86Sr are restricted to breccia horizons. Mineralised hyaloclastic breccias in the Lava-Dike Transition are strongly altered to Mg-saponite, silica and pyrite, indicating alteration by mixed seawater and cooled hydrothermal fluids. In the Sheeted Dike Complex 87Sr/86Sr ratios are pervasively shifted towards hydrothermal fluid values (∼0.705). Dike chilled margins display secondary mineral assemblages formed during both axial recharge and discharge and have higher 87Sr/86Sr than dike cores, indicating preferential fluid flow along dike margins. Localised increases in 87Sr/86Sr in the Dike-Gabbro Transition indicates the channelling of fluids along the sub-horizontal intrusive boundaries of the 25 to 50 m-thick gabbroic intrusions, with only minor increases in 87Sr/86Sr within the cores of the gabbro bodies. When compared to the pillow lava-dominated section from Hole 504B, the Sr isotope measurements from Site 1256 suggest that the extent of hydrothermal circulation in the upper ocean crust may be

  17. What Hf isotopes in zircon tell us about crust-mantle evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Takao; Itano, Keita; Hibiya, Yuki; Suzuki, Kazue

    2017-03-01

    The 176Lu-176Hf radioactive decay system has been widely used to study planetary crust-mantle differentiation. Of considerable utility in this regard is zircon, a resistant mineral that can be precisely dated by the U-Pb chronometer and record its initial Hf isotope composition due to having low Lu/Hf. Here we review zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopic data mainly obtained over the last two decades and discuss their contributions to our current understanding of crust-mantle evolution, with emphasis on the Lu-Hf isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE), early differentiation of the silicate Earth, and the evolution of the continental crust over geologic history. Meteorite zircon encapsulates the most primitive Hf isotope composition of our solar system, which was used to identify chondritic meteorites best representative of the BSE (176Hf/177Hf = 0.282793 ± 0.000011; 176Lu/177Hf = 0.0338 ± 0.0001). Hadean-Eoarchean detrital zircons yield highly unradiogenic Hf isotope compositions relative to the BSE, providing evidence for the development of a geochemically enriched silicate reservoir as early as 4.5 Ga. By combining the Hf and O isotope systematics, we propose that the early enriched silicate reservoir has resided at depth within the Earth rather than near the surface and may represent a fractionated residuum of a magma ocean underlying the proto-crust, like urKREEP beneath the anorthositic crust on the Moon. Detrital zircons from world major rivers potentially provide the most robust Hf isotope record of the preserved granitoid crust on a continental scale, whereas mafic rocks with various emplacement ages offer an opportunity to trace the Hf isotope evolution of juvenile continental crust (from εHf[4.5 Ga] = 0 to εHf[present] = + 13). The river zircon data as compared to the juvenile crust composition highlight that the supercontinent cycle has controlled the evolution of the continental crust by regulating the rates of crustal generation and intra

  18. Geochemical and Isotopic Evidence for Melting and Erosion of Wyoming Craton Mantle Lithosphere Prior to 48 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, G. I.; Carlson, R. W.; Frost, C. D.

    2010-12-01

    Trace-element geochemistry of Cretaceous-Tertiary Great Plains igneous rocks supports isotopic data that reveal a sequence of digestion of lithospheric mantle followed by intrusion of dominantly asthenospheric magmas. Multiple Archean, Proterozoic, and Phanerozoic subduction events beneath the Wyoming craton concentrated Ba and K within the underlying mantle lithosphere, resulting in earliest Cretaceous-Tertiary lithospheric melts with fingerprints of high K, high Ba/Nb and negative epsilon-Nd, but low U, Th, total REE, and less extreme values of LREE/HREE. Youngest (Eocene-Oligocene) magmas were kimberlite and carbonatite, with high U, Th, LREE, extremely high LREE/HREE, and positive epsilon-Nd, but with high-T xenoliths from depths of only 150 km (Carlson et al., 1999). Importantly, in the entire Wyoming craton, the Homestead kimberlite is the only one of K-T age that has transported a diamond—a single micro-diamond discovered. The shallow low-T to high-T xenolith transition, lack of diamonds, and changing magma geochemistry, suggest that a significant portion of the mantle lithosphere beneath the Wyoming Archean craton must have been consumed prior to the ≤48 Ma kimberlite eruptions. In contrast, the earliest phase of Cretaceous magmatism in Arkansas was explosive diamond-containing lamproite (~102 Ma) with a Proterozoic lithospheric isotopic signature (Lambert et al., 1995). In Arkansas, there was no earlier subalkalic magmatism, and no evidence of slow digestion of the mantle lithosphere, although later magmatism trended toward higher positive epsilon-Nd values (i.e. larger asthenospheric component). Removal by melting of a significant portion of the Wyoming mantle lithosphere during late Cretaceous-early Tertiary magmatism, along with heating, may have helped promote lithospheric “relaxation” related to extension further west between 53 Ma and 49 Ma, followed by more facile penetration by asthenospheric magmas, an idea proposed to explain the time

  19. Long-term geochemical evolution of the near field repository: insights from reactive transport modelling and experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Arcos, David; Grandia, Fidel; Domènech, Cristina; Fernández, Ana M; Villar, María V; Muurinen, Arto; Carlsson, Torbjörn; Sellin, Patrik; Hernán, Pedro

    2008-12-12

    The KBS-3 underground nuclear waste repository concept designed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) includes a bentonite buffer barrier surrounding the copper canisters and the iron insert where spent nuclear fuel will be placed. Bentonite is also part of the backfill material used to seal the access and deposition tunnels of the repository. The bentonite barrier has three main safety functions: to ensure the physical stability of the canister, to retard the intrusion of groundwater to the canisters, and in case of canister failure, to retard the migration of radionuclides to the geosphere. Laboratory experiments (< 10 years long) have provided evidence of the control exerted by accessory minerals and clay surfaces on the pore water chemistry. The evolution of the pore water chemistry will be a primordial factor on the long-term stability of the bentonite barrier, which is a key issue in the safety assessments of the KBS-3 concept. In this work we aim to study the long-term geochemical evolution of bentonite and its pore water in the evolving geochemical environment due to climate change. In order to do this, reactive transport simulations are used to predict the interaction between groundwater and bentonite which is simulated following two different pathways: (1) groundwater flow through the backfill in the deposition tunnels, eventually reaching the top of the deposition hole, and (2) direct connection between groundwater and bentonite rings through fractures in the granite crosscutting the deposition hole. The influence of changes in climate has been tested using three different waters interacting with the bentonite: present-day groundwater, water derived from ice melting, and deep-seated brine. Two commercial bentonites have been considered as buffer material, MX-80 and Deponit CA-N, and one natural clay (Friedland type) for the backfill. They show differences in the composition of the exchangeable cations and in the accessory mineral

  20. Long-term geochemical evolution of the near field repository: Insights from reactive transport modelling and experimental evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcos, David; Grandia, Fidel; Domènech, Cristina; Fernández, Ana M.; Villar, María V.; Muurinen, Arto; Carlsson, Torbjörn; Sellin, Patrik; Hernán, Pedro

    2008-12-01

    The KBS-3 underground nuclear waste repository concept designed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) includes a bentonite buffer barrier surrounding the copper canisters and the iron insert where spent nuclear fuel will be placed. Bentonite is also part of the backfill material used to seal the access and deposition tunnels of the repository. The bentonite barrier has three main safety functions: to ensure the physical stability of the canister, to retard the intrusion of groundwater to the canisters, and in case of canister failure, to retard the migration of radionuclides to the geosphere. Laboratory experiments (< 10 years long) have provided evidence of the control exerted by accessory minerals and clay surfaces on the pore water chemistry. The evolution of the pore water chemistry will be a primordial factor on the long-term stability of the bentonite barrier, which is a key issue in the safety assessments of the KBS-3 concept. In this work we aim to study the long-term geochemical evolution of bentonite and its pore water in the evolving geochemical environment due to climate change. In order to do this, reactive transport simulations are used to predict the interaction between groundwater and bentonite which is simulated following two different pathways: (1) groundwater flow through the backfill in the deposition tunnels, eventually reaching the top of the deposition hole, and (2) direct connection between groundwater and bentonite rings through fractures in the granite crosscutting the deposition hole. The influence of changes in climate has been tested using three different waters interacting with the bentonite: present-day groundwater, water derived from ice melting, and deep-seated brine. Two commercial bentonites have been considered as buffer material, MX-80 and Deponit CA-N, and one natural clay (Friedland type) for the backfill. They show differences in the composition of the exchangeable cations and in the accessory mineral

  1. Stable isotope geochemical study of Pamukkale travertines: New evidences of low-temperature non-equilibrium calcite-water fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kele, Sándor; Özkul, Mehmet; Fórizs, István; Gökgöz, Ali; Baykara, Mehmet Oruç; Alçiçek, Mehmet Cihat; Németh, Tibor

    2011-06-01

    , besides the detailed geochemical analyses along downstream sections, we present new evidences of non-equilibrium calcite-water fractionation in lower temperature range (13.3 to 51.3 °C). Our measurements and calculations on natural hot water travertine precipitations at Pamukkale and Egerszalók revealed that the δ 18O travertine is equal with the δ 18O HCO3 at the orifice of the thermal springs, which means that practically there is no oxygen isotope fractionation between these two phases. High rate of CO 2 degassing with rapid precipitation of carbonate could be responsible for this as it was theoretically supposed by O'Neil et al. (1969). Thus, for the determination of the deposition temperature of a fossil travertine deposit we propose to use the water-bicarbonate oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation instead of the water-travertine fractionation, which can result 8-9 °C difference in the calculated values. Our study is the first detailed empirical proof of O'Neil's hypothesis on a natural carbonate depositing system. The presented observations can be used to identify more precisely the deposition temperature of fossil travertines during paleoclimate studies.

  2. A geochemical study of lithospheric mantle beneath Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica): main evidences from volatile content in ultramafic xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, Alessandra; Pelorosso, Beatrice; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Coltorti, Massimo; Italiano, Francesco; Bonadiman, Costanza

    2017-04-01

    A geochemical study of ultramafic xenoliths from Northern Victoria Land (Green Point, GP and Handler Ridge, HR), is carried out in order to investigate the features of the lithosphere mantle beneath the Western Antarctic Ridge System (WARS). The majority of samples is spinel anhydrous lherzolite with rare presence of secondary phases (secondary cpx and glass). Geothermobarometric calculations, based on the Fe/Mg distribution among the peridotite minerals reveal that Sub Continental Lithospheric Mantle (SCLM) beneath Handler Ridge records temperatures and redox conditions higher then Greene Point (P fixed at 15 Kbar). Moreover, geochemical models evidence that, GP mantle domain represents a residuum after ˜7 to 21 % of partial melting in the spinel stability field, which was variably affected by interaction with infiltrating melts, acting in different times, from at least Jurassic to Cenozoic (Pelorosso et al., 2016). Fluid inclusions (FI) entrapped in olivine and pyroxene crystals were investigated for elemental and isotopic contents of both, noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) and CO2. He, Ar and Ne concentrations range from 1.52×10-14 to 1.07×10-12, from 4.09×10-13 to 3.47×10-11and from 2.84×10-16 to 7.57×10-14 mol/g, respectively, while the CO2amounts are between 7.08×10-10 and 8.12×10-7 mol/g. The 3He/4He varies between 5.95 and 20.18 Ra (where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio of air), being the lowest and the highest values measured in the He-poorer samples. Post-eruptive input of cosmogenic 3He and radiogenic 4He seems to influence mainly the samples associated to a lower He concentrations, increasing and decreasing respectively their primordial 3He/4He values, that for all the other samples range between 6.76 and 7.45 Ra. This range reasonably reflects the isotope signature of mantle beneath the investigated areas. The 4He/40Ar* ratio corrected for atmospheric-derived contamination ranges between 0.004 and 0.39. The lowest 4He/40Ar* values (4He/40Ar*<0.1) are

  3. Geochemical evidence for consecutive accretion of oceanic fragments: The example of the Samarka Terrane, Sikhote-Alin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemkin, I. V.; Khanchuk, A. I.; Kemkina, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    The data of geochemical study of Late Triassic cherts from tectonic-sedimentary complexes from different structural levels of the Samarka Terrane are reported. It is shown that the concentration and character of distribution of the major petrogenic oxides and minor and rare-earth elements in cherts of the upper and lower structural levels differ significantly, which results from differences in the facies environments of chert deposition. All the geochemical characteristics of cherts show that their deposition proceeded in the pelagic area of sedimentation, but in different parts. The Katen Complex composing the lower structural level is the most distant from the continental margin. The closest is the Amba-Matay Complex composing the upper structural level. Based on the geochemical and biostratigraphic data and the age of accretion of paleooceanic fragments, the length of the subducted oceanic plate (>6000 km) is calculated.

  4. Subduction-related cryptic metasomatism in fore-arc to nascent fore-arc Neoproterozoic mantle peridotites beneath the Eastern Desert of Egypt: mineral chemical and geochemical evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdy, Mohamed; Salam Abu El-Ela, Abdel; Hassan, Adel; Kill, Youngwoo; Gamal El Dien, Hamed

    2013-04-01

    Mantle spinel peridotites beneath the Arabian Nubian Shield (ANS) in the Eastern Desert (ED) of Egypt were formed in arc stage in different tectonic setting. Thus they might subject to exchange with the crustal material derived from recycling subducting oceanic lithosphere. This caused metasomatism enriching the rocks in incompatible elements and forming non-residual minerals. Herein, we present mineral chemical and geochemical data of four ophiolitic mantle slice serpentinized peridotites (W. Mubarak, G. El-Maiyit, W. Um El Saneyat and W. Atalla) widely distributed in the ED. These rocks are highly serpentinized, except some samples from W. Mubarak and Um El-Saneyat, which contain primary olivine (Fo# = 90-92 mol %) and orthopyroxene (En# = 86-92 mol %) relics. They have harzburgite composition. Based on the Cr# and Mg# of the unaltered spinel cores, all rocks formed in oceanic mantle wedge in the fore-arc setting, except those from W. Atalla formed in nascent fore-arc. This implies that the polarity of the subduction during the arc stage was from the west to the east. These rocks are restites formed after partial melting between 16.58 in W. Atalla to 24 % in G-El Maiyit. Melt extraction occurred under oxidizing conditions in peridotites from W. Mubarak and W. Atalla and under reducing conditions in peridotites from G. El-Maiyit and Um El-Saneyat. Cryptic metasomatism in the studied mantle slice peridotites is evident. This includes enrichment in incompatible elements in minerals and whole rocks if compared with the primitive mantle (PM) composition and the trend of the depletion in melt. In opx the Mg# doesn't correlate with TiO2, CaO, MnO, NiO and Cr2O3concentrations. In addition, in serpentinites from W. Mubarak and W. Atalla, the TiO2spinel is positively correlated with the TiO2 whole-rock, proposing enrichment by the infiltration of Ti-rich melts, while in G. El- Maiyit and Um El-Saneyat serpentinites they are negatively correlated pointing to the reaction

  5. Nitrogen isotopes in thermal fluids of a forearc region (Jalisco Block, Mexico): Evidence for heavy nitrogen from continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inguaggiato, S.; Taran, Y.; Grassa, F.; Capasso, G.; Favara, R.; Varley, N.; Faber, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Jalisco Block (JB) is a geologically and tectonically complex part of northwestern Mexico characterized by active subduction-type volcanism, rifting, and old stable structures. Thermal springs and groups of springs are widely distributed over JB. Bubbling gas from seven thermal springs located within different tectonic environments of the JB was analyzed for He, 20Ne, and N2 concentrations and δ15N ratios. All gases are N2-dominant (>84%) with the exception of one sample (Rió Purificación), which has a significant CH4 content (about 50%). All collected gas samples are relatively high in He, up to 1500 ppm vol and with 3He/4He values ranging from 0.6 to 4.5 Ra. All measured nitrogen isotope ratios are heavier than air with δ15N values ranging from 0.5 to 5.0‰. The relative N2 excess with respect to air-saturated water computed on the basis of N2 and 20Ne contents indicates the contribution of a nonatmospheric N2 source. All the samples show a good correlation between δ15N and the relative excess of N2 with δ15N ˜ +5.3‰ for the maximum N2 excess of 100%. Due to a presumed lack of seafloor sediment involved in the subduction process, such a δ15N positive value seems to reflect the addition to the fluids of a heavy nitrogen originating from metamorphism processes of rocks occurring within the overlying continental crust.

  6. Silica-rich lavas in the oceanic crust: experimental evidence for fractional crystallization under low water activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Martin; Koepke, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally investigated phase relations and phase compositions as well as the influence of water activity ( aH2O) and redox conditions on the equilibrium crystallization path within an oceanic dacitic potassium-depleted system at shallow pressure (200 MPa). Moreover, we measured the partitioning of trace elements between melt and plagioclase via secondary ion mass spectrometry for a highly evolved experiment (SiO2 = 74.6 wt%). As starting material, we used a dacitic glass dredged at the Pacific-Antarctic Rise. Phase assemblages in natural high-silica systems reported from different locations of fast-spreading oceanic crust could be experimentally reproduced only in a relatively small range of temperature and melt-water content ( T ~950 °C; melt H2O < 1.5 wt%) at redox conditions slightly below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer. The relatively low water content is remarkable, because distinct hydrothermal influence is generally regarded as key for producing silica-rich rocks in an oceanic environment. However, our conclusion is also supported by mineral and melt chemistry of natural evolved rocks; these rocks are only congruent to the composition of those experimental phases that are produced under low aH2O. Low FeO contents under water-saturated conditions and the characteristic enrichment of Al2O3 in high aH2O experiments, in particular, contradict natural observations, while experiments with low aH2O match the natural trend. Moreover, the observation that highly evolved experimental melts remain H2O-poor while they are relatively enriched in chlorine implies a decoupling between these two volatiles during crustal contamination.

  7. U-Pb zircon and geochemical evidence for bimodal mid-Paleozoic magmatism and syngenetic base-metal mineralization in the Yukon-Tanana terrane, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Wooden, J.L.; Hopkins, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    New SHRIMP (sensitive, high-resolution ion microprobe) U-Pb zircon ages and trace element geochemical data for mafic and felsic metaigneous rocks of the pericratonic Yukon-Tanana terrane in east-central Alaska help define the tectonic setting of mid-Paleozoic magmatism and syngenetic hydrothermal Zn-Pb-Ag mineralization along the ancient Pacific margin of North America. We compare data from similar greenschist-facies sequences of bimodal volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with carbonaceous and siliciclastic marine sedimentary rocks, in the Wood River area of the Alaska Range and the Salcha River area of the Yukon-Tanana Upland, and from amphibolite-facies augen gneiss and mafic gneiss (amphibolite) in the Goodpaster River area of the upland. Allowing for analytical uncertainties, igneous crystallization age ranges of 376-353 Ma, 378-346 Ma, and 374-358 Ma are indicated by 13 new SHRIMP U-Pb dates for the Wood River, Salcha River, and Goodpaster River areas, respectively. Bimodal magmatism is indicated by Late Devonian crystallization ages for both augen gneiss (371 ?? 3 and 362 ?? 4 Ma) and associated orthoamphibolite (369 ?? 3 Ma) in the upland and by stratigraphic interleaving of mafic and felsic rocks in the Alaska Range. Metabasites in all three study areas have elevated HFSE (high field strength element) and REE (rare earth element) contents indicative of generation in a within-plate (extensional) tectonic setting. Within-plate trace element signatures also are indicated for peralkaline metarhyolites that host the largest volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Bonnifield district in the Wood River area and for metarhyolite tuff interlayered with the carbonaceous Nasina assemblage, which hosts sedimentary exhalative sulfide occurrences in the Salcha River area. Most of the other felsic metaigneous samples from the Alaska Range and the Yukon-Tanana Upland have geochemical signatures that are similar to those of both average upper continental crust

  8. The extimated presence of differentiated higly explosive magmas beneath Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei: evidence from geochemical and textural studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Lucia; Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Highly catastrophic explosive eruptions are supplied by Si-rich magmas, generated at shallower level in crust by the evolution of mantle liquids. The timescale of these evolution processes is a crucial factor, because of its control on the length of volcano repose interval leading to high explosive events. Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius alkaline volcanic systems, located respectively at few kilometers west and east of Neapolitan metropolitan area, produced a variety of eruptions ranging from not explosive lava flows and domes to highly destructive eruptions. Both these high risk volcanoes are in repose time since the last eruption occurred in the 1538 and 1944 BP, respectively. Since that time, the volcanoes experienced fumarolic activity, low level of seismicity with rare earthquakes swarms, as well as two bradyseismic crisis (1969-1972 and 1982-1984) localized in the center of Campi Flegrei caldera, that generated a net uplift of 3.5 m around the town of Pozzuoli. A wide low velocity layer interpreted as an extended magmatic body has been detected at 8-10 km depth beneath these volcanoes by seismic data. The capability of this reservoir to erupt explosively again strongly depends on magma differentiation degree, therefore the knowledge of the time lapse necessary at not explosive mafic liquids to differentiate toward explosive magmas is very crucial to predict the size of a possible short-term future eruption in Campanian area. Our petrologic data indicate that a multi-depth supply system was active under the Campanian Plain since 39 ka. Fractional crystallization during magma cooling associated with upward migration of less dense evolved liquids appears to be the prevalent differentiation process. Our results indicate that huge steam exolution occurred during the late stage of trachyte and phonolite crystallization thus accounting for the high Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) of eruptions supplied by these melts. Moreover our CSD data on phenocrysts reveal

  9. Silicon Isotope Geochemistry of Ocean Island Basalts: Search for Deep Mantle Heterogeneities and Evidence for Recycled Altered Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, E. A.; Savage, P. S.; Jackson, M. G.; Moreira, M. A.; Day, J. M.; Moynier, F.

    2014-12-01

    recycled altered oceanic crust in the plume source. However, the sampling of a primitive reservoir enriched in the light isotopes of Si, as suggested by [4], cannot be ruled out as a potential source of Si isotope variations in OIBs. References: [1] Ziegler et al., GCA 2005 [2] Savage et al., GCA 2011 [3] Savage et al., EPSL 2010 [4] Huang et al., GCA 2014

  10. Formation of iddingsite veins in the martian crust by centripetal replacement of olivine: Evidence from the nakhlite meteorite Lafayette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. R.; Tomkinson, T.; Hallis, L. J.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-04-01

    common microstructural control on water-mineral interaction between Mars and Earth, and indicates that prior shock deformation was not a prerequisite for aqueous alteration of the martian crust.

  11. Evidence for chondritic Lu/Hf in the early crust - mantle system from Antarctic and Western Australian Eoarchean zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiess, J.; Bennett, V. C.; Black, L.; Eggins, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    The timing and extent of early continental crust formation and mantle differentiation remain contentious issues in Earth Sciences. Here we report new, SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology (n = 142 spot analyses on 69 grains), combined with LA-MC-ICPMS 176Hf determinations (n = 110 spot analyses on 59 grains), in three well-characterized orthogneiss samples of the Napier Complex (Mt Sones and Gage Ridge), East Antarctica and the Narryer Complex, West Australia. Prior to analysis all crystals were extensively documented by cathodoluminesence, reflected and transmitted light imaging to guide beam placement and to identify zones of magmatic oscillatory growth from metamorphic recrystallisation textures. Each sample records complex 207Pb/206Pb age structures that can extend from Hadean through to the Neoarchean, while displaying concordant, reverse-discordant and normal-discordant behaviour. U-Pb systematics within individual grains can be correlated with distinct variations in their measured Lu and Hf isotopic compositions. These features lead to the presence of multiple Lu/Hf arrays within each rock sample evolving towards progressively un-radiogenic values through time. Highly concordant populations of Eoarchean zircon from each rock represent the intrusive age of their igneous protolith at approximately 3.88, 3.85 and 3.73 Ga. Across all three samples these zircon populations typically record initial ɛHf values that lie within error of the Earth’s chondritic uniform reservoir (calculated using λ176Lu of 1.867×10-11 yr-1 and CHUR parameters of Bouvier et al., 2008, EPSL 273: 48-57). These near-chondritic results are consistent with recent LA-MC-ICPMS 176Hf work on primitive Eoarchean TTG zircon from other cratons (e.g. the Itsaq Complex of Greenland, Hiess et al., 2009, GCA 73: 4489-4516) and together argue against voluminous continental crustal growth or significant mantle Lu/Hf differentiation during the Hadean or Eoarchean on a global scale. Two grains of

  12. Petrologic and Geochemical Evidence for Biologic Contributions to Carbonate Formation in the Panoche-Tumey Hills Paleoseep, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sample, J.; Schwartz, H.; Moore, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Panoche-Tumey Hills (PTH) paleoseep is a Paleocene seep system that extends greater than 20 km nearly continuously along strike along the western edge of the Great Valley. The seep fauna is dominated by tubeworms but includes bivalves, gastropods, and solitary corals. The entire system, including feeder sandstone intrusions, is 800 m thick. Carbonate deposits occur in the upper 150 m, and are most concentrated in the upper 50 m. Authigenic carbonates include several generations of cements and veins. The carbonates are mainly calcite, but there is evidence for calcite replacing aragonite in pipe structures. Textures indicate the seep system evolved from an open, relatively permeable sedimentary matrix to one of increasingly focused flow. Late stages of cementation included formation of pipe structures with flow velocities vigorous enough to allow precipitation of carbonate relatively free of silt and sand. \\delta13CPDB values as low as -45 permil are consistent with a component of biogenic methane during carbonate formation. Pronounced laminated structures in the carbonates suggest microorganisms played an important role in carbonate formation, by binding cements and/or varying the PCO2 in distinct microenvironments. Biomarker analysis will help to constrain the importance of bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation. During the fluid evolution of the seep organic and inorganic structures served as conduits, and isolated fluid reservoirs at small scales. Carbon isotopes differ outside and inside tubeworms and pipe structures by 18 permil and 45 permil, respectively, but in opposite directions. Clearly fluid sources, as characterized by carbon isotope signatures, can vary substantially over short distances and presumably over short time scales. The geochemical data along with the cement textures indicate that individual seep sites within the system were doomed by their own carbonate- precipitating success. As one seep site became clogged and less permeable

  13. Evidence for Niche Partitioning Revealed by the Distribution of Sulfur Oxidation Genes Collected from Areas of a Terrestrial Sulfidic Spring with Differing Geochemical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Annette Summers

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and phylogenetic significance of bacterial genes in the environment has been well studied, but comparatively little attention has been devoted to understanding the functional significance of different variations of the same metabolic gene that occur in the same environment. We analyzed the geographic distribution of 16S rRNA pyrosequences and soxB genes along a geochemical gradient in a terrestrial sulfidic spring to identify how different taxonomic variations of the soxB gene were naturally distributed within the spring outflow channel and to identify possible evidence for altered SoxB enzyme function in nature. Distinct compositional differences between bacteria that utilize their SoxB enzyme in the Paracoccus sulfide oxidation pathway (e.g., Bradyrhizobium, Paracoccus, and Rhodovulum) and bacteria that utilize their SoxB enzyme in the branched pathway (e.g., Chlorobium, Thiothrix, Thiobacillus, Halothiobacillus, and Thiomonas) were identified. Different variations of the soxB genes were present at different locations within the spring outflow channel in a manner that significantly corresponded to geochemical conditions. The distribution of the different soxB gene sequence variations suggests that the enzymes encoded by these genes are functionally different and could be optimized to specific geochemical conditions that define niche space for bacteria capable of oxidizing reduced sulfur compounds. PMID:23220955

  14. Evidence for niche partitioning revealed by the distribution of sulfur oxidation genes collected from areas of a terrestrial sulfidic spring with differing geochemical conditions.

    PubMed

    Headd, Brendan; Engel, Annette Summers

    2013-02-01

    The diversity and phylogenetic significance of bacterial genes in the environment has been well studied, but comparatively little attention has been devoted to understanding the functional significance of different variations of the same metabolic gene that occur in the same environment. We analyzed the geographic distribution of 16S rRNA pyrosequences and soxB genes along a geochemical gradient in a terrestrial sulfidic spring to identify how different taxonomic variations of the soxB gene were naturally distributed within the spring outflow channel and to identify possible evidence for altered SoxB enzyme function in nature. Distinct compositional differences between bacteria that utilize their SoxB enzyme in the Paracoccus sulfide oxidation pathway (e.g., Bradyrhizobium, Paracoccus, and Rhodovulum) and bacteria that utilize their SoxB enzyme in the branched pathway (e.g., Chlorobium, Thiothrix, Thiobacillus, Halothiobacillus, and Thiomonas) were identified. Different variations of the soxB genes were present at different locations within the spring outflow channel in a manner that significantly corresponded to geochemical conditions. The distribution of the different soxB gene sequence variations suggests that the enzymes encoded by these genes are functionally different and could be optimized to specific geochemical conditions that define niche space for bacteria capable of oxidizing reduced sulfur compounds.

  15. Fossil 26Al and 53Mn in the Asuka 881394 eucrite: evidence of the earliest crust on asteroid 4 Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Shih, C.-Y.; Takeda, H.

    2003-09-01

    have been important for magma genesis on the parent body. If 26Al were the only heat source, partial melting would have been the major process in the interior of the parent body, and Mg/(Mg+Fe) would be lower in the melts than in the primordial source material. Late-stage accretion could have supplied relatively magnesian primordial material to the surface of the parent body, thereby increasing Mg/(Mg+Fe) in a shallow magma ocean from which A881394 crystallized, and also may have augmented 26Al heating. The granulitic texture of A881394 may have been produced during residence in the thin, earliest, crust, kept hot by the magma beneath it. If 26Al was, nevertheless, the major heat source for asteroidal melting, it may account for declining post-accretion heating of main belt asteroids with increasing heliocentric distance.

  16. Platinum-group element abundances and Re-Os isotopic systematics of the upper continental crust through time: Evidence from glacial diamictites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Walker, Richard J.; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Gao, Shan; Gaschnig, Richard M.; Puchtel, Igor S.; Tang, Ming; Hu, Zhao-Chu

    2016-10-01

    The fine-grained matrix of glacial diamictites, deposited periodically by continental ice sheets over much of Earth history, provides insights into the average composition and chemical evolution of the upper continental crust (UCC) (Gaschnig et al., 2016, and references therein). The concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGEs, including Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd) and the geochemically related Re, as well as 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios, are reported here for globally-distributed glacial diamictites that were deposited during the Mesoarchean, Paleoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic eras. The medians and averages of PGE concentrations of these diamictite composites decrease from the Mesoarchean to the Neoproterozoic, mimicking decreases in the concentrations of first-row transition elements (Sc, V, Cr, Co and Ni). By contrast, Re concentrations are highly variable with no discernable trend, owing to its high solubility. Assuming these diamictites are representative of average UCC through time, the new data are fully consistent with the previous inference that the Archean UCC contained a greater proportion of mafic-ultramafic rocks relative to younger UCC. Linear regressions of PGEs versus Cr and Ni concentrations in all the diamictite composites from the four time periods are used to estimate the following concentrations of the PGEs in the present-day UCC: 0.059 ± 0.016 ng/g Os, 0.036 ± 0.008 ng/g Ir, 0.079 ± 0.026 ng/g Ru, 0.80 ± 0.22 ng/g Pt and 0.80 ± 0.26 ng/g Pd (2σ of 10,000 bootstrapping regression results). These PGE estimates are slightly higher than the estimates obtained from loess samples. We suggest this probably results from loess preferentially sampling younger UCC rocks that have lower PGE concentrations, or PGEs being fractionated during loess formation. A Re concentration of 0.25 ± 0.12 ng/g (2σ) is obtained from a regression of Re versus Mo. From this, time-integrated 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios for the UCC are

  17. Carbon fixation in oceanic crust: Does it happen, and is it important?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B.; Sylvan, J. B.; Rogers, D.; Lee, R.; Girguis, P. R.; Carr, S. A.; Jungbluth, S.; Rappe, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The carbon sources supporting a deep biosphere in igneous oceanic crust, and furthermore the balance of heterotrophy and autotrophy, are poorly understood. When the large reservoir size of oceanic crust is considered, carbon transformations in this environment have the potential to significantly impact the global carbon cycle. Furthermore, igneous oceanic crust is the most massive potential habitat for life on Earth, so understanding the carbon sources for this potential biosphere are important for understanding life on Earth. Geochemical evidence suggests that warm and anoxic upper basement is net heterotrophic, but the balance of these processes in cooler and potentially oxic oceanic crust are poorly known. Here, we present data from stable carbon isotope tracer incubations to examine carbon fixation in basalts collected from the Loihi Seamount, the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, to provide a first order constraint on the rates of carbon fixation on basalts. These data will be compared to recently available assessments of carbon cycling rates in fluids from upper basement to synthesize our current state of understanding of the potential for carbon fixation and respiration in oceanic crust. Moreover, we will present new genomic data of carbon fixation genes observed in the basalt enrichments as well as from the subsurface of the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank, enabling identification of the microbes and metabolic pathways involved in carbon fixation in these systems.

  18. Decoding recent mud-volcano activity in the westernmost Mediterranean: Evidence from sediment/porewater data and geochemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Rodríguez, Carmina; Martínez-Ruíz, Francisca; Mogollón, José M.; Comas, Menchu; Nieto, Fernando; Böning, Philipp; Pahnke, Katharina; Sapart, Célia; De Lange, Gert J.

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the occurrence of active mud volcanism in the West Alboran Basin. Though most of the mud volcanoes (MVs) discovered in this region are dormant, a few structures evidence active hydrocarbon venting, as Carmen MV. This study focuses on sedimentological and geochemical investigations on one piston core, GP05PC, recovered from the summit of Carmen MV during the Gasalb-Pelagia cruise (2011). Although the full core consists of mud breccia sediments, a dramatic change occurs between enhanced methane concentrations in its lowermost and dissolved SO42- in its uppermost sediments. At the boundary of 150 cm, methane is oxidized and sulphate reduced. In the lowermost interval, the depletion of major elements (i.e., Ca2+ and Mg2+), the enrichment of trace species (i.e., Li+ and B) and the radiogenic 87Sr all point to a deep fluid source. The δ18Opw and δDpw compositions of pore water (5.7‰ and -10‰ VSMOW, respectively) together with the mineralogical results (presence of randomly insterstrafied (R0) illite-smectite minerals (I/S) to more illitic (>50% I) and ordered ones (R1-R3)) indicate smectite to illite transformation at greater depth and support smectite dehydration as the main porewater freshening mechanism. Water formation temperatures calculated through the application of empirical geo-thermometers (K-Na, K-Mg and K-Ca) together with the presence from I/S mixed layers (R3) suggest that fluids were generated at temperatures 100-200°C. This temperature indicates that, under a regional geothermal gradient, the fluid source originates from 8 km depth. From an adjacent borehole it is known that sedimentary units of Early to Middle Miocene age occur at that depth (Jurado and Comas et al., 1992). The δ13Cmethane and δDmethane composition of methane (-59‰ VPDB and -184‰ VSMOW, respectively) of the deepest sample also may be associated to a thermogenic origin. The absence of hemipelagic sediment draping, the distinctive seawater

  19. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  20. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  1. Evidence of Tectonic Rotations and Magmatic Flow Within the Sheeted Dike Complex of Super-Fast Spread Crust Exposed at the Pito Deep Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A. J.; Varga, R. J.; Gee, J. S.; Karson, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Escarpments bounding the Pito Deep Rift expose cross-sections into ~3 Ma oceanic crust accreted at a super-fast spreading (>140 mm/yr) segment of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Dikes within the sheeted dike complex persistently strike NE, parallel to local abyssal hill lineaments and magnetic anomaly stripes, and dip SE, outward and away from the EPR. During the Pito Deep 2005 Cruise, both ALVIN and JASON II used the Geocompass to fully orient a total of 69 samples [63 basaltic dikes, 6 massive gabbros] collected in situ. Paleomagnetic analyses of these oriented samples provide a quantitative constraint of kinematics of structural rotations of dikes. Magnetic remanence of dike samples indicates a dominant normal polarity with almost all directions rotated clockwise from the expected direction. The most geologically plausible model to account for these dispersions using these data coupled with the general orientation of the dikes incorporates two different structural rotations: 1) A horizontal-axis rotation that occurred near the EPR axis, related to sub-axial subsidence, and 2) A clockwise vertical-axis rotation, associated with the rotation of the Easter microplate consistent with current models. Additionally, the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of dike samples indicates rock fabric and magmatic flow direction within dikes. In most samples, two of three AMS eigenvectors lie near the dike plane orientations. Generally, Kmin lies perpendicular to dike planes, while Kmax is often shallow within the dike planes, indicating dominantly subhorizontal magma flow. Steep Kmax in a few samples indicates vertical flow directions that suggest either primary flow or gravitational back-flow during waning stages of dike intrusion. These results provide the first direct evidence for primarily horizontal magma flow in sheeted dikes of super-fast spread oceanic crust. Results for Pito Deep Rift and previous results for Hess Deep Rift reveal outward dipping dikes that are

  2. Observed changes of the diffuse H_{2} emission at the summit cone of Teide volcano (Tenerife, Canary Islands): a geochemical evidence of processes operating deep in the magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys V.; Padrón, Eleazar; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Calvo, David; Barrancos, José; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2017-04-01

    cone of Teide volcano during the 2005-2009 period (Pérez et al., 2013) suggesting the ascent of deep-reservoir (CO2-H2-rich) gas bubbles. These geochemical observations seem to be clear evidences of changes of processes operating deep in the magmatic system of Tenerife. Chiodini and Marini 1998, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, Giggenbach1987. App. Geochem., DOI: 10.1016/0883-2927(87)90030-8 Pérez et al. 2013. J. Geol. Soc., DOI: 10.1144/jgs2012-125 Pérez and Schmincke 2016, Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 18, EGU2016-10379 .

  3. Petrographic and geochemical evidence for the formation of primary, bacterially induced lacustrine dolomite: La Roda 'white earth' (Pliocene, Central Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Del; Cura, M.A.; Calvo, J.P.; Ordonez, S.; Jones, B.F.; Canaveras, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    low and negative (r = -0??05), whereas it is higher and positive (r = 0??47) for calcite. The lacustrine dolomite deposit from La Roda is interpreted mainly as a result of primary precipitation of dolomite in a shallow, hydrologically closed perennial lake. The lake was supplied by highly saturated HCO3-/CO32- groundwater that leached dolomitic Mesozoic formations. Precipitation of dolomite from alkaline lake waters took place under a semi-arid to arid climate. However, according to our isotopic data, strong evaporative conditions were not required for the formation of the La Roda dolomite. A significant contribution by bacteria to the formation of the dolomites is assumed in view of both petrographic and geochemical evidence.

  4. Generation of felsic crust in the Archean: a geodynamic modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizova, Elena; Gerya, Taras; Stüwe, Kurt; Brown, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The relevance of contemporary tectonics to the formation of the Archean terrains is a matter of vigorous debate. Higher mantle temperatures and higher radiogenic heat production in the past would have impacted on the thickness and composition of the oceanic and continental crust. As a consequence of secular cooling, there is generally no modern analog to assist in understanding the tectonic style that may have operated in the Archean. For this reason, well-constrained numerical modeling, based on the fragmentary evidence preserved in the geological record, is the most appropriate tool to evaluate hypotheses of Archean crust formation. The main lithology of Archean terrains is the sodic tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite. Melting of hydrated basalt at garnet-amphibolite to eclogite facies conditions is considered to be the dominant process for the generation of the Archean TTG crust. Taking into account geochemical signatures of possible mantle contributions to some TTGs, models proposed for the formation of Archean crust include subduction, melting at the bottom of thickened continental crust and fractional crystallization of mantle-derived melts under water-saturated conditions. We evaluated these hypotheses using a 2D coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical model with initial conditions appropriate to the Eoarchean-Mesoarchean. As a result, we identified three tectonic settings in which intermediate to felsic melts are generated by melting of hydrated primitive basaltic crust: 1) delamination and dripping of the lower primitive basaltic crust into the mantle; 2) local thickening of the primitive basaltic crust; and, 3) small-scale crustal overturns. In addition, we consider remelting of the fractionated products derived from underplated dry basalts as an alternative mechanism for the formation of some Archean granitoids. In the context of a stagnant lid tectonic regime which is intermittently terminated by short-lived subduction, we identified

  5. Evidence for distributed clockwise rotation of the crust in the northwestern United States from fault geometries and focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Wells, Ray E.; Lamb, Andrew P.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2017-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and GPS data indicate that Washington and Oregon have rotated clockwise for the past 16 Myr. Late Cenozoic and Quaternary fault geometries, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that this rotation is accommodated by north directed thrusting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting in Washington, and SW to W directed normal faulting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the east. Several curvilinear NW to NNW trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments in Washington and NW Oregon define a geologic pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America. Many faults and focal mechanisms throughout northwestern U.S. and southwestern British Columbia have orientations consistent with this geologic pole as do GPS surface velocities corrected for elastic Cascadia subduction zone coupling. Large Quaternary normal faults radial to the geologic pole, which appear to accommodate crustal rotation via crustal extension, are widespread and can be found along the Lewis and Clark zone in Montana, within the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Montana, to the west of the Wasatch Front in Utah, and within the northern Basin and Range in Oregon and Nevada. Distributed strike-slip faults are most prominent in western Washington and Oregon and may serve to transfer slip between faults throughout the northwestern U.S.

  6. Evidence for distributed clockwise rotation of the crust in the northwestern United States from fault geometries and focal mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Wells, Ray E.; Lamb, Andrew P.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2017-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and GPS data indicate that Washington and Oregon have rotated clockwise for the past 16 Myr. Late Cenozoic and Quaternary fault geometries, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that this rotation is accommodated by north directed thrusting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting in Washington, and SW to W directed normal faulting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the east. Several curvilinear NW to NNW trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments in Washington and NW Oregon define a geologic pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America. Many faults and focal mechanisms throughout northwestern U.S. and southwestern British Columbia have orientations consistent with this geologic pole as do GPS surface velocities corrected for elastic Cascadia subduction zone coupling. Large Quaternary normal faults radial to the geologic pole, which appear to accommodate crustal rotation via crustal extension, are widespread and can be found along the Lewis and Clark zone in Montana, within the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Montana, to the west of the Wasatch Front in Utah, and within the northern Basin and Range in Oregon and Nevada. Distributed strike-slip faults are most prominent in western Washington and Oregon and may serve to transfer slip between faults throughout the northwestern U.S.

  7. Geochemical heterogeneities and dynamics of magmas inside the plumbing system of a persistently active volcano: evidences from Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, Massimo; Bertagnini, Antonella; Métrich, Nicole; Belhadj, Oulfa

    2010-05-01

    Shallow processes such as degassing, crystallization and magma drain-back commonly operate in the upper parts of the plumbing systems of open-conduit basaltic volcanoes, often hindering the identification of potentially important geochemical changes in the volcano systems. Stromboli, known for its long-lived persistent activity over the last 18 centuries, is a suitable subject of study for addressing this issue, since basaltic magmas presently erupting at in this volcano record both deep and shallow processes. We report petrological and geochemical data on magmas erupted by Stromboli since the beginning of the persistent activity, in order to find a correlation between magma composition and the dynamics of magma in the plumbing system. Geochemical data on deep-derived magmas erupted as pumice during paroxysmal eruptions allowed us to identify two distinct parental melts (1944- and 2003-Type). These magmas, in which geochemical differences are linked to source processes rather than crystal fractionation, have alternately fed the deep reservoir in the last two millennia several times. The chemical heterogeneities recorded in lava flows and the products of Strombolian activity testify to the extent of homogenization after magma recharges at shallow depths. Persistent heterogeneities in the shallow plumbing system have important implications for magma residence times calculated on the basis of time-series analysis. These models are based on the assumptions that the reservoir is well stirred and chemically homogeneous and that the time for the re-homogenization after recharge (or mixing) is shorter than the residence time. We argue that these models do not apply to present-day activity at Stromboli and may not apply to other open-conduit, persistently degassing basaltic volcanoes. Thus compositional variations within the shallow magma bodies provide only a biased signal of ongoing changes within the plumbing system. We conclude that source changes responsible for

  8. Tomographic image of the crust and upper mantle beneath the western Tien Shan from the MANAS broadband deployment: Possible evidence for lithospheric delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiwei, Li; Roecker, Steve; Zhihai, Li; Bin, Wei; Haitao, Wang; Schelochkov, Gennady; Bragin, Vitaly

    2009-11-01

    We combine teleseismic P arrival times from the recent MANAS deployment of broadband sensors with P and S arrival times from local events recorded by the GENGHIS deployment and analog observations from the Kyrgyz Institute of Seismology to generate a high resolution (~ 20 km) image of elastic wavespeeds in the crust and upper mantle beneath the western Tien Shan. The total data set consists of 29,006 P and 21,491 S arrivals from 2176 local events recorded at 144 stations along with 5202 P arrivals from 263 teleseismic events recorded at 40 stations. The most significant feature in our image of the mantle beneath the Tien Shan is a pair of large, elongated high wavespeed regions dipping in opposite directions from the near surface to depths of at least 400 km. These regions appear to be continuous and extend upwards to bounding range fronts where the Tarim Basin is being overthrust by the Kokshal range on the south side, and the Kazach shield underthrusts the Kyrgyz range on the north side. While it is tempting to interpret these high wavespeed anomalies as evidence for contemporary subduction of continental lithosphere, such a scenario is difficult to reconcile with both the timing of the orogen and the size of the wavespeed anomaly. We suggest instead that they represent downwelling side-limbs of a lithospheric delamination beneath the central part of the Tien Shan, possibly by siphoning of the bordering continental lithosphere as the central part descends.

  9. Evidence from Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions that the Martian Mantle has a Chondritic D/H Ratio and that Some Young Basalts have Assimilated Old Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Magmatic degassing of volatile elements affects the climate and near-surface environment of Mars. Telescopic and meteorite studies have revealed that the Martian atmosphere and near-surface materials have D/H ratios 5-6 times terrestrial values [e.g., 1, 2]. Such high D/H ratios are interpreted to result from the preferential loss of H relative to heavier D from the Martian atmosphere, assuming that the original Martian water inventory had a D/H ratio similar to terrestrial values and to H in primitive meteorites [e.g., 1, 3]. However, the primordial Martian D/H ratio has, until now, not been well constrained. The uncertainty over the Martian primordial D/H ratio has arisen both from the scarcity of primitive Martian meteorites and as a result of contamination by terrestrial and, perhaps, Martian surface waters that obscure the signature of the Martian mantle. This study reports a comprehensive dataset of magmatic volatiles and D/H ratios in Martian primary magmas based on low-contamination, in situ ion microprobe analyses of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from both depleted [Yamato 980459 (Y98)] and enriched [Larkman Nunatak 06319 (LAR06)] Martian basaltic meteorites. Analyses of these primitive melts provide definitive evidence that the Martian mantle has retained a primordial D/H ratio and that young Martian basalts have assimilated old Martian crust.

  10. North Atlantic Deep Water export to the Southern Ocean over the past 14 Myr: Evidence from Nd and Pb isotopes in ferromanganese crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, M.; Whiteley, N.; Kasten, S.; Hein, J.R.; O'Nions, K.

    2002-01-01

    The intensity of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) production has been one of the most important parameters controlling the global thermohaline ocean circulation system and climate. Here we present a new approach to reconstruct the overall strength of NADW export from the North Atlantic to the Southern Ocean over the past 14 Myr applying the deep water Nd and Pb isotope composition as recorded by ferromanganese crusts and nodules. We present the first long-term Nd and Pb isotope time series for deep Southern Ocean water masses, which are compared with previously published time series for NADW from the NW Atlantic Ocean. These data suggest a continuous and strong export of NADW, or a precursor of it, into the Southern Ocean between 14 and 3 Ma. An increasing difference in Nd and Pb isotope compositions between the NW Atlantic and the Southern Ocean over the past 3 Myr gives evidence for a progressive overall reduction of NADW export since the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (NHG). The Nd isotope data allow us to assess at least semiquantitatively that the amount of this reduction has been in the range between 14 and 37% depending on location.

  11. Double-layer structure of the crust beneath the Zhongdian arc, SW China: U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Kang; Xu, Ji-Feng; Chen, Jian-Lin; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Ren, Jiang-Bo; Zhao, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Zhen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    U-Pb ages and Hf isotopes of zircons in Late Triassic and Cretaceous intrusive rocks from the Zhongdian arc, SW China, are used to decipher the tectonic, magmatic, and metallogenic processes that occurred during this period. New U-Pb dating of zircons from Late Triassic porphyries yielded ages of ca. 216 Ma and εHf(t) values of -2.1 to +6.1. Combined with previous results, the data indicate that these Late Triassic rocks were most likely derived from a juvenile mafic lower-crust with minor old crust material. However, the Cretaceous granites (∼80 Ma) have lower εHf(t) values (-7.6 to -2.4) than the Late Triassic rocks, indicating that the former originated from old crust. Based on the new data and previous studies of Mesozoic magmatic activity, a plausible model for the tectono-magmatism and metallogenesis of the Zhongdian arc is proposed. The westwards subduction of the Ganzi-Litang oceanic crust began before ∼230 Ma, resulting in the formation of a juvenile lower crust beneath the Zhongdian arc due to the underplating of mafic arc magmas during ca. 230-216 Ma. At ca. 216 Ma, break-off or slab-tearing of the west-dipping Ganzi-Litang oceanic slab led to partial melting of the juvenile lower crust, which gave rise to Cu-bearing porphyries. In the Late Cretaceous, the Zhongdian arc probably underwent post-collision extension, triggering the partial melting of the old middle-upper crustal materials and producing various granites and related Mo-Cu deposits. According to this model, the crust beneath the Zhongdian arc probably has a double-layer structure, with older crust at shallow levels and juvenile crust at deeper levels.

  12. New Russian aerogeophysical data providing compelling evidences of riftogenic crust in eastern Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golynsky, Dmitry; Golynsky, Alexander; Kiselev, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of radio-echosounding and RADARSAT mosaic data reveals at least 500 km long structure called the Gaussberg rift over the eastern part of Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica. New Russian ice penetrating radar data shows that the floor of the central depression placed more than 1000 m below sea level. Horsts and grabens are heavily dissected by N-S running transverse lineaments that were discovered by analysis of ice surface satellite imagery. High-quality aeromagnetic data show that outstanding changes of the magnetic anomaly patterns observed in vicinity, along strike and over shoulders of the inferred Gaussberg rift are thought to have the tectonic origin. Abrupt disappearance of the long-wavelength high-intensity magnetic anomaly belt with a number of short-wavelength anomalies associated with eastern boundary of the Vestfold-Rauer cratonic block in vicinity of western depression can't be explained simply by subglacial erosion. In our interpretation, these changes of magnetic anomaly pattern apparently associated with development of regional fault zones during initial stages of rifting. The Mount Brown horst is clearly evident in magnetic data as an area of concentration of high-intensity anomalies with amplitude up to 1575 nT. The observed trends are in agreement with the strike of the metamorphic rocks in Mount Brown, which experienced c. 980-920 Ma high-grade metamorphism. This suggests that this area experienced the Rayner Orogeny, distinguished in Kemp Land and the northern Prince Charles Mountains and may represent suspect suture of the Mesoproterozoic age, as evidenced by new date for Mount Brown mafic rocks at c. 1480 Ma. Depth-estimates of magnetic anomaly sources indicate that the central depression of the rift is likely underlain by a 3-5 km thick sedimentary basin, thereby supporting our idea of existence of riftogenic structure in the eastern part of Princess Elizabeth Land. Crustal two-dimensional modelling by using gravity data also

  13. Building Archean cratons from Hadean mafic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, Jonathan; Carlson, Richard W.

    2017-03-01

    Geologic processing of Earth’s surface has removed most of the evidence concerning the nature of Earth’s first crust. One region of ancient crust is the Hudson Bay terrane of northeastern Canada, which is mainly composed of Neoarchean felsic crust and forms the nucleus of the Northeastern Superior Province. New data show these ~2.7-billion-year-old rocks to be the youngest to yield variability in neodymium-142 (142Nd), the decay product of short-lived samarium-146 (146Sm). Combined 146-147Sm-142-143Nd data reveal that this large block of Archean crust formed by reworking of much older (>4.2 billion-year-old) mafic crust over a 1.5-billion-year interval of early Earth history. Thus, unlike on modern Earth, mafic crust apparently could survive for more than 1 billion years to form an important source rock for Archean crustal genesis.

  14. Feldspar palaeo-isochrons from early Archaean TTGs: Pb-isotope evidence for a high U/Pb terrestrial Hadean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamber, B. S.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Moorbath, S.; Collerson, K. D.

    2001-12-01

    Feldspar lead-isotope data for 22 early Archaean (3.80-3.82 Ga) tonalitic gneisses from an area south of the Isua greenstone belt (IGB),West Greenland, define a steep linear trend in common Pb-isotope space with an apparent age of 4480+/-77 Ma. Feldspars from interleaved amphibolites yield a similar array corresponding to a date of 4455+/-540 Ma. These regression lines are palaeo-isochrons that formed during feldspar-whole rock Pb-isotope homogenisation a long time (1.8 Ga) after rock formation but confirm the extreme antiquity (3.81 Ga) of the gneissic protoliths [1; this study]. Unlike their whole-rock counterparts, feldspar palaeo-isochrons are immune to rotational effects caused by the vagaries of U/Pb fractionation. Hence, comparison of their intercept with mantle Pb-isotope evolution models yields meaningful information regarding the source history of the magmatic precursors. The locus of intersection between the palaeo-isochrons and terrestrial mantle Pb-isotope evolution lines shows that the gneissic precursors of these 3.81 Ga gneisses were derived from a source with a substantially higher time-integrated U/Pb ratio than the mantle. Similar requirements for a high U/Pb source have been found for IGB BIF [2], IGB carbonate [3], and particularly IGB galenas [4]. Significantly, a single high U/Pb source that separated from the MORB-source mantle at ca. 4.3 Ga with a 238U/204Pb of ca. 10.5 provides a good fit to all these observations. In contrast to many previous models based on Nd and Hf-isotope evidence we propose that this reservoir was not a mantle source but the Hadean basaltic crust which, in the absence of an operating subduction process, encased the early Earth. Differentiation of the early high U/Pb basaltic crust could have occurred in response to gravitational sinking of cold mantle material or meteorite impact, and produced zircon-bearing magmatic rocks. The subchondritic Hf-isotope ratios of ca. 3.8 Ga zircons support this model [5] provided that

  15. Recycled crust and the secular cooling of mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel Dondi, E.; Herzberg, C. T.; Vidito, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Current models suggest that the massive basaltic production responsible for the emplacement of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPS) during the Permian-Paleocene may represent the initial phases of some of the mantle plumes that feed the current ocean island basalts (OIB). In some cases this magmatism was so voluminous that it produced global environmental impacts. Recent petrological, geochemical and geophysical studies of some of these localities like Samoa, Hawaii, Galapagos provide evidence that melting is related to a true mantle plume that originates from a boundary layer beneath the upper mantle. Thus, plume-related magmas produced in OIB and LIPS and their connecting plume tracks provide evidence on mantle temperature, size and composition of heterogeneities, and deep geochemical cycles. Although a lot of work has been done on LIPS and OIB, no complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume is available to this point. Galapagos-related lavas provide a complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume since the plume's initial stages in the Cretaceous. In the case of the Galapagos, our work suggests a decrease from TP(max) of 1650 °C in the Cretaceous to 1500 °C in the present day. Our recent work on the Galapagos Islands and the preliminary work on older Galapagos-related terranes suggest that this secular cooling is related with increasing amounts of recycled crust in the plume. Detailed olivine chemistry shows that although peridotite is the dominant source lithology of the Galapagos Plume, a recycled pyroxenite component is also significant in both isotopically enriched and depleted domains of the archipelago. We suggest that this possibly represents two separate bodies of recycled crust within the Galapagos mantle plume.

  16. Elemental composition of the Martian crust.

    PubMed

    McSween, Harry Y; Taylor, G Jeffrey; Wyatt, Michael B

    2009-05-08

    The composition of Mars' crust records the planet's integrated geologic history and provides clues to its differentiation. Spacecraft and meteorite data now provide a global view of the chemistry of the igneous crust that can be used to assess this history. Surface rocks on Mars are dominantly tholeiitic basalts formed by extensive partial melting and are not highly weathered. Siliceous or calc-alkaline rocks produced by melting and/or fractional crystallization of hydrated, recycled mantle sources, and silica-poor rocks produced by limited melting of alkali-rich mantle sources, are uncommon or absent. Spacecraft data suggest that martian meteorites are not representative of older, more voluminous crust and prompt questions about their use in defining diagnostic geochemical characteristics and in constraining mantle compositional models for Mars.

  17. Elemental Composition of the Martian Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, Harry Y.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Wyatt, Michael B.

    2009-05-01

    The composition of Mars’ crust records the planet’s integrated geologic history and provides clues to its differentiation. Spacecraft and meteorite data now provide a global view of the chemistry of the igneous crust that can be used to assess this history. Surface rocks on Mars are dominantly tholeiitic basalts formed by extensive partial melting and are not highly weathered. Siliceous or calc-alkaline rocks produced by melting and/or fractional crystallization of hydrated, recycled mantle sources, and silica-poor rocks produced by limited melting of alkali-rich mantle sources, are uncommon or absent. Spacecraft data suggest that martian meteorites are not representative of older, more voluminous crust and prompt questions about their use in defining diagnostic geochemical characteristics and in constraining mantle compositional models for Mars.

  18. Geochemical and geomorphological evidence for the provenance of aeolian deposits in the Badain Jaran Desert, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangen; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Identifying provenance of aeolian deposits in the mid-latitude deserts of Asia is essential for understanding formation and changes of Earth surface processes due to palaeoclimatic fluctuations. While some earlier studies focused on the interpretation of palaeoenvironments on the basis of aeolian deposits mainly in the desert margins and inter-dune lacustrine sediments, research on provenance of desert sands in the vast Asian mid-latitude deserts is still rare. In this paper, we present new geochemical data which provide insight to the provenance of dune sands in the Badain Jaran Desert, northwestern China, an important part of this desert belt. We sampled aeolian and lacustrine sediments in various parts of the Badain Jaran Desert, and examined their major, trace and rare earth elements (REE) in bulk samples, coarse and fine fractions, respectively. In addition, we took and analyzed samples from a rarely known dune field with red sands, northeast of the Badain Jaran. Our results show that the sands from the Badain Jaran Desert are generally different from those in the red sand dune field in terms of REE pattern and geochemical characteristics, suggesting different sediment origins. Geochemical composition of the aeolian sand samples indicates these sediments should be mainly derived from mixed source rocks of granite, granitoids and granodiorite. Comparing the immobile trace elements and REE ratios of the samples from the Badain Jaran Desert, red sand dune field with rocks of granite, granitoids in their potential source areas, we conclude that: (1) The aeolian deposits in the Badain Jaran Desert are predominantly derived from the Qilian Mountains, northeastern Tibetan Plateau initially via fluvial processes; (2) The Altay Mountains and Mongolian Gobi are the ultimate source areas for the red sand dune field; (3) The Altai Mountains and Mongolian Gobi in the northwest, that could produce massive amounts of materials via intensive deflation and alluvial process

  19. Fluoride and iodine enrichment in groundwater of North China Plain: Evidences from speciation analysis and geochemical modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Zhou, Hailing; Qian, Kun; Xie, Xianjun; Xue, Xiaobin; Yang, Yijun; Wang, Yanxin

    2017-11-15

    To better understand the enrichment of fluoride and iodine in groundwater at North China Plain (NCP), speciation analysis and geochemical modeling were conducted to identify the key hydrochemical processes controlling their mobilization in groundwater system. Groundwater fluoride and iodine concentrations ranged from 0.18 to 5.59mg/L and from 1.51 to 1106μg/L, respectively, and approximately 63% and 32.3% of groundwater fluoride and iodine were higher than the guidelines for drinking water (1.5mg/L and 150μg/L). High fluoride concentration (>1.5mg/L) can be detected in groundwater from the flow-through and discharge areas of NCP, and high iodine groundwater (>150μg/L) is mainly scattered in the coastal area. Na-HCO3/Cl type water resulted from water-rock interaction and seawater intrusion favors fluoride and iodine enrichment in groundwater. Speciation analysis results indicate that (1) fluoride complexes in groundwater are dominated by free fluoride, the negative charge of which favors fluoride enrichment in groundwater under basic conditions, and (2) iodide, iodate and organic iodine co-occur in groundwater at NCP with iodide as the dominant species. The geochemical modeling results indicate that groundwater fluoride is mainly associated with the saturation states of fluorite and calcite, as well as the adsorption equilibrium onto goethite and gibbsite, including the competitive adsorption between fluoride and carbonate. Groundwater iodine is mainly controlled by redox potential and pH condition of groundwater system. Reducing condition favors the mobilization and enrichment of groundwater iodide, which has the highest mobility among iodine species. Under reducing condition, reductive dissolution of iron (oxy)hydroxides is a potential geochemical process responsible for iodine release from sediment into groundwater. Under (sub)oxidizing condition, as groundwater pH over the 'point of zero charge' of iron (oxy)hydroxides, the lowering adsorption capacity of

  20. Devonian Nb-enriched basalts and andesites of north-central Tibet: Evidence for the early subduction of the Paleo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the North Qiangtang Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongrui; Yang, Tiannan; Hou, Zengqian; Bian, Yeke

    2016-07-01

    The early evolution of the Tethyan Ocean in north-central Tibet is currently poorly constrained. A sequence of volcanic rocks ranging from basic to intermediate in composition has been identified in the Zaduo area of the North Qiangtang Block. SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircons from a sample of Zaduo andesite suggests an eruption age of Late Devonian ( 380 Ma). The Zaduo volcanic rocks exhibit geochemical characteristics similar to those of typical Nb-enriched basalts, with relatively high Nb, Ta, and Zr contents, resulting in high Nb/La ratios (0.70-1.08) and Nb/U ratios (10.57-34.37). The relative enrichment in high field strength elements, together with positive εNd(t) values of + 4.6 to + 5.8 and low (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios of 0.70367-0.70532, indicates the Zaduo volcanic rocks were derived from a depleted mantle source metasomatized by silicate melts of a subducted oceanic slab. The occurrence of Nb-enriched volcanic rocks in the North Qiangtang Block suggests that the subduction of Paleo-Tethyan oceanic crust was initiated in the Late Devonian. Available geochronological data from ophiolites surrounding the North Qiangtang Block suggest that the subducted slab is most likely the Longmucuo-Shuanghu Paleo-Tethyan oceanic crust.

  1. Provenance change in the Irkutsk coal basin during the early and middle Jurassic: Geochemical and Sm-Nd isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheeva, E. A.; Demonterova, E. I.; Frolov, A. O.; Arzhannikova, A. V.; Arzhannikov, S. G.; Cherkashina, T. Yu.; Ivanov, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    On the basis of the recently accepted chronostratigraphic chart, Jurassic sedimentation in the Irkutsk coal basin took place over a short time interval ( 23 My), from the Pliensbachian ( 191 Ma) to the Aalenian ( 170 Ma). In this study, we present geochemical and Sm-Nd isotope data for sedimentary rocks of the Prisayan and Kuda formations and those in the upper course of the Angara River, which were deposited over an even shorter time interval (from 174 to 170 Ma), as indicated by new data on biostratigraphy. Our results suggest that a greater contribution from Transbaikalia compared to that from the Siberian Platform during sediment deposition in the Irkutsk coal basin may reflect the onset of mountain building in Transbaikalia and reorganization of the river drainage network during the Middle Jurassic.

  2. Magma mixing at mid-ocean ridges - Evidence from legs 45 and 46-DSDP. [petrologic and geochemical study of basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, M. A.; Long, P. E.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    An integrated petrologic and geochemical study of basalts recovered in Legs 45 and 46 (DSDP) has indicated, on the basis of disequilibrium mineralogy, that these moderately evolved basalts are mixtures of primitive mantle-derived tholeiites with more evolved magmas. Plagioclase phenocrysts are characterized by substantial diversity in composition and zoning pattern. Many olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts are too refractory to be in equilibrium with liquids of the host basalt composition but possess a composition consistent with crystallization from a primitive mantle-derived basalt liquid. On the basis of melt inclusions trapped in the olivine phenocrysts, features of the primitive melt are estimated. It is suggested that subvolcanic magma chambers beneath midocean ridges receive periodic injections of this primitive melt and its attendant phenocrysts which mix with fractionated chamber-bound magmas, resulting in observed moderately evolved lavas.

  3. Water and gas chemistry at Lake Kivu (DRC): Geochemical evidence of vertical and horizontal heterogeneities in a multibasin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, F.; Vaselli, O.; Tedesco, D.; Montegrossi, G.; Darrah, T.; Cuoco, E.; Mapendano, M. Y.; Poreda, R.; Delgado Huertas, A.

    2009-02-01

    Waters and dissolved gases collected along vertical profiles in the five basins (Main, Kabuno Bay, Kalehe, Ishungu, and Bukavu) forming the 485 m deep Lake Kivu (Democratic Republic of the Congo) were analyzed to provide a geochemical conceptual model of the several processes controlling lake chemistry. The measured horizontal and vertical variations of water and gas compositions suggest that each basin has distinct chemical features produced by (1) different contribution from long circulating fluid system containing magmatic CO2, responsible of the huge CO2(CH4)-rich reservoir hosted within the deep lake water; (2) spatial variations of the biomass distribution and/or speciation; and (3) solutes from water-rock interactions. The Kabuno Bay basin is characterized by the highest rate of magmatic fluid input. Accordingly, this basin must be considered the most hazardous site for possible gas outburst that could be triggered by the activity of the Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira volcanoes, located a few kilometers north of the lake.

  4. Magma mixing at mid-ocean ridges - Evidence from legs 45 and 46-DSDP. [petrologic and geochemical study of basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, M. A.; Long, P. E.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    An integrated petrologic and geochemical study of basalts recovered in Legs 45 and 46 (DSDP) has indicated, on the basis of disequilibrium mineralogy, that these moderately evolved basalts are mixtures of primitive mantle-derived tholeiites with more evolved magmas. Plagioclase phenocrysts are characterized by substantial diversity in composition and zoning pattern. Many olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts are too refractory to be in equilibrium with liquids of the host basalt composition but possess a composition consistent with crystallization from a primitive mantle-derived basalt liquid. On the basis of melt inclusions trapped in the olivine phenocrysts, features of the primitive melt are estimated. It is suggested that subvolcanic magma chambers beneath midocean ridges receive periodic injections of this primitive melt and its attendant phenocrysts which mix with fractionated chamber-bound magmas, resulting in observed moderately evolved lavas.

  5. Reviewing the circulation and mixing of Antarctic Intermediate Water in the South Pacific using evidence from geochemical tracers and Argo float trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, Helen C.; Sutton, Phil J.; Williams, Michael J. M.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2013-03-01

    Evidence from physical and geochemical tracers measured during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) shows that there are four sub-types of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the South Pacific. The main formation region of AAIW is the southeast Pacific, where fresh, cold, high oxygen, low nutrient, intermediate waters are created. This AAIW is transported north and mixes with Equatorial Pacific Intermediate Waters (EqPIW), themselves a combination of AAIW and nutrient rich, old North Pacific deep waters. 'Tasman' AAIW found in the Coral and Tasman Seas is more saline and warmer than the main subtropical gyre, and appears to have formed from mixing of AAIW with thermocline waters in the Tasman Gyre. Tasman AAIW leaks out of the Tasman basin to the north of New Zealand and along Chatham Rise, and also in the South Tasman Sea via the Tasman Leakage. Another source of relatively fresh, high oxygen, low nutrient, young AAIW comes directly from the Southern Ocean, flowing into the southwest and central South Pacific Basin, west of the East Pacific Rise. This 'Southern Ocean' (SO) AAIW is most likely a mixture of AAIW formed locally at the Subantarctic Front (SAF), and AAIW formed along the SAF in the southeast Pacific or Indian oceans and transported by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Interpreting physical and geochemical tracers, combined with velocity estimates from Argo floats, and previous research, has allowed us to refine the detailed circulation pattern of AAIW in the South Pacific, especially in the topographically complex southwest Pacific.

  6. Geochemical and microbiological evidence for a hydrogen-based, hyperthermophilic subsurface lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem (HyperSLiME) beneath an active deep-sea hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Gamo, Toshitaka; Tsunogai, Urumu; Nakayama, Noriko; Hirayama, Hisako; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2004-08-01

    Subsurface microbial communities supported by geologically and abiologically derived hydrogen and carbon dioxide from the Earth's interior are of great interest, not only with regard to the nature of primitive life on Earth, but as potential analogs for extraterrestrial life. Here, for the first time, we present geochemical and microbiological evidence pointing to the existence of hyperthermophilic subsurface lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem (HyperSLiME) dominated by hyperthermophilic methanogens beneath an active deep-sea hydrothermal field in the Central Indian Ridge. Geochemical and isotopic analyses of gaseous components in the hydrothermal fluids revealed heterogeneity of both concentration and carbon isotopic compositions of methane between the main hydrothermal vent (0.08 mM and -13.8 per thousand PDB, respectively) and the adjacent divergent vent site (0.2 mM and -18.5 per thousand PDB, respectively), representing potential subsurface microbial methanogenesis, at least in the divergent vent emitting more 13C-depleted methane. Extremely high abundance of magmatic energy sources such as hydrogen (2.5 mM) in the fluids also encourages a hydrogen-based, lithoautotrophic microbial activity. Both cultivation and cultivation-independent molecular analyses suggested the predominance of Methanococcales members in the superheated hydrothermal emissions and chimney interiors along with the other major microbial components of Thermococcales members. These results imply that a HyperSLiME, consisting of methanogens and fermenters, occurs in this tectonically active subsurface zone, strongly supporting the existence of hydrogen-driven subsurface microbial communities.

  7. A Geochemical Transect Across the Lau and North Fiji Basins: New Evidence for the Distribution of Multiple Mantle Plume Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. A.; Jackson, M. G.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Arculus, R. J.; Conatser, C. S.; Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Blusztajn, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lau and North Fiji backarc basins are located in a tectonically complex region of the South Pacific, where the upper mantle may have been modified by up to five hotspots (Samoa, Rurutu, Rarotonga, Macdonald, and Louisville), each with distinct geochemical fingerprints. We present new Hf, Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic data for basaltic samples dredged from seven areas along an east-west transect spanning the Lau and North Fiji basins to determine the possible influence and distribution of these various hotspot sources. We find that the isotope ratios of nearly all samples can be explained by mixing a depleted mantle component, which is ubiquitous in the Lau Basin, with a component similar to that found in Samoan shield (EMII) and/or rejuvenated (EMI) lavas. Lavas as far southwest as the Fiji Triple Junction (North Fiji Basin) show enriched geochemical signatures (87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb up to 0.7037 and 18.635 respectively, and 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf down to 0.51285 and 0.283023, respectively) trending toward Samoa. This observation extends the range of Samoan influence into the North Fiji Basin 400 km south of its previous observed extent at South Pandora Ridge. The few samples that cannot be explained solely by incorporation of Samoan material are from the northeastern Lau Basin (Falloon et al., 2007) and host a dilute HIMU component that may relate to the incorporation of material from the Rurutu hotspot. This component is not observed further to the west in the Lau and North Fiji basins. A ubiquitous EMI signature in the region may be linked to the Rarotonga hotspot. New dredges from the northeast Lau Basin may give clearer signals that will reveal the identity of the enriched plume component.

  8. Geochemical evidence for fluid flow in the upper and subducting plates of the Costa Rica margin: Results from CRISP drilling during Exp. 334 and 344 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. E.; Solomon, E. A.; Kastner, M.; Harris, R. N.; Formolo, M.; Choi, J.; Berg, R. D.; Nuzzo, M.

    2013-12-01

    lithologic Units I and II that defines the interface between the slope sediment cover and deeper upper plate material. The Cl, Li, and hydrocarbon concentration data indicate that this fluid originated from a source temperature greater than 90°C. Within the well-cemented sediments below the slope cover, there is a more pervasive non-foccussed transport of a fluid, fresher than seawater, having a strong signature of ash/basalt interaction (high Ca, low Mg), and a marked increase in C1/C2+ ratio, indicating either a more biogenic signature of the gases or/and an extensive migration effect on the gas composition. Geochemical data at two sites drilled on the incoming plate, reveal fluid flow within the permeable upper oceanic crust. At Site U1381, the sulfate concentration profile shows a reversal below ~40 mbsf, with a steady increase in concentration with depth. This observation is similar to that previously reported at the nearby incoming sediment section offshore the Nicoya Peninsula, and reflect diffusional communication with a fluid with seawater-like chemistry in the igneous basement. The sulfate concentration profile at Site U1414 is unusual in that it displays a second minimum at 330 mbsf, which corresponds to a sharp minimum in calcium and a maximum in barium concentrations. These data suggest lateral flow of fluid originating landward of Site U1414 where microbial oxidation of methane and/or other organic carbon sources has depleted dissolved sulfate.

  9. Ferromanganese crusts as indicators for paleoceanographic events in the NE Atlantic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Hein, J.R.; Mangini, A.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese crusts reflect the chemical conditions of the seawater from which they formed. Fine-scale geochemical analysis of crust layers in combination with age determinations can therefore be used to investigate paleoceanographic changes which are recorded in geochemical gradients in the crusts. At Tropic seamount (off northwest Africa), uniform crust growth influenced by terrigenous input from the African continent occurred during approximately the past 12 Ma. Phosphatization of these crusts is minor. In contrast, crusts from Lion seamount, located between Madeira and the Portuguese coast, display a much more variable growth history. A pronounced increase in Ni, Cu, and Zn is observed in some intervals of the crusts, which probably reflects increased surface productivity. A thick older phosphatized generation occurs in many samples. Hydrographic profiles indicate that Mediterranean outflow water (MOW) may play an important role in the composition of these crusts. 10Be dating of one sample confirms that the interruption of the MOW during the Messinian salinity crisis (6.2-5 Ma ago) resulted in changes in element composition. Sr-isotope dating of the apatite phase of the old crust generation has been carried out to obtain a minimum age for the older generation of Atlantic crusts and to determine whether crust phosphatization in the Atlantic can be related to phosphatization episodes recorded in Pacific crusts. The preliminary data show that the old phosphatized crust generation might be as old as approximately 30-40 Ma.

  10. Chlorine-rich amphibole in deep layered gabbros as evidence for brine/rock interaction in the lower oceanic crust: a microstructural and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currin, Adriana; Koepke, Juergen; Almeev, Renat; Ildefonse, Benoit; Wolff, Paul Eric

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of amphiboles in the lower oceanic crust indicates the presence of water during rock formation or alteration, either in the parental melt or in reacting hydrothermal fluids. Amphibole-rich high temperature metamorphic veins and magmatic dykes are found in MOR-associated layered olivine gabbros from Wadi Wariyah of the deep palaeocrust of the Sumail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman. These veins contain different types of amphiboles: pargasite, hornblende, actinolite and Cl-rich pargasite. In some cases, amphibole grains are zoned and contain a range of compositions, from pargasite formed at magmatic conditions to Cl-rich pargasite formed at subsolidus conditions. Pargasite and ferropargasite are found containing up to 5 wt% Cl (1.4 a.p.f.u.). This variety of amphibole compositions occurring in layered gabbros evidences a complex history of brine/rock interaction and hydrothermal cooling at the base of the oceanic crust. However, the precise origin of these amphibole- and Cl-rich veins associated to hydrothermal activity is still poorly understood. We investigated the formation of Cl-rich amphibole by means of a microstructural study using EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction) and, in addition, an experimental simulation of hydrothermal processes affecting amphibole formation in gabbro at subsolidus conditions. The microstructural EBSD study on natural gabbro from Oman confirms that the hydrothermally-formed amphiboles (hornblende, actinolite, Cl-pargasite) are epitactic in relation to high-temperature pargasite areas adjacent to them. This implies a coherent process, where magmatic pargasite formed initially was subsequently transformed by a Cl-rich hydrothermal brine and fluid at decreasing temperatures, ranging from the magmatic regime down to greenschist facies. Experiments were performed with a starting material of millimetre-sized pargasite pieces (with Cl content <0.02 Cl wt%) and added olivine gabbro powder (ol+plg+cpx+mt) with an excess of

  11. Generation of continental crust in intra-oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Kelemen, P. B.; Everson, E. D.; Holbrook, W. S.; Vance, E.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of continental crust is still an unsolved mystery in the evolution of our planet. Although the best candidates to produce juvenile continental crust are intra-oceanic arcs these systems are dominated by basaltic lavas, and when silicic magmas are produced, the incompatible-element compositions are generally too depleted to be a good match for continental crust estimates. Others, such as the W. Aleutians, are dominated by andesitic melts with trace element compositions similar to average continental crust. In order to evaluate which intra-oceanic arcs produced modern continental crust, we developed a geochemical continental index (CI) through a statistical analysis that compared all available data from modern intra-oceanic arcs with global estimates of continental crust. Our results suggest that magmas from Costa Rica (<10 Ma) have a CI <50, closer to the CI (~20) computed from available average continental crust estimates. Transitional CI values of 50-100 were found in the Aleutians, the Iwo-Jima segment of Izu-Bonin, the L. Antilles, Panama, Nicaragua, and Vanuatu. The geochemical signature of the Costa Rican lavas is controlled by melts from the subducting Galapagos tracks. Iwo-Jima and Vanuatu are in a similar tectonic scenario with subducting intraplate seamounts. Melts from the subducting oceanic crust are thought to significantly control the geochemical signature in the W. Aleutians and Panama. In the L. Antilles and E. Aleutians the continental signature may reflect recycling of a component derived from subducting continental sediments. Most of Izu-Bonin, Marianas, S. Scotia and Tonga arcs with a CI >100 have the least continent-like geochemical signatures. In these arcs the subducting plate is old (>100 Ma), not overprinted by enriched intraplate volcanism and the geochemistry may be dominated by slab-derived, aqueous fluids. We also found a strong correlation between the CI and average crustal P-wave velocity, validating the geochemical index

  12. Magmatic garnet in the Cordilleran-type Galiléia granitoids of the Araçuaí belt (Brazil): Evidence for crystallization in the lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narduzzi, F.; Farina, F.; Stevens, G.; Lana, C.; Nalini, H. A.

    2017-06-01

    Magmatic garnet, together with epidote, is a rare mineral association in cordilleran-I-type granitoids and of special petrogenetic significance. The metaluminous to slightly peraluminous (ASI = 0.97-1.07) Galiléia batholith (Brazil) is a large (ca. 30,000 km2), Neoproterozoic (ca. 632-570 Ma) weakly foliated calc-alkaline granitoid body, characterized by the widespread occurrence of garnet (grossular 25-43 mol%) and epidote (pistacite 9.3-22.7 mol%). Field, petrographic and mineral chemical evidence indicates that garnet, epidote, biotite as well as white mica crystals (low-Si phengite), are magmatic. There is no difference in bulk rock major and trace element composition between the Galiléia granitoids and other garnet-free cordilleran-type granitoids worldwide. This evidence strongly suggests that the origin of the uncommon garnet + epidote parageneses is related to the conditions of magma crystallization, such as pressure, temperature and water content. Comparison between the mineral assemblages and mineral compositions from this study and those recorded in crystallization experiments on metaluminous calc-alkaline magmas, as well as within garnet-bearing metaluminous volcanic rocks and granitoids, indicates that the supersolidus coexistence of grossular-rich garnet, epidote and white mica is consistent with magma crystallization at pressures greater than 0.8 GPa (above 25 km depth) and at temperatures below 700 °C, i.e. near the water saturated solidus. Furthermore, resorption textures around garnet (plagioclase ± quartz coronas) and epidote suggest that these minerals have been partially consumed prior to complete crystallization. These findings demonstrate that at 630 Ma the crust underneath the Araçuaí Orogen was already at least 25-30 km thick and relatively cool. However, this contrasts with the marked high heat flow registered from the neighbour Carlos Chagas Batholith located 50 km to the east. In fact such granitoids record granulite

  13. Thermomagmatic evolution of Mesoproterozoic crust in the Blue Ridge of SW Virginia and NW North Carolina: Evidence from U-Pb geochronology and zircon geothermometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollo, Richard P.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Mazdab, Frank K.; Southworth, Scott; Fanning, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    New geologic mapping, petrology, and U-Pb geochronology indicate that Mesoproterozoic crust near Mount Rogers consists of felsic to mafic meta-igneous rocks emplaced over 260 m.y. The oldest rocks are compositionally diverse and migmatitic, whereas younger granitoids are porphyritic to porphyroclastic. Cathodoluminescence imaging indicates that zircon from four representative units preserves textural evidence of multiple episodes of growth, including domains of igneous, metamorphic, and inherited origin. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) trace-element analyses indicate that metamorphic zircon is characterized by lower Th/U, higher Yb/Gd, and lower overall rare earth element (REE) concentrations than igneous zircon. SHRIMP U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon define three episodes of magmatism: 1327 ± 7 Ma, 1180–1155 Ma, and 1061 ± 5 Ma. Crustal recycling is recorded by inherited igneous cores of 1.33–1.29 Ga age in 1161 ± 7 Ma meta-monzogranite. Overlapping ages of igneous and metamorphic crystallization indicate that plutons of ca. 1170 and 1060 Ma age were emplaced during episodes of regional heating. Local development of hornblende + plagioclase + quartz ± clinopyroxene indicates that prograde metamorphism at 1170–1145 Ma and 1060–1020 Ma reached upper-amphibolite-facies conditions, with temperatures estimated using Ti-in-zircon geothermometry at ~740 ± 40 °C during both episodes. The chemical composition of 1327 ± 7 Ma orthogranofels from migmatite preserves the first evidence of arc-generated rocks in the Blue Ridge, indicating a subduction-related environment that may have been comparable to similar-age systems in inliers of the Northern Appalachians and the Composite Arc belt of Canada. Granitic magmatism at 1180–1155 Ma and ca. 1060 Ma near Mount Rogers was contemporaneous with anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite (AMCG) plutonism in the Northern Appalachian inliers and Canadian Grenville Province. Metamorphism at ca. 1160

  14. Decoding magma plumbing and geochemical evolution beneath the Lastarria volcanic complex (Northern Chile)-Evidence for multiple magma storage regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechern, André; Just, Tobias; Holtz, François; Blume-Oeste, Magdalena; Namur, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    The petrology of quaternary andesites and dacites from Lastarria volcano was investigated to reconstruct the magma plumbing and storage conditions beneath the volcano. The mineral phase compositions and whole-rock major and trace element compositions were used to constrain temperature, pressure and possible mechanisms for magma differentiation. The applied thermobarometric models include two-pyroxene thermobarometry, plagioclase-melt thermometry, amphibole composition thermobarometry, and Fe-Ti oxide thermo-oxybarometry. The overall temperature estimation is in the range 840 °C to 1060 °C. Calculated oxygen fugacity ranges between NNO to NNO + 1. Results of the geo-barometric calculations reveal multiple magma storage regions, with a distinct storage level in the uppermost crust ( 6.5-8 km depth), a broad zone at mid-crustal levels ( 10-18 km depth), and a likely deeper zone at intermediate to lower crustal levels (> 20 km depth). The highest temperatures in the range 940-1040 °C are recorded in minerals stored in the mid-crustal levels ( 10-18 km depth). The whole-rock compositions clearly indicate that magma mixing is the main parameter controlling the general differentiation trends. Complex zoning patterns and textures in the plagioclase phenocrysts confirm reheating and remobilization processes due to magma replenishment.

  15. A seafloor microbial biome hosted within incipient ferromanganese crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, A. S.; Knowles, E. J.; Eldridge, D. L.; Arey, B. W.; Dohnalkova, A. C.; Webb, S. M.; Bailey, B. E.; Tebo, B. M.; Staudigel, H.

    2009-12-01

    Exposed rocks at underwater volcanoes and ridges host complex, abundant and diverse microbial communities. The volcanic glasses associated with these features constitute one of the most geochemically reactive components of the Earth's crust. The most commonly held hypothesis is that their oxidation in sea water provides the energy necessary to establish a seafloor biosphere. However, this hypothesis has yet to be directly tested. Here we used synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe mapping, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques to examine the initial chemical changes that occur as the glassy rims of young pillow basalts are colonized by microbial organisms at Loihi seamount, Hawaii. We found little evidence of basalt dissolution. Instead, microbial biofilms were intimately associated with Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides that had precipitated from sea water onto the fresh basalt surfaces. These accumulations of secondary minerals probably represent the earliest stages of ferromanganese crust formation. We suggest that fluid-derived energy sources, such as dissolved and particulate Fe(II), Mn(II) and organic matter, may support the microbial communities colonizing seafloor rocks to a greater degree than local rock dissolution.

  16. Growth of early continental crust by partial melting of eclogite.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Robert P; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Norman, Marc D

    2003-10-09

    The tectonic setting in which the first continental crust formed, and the extent to which modern processes of arc magmatism at convergent plate margins were operative on the early Earth, are matters of debate. Geochemical studies have shown that felsic rocks in both Archaean high-grade metamorphic ('grey gneiss') and low-grade granite-greenstone terranes are comprised dominantly of sodium-rich granitoids of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite of rocks. Here we present direct experimental evidence showing that partial melting of hydrous basalt in the eclogite facies produces granitoid liquids with major- and trace-element compositions equivalent to Archaean TTG, including the low Nb/Ta and high Zr/Sm ratios of 'average' Archaean TTG, but from a source with initially subchondritic Nb/Ta. In modern environments, basalts with low Nb/Ta form by partial melting of subduction-modified depleted mantle, notably in intraoceanic arc settings in the forearc and back-arc regimes. These observations suggest that TTG magmatism may have taken place beneath granite-greenstone complexes developing along Archaean intraoceanic island arcs by imbricate thrust-stacking and tectonic accretion of a diversity of subduction-related terranes. Partial melting accompanying dehydration of these generally basaltic source materials at the base of thickened, 'arc-like' crust would produce compositionally appropriate TTG granitoids in equilibrium with eclogite residues.

  17. Geochemical and microstructural evidence for interseismic changes in fault zone permeability and strength, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, Carolyn; Menzies, Catriona D.; Toy, Virginia G.; Townend, John; Sutherland, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    Oblique dextral motion on the central Alpine Fault in the last circa 5 Ma has exhumed garnet-oligoclase facies mylonitic fault rocks from ˜35 km depth. During exhumation, deformation, accompanied by fluid infiltration, has generated complex lithological variations in fault-related rocks retrieved during Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) drilling at Gaunt Creek, South Island, New Zealand. Lithological, geochemical, and mineralogical results reveal that the fault comprises a core of highly comminuted cataclasites and fault gouges bounded by a damage zone containing cataclasites, protocataclasites, and fractured mylonites. The fault core-alteration zone extends ˜20-30 m from the principal slip zone (PSZ) and is characterized by alteration of primary phases to phyllosilicate minerals. Alteration associated with distinct mineral phases occurred proximal the brittle-to-plastic transition (T ≤ 300-400°C, 6-10 km depth) and at shallow depths (T = 20-150°C, 0-3 km depth). Within the fault core-alteration zone, fractures have been sealed by precipitation of calcite and phyllosilicates. This sealing has decreased fault normal permeability and increased rock mass competency, potentially promoting interseismic strain buildup.

  18. Geochemical and detrital mode evidence for two sources of Early Proterozoic sedimentary rocks from the Tonto Basin Supergroup, central Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, Kent C.; Noll, Phillip D.; Conway, Clay M.

    1992-04-01

    The Tonto Basin Supergroup includes up to 6.5 km of Early Proterozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks that were deposited in a relatively short period of time at about 1.7 Ga in central Arizona. Moderate correlations of rare earth elements (REE) and Ti with Al 2O 3 and REE distributions in detrital sediments of this supergroup suggest that these elements are contained chiefly in clay-mica and/or zircon fractions. REE distributions, including negative Eu anomalies in most Tonto Basin sediments, are similar to those in Phanerozoic shales. Weak to moderate correlations of Fe, Sc, Ni, and Co to Al 2O 3 also suggest a clay-mica control of these elements. Detrital modes and geochemical characteristics of sediments indicate two dominant sources for sedimentary rocks of the Tonto Basin Supergroup: a granitoid source and a volcanic source. The granitoid source was important during deposition of the upper part of the succession (the Mazatzal Group) as shown by increases in K 2O, Al 2O 3, and Th in pelites with stratigraphic height, and increases in Zr and Hf and decreases in Eu/Eu ∗, Cr, and Ni in in pelites of the Maverick Shale. Sediment provenance characteristics and paleocurrent indicators are consistent with deposition of the supergroup in a continental-margin back-arc basin. The granitoid sediment source appears to have been the North American craton on the north, and the volcanic source a more local source from an arc on the south.

  19. Geochemical and detrital mode evidence for two sources of Early Proterozoic sedimentary rocks from the Tonto Basin Supergroup, central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condie, K.C.; Noll, P.D.; Conway, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Tonto Basin Supergroup includes up to 6.5 km of Early Proterozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks that were deposited in a relatively short period of time at about 1.7 Ga in central Arizona. Moderate correlations of rare earth elements (REE) and Ti with Al2O3 and REE distributions in detrital sediments of this supergroup suggest that these elements are contained chiefly in clay-mica and/or zircon fractions. REE distributions, including negative Eu anomalies in most Tonto Basin sediments, are similar to those in Phanerozoic shales. Weak to moderate correlations of Fe, Sc, Ni, and Co to Al2O3 also suggest a clay-mica control of these elements. Detrital modes and geochemical characteristics of sediments indicate two dominant sources for sedimentary rocks of the Tonto Basin Supergroup: a granitoid source and a volcanic source. The granitoid source was important during deposition of the upper part of the succession (the Mazatzal Group) as shown by increases in K2O, Al2O3, and Th in pelites with stratigraphic height, and increases in Zr and Hf and decreases in Eu/Eu*, Cr, and Ni in in pelites of the Maverick Shale. Sediment provenance characteristics and paleocurrent indicators are consistent with deposition of the supergroup in a continental-margin back-arc basin. The granitoid sediment source appears to have been the North American craton on the north, and the volcanic source a more local source from an arc on the south. ?? 1992.

  20. Evidence for Milankovitch periodicities in Cenomanian-Turonian lithologic and geochemical cycles, western interior U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sageman, B.B.; Rich, J.; Arthur, M.A.; Birchfield, G.E.; Dean, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    The limestone/marlstone bedding couplets of the Bridge Creek Limestone Member, Cenomanian-Turonian Greenhorn Formation, were analyzed by applying spectral techniques to high-resolution lithologic and geochemical data from a core. The results suggest that the Bridge Creek contains a complex record of orbital cyclicity. The dominant signal appears to be obliquity, but signals corresponding to precession and eccentricity were also observed. The development of the bedding couplets is interpreted to have resulted from a combination of factors, including insolation-controlled changes in higher-latitude precipitation leading to dilution/redox cycles, and in lower-latitude evaporation, leading to changes in surface water conditions and productivity cycles in the calcareous plankton. The data interpreted to reflect redox cycles appear to be more strongly influenced by obliquity, and show a weak precessional signal. In contrast, trends in the carbonate record show the opposite response. The complex bedding pattern observed in the Bridge Creek Limestone is interpreted to result from the competing influences of different orbital cycles expressed through different pathways of the depositional system, and was also affected by changes in sedimentation rates related to relative sea level fluctuations, aperiodic dilution by volcanic ash, and changes in organic-matter production and redox conditions related to a global "oceanic anoxic event". These factors complicate cycle analysis in the lower part of the member but leave a relatively undisturbed record in the upper Bridge Creek Limestone. Copyright ?? 1997, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  1. Late Quaternary Provenance and Flow Regime Reconstruction through Sedimentologic and Geochemical Evidence from the Bering/Chukchi Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelto, B. M.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Kocis, J. J.; Petsch, S.

    2013-12-01

    The last 20 kyr have been marked by great changes in the Arctic, as the Laurentide Ice Sheet melted and led to the submergence of the Bering Land Bridge and the re-opening of the Bering Strait (BS). The BS is a narrow connection (about 85 km wide) between the Arctic and Pacific Oceans averaging less than 50 m in depth, with present-day flow of seawater northward through the BS, from the Pacific to the Arctic. This flow is of vital importance to global ocean circulation through its role in formation and stability of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). An open BS is believed to speed dispersal of North Atlantic freshwater anomalies, both by keeping thermohaline circulation strong, and through reversals of flow through the BS when the North Atlantic is hosed with freshwater. When the BS is closed, these anomalies cannot efficiently dissipate and thermohaline circulation is weakened, which is considered a factor in climate perturbations outside of orbital forcing. Given the period of flux and transition in the Arctic following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the paleoceanographic history of the Bering and Chukchi Seas post-LGM, is important to an understanding of Arctic Ocean circulation, and consequent climate impacts. Today the Arctic is in a period of rapid change, multi-year sea ice is disappearing, and the continuation of climatic stability of the Holocene appears to be at an end. Comprehension of the functioning of the Arctic as a dynamic system is essential to predict future response of the system to change, such as seawater salinity-density changes, lowered sea and land albedo, and rising temperatures. Changes in BS throughflow intensity and direction during deglaciation and submergence of the Bering Land Bridge are proposed and supported in modeling simulations, and are thought to occur during millennial-scale climate changes. We have conducted a coupled sedimentological and geochemical investigation of a suite of marine sediment cores from the Bering and

  2. Geochemical Evidence for Periods of Increased Mineral Dust Deposition in Patagonian Peat Bogs Since the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, H.; De Vleeschouwer, F.; Mattielli, N. D.; Vanderstraeten, A.; von Scheffer, C.; Piotrowska, N.; Coronato, A.; Le Roux, G.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust plays an important role in the earth's climate system, influencing atmospheric parameters such as cloud condensation as well as biogeochemical cycles, affecting atmospheric CO2 levels. Antarctic ice core records show that mineral dust deposition has varied in the Southern Hemisphere over glacial-interglacial stages, suggesting major changes in atmospheric circulation. Nevertheless, to make predictions for the near future possible, a better understanding of atmospheric dust load and transport variability in the recent past, is essential. Ombrotrophic peat bogs have proven to provide excellent records of atmospheric dust deposition for the Holocene as their accumulation rates are higher than any other archive. Hence two ombrotrophic peat bogs, located southwest (Karukinka) and southeast (Harberton) on Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, were sampled to investigate dust-palaeoclimatic interactions in southern South America since the last deglaciation. Here we present a detailed geochemical (major, trace elements and Nd isotopes) record for both sites. The base of the peat sequences in Karukinka and Harberton were dated by 14C at ca. 8,000 cal yr BP and ca. 16,500 cal yr BP, respectively. The distribution of trace elemental (Sc, REE) concentrations within the cores indicates, besides tephra layers, episodes of increased mineral dust deposition at Harberton and Karukinka. The glacial-interglacial transition can be observed in the Harberton record (at ca. 11,500 cal yr BP), marked by a drop in the dust flux from 102 g/m2/yr to 10 g/m2/yr. The most significant episode of mineral dust deposition at Karukinka is concentrated around 1,600 cal yr BP with a maximum dust flux of 108 g/m2/yr. Its neodymium isotopic signature of -1 suggests crustal admixing, compared to the ɛNd values of ˜2, for both tephra layers.

  3. Early Variscan magmatism along the southern margin of Laurasia: geochemical and geochronological evidence from the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengün, Fırat; Koralay, O. Ersin

    2017-04-01

    Massive, fine-grained metavolcanic rocks of the Çamlıca metamorphic unit exposed in the Biga Peninsula, northwestern Anatolia, have provided new Carboniferous ages and arc-related calc-alkaline petrogenesis constraints, suggesting that the Biga Peninsula was possibly involved in the Variscan orogeny. The metavolcanic rocks are mainly composed of metalava and metatuff and have the composition of andesite. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns from these rocks are fractionated (LaN/YbN 2.2 to 8.9). Europium anomalies are slightly variable (Eu/Eu* = 0.6 to 0.7) and generally negative (average Eu/Eu* = 0.68). The metavolcanic rocks have a distinct negative Nb anomaly and negative Sr, Hf, Ba, and Zr anomalies. These large negative anomalies indicate crustal involvement in their derivation. Tectonic discrimination diagrams show that all metavolcanic rocks formed within a volcanic arc setting. Zircon ages (LA-ICP-MS) of two samples yield 333.5 ± 2.7 and 334.0 ± 4.8 Ma. These ages are interpreted to be the time of protolith crystallization. This volcanic episode in the Biga Peninsula correlates with other Variscan age and style of magmatism and, by association with a collisional event leading to the amalgamation of tectonic units during the Variscan contractional orogenic event. Carboniferous calc-alkaline magmatism in the Sakarya Zone is ascribed to arc-magmatism as a result of northward subduction of Paleo-Tethys under the Laurasian margin. Geochemical and U-Pb zircon data indicate that the Sakarya Zone is strikingly similar to that of the Armorican terranes in central Europe. The Biga Peninsula shows a connection between the Sakarya Zone and the Armorican terranes.

  4. Early Variscan magmatism along the southern margin of Laurasia: geochemical and geochronological evidence from the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengün, Fırat; Koralay, O. Ersin

    2016-05-01

    Massive, fine-grained metavolcanic rocks of the Çamlıca metamorphic unit exposed in the Biga Peninsula, northwestern Anatolia, have provided new Carboniferous ages and arc-related calc-alkaline petrogenesis constraints, suggesting that the Biga Peninsula was possibly involved in the Variscan orogeny. The metavolcanic rocks are mainly composed of metalava and metatuff and have the composition of andesite. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns from these rocks are fractionated (LaN/YbN ~ 2.2 to 8.9). Europium anomalies are slightly variable (Eu/Eu* = 0.6 to 0.7) and generally negative (average Eu/Eu* = 0.68). The metavolcanic rocks have a distinct negative Nb anomaly and negative Sr, Hf, Ba, and Zr anomalies. These large negative anomalies indicate crustal involvement in their derivation. Tectonic discrimination diagrams show that all metavolcanic rocks formed within a volcanic arc setting. Zircon ages (LA-ICP-MS) of two samples yield 333.5 ± 2.7 and 334.0 ± 4.8 Ma. These ages are interpreted to be the time of protolith crystallization. This volcanic episode in the Biga Peninsula correlates with other Variscan age and style of magmatism and, by association with a collisional event leading to the amalgamation of tectonic units during the Variscan contractional orogenic event. Carboniferous calc-alkaline magmatism in the Sakarya Zone is ascribed to arc-magmatism as a result of northward subduction of Paleo-Tethys under the Laurasian margin. Geochemical and U-Pb zircon data indicate that the Sakarya Zone is strikingly similar to that of the Armorican terranes in central Europe. The Biga Peninsula shows a connection between the Sakarya Zone and the Armorican terranes.

  5. Post-Eocene volcanics of the Abazar district, Qazvin, Iran: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence for a complex magmatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiabanha, A.; Bardintzeff, J. M.; Kananian, A.; Rahimi, G.

    2012-02-01

    The style of volcanism of post-Eocene volcanism in the Alborz zone of northern Iran is different to that of Eocene volcanism (Karaj Formation). Indeed, the volcanic succession of the Abazar district, located in a narrow volcanic strip within the Alborz magmatic assemblage, is characterized by distinct mineralogical and chemical compositions linked to a complex magmatic evolution. The succession was produced by explosive eruptions followed by effusive eruptions. Two main volcanic events are recognized: (1) a thin rhyolitic ignimbritic sheet underlain by a thicker lithic breccia, and (2) lava flows including shoshonite, latite, and andesite that overlie the first event across a reddish soil horizon. Plagioclase in shoshonite (An 48-92) shows normal zoning, whereas plagioclase in latite and andesite (An 48-75) has a similar composition but shows reverse and oscillatory zoning. QUILF temperature calculations for shoshonites and andesites yield temperatures of 1035 °C and 1029 °C, respectively. The geothermometers proposed by Ridolfi et al. (2010) and Holland and Blundy (1994) yield temperatures of 960 °C and 944 °C for latitic lava, respectively. The samples of volcanic rock show a typical geochemical signature of the continental arc regime, but the andesites clearly differ from the shoshonites, the latites and the rhyolites. The mineralogical and chemical characteristics of these rocks are explained by the following petrogenesis: (1) intrusion of a hot, mantle-depth mafic (shoshonitic) magma, which differentiated in the magma chamber to produce a latitic and then a rhyolitic liquid; (2) rhyolitic ignimbritic eruptions from the top of the magma chamber, following by shoshonitic and then latitic extrusions; (3) magma mingling between the latitic and andesitic magmas, as indicated by the occurrence of andesite clasts within the latite; and (4) andesitic effusions. The youngest volcanic events in the Alborz zone show a close chemical relationship with continental arc

  6. Geochemical gradients in the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: Evidence for eruption across a magmatic interface

    SciTech Connect

    Schuraytz, B.C.; Vogel, T.A.; Younker, L.W.

    1986-06-01

    The Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff in southern Nevada is a classic example of a compositionally zoned ash-flow sheet that is inferred to have resulted from eruption of a compositionally zoned magma body. Geochemical and petrographic analyses of whole-rock tuff samples indicate that the base of the ash-flow sheet and the dominant volume of erupted material are composed of crystal-poor high-silica rhyolite, with a gradational transition into overlying crystal-rich quartz latite at the top of the sequence. These compositional variations are consistent with a model of progressive eruption of a stratified magma body in which relatively cooler, crystal-poor high-silica rhyolitic magma overlay hotter, crystal-rich quartz latitic magma. Major and trace element chemical analyses of whole glassy pumices and analyses of coexisting ilmenite and magnetite phenocrysts from within the pumices provide closer approximations to the chemical and thermal gradients within the inferred magma body. The magmatic gradients inferred from these data indicate that the transition from high-silica rhyolitic to quartz latitic magma within the chamber was abrupt rather than gradational, with a distinct liquid-liquid interface separating the two contrasting magmas. Throughout the ash-flow sheet, individual pumice lumps with distinct and variable textural characteristics are present within outcrop, hand-sample, and thin-section scale. Within the lower portion of the ash-flow sheet, the individual pumices are all high-silica rhyolites with relatively small variations in trace-element composition and estimated quench temperatures, and thus are chemically similar to their associated whole-rock tuff composites. In contrast, the chemical variability among pumices within the uppermost quartz latite is as great as that of the entire ash-flow sheet.

  7. The hydrothermal system of the Domuyo volcanic complex (Argentina): A conceptual model based on new geochemical and isotopic evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, F.; Liccioli, C.; Agusto, M.; Chiodini, G.; Vaselli, O.; Calabrese, S.; Pecoraino, G.; Tempesti, L.; Caponi, C.; Fiebig, J.; Caliro, S.; Caselli, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Domuyo volcanic complex (Neuquén Province, Argentina) hosts one of the most promising geothermal systems of Patagonia, giving rise to thermal manifestations discharging hot and Cl--rich fluids. This study reports a complete geochemical dataset of gas and water samples collected in three years (2013, 2014 and 2015) from the main fluid discharges of this area. The chemical and isotopic composition (δD-H2O and δ18O-H2O) of waters indicates that rainwater and snow melting are the primary recharge of a hydrothermal reservoir located at relative shallow depth (400-600 m) possibly connected to a second deeper (2-3 km) reservoir. Reactive magmatic gases are completely scrubbed by the hydrothermal aquifer(s), whereas interaction of meteoric waters at the surface causes a significant air contamination and dilution of the fluid discharges located along the creeks at the foothill of the Cerro Domuyo edifice. Thermal discharges located at relatively high altitude ( 3150 m a.s.l.), namely Bramadora, are less affected by this process, as also shown by their relatively high R/Ra values (up to 6.91) pointing to the occurrence of an actively degassing magma batch located at an unknown depth. Gas and solute geothermometry suggests equilibrium temperatures up to 220-240 °C likely referred to the shallower hydrothermal reservoir. These results, confirming the promising indications of the preliminary surveys carried out in the 1980‧s, provide useful information for a reliable estimation of the geothermal potential of this extinct volcanic system, although a detailed geophysical measurements is required for the correct estimation of depth and dimensions of the fluid reservoir(s).

  8. Ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism: tracing continental crust into the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopin, Christian

    2003-07-01

    velocities (1-2 cm/yr), especially during early stages of exhumation, and bear no relation to normal erosion rates. Important observations are that: (i) as a result of strain partitioning and fluid channelling, significant volumes of subducted crust may remain unreacted (i.e. metastable) even at conditions as high as 700°C and 3 GPa - with implications as to geophysical modeling; (ii) subducted continental crust shows no isotopic or geochemical evidence of interaction with mantle material. An unknown proportion of subducted continental crust must have escaped exhumation and effectively recycled into the mantle, with geochemical implications still to be explored, bearing in mind the above inefficiency of mixing. The repeated occurrence of UHP metamorphism, hence of continental subduction, through time and space since at least the late Proterozoic shows that it must be considered a common process, inherent to continental collision. Evidence of older, Precambrian UHP metamorphism is to be sought in high-pressure granulite-facies terranes.

  9. Geochemical and isotopic evidence for Carboniferous rifting: mafic dykes in the central Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (Dorud-Azna, West Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerardakani, Farzaneh; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Peytcheva, Irena; Liu, Xiaoming; Genser, Johann; Monfaredi, Behzad; Masoudi, Fariborz

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we present detailed field observations, chronological, geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data and discuss the petrogenetic aspects of two types of mafic dykes, of alkaline to subalkaline nature. The alkaline mafic dykes exhibit a cumulate to foliated texture and strike NW-SE, parallel to the main trend of the region. The 40Ar/39Ar amphibole age of 321.32 ± 0.55 Ma from an alkaline mafic dyke is interpreted as an indication of Carboniferous cooling through ca. 550 °C after intrusion of the dyke into the granitic Galeh-Doz orthogneiss and Amphibolite-Metagabbro units, the latter with Early Carboniferous amphibolite facies grade metamorphism and containing the Dare-Hedavand metagabbro with a similar Carboniferous age. The alkaline and subalkaline mafic dykes can be geochemically categorized into those with light REE-enriched patterns [(La/Yb)N = 8.32-9.28] and others with a rather flat REE pattern [(La/Yb)N = 1.16] and with a negative Nb anomaly. Together, the mafic dykes show oceanic island basalt to MORB geochemical signature, respectively. This is consistent, as well, with the (Tb/Yb)PM ratios. The alkaline mafic dykes were formed within an enriched mantle source at depths of > 90 km, generating a suite of alkaline basalts. In comparison, the subalkaline mafic dykes were formed within more depleted mantle source at depths of < 90 km. The subalkaline mafic dyke is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.706 and positive ɛNd(t) value of + 0.77, whereas 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.708 and ɛNd(t) value of + 1.65 of the alkaline mafic dyke, consistent with the derivation from an enriched mantle source. There is no evidence that the mafic dykes were affected by significant crustal contamination during emplacement. Because of the similar age, the generation of magmas of alkaline mafic dykes and of the Dare-Hedavand metagabbro are assumed to reflect the same process of lithospheric or asthenospheric melting. Carboniferous back-arc rifting is the likely geodynamic

  10. Geochemical evidence of groundwater flow paths and the fate and transport of constituents of concern in the alluvial aquifer at Fort Wingate Depot Activity, New Mexico, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Andrew J.; Henry, David W.; Langman, Jeffery B.

    2013-01-01

    As part of an environmental investigation at Fort Wingate Depot Activity, New Mexico, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, interpreted aqueous geochemical concentrations to better understand the groundwater flow paths and the fate and transport of constituents of concern in the alluvial aquifer underlying the study area. The fine-grained nature of the alluvial matrix creates a highly heterogeneous environment, which adds to the difficulty of characterizing the flow of groundwater and the fate of aqueous constituents of concern. The analysis of the groundwater geochemical data collected in October 2009 provides evidence that is used to identify four groundwater flow paths and their extent in the aquifer and indicates the dominant attenuation processes for the constituents of concern. The extent and interaction of groundwater flow paths were delineated by the major ion concentrations and their relations to each other. Four areas of groundwater recharge to the study area were identified based on groundwater elevations, hydrogeologic characteristics, and geochemical and isotopic evidence. One source of recharge enters the study area from the saturated alluvial deposits underlying the South Fork of the Puerco River to the north of the study area. A second source of recharge is shown to originate from a leaky cistern containing production water from the San Andres-Glorieta aquifer. The other two sources of recharge are shown to enter the study area from the south: one from an arroyo valley draining an area to the south and one from hill-front recharge that passes under the reported release of perchlorate and explosive constituents. The spatial extent and interaction of groundwater originating from these various sources along identified flow paths affect the persistence and attenuation of constituents of concern. It was determined that groundwater originating in the area of a former explosives’ wash-out operation and an

  11. Anorogenic nature of magmatism in the Northern Baikal volcanic belt: Evidence from geochemical, geochronological (U-Pb), and isotopic (Pb, Nd) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neymark, L.A.; Larin, A.M.; Nemchin, A.A.; Ovchinnikova, G.V.; Rytsk, E. Yu

    1998-01-01

    The Northern Baikal volcanic belt has an age of 1.82-1.87 Ga and extends along the boundary between the Siberian Platform and the Baikal foldbelt. The volcanic belt is composed of volcanics of the Akitkan Group and granitic rocks of the Irel and Primorsk complexes. The geochemistry of the rocks points to the intraplate anorogenic nature of the belt. U-Pb zircon dating of the Chuya granitoids revealed that they are older (2020-2060 Ma) than the Northern Baikal volcanic belt and, thus, cannot be regarded as its component. Data on the Pb isotopic system of feldspars from the granitoids confirm the contemporaneity of all volcanic rocks of the belt except the volcanics of the upper portion of the Akitkan Group (Chaya Formation). Our data suggest its possibly younger (???1.3 Ga) age. The isotopic Nd and Pb compositions of the acid volcanic rocks provide evidence of the heterogeneity of their crustal protoliths. The volcanics of the Malaya Kosa Formation have ??Nd(T) = -6.1, ??2 = 9.36, and were most probably produced with the participation of the U-depleted lower continental crust of Archean age. Other rocks of the complex show ??Nd(T) from -0.1 to -2.4, ??2 = 9.78, and could have been formed by the recycling of the juvenile crust. The depletion of the Malaya Kosa volcanics in most LILEs and HFSEs compared with other acid igneous rocks of the belt possibly reflects compositional differences between the Late Archean and Early Proterozoic crustal sources. The basaltic rocks of the Malaya Kosa Formation (??Nd varies from -4.6 to -5.4) were produced by either the melting of the enriched lithospheric mantle or the contamination of derivatives of the depleted mantle by Early Archean lower crustal rocks, which are not exposed within the area. Copyright ?? 1998 by MAEe Cyrillic signK Hay??a/Interperiodica Publishing.

  12. Lead isotopic evidence for interaction between plume and lower crust during emplacement of peralkaline Lovozero rocks and related rare-metal deposits, East Fennoscandia, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zartman, R. E.; Kogarko, L. N.

    2017-05-01

    country rock provides strong evidence that this old lower crust was the contaminant responsible for the deviation of the Lovozero rocks from a presumed original FOZO lead isotopic composition. Evaluating the presence of such a lower crustal component in the Lovozero rock samples suggests a 5-10% contamination by such rocks. Contamination by upper crustal rock is limited to only a negligible amount.

  13. Crustal underplating in the North American Craton: Evidence from the Petrogenesis of anorthositic rocks in the Middle Proterozoic Midcontinent Rift System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiblen, P. W.; Miller, J. D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence for underplating as a significant mechanism for the growth of continental crust continues to accumulate, particularly from considerations of thermal, seismic, and density contraints on the lower crust and upper mantle. Compelling geochemical and petrological arguments were made that in continental flood basalt provinces, the volume of underplated cumulates may be at least as large as the expression of surface lavas. Geological, petrological, and geochemical data are presented on anorthositic rocks in the Duluth Complex, which indicates that underplating processes similar to those postulated by Cox played a significant role in their origin. The interpretations may be applicable to the origin of anorthositic rocks in general.

  14. Crustal underplating in the North American Craton: Evidence from the Petrogenesis of anorthositic rocks in the Middle Proterozoic Midcontinent Rift System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiblen, P. W.; Miller, J. D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence for underplating as a significant mechanism for the growth of continental crust continues to accumulate, particularly from considerations of thermal, seismic, and density contraints on the lower crust and upper mantle. Compelling geochemical and petrological arguments were made that in continental flood basalt provinces, the volume of underplated cumulates may be at least as large as the expression of surface lavas. Geological, petrological, and geochemical data are presented on anorthositic rocks in the Duluth Complex, which indicates that underplating processes similar to those postulated by Cox played a significant role in their origin. The interpretations may be applicable to the origin of anorthositic rocks in general.

  15. Sediment melting during subduction initiation: Geochronological and geochemical evidence from the Darutso high-Mg andesites within ophiolite melange, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yun-Chuan; Chen, Jian-Lin; Xu, Ji-Feng; Wang, Bao-Di; Huang, Feng

    2016-12-01

    In addition to fluids, the concept of sediment-derived melts infiltrating the fore-arc mantle during subduction initiation has been proposed based on studies of modern subduction zones and ophiolite mélange. However, outcrops that contain the products of such melts are rare, especially in conjunction with boninite. New U-Pb zircon dating reveals that the Darutso volcanic rocks (DVRs) within ophiolitic mélange in the Beila area, central Tibet, crystallized at ˜164-162 Ma. This is the first recognition of Jurassic volcanic rocks in the middle section of the Bangong-Nujiang Suture Zone. Geochemically, the DVRs are high-Mg andesites with moderate SiO2 (59.03-63.62 wt %) and high MgO (3.74-6.53 wt %), Cr (up to 395 ppm), and Mg# (50.3-67.9). They also have high Th contents, (La/Sm)N ratios, and (87Sr/86Sr)i values (0.7085-0.7147); low Ba/Th, U/Th, and Sr/Y ratios; and negative values of ɛNd(t) (-8.7 to -9.8) and zircon ɛHf(t) (-7.4 to -9.9). The ɛNd(t) values of the DVRs overlap those of regional sediments. Detailed analyses of these geochemical characteristics indicate that the DVRs were derived from partial melting of subducted sediments and subsequent interaction with overlying mantle peridotite in a shallow and hot setting. In combination with the regional geology, in particular adjacent ophiolites that contain MORB-like and boninite mafic lavas, these rocks collectively recorded the evolution of a fore-arc setting during the initiation of the northward subduction of the south branch of the Bangong-Nujiang Ocean. Therefore, the results provide direct evidence for sediment melting during subduction initiation and constrain the Jurassic tectonic evolution of the Lhasa terrane.

  16. Petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence from the Saima alkaline complex, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Jin-Hui; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Heng; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb ages, mineral chemistry, whole-rock elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes was carried out for the Saima alkaline complex in the northeastern China, in order to investigate the source and petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks. The Saima alkaline complex consists of nepheline syenites, quartz-bearing syenites and alkaline volcanic rocks (i.e., phonolite and trachyte), with minor mafic dikes and carbonatitic veins. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) zircon U-Pb dating gives consistent ages of 230-224 Ma for these rocks, suggesting that they are coeval. All alkaline rocks in the Saima complex are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) with significant negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies. Geochemical data and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the various alkaline rocks were all derived from partial melting of an ancient, re-enriched lithospheric mantle in the garnet stability field, but experienced variable siliceous- or carbonate-rich crustal contamination. Based on petrographic evidence, mineral compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data, two distinct magmatic evolutionary trends are proposed to explain the coeval emplacement of the various rock types within the Saima alkaline complex. The silica-undersaturated rocks (nepheline syenites and phonolites) result from alkali feldspar + apatite + titanite crystal fractionation of an alkaline mafic parental melt combined with assimilation of marine carbonate host rocks. In contrast, the generation of silica-saturated rocks (quartz-bearing syenites and trachytes) may be attributed to subsequent and continued clinopyroxene + apatite + biotite crystal fractionation coupled with assimilation of siliceous sediments.

  17. Geochronological and Geochemical evidence of amphibolite from the Hualong Group, northwest China: Implication for the early Paleozoic accretionary tectonics of the Central Qilian belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Zongqi; Yan, Zhen; Ma, Zhenhui; He, Shengfei; Fu, Changlei; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The Hualong Group, located in the Central Qilian belt, northwest China, consists mainly of schist, amphibolite, quartzite, and marble, ranging from greenschist to amphibolite facies metamorphism. On the basis of the medium-grade metamorphism, the group has been considered to comprise Proterozoic basement rocks. In this study, geochemical, Sr-Nd isotopic, and zircon U-Pb geochronological analyses were performed on lentoid amphibolites from the Hualong Group, to characterize their age, petrogensis, and tectonic setting. Uranium-lead zircon dating of amphibolite revealed a formation age of 456 ± 2 Ma and a metamorphic age of 440 ± 1 Ma. Major, trace, and rare earth element data indicate that the amphibolites are predominantly basaltic-andesitic to andesitic rocks, with island arc affinities. The trace element patterns show enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements and depletion in high field strength elements relative to the N-MORB which confirm their island arc signatures. Obviously enriched light REEs ((La/Yb)N = 2.5-16.9) to chondrite normalized REE patterns further support this interpretation. The εNd(t) values for the amphibolites range from 4.6 to + 2.1, indicating subducted sediments as a larger endmember in the source. Geochemical data for these rocks suggest an island arc setting, and the rocks were derived from the depleted mantle that was enriched by melts of subducted sediments in an active continental margin setting at ca. 456 Ma. Together with regional evidence it suggests that the Hualong Group is an accretionary complex that was incorporated into the Central Qilian belt during the 440-400 Ma orogenic event.

  18. Continued Evidence for Input of Chlorine into the Martian Crust from Degassing of Chlorine-Rich Martian Magmas with Implications for Potential Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, J.; Gross, J.

    2014-12-01

    The chlorine-concentration (or salinity) of a fluid affects the potential for that fluid to be a habitable environment, with most known terrestrial organisms preferring low salinity fluids [1, 2]. The Martian crust (as analyzed by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer) is chlorine-rich with up to 0.8 wt% Cl; while the MER rovers Spirit and Opportunity as well as MSL Curiosity have analyzed rocks with even higher chlorine concentrations [e.g., 3]. This suggests that any potential fluid flowing through the crust would have high chlorine concentrations and therefore high salinity. Here we investigate the bulk and mineral chemistry of the SNC meteorites to constrain the pre-eruptive chlorine concentrations of Martian magmas as the potential source of chlorine in the Martian crust. Bulk SNC meteorites have Cl concentrations similar to terrestrial Mid Ocean Ridge Basalts which would suggest a Cl content of the Martian interior similar to that of the Earth [4]. However, based on Cl/La ratios, the Martian interior actually has 2-3 times more Cl than the Earth [5]. This is also reflected in the composition of Cl-rich minerals within the SNC meteorites [5, 6] and suggests that the pre-eruptive parental magmas to the SNC meteorites were Cl-rich. Eruption and degassing of such Cl-rich magmas would have delivered Cl to the Martian crust, thereby increasing the salinity of any fluids within the crust. [1] Rothschild L.J. and R.L. Mancinelli (2001) Nature. 409: 1092-1101. [2] Sharp Z.D. and D.S. Draper (2013) EPSL. 369-370: 71-77. [3] Taylor G.J. et al. (2010) GRL. 37: L12204. [4]. Burgess R. et al (2013) GCA 77: 793. [5] Filiberto J. and A.H. Treiman (2009) Geology. 37: 1087-1090. [6] McCubbin F.M. et al. (2013) MaPS. 48: 819-853.

  19. Constrained potential field modeling of the crustal architecture of the Musgrave Province in central Australia: Evidence for lithospheric strengthening due to crust-mantle boundary uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan R. A.; Betts, Peter G.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Gray, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    We image the crustal architecture of the Musgrave Province with petrophysically constrained forward models of new potential field data. These models image divergent shallow-dipping crustal scale thrusts that, at depth, link with an axial zone defined by steeper, lithospheric scale transpressional shear zones. They also show that to permit a near-surface density distribution that is consistent with petrophysical and geological observations, approximately 15-20 km of crust-mantle boundary uplift is necessary beneath the axial zone. The long-term preservation of this crust-mantle boundary offset implies a change from relatively weak lithosphere to relatively strong lithosphere during the intraplate Petermann Orogeny. To explain this, we propose a model in which uplift of the axial zone of the orogen leads to local lithospheric strengthening as a result of the uplift of mantle rocks into the lower crust, coupled with long-term lithospheric cooling due to the erosion of a radioactive upper crust. Brace-Goetze lithospheric strength models suggest that these processes may have increased the integrated strength of the lithosphere by a factor of 1.4-2.8. Because of this strengthening, this system is self-limiting, and activity will cease when lithospheric strength is sufficient to resist external forces and support isostatic imbalances. A simple force-balance model demonstrates that the force required to uplift the axial zone is tectonically reasonable and that the system can subsequently withstand significant tensional forces. This example shows that crust-mantle boundary uplift coupled with reduced crustal heat production can profoundly affect the long-term strength of the continental lithosphere and may be a critical process in the tectonic stabilization of intraplate regions.

  20. Age and evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Khanka Massif: Geochemical and Re-Os isotopic evidence from Sviyagino mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Chun-Guang; Wang, Feng; Ge, Wen-Chun; Sorokin, A. A.; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2017-06-01

    New geochemical and Re-Os isotopic data of mantle xenoliths entrained in Cenozoic Sviyagino alkali basalts from the Russian Far East provide insights into the age and evolution of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the Khanka Massif, within the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). These mantle xenoliths are predominantly spinel lherzolites with minor spinel harzburgite. The lherzolites contain high whole-rock concentrations of Al2O3 and CaO, with low forsterite content in olivine (Fo = 89.5-90.3%) and low Cr# in spinel (0.09-0.11). By contrast, the harzburgite is more refractory, containing lower whole rock Al2O3 and CaO contents, with higher Fo (91.3%) and spinel Cr# (0.28). Their whole rock and mineral compositions suggest that the lherzolites experienced low-degree (1-4%) batch melting and negligible metasomatism, whereas the harzburgite underwent a higher degree (10%) of fractional melting, and experienced minor post-melting silicate metasomatism. Two-pyroxene rare earth element (REE)-based thermometry (TREE) yields predominant equilibrium temperatures of 884-1043 °C, similar to values obtained from two-pyroxene major element-based thermometry (TBKN = 942-1054 °C). Two lherzolite samples yield high TREE relative to TBKN (TREE - TBKN ≥ 71 °C), suggesting that they cooled rapidly as a result of the upwelling of hot asthenospheric mantle material that underplated a cold ancient lithosphere. The harzburgite with a low Re/Os value has an 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.11458, yielding an Os model age (TMA) relative to the primitive upper mantle (PUM) of 2.09 Ga, and a Re depletion ages (TRD) of 1.91 Ga; both of which record ancient melt depletion during the Paleoproterozoic ( 2.0 Ga). The 187Os/188Os values of lherzolites (0.12411-0.12924) correlate well with bulk Al2O3 concentrations and record the physical mixing of ancient mantle domains and PUM-like ambient mantle material within the asthenosphere. This indicates that the SCLM beneath the Khanka

  1. Mesoproterozoic continental arc magmatism and crustal growth in the eastern Central Tianshan Arc Terrane of the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Geochronological and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhen-Yu; Klemd, Reiner; Zhang, Ze-Ming; Zong, Ke-Qing; Sun, Li-Xin; Tian, Zuo-Lin; Huang, Bo-Tao

    2015-11-01

    Numerous microcontinents are known to occur in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), one of the largest accretionary orogens and the most significant area of Paleozoic crustal growth in the world. The evolution of the Precambrian crust in these microcontinents is central to understanding the accretionary and collisional tectonics of the CAOB. Here, we present systematic zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotope studies of Mesoproterozoic gneissic granitoids from the eastern Central Tianshan Arc Terrane (CTA) of the southern CAOB. The investigated intermediate to felsic (SiO2 = 60.48-78.92 wt.%) granitoids belong to the calcic- to calc-alkaline series and usually have pronounced negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies, relative enrichments of light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) while heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and high field strength elements (HFSEs) are depleted, revealing typical active continental margin magmatic arc geochemical characteristics. These spatially-distant rocks show consistent zircon U-Pb crystallization ages from ca. 1.45 to 1.40 Ga and thus constitute a previously unknown Mesoproterozoic continental magmatic arc covering hundreds of kilometers in the eastern segment of the CTA. Furthermore the high and mainly positive zircon εHf(t) values between - 1.0 and + 8.6 and the zircon Hf model ages of 1.95 to 1.55 Ga, which are slightly older than their crystallization ages, suggest that they were mainly derived from rapid reworking of juvenile material with a limited input of an ancient crustal component. Therefore, the formation of these granitoids defines an extensive Mesoproterozoic intermediate to felsic, subduction-related intrusive magmatic arc activity that was active from at least 1.45 to 1.40 Ga, involving significant juvenile continental growth in the eastern segment of the CTA. Furthermore the zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data challenge the common belief that the CTA was part of the Tarim Craton during Paleo

  2. Geochemical and isotope characterization of geothermal spring waters in Sri Lanka: Evidence for steeper than expected geothermal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrajith, Rohana; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Subasinghe, N. D.; Merten, Dirk; Dissanayake, C. B.

    2013-01-01

    SummarySeven geothermal springs from the Precambrian high-grade metamorphic terrain of Sri Lanka were investigated to assess their formation processes and to determine reservoir temperatures based on their chemical compositions. Silica-based geothermometric calculations for the Marangala and Nelumwewa springs showed the highest average reservoir temperatures of 122 °C and 121 °C, respectively. Samples of low temperature (<35 °C) groundwater from nearby springs, piezometers and open wells were also collected for comparison. All samples were analyzed for their major and trace element compositions as well as stable isotope ratios 2H/1H and 18O/16O (expressed as δ2HH2O and δ18OH2O). Discharge temperatures of the thermal waters varied from 39-62 °C. These waters showed low concentrations of selected trace elements (Fe < 0.09; Mn < 0.04; Cu < 0.01; Cr < 0.01; As < 0.025 mg/L)) and were also comparable to that of non-geothermal groundwaters. Stable isotope compositions of geothermal waters ranged from -6.5 to -5.0‰ for δ18OH2O and between -39 ‰ to -28 ‰ for δ2HH2O. In the non-geothermal waters, the isotope values were almost identical within the analytical uncertainties of 0.1‰ and 1‰ for δ2HH2O and δ18OH2O, respectively. In addition, all isotope ratios of geothermal and non-geothermal water samples scattered around the local meteoric water lines for the dry and intermediate climatic regions of Sri Lanka, thus indicating origin from precipitation without further influences of evaporation or water rock interaction. This similarity to the local meteoric water lines also makes influences of seawater an unlikely factor. Close matches of geochemical and isotope data from geothermal and corresponding non-geothermal waters confirm the hypothesis of a common source. The proposed model for Sri Lanka subsurface waters is that rainfall from the dry and/or intermediate climatic zones percolates with little time delay downward through structurally weaker zones in

  3. Badrinath-Gangotri plutons (Garhwal, India): petrological and geochemical evidence for fractionation processes in a high Himalayan leucogranite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, Bruno; France-Lanord, Christian; Le Fort, Patrick

    1990-12-01

    The Gangotri leucogranite is the western end of the Badrinath granite, one of the largest bodies of the High Himalayan Leucogranite belt (HHL). It is a typical fine grained tourmaline + muscovite ± biotite leucogranite. The petrography shows a lack of restitic phases. The inferred crystallization sequence is characterized by the early appearance of plagioclase, quartz and biotite and by the late crystallization of the K-feldspar. This suggests that, in spite of being of near minimum melt composition, the granite probably had long crystallization or melting interval, in agreement with previous experimental studies. Tourmaline and muscovite have a mainly magmatic origin. Even though the major element composition is homogeneous, there are several geochemical trends (when CaO decreases there is an increase in Na 2O, Rb, Sn, U, B, F and a decrease in K 2O, Fe 2O 3, TiO 2, Sr, Ba, Zr, REE, Th) which are best explained by a fractionation process with early crystallizing phases. Experimental solubility models for zircon and monazite in felsic melt support a magmatic origin for these two accessory phases as well. Rb/Sr isotope data show this granite to have, like other HHL, heterogeneous isotopic values for Sr (initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios, calculated at 20 Ma, range between 0.765 and 0.785). Therefore no mixing (i.e. no convection) occurred between the different batches of magma. In contrast 18O data show little variation (13.04% ± 0.25), implying a source with homogeneous 18O values. Differences in timing between fluid infiltration and the onset of melting, related to differences in temperature of the source, could explain why source homogenization occurred for the Gangotri and not for the Manaslu granite. The use of experimental results for solubility and the position of the accessory minerals during melting, predict a low viscosity for the melt during its extraction. This in turn explains the lack of restitic phases (major and accessory) in the granite as well as some

  4. Isotopic and Geochemical Evidence for Differing Magmatic and Tectonic Origins of Mafic Subduction Zone Rocks, Vermont Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsberger, I. W.; Zhang, S.; Coish, R.; Laird, J.

    2016-12-01

    from moderate degrees of partial melting. The geochemical and isotopic variations among different mafic subduction zone rocks in VT may be explained by mixing of a mantle plume with MORB-type mantle melts in an oceanic rift environment that was evolving into an arc rift setting as a result of subduction.

  5. New mineralogical and geochemical evidence for the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) in the Neo-Tethys (Central Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego, E. S.; Jovane, L.; Giorgioni, M.; Hein, J. R.; Sant'Anna, L. G.; Rodelli, D.; Özcan, E.; Frontalini, F.; Coccioni, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is one of several climate warming events that occurred during the Paleogene. It started at 40.5 Ma and produced a global temperature increase over a period of 500 kyr. However, the duration and the d13C signature of this event are not consistent with the models commonly proposed to explain warming events in the Cenozoic, and thus challenge our understanding of carbon cycling and climatic processes. Here we present data of a new section from central Turkey, recording the MECO in the eastern part of the Neo-Tethys. The stratigraphic extent and continuity, as well as the exceptional preservation of various types of microfossils, allow us to obtain a multi-proxy record of unprecedented high resolution for this interval. We integrate data from stable isotopes, X-ray diffraction mineralogy, XRF chemistry, and magnetic properties to obtain a complete paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic reconstruction. Stable isotopes (d13C and d18O) allow us to clearly define the geochemical signature of the MECO. A divergence between the d18O curves of the shallow- and deep-water dwelling planktonic foraminifera after the event suggests a more stratified water column in the Neo-Tethys. Bulk and clay mineralogy reveal changing weathering conditions on land. Higher amounts of chlorite and illite (physical weathering) occur prior and after the event, while the MECO interval displays greater amounts of illite and smectite (chemical weathering). Additionally, the inverse relationship between detrital minerals and calcite suggests that carbonate productivity might have suffered at that time, or an increase in detrital input could have diluted the carbonate fraction. An increase in ARM and magnetic particle grain size also suggests an increase in productivity or preservation of biogenic magnetite. Our results confirm the global nature of the MECO, affecting both oceans and continents. However, different from other events, warming conditions were not

  6. Mafic enclave-bearing tonalites as hybrids generated in the lower crust: Examples from the north Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, R.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Late Cretaceous tonalites, trondhjemites and granodiorites of the North Cascades of Washington State completed igneous crystallization at mid-crustal depths and contain magmatic epidote, garnet, and muscovite-rich white mica. Whole-rock geochemical and isotopic characteristics, combined with field, petrographic, and mineralogic data, disallow a fractional crystallization relationship between synplutonic mafic, intermediate, and felsic rocks, and also argue against an origin of the mafic and intermediate rocks solely by melting of the lower crust. The petrogenetic model that best accounts for the evidence is that the intermediate, enclave-bearing tonalites are hybrids created by mixing of modified, mantle-derived mafic magmas with lower crustal melt.

  7. Three-dimensional conductivity model of crust and uppermost mantle at the northern Trans North China Orogen: Evidence for a mantle source of Datong volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiqian; Huang, Qinghua; Zhao, Guoze; Guo, Zhen; Chen, Y. John

    2016-11-01

    While the Eastern Block of North China Craton (NCC) had experienced significant lithospheric destruction in the Mesozoic, the Western Block of NCC and the Trans North China Orogen (TNCO) have undergone localized lithospheric modification since the Cenozoic. The northern TNCO is highlighted by the Cenozoic magmatic activities including Hannuoba basalts and Datong volcanoes and is a seismically active region. In this study 3-D electrical conductivity model of the crust and uppermost mantle is derived by the 3-D inversion technique using data from 72 broadband magnetotelluric (MT) stations. The final model shows that a 15 km thick resistive layer of about 3000 Ω m dominates the upper crust, which may represent the intact Archean and Paleoproterozoic terrains. Whereas in the mid-crust there are marked high conductivity anomalies of about 10 Ω m beneath Shanxi rifting basin, which may result from the interconnected saline fluid of 0.2% to 6% volume fraction. The most important finding is that one significant conductor extended into the mantle is located between Hannuoba field and Datong volcanoes and it connects with the mid-crust conductor beneath the Datong volcanoes. We suggest that this could be the mantle source (partial melting region) for the Quaternary volcanic activities of Datong volcanoes and the melt fraction is estimated as 6.6%. Its location inside the Western Block suggests that the volcanic activities at Datong volcanoes are irrelevant to the tectonic process to the east of TNCO. It is likely to be related to the mantle flows from the Tibetan Plateau around the Ordos block which converges at the northeastern corner of the Ordos block and local upward flow along the slope of the thinning lithosphere resulted in decompression partial melting and the melt percolated upward through the crust to feed the lava eruptions at the Datong volcanoes to the east. Finally, large crustal earthquakes in this region are generally located in resistive zones with high

  8. Highland crust at the Apollo 14 site: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Recent petrologic studies of pristine nonmare samples from the Apollo 14 site have demonstrated the unique character of the western highlands crust. Many of the lithologies which occur here are not found at other highland sites or represent unique variations of more common lithologies. Rare highland samples found at the Apollo 12 site have petrologic and geochemical affinities with the Apollo 14 highland suite and the two sites taken together constitute what can be called the Western Highland Province. Rocks of the Western Highland Province are geochemically distinct from similar lithologies found at eastern highland sites (Apollo 15, Apollo 16, Apollo 17, and the Luna sites) -- a fact which adds further complications to current petrogenetic models for the lunar crust. Nonetheless, an understanding of how the Western Highlands Province formed and why it differs from highland crust in the east is crucial to our overall understanding of primordial lunar differentiation and petrogenesis.

  9. The Oceanic Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francheteau, Jean

    1983-01-01

    The earth's oceanic crust is created and destroyed in a flow outward from midocean ridges to subduction zones, where it plunges back into the mantle. The nature and dynamics of the crust, instrumentation used in investigations of this earth feature, and research efforts/findings are discussed. (JN)

  10. The Oceanic Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francheteau, Jean

    1983-01-01

    The earth's oceanic crust is created and destroyed in a flow outward from midocean ridges to subduction zones, where it plunges back into the mantle. The nature and dynamics of the crust, instrumentation used in investigations of this earth feature, and research efforts/findings are discussed. (JN)

  11. Mantle transition zone-derived EM1 component beneath NE China: Geochemical evidence from Cenozoic potassic basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Li-Hui; Hofmann, Albrecht W.; Mao, Fu-Gen; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Zhong, Yuan; Xie, Lie-Wen; Yang, Yue-Heng

    2017-05-01

    The isotopic characteristics of the sub-oceanic mantle are well established, but in continental regions these properties are usually obscured, and therefore controversial, because of the potential effects of crustal contamination together with lithospheric mantle metasomatism and melting. The so-called EM1 (Enriched Mantle-1) signature, characterized by low 206Pb/204Pb and 143Nd/144Nd ratios, is particularly problematic in this respect because EM1-type OIB sources are commonly attributed to recycled crust and/or lithospheric mantle. In this paper we show that a suite of Cenozoic potassic basalts from NE China displays many previously unrecognized correlations between chemical and isotopic parameters, which tightly constrain the isotopic characteristics of an extreme EM1-type mantle source located in the asthenosphere. Its radiogenic isotopes are similar to, but even more extreme than, those of the oceanic endmember composition represented by the Pitcairn hotspot, namely 206Pb/204Pb ≤ 16.5, 143Nd/144Nd ≤ 0.5123 (or εNd ≤ - 6.4), 176Hf/177Hf ≤ 0.2825 (or εHf ≤ - 10.1). These characteristics require a source of recycled crustal material of Precambrian age (∼2.2 Ga). An important new constraint is the Mg isotopic composition of δ26 Mg (≤ - 0.6 ‰), which is lower than normal mantle (δ26 Mg = - 0.25 ± 0.07 ‰) and lower crustal values (δ26 Mg = - 0.29 ± 0.15 ‰), but consistent with sedimentary carbonate (δ26 Mg = - 5.57 ‰ to - 0.38 ‰). The endmember EM1 source produced high-SiO2 melts with low MgO, CaO/Al2O3 and δ26 Mg values, exceptionally high K/U ≅ 50,000, Ba/Th ≅ 400, low U/Pb ≅ 0.06, and positive Zr and Hf anomalies. The chemical and isotopic parameters of this potassic basalt suite form binary mixing arrays, one end point of which is the inferred asthenospheric EM1 reservoir, whereas the other is a more ordinary, depleted mantle component, which is also sampled by local lithospheric mantle xenoliths. These binary arrays include

  12. Variations in the Pb isotope composition in polyformational magmatic rocks of the Ketkap-Yuna igneous province of the Aldan Shield: Evidence for mantle-crust interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, V. F.; Dril, S. I.; Khanchuk, A. I.; Velivetskaya, T. A.; Vladimirova, T. A.; Il'ina, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    The Pb isotope composition of polyformational Mesozoic igneous rocks of the Ketkap-Yuna igneous province (KYIP) and lower crustal metamorphic rocks of the Batomga granite-greenstone area (the complex of the KYIP basement) of the Aldan Shield was studied for the first time. Based on the data obtained, several types of material sources participating in petrogenetic processes were distinguished. The mantle source identified as PREMA is registered in most of the igneous formations and predominates in mafic alkaline rocks. According to the isotope characteristics, the upper crustal source corresponds to a source of the "Orogen" type by the model of "plumbotectonics" or to the average composition of the continental crust by the Stacey-Kramers model. The lower crust is the third material source; however, the type of lower crustal protolith involved in the igneous process is still not defined, which makes difficult to estimate its role in the petrogenetic processes.

  13. Growth of continental crust and its episodic reworking over >800 Ma: evidence from Hf-Nd isotope data on the Pietersburg block (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Oscar; Zeh, Armin; Moyen, Jean-François; Doucelance, Régis; Martin, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    The formation and evolution of the continental crust during the Precambrian, and in particular during the Archaean eon (4.0-2.5 Ga), is still a matter of debate. In particular, it is not yet clear in which tectonic environment the genesis of crust took place and how the large volume of granitoid rocks that form ~70% of the Archaean crust were extracted from the mantle. Many studies highlighted that radiogenic isotope systems, especially Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd, are powerful tools to unravel the respective extent of crustal growth and recycling in Archaean terranes. This work presents coupled Hf and Nd isotope data (analyzed both in situ in accessory minerals and in whole rock samples) of Meso- to Neoarchaean granitoids, applied to unravel the processes of crust formation and evolution of the Pietersburg crustal block in South Africa. This crustal segment, the northermost one of the Archaean Kaapvaal Craton, is separated from older crust (3.65-3.10 Ga) by a large-scale suture zone, and the processes related to amalgamation of both blocks and their subsequent evolution are still unclear. The Pietersburg block is made up of a wide range of Archaean granitoid rocks, including tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) series, high-K monzogranites as well as (grano)diorites belonging to the so-called "sanukitoid" group [1], all intruded by late Paleoproterozoic alkaline complexes. Age determinations highlighted two stages of granitoid formation: (1) TTG magmatism took place episodically over >400 Ma between 3.34 and 2.89 Ga, with a major pulse at 2.97-2.90 Ga; while (2) all the other (high-K) granitoid types emplaced subsequently between 2.84 and 2.69 Ga before a long magmatic shutdown until the intrusion of alkaline complexes at ~2.00 Ga [2-3]. Isotope systematics reveal that these two stages are related to juvenile crust formation and crust reworking, respectively. Indeed, all Hf-Nd isotope data from TTG gneisses are suprachondritic, pointing to a juvenile origin and precluding

  14. First findings of Paleo- and Mesoarchean zircons in the rocks from the Central Arctic province of oceanic rises as an evidence of the ancient continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, S. A.; Presnyakov, S. L.; Antonov, A. V.; Belyatsky, B. V.; Rodionov, N. V.; Shevchenko, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    This report presents the results of local U-Pb zircon dating (SIMS SHRIMP II) for a sample of migmatite gneiss dredged on the western slope of Alpha Ridge in the Arctic Ocean in the course of the "Arktika-2012" Russian polar expedition. The distribution of U-Pb ages of the examined zircon points to the Early Precambrian origin of this gneiss, for the bulk of the zircon was crystallized at least 3450 Ma ago from a magmatic melt under acidic volcanism at the primary crust formation. Zircon of the second generation was crystallized 3300 Ma ago under the remelting of acid volcanics and appearance of migmatite gneisses under the amphibolite facies of metamorphism. Most likely, a partial recrystallization of zircon and formation of microfolded structures and foliation took place 3000 Ma ago at the stage of rocks deformation. The latest zircon was formed 1900 Ma ago from the crust fluid or melt under the low-gradient metamorphism. In view of the possibility of the appearance of the treated clastogenic gneiss fragment under current oceanic erosion, the obtained results allow one to affirm that the occurrence of a fragment of the most ancient sialic continental crust formed at least 3450 Ma ago is possible at the submarine rises of the Arctic Ocean (Alpha Ridge and the Mendeleev Rise).

  15. ­Crustal Structure of the Western Anatolian Extensional Province: Evidence for a ductile lower crust through the joint inversion of Receiver Functions and Dispersion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, J. R.; Kahraman, M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Ozacar, A. A.; Turkelli, N.

    2014-12-01

    Western Anatolia is one of the most seismically active regions in the world, undergoing broad N-S extension associated with the rollback of the Aegean slab in the south. This region is characterized by high heat-flow, recent volcanism, and core-complex formation. We use >3500 receiver functions from a dense array of 47 stations located in western Turkey and dispersion data from a recent regional-scale, ambient noise tomography study to invert for shear-wave velocity as a function of depth. Using this technique, we obtain an unprecedented three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model that characterizes the crust of western Turkey. We find a sharp Moho transition beneath much of western Anatolia, with crustal thickness varying from ~25 km near the Aegean Sea to ~35 km beneath the Fethiye Lobe correlating with the topography in western Turkey. The lower crust exhibits a relatively continuous ~10-15 km thick low shear-wave velocity layer (LVL) beneath most of western Anatolia, reaching velocities below 3.0 km/s in some places. The top of this LVL marks the lower boundary of crustal seismicity. These characteristics suggest that the lower crust in western Anatolia is behaving as a ductile solid, as seismic velocities in this range at lower crustal depths are indicative of the presence of fluids (possibly partial melts when considering the high heat-flow in the region). We propose that the lower crust in this region may be undergoing local crustal flow due to the N-S dominated stress regime, which led to the formation of the sharp, low-relief Moho observed in western Turkey. Across the Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone, we see the slowest S-wave velocities in the lower crust, reaching ~2.8 km/s. Unlike elsewhere in western Turkey, this region has relatively low surficial heat-flow and no recent volcanism. Therefore, the anomaly in the Fethiye Lobe is likely due to a different mechanism than western Turkey. We also observe a very slow uppermost mantle beneath this region, with

  16. Mineralogical and geochemical evidence for hydrothermal activity at the west wall of 12°50′N core complex (Mid-Atlantic ridge): a new ultramafic-hosted seafloor hydrothermal deposit?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dekov, Vesselin; Boycheva, Tanya; Halenius, Ulf; Billstrom, Kjell; Kamenov, George D.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Stummeyer, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Dredging along the west wall of the core complex at 12°50′N Mid-Atlantic Ridge sampled a number of black oxyhydroxide crusts and breccias cemented by black and dark brown oxyhydroxide matrix. Black crusts found on top of basalt clasts (rubble) are mainly composed of Mn-oxides (birnessite, 10-Å manganates) with thin films of nontronite and X-ray amorphous FeOOH on their surfaces. Their chemical composition (low trace- and rare earth-element contents, high Li and Ag concentrations, rare earth element distribution patterns with negative both Ce and Eu anomalies), Sr–Nd–Pb-isotope systematic and O-isotope data suggest low-temperature (~ 20 °C) hydrothermal deposition from a diffuse vent area on the seafloor. Mineralogical, petrographic and geochemical investigations of the breccias showed the rock clasts were hydrothermally altered fragments of MORBs. Despite the substantial mineralogical changes caused by the alteration the Sr–Nd–Pb-isotope ratios have not been significantly affected by this process. The basalt clasts are cemented by dark brown and black matrix. Dark brown cement exhibits geochemical features (very low trace- and rare earth- element contents, high U concentration, rare earth element distribution pattern with high positive Eu anomaly) and Nd–Pb-isotope systematics (similar to that of MORB) suggesting that the precursor was a primary, high-temperature Fe-sulfide, which was eventually altered to goethite at ambient seawater conditions. The data presented in this work points towards the possible existence of high- and low-temperature hydrothermal activity at the west wall of the core complex at 12°50′N Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Tectonic setting at the site implies that the proposed hydrothermal field is possibly ultramafic-hosted.

  17. The tectonic emplacement of Sumba in the Sunda-Banda Arc: paleomagnetic and geochemical evidence from the early Miocene Jawila volcanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, Hans; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    1995-11-01

    The island of Sumba is a continental fragment in the fore-arc region near the transition between the Sunda Arc and Banda Arc in southeastern Indonesia. Paleomagnetic and geochemical evidence from the early Miocene volcanics of the Jawila Formation in western Sumba constrain the final drift stage and tectonic emplacement of the island. The lavas range from predominantly andesites to dacites, and display textural evidence for a weak metamorphism. Rock magnetic and mineral chemical data point to pseudo-single- to multi-domain (titano)magnetite (Fe 2.5-3Ti 0.5-0O 3), with grain sizes up to 10 μm, as the main carrier of remanence. The Jawila Formation reveals a ChRM direction with declination = 4.6°, inclination = - 19.2°, α95 = 9.9° and a paleolatitude of 9.9°S, which corroborates earlier results (Chamalaun and Sunata, 1982). Taking paleomagnetic evidence from other formations on the island into account, we conclude that the Sumba fragment has occupied approximately its present position since the Miocene. The calc-alkaline affinity and trace-element signatures of the lavas point to an origin in an arc environment. This occurrence of subduction-related volcanic activity in the early Miocene on Sumba implies that a volcanic arc existed south of the present-day East Sunda Arc, or that the island was located within the latter arc between Sumbawa and eastern Flores, and still had a minor southward drift to cover.

  18. Absence of geochemical evidence for an impact event at the Bølling–Allerød/Younger Dryas transition

    PubMed Central

    Paquay, François S.; Goderis, Steven; Ravizza, Greg; Vanhaeck, Frank; Boyd, Matthew; Surovell, Todd A.; Holliday, Vance T.; Haynes, C. Vance; Claeys, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    High concentrations of iridium have been reported in terrestrial sediments dated at 12.9 ka and are interpreted to support an extraterrestrial impact event as the cause of the observed extinction in the Rancholabrean fauna, changes in the Paleoindian cultures, and the onset of the Younger Dryas cooling [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:16016–16021]. Here, we report platinum group element (PGE: Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd), gold (Au) concentrations, and 187Os/188Os ratios in time-equivalent terrestrial, lacustrine, and marine sections to seek robust evidence of an extraterrestrial contribution. First, our results do not reproduce the previously reported elevated Ir concentrations. Second, 187Os/188Os isotopic ratios in the sediment layers investigated are similar to average crustal values, indicating the absence of a significant meteoritic Os contribution to these sediments. Third, no PGE anomalies distinct from crustal signatures are present in the marine record in either the Gulf of California (DSDP 480, Guaymas Basin) or the Cariaco Basin (ODP 1002C). Our data show no evidence of an extraterrestrial (ET)-PGE enrichment anomaly in any of the investigated depositional settings investigated across North America and in one section in Belgium. The lack of a clear ET-PGE signature in this sample suite is inconsistent with the impact of a large chondritic projectile at the Bølling–Allerød/Younger Dryas transition. PMID:20007789

  19. Impact of recent coastal development and human activities on Nha Trang Bay, Vietnam: evidence from a Porites lutea geochemical record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A. D.; Zhao, J.-x.; Feng, Y.-x.; Hu, W.-p.; Yu, K.-f.; Gasparon, M.; Pham, T. B.; Clark, T. R.

    2013-03-01

    Nha Trang Bay (NTB) is located on the Central Vietnam coast, western South China Sea. Recent coastal development of Nha Trang City has raised public concern over an increasing level of pollution within the bay and degradation of nearby coral reefs. In this study, multiple proxies (e.g., trace metals, rare earth elements (REEs), and Y/Ho) recorded in a massive Porites lutea coral colony were used to reconstruct changes in seawater conditions in the NTB from 1995 to 2009. A 14-year record of REEs and other trace metals revealed that the concentrations of terrestrial trace metals have increased dramatically in response to an increase in coastal development projects such as road, port, and resort constructions, port and river dredging, and dumping activities since 2000. The effects of such developmental processes are also evident in changes in REE patterns and Y/Ho ratios through time, suggesting that both parameters are critical proxies for marine pollution.

  20. Lower-crustal xenoliths from Jurassic kimberlite diatremes, upper Michigan (USA): Evidence for Proterozoic orogenesis and plume magmatism in the lower crust of the southern Superior Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, Robert E.; Kempton, Pamela D.; Paces, James B.; Downes, Hilary; Williams, Ian S.; Dobosi, Gábor; Futa, Kiyoto

    2013-01-01

    Jurassic kimberlites in the southern Superior Province in northern Michigan contain a variety of possible lower-crustal xenoliths, including mafic garnet granulites, rare garnet-free granulites, amphibolites and eclogites. Whole-rock major-element data for the granulites suggest affinities with tholeiitic basalts. P–T estimates for granulites indicate peak temperatures of 690–730°C and pressures of 9–12 kbar, consistent with seismic estimates of crustal thickness in the region. The granulites can be divided into two groups based on trace-element characteristics. Group 1 granulites have trace-element signatures similar to average Archean lower crust; they are light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched, with high La/Nb ratios and positive Pb anomalies. Most plot to the left of the geochron on a 206Pb/€204Pb vs 207Pb/€204Pb diagram, and there was probably widespread incorporation of Proterozoic to Archean components into the magmatic protoliths of these rocks. Although the age of the Group 1 granulites is not well constrained, their protoliths appear to be have been emplaced during the Mesoproterozoic and to be older than those for Group 2 granulites. Group 2 granulites are also LREE-enriched, but have strong positive Nb and Ta anomalies and low La/Nb ratios, suggesting intraplate magmatic affinities. They have trace-element characteristics similar to those of some Mid-Continent Rift (Keweenawan) basalts. They yield a Sm–Nd whole-rock errorchron age of 1046 ± 140 Ma, similar to that of Mid-Continent Rift plume magmatism. These granulites have unusually radiogenic Pb isotope compositions that plot above the 207Pb/€204Pb vs 206Pb/€204Pb growth curve and to the right of the 4·55 Ga geochron, and closely resemble the Pb isotope array defined by Mid-Continent Rift basalts. These Pb isotope data indicate that ancient continental lower crust is not uniformly depleted in U (and Th) relative to Pb. One granulite xenolith, S69-5, contains quartz, and has a

  1. Nitrogen Recycling in the Atmosphere - Crust - Mantle Systems: Evidence From Secular Variation of Crustal N Abundances and δ 15N Values, Archean to Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Kerrich, R.

    2001-12-01

    The origin and evolution of nitrogen in the Earth's major reservoirs of atmosphere, crust, and mantle is controversial. The initial mantle acquired a δ 15N of -m 25‰ corresponding to enstatite chondrite as found in rare diamonds, and the secondary atmosphere from late accretion of volatile-rich C1 carbonaceous chondrites was +30 to +43‰ . Most diamonds and mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) are -m 5‰ , and the present atmosphere 0‰ , requiring shifts of +20‰ and -m 30 to -m 43‰ in these two reservoirs. The present mass of N in the mantle and atmosphere are estimated at 3.5 x 1019 kg and 3.8 x 1018 kg, respectively. Initial atmospheric δ 15N could have been shifted to lower values by degassing of 15N depleted N from the mantle. However, the mantle would remain more depleted than is observed. The crustal record shows that shifts of both atmosphere and mantle could have occurred by recycling. Sedimentary rocks, and crustal hydrothermal systems that proxy for bulk crust, both show systematic trends over 2.7 Ga from the Archean (δ 15N = 15.0 +/- 1.8‰ ; 16.5 +/- 3.3‰ ); through Paleoproterozoic (δ 15N = 9.7 +/- 1.0‰ ; 9.5 +/- 2.4‰ ); to the Phanerozoic (δ 15N = 3.5 +/- 1.0‰ ; 3.0 +/- 1.2‰ ). Crustal N content has increased in parallel from 84 +/- 67 ppm, through 266 +/- 195 ppm, to 1550 +/- 1135 ppm in the Phanerozoic. These trends are consistent with progressive sequestering of atmospheric N2 into sediments, recycling of 15N enriched continental crust into the mantle, and degassing of 15N depleted from the mantle N into the atmosphere.

  2. Geochemical evidences for two chondritic-like cometary or asteroidal impacts before and at the K/T boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y.-G.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A number of geological and palaeontological evidences support multiple impacts of cometary showers within a short time (approximately 1-3 Ma) and their connection with mass extinctions. Observations include clustered crater ages, stratigraphic horizons of impact ejecta closely spaced in time, and evidence for stepwise mass extinctions spanning intervals of 1-3 Ma. For the K/T boundary, three candidates, Popigai, Manson, and Yucatan, have been proposed as impact craters. Two distinct strata at the K/T boundary in western North America have been interpreted as evidence for two sequential impacts. If multiple impacts occurred within a time span of about 1 Ma then multiple Ir enrichments should be observed. DSDP Hole 577B on the Shatsky Plateau in the northern Pacific at K/T time is the first site. Samples contain approximately greater than 97 percent CaCO3, which exhibit clear chemical signals associated with asteroidal/cometary impact. Ir, Fe, and Cr data are presented. From the Th-normalized data, two satellite peaks below the major peak at 78 cm and 81 cm of 577B-1-4 are clearly shown. The major Ir peak (K/T boundary) is at 72 cm. Fe and Cr, from C1-like impactor ejecta fallout, also show two peaks at the same positions. For hole 738C on the southern Kerguelen Plateau, Ir values reach a peak concentration of 18 ppb in the clay layer at 96.0-96.2 cm in section 20R-5, and gradually tail off. In the sample 115 cm above the boundary, Ir concentrations have still not reached background levels. From the Ir peak downward to the lowermost sample analyzed at 102 cm, the Ir concentration is still as high as 1.7 ppb. From the Th-normalized data, we observe a small Ir/Th peak at 100-101 cm. Though this peak is within the error margin, the trend is clear. Fe and Cr exhibit the same pattern. The third case is Hole 690C on the Queen Maud Ridge. Again, the Ir/Th plot indicates the strong possibility of satellite peaks at approximately 52 cm. The main peak is at 39-40 cm. For the

  3. Seismic and thermal evidences for subduction of exhumed mantle oceanic crust beneath the seismically quiet Antigua-St Martin Margin segment in the Northern Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcaillou, Boris; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Laurencin, Muriel; Biari, Youssef; Graindorge, David; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Laigle, Mireille; Lallemand, Serge

    2017-04-01

    Wide-angle, multichannel reflection seismic data and heat-flow measurements from the Lesser Antilles subduction zone depict a large patch of atypical oceanic basement in the trench and beneath the outer fore-arc offshore of the Antigua-Saint Martin active margin segment. This segment triggers a very low number of earthquakes compared to the seismicity beneath the Virgin Island Platform to the north or in the Central Antilles (Martinique-Guadeloupe) to the south. Seven along-dip and two along-strike multichannel seismic lines acquired in this region show high amplitude steep reflectors that extend downward to 15-km depth in the downgoing slab. These lines also substantiate the absence of any reflections at Moho depth. Based on the wide-angle velocity model, the oceanic basement consists of a 5-km-thick unique layer with p-wave velocities ranging from 5.2 to 7.4 km/s, which is atypical for an oceanic crust. Heat-flow measurements along a transect perpendicular to the margin indicate a "flat" heat-flow trend from the trench to the fore-arc at 40 ± 15 mW.m-2 (Biari et al., same session). This heat flow profile contrasts with the expected trench-to-forearc decreasing heat-flow and the 50% higher heat-flow values measured in the trench offshore off the central Antilles. Calculated heat-flow for an incoming oceanic plate with a depressed geothermal gradient in the trench and heat source at depth in the subduction zone corresponding with temperatures of 200-250°C fit the measurements. We propose that a large patch of exhumed and serpentinized mantle rocks solidified at the slow-spreading mid-Atlantic Ridge is currently subducting beneath the studied margin segment. The fact that the crust here consists of one single layer and comprises velocities higher than found in igneous rocks (> 7.2 km/s) are consistent with this hypothesis. The plate bending possibly triggers long and deep delamination planes that extend into the mantle beneath the serpentinization front, which has

  4. Geochemical evidence for Se mobilization by the weathering of pyritic shale, San Joaquin Valley, California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, T.S.; Swain, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Acidic (pH 4) seeps issue from the weathered Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene marine sedimentary shales of the Moreno Formation in the semi-arid Coast Ranges of California. The chemistry of the acidic solutions is believed to be evidence of current reactions ultimately yielding hydrous sodium and magnesium sulfate salts, e.g. mirabilite and bloedite, from the oxidation of primary pyrite. The selenate form of Se is concentrated in these soluble salts, which act as temporary geological sinks. Theoretically, the open lattice structures of these hydrous minerals could incorporate the selenate (SeO4-2) anion in the sulfate (SO4-2) space. When coupled with a semi-arid to arid climate, fractional crystallization and evaporative concentration can occur creating a sodium-sulfate fluid that exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limit of 1000 ??g l-1 for a toxic Se waste. The oxidative alkaline conditions necessary to ensure the concentration of soluble selenate are provided in the accompanying marine sandstones of the Panoche and Lodo Formations and the eugeosynclinal Franciscan assemblage. Runoff and extensive mass wasting in the area reflect these processes and provide the mechanisms which transport Se to the farmlands of the west-central San Joaquin Valley. Subsurface drainage from these soils consequently transports Se to refuge areas in amounts elevated to cause a threat to wildlife. ?? 1990.

  5. Geochemical evidence of past earthquakes in sediments of the Reloncaví fjord (Chilean Patagonia) during the last ˜ 1000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, Lorena; Lange, Carina; Muñoz, Práxedes; Salamanca, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The Chilean fjords are excellent archives of paleoearthquakes, tsunamis and landslides (St-Onge et al., 2012 in Sedimentary Geology 243-244: 89-107). Here we report on new sedimentological and geochemical evidence of past earthquakes in sediments of the Reloncavi fjord, Northern Patagonia (41° S, 72° W), during the last ~1000 years. We recovered four sediment cores from the Reloncaví fjord (RH-5B, RH-5C, RH-6B, RH7B, water depth range = 90-260 m; core length range = 45-75 cm). Age models were based on 210Pb, AMS-14C and the first appearance of the diatom Rhizosolenia setigera cf. pungens in the fossil record as statigraphic marker. The cores span the last ~122 to 800 years of sedimentation with sedimentation rates ranging between 0.1 and 0.24 cm yr-1. The cores revealed evidence of turbidites associated with the historical earthquakes of 1960, 1837, 1737 and 1575 AD, and an earlier period for which there is no historical information, 1200-1400 AD. The turbidites exhibit a grading-up pattern with sand layers, and are characterized by a decrease in organic carbon and biogenic opal, an increase in the C/N molar ratio, negative values of δ13Corg(average -27),and an increase in the relative abundance of Paralia sulcata, a diatom associated with sandy environments, being the turbite layers mainly freshwater in origen. We suggest that these turbidite layers were triggered by past earthquakes that produced movement of land from the cliff areas that surround the Reloncaví fjord. Funding: Project FONDECYT # 11110103 and COPAS Sur-Austral project PFB-31.

  6. Diapirs and cantaloupes: Layering and overturn of Triton's crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, P.; Jackson, M. P. A.

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that cantaloupe terrain formed as a result of instability and overturn (i.e., diapirism) of Triton's crust. Morphologic evidence implicates compositional layering within Triton's crust as the driving mechanism for the overturn. Here, we review the morphologic evidence for this origin and evaluate some of the implications.

  7. Diapirs and cantaloupes: Layering and overturn of Triton's crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, P.; Jackson, M. P. A.

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that cantaloupe terrain formed as a result of instability and overturn (i.e., diapirism) of Triton's crust. Morphologic evidence implicates compositional layering within Triton's crust as the driving mechanism for the overturn. Here, we review the morphologic evidence for this origin and evaluate some of the implications.

  8. Multi-stage melt-rock interaction in the Mt. Maggiore (Corsica, France) ophiolitic peridotites: microstructural and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Elisabetta; Piccardo, Giovanni B.; Hofmann, Albrecht W.

    2008-10-01

    Spinel and plagioclase peridotites from the Mt.Maggiore (Corsica, France) ophiolitic massif record a composite asthenosphere-lithosphere history of partial melting and subsequent multi-stage melt-rock interaction. Cpx-poor spinel lherzolites are consistent with mantle residues after low-degree fractional melting ( F = 5-10%). Opx + spinel symplectites at the rims of orthopyroxene porphyroclasts indicate post-melting lithospheric cooling ( T = 970-1,100°C); this was followed by formation of olivine embayments within pyroxene porphyroclasts by melt-rock interaction. Enrichment in modal olivine (up to 85 wt%) at constant bulk Mg values, and variable absolute REE contents (at constant LREE/HREE) indicate olivine precipitation and pyroxene dissolution during reactive porous melt flow. This stage occurred at spinel-facies depths, after incorporation of the peridotites in the thermal lithosphere. Plagioclase-enriched peridotites show melt impregnation microtextures, like opx + plag intergrowths replacing exsolved cpx porphyroclasts and interstitial gabbronoritic veinlets. This second melt-rock interaction stage caused systematic chemical changes in clinopyroxene (e.g. Ti, REE, Zr, Y increase), related to the concomitant effects of local melt-rock interaction at decreasing melt mass, and crystallization of small (<3%) trapped melt fractions. LREE depletion in minerals of the gabbronoritic veinlets indicates that the impregnating melts were more depleted than normal MORB. Preserved microtextural evidence of previous melt-rock interaction in the impregnated peridotites suggests that they were progressively uplifted in response to lithosphere extension and thinning. Migrating melts were likely produced by mantle upwelling and melting related to extension; they were modified from olivine-saturated to opx-saturated compositions, and caused different styles of melt-rock interaction (reactive spinel harzburgites, vs. impregnated plagioclase peridotites) depending on the

  9. Geochemical evidence for a magmatic CO2 degassing event at Mammoth Mountain, California, September-December 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; Kessler, R.; Doukas, M.P.

    2000-01-01

    Recent time series soil CO2 concentration data from monitoring stations in the vicinity of Mammoth Mountain, California, reveal strong evidence for a magmatic degassing event during the fall of 1997 lasting more than 2 months. Two sensors at Horseshoe Lake first recorded the episode on September 23, 1997, followed 10 days later by a sensor on the north flank of Mammoth Mountain. Direct degassing from shallow intruding magma seems an implausible cause of the degassing event, since the gas released at Horseshoe Lake continued to be cold and barren of other magmatic gases, except for He. We suggest that an increase in compressional strain on the area south of Mammoth Mountain driven by movement of major fault blocks in Long Valley caldera may have triggered an episode of increased degassing by squeezing additional accumulated CO2 from a shallow gas reservoir to the surface along faults and other structures where it could be detected by the CO2 monitoring network. Recharge of the gas reservoir by CO2 emanating from the deep intrusions that probably triggered deep long-period earthquakes may also have contributed to the degassing event. The nature of CO2 discharge at the soil-air interface is influenced by the porous character of High Sierra soils and by meteorological processes. Solar insolation is the primary source of energy for the Earth atmosphere and plays a significant role in most diurnal processes at the Earth surface. Data from this study suggest that external forcing due largely to local orographic winds influences the fine structure of the recorded CO2 signals.

  10. Emergence of silicic continents as the lower crust peels off on a hot plate-tectonic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Priyadarshi; Gerya, Taras; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2017-09-01

    The rock record and geochemical evidence indicate that continental recycling has been occurring since the early history of the Earth. The stabilization of felsic continents in place of Earth's early mafic crust about 3.0 to 2.0 billion years ago, perhaps due to the initiation of plate tectonics, implies widespread destruction of mafic crust during this time interval. However, the physical mechanisms of such intense recycling on a hotter, (late) Archaean and presumably plate-tectonic Earth remain largely unknown. Here we use thermomechanical modelling to show that extensive recycling via lower crustal peeling-off (delamination but not eclogitic dripping) during continent-continent convergence was near ubiquitous during the late Archaean to early Proterozoic. We propose that such destruction of the early mafic crust, together with felsic magmatism, may have caused both the emergence of silicic continents and their subsequent isostatic rise, possibly above the sea level. Such changes in the continental character have been proposed to influence the Great Oxidation Event and, therefore, peeling-off plate tectonics could be the geodynamic trigger for this event. A transition to the slab break-off controlled syn-orogenic recycling occurred as the Earth aged and cooled, leading to reduced recycling and enhanced preservation of the continental crust of present-day composition.

  11. Evidence from meimechites and other low-degree mantle melts for redox controls on mantle-crust fractionation of platinum-group elements

    PubMed Central

    Mungall, James E.; Hanley, Jacob J.; Arndt, Nicholas T.; Debecdelievre, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of the geochemistry of the chalcophile elements [i.e., Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd (platinum-group elements), and Au, Cu, Ni] has been informed for at least 20 years by the common assumption that when crust-forming partial melts are extracted from the upper mantle, sulfide liquid in the restite sequesters chalcophile elements until the extent of partial melting exceeds ≈25% and all of the sulfide has been dissolved in silicate melt [Hamlyn, P. R. & Keays, R. R. (1985) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 49, 1797–1811]. Here we document very high, unfractionated, chalcophile element concentrations in small-degree partial melts from the mantle that cannot be reconciled with the canonical residual sulfide assumption. We show that the observed high, unfractionated platinum-group element concentrations in small-degree partial melts can be attained if the melting takes place at moderately high oxygen fugacity, which will reduce the amount of sulfide due to the formation of sulfate and will also destabilize residual monosulfide solid solution by driving sulfide melts into the spinel-liquid divariant field. Magmas formed at high oxygen fugacity by small degrees of mantle melting can be important agents for the transfer of chalcophile elements from the upper mantle to the crust and may be progenitors of significant ore deposits of Pt, Pd, and Au. PMID:16908861

  12. Oceanic crust in the mid-mantle beneath west-central Pacific subduction zones: evidence from S to P converted waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongtao; He, Xiaobo

    2015-10-01

    The fate of subducted slabs is enigmatic, yet intriguing. We analyse seismic arrivals at ˜20-50 s after the direct P wave in an array in northeast China (NECESSArray) recordings of four deep earthquakes occurring beneath the west-central Pacific subduction zones (from the eastern Indonesia to Tonga region). We employ the array analysing techniques of fourth root vespagram and beam-forming analysis to constrain the slowness and backazimuth of later arrivals. Our analyses reveal that these arrivals have a slightly lower slowness value than the direct P wave and the backazimuth deviates slightly from the great circle direction. Along with calculation of 1-D synthetic seismograms, we conclude that the later arrival is corresponding to an energy of S-to-P converted at a scatterer below the sources. Total five scatterers are detected at depths varying from ˜700 to 1110 km in the study region. The past subducted oceanic crust most likely accounts for the seismic scatterers trapped in the mid-mantle beneath the west-central subduction zones. Our observation in turn reflects that oceanic crust at least partly separated from subducted oceanic lithosphere and may be trapped substantially in the mid-mantle surrounding subduction zones, in particular in the western Pacific subduction zones.

  13. Oceanic crust in the mid-mantle beneath Central-West Pacific subduction zones: Evidence from S-to-P converted waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of subducted slabs is enigmatic, yet intriguing. We analyze seismic arrivals at ~20-50 s after the direct P wave in an array in northeast China (NECESSArray) recordings of four deep earthquakes occurring beneath the west-central Pacific subduction zones (from the eastern Indonesia to Tonga region). We employ the array analyzing techniques of 4th root vespagram and beam-form analysis to constrain the slowness and back azimuth of later arrivals. Our analyses reveal that these arrivals have a slightly lower slowness value than the direct P wave and the back azimuth deviates slightly from the great-circle direction. Along with calculation of one-dimensional synthetic seismograms, we conclude that the later arrival is corresponding to an energy of S-to-P converted at a scatterer below the sources. Total five scatterers are detected at depths varying from ~700 to 1110 km in the study region. The past subducted oceanic crust most likely accounts for the seismic scatterers trapped in the mid-mantle beneath the west-central subduction zones. Our observation in turn reflects that oceanic crust at least partly separated from subducted oceanic lithosphere and may be trapped substantially in the mid-mantle surrounding subduction zones, in particular in the western Pacific subduction zones.

  14. Cretaceous crust-mantle interaction and tectonic evolution of Cathaysia Block in South China: Evidence from pulsed mafic rocks and related magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Hai-Xiang; Zhao, Kui-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Cretaceous tectono-magmatic evolution of the Cathaysia Block in South China is important but their mechanism and geodynamics remain highly disputed. In this study we carried out a detailed geochemical study on the recently found Kuokeng mafic dikes in the western Fujian Province (the Interior Cathaysia Block) to reveal the petrogenesis and geodynamics of the Cretaceous magmatism. Kuokeng mafic dikes were emplaced in three principal episodes: ~ 129 Ma (monzogabbro), ~ 107 Ma (monzodiorite), and ~ 97 Ma (gabbro). Geochemical characteristics indicate that the monzogabbros were derived from the unmodified mantle source, while gabbros were likely derived from metasomatized mantle by subducted slab (fluids and sediments). Sr-Nd isotope compositions indicate that the parental magmas of the monzodiorites were generated by mixing of enriched, mantle-derived, mafic magmas and felsic melts produced by partial melting of crustal materials. Until the Early Cretaceous (~ 123 Ma), the dominant ancient Interior Cathaysia lithospheric mantle exhibited insignificant subduction signature, indicating the melting of asthenospheric mantle and the consequent back-arc extension, producing large-scale partial melting of the crustal materials under the forward subduction regime of the paleo-Pacific plate. The monzodiorites and gabbros appear to be associated with northwestward subduction of Pacific plate under an enhanced lithospheric extensional setting, accompanying with mantle modification, which triggered shallower subduction-related metasomatically enriched lithospheric mantle to melt partially. After ca. 110 Ma, the coastal magmatic belts formed due to a retreat and rollback of the subducting Pacific Plate underneath SE China in the continental margin arc system.

  15. Geochemical characterization of two distinctive systems with evidence of chemosynthetic activity, explored at the SE Pacific margin off Chile (46°S and 33°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Práxedes; Cárdenas, Lissette J.; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Sellanes, Javier; Dezileau, Laurent; Melville, Ives; Mendes, Stephanie D.

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the geochemical composition of superficial sediment under oxic and suboxic bottom water conditions along the Chilean continental margin (SE Pacific), where evidence for benthic chemosynthetic activity associated with diffuse seeping of chemically reduced fluids has been reported. The exploration was carried out at: (1) the Chilean Triple Junction (CTJ), at a water depth of ∼2900 m, with the additional indication of hydrothermal activity near a methane-rich cold-seep area (46°S) (German et al., 2010); and (2) the El Quisco methane seep site (EQSS), at ∼340 m water depth (33°S) (Melo et al., 2007; Krylova et al., 2014). While the deeper CTJ is located within an oxic environment (dissolved oxygen in the bottom waters: 164 μM), the shallower EQSS lies within a suboxic environment (dissolved oxygen in bottom water: 23 μM), located within the lower limit of the SE Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Pore water from short cores was analyzed for dissolved major, minor, and trace elements (Cl, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Sr, Si, B, P, Ba, Pb, Mn, Fe, Cd, U, and Mo), δ13DIC, sulfide, sulfate, and methane. The solid sediment fraction was likewise analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), metals, and redox potential. Elevated sediment temperatures were found in superficial sediments (5-13 °C) at the CTJ site, which could be due to warm fluids associated with the proximity of the ridge, where hydrothermal vents may occur. Reduced fluids were also present here, indicated by higher Mn fluxes toward the water column even in oxidized sediments (RPD > 8 cm), which contrasted with the lower fluxes in reduced sediments of the EQSS site (RPD ∼ 2 cm). 13C-depleted DIC, anomalously low pore water Cl (∼15 ppb), and low concentrations of other major elements may be the result of dilution by fluid seeping and precipitation of major elements, producing authigenic enrichment (Ca, Mg, Sr). The fluid could also: (a) be diluted by pure water produced during methane hydrate

  16. Petrogenesis of Late Mesozoic granitoids and coeval mafic rocks from the Jiurui district in the Middle-Lower Yangtze metallogenic belt of Eastern China: Geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao-Ming; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Shui-Yuan; Zhou, Wei

    2014-03-01

    enriched lithospheric mantle. The thickened lower continental crust and underlying enriched lithospheric mantle may have been simultaneously delaminated into the asthenospheric mantle. This process led to the partial melting of the thickened lower crust and the enriched lithospheric mantle, and the melts experienced an interaction with the asthenospheric mantle during ascension. Mafic melts could be generated from the enriched lithospheric mantle, which was heated by the upwelling asthenospheric mantle. The geochemical and isotopic compositions of mafic rocks were most likely controlled by the AFC process. A geochemical and isotopic comparison of the granitoids in the Jiurui district with those of two other districts (e.g., Angui and Tongling) in the same mineralization belt indicates that a significant crust-mantle interaction played a crucial role in their petrogeneses and metallogeneses. From the southwest to northeast in this metallogenic belt, the proportion of mantle component that was involved in the granitic magma shows a decreasing trend from the Jiurui to the Angui and Tongling districts. It is suggested that the Juirui district has the highest potential for a significant amount of Cu-Au accumulation because the mantle is an important supply for these metals.

  17. An organic geochemical multi-proxy study of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum: Evidence from northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, H. R.; Grimes, S.; Sutton, P.; Domingo, L.; Pancost, R. D.; Leng, M. J.; Twitchett, R. J.; Hart, M. B.; Taylor, K. W.

    2012-12-01

    , profile shape, and onset of the CIE in a localised system. Preliminary results for Claret suggest that the continental δ13CTOC records a lower magnitude excursion than δ13Cn-alkane data, where excursions of up to 8‰ are recorded - one of the largest continental excursions recorded to date. In comparison, there is good agreement between the δ13CTOC and δ13Cn-alkane records for the marine section of Zumaia, where an excursion of ca. 4‰ occurs in both proxies. The apparent enhancement in magnitude of the continental CIE is particularly significant, because unlike other sites4, there is no biomarker evidence for vegetation change, e.g. the average chain length of the n-alkanes, in either the Claret or Zumaia sections. Higher plant-derived biomarker and palynological analysis will serve to further test these results, which will provide the first data of this type in northern Spain, and could have implications for our understanding of the PETM. References 1. Bains, S. et al. 1999. Science, 285, (5428) 724-727. 2. Bowen, G. J. et al. 2001. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, 33, 73 - 88. 3. Schmitz, B. and Pujalte, V. 2003. Geology. 689-692. 4. Smith, F. A. et al. 2007. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 262, (1-2) 50-65. 5. Schouten, S. et al. 2007. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 258, (3-4) 581 - 592.

  18. The syncollisional granitoid magmatism and continental crust growth in the West Kunlun Orogen, China - Evidence from geochronology and geochemistry of the Arkarz pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Niu, Yaoling; Hu, Yan; Liu, Jinju; Ye, Lei; Kong, Juanjuan; Duan, Meng

    2016-02-01

    The West Kunlun orogenic belt (WKOB) at the northwest margin of the Greater Tibetan Plateau records seafloor subduction, ocean basin closing and continental collision with abundant syncollisional granitoids in response to the evolution of the Proto- and Paleo-Tethys Oceans from the early-Paleozoic to the Triassic. Here we present a combined study of detailed zircon U-Pb geochronology, whole-rock major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic geochemistry on the syncollisional Arkarz (AKAZ) pluton with mafic magmatic enclaves (MMEs) exposed north of the Mazha-Kangxiwa suture (MKS) zone. The granitoid host rocks and MMEs of the AKAZ pluton give the same late Triassic age of ~ 225 Ma. The granitoid host rocks are metaluminous granodiorite and monzogranite. They have initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.70818 to 0.70930, εNd(225 Ma) = - 4.61 to - 3.91 and εHf(225 Ma) = - 3.01 to 0.74. The MMEs are more mafic than the host with varying SiO2 (51.00-63.24 wt.%) and relatively low K2O (1.24-3.02 wt.%), but have similar Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions to the host ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.70830-0.70955, εNd(225 Ma) = - 4.88 to - 4.29, εHf(225 Ma) = - 2.57 to 0.25). Both the host and MMEs have rare earth element (REE) and trace element patterns resembling those of bulk continental crust (BCC). The MMEs most likely represent cumulate formed from common magmas parental to the granitoid host. The granitoid magmatism is best explained as resulting from melting of amphibolite of MORB protolith during continental collision, which produces andesitic melts with a remarkable compositional similarity to the BCC and the inherited mantle-like isotopic compositions. Simple isotopic mixing calculations suggest that ~ 80% ocean crust and ~ 20% continental materials contribute to the source of the AKAZ pluton. Thus, the hypothesis "continental collision zones as primary sites for net continental crust growth" is applicable in the WKOB as shown by studies in southern Tibet, East Kunlun and Qilian orogens. In

  19. Corium crust strength measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-11-01

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.

  20. Evolution of the Archaean crust by delamination and shallow subduction.

    PubMed

    Foley, Stephen F; Buhre, Stephan; Jacob, Dorrit E

    2003-01-16

    The Archaean oceanic crust was probably thicker than present-day oceanic crust owing to higher heat flow and thus higher degrees of melting at mid-ocean ridges. These conditions would also have led to a different bulk composition of oceanic crust in the early Archaean, that would probably have consisted of magnesium-rich picrite (with variably differentiated portions made up of basalt, gabbro, ultramafic cumulates and picrite). It is unclear whether these differences would have influenced crustal subduction and recycling processes, as experiments that have investigated the metamorphic reactions that take place during subduction have to date considered only modern mid-ocean-ridge basalts. Here we present data from high-pressure experiments that show that metamorphism of ultramafic cumulates and picrites produces pyroxenites, which we infer would have delaminated and melted to produce basaltic rocks, rather than continental crust as has previously been thought. Instead, the formation of continental crust requires subduction and melting of garnet-amphibolite--formed only in the upper regions of oceanic crust--which is thought to have first occurred on a large scale during subduction in the late Archaean. We deduce from this that shallow subduction and recycling of oceanic crust took place in the early Archaean, and that this would have resulted in strong depletion of only a thin layer of the uppermost mantle. The misfit between geochemical depletion models and geophysical models for mantle convection (which include deep subduction) might therefore be explained by continuous deepening of this depleted layer through geological time.

  1. Deformation at the frictional-viscous transition: Evidence for cycles of fluid-assisted embrittlement and ductile deformation in the granitoid crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrens, Philip; Berger, Alfons; Peters, Max; Spillmann, Thomas; Herwegh, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Mid-crustal deformation is classically characterized by the transition from ductile to brittle deformation defining the frictional-to-viscous transition (FVT). Here we investigate an exhumed continental mid-crustal basement section in order to envisage the relationship between ductile and brittle deformation at the FVT. Our detailed study from km- to micro-scale shows that, under greenschist metamorphic conditions, deformation is accommodated by a dense network of highly-localized ductile shear zones. In the investigated case it is not quartz which defines the overall ductile deformation behavior but the viscous granular deformation in shear zones with an ultrafine-grained polymineralic matrix consisting of quartz, feldspar, sheet silicates and epidote. During viscous granular flow mass transfer processes under the presence of fluids promote a chemo-mechanical mixing, resulting in grain size reduction and reaction softening. Coeval with this ductile deformation, fluid-assisted embrittlement occurs, as indicated by biotite-coated fractures, cataclasites and injection of non-cohesive polymineralic gouge material into secondary fractures inside the host rock. The embrittlement during predominant ductile deformation occurs in cycles, i.e. prolonged periods of slow viscous granular flow are interrupted by rapid brittle deformation. We interpret this fluid-assisted cyclic embrittlement evidenced by injection of the fluidized material into off-fault fractures as an alternative equivalent to pseudotachylites and as a microstructural indicator for paleo-seismic activity. With exhumation and associated cooling, localized deformation persists in the ultrafine-grained polymineralic shear zones but progressively transitions to cataclastic flow and finally to pressure-dependent frictional flow; always showing cycles of slow interseismic flow and fast seismic injection events. Overall, in the granitic crust of the Aar-massif, brittle and ductile deformation coexist up to

  2. Mass transfer in the lower crust: Evidence for incipient melt assisted flow along grain boundaries in the deep arc granulites of Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Catherine A.; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan R.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of mass transfer is critical in improving our understanding of crustal evolution, however mass transfer mechanisms are debated, especially in arc environments. The Pembroke Granulite is a gabbroic gneiss, passively exhumed from depths of >45 km from the arc root of Fiordland, New Zealand. Here, enstatite and diopside grains are replaced by coronas of pargasite and quartz, which may be asymmetric, recording hydration of the gabbroic gneiss. The coronas contain microstructures indicative of the former presence of melt, supported by pseudosection modeling consistent with the reaction having occurred near the solidus of the rock (630-710°C, 8.8-12.4 kbar). Homogeneous mineral chemistry in reaction products indicates an open system, despite limited metasomatism at the hand sample scale. We propose the partial replacement microstructures are a result of a reaction involving an externally derived hydrous, silicate melt and the relatively anhydrous, high-grade assemblage. Trace element mapping reveals a correlation between reaction microstructure development and bands of high-Sr plagioclase, recording pathways of the reactant melt along grain boundaries. Replacement microstructures record pathways of diffuse porous melt flow at a kilometer scale within the lower crust, which was assisted by small proportions of incipient melt providing a permeable network. This work recognizes melt flux through the lower crust in the absence of significant metasomatism, which may be more common than is currently recognized. As similar microstructures are found elsewhere within the exposed Fiordland lower crustal arc rocks, mass transfer of melt by diffuse porous flow may have fluxed an area >10,000 km2.

  3. Iron and Zinc isotope fractionation during magmatism in the continental crust: Evidence from bimodal volcanic rocks from Hailar basin, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Li, Shuangqing; Huang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    This study presents Fe-Zn isotope data for a suite of well-characterized bimodal volcanic rocks from Hailar Basin, northeast China to understand the mechanism of Fe isotope fractionation in highly differentiated igneous rocks. The samples range from basaltic trachyandesites to trachytes-rhyodacites, and rhyolites. The δ56Fe values increase with increasing SiO2 contents with the rhyolites having the highest δ56Fe (up to 0.64 ± 0.02‰) among the previously reported data for igneous rocks at a similar SiO2. The lack of correlation between δ56Fe and Rb/La argues against the effect of fluid exsolution on Fe isotopes. The δ56Fe do not show a clear correlation with δ66Zn and radiogenic isotopes, suggesting that thermal diffusion or crustal contamination cannot produce the high δ56Fe in Hailar volcanic rocks. Fe isotopic variation in Hailar volcanic rocks can be explained by two steps of magmatism. During the first step, partial melting of basaltic trachyandesites with an average δ56Fe of 0.09 ± 0.14‰ produced trachytes-rhyodacites with an average δ56Fe of 0.24 ± 0.27‰. Modelling using rhyolite-MELTS shows that Fe isotopes can be fractionated by preferential partitioning of isotopically different Fe3+ and Fe2+ between the solid residue and partial melt. The second step involves formation of rhyolites with significantly high δ56Fe through partial melting or extensive crystallization of crust materials, during which isotopically heavy Fe preferentially partition into the rhyolitic melt. Therefore, fractionation of Fe isotopes between melts and minerals can result in high δ56Fe in SiO2-rich igneous rocks and apparent Fe isotope heterogeneity within the continental crust.

  4. Isotopic evidence ( 87Sr/ 86Sr, δ 7Li) for alteration of the oceanic crust at deep-rooted mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Hensen, Christian; Reitz, Anja; Romer, Rolf L.; Liebetrau, Volker; Meixner, Anette; Weise, Stephan M.; Haeckel, Matthias

    2009-09-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of pore fluids is presented for five deep-rooted mud volcanoes aligned on a transect across the Gulf of Cadiz continental margin at water depths between 350 and 3860 m. Generally decreasing interstitial Li concentrations and 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios with increasing distance from shore are attributed to systematically changing fluid sources across the continental margin. Although highest Li concentrations at the near-shore mud volcanoes coincide with high salinities derived from dissolution of halite and late-stage evaporites, clayey, terrigenous sediments are identified as the ultimate Li source to all pore fluids investigated. Light δ 7Li values, partly close to those of hydrothermal vent fluids (δ 7Li: +11.9‰), indicate that Li has been mobilized during high-temperature fluid/sediment or fluid/rock interactions in the deep sub-surface. Intense leaching of terrigenous clay has led to radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (˜0.7106) in pore fluids of the near-shore mud volcanoes. In contrast, non-radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (˜0.7075) at the distal locations are attributed to admixing of a basement-derived fluid component, carrying an isotopic signature from interaction with the basaltic crust. This inference is substantiated by temperature constraints from Li isotope equilibrium calculations suggesting exchange processes at particularly high temperatures (>200 °C) for the least radiogenic pore fluids of the most distal location. Advective pore fluids in the off-shore reaches of the Gulf of Cadiz are influenced by successive exchange processes with both oceanic crust and terrigenous, fine-grained sediments, resulting in a chemical and isotopic signature similar to that of fluids in near-shore ridge flank hydrothermal systems. This suggests that deep-rooted mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz represent a fluid pathway intermediate between mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vent and shallow, marginal cold seep. Due to the thicker sediment

  5. Raising the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ian H.; Davies, D. Rhodri

    2017-02-01

    The changes that occur at the boundary between the Archean and Proterozoic eons are arguably the most fundamental to affect the evolution of Earth's continental crust. The principal component of Archean continental crust is Granite-Greenstone Terranes (GGTs), with granites always dominant. The greenstones consist of a lower sequence of submarine komatiites and basalts, which erupted onto a pre-existing Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) crust. These basaltic rocks pass upwards initially into evolved volcanic rocks, such as andesites and dacites and, subsequently, into reworked felsic pyroclastic material and immature sediments. This transition coincides with widespread emplacement of granitoids, which stabilised (cratonised) the continental crust. Proterozoic supra-crustal rocks, on the other hand, are dominated by extensive flat-lying platform sequences of mature sediments, which were deposited on stable cratonic basements, with basaltic rocks appreciably less abundant. The siliceous TTGs cannot be produced by direct melting of the mantle, with most hypotheses for their origin requiring them to be underlain by a complimentary dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite root, which we suggest acted as ballast to the early continents. Ubiquitous continental pillow basalts in Archean lower greenstone sequences require the early continental crust to have been sub-marine, whereas the appearance of abundant clastic sediments, at higher stratigraphic levels, shows that it had emerged above sea level by the time of sedimentation. We hypothesise that the production of komatiites and associated basalts, the rise of the continental crust, widespread melting of the continental crust, the onset of sedimentation and subsequent cratonisation form a continuum that is the direct result of removal of the continent's dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite roots, triggered at a regional scale by the arrival of a mantle plume at the base of the lithosphere. Our idealised calculations suggest

  6. Early formation of evolved asteroidal crust.

    PubMed

    Day, James M D; Ash, Richard D; Liu, Yang; Bellucci, Jeremy J; Rumble, Douglas; McDonough, William F; Walker, Richard J; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2009-01-08

    Mechanisms for the formation of crust on planetary bodies remain poorly understood. It is generally accepted that Earth's andesitic continental crust is the product of plate tectonics, whereas the Moon acquired its feldspar-rich crust by way of plagioclase flotation in a magma ocean. Basaltic meteorites provide evidence that, like the terrestrial planets, some asteroids generated crust and underwent large-scale differentiation processes. Until now, however, no evolved felsic asteroidal crust has been sampled or observed. Here we report age and compositional data for the newly discovered, paired and differentiated meteorites Graves Nunatak (GRA) 06128 and GRA 06129. These meteorites are feldspar-rich, with andesite bulk compositions. Their age of 4.52 +/- 0.06 Gyr demonstrates formation early in Solar System history. The isotopic and elemental compositions, degree of metamorphic re-equilibration and sulphide-rich nature of the meteorites are most consistent with an origin as partial melts from a volatile-rich, oxidized asteroid. GRA 06128 and 06129 are the result of a newly recognized style of evolved crust formation, bearing witness to incomplete differentiation of their parent asteroid and to previously unrecognized diversity of early-formed materials in the Solar System.

  7. Frozen magma lenses below the oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Nedimović, Mladen R; Carbotte, Suzanne M; Harding, Alistair J; Detrick, Robert S; Canales, J Pablo; Diebold, John B; Kent, Graham M; Tischer, Michael; Babcock, Jeffrey M

    2005-08-25

    The Earth's oceanic crust crystallizes from magmatic systems generated at mid-ocean ridges. Whereas a single magma body residing within the mid-crust is thought to be responsible for the generation of the upper oceanic crust, it remains unclear if the lower crust is formed from the same magma body, or if it mainly crystallizes from magma lenses located at the base of the crust. Thermal modelling, tomography, compliance and wide-angle seismic studies, supported by geological evidence, suggest the presence of gabbroic-melt accumulations within the Moho transition zone in the vicinity of fast- to intermediate-spreading centres. Until now, however, no reflection images have been obtained of such a structure within the Moho transition zone. Here we show images of groups of Moho transition zone reflection events that resulted from the analysis of approximately 1,500 km of multichannel seismic data collected across the intermediate-spreading-rate Juan de Fuca ridge. From our observations we suggest that gabbro lenses and melt accumulations embedded within dunite or residual mantle peridotite are the most probable cause for the observed reflectivity, thus providing support for the hypothesis that the crust is generated from multiple magma bodies.

  8. Oxygen consumption in subseafloor basaltic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Wheat, C. G.; Hulme, S.; Edwards, K. J.; Bach, W.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest potential habitat for life on Earth and may contain a significant fraction of Earth's total microbial biomass, yet little is known about the form and function of life in this vast subseafloor realm that covers nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface. A deep biosphere hosted in subseafloor basalts has been suggested from several lines of evidence; yet, empirical analysis of metabolic reaction rates in basaltic crust is lacking. Here we report the first measure of oxygen consumption in young (~ 8 Ma) and cool (<25 degrees C) basaltic crust, calculated from modeling oxygen and strontium profiles in basal sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 to 'North Pond', a sediment 'pond' on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), where vigorous fluid circulation within basaltic crust occurs. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased towards the sediment-basement interface, indicating an upward diffusional supply from oxic fluids circulating within the crust. A parametric reaction-transport model suggests oxygen consumption rates on the order of 0.5-500 nmol per cubic centimeter fluid per day in young and cool basaltic crust, providing sufficient energy to support a subsurface crustal biosphere.

  9. Building Archean cratons from Hadean mafic crust.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Jonathan; Carlson, Richard W

    2017-03-17

    Geologic processing of Earth's surface has removed most of the evidence concerning the nature of Earth's first crust. One region of ancient crust is the Hudson Bay terrane of northeastern Canada, which is mainly composed of Neoarchean felsic crust and forms the nucleus of the Northeastern Superior Province. New data show these ~2.7-billion-year-old rocks to be the youngest to yield variability in neodymium-142 ((142)Nd), the decay product of short-lived samarium-146 ((146)Sm). Combined (146-147)Sm-(142-143)Nd data reveal that this large block of Archean crust formed by reworking of much older (>4.2 billion-year-old) mafic crust over a 1.5-billion-year interval of early Earth history. Thus, unlike on modern Earth, mafic crust apparently could survive for more than 1 billion years to form an important source rock for Archean crustal genesis. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. The oceanic crust as a bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, Hubert; Tebo, Bradley; Yayanos, Art; Furnes, Harald; Kelley, Katie; Plank, Terry; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    Various lines of evidence suggest that large portions of hydrothermal systems in the oceanic crust acts like a giant bioreactor that mediates water-rock exchange and buffers the chemical composition of seawater. We review the current literature and present new chemical, biological and petrographic data on microbially mediated alteration of glass in the oceanic crust. Microbial alteration of glass displays characteristic bioalteration features, in particular in the alteration fronts around residual glass in the oceanic crust, suggesting that microbes take on an active role in its dissolution. Such features are found throughout the oceanic crust ranging in age from a few million to 170 Ma and they are found down to crustal depths of 500 m, possibly defining a Deep Oceanic Biosphere (DOB) that covers up to 2/3 of the earth's surface area. Microbial glass alteration substantially increases the active surface area of dissolving glass particles thereby enhancing the reaction rates during microbially aided dissolution. Microbially mediated glass alteration involves the establishment of two types of diffusion barriers including hydration rinds and biofilms that play an important role in mediating glass alteration. In particular biofilms may be very active by creating a localized chemical environment conducive to glass alteration, and by sequestering dissolved chemical inventory from solution. When compared with abiotic alteration of the oceanic crust, bio-alteration causes more rapid deposition of biotic and abiotic reaction products in the oceanic crust that result in a more effective removal of elements from seawater and a more rapid sealing of the oceanic crust. Thus, it is likely that microbial activity increases the fluxes of seawater components into the crust, while reducing the low—temperature flux of basalt components into seawater. However, much about the microbial activity and its relationships to the chemistry of hydrothermal systems still remains to be

  11. Ophiolites and oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moores, E.M.; Jackson, E.D.

    1974-01-01

    OPHIOLITES consist of a pseudostratiform sequence, of harzburgite, tectonite, ultramafic and mafic cumulates sometimes including gabbro and quartz diorite (plagiogranite) intrusions, dolerite dyke swarms, pillow lava 1, and deep-sea sediments2-4. This assemblage occurs in all Phanerozoic mountain systems and is interpreted as fossil oceanic crust and uppermost mantle5-10. Outstanding problems include differences between the chemical properties of Ophiolites and rocks thought to represent present-day oceanic crust11,12, the lack in some complexes of recognised dyke swarms or cumulates, and the relative thinness of ophiolite mafic rocks compared with standard oceanic crustal sections5,8,13. ?? 1974 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Coupling of Oceanic and Continental Crust During Eocene Eclogite-Facies Metamorphism: Evidence From the Monte Rosa Nappe, Western Alps, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapen, T. J.; Johnson, C. M.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Skora, S.; Mahlen, N. J.; Beard, B. L.

    2006-12-01

    Subduction of continental crust to HP-UHP metamorphic conditions requires overcoming density contrasts that are unfavorable to deep burial, whereas exhumation of these rocks can be reasonably explained through buoyancy-assisted transport in the subduction channel to more shallow depths. In the western Alps, both continental and oceanic lithosphere has been subducted to eclogite-facies metamorphic conditions. The burial and exhumation histories of these sections of lithosphere bear directly on the dynamics of subduction and the stacking of units within the subduction channel. We address the burial history of the continental crust with high precision U-Pb rutile and Lu-Hf garnet geochronology of the eclogite-facies Monte Rosa nappe (MR), western Alps, Italy. U-Pb rutile ages from quartz-carbonate-white mica-rutile veins that are hosted within eclogite and schist of the MR, Gressoney Valley, Italy, indicate that it was at eclogite-facies metamorphic conditions at 42.6 +/- 0.6 Ma. The sample area (Indren glacier, Furgg zone; Dal Piaz, 2001) consists of eclogite boudins that are surrounded by micaceous schist. Associated with the eclogite and schist are quartz-carbonate-white mica-rutile veins that formed in tension cracks in the eclogite and along the contact between eclogite and surrounding schist. Intrusion of the veins occurred at eclogite-facies metamorphic conditions (480-570°C, >1.3-1.4 GPa) based on textural relations, oxygen isotope thermometry, and geothermobarometry. Lu-Hf geochronology of garnet from a chloritoid-talc-garnet-phengite-quartz-calcite-pyrite - chalcopyrite bearing boudin within talc-chloritoid whiteschists of the MR, Val d'Ayas, Italy (Chopin and Monie, 1984; Pawlig, 2001) yields an age of 40.54 +/- 0.36 Ma. The talc-chloritoid whiteschists from the area record pressures and temperatures of 1.6-2.4 GPa and 500-530°C (Chopin and Monie, 1984; Le Bayon et al., 2006) indicating near UHP metamorphic conditions. Based on the age, P-T, and textural

  13. Composition and origin of the Dewar geochemical anomaly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, S.J.; Hawke, B.R.; Gillis-Davis, J. J.; Taylor, G.J.; Lawrence, D.J.; Cahill, J.T.; Hagerty, J.J.; Lucey, P.G.; Smith, G.A.; Keil, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Dewar crater is a 50-km diameter impact structure located in the highlands northwest of the South Pole-Aitken basin on the lunar farside. A low-albedo area with enhanced Th and Sm values is centered east-oortheast of Dewar crater. This area also exhibits elevated FeO abundances (9.0-16.6 wt %) and TiO2 values (0.6-2 wt %). The range of FeO and TiO2 abundances determined for the darkest portions of the geochemical anomaly overlap the range of FeO and TiO2 values determined for nearside mare basalt deposits. Analysis of Clementine spectra obtained from the darkest portions of the Dewar geochemical anomaly indicates that the low-albedo materials contain large amounts of high-Ca clinopyroxene consistent with the presence of major amounts of mare basalt. Cryptomare deposits have played an important role in the formation of the Dewar geochemical anomaly. The evidence indicates that buried basalt, or cryptomare, was excavated from depth during impact events that formed dark-haloed craters in the region. We show that an early Imbrian- or Nectarian-age, low-TiO2 mare basalt deposit with enhanced Th concentrations (6-7 ??g/g) exists in the Dewar region. This ancient mare unit was buried by ejecta from Dewar crater, creating a cryptomare. Although most mare units on the central farside of the Moon exhibit low Th abundances, the enhanced Th values associated with the Dewar cryptomare deposit indicate that at least some portions of the underlying lunar interior (mantle and crust) on the farside of the Moon were not Th poor. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. SEDIMENT GEOCHEMICAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently, sediment geochemical models (diagenetic models) have been only able to explain sedimentary flux and concentration profiles for a few simplified geochemical cycles (e.g., nitrogen, carbon and sulfur). However with advances in numerical methods, increased accuracy ...

  15. SEDIMENT GEOCHEMICAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently, sediment geochemical models (diagenetic models) have been only able to explain sedimentary flux and concentration profiles for a few simplified geochemical cycles (e.g., nitrogen, carbon and sulfur). However with advances in numerical methods, increased accuracy ...

  16. Osmium isotope evidence for Early to Middle Proterozoic mantle lithosphere stabilization and concomitant production of juvenile crust in Dish Hill, CA peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armytage, Rosalind M. G.; Brandon, Alan D.; Peslier, Anne H.; Lapen, Thomas J.

    2014-07-01

    The 187Os/188Os compositions in peridotite samples from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) can be used to constrain the timing of melt extraction and potentially test the link between large-scale mantle melting and juvenile crust production. The SCLM has often experienced a complex history such that some lithophile elements such as REEs (rare earth elements) in these rocks typically record overprinting during metasomatism. New 187Os/188Os, major and trace element compositional data were obtained on sixteen Dish Hill peridotite xenoliths (California, USA) and are used to examine these issues. The samples show strong correlations between 187Os/188Os and indicators of melt depletion such as Lu abundance in clinopyroxene, modal abundance of clinopyroxene, bulk rock Al2O3 and the Cr# (Cr/(Cr + Al) in spinel. These relationships indicate that metasomatism did not compromise the 187Os/188Os systematics. The data appear to form two melt depletion trends consistent with Re depletion model ages (TRD) obtained from the two Al2O3 versus 187Os/188Os trends are 2.1 ± 0.5 Ga and 1.3 ± 0.3 Ga (±95% conf.). It has been suggested that the SCLM under Dish Hill may be fragments of oceanic lithosphere emplaced as the result of Farallon plate subduction during the Late Cretaceous (Luffi et al., 2009). However, the strong melt depletion trends, major element compositions and Re-depletion ages are not consistent with the interpretation of this suite of xenoliths having an oceanic lithospheric origin. Rather, the 2.1 Ga age coincides with Nd model ages of 2-2.3 Ga (Bennett and DePaolo, 1987; Rämö and Calzia, 1998) for the overlying Mojavia crustal province. The 1.3 Ga age is consistent with large-scale A-type magmatism in the nearby region at this time that is purported to be the result of mantle plume melting processes. Therefore, data from this study point to the SCLM under Dish Hill being formed by two ancient mantle-melting events, which could be the result of

  17. A relatively reduced Hadean continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhi; Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    Among the physical and chemical parameters used to characterize the Earth, oxidation state, as reflected by its prevailing oxygen fugacity (fO2), is a particularly important one. It controls many physicochemical properties and geological processes of the Earth's different reservoirs, and affects the partitioning of elements between coexisting phases and the speciation of degassed volatiles in melts. In the past decades, numerous studies have been conducted to document the evolution of mantle and atmospheric oxidation state with time and in particular the possible transition from an early reduced state to the present oxidized conditions. So far, it has been established that the oxidation state of the uppermost mantle is within ±2 log units of the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer, probably back to ~4.4 billion years ago (Ga) based on trace-elements studies of mantle-derived komatiites, kimberlites, basalts, volcanics and zircons, and that the O2 levels of atmosphere were initially low and rose markedly ~2.3 Ga known as the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), progressively reaching its present oxidation state of ~10 log units above QFM. In contrast, the secular evolution of oxidation state of the continental crust, an important boundary separating the underlying upper mantle from the surrounding atmosphere and buffering the exchanges and interactions between the Earth's interior and exterior, has rarely been addressed, although the presence of evolved crustal materials on the Earth can be traced back to ~4.4 Ga, e.g. by detrital zircons. Zircon is a common accessory mineral in nature, occurring in a wide variety of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, and is almost ubiquitous in crustal rocks. The physical and chemical durability of zircons makes them widely used in geochemical studies in terms of trace-elements, isotopes, ages and melt/mineral inclusions; in particular, zircons are persistent under most crustal conditions and can survive many secondary

  18. Phantom Archean crust in Mangaia hotspot lavas and the meaning of heterogeneous mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, C.; Cabral, R. A.; Jackson, M. G.; Vidito, C.; Day, J. M. D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-06-01

    Lavas from Mangaia in the Cook-Austral island chain, Polynesia, define an HIMU (or high μ, where μ=U238/Pb204) global isotopic end-member among ocean island basalts (OIB) with the highest 206,207,208Pb/204Pb. This geochemical signature is interpreted to reflect a recycled oceanic crust component in the mantle source. Mass independently fractionated (MIF) sulfur isotopes indicate that Mangaia lavas sampled recycled Archean material that was once at the Earth's surface, likely hydrothermally-modified oceanic crust. Recent models have proposed that crust that is subducted and then returned to the surface in a mantle plume is expected to transform to pyroxenite/eclogite during transit through the mantle. Here we examine this hypothesis for Mangaia using high-precision electron microprobe analysis on olivine phenocrysts. Contrary to expectations of a crustal component and, hence pyroxenite, results show a mixed peridotite and pyroxenite source, with peridotite dominating. If the isotopic compositions were inherited from subduction of recycled oceanic crust, our work shows that this source has phantom-like properties in that it can have its lithological identity destroyed while its isotope ratios are preserved. This may occur by partial melting of the pyroxenite and injection of its silicic melts into the surrounding mantle peridotite, yielding a refertilized peridotite. Evidence from one sample reveals that not all pyroxenite in the melting region was destroyed. Identification of source lithology using olivine phenocryst chemistry can be further compromised by magma chamber fractional crystallization, recharge, and mixing. We conclude that the commonly used terms mantle “heterogeneities” and “streaks” are ambiguous, and distinction should be made of its lithological and isotopic properties.

  19. Grenville age of basement rocks in Cape May NJ well: New evidence for Laurentian crust in U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain basement Chesapeake terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, R.E.; Maguire, T.J.; Feigenson, M.D.; Patino, L.C.; Volkert, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Chesapeake terrane of the U.S. mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain basement is bounded on the northwest by the Salisbury positive gravity and magnetic anomaly and extends to the southeast as far as the Atlantic coast. It underlies the Coastal Plain of Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and southern New Jersey. Rubidium/Strontium dating of the Chesapeake terrane basement yields an age of 1.025 ?? 0.036 Ga. This age is typical of Grenville province rocks of the Middle to Late Proterozoic Laurentian continent. The basement lithologies are similar to some exposed Grenville-age rocks of the Appalachians. The TiO2 and Zr/P2O5 composition of the metagabbro from the Chesapeake terrane basement is overlapped by those of the Proterozoic mafic dikes in the New Jersey Highlands. These new findings support the interpretation that Laurentian basement extends southeast as far as the continental shelf in the U.S. mid-Atlantic region. The subcrop of Laurentian crust under the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain implies unroofing by erosion of the younger Carolina (Avalon) supracrustal terrane. Dextral-transpression fault duplexes may have caused excessive uplift in the Salisbury Embayment area during the Alleghanian orogeny. This extra uplift in the Salisbury area may have caused the subsequent greater subsidence of the Coastal Plain basement in the embayment.

  20. Secular changes recorded in mineralization of African crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabidi, T.; Thiart, C.; de Wit, M. J.

    2007-02-01

    Variations in enrichment of mineral deposits in continental crust over time may be one way to test for secular changes in crustal genesis. We present spatial and chemical information about African mineral deposits with which to 'fingerprint' the metal endowment of African crust of different age. We then compare three regions of juvenile African crust, all with similar geology, tectonic history, and mineral deposits, but each of a different age. Each region was formed during rapid accretion of similar tectonic units derived from the mantle over ˜500 million years, and is apparently devoid of older recycled continental crust. Together, the three areas span 2500 million years of Earth history, from 0.5 Ga to 3.0 Ga, (e.g. the Zimbabwe Craton (2.5-3.0 Ga), the Birimian Shield (1.8-2.3 Ga), and the Arabian-Nubian Shield (0.5-1.0 Ga)). The three areas have a studied total of 2671 mineral deposits that are divided into six groups according to their geochemical affinities. Using these known deposits, a measure of spatial association (spatial coefficient) is derived. We show that each region has a unique metal endowment and that, per unit area, there is a greater concentration of mineral deposits in the crust of the Archean Zimbabwe Craton relative to the younger crust of the Birimian Shield and in turn the Arabian-Nubian Shield. This study quantitatively corroborates past studies that suggest older crust is more mineral diverse and enriched in mineral deposits than younger crust. Thus, a secular change in mineralization is implicated, and the mantle derived metal endowment of the African crust has undergone major evolutionary changes from Archean to Neoproterozoic time.

  1. Exploring the link between crustal melting and extensional collapse; field, geochemical, and Sr-Nd isotopic evidence from pre-, syn-, and post- extensional lavas of the Whipple Mountains region, lower Colorado River extensional corridor, CA and AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, M. K.; Gans, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    New geochemical and isotopic data from pre-, syn-, and post-extensional lavas shed light on the Miocene magmatic and tectonic evolution of the Lower Colorado River Extensional Corridor (LCREC) in the vicinity of the Whipple Mountains, CA. Extensional block rotation has exposed an exceptional cross-sectional view of the entire Tertiary volcanic accumulation, allowing interpretation of the relative timing of volcanic and extensional tilting events and thorough sampling of volcanic units. A 1.5 km thick homoclinal section of basalt and basaltic andesite lava flows and dacite and rhyolite flows and domes was erupted in the 1.5 million years immediately prior to a major extensional event at 19 Ma. This extensional event caused 40-60° of block rotation within 500,000 years before mafic and intermediate volcanism resumed at 18.5 Ma. Our field observations are consistent with a model where thermal weakening drives extensional collapse. This model predicts that erupted lavas should incorporate a significant crustal component. To test for the involvement of crustal melting and assimilation in the generation of these lavas, Sr and Nd isotopes were collected by ID-TIMS on a suite of 18 volcanic rocks, spanning the compositional and chronologic diversity of the volcanic stratigraphy. Major and trace elements were also collected by XRF and ICP-MS respectively. 86Sr/87Sr(i) values range from 0.706093 to 0.711527 while eNd(i) values range from -1.23 to -12.37, and the two isotope ratios correlate negatively. 86Sr/87Sr(i) increases and eNd(i) decreases with increasing SiO2, indicating that crustal melting and assimilation plays an important role in the evolution of these extension related magmas. Along with field observations, this new geochemical data lends support to the hypothesis that thermal weakening of the crust drove extensional collapse within the LCREC.

  2. Origin of the Sinai-Negev erg, Egypt and Israel: mineralogical and geochemical evidence for the importance of the Nile and sea level history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Roskin, Joel; Tsoar, Haim; Skipp, Gary; Budahn, James R.; Sneh, Amihai; Porat, Naomi; Stanley, Jean-Daniel; Katra, Itzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    The Sinai–Negev erg occupies an area of 13,000 km2 in the deserts of Egypt and Israel. Aeolian sand of this erg has been proposed to be derived from the Nile Delta, but empirical data supporting this view are lacking. An alternative source sediment is sand from the large Wadi El Arish drainage system in central and northern Sinai. Mineralogy of the Negev and Sinai dunes shows that they are high in quartz, with much smaller amounts of K-feldspar and plagioclase. Both Nile Delta sands and Sinai wadi sands, upstream of the dunes, also have high amounts of quartz relative to K-feldspar and plagioclase. However, Sinai wadi sands have abundant calcite, whereas Nile Delta sands have little or no calcite. Overall, the mineralogical data suggest that the dunes are derived dominantly from the Nile Delta, with Sinai wadi sands being a minor contributor. Geochemical data that proxy for both the light mineral fraction (SiO2/10–Al2O3 + Na2O + K2O–CaO) and heavy mineral fraction (Fe2O3–MgO–TiO2) also indicate a dominant Nile Delta source for the dunes. Thus, we report here the first empirical evidence that the Sinai–Negev dunes are derived dominantly from the Nile Delta. Linkage of the Sinai–Negev erg to the Nile Delta as a source is consistent with the distribution of OSL ages of Negev dunes in recent studies. Stratigraphic studies show that during the Last Glacial period, when dune incursions in the Sinai–Negev erg began, what is now the Nile Delta area was characterized by a broad, sandy, minimally vegetated plain, with seasonally dry anastomosing channels. Such conditions were ideal for providing a ready source of sand for aeolian transport under what were probably much stronger glacial-age winds. With the post-glacial rise in sea level, the Nile River began to aggrade. Post-glacial sedimentation has been dominated by fine-grained silts and clays. Thus, sea level, along with favorable climatic conditions, emerges as a major influence on the timing of dune

  3. Does subduction zone magmatism produce average continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellam, R. M.; Hawkesworth, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether present day subduction zone magmatism produces material of average continental crust composition, which perhaps most would agree is andesitic, is addressed. It was argued that modern andesitic to dacitic rocks in Andean-type settings are produced by plagioclase fractionation of mantle derived basalts, leaving a complementary residue with low Rb/Sr and a positive Eu anomaly. This residue must be removed, for example by delamination, if the average crust produced in these settings is andesitic. The author argued against this, pointing out the absence of evidence for such a signature in the mantle. Either the average crust is not andesitic, a conclusion the author was not entirely comfortable with, or other crust forming processes must be sought. One possibility is that during the Archean, direct slab melting of basaltic or eclogitic oceanic crust produced felsic melts, which together with about 65 percent mafic material, yielded an average crust of andesitic composition.

  4. Recycled oceanic crust and marine sediment in the source of alkali basalts in Shandong, eastern China: Evidence from magma water content and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Xia, Qun-Ke; Deloule, Etienne; Chen, Huan; Feng, Min

    2015-12-01

    The magma water contents and cpx δ18O values in alkali basalts from the Fuyanyshan (FYS) volcano in Shandong, eastern China, were investigated by an inverse calculation based on the water content of clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts, the ivAlcpx-dependent water partitioning coefficient Dwatercpx>/melt, and secondary ion mass spectrometer, respectively. The calculated water content (H2O wt.) of magma ranges from 0.58% to 3.89%. It positively correlates with heavy rare earth element concentrations and bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr ratios, and it negatively correlates with Nb/U ratios. However, it is not correlated with bulk Mg# (Mg# = 100 × Mg / (Mg + Fe)) and (La/Yb)n (n represents primitive mantle normalization). Combined with the rather homogenous distribution of water content within cpx grains, these correlations indicate that the water variations among different samples represent the original magma signature, rather than results of a shallow process, such as degassing and diffusion. The δ18O of cpx phenocrysts varies from 3.6‰ to 6.3‰ (±0.5‰, 2SD), which may be best explained by the involvement of components from the lower and upper oceanic crust with marine sediments within the mantle source. The H2O/Ce ratios of the calculated melts range from 113 to 696 and form a positive trend with bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr, which cannot be explained by the recycled Sulu eclogite or by the metasomatized lithospheric mantle. Our modeling calculation shows that the decoupling of ɛHf and ɛNd could be caused by the involvement of marine sediments. Combing the high Ba/Th ratios, positive Sr spikes, and low Ce/Pb ratios for the Fuyanshan basalts, we suggest that the hydrous nature of the FYS basalts was derived from the hydrous mantle transition zone with ancient sediments.

  5. Direct dating of paleomagnetic results from Precambrian sediments in the Amazon craton: Evidence for Grenvillian emplacement of exotic crust in SE Appalachians of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agrella-Filho, Manoel S.; Tohver, Eric; Santos, João O. S.; Elming, Sten-Åke; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Pacca, Igor I. G.; Geraldes, Mauro C.

    2008-03-01

    We apply a new diagenetic dating technique to determine the age of magnetization for Precambrian sedimentary rocks in the SW Amazon craton. Two new paleomagnetic poles are reported from the rocks of the Aguapeí Gp.: red beds of the Fortuna Fm. (Plat = 59.8°N, Plon = 155.9°E, A95 = 9.5, K = 14, 18 sites, N/n 128/115, Q = 5) and the reverse-polarity mudstones of the overlying Vale da Promissão Formation (Plat = 49.5°N, Plon = 89.3°E, A95 = 12.5, K = 30, 6 sites, N/n = 94/80, Q = 4). The Fortuna Fm. magnetization is hosted by massive, interstitial hematite cement and constitutes a post-depositional remanence. The age of diagenesis of the red beds is well-constrained by the 1149 ± 7 Ma U-Pb age of authigenic xenotime rims on detrital zircons determined by SHRIMP analysis. The magnetite-hosted remanence of the Vale da Promissão Fm. may be detrital in origin, but the age of deposition is poorly constrained. The reliable and precisely-dated Fortuna Fm. paleomagnetic pole fixes the paleogeographic position of the Amazon craton near the SE Appalachians portion of North America at 1.15 Ga. These data demonstrate a mobile Grenvillian link between these two cratons, and support the recent identification of Amazon crust in the Blue Ridge province region of North America.

  6. Isotopic Modeling of Dynamic Geochemical Layering in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, V. E.; Depaolo, D. J.

    2005-12-01

    In order to understand the dynamics of the Earth's mantle, it is vitally important to reconcile geophysical and geochemical lines of evidence that suggest discrepant models for mantle convection. For example, seismic tomography provides evidence that subducted slabs of oceanic lithosphere can penetrate through the transition zone into the lower mantle, implying whole-mantle convection, whereas the distinct ranges of isotopic values for mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and ocean island basalts (OIB) has been invoked as evidence for layered mantle convection. We present here a model that results in dynamic geochemical layering in the mantle (allowing for whole-mantle convection while creating distinct isotopic reservoirs in the shallow and deep mantle). A key aspect of this model is that the process of wet partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges generates three chemically distinct regions: enriched basaltic crust (BC), a depleted harzburgite/lherzolite layer (DHL), and an incipiently melted lherzholite layer (IML) that is only slightly depleted. These three layers can also have different, distinct physical properties as well (e.g., Braun et al. 2000). During subduction and penetration of the subducted slab lithologic column through the transition zone, any preferential separation of the slab material based on physical properties (e.g., retention of low-viscosity DHL material in the upper mantle or penetration of the cold, high-viscosity BC layer to the lower mantle) will result in distinct ɛNd and ɛHf values for the upper and lower mantle. Box models are used to investigate the evolution of ɛNd and ɛHf during Earth's history, and the resulting values are compared to measured values for MORBs and OIBs. These results may have implications for constraining the slab flux from the upper to lower mantle.

  7. 1900-Ma ocean crust in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The oldest known occurrence in North America of an ophiolite, considered to be a piece of ancient ocean crust, has been reported in the Cape Smith Belt in northern Quebec, Canada.The recognition last summer of a key structural component of the characteristic ophiolite suite has buttressed confidence in the theory that the 1900-Ma fragments of an ocean basin were accreted to an early Proterozoic Canadian continent. The tectonic mixing of oceanic and continental crust is strong evidence for the operation of plate tectonics early in Earth's history.

  8. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

  9. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

  10. Electrical signature of modern and ancient tectonic processes in the crust of the Atlas mountains of Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo; Jones, Alan G.; Siniscalchi, Agata; Campanyà, Joan; Kiyan, Duygu; Romano, Gerardo; Rouai, Mohamed; TopoMed MT Team

    2011-04-01

    The Atlas Mountains in Morocco are considered as type examples of intracontinental mountain chains, with high topography that contrasts with moderate crustal shortening and thickening. Whereas recent geological studies and geodynamic modelling suggest the existence of dynamic topography to explain this apparent contradiction, there is a lack of modern geophysical data at the crustal scale to corroborate this hypothesis. To address this deficiency, magnetotelluric data were recently acquired that image the electrical resistivity distribution of the crust from the Middle Atlas to the Anti-Atlas, crossing the tabular Moulouya plain and the High Atlas. All tectonic units show different, distinct and unique electrical signatures throughout the crust reflecting the tectonic history of development of each one. In the upper crust, electrical resistivity values and geometries can be associated to sediment sequences in the Moulouya and Anti-Atlas and to crustal scale fault systems in the High Atlas developed likely during Cenozoic times. In the lower crust, the low resistivity anomaly found below the Moulouya plain, together with other geophysical (low velocity anomaly, lack of earthquakes and minimum Bouguer anomaly) and geochemical (Neogene-Quaternary intraplate alkaline volcanic fields) evidences, infer the existence of a small degree of partial melt at the base of the crust. Resistivity values suggest a partial melt fraction of the order of 2-8%. The low resistivity anomaly found below the Anti-Atlas may be associated with a relict subduction of Precambrian oceanic sediments, or to precipitated minerals during the release of fluids from the mantle during the accretion of the Anti-Atlas to the West African Supercontinent during the Panafrican orogeny (ca. 685 Ma).

  11. Lu-Hf systematics of the ultra-high temperature Napier Complex, East Antarctica: evidence for the early Archean formation of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Mukasa, S. B.; Andronikov, A. V.; Osanai, Y.; Harley, S. L.; Kelly, N. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Napier Complex in East Antarctica comprises some of the oldest rocks on earth (~3.8 billion years old), overprinted by an ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphic event near the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. Garnet, orthopyroxene, sapphirine, osumilite, rutile and a whole rock representing an equilibrated assemblage from this belt yield a Lu-Hf isochron age of 2,403 ± 43 Ma. Preservation of the UHT mineral assemblage in the rock analyzed suggests rapid cooling with closure likely to have occurred for the Lu-Hf system at post-peak UHT conditions near a temperature of ~800C. Individual zircon grains from Gage Ridge within the Napier Complex yielded a remarkably uniform range of 176Hf/177Hf values between 0.280433 ± 7 and 0.280505 ± 10, corresponding to ɛHf > +5.6 at 3.85 Ga relative to the chondritic uniform reservoir (CHUR). Because of their exceedingly low Lu/Hf values (<0.001), the grains are effectively recording the initial Hf isotope composition of the magmatic systems from which the gneiss protoliths crystallized. These results indicate that (1) the source of the crustal materials that formed the Napier Complex at 3.85 Ga were depleted relative to the CHUR. The extent of depletion involved is higher than has been predicted by extrapolation from the Lu-Hf isotopic evolution inferred for the source of Proterozoic and Phanerozoic basalts, judging from an fLu/Hf value of 0.51, (2) the depleted mantle reservoir has been in existence since very early in Earth’s history, in agreement with the early differentiation of the Earth that the latest core formation models require, and (3) an extremely depleted source also mean that the bulk of continental crust was extracted from the mantle by ~3.8 Ga. Moreover, the results demonstrate that even the oldest silicic rocks in the complex are not likely to have formed from remobilized older crustal materials, but were instead juvenile products of mantle melting. In addition, zircons with metamorphic rims have a similar

  12. Fault zone architecture, San Jacinto fault zone, southern California: evidence for focused fluid flow and heat transfer in the shallow crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, N.; Girty, G. H.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    We report results of a new study of the San Jacinto fault zone architecture in Horse Canyon, SW of Anza, California, where stream incision has exposed a near-continuous outcrop of the fault zone at ~0.4 km depth. The fault zone at this location consists of a fault core, transition zone, damage zone, and lithologically similar wall rocks. We collected and analyzed samples for their bulk and grain density, geochemical data, clay mineralogy, and textural and modal mineralogy. Progressive deformation within the fault zone is characterized by mode I cracking, subsequent shearing of already fractured rock, and cataclastic flow. Grain comminution advances towards the strongly indurated cataclasite fault core. Damage progression towards the core is accompanied by a decrease in bulk and grain density, and an increase in porosity and dilational volumetric strain. Palygorskite and mixed-layer illite/smectite clay minerals are present in the damage and transition zones and are the result of hydrolysis reactions. The estimated percentage of illite in illite/smectite increases towards the fault core where the illite/smectite to illite conversion is complete, suggesting elevated temperatures that may have reached 150°C. Chemical alteration and elemental mass changes are observed throughout the fault zone and are most pronounced in the fault core. We conclude that the observed chemical and mineralogical changes can only be produced by the interaction of fractured wall rocks and chemically active fluids that are mobilized through the fault zone by thermo-pressurization during and after seismic events. Based on the high element mobility and absence of illite/smectite in the fault core, we expect that greatest water/rock ratios occur within the fault core. These results indicate that hot pore fluids circulate upwards through the fractured fault core and into the surrounding damage zone. Though difficult to constrain, the site studied during this investigation may represent the top

  13. The cordierite- to spinel-cataclasite transition - Structure of the lunar crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzberg, C. T.; Baker, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    A two-layer lunar crust model is proposed in light of geochemical relationships between spinel cataclasites and anorthosites, discussing the relative abundances of these rocks. The uppermost stratigraphic unit of this model consists of members of the anorthositic series, and is estimated to be 12-20 km thick. The lower, Mg-rich unit consists of rocks with cotectic mineralogical proportions, and may constitute the greatest volume of the crust.

  14. Neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, C. P.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    We calculate properties of neutron star matter at subnuclear densities using an improved nuclear Hamiltonian. Nuclei disappear and the matter becomes uniform at a density of about 0.6n(s), where n(s) of about 0.16/cu fm is the saturation density of nuclear matter. As a consequence, the mass of matter in the crusts of neutron stars is only about half as large as previously estimated. In about half of that crustal mass, nuclear matter occurs in shapes very different from the roughly spherical nuclei familiar at lower densities. The thinner crust and the unusual nuclear shape have important consequences for theories of the rotational and thermal evolution of neutron stars, especialy theories of glitches.

  15. Psoriasis or crusted scabies.

    PubMed

    Goyal, N N; Wong, G A

    2008-03-01

    We describe a case of a 67-year-old woman with a 1-year history of nail thickening and a non-itchy erythematous scaly eruption on the fingertips. She was diagnosed with psoriasis and started on methotrexate after having had no response to topical calcipotriol. The diagnosis was reviewed after it was revealed by another consultant that the patient's husband had been attending dermatology clinics for several years with chronic pruritus, which had been repeatedly thought to be due to scabies. Our patient was found to have crusted scabies after a positive skin scraping showed numerous mites. She was treated with topical permethrin, keratolytics and oral ivermectin. We also review the literature on crusted scabies and its management, with recommendations.

  16. Syn-volcanic cannibalisation of juvenile felsic crust: Superimposed giant 18O-depleted rhyolite systems in the hot and thinned crust of Mesoproterozoic central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithies, R. H.; Kirkland, C. L.; Cliff, J. B.; Howard, H. M.; Quentin de Gromard, R.

    2015-08-01

    Eruptions of voluminous 18O-depleted rhyolite provide the best evidence that the extreme conditions required to produce and accumulate huge volumes of felsic magma can occur in the upper 10 km of the crust. Mesoproterozoic bimodal volcanic sequences from the Talbot Sub-basin in central Australia contain possibly the world's most voluminous accumulation of 18O-depleted rhyolite. This volcanic system differs from the better known, but geochemically similar, Miocene Snake River Plain - Yellowstone Plateau of North America. Both systems witnessed 'super' sized eruptions from shallow crustal chambers, and produced 18O-depleted rhyolite. The Talbot system, however, accumulated over a much longer period (>30 Ma), at a single depositional centre, and from a magma with mantle-like isotopic compositions that contrast strongly with the isotopically evolved basement and country-rock compositions. Nevertheless, although the Talbot rhyolites are exclusively 18O-depleted, the unavoidable inference of an 18O-undepleted precursor requires high-temperature rejuvenation of crust in an upper-crustal chamber, and in this respect the evolution of the Talbot rhyolites and 18O-depleted rhyolites of the Snake River Plain - Yellowstone Plateau is very similar. However, instead of older crustal material, the primary upper-crustal source recycled into Talbot rhyolites was comagmatic (or nearly so) felsic rock itself derived from a contemporaneous juvenile basement hot-zone. Whereas giant low δ18O volcanic systems show that voluminous melting of upper crust can occur, our studies indicate that felsic magmas generated at lower crustal depths can also contribute significantly to the thermal and material budget of these systems. The requirement that very high-temperatures be achieved and sustained in the upper crust means that voluminous low δ18O magmatism is rare, primarily restricted to bimodal tholeiitic, high-K rhyolite (A-type) magmatic associations in highly attenuated lithosphere. In the

  17. Petrology and geochronology of crustal xenoliths from the Bering Strait region: Linking deep and shallow processes in extending continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akinin, V.V.; Miller, E.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Petrologic, geochemical, and metamorphic data on gneissic xenoliths derived from the middle and lower crust in the Neogene Bering Sea basalt province, coupled with U-Pb geochronology of their zircons using sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry (SHRIMP-RG), yield a detailed comparison between the P-T-t and magmatic history of the lower crust and magmatic, metamorphic, and deformational history of the upper crust. Our results provide unique insights into the nature of lithospheric processes that accompany the extension of continental crust. The gneissic, mostly maficxenoliths (constituting less than two percent of the total xenolith population) from lavas in the Enmelen, RU, St. Lawrence, Nunivak, and Seward Peninsula fields most likely originated through magmatic fractionation processes with continued residence at granulite-facies conditions. Zircon single-grain ages (n ??? 125) are interpreted as both magmatic and metamorphic and are entirely Cretaceous to Paleocene in age (ca. 138-60 Ma). Their age distributions correspond to the main ages of magmatism in two belts of supracrustal volcanic and plutonic rocks in the Bering Sea region. Oscillatory-zoned igneous zircons, Late Cretaceous to Paleocene metamorphic zircons and overgrowths, and lack of any older inheritance in zircons from the xenoliths provide strong evidence for juvenile addition of material to the crust at this time. Surface exposures of Precambrian and Paleozoic rocks locally reached upper amphibolite-facies (sillimanite grade) to granulite-facies conditions within a series of extension-related metamorphic culminations or gneiss domes, which developed within the Cretaceous magmatic belt. Metamorphic gradients and inferred geotherms (??30-50 ??C/km) from both the gneiss domes and xenoliths aretoo high to be explained by crustal thickening alone. Magmatic heat input from the mantle is necessary to explain both the petrology of the magmas and elevated metamorphic temperatures. Deep

  18. Geochemical and isotopic (Sr, O, C, S) evidence for multiple fluid sources for the Muþ barite deposits, SE Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumral, M.; Baran, A.; Budakoglu, M.

    2009-05-01

    Barite mineralizations are observed in recrystalized and dolomitic limestones relating to Devonian aged Ground Formation, and in forms of veins, clearance filling ; and they are mostly hydrothermal characterized. It was defined by the results of field observations and analysis that barite mineralization is accompanied by the elements like copper, lead and zinc. That 18O and 87Sr/86Sr isotope values of limestones and barites which are wall rocks are very close reminds same origin formation. According to the relations of ore and wall rock, the most natural source that may cause mineralization is Devonian sea water, but mineralization has higher trace element and rare earth element concentrations. That Eu characterizing continental climate from rare earth elements was found high and Ce, characteristic of sea water, was negative preoccupy that mineralization in the area did not create any formation. In addition, considering that high 34S (‰ 17-44) and 18O values (‰ 12-20) and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes characterize the continental crust, a complicate formation mechanism is seen. It is thought that the solution causing mineralization is the Devonian sea water affected from continental crust. 34S ve 18O are enriched when Devonian sea water, in continental crust, enters a hydrothermal cycle which is permanently heatened by granitic intrusion and in consequence of bacterial activities occured during this process. It dissolves and incorporates Ba, Sr, Pb, Cu and Zn during this cycle. Eventually, mineralization occured through impregnation of these elements into piling in parts sedimentation continued.

  19. Nature of the crust in the northern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, Marco; Bonatti, Enrico; Bosworth, William; Cai, Yue; Cipriani, Anna; Palmiotto, Camilla; Ronca, Sara; Seyler, Monique

    2017-04-01

    We present here 3D seismic reflection and gravity data obtained from an off-axis area of the NW Red Sea, as well as results of a study of gabbroic rocks recovered in the same area both from an oil well below a thick evaporitic-sedimentary sequence, and from a layered mafic complex exposed on the Brothers islets. We show that magmatism can play an important role in the evolution of narrow rifts, and that our results can help to solve the controversy on the nature of the crust in the northern/central Red Sea, i.e., the crust outside the axial oceanic cells is either oceanic or it consists of melt-intruded extended continental crust. The studied gabbros show petrologic and geochemical signatures similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and are compatible with their having been emplaced either in a continental or in an oceanic context. We explored the different hypotheses proposed to explain the lack of magnetic anomalies in presence of oceanic crust in the northern Red Sea. Our results combined with a review of all the geophysical and geological data in the area point to a stretched and thinned continental crust with few isolated sites of basaltic injections, in line with a model whereby asthenospheric melt intrusions contribute to weaken the lower crust enabling some decoupling between upper and lower crust, protracting upper crust extension and delaying crustal breakup. Our findings show that continental rupture in the northern Red Sea is preceded by intrusion of basaltic melts with MORB-type elemental and isotopic signature, that cooled forming gabbros at progressively shallower crustal depths as rifting progressed towards continental separation.

  20. Geochemical cycles of atmospheric gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Drever, J. I.

    1988-01-01

    The processes that control the atmosphere and atmospheric changes are reviewed. The geochemical cycles of water vapor, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and minor atmospheric constituents are examined. Changes in atmospheric chemistry with time are discussed using evidence from the rock record and analysis of the present atmosphere. The role of biological evolution in the history of the atmosphere and projected changes in the future atmosphere are considered.

  1. Geochemical cycles of atmospheric gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Drever, J. I.

    1988-01-01

    The processes that control the atmosphere and atmospheric changes are reviewed. The geochemical cycles of water vapor, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and minor atmospheric constituents are examined. Changes in atmospheric chemistry with time are discussed using evidence from the rock record and analysis of the present atmosphere. The role of biological evolution in the history of the atmosphere and projected changes in the future atmosphere are considered.

  2. The Mafic Lower Crust of Neoproterozoic age beneath Western Arabia: Implications for Understanding African Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.; Mooney, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    We review evidence that the lower crust of Arabia - and by implication, that beneath much of Africa was formed at the same time as the upper crust, rather than being a product of Cenozoic magmatic underplating. Arabia is a recent orphan of Africa, separated by opening of the Red Sea ~20 Ma, so our understanding of its lower crust provides insights into that of Africa. Arabian Shield (exposed in W. Arabia) is mostly Neoproterozoic (880-540 Ma) reflecting a 300-million year process of continental crustal growth due to amalgamated juvenile magmatic arcs welded together by granitoid intrusions that make up as much as 50% of the Shield's surface. Seismic refraction studies of SW Arabia (Mooney et al., 1985) reveal two layers, each ~20 km thick, separated by a well-defined Conrad discontinuity. The upper crust has average Vp ~6.3 km/sec whereas the lower crust has average Vp ~7.0 km/sec, corresponding to a granitic upper crust and gabbroic lower crust. Neogene (<30 ma) lava fields in Arabia (harrats) extend over 2500 km, from Yemen to Syria. Many of these lavas contain xenoliths, providing a remarkable glimpse of the lower-crustal and upper-mantle lithosphere beneath W. Arabia. Lower crustal xenoliths brought up in 8 harrats in Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Syria are mostly 2-pyroxene granulites of igneous (gabbroic, anorthositic, and dioritic) origin. They contain plagioclase, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene, and a few contain garnet and rare amphibole and yield mineral-equilibrium temperatures of 700-900°C. Pyroxene-rich and plagioclase-rich suites have mean Al2O3 contents of 13% and 19%, respectively: otherwise the two groups have similar elemental compositions, with ~50% SiO2 and ~1% TiO2, with low K2O (<0.5%) and Na2O (1-3%). Both groups show tholeiitic affinities, unrelated to their alkali basalt hosts. Mean pyroxene-rich and plagioclase-rich suites show distinct mean MgO contents (11% vs. 7%), Mg# (67 vs. 55), and contents of compatible elements Ni (169 vs. 66 ppm

  3. The effect of recycled oceanic crust in the thermal evolution of the Galapagos Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Herzberg, C. T.; Vidito, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Current models suggest that the massive basaltic production responsible for the emplacement of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPS) during the Permian-Paleocene may represent the initial phases (plume heads) of some of the mantle plumes that feed the current ocean island basalts (OIB). In many cases, magmatism associated with the initiation of mantle plumes was so voluminous that produced global environmental impacts. The origin of these intra-plate magmatism is still debated but recent petrological, geochemical and geophysical studies of some of these localities like Samoa, Hawaii, Galapagos, provide evidence that melting is related to a true mantle plume, representing a geochemically heterogeneous, hot-buoyant domain that originates from a boundary layer beneath the upper mantle. Thus, plume-related magmas produced in OIB and LIPS and their connecting plume tracks are windows into the Earth's mantle, providing evidence on mantle temperature, size and composition of heterogeneities, and the deep earth geochemical cycles. Our preliminary petrological modeling suggests that mantle plumes for LIPS with Permian-Paleocene ages were generally hotter and melted more extensively than plumes of more modern oceanic islands. Although a lot of work has been done on LIPS and OIB, no complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume is available to this point, mostly due to the inaccessibility of the submerged sections of almost all plume tracks. Galapagos-related lavas provide a complete record of the evolution of a mantle plume since the plume's initial stages in the Cretaceous. In the case of the Galapagos, our work suggests a decrease from TP(max) of1650 C in the Cretaceous to 1500 C in the present day. Our recent work on the Galapagos Islands and the preliminary work on older Galapagos-related terranes suggest that this secular cooling is directly related with increasing amounts of recycled crust in the plume.

  4. Argon, oxygen, and boron isotopic evidence documenting 40ArE accumulation in phengite during water-rich high-pressure subduction metasomatism of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menold, Carrie A.; Grove, Marty; Sievers, Natalie E.; Manning, Craig E.; Yin, An; Young, Edward D.; Ziegler, Karen

    2016-07-01

    were even older, exceeding the time of eclogite formation by a factor of 1.7. In contrast, lower pressure retrograde muscovite present within the host gneiss and in discrete shear zones cutting the selvage yield 40Ar/39Ar ages that were younger than the time of HP metamorphism and consistent with regional cooling age patterns. Our observation of high 40ArE concentrations in phengite from schistose rocks infiltrated by regionally extensive fluids at HP conditions runs contrary to widely held expectations. Conventional wisdom dictates that low phengite/fluid partition coefficients for argon (Dphg/fluid Ar =10-3to 10-5) coupled with the dry, closed systems conditions that are widely reported to characterize HP metamorphism of continental crust explains why high concentrations of 40ArE partitions are able to accumulate within phengite. We alternatively propose that phengite/fluid partition coefficients for argon increase linearly with pressure to values as high as 10-2 to allow phengites to accumulate large amounts of 40ArE from aqueous fluids under HP to UHP conditions.

  5. Crust-mantle evolution in active arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimalanta, Carla B.; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Shyu, J. Bruce H.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.

    2017-07-01

    The East-Southeast Asia has been regarded as one of the most tectonically complex regions in the world. It is essentially located at junctions between major plate systems, including the Sundaland, the Philippine Sea Plate and the Indo-Australian Plate. The region, thus, presents a very challenging laboratory for understanding the many operative processes that have shaped and continue to shape it. By integrating researches involving geological, structural, paleontological, geochemical, geochronological and geophysical interests on the Philippines and the region, fresh insights are produced that help better explain its geodynamic history. The integration of these different methods advance our understanding on the timing, causes and environmental impacts of tectonic processes, such as the generation of oceanic crust, ophiolite emplacement, magmatism, deposition of sediments, mineralization, earthquake and faulting.

  6. Nd-Sr evidence of Palaeoproterozoic Cu-Ni-Co-PGE-magmatism in Fennoscandia and mantle-crust interaction on stages of layered intrusions formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Pavel; Bayanova, Tamara; Steshenko, Ekaterina

    2017-04-01

    Palaeoproterozoic Fennoscandian layered intrusions belong to the pyroxenite-gabbronorite-anorthosite formation and spread on a vast area within the Baltic Shield. Based on isotope U-Pb, Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr and Re-Os data the duration of this formation can be to 100-130 Ma (2.53-2.40 Ga) [Serov et. al., 2008; Bayanova et. al., 2009]. We have studied rocks of layered PGE-bearing Fedorovo-Pansky, Monchetundra, Burakovsky, Olanga group intrusions and Penikat intrusion. According to recent and new complex Nd-Sr-REE data magma source of the vast majority of these intrusions was a mantle reservoir with unusual characteristics: negative values of ɛNd (from 0 to -4) and ISr = 0.702-0.706, flat spectra of REE (value of (La/Yb)N 1.0-5.8) with positive Eu-anomalies [Bayanova et. al., 2009; Bayanova et. al., 2014]. However, the distribution of REE for ore-bearing gabbronorite intrusions Penikat (Sm-Nd age is 2426 ± 38 Ma [Ekimova et. al., 2011]) has a negative Eu-anomalies. This may be due to the formation of plagioclase and its removal from the magma chamber. One of the aims of isotope geochemical investigations is to establish the contribution of mantle components in the formation of layered intrusions rocks and the degrees of contamination of the magma source by crustal material. To calculate the proportion of mantle component model binary mixture was used [Jahn et. al., 2000]. As the mantle components we used data for CHUR: ɛNd = 0, [Nd] = 1.324 [Palm, O'Neil, 2003] and for crustal components were used host-rocks Nd-data. The proportion of mantle component for the studied intrusions was 77-99%. Also, data were obtained for the Monchetundra dike complex and amphibolized gabbro, for which the proportion of mantle material was 20-40%. For these rocks a significant crustal contamination is most likely. This process resulted in low values of ɛNd, a direct relationship between ɛNd and Nd concentration, and significant differences between the U-Pb and Sm-Nd model ages. A

  7. Plutonic rocks in the Mineoka-Setogawa ophiolitic mélange, central Japan: Fragments of middle to lower crust of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyama, Yuji; Ito, Hisatoshi; Hokanishi, Natsumi; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2017-06-01

    A Paleogene accretionary complex, the Mineoka-Setogawa Belt, is distributed around the Izu Collision Zone, central Japan. Plutonic rocks of gabbro, diorite and tonalite compositions are included as fragments and dykes in an ophiolitic mélange in this belt. Zircon U-Pb dating of the plutonic rocks indicates that they were formed at ca. 35 Ma simultaneously. These ages are consistent with Eocene-Oligocene tholeiite and calc-alkaline arc magmatism in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Arc and exclude several previous models for the origin of the Mineoka-Setogawa ophiolitic rocks. The geochemical characteristics of these plutonic rocks are similar to those of the Eocene-Oligocene IBM tholeiite and calc-alkaline volcanic rocks as well as to the accreted middle crust of the IBM Arc, the Tanzawa Plutonic Complex. Moreover, their lithology is consistent with those of the middle and lower crust of the IBM Arc estimated from the seismic velocity structure. These lines of evidence strongly indicate that the plutonic rocks in the Mineoka-Setogawa ophiolitic mélange are fragments of the middle to lower crust of the IBM Arc. Additionally, the presence of the Mineoka-Setogawa intermediate to felsic plutonic rocks supports the hypothesis that intermediate magma can form continental crust in intra-oceanic arcs.

  8. Petrological and two-phase flow modelling of deep arc crust: insights on continental crust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, Nicolas; Bouilhol, Pierre; van Hunen, Jeroen; Cornet, Julien

    2017-04-01

    The genesis of felsic crust is generally attributed to two main processes: the differentiation of primary magmas by crystallization within the crust or uppermost mantle and the partial melting of older crustal rocks. The Mixing/Assimilation/Hybridization of these magmas in the deep crust (MASH zone) and their subsequent segregation constitutes the principal process by which continents have become differentiated into a more mafic, residual lower crust and a more felsic and hydrated upper crust. Although this model describes qualitatively how continental crust forms, little is known on the physical and chemical mechanisms occurring at the root of volcanic arcs. To assess the dynamics of partial melting, melt injection and hybridization in the deep crust, a new 2-D two-phase flow code using finite volume method has been developed. The formulation takes into account: (i) melt flow through porosity waves/channels, (ii) heat transfer, assuming local thermal equilibrium between solid and liquid, (iii) thermodynamic modelling of stable phases and (iv) injection of mantle-derived melt at the Moho. Our parametric study shows that pressure, heat influx and melt:rock ratio are the main parameters controlling the volume and composition of differentiated magma. Overall the composition of segregated products scatters in two groups: felsic (80-68% SiO2) and intermediate (60-52% SiO2), with an average andesitic composition. The bimodal distribution is controlled by amphibole which buffer the composition of segregated products to high SiO2-content when stable. As the amphibole-out melting reaction is crossed segregated products become intermediate. When compared to available geological evidence, the liquid line of descent of mantle-derived magma do not fit the Mg# versus silica trends of exposed volcanic arcs. Instead our modelling results show that reactive flow of those same magma through a mafic crust is able to reproduce such trends.

  9. Aleutian basin oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christeson, Gail L.; Barth, Ginger A.

    2015-01-01

    We present two-dimensional P-wave velocity structure along two wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer profiles from the Aleutian basin in the Bering Sea. The basement here is commonly considered to be trapped oceanic crust, yet there is a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features within the basin that might reflect later processes. Line 1 extends ∼225 km from southwest to northeast, while Line 2 extends ∼225 km from northwest to southeast and crosses the observed change in magnetic lineation orientation. Velocities of the sediment layer increase from 2.0 km/s at the seafloor to 3.0–3.4 km/s just above basement, crustal velocities increase from 5.1–5.6 km/s at the top of basement to 7.0–7.1 km/s at the base of the crust, and upper mantle velocities are 8.1–8.2 km/s. Average sediment thickness is 3.8–3.9 km for both profiles. Crustal thickness varies from 6.2 to 9.6 km, with average thickness of 7.2 km on Line 1 and 8.8 km on Line 2. There is no clear change in crustal structure associated with a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features. The velocity structure is consistent with that of normal or thickened oceanic crust. The observed increase in crustal thickness from west to east is interpreted as reflecting an increase in melt supply during crustal formation.

  10. Evolution of the continental crust.

    PubMed

    Hawkesworth, C J; Kemp, A I S

    2006-10-19

    The continental crust covers nearly a third of the Earth's surface. It is buoyant--being less dense than the crust under the surrounding oceans--and is compositionally evolved, dominating the Earth's budget for those elements that preferentially partition into silicate liquid during mantle melting. Models for the differentiation of the continental crust can provide insights into how and when it was formed, and can be used to show that the composition of the basaltic protolith to the continental crust is similar to that of the average lower crust. From the late Archaean to late Proterozoic eras (some 3-1 billion years ago), much of the continental crust appears to have been generated in pulses of relatively rapid growth. Reconciling the sedimentary and igneous records for crustal evolution indicates that it may take up to one billion years for new crust to dominate the sedimentary record. Combining models for the differentiation of the crust and the residence time of elements in the upper crust indicates that the average rate of crust formation is some 2-3 times higher than most previous estimates.

  11. [Crusted scabies: A review].

    PubMed

    Jouret, G; Bounemeur, R; Presle, A; Takin, R

    2016-04-01

    Crusted scabies is a rare and severe form of infestation by Sarcoptes scabies var. hominis. It is characterized by profuse hyperkeratosis containing over 4000 mites per gram of skin, with treatment being long and difficult. The condition is both direct and indirectly contagious. It has a central role in epidemic cycles of scabies, the incidence of which is on the rise in economically stable countries. Recent discoveries concerning the biology of mites, the pathophysiology of hyperkeratosis and the key role of IL-17 in this severe form open up new therapeutic perspectives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. KTB and the electrical conductivity of the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haak, V.; Simpson, F.; Bahr, Karsten; Bigalke, J.; Eisel, M.; Harms, U.; Hirschmann, G.; Huenges, E.; Jödicke, H.; Kontny, A.; Kück, J.; Nover, G.; Rauen, A.; Stoll, J.; Walther, J.; Winter, H.; Zulauf, G.; Wolfgang, J.

    1997-08-01

    The German Continental Deep Drilling Program (KTB) drilled two holes through crystalline rocks which are rich in both high-salinity fluids and graphite accumulated along shear zones. Analyses of a large number of borehole measurements yield models for the electrical resistivity of the upper and middle crust in the vicinity of the KTB holes. High observed resistivity, of more than 105Ωm in the lowermost part of the 9000 m deep main hole, in a rather ``wet'' crust, indicates that effective mechanisms exist to cut down connections between fluid accumulations and therefore that fluids are not the likely cause of high-conductivity anomalies. On the other hand, graphite accumulations appear to be connected along shear lineaments over hundreds of meters or more. Structural, mineralogical, and geochemical studies suggest a tectonic model which explains the deposition of graphite as the relic and witness of a shearing process that occurred during the late Variscan (Upper Carboniferous) thrusting. This process took place while this part of the crust resided at temperatures between 240° and 380°C. Subsequent independent reverse faulting lifted this part to the Earth's surface. Our conclusion is that the KTB case indicates how high electrical conductivities in the upper crust, which originated from the middle to lower crust, are caused by graphite accumulations, rather than by fluids, and that these anomalies are related to shearing processes. Such graphite accumulations may exist elsewhere and may be of relevance in the context of present-day midcrustal conductors.

  13. Seismotectonics of thin- and thick-skinned deformation in the Andean foreland from local network data - Evidence for a seismogenic lower crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Robert, Jr.; Isacks, Bryan L.

    1990-01-01

    Local network data from San Juan, Argentina, provides new information about crustal seismicity in the Andean foreland above a horizontal segment of the subducted Nazca Plate. Two areas of foreland seismicity are found, one associated with the Sierras Pampeanas basement uplifts, and the other beneath, but not within, the Precordillera foreland fold-thrust belt. The Precordillera seismicity provides direct evidence for basement deformation beneath the sediments of the thrust belt and supports the idea that its eastern part is significantly modified by underlying basement deformation. In both areas, events are concentrated between 15 and 35 km depth and have volumetric, rather than planar, faultlike distributions. The depth distribution is unusually deep for intraplate earthquakes and suggests a brittle-ductile transition near 30-35 km.

  14. Seismotectonics of thin- and thick-skinned deformation in the Andean foreland from local network data - Evidence for a seismogenic lower crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Robert, Jr.; Isacks, Bryan L.

    1990-01-01

    Local network data from San Juan, Argentina, provides new information about crustal seismicity in the Andean foreland above a horizontal segment of the subducted Nazca Plate. Two areas of foreland seismicity are found, one associated with the Sierras Pampeanas basement uplifts, and the other beneath, but not within, the Precordillera foreland fold-thrust belt. The Precordillera seismicity provides direct evidence for basement deformation beneath the sediments of the thrust belt and supports the idea that its eastern part is significantly modified by underlying basement deformation. In both areas, events are concentrated between 15 and 35 km depth and have volumetric, rather than planar, faultlike distributions. The depth distribution is unusually deep for intraplate earthquakes and suggests a brittle-ductile transition near 30-35 km.

  15. Diffusive transfer of oxygen from seamount basaltic crust into overlying sediments: An example from the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, K.; Mogollón, J. M.; Picard, A.; Rühlemann, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Kuhn, T.; Ziebis, W.; Kasten, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ) in the Pacific Ocean is characterized by organic carbon-starved sediments and meter-scale oxygen penetration into the sediment. Furthermore, numerous seamounts occur throughout its deep-sea plain, which may serve as conduits for low-temperature hydrothermal seawater circulation through the oceanic crust. Recent studies in deep-sea environments of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans have suggested and presented evidence of dissolved constituent exchange between the seawater flowing in the basaltic crust and the pore water of the overlying sediments. Through high-resolution pore-water oxygen and nutrient measurements, we examined fluxes and geochemical interactions between the seamount basaltic basement and pore waters of the overlying sediments at three sites located on a radial transect from the foot of Teddy Bare, a small seamount in the CCFZ. At three sites, located 1000, 700 and 400 m away from the foot of the seamount, we found that oxygen concentrations initially decrease with sediment depth but start to increase at depths of 3 and 7 m toward the basaltic basement. Nitrate (NO3-) concentrations mirror the oxygen concentration profiles, as they increase with sediment depth but decrease towards the basement. These profiles suggest an upward diffusion of oxygen from seawater circulating within the seamount crust into the overlying basal sediments and a downward diffusion of NO32- from sediment pore water into the basaltic crust. At one site, we determined that the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the bottom water and of the deep sediment near the basaltic crust are similar, further supporting diffusive exchange between basaltic crust fluids and sediment pore water. Transport-reaction modeling performed at two of the study sites revealed that (1) the diffusive flux of oxygen from the basaltic basement outpaces the oxygen consumption through organic matter oxidation and nitrification in the basal sediments and (2) the nutrient exchange

  16. Reactive overprint of the Central Indian Ridge mantle and formation of hybrid troctolites: reassessing the significance of bulk oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfilippo, A.; Morishita, T.; Kumagai, H.; Nakamura, K.; Okino, K.; Tamura, A.; Arai, S.

    2014-12-01

    The idea that hybridized mantle rocks can contribute to the oceanic crust composition has recently emerged thanks to studies on primitive (olivine-rich) troctolites [e.g. 1]. These rocks are considered to be formed by melt-rock interaction, but the exact reaction process by which they originate is still debated and their role on the bulk oceanic crust composition has been never defined. Olivine-rich troctolites have been mostly found at slow spreading ridges [2] or at their fossil analogues [3]. Similar rocks have been recently collected in the 25ºS area of the intermediate spreading Central Indian Ridge (CIR), and rarely characterize the crust mantle boundary at fast spreading ridges [4]. We show that textural and chemical inheritances of the pre-existing mantle are preserved in the CIR troctolites. In particular, the local occurrence of granular, mantle-derived orthopyroxenes and the composition of the associated clinopyroxene indicate that these crustal rocks formed through a direct (one-stage) conversion of a mantle peridotite. We use chemical evidence to infer the same origin of the olivine-rich troctolites worldwide, concluding that the reactive overprint of the oceanic mantle is a process diffused over the entire spreading rate spectrum. Bulk oceanic crust estimates of the Hess Deep (Pacific) and Atlantis Massif (Atlantic) crustal sections are used to quantify and compare the effect of these rocks on the bulk crust composition at fast and slow spreading ridges. Our inferences suggest that the significance of the bulk oceanic crust should be reassessed. When hybrid troctolites are included at crustal levels, the oceanic crust cannot be considered equal to the composition of the melt extracted from the mantle, but it results more primitive and importantly thicker. References: [1] Suhr G., Hellebrand E., Johnson K., Brunelli D., 2008, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 9, doi:10.1029/2008GC002012; [2] Drouin M., Godard M., Ildefonse B., Bruguier O., Garrido C

  17. Microtopography of manganese crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Charles L.

    Quantitative examination of the seafloor surface roughness will be necessary for any design of equipment intended for use in collecting surface deposits such as cobalt-rich manganese crusts or nodules. Furthermore, it is an essential prerequisite to the confident interpretation of returns from high frequency side-scan and other acoustic systems. The objectives of the project were to develop the capability at the University of Hawaii of generating high resolution (less than 1 cm horizontal and vertical) topographic models of the seafloor from 35 mm stereo photographs; to produce such models from existing photographs of cobalt-rich manganese crust deposits; and to optimize the configuration of the existing Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) camera system for stereo photograph collection and correlation of acoustic data with the photographic ground-truth. These tasks were accomplished and have also led to the development of a follow-on project (MMTC/OBD Project 1512) dedicated to the simultaneous acquisition of both optical and side-scan acoustic data for future accurate determination of seabed microtopography.

  18. Physical constraints on dolomite crust formation, Ambergris Cay Belize

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, B.A.; Bischoff, W.D.; Mazzullo, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Dolomitic crusts forming on a peritidal flat on Ambergris Cay, Belize, occur beneath surface sediment adjacent to, but not within, small saline (60-90 ppt) ponds. Upper crusts, 2-12 cm thick forming at or slightly below the water table (approximately equivalent to lagoon water level) are areally restricted by (1) ponds where sediment lies below 20-50 cm of water, (2) high and relatively dry areas where sediment accumulation of more than 15 cm above water level supports diverse vegetation, and (3) low areas affected by mangrove encroachment where preexisting crusts are perforated by roots and displaced. The lower crusts occur immediately above the Pleistocene in lows beneath the Holocene sediment and on exposed Pleistocene surfaces. Estimates from x-ray diffraction analysis indicate 80-100% dolomite content within the upper crusts and 50-60% dolomite content in the lower crusts. Unlithified sediment above and below the upper crust contain up to 80% dolomite. Compositions range from Ca{sub 56}, Mg{sub 44} in the upper crusts to Ca{sub 60} Mg{sub 40} in the lower crusts. There is no correlation between stoichiometry and ordering in the dolomites; all are poorly ordered as indicated by very weak (015) and (021) superstructure peaks. Where crusts are not 100% dolomite, the dolomite is evident as euhedral cements within pores, especially within foraminiferal tests, and as micrite along algal laminations and walls of burrows. However, preliminary examinations with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray mapping show that magnesium enrichment is pervasive within these crusts and may represent Mg-enrichment of calcite as an intermediate stage in dolomite formation.

  19. Primitive layered gabbros from fast-spreading lower oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Kathryn M.; Snow, Jonathan E.; Klaus, Adam; Abe, Natsue; Adrião, Álden B.; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Ceuleneer, Georges; Cheadle, Michael J.; Faak, Kathrin; Falloon, Trevor J.; Friedman, Sarah A.; Godard, Marguerite; Guerin, Gilles; Harigane, Yumiko; Horst, Andrew J.; Hoshide, Takashi; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jean, Marlon M.; John, Barbara E.; Koepke, Juergen; Machi, Sumiaki; Maeda, Jinichiro; Marks, Naomi E.; McCaig, Andrew M.; Meyer, Romain; Morris, Antony; Nozaka, Toshio; Python, Marie; Saha, Abhishek; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Three-quarters of the oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges is composed of plutonic rocks whose mineral assemblages, textures and compositions record the history of melt transport and crystallization between the mantle and the sea floor. Despite the importance of these rocks, sampling them in situ is extremely challenging owing to the overlying dykes and lavas. This means that models for understanding the formation of the lower crust are based largely on geophysical studies and ancient analogues (ophiolites) that did not form at typical mid-ocean ridges. Here we describe cored intervals of primitive, modally layered gabbroic rocks from the lower plutonic crust formed at a fast-spreading ridge, sampled by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program at the Hess Deep rift. Centimetre-scale, modally layered rocks, some of which have a strong layering-parallel foliation, confirm a long-held belief that such rocks are a key constituent of the lower oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. Geochemical analysis of these primitive lower plutonic rocks--in combination with previous geochemical data for shallow-level plutonic rocks, sheeted dykes and lavas--provides the most completely constrained estimate of the bulk composition of fast-spreading oceanic crust so far. Simple crystallization models using this bulk crustal composition as the parental melt accurately predict the bulk composition of both the lavas and the plutonic rocks. However, the recovered plutonic rocks show early crystallization of orthopyroxene, which is not predicted by current models of melt extraction from the mantle and mid-ocean-ridge basalt differentiation. The simplest explanation of this observation is that compositionally diverse melts are extracted from the mantle and partly crystallize before mixing to produce the more homogeneous magmas that erupt.

  20. Primitive layered gabbros from fast-spreading lower oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Kathryn M; Snow, Jonathan E; Klaus, Adam; Abe, Natsue; Adrião, Alden B; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Ceuleneer, Georges; Cheadle, Michael J; Faak, Kathrin; Falloon, Trevor J; Friedman, Sarah A; Godard, Marguerite; Guerin, Gilles; Harigane, Yumiko; Horst, Andrew J; Hoshide, Takashi; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jean, Marlon M; John, Barbara E; Koepke, Juergen; Machi, Sumiaki; Maeda, Jinichiro; Marks, Naomi E; McCaig, Andrew M; Meyer, Romain; Morris, Antony; Nozaka, Toshio; Python, Marie; Saha, Abhishek; Wintsch, Robert P

    2014-01-09

    Three-quarters of the oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges is composed of plutonic rocks whose mineral assemblages, textures and compositions record the history of melt transport and crystallization between the mantle and the sea floor. Despite the importance of these rocks, sampling them in situ is extremely challenging owing to the overlying dykes and lavas. This means that models for understanding the formation of the lower crust are based largely on geophysical studies and ancient analogues (ophiolites) that did not form at typical mid-ocean ridges. Here we describe cored intervals of primitive, modally layered gabbroic rocks from the lower plutonic crust formed at a fast-spreading ridge, sampled by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program at the Hess Deep rift. Centimetre-scale, modally layered rocks, some of which have a strong layering-parallel foliation, confirm a long-held belief that such rocks are a key constituent of the lower oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. Geochemical analysis of these primitive lower plutonic rocks--in combination with previous geochemical data for shallow-level plutonic rocks, sheeted dykes and lavas--provides the most completely constrained estimate of the bulk composition of fast-spreading oceanic crust so far. Simple crystallization models using this bulk crustal composition as the parental melt accurately predict the bulk composition of both the lavas and the plutonic rocks. However, the recovered plutonic rocks show early crystallization of orthopyroxene, which is not predicted by current models of melt extraction from the mantle and mid-ocean-ridge basalt differentiation. The simplest explanation of this observation is that compositionally diverse melts are extracted from the mantle and partly crystallize before mixing to produce the more homogeneous magmas that erupt.

  1. Apollo 15 Geochemical X-ray Fluorescence Experiment: Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Adler, I; Trombka, J; Gerard, J; Lowman, P; Schmadebeck, R; Blodget, H; Eller, E; Yin, L; Lamothe, R; Gorenstein, P; Bjorkholm, P

    1972-01-28

    Although only part of the information from the x-ray fluorescence geochemical experiment has been analyzed, it is clear that the experiment was highly successful. Significant compositional differences among and possibly within the maria and highlands have been detected. When viewed in the light of analyzed lunar rocks and soil samples, and the data from other lunar orbital experiments (in particular, the Apollo 15 gamma-ray spectroscopy experiment), the results indicate the existence of a differential lunar highland crust, probably feldspathic. This crust appears to be related to the plagioclase-rich materials previously found in the samples from Apollo 11, Apollo 12, Apollo 14, Apollo 15, and Luna 16.

  2. Origin and age of the earliest Martian crust from meteorite NWA 7533.

    PubMed

    Humayun, M; Nemchin, A; Zanda, B; Hewins, R H; Grange, M; Kennedy, A; Lorand, J-P; Göpel, C; Fieni, C; Pont, S; Deldicque, D

    2013-11-28

    The ancient cratered terrain of the southern highlands of Mars is thought to hold clues to the planet's early differentiation, but until now no meteoritic regolith breccias have been recovered from Mars. Here we show that the meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 7533 (paired with meteorite NWA 7034) is a polymict breccia consisting of a fine-grained interclast matrix containing clasts of igneous-textured rocks and fine-grained clast-laden impact melt rocks. High abundances of meteoritic siderophiles (for example nickel and iridium) found throughout the rock reach a level in the fine-grained portions equivalent to 5 per cent CI chondritic input, which is comparable to the highest levels found in lunar breccias. Furthermore, analyses of three leucocratic monzonite clasts show a correlation between nickel, iridium and magnesium consistent with differentiation from impact melts. Compositionally, all the fine-grained material is alkalic basalt, chemically identical (except for sulphur, chlorine and zinc) to soils from Gusev crater. Thus, we propose that NWA 7533 is a Martian regolith breccia. It contains zircons for which we measured an age of 4,428 ± 25 million years, which were later disturbed 1,712 ± 85 million years ago. This evidence for early crustal differentiation implies that the Martian crust, and its volatile inventory, formed in about the first 100 million years of Martian history, coeval with earliest crust formation on the Moon and the Earth. In addition, incompatible element abundances in clast-laden impact melt rocks and interclast matrix provide a geochemical estimate of the average thickness of the Martian crust (50 kilometres) comparable to that estimated geophysically.

  3. The fate of mafic and ultramafic intrusions in the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Alberto; Jaupart, Claude

    2016-11-01

    Geochemical and petrological data indicate that the bulk continental crust results from the fractionation of basaltic magmas followed by the foundering of residual mafic cumulates. Structural and geological evidence for foundering has been elusive and it is argued that it lies in the shapes of mafic intrusions that have been preserved in the crust. Numerical calculations of visco-elasto-plastic deformation induced by a dense intrusive body in continental crust have been carried out for a wide range of physical conditions. Three regimes are defined on the basis of the amount of dense material that remains at the original emplacement level as well as on the shape of the residual body. With strong encasing rocks, the intrusion deforms weakly in a sagging regime characterized by downwarping of the floor. At the other extreme, the intrusion sinks through weak surroundings, leaving behind a very small volume of material. In an intermediate regime, the intrusion does not sink wholesale and undergoes a dramatic change of shape. A residual body is preserved with a shape that depends on the aspect ratio of the initial intrusion. For aspect ratios of order one, the residual body is funnel-shaped above a thin and deep vertical extension. For the small aspect ratios that typify large igneous complexes such as the Bushveld, South Africa, the residual body is characterized by thick peripheral lobes with inward-dipping igneous layers and a thinner central area that has lost some of the basal cumulates. The transitions between these regimes depend on the rheology and temperature of encasing rocks.

  4. Intermittency and lifetime of the 625 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation in the 2004 hyperflare from the magnetar SGR 1806-20 as evidence for magnetic coupling between the crust and the core

    SciTech Connect

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Levin, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) detected in the 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 are often interpreted as global magneto-elastic oscillations of the neutron star. There is, however, a large discrepancy between theoretical models, which predict that the highest frequency oscillations should die out rapidly, and the observations, which suggested that the highest-frequency signals persisted for ∼100 s in X-ray data from two different spacecraft. This discrepancy is particularly important for the high-frequency QPO at ∼625 Hz. However, previous analyses did not systematically test whether the signal could also be present in much shorter data segments, more consistent with the theoretical predictions. Here, we test for the presence of the high-frequency QPO at 625 Hz in data from both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) systematically both in individual rotational cycles of the neutron star, as well as averaged over multiple successive rotational cycles at the same phase. We find that the QPO in the RXTE data is consistent with being only present in a single cycle, for a short duration of ∼0.5 s, whereas the RHESSI data are as consistent with a short-lived signal that appears and disappears as with a long-lived QPO. Taken together, this data provides evidence for strong magnetic interaction between the crust and the core.

  5. Geochemical and isotopic evidence for the petrogenesis and emplacement tectonics of the Serra dos Órgãos batholith in the Ribeira belt, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Rômulo; Philipp, Ruy Paulo; McReath, Ian; Peucat, Jean Jacques

    2016-07-01

    The Serra dos Órgãos batholith in the State of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) is a NE-SW-trending elongated body that occupies ca. 5000 km2 in plan view. It is a foliated intrusion, especially at its borders and is crosscut by syn-magmatic shear zones, with foliations that are moderately-to steeply-dipping to the northwest and moderately-to shallow-dipping in the center and to the southeast, in a configuration of a large laccolith. It was emplaced between 560 and 570 Ma, during an extensional episode that was part of a series of events that comprise the Brasiliano Orogeny in SE Brazil, and which includes deformation, metamorphism and granite intrusion during the interval between 630 and 480 Ma. The two main rock types in the batholith are biotite-hornblende monzogranite, and biotite leucogranite, with subordinate tonalite, granodiorite, diorite, quartz diorite (enclaves), aplite and pegmatite. Harker-type diagrams help show two rock groups with similar trends of evolution: a dioritic and a granitic. The first one is tholeiitic, whereas the second is calc-alkaline, with medium-to high-K calc-alkaline affinity and metaluminous to slightly peraluminous character. In both groups strong decrease in Al2O3, MgO, FeOT and CaO relative to silica contents are observed, which is compatible with trends of fractional crystallization involving clinopyroxene and/or hornblende, plagioclase, opaque minerals, apatite, microcline and biotite. The Sr and Nd isotopic data suggest recycling of a Paleoproterozoic crust as an important petrological process to generate the batholith rocks. Geothermometry (amphibole composition) and geobarometry (saturation in zircon and apatite) indicate that most of the batholith solidified at mid to lower crustal levels at about 750 °C and between 5 and 5.5 kbar. We consider that Serra dos Órgãos crustal protoliths underwent melting caused by the interaction with hotter mafic magma at the base of the crust. These two magmas, with distinct initial

  6. Subduction- and non-subduction-related igneous rocks in the Central European Variscides: geochemical and Nd isotope evidence from the Kłodzko Metamorphic Complex, Polish Sudetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryza, Ryszard; Mazur, Stanisław; Pin, Christian

    2003-11-01

    The Kłodzko Metamorphic Complex (KMC) in the Central Sudetes is a composite outcrop of pre-Upper Devonian metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks, formed of several thrust units. The metaigneous rocks are geochemically diversified, and were interpreted to reflect a complex geodynamic setting of emplacement. The association of large amounts of felsic and mafic rocks is reminiscent of the model of Cambro-Ordovician bimodal, rift-related suites developed along the northern periphery of Gondwana. However, the felsic rocks are potash-poor, calc-alkaline in character, while the associated mafic rocks are, in part, metagabbros and cumulates resembling N-MORB, which is consistent with neither typical ensialic rift nor evolved MOR tectonic environments. Combined with published data, our new geochemical and Nd isotope results show that the metabasic rocks of the northeastern part of the KMC, not associated with felsic volcanics, are of within-plate type, with an ɛNd 400 (assuming approximate youngest possible Silurian/Devonian age) of +6.8, typical of magmas derived from time-integrated depleted mantle sources. The metagabbros of the southwestern part of the KMC (associated with felsic rocks) range from slightly enriched to depleted rocks, and their ɛNd 560 (assuming a Neoproterozoic age, K. Turniak, personal communication) scatters from +2.2 to +8.6, suggesting that hybrid sources and/or variable degrees of crustal contamination of a strongly depleted mantle source were involved. The intermediate and acidic rocks are peraluminous to metaluminous rhyolites, rhyodatites/dacites, and andesites (and volcaniclastics), with Na 2O > K 2O and large negative anomalies of Nb, Sr, and Ti. Their highly variable, but distinctly positive, ɛNd 560 values (from +2.9 to +8.6, mostly clustered around +5.5) overlap those measured in the associated metagabbros, thereby substantiating close genetic relationships. Metarhyolites produced by crustal melting are conspicuously missing. A