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Sample records for cruz tenerife spain

  1. Paleoparasitologic, paleogenetic and paleobotanic analysis of XVIII century coprolites from the church La Concepción in Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Gijón Botella, Herminia; Afonso Vargas, José A; Arnay de la Rosa, Matilde; Leles, Daniela; González Reimers, Emilio; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Iñiguez, Alena M

    2010-12-01

    We present the results of a paleoparasitologic, paleogenetic and paleobotanic analysis of coprolites recovered during the excavation of the church La Concepción in Santa Cruz de Tenerife. Coprolites (n = 4) were rehydrated and a multidisciplinary analysis was conducted. The paleobotanic analysis showed numerous silicates, seeds and fruits of the family Moraceae. In the paleoparasitologic study, Ascaris sp. eggs (n = 344) were identified. The paleogenetic results confirmed the Ascaris sp. infection as well as the European origin of human remains. These findings contribute to our knowledge of ancient helminthes infections and are the first paleoparasitological record of Ascaris sp. infection in Spain.

  2. Study of the air quality in industrial areas of Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain) by active biomonitoring with Pseudoscleropodium purum.

    PubMed

    Ares, Ángela; Fernández, Jose Ángel; Aboal, Jesús Ramón; Carballeira, Alejo

    2011-03-01

    A biomonitoring technique with terrestrial moss transplants (50 sampling sites in a regular grid) was used in an area of the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, close to an oil refinery and to an area of dense road traffic for a period of 2 months. The concentration of metals and metalloids (As, Cd, Hg, Ni, Pb and V) and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined. The density distribution was represented, the enrichment factors calculated and multifactorial analysis applied. In addition, contamination maps were elaborated on the basis of the bioconcentration obtained, and after confirming the existence of spatial structure, the response surfaces were represented. The results showed very high levels of contamination by Ni and V in the study area, with similar dispersal patterns observed for both. The concentrations of Cd, Hg, Pb and PAHs were lower. Active biomonitoring with terrestrial mosses was found to be a suitable technique for implementing inexpensive environmental monitoring programmes in urban and industrialized areas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated assessment of air pollution using observations and modelling in Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands).

    PubMed

    Baldasano, José M; Soret, Albert; Guevara, Marc; Martínez, Francesc; Gassó, Santiago

    2014-03-01

    The present study aims to analyse the atmospheric dynamics of the Santa Cruz de Tenerife region (Tenerife, Canary Islands). This area is defined by the presence of anthropogenic emissions (from a refinery, a port and road traffic) and by very specific meteorological and orographic conditions-it is a coastal area with a complex topography in which there is an interaction of regional atmospheric dynamics and a low thermal inversion layer. These factors lead to specific atmospheric pollution episodes, particularly in relation to SO2 and PM10. We applied a methodology to study these dynamics based on two complementary approaches: 1) the analysis of the observations from the air quality network stations and 2) simulation of atmospheric dynamics using the WRF-ARW/HERMESv2/CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b and WRF-ARW/HYSPLIT modelling systems with a high spatial resolution (1×1 km(2)). The results of our study show that the refinery plume plays an important role in the maximum SO2 observed levels. The area of maximum impact of the refinery is confined to a radius of 3 km around this installation. A cluster analysis performed for the period: 1998-2011 identified six synoptic situations as predominant in the area. The episodes of air pollution by SO2 occur mainly in those with more limited dispersive conditions, such as the northeastern recirculation, the northwestern recirculation and the western advection, which represent 33.70%, 11.23% and 18.63% of the meteorological situations affecting the study area in the year 2011, respectively. In the case of particulate matter, Saharan dust intrusions result in episodes with high levels of PM10 that may exceed the daily limit value in all measurement station; these episodes occur when the synoptic situation is from the east (3.29% of the situations during the year 2011). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Intermediate Hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Tenerife, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Alonso, Aarón; Abreu-Yanes, Estefanía; Feliu, Carlos; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Bargues, María Dolores; Valladares, Basilio; Foronda, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the causative agent of human angiostrongyliasis, the main clinical manifestation of which is eosinophilic meningitis. Although this parasite has been found recently in its definitive rat host in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), showing a widespread distribution over the north-east part of the island, there are no available data regarding which snail and/or slug species are acting as intermediate hosts on this island. Consequently, the objective of this work was to determine the possible role of three mollusc species, Plutonia lamarckii, Cornu aspersum and Theba pisana, as intermediate hosts of A. cantonensis in Tenerife. Between 2011 and 2014, 233 molluscs were collected from five biotopes where rats had been found previously to harbor either adult worms or antibodies against A. cantonensis, and the identification was carried out on the basis of morphological features and a LAMP technique. The prevalence of A. cantonensis larvae in the mollusc samples, based on morphological identification, was 19.3%, whereas 59 out of the 98 individuals (60.2%) analyzed by LAMP were positive. Positive results were obtained for the three mollusc species analyzed and two of the positive samples, both obtained from P. lamarckii, were confirmed as positive by 18S rRNA and ITS1 PCR. Sequence analysis of 18S rRNA PCR products showed 100% similarity with previously published A. cantonensis sequences. These results may be relevant from a public health point of view, since all the biotopes from which the samples were obtained were in inhabited areas or areas with human activity, but it is also important from the perspective of a possible transmission to other accidental hosts, such as dogs and horses, animals that are present in some of the areas analyzed. PMID:25803658

  5. Neoparamoeba branchiphila infections in moribund sea urchins Diadema aff. antillarum in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Dyková, Iva; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Kostka, Martin; Valladares, Basilio; Pecková, Hana

    2011-07-12

    A total of 109 sea urchins from 3 species collected in 2 localities off the coast of Tenerife Island, Spain, were examined for the presence of free-living amoebae in their coelomic fluid. Amoeba trophozoites were isolated exclusively from moribund individuals of long-spined sea urchins Diadema aff. antillarum (Philippi) (Echinoidea, Echinodermata) that manifested lesions related to sea urchin bald disease on their tests (16 out of 56 examined). No amoebae were detected in Arbacia lixula (L.) and Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck). From the former sea urchin species, 8 strains, established from 10 primary isolates, were identified as Neoparamoeba branchiphila Dyková et al., 2005 using morphological and molecular methods. Results of this study (limited to the screening for free-living amoebae) together with data on agents of sea urchin mortalities reported to date justify the hypothesis that free-living amoebae play an opportunistic role in D. aff. antillarum mortality. The enlargement of the dataset of SSU rDNA sequences brought new insight into the phylogeny of Neoparamoeba species.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric exploration of Tenerife geothermal field (Canary Islands, Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña-Varas, Perla; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Bellmunt, Fabián; Hidalgo, Raúl

    2013-04-01

    Several magnetotelluric (MT) surveys have been carried out to investigate the geothermal system in Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). These data have been acquired since 1987 till 2012 by different agencies and institutions. In 1987 and 1991, two MT surveys were carried out by the Spanish Geological Survey (IGME). These data in paper format (129 MT sites in total) were collected and digitized. In October 2009, 83 stations were acquired for Petratherm Ltd., and 25 stations in March 2012 by the University of Barcelona. In total, 237 MT stations distributed around the island center are available for this study. A simplified conceptual model of the island using known geological and geophysical data has been created to identify the ocean and topography effects on the MT data. The typical conceptual model of a generic high temperature volcanic geothermal system (Cumming, 2009a; Pellerin, 1996) and the 1D models from the MT data have played a key role for the correct construction of this conceptual model. Synthetic forward modeling was performed on a set of models to determine the effect of topography and of the conductive Atlantic Ocean. Finally, a 3D resistivity model of Tenerife Island has been computed with modEM code (Egbert and Kelbert, 2012). Out of the 237 MT sites available, 87 stations were discarded because of computational capability problems. Thus, for this new 3D model, 150 MT sites have been taking into account from the different field surveys. The model is discrtized on 94x65x133-layer grid and the inversions are undertaken using the off-diagonal components (Zxy, Zyx) of the impedance tensor for 16 periods in the frequency range from 1000 to 0.1 Hz. In the inversion processing we assumed a 5% error floor in the impedance components and the final RMS is 3.5. The 3D inversion model shows the typical layered pattern expected from a volcanic complex (andesite, basalt) with a possible geothermal overprint; a resistive fresh volcanic structure near the

  7. First high resolution P wave velocity structure beneath Tenerife Island, (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, Araceli; Ivan, Koulakov; Ibañez Jesus, M.; Valenti, Sallarès.

    2010-05-01

    3D velocity structure distribution has been imaged for first time using high resolution traveltime seismic tomography of the active volcano of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). It is located in the Atlantic Ocean. In this island is situated the Teide stratovolcano (3718 m high) that is part of the Cañadas-Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex. Las Cañadas is a caldera system more than 20 kilometers wide where at least four distinct caldera processes have been identified. Evidence for many explosive eruptions in the volcanic complex has been found; the last noticeable explosive eruption (sub-plinean) occurred at Montaña Blanca around 2000 years ago. During the last 300 years, six effusive eruptions have been reported, the last of which took place at Chinyero Volcano on 18 November 1909. In January 2007, a seismic active experiment was carried out as part of the TOM-TEIDEVS project. About 6850 air gun shots were fired on the sea and recorded on a dense local seismic land network consisting of 150 independent (three component) seismic stations. The good quality of the recorded data allowed identifying P-wave arrivals up to offsets of 30-40 km obtaining more than 63000 traveltimes used in the tomographic inversion. The images have been obtained using ATOM-3D code (Koulakov, 2009). This code uses ray bending algorithms in the ray tracing for the forward modelling and in the inversion step it uses gradient methods. The velocity models show a very heterogeneous upper crust that is usual in similar volcanic environment. The tomographic images points out the no-existence of a magmatic chamber near to the surface and below Pico Teide. The ancient Las Cañadas caldera borders are clearly imaged featuring relatively high seismic velocity. Moreover, we have found a big low velocity anomaly in the northwest dorsal of the island. The last eruption took place in 1909 in this area. Furthermore, in the southeast another low velocity anomaly has been imaged. Several resolution

  8. Kinematic model for Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain): Geodynamic interpretation in the Nubian plate context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrocoso, M.; Carmona, J.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Pérez-Peña, A.; Ortiz, R.; García, A.

    2010-12-01

    Establishment of a geodetic network in Tenerife is the starting point for the use of GPS and other precise geodetic techniques in the support of the study of kinematics and their relation with island volcanic activity. This paper is focused on the characterization of volcanotectonic activity of Tenerife, to determine the geodynamic framework for volcanic surveillance. TEGETEIDE network, set up in 2005 and re-observed each year, is composed of seven GNSS-GPS stations scattered throughout the island. A horizontal deformation model is presented in order to explain the observed island displacement pattern in the geodynamic context of the Nubian plate. According to the models obtained, the most important geologic structures, such as the volcanic rifts and the caldera, determine the current deformation pattern of Tenerife. The geodynamics of the most stable areas of the island behave similarly to that observed from the permanent GNSS-GPS reference stations located in La Palma and Gran Canaria Islands. Anomalous geodynamic behaviour has been detected in two zones of Tenerife, which configure an NW-SE axis crossing the central sector of the island, related with the volcanotectonic activity of the island and its surroundings.

  9. Ground deformation model for Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) from TEGETEIDE GNSS stations observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, A.; Carmona, J.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Pérez-Peña, A.; Ortiz, R.; Berrocoso, M.

    2009-04-01

    TEGETEIDE GNSS network is composed of seven benchmarks distributed over Tenerife Island, two of them are permanent stations. The whole network has been observed periodically from 2005 at least twice a year. Processed data using Bernese 5.0 software indicates different vector displacement pattern, as in magnitude as in direction, which expected from the African plate movement, suggesting the activity of other geodynamic process in the Island. The TEGETEIDE ground deformation model suggest the action not only the tectonics, but also the volcanic activity in an island where during 2004 a reawakening of the Teide volcano was detected. In this sense, the use of precise space-geodetic techniques to study the present-day dynamics of Tenerife is essential for a better knowledge and forecasting of the volcanic evolution during periods of crises, in an island of one million inhabitants and 5 million tourists a year.

  10. Methanotrophy under Versatile Conditions in the Water Column of the Ferruginous Meromictic Lake La Cruz (Spain).

    PubMed

    Oswald, Kirsten; Jegge, Corinne; Tischer, Jana; Berg, Jasmine; Brand, Andreas; Miracle, María R; Soria, Xavier; Vicente, Eduardo; Lehmann, Moritz F; Zopfi, Jakob; Schubert, Carsten J

    2016-01-01

    Lakes represent a considerable natural source of methane to the atmosphere compared to their small global surface area. Methanotrophs in sediments and in the water column largely control methane fluxes from these systems, yet the diversity, electron accepting capacity, and nutrient requirements of these microorganisms have only been partially identified. Here, we investigated the role of electron acceptors alternative to oxygen and sulfate in microbial methane oxidation at the oxycline and in anoxic waters of the ferruginous meromictic Lake La Cruz, Spain. Active methane turnover in a zone extending well below the oxycline was evidenced by stable carbon isotope-based rate measurements. We observed a strong methane oxidation potential throughout the anoxic water column, which did not vary substantially from that at the oxic/anoxic interface. Both in the redox-transition and anoxic zones, only aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and sequencing techniques, suggesting a close coupling of cryptic photosynthetic oxygen production and aerobic methane turnover. Additions of nitrate, nitrite and to a lesser degree iron and manganese oxides also stimulated bacterial methane consumption. We could not confirm a direct link between the reduction of these compounds and methane oxidation and we cannot exclude the contribution of unknown anaerobic methanotrophs. Nevertheless, our findings from Lake La Cruz support recent laboratory evidence that aerobic methanotrophs may be able to utilize alternative terminal electron acceptors under oxygen limitation.

  11. Methanotrophy under Versatile Conditions in the Water Column of the Ferruginous Meromictic Lake La Cruz (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Kirsten; Jegge, Corinne; Tischer, Jana; Berg, Jasmine; Brand, Andreas; Miracle, María R.; Soria, Xavier; Vicente, Eduardo; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Zopfi, Jakob; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Lakes represent a considerable natural source of methane to the atmosphere compared to their small global surface area. Methanotrophs in sediments and in the water column largely control methane fluxes from these systems, yet the diversity, electron accepting capacity, and nutrient requirements of these microorganisms have only been partially identified. Here, we investigated the role of electron acceptors alternative to oxygen and sulfate in microbial methane oxidation at the oxycline and in anoxic waters of the ferruginous meromictic Lake La Cruz, Spain. Active methane turnover in a zone extending well below the oxycline was evidenced by stable carbon isotope-based rate measurements. We observed a strong methane oxidation potential throughout the anoxic water column, which did not vary substantially from that at the oxic/anoxic interface. Both in the redox-transition and anoxic zones, only aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and sequencing techniques, suggesting a close coupling of cryptic photosynthetic oxygen production and aerobic methane turnover. Additions of nitrate, nitrite and to a lesser degree iron and manganese oxides also stimulated bacterial methane consumption. We could not confirm a direct link between the reduction of these compounds and methane oxidation and we cannot exclude the contribution of unknown anaerobic methanotrophs. Nevertheless, our findings from Lake La Cruz support recent laboratory evidence that aerobic methanotrophs may be able to utilize alternative terminal electron acceptors under oxygen limitation. PMID:27891115

  12. Physicochemical characteristics and pollen spectrum of monofloral honeys from Tenerife, Spain.

    PubMed

    Bentabol Manzanares, Antonio; Hernández García, Zoa; Rodríguez Galdón, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elena M; Díaz Romero, Carlos

    2017-08-01

    Physicochemical parameters, sugar composition and botanical origin were determined in four monofloral honeys, chestnut, fennel, tajinaste, and Teide broom honeys, abundantly produced in Tenerife Island. All the parameters were within the established intervals in Europe for each type of honey. Large differences between the four monofloral honeys were observed, being the chestnut honeys with most of differential characteristics. Linear discriminant analysis on the physicochemical parameters and sugar composition allows to distinguishing the four types of honeys analysed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Indications for solar influence on radon signal in the subsurface of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinitz, G.; Martin-Luis, M. C.; Piatibratova, O.

    2015-05-01

    Radon at two locations in Tenerife is investigated. The MM-0 site is located in a bunker near Teide volcano. Daily radon (DR) signals are dominated by a 12-hour (S2) periodicity. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) analysis of day-time and night-time series results in a day-night differentiation, which does not occur in the coeval temperature and pressure. This indicates that the radon system is directly affected by rotation of Earth around its axis, and not via the pressure and/or temperature pattern. San Fernando sites are in an underground gallery, located at 2.1 and 3 km from the entrance. Alpha and gamma time series show DR signals having an S1 and a strong S2 periodicity. Sidebands occur around the S1 periodicity. The lower sideband is close to 0.9972696 cycles per day (CPD; = sidereal frequency) and the upper sideband at a symmetric frequency above. They reflect a driver containing two waveforms having periodicities of rotation of Earth around its axis and around the Sun that influences radon in a non-linear fashion, leading to the sidebands around the S1 periodicity. Observation in Tenerife of sidebands and day-night phenomena substantiates the notion that the periodic components in the diurnal and annual frequency band of radon time series are due to the influence of a component in solar radiation.

  14. Upper mantle magma storage and transport under a Canarian shield-volcano, Teno, Tenerife (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longpré, Marc-Antoine; Troll, Valentin R.; Hansteen, Thor H.

    2008-08-01

    We use clinopyroxene-liquid thermobarometry, aided by petrography and mineral major element chemistry, to reconstruct the magma plumbing system of the late Miocene, largely mafic Teno shield-volcano on the island of Tenerife. Outer rims of clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts show patterns best explained by decompression-induced crystallization upon rapid ascent of magmas from depth. The last equilibrium crystallization of clinopyroxene occurred in the uppermost mantle, from ˜20 to 45 km depth. We propose that flexural stresses or, alternatively, thermomechanical contrasts create a magma trap that largely confines magma storage to an interval roughly coinciding with the Moho at ˜15 km and the base of the long-term elastic lithosphere at ˜40 km below sea level. Evidence for shallow magma storage is restricted to the occurrence of a thick vitric tuff of trachytic composition emplaced before the Teno shield-volcano suffered large-scale flank collapses. The scenario developed in this study may help shed light on some unresolved issues of magma supply to intraplate oceanic volcanoes characterized by relatively low magma fluxes, such as those of the Canary, Madeira and Cape Verde archipelagoes, as well as Hawaiian volcanoes in their postshield stage. The data presented also support the importance of progressive magmatic underplating in the Canary Islands.

  15. Volcanic geomorphosites and geotourism in Las Cañadas del Teide National Park, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dóniz-Paéz, Javier; Becerra-Ramírez, Rafael; González-Cárdenas, Elena; Rodriguez, Fátima

    2017-04-01

    Geomorphosites and geoturism studies are increasing for the high scientific, societal, cultural, and aesthetic values of the relief. Volcanic areas are exciting targets for such studies for their geodiversity. The aim of these study is an inventory of volcanic geomorphosites and its relationship to geotourism. Las Cañadas del Teide National Park (LCTNP) is a volcanic complex area located in the central part of Tenerife island (Canary Islands, Spain). This area is a volcanic paradise rich in spectacular landforms: stratovolcanoes, calderas, cinder cones, craters, pahoehoe, aa, block and balls lavas, gullies, etc. The national park is registered in the world heritage list (UNESCO) in 2007 as a natural site. The LCTNP receives more than 2,5 million tourists per year and it has 21 main pahts and 14 secondary ones. For the selection of the geomophosites the LCTNP was divided into four geomorphological units (Teide-Pico Viejo stratovolcanoes, Las Cañadas Caldera wall, the bottom of Las Cañadas and the basaltic volcanic field) and each one of them is selected the most representative geomorphosites by its geodiversity, because of its geomorphological heritage, its landscapes and its tourist potential with the paths. All selected geomorphosites are within areas where public use is allowed in the park. The inventory classifies the 23 geomorphosites in two main categories: (a) direct volcanic with 17 geomorphosites (stratovolcanoes, domes, cinder cones, pahoehoe, aa and bloc lava flows, etc.) and (b) eroded volcanic landforms with 6 (wall of Las Cañadas caldera, talusees, foodplains, etc.). The Teide-Pico Viejo unit is which has more geomorphosites with 8 and the Las Cañadas wall unit possessing less with 5. The assessment evaluates the scientific, cultural/historical, and use values and helps to define priorities in site management. These geomorphosites demonstrate the volcanic history and processes of the LCTNP.

  16. A multisystemic Acanthamoeba infection in a dog in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Valladares, María; Reyes-Batlle, María; Mora-Peces, Inmaculada; Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Dorta-Gorrín, Alexis; Comyn-Afonso, Estefanía; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Maciver, Sutherland K; Piñero, José E; Valladares, Basilio; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-10-15

    A 22-month-old male Spanish water dog was hospitalized after its physical examination revealed fever and movement difficulty. After 24h, the dog was found to have a high fever (39.5 °C) and was treated empirically with doxycycline/ciprofloxacin. At 48 h, after submission the fever rose to 41 °C and the animal presented with a stiff neck and dehydration. Peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were sampled and trophozoites with an Acanthamoeba-like morphology were observed in the CSF. PCR specific for Acanthamoeba, Naegleria fowleri and Balamuthia mandrillaris were performed and the CSF sample found positive for Acanthamoeba. Lungs, kidney, liver and spleen samples were collected post mortem. All collected organ samples were positive for Acanthamoeba by PCR, thus confirming a multisystemic infection. Water samples taken at a suspected site of infection yielded an almost identical PCR fragment to those of the clinical samples, indicating that this was probably where the infection originated. This is the first report of a fatal case of Acanthamoeba disseminated infection in a dog in Spain.

  17. Diffuse volcanic degassing and thermal energy release 2015 surveys from the summit cone of Teide volcano, Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán; Alonso, Mar; Halliwell, Simon; Sharp, Emerson; Butters, Damaris; Ingman, Dylan; Alexander, Scott; Cook, Jenny; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    The summit cone of Teide volcano (Spain) is characterized by the presence of a weak fumarolic system, steamy ground, and high rates of diffuse CO2 degassing all around this area. The temperature of the fumaroles (83° C) corresponds to the boiling point of water at discharge conditions. Water is the major component of these fumarolic emissions, followed by CO2, N2, H2, H2S, HCl, Ar, CH4, He and CO, a composition typical of hydrothermal fluids. Previous diffuse CO2 surveys have shown to be an important tool to detect early warnings of possible impending volcanic unrests at Tenerife Island (Melián et al., 2012; Pérez et al., 2013). In July 2015, a soil and fumarole gas survey was undertaken in order to estimate the diffuse volcanic degassing and thermal energy release from the summit cone of Teide volcano. A diffuse CO2 emission survey was performed selecting 170 observation sites according to the accumulation chamber method. Soil CO2 efflux values range from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m-2d-1) up to 10,672 g m-2d-1, with an average value of 601 g m-2d-1. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. Measurement of soil CO2 efflux allowed an estimation of 162 ± 14 t d-1 of deep seated derived CO2. To calculate the steam discharge associated with this volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 output, we used the average H2O/CO2 mass ratio equal to 1.19 (range, 0.44-3.42) as a representative value of the H2O/CO2 mass ratios for Teide fumaroles. The resulting estimate of the steam flow associated with the gas flux is equal to 193 t d-1. The condensation of this steam results in a thermal energy release of 5.0×1011J d-1 for Teide volcano or a total heat flow of 6 MWt. The diffuse gas emissions and thermal energy released from the summit of Teide volcano are comparable to those observed at other volcanoes. Sustained surveillance using these methods will be valuable for monitoring the activity of Teide volcano.

  18. Groundwater intensive exploitation and mining in Gran Canaria and Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain: Hydrogeological, environmental, economic and social aspects.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Emilio; Cabrera, María Del Carmen; Poncela, Roberto; Puga, Luis-Olavo; Skupien, Elzbieta; Del Villar, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Intensive exploitation and continuous consumption of groundwater reserves (groundwater mining) have been real facts for decades in arid and semiarid areas. A summary of experience in the hydrogeological, economic, social and ethical consequences of groundwater intensive and mining exploitation in Gran Canaria and Tenerife Islands, in the Canarian Archipelago, is presented. Groundwater abstraction is less than recharge, but a significant outflow of groundwater to the sea cannot be avoided, especially in Tenerife, due to its younger volcanic coastal formations. Consequently, the intensive aquifer groundwater development by means of wells and water galleries (tunnels) has produced a groundwater reserve depletion of about 2km(3). Should current groundwater abstraction cease, the recovery time to close-to-natural conditions is from decades to one century, except in the mid and high elevations of Tenerife, where this recovery is not possible as aquifer formations will remain permanently drained by the numerous long water galleries. The socio-economic circumstances are complex due to a long standing history of water resources exploitation, successive social changes on each island, and well-established groundwater water trading, with complex relationships that affect water governance and the resulting ethical concerns. Gran Canaria and Tenerife are in an advanced groundwater exploitation stage and have a large water demand. They are good examples that allow drawing guidelines to evaluate groundwater development on other small high islands. After presenting the hydrogeological background, the socio-economic results are discussed to derive general knowledge to guide on water governance.

  19. Effect of fly ash from a fuel oil power station on heavy metal content of wild plants at Tenerife island, the Canarian archipelago, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, C.E.; Fernandez, M.; Iglesias, E. ); Perez, N. Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge ); Snelling, R. )

    1993-02-01

    Heavy metal analysis have been carried out in wild plants around a Power Station located at the southeastern area of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). The concentrations of Fe, Ni, and V in the leaves and terminal stems of three wild plants (Euphorbia obtusifolia, Kleinia neriifolia, and Plocama pendula) which were collected during the spring of 1988 are reported from four different allotments. These sampling sites were located at distances of 0.4, 1, 1, 25, and 34 km from the Electric Generating Facility, and at elevations of 60, 120, 180 and 60 m, respectively. Results show a potential contamination of vanadium in E. obtusifolia and P. pendula plants located close to the Power Station, probably due to dry deposition on fly ash in the surrounding area. The levels of iron and nickel concentrations in the same type of plants did not show any geographical relationship with respect to the location of the Power Station. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  20. [The creation of the first anesthesiology service in Spain (Hospital de la Santa Cruz y San Pablo, Barcelona 1941)].

    PubMed

    Unzueta, M C; Hervás, C; Villar Landeira, J M

    2002-03-01

    On the sixtieth anniversary of the founding of the first Spanish anesthesia department, we review factors that led to its creation and its early development. Hospital de la Santa Cruz y San Pablo in Barcelona was the place where the service was established for several reasons. The first was the growing need for anesthesia to be administered by specialized physicians able to handle problems developing during and after surgery. The second was the presence of a prestigious surgeon, Dr. Juan Soler Juliá, who perceived the need, alongside the only physician in Spain who was completely dedicated to anesthesiology, Dr. José Miguel Martínez. Finally, the fact that professional anesthesiology allowed a physician to earn a decent income triggered interest in the specialty among physicians.

  1. Cycles of selected elements in the frame of Globalization and Global Change in the environment of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidak, Markus O.; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Schöler, Heinfried; Trieloff, Mario; Kober, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    The Laurel Forest is an important and sensitive ecosystem with particular element cycling mechanisms. On Tenerife the distribution is straitened to some parts in the north, north-west and northeast. The NE trade wind ensures a permanently humid climate in the north. Major urban and industrial development is centred on Tenerife, and as a touristy hotspot the Island is exposed to heavy air traffic. Furthermore, the short distance to the African coastline and, therefore, to the Sahara, contribute a regular influence of African Dust emissions. In summary, Laurel Forest is exposed to different climatic conditions, variations in lithology and soils, and aerosols caused by local anthropogenic emissions, Saharan dust, and sea spray. The present study aims to understand geogenic and anthropogenic element transports of K, P, N, and organic components between soils and Laurel Forest. In addition, the element contribution from the aerosols such as the Sahara dust has to be quantified to understand the rock - soil - vegetation coupling system. The Sahara dust as one of the important aerosols has been studied by various researchers (Bustos et al., 1998; Rodrıguez, 1999; Torres et al., 2001; Viana et al., 2002). Viana et al.,(2002) quantified the impacts of African dust outbreaks for Tenerife and Gran Canaria, after the interpretation of the PM10 (thoracis particulate matter) from nineteen air quality monitoring stations. Three types of African dust contributions were identified and characterized (winter, summer and autumn-winter dust outbreaks). Collected samples with and without African dust influence proved that: (a) for the intensive winter African dust outbreaks (daily PM10 levels up to 191 mg/m3) at least 76% of the bulk PM10 levels may be attributable to dust load, whereas the anthropogenic input accounts for only 3-14% and (b) SiO2, Al2O3, Ca, K, Fe, Ti, V, Mn and Ba concentrations are excellent tracers of African origin (Viana et al., 2002).

  2. Monitoring the NW volcanic rift-zone of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain: sixteen years of diffuse CO_{2} degassing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Fátima; Halliwell, Simon; Butters, Damaris; Padilla, Germán; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    Tenerife is the largest of the Canary Islands and, together with Gran Canaria, is the only one that has developed a central volcanic complex characterized by the eruption of differentiated magmas. At present, one of the most active volcanic structures in Tenerife is the North-West Rift-Zone (NWRZ), which has hosted two historical eruptions: Arenas Negras in 1706 and Chinyero in 1909. Since the year 2000, 47 soil CO2 efflux surveys have been undertaken at the NWRZ of Tenerife Island to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations of CO2 efflux and their relationships with the volcanic-seismic activity. We report herein the last results of diffuse CO2 efflux survey at the NWRZ carried out in July 2015 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area. Measurements were performed in accordance with the accumulation chamber method. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. During 2015 survey, soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 103 g m-2 d-1. The total diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere was estimated at 403 ± 17 t d-1, values higher than the background CO2 emission estimated on 143 t d-1. For all campaigns, soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 141 g m-2 d-1, with the highest values measured in May 2005. Total CO2 output from the studied area ranged between 52 and 867 t d-1. Temporal variations in the total CO2 output showed a temporal correlation with the onsets of seismic activity, supporting unrest of the volcanic system, as is also suggested by anomalous seismic activity recorded in the area during April 22-29, 2004. Spatial distribution of soil CO2 efflux values also showed changes in magnitude and amplitude, with higher CO2 efflux values located along a trending WNW-ESE area. Subsurface magma movement is proposed as a cause for the observed changes in the total output of diffuse CO2 emission, as well as for the spatial distribution of soil CO2 efflux

  3. Application of a cross correlation-based picking algorithm to active seismic signals from experiments in Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, A.; Granados, M.; Garcia, L.; Benitez, C.; De la Torre, A.; Alvarez, I.; Diaz, A.; Ibañez, J.

    2013-12-01

    The detection of the arrival time of seismic waves or picking is of great importance in many seismology applications. Traditionally, picking has been carried out by human operators. This process is not systematic and relies completely on the expertise and judgment of the analysts. The limitations of manual picking and the increasing amount of data daily stored in the seismic networks worldwide distributed led to the development of automatic picking algorithms. The accuracy of conventional 'short-term average over long-term average' (STA/LTA) algorithm, the recently developed 'Adaptive Multiband Picking Algorithm' (AMPA) and the proposed cross correlation-based picking algorithm have been assessed using a huge data set composed by active seismic signals from experiments in Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). The experiment consisted of the deployment of a dense seismic network on Tenerife Island (125 seismometers in total) and the shooting of air-guns around the island with the Spanish Oceanographic Vessel Hespérides (6459 air shots in total). Thus, more than 800.000 signals were recorded and subsequently manually picked. Since the sources and receivers locations are known and considering that the ship travelled a small distance between two consecutive shots, a picking algorithm based on cross-correlation has been proposed. The main advantage of this approach is that the algorithm does not require to set up sophisticated parameters, in contrast to other automatic algorithms. This work was supported in part by the CEI BioTic Granada project (COD55), the Spanish mineco project APASVO (TEC2012-31551), the Spanish micinn project EPHESTOS (CGL2011-29499-C02-01) and the EU project MED-SUV.

  4. Increased water use efficiency does not prevent growth decline of Pinus canariensis in a semi-arid treeline ecotone in Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Patricia; Grams, Thorsten E.E.; Matysssek, Rainer; Jimenez, Maria S.; Gonzalez-Rodríguez, Agueda M.; Oberhuber, Walter; Wieser, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Key message Intrinsic water-use efficiency of Pinus canariensis (Sweet ex Spreng.) growing at a semi-arid treeline has increased during the past 37 years. Tree-ring width by contrast has declined, likely caused by reduced stomatal conductance due to increasing aridity. Context Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca) has been related to tree growth enhancement accompanied by increasing intrinsic water-use-efficiency (iWUE). Nevertheless, the extent of rising Ca on long-term changes in iWUE and growth has remained poorly understood to date in Mediterranean treeline ecosystems. Aims This study aimed to examine radial growth and physiological responses of P. canariensis in relation to rising Ca and increasing aridity at treeline in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Methods We evaluated temporal changes in secondary growth (tree-ring width; TRW) and tree ring stable C isotope signature for assessing iWUE from 1975 through 2011. Results Precipitation was the main factor controlling secondary growth. Over the last 36 years P. canariensis showed a decline in TRW at enhanced iWUE, likely caused by reduced stomatal conductance due to increasing aridity. Conclusion Our results indicate that increasing aridity has overridden the potential CO2 fertilization on tree growth of P. canariensis at its upper distribution limit. PMID:27482149

  5. Subsidence and current strain patterns on Tenerife Island (Canary Archipelago, Spain) derived from continuous GNSS time series (2008-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Alzola, A.; Martí, J.; García-Yeguas, A.; Gil, A. J.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present the current crustal deformation model of Tenerife Island derived from daily CGPS time series processing (2008-2015). Our results include the position time series, a global velocity estimation and the current crustal deformation on the island in terms of strain tensors. We detect a measurable subsidence of 1.5-2 mm/yr. in the proximities of the Cañadas-Teide-Pico Viejo (CTPV) complex. These values are higher in the central part of the complex and could be explained by a lateral spreading of the elastic lithosphere combined with the effect of the drastic descent of the water table in the island experienced during recent decades. The results show that the Anaga massif is stable in both its horizontal and vertical components. The strain tensor analysis shows a 70 nstrain/yr. E-W compression in the central complex, perpendicular to the 2004 sismo-volcanic area, and 50 nstrain/yr. SW-NE extension towards the Northeast ridge. The residual velocity and strain patterns coincide with a decline in volcanic activity since the 2004 unrest.

  6. [Exposure to persistent and non-persistent pesticides in a non-occupationally exposed population in Tenerife Island (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Burillo-Putze, Guillermo; Luzardo, Octavio P; García, Carlos Pérez; Zumbado, Manuel; Yanes, Carmen; Trujillo-Martín, María del Mar; Boada Fernández del Campo, Carlos; Boada, Luis D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to non-persistent pesticides (NPPs) is of concern because these substances have been associated with chronic diseases. However, few studies have addressed chronic exposure to NPPs in Spanish populations. We determined the presence of 24 pesticide residues by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in 363 serum samples obtained from non-occupationally exposed adults from Tenerife island in 2007. Most of the samples (99.45%) showed detectable residues (6 ± 2 pesticides per sample). The most frequently detected pesticides were pyrethrins (96.1%), organophosphates (93.9%) and organochlorines (92.3%). The neurotoxicants bifenthrin and malathion were detected in 81% of the samples and hexachlorobenzene DDT and buprofezin in more than 50%. Malation, an "environmental obesogen", was detected in 82%, and "endocrine disrupter" pesticides were present in 97.2% of the samples. Because there is clear, continuous and inadvertent exposure to NPPs that may be inducing adverse effects on human health, NPPs should be included in biomonitoring studies. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. A GIS-based methodology for the estimation of potential volcanic damage and its application to Tenerife Island, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaini, C.; Felpeto, A.; Martí, J.; Carniel, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a GIS-based methodology to estimate damages produced by volcanic eruptions. The methodology is constituted by four parts: definition and simulation of eruptive scenarios, exposure analysis, vulnerability assessment and estimation of expected damages. Multi-hazard eruptive scenarios are defined for the Teide-Pico Viejo active volcanic complex, and simulated through the VORIS tool. The exposure analysis identifies the elements exposed to the hazard at stake and focuses on the relevant assets for the study area. The vulnerability analysis is based on previous studies on the built environment and complemented with the analysis of transportation and urban infrastructures. Damage assessment is performed associating a qualitative damage rating to each combination of hazard and vulnerability. This operation consists in a GIS-based overlap, performed for each hazardous phenomenon considered and for each element. The methodology is then automated into a GIS-based tool using an ArcGIS® program. Given the eruptive scenarios and the characteristics of the exposed elements, the tool produces expected damage maps. The tool is applied to the Icod Valley (North of Tenerife Island) which is likely to be affected by volcanic phenomena in case of eruption from both the Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex and North-West basaltic rift. Results are thematic maps of vulnerability and damage that can be displayed at different levels of detail, depending on the user preferences. The aim of the tool is to facilitate territorial planning and risk management in active volcanic areas.

  8. Nitrogen cycling and N2O production in the water column of the ferruginous meromictic Lake La Cruz (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischer, Jana; Zopfi, Jakob; Frame, Caitlin H.; Jegge, Corinne; Kirsten, Oswald; Andreas, Brand; Miracle, Maria R.; Vicente, Eduardo; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2016-04-01

    Ferruginous meromictic lakes are rare systems, considered potential modern analogues for an ancient Archean ferruginous Ocean. They may therefore represent valuable model ecosystems to study biogeochemical processes of early Earth history, in particular, the interaction between the iron (Fe) and other element cycles such as the complex nitrogen (N) cycle. In context of its exceptional water chemistry, we studied the N-cycling in the meromictic, ferruginous Lake La Cruz in the Central Iberian Ranges in Spain, combining i) general water column chemistry and detailed N speciation ii) stable isotope composition and intramolecular 15N distributions (site preference) of dissolved N2O and iii) 15N-isotope label incubation experiments, to identify and quantify biotic and abiotic N2O and N2 production pathways. Nitrification was identified as the main N2O production mechanism in the oxic zone, based on the N2O concentration profile and the isomeric composition of N2O (site preference = 24.7) at the depth of maximum concentration relative to the surface water. A second N2O peak of 23 nmol/L was observed within the chemocline, and relatively low values for the δ15N-N2O (-1.1) and a site preference of 16.1‰ with respect to the oxic water column suggest that here incomplete (nitrifier) denitrification is the dominant N2O production pathway. However, based on the bulk dual N-versus-O isotope signature, other production mechanisms cannot be excluded at this point. Within the anoxic water column, N2O is consumed quantitiatively to N2, consistent with 15N-NO3- incubation experiments, showing denitrification (and anammox) activity below the redox transition zone. The overlap of Fe and N-species (N2O, NO2-) in the water column is small, therefore abiotic N2O production is most likely negligible. The planned analysis of the NO3- and NH4+ isotopic signatures will provide further insight into the origin of N2O. Additionally, molecular biological analyses will provide information on

  9. Application of Spectroscopic Techniques (FT-IR, 13C NMR) to the analysis of humic substances in volcanic soils along an environmental gradient (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, Antonio; María Armas Herrera, Cecilia; González Pérez, José Antonio; González-Vila, Francisco Javier; Arbelo Rodríguez, Carmen Dolores; Mora Hernández, Juan Luis; Polvillo Polo, Oliva

    2010-05-01

    Andosols and andic soils are considered as efficient C-sinks in terms of C sequestration. These soils are usually developed from volcanic materials, and are characterized by a predominance of short-range ordered minerals like allophanes, imogolite and other Fe and Al oxyhydroxides. Such materials occur commonly associated with organic compounds, thus generating highly stable organo-mineral complexes and leading to the accumulation of a high amount of organic carbon. Spectroscopic methods like FT-IR and 13C NMR are suitable for the analysis of the chemical structure of soil humic substances, and allow identifying distinct functional groups and protein, lipids, lignin, carbohydrate-derived fragments. In this work we study the structural features of four soils developed on Pleistocene basaltic lavae in Tenerife (Canary Island, Spain), distributed along an altitudinal climatic gradient. The soil sequence comprises soils with different degree of geochemical evolution and andic character, including a mineral ‘Hypersalic Solonchak' (Tabaibal de Rasca), a slightly vitric ‘Luvic Phaeozem' (Los Frailes), a degraded and shallow ‘Endoleptic, fulvic, silandic Andosol' (Siete Lomas), and a well-developed and deep ‘Fulvic, silandic, Andosol' (Ravelo). Samples of the raw soil and humic and fulvic acids isolated from the surface horizons were analyzed. The results show a low content of organic carbon in the mineral soil, the inherited humin predominating, and a very high content of humic and fulvic acids in Andosols. The FT-IR and 13C NMR spectra of the raw soil samples show a low resolution, related to interferences from mineral complexes signals, particularly in soils with lower organic carbon content. 13C NMR shows a predominance of O-alkyl carbon (derived of carbohydrates) in andic soils, whereas O-alkyl and aromatic fractions are most evident in the mineral soil. The humic acids spectra are characterized by a dominance of alkyl and aromatic fractions with a high degree

  10. A record of long-time rift activity and earthquake-induced ground effects in Pleistocene deposits of southern Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Elmar; Kröchert, Jörg

    2009-09-01

    Faults with a well-defined strike direction that precisely coincides with the southern rift fault system occur in the study area in southern Tenerife. This fault system was generated contemporaneously with a chain of cinder cones ~948 ka. Open fractures in ignimbrites (~668 ka) and fossil beach deposits (~42 ka) of the El Médano area suggest that the rift-associated fault system was seismically active in the aftermath of the initial volcanic activity (~948 ka) and is probably still active. A second fault system striking perpendicular to the rift-related faults probably originates from a Holocene paleoearthquake of moderate intensity. Earthquake-induced ground effects in fossil beach deposits within the study area are consistent with seismically induced ground effects of several recent and well-documented earthquakes, as well as gravitational sliding triggered by an intense earthquake in the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 1990. Both, the rift-associated and the earthquake-induced fault system, initially produced open fractures that were occupied by plants and subsequently stabilized by cementation, forming conspicuous sediment structures in fossil beach deposits of the El Médano site in southern Tenerife.

  11. Spatial and temporal variations of diffuse CO_{2} degassing at the N-S volcanic rift-zone of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) during 2002-2015 period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Mar; Ingman, Dylan; Alexander, Scott; Barrancos, José; Rodríguez, Fátima; Melián, Gladys; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    Tenerife is the largest of the Canary Islands and, together with Gran Canaria Island, is the only one with a central volcanic complex that started to grow at about 3.5 Ma. Nowadays the central complex is formed by Las Cañadas caldera, a volcanic depression measuring 16×9 km that resulted from multiple vertical collapses and was partially filled by post-caldera volcanic products. Up to 297 mafic monogenetic cones have been recognized on Tenerife, and they represent the most common eruptive activity occurring on the island during the last 1 Ma (Dóniz et al., 2008). Most of the monogenetic cones are aligned following a triple junction-shaped rift system, as result of inflation produced by the concentration of emission vents and dykes in bands at 120o to one another as a result of minimum stress fracturing of the crust by a mantle upwelling. The main structural characteristic of the southern volcanic rift (N-S) of the island is an apparent absence of a distinct ridge, and a fan shaped distribution of monogenetic cones. Four main volcanic successions in the southern volcanic rift zone of Tenerife, temporally separated by longer periods (˜70 - 250 ka) without volcanic activity, have been identified (Kröchert and Buchner, 2008). Since there are currently no visible gas emissions at the N-S rift, diffuse degassing surveys have become an important geochemical tool for the surveillance of this volcanic system. We report here the last results of diffuse CO2 efflux survey at the N-S rift of Tenerife, performed using the accumulation chamber method in the summer period of 2015. The objectives of the surveys were: (i) to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area and (ii) to evaluate occasional CO2 efflux surveys as a volcanic surveillance tool for the N-S rift of Tenerife. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 31.7 g m-2 d-1. A spatial distribution map, constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure, did not show an

  12. Diffuse CO2 emission from the NE volcanic rift-zone of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain): a 15 years geochemical monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Germán; Alonso, Mar; Shoemaker, Trevor; Loisel, Ariane; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    The North East Rift (NER) volcanic zone of Tenerife Island is one of the three volcanic rift-zones of the island (210 km2). The most recent eruptive activity along the NER volcanic zone took place in the 1704-1705 period with the volcanic eruptions of Siete Fuentes, Fasnia and Arafo volcanoes. The aim of this study was to report the results of a soil CO2 efflux survey undertaken in June 2015, with approximately 580 measuring sites. In-situ measurements of CO2 efflux from the surface environment of NER volcanic zone were performed by means of a portable non-dispersive infrared spectrophotometer (NDIR) model LICOR Li800 following the accumulation chamber method. To quantify the total CO2 emission from NER volcanic zone, soil CO2 efflux contour maps were constructed using sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) as interpolation method. The total diffuse CO2 emission rate was estimated in 1209 t d-1, with CO2 efflux values ranging from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m-2 d-1) up to 123 g m-2 d-1, with an average value of 5.9 g m-2 d-1. If we compare these results with those obtained in previous surveys developed in a yearly basis, they reveal slightly variations from 2006 to 2015, with to pulses in the CO2 emission observed in 2007 and 2014. The main temporal variation in the total CO2 output does not seem to be masked by external variations. First peak precedes the anomalous seismicity registered in and around Tenerife Island between 2009 and 2011, suggesting stress-strain changes at depth as a possible cause for the observed changes in the total output of diffuse CO2 emission. Second peak could be related with futures changes in the seismicity. This study demonstrates the importance of performing soil CO2 efflux surveys as an effective surveillance volcanic tool.

  13. Oxygen Isotope Variation Within a Quaternary, Caldera-forming, Phonolitic Eruptive Sequence; the Diego Hernández Formation, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickes, H. J.; Larson, P. B.; Wolff, J. A.; Olin, P.

    2003-12-01

    Much of the work done on oxygen isotopes in volcanic rocks has been based on analyses of whole rock or multiple crystal aliquots, inherently discounting the importance of heterogeneity. Recently, due to advances in technology and the recognition of small-scale chemical disequilibria in magmatic systems, it has proven valuable to measure variations among individual grains to examine the evolution of these systems. Here, we present the results of both single and multi-crystal feldspar oxygen isotope analyses (1σ < 0.1 ‰ ) from phonolitic eruptive units of the Diego Hernández Formation (DHF) as part of an on-going study of the evolution of the Las Cañadas caldera complex on Tenerife. δ 18O (VSMOW) values of feldspar range from 4.7 to 6.7 ‰ (slightly lower than previously reported) and show a positive correlation with average crystal size (mg) in units that display a range of oxygen isotope values. For example, one unit shows a linear variation of feldspar δ 18O values that range from 4.7 to 6.4 ‰ , and these ratios are positively correlated with average phenocryst size over a range of 0.7 to 3.6 mg. Overall, intra-unit feldspar δ 18O values vary by as much as ˜2 ‰ and are lower than those predicted by fractionation of a basanitic parental magma. Additionally, δ 18O values show no coherent relationship with incompatible trace element abundances, an indication that the oxygen isotopic ratios are being controlled by neither fractionation nor recharge of the system by basaltic injections. However, the largest variation in oxygen isotope ratios is found in the most differentiated units, consistent with earlier suggestions that the most highly evolved phonolites may contain a component of hydrothermally-altered wall rock. We propose that oxygen isotope variation in Tenerife phonolites is being controlled by variable amounts of assimilation of hydrothermally-altered syenite country rock (δ 18O 0.1 - 5.8 ‰ ) and that timescales between assimilation and

  14. Non-Controlled Emission of Inorganic Toxic gas Components (CO, H2S, NH3 and Hg0) to the atmosphere from Arico's landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeita, A.; Perez, C.; Hernandez, C.; Fariña, L.; Lima, R.; Salazar, J.; Hernandez, P.; Perez, N.

    2001-12-01

    Landfill gas is mainly constituted by CO2 and CH4. However, other inorganic toxic gas components such as CO, NH3, H2S and Hg0, are also present. Reduced gas species are produced and released during the anaerobic decomposition of urban waste, while Hg0 is originally present in the waste and it is released as a volatile. Significant amounts of non-controlled emission of these components could be released to the atmosphere in the form of diffuse degassing, The goal of this study is to evaluate the "non-controlled" emissions of these inorganic toxic gas components from Arico's landfill, Tenerife. Arico's landfill (0.35 Km2) holds about 1,200 t/d of urban solid waste with an average organic matter content of 48%. Diffuse CO2 emission has been measured at the surface of Arico's landfill by means of a NDIR according with the accumulation chamber method. Landfill gases were also collected at 40 cm depth using a metallic probe and analyzed within 24 hours for CO2 and CO composition by means of a VARIAN micro-GC QUAD. H2S and Hg0 were analyzed by means of a Polytron-II electrochemical sensor and a JEROME 431-X mercury analyzer, respectively. NH3 was fixed in a boric acid solution and determined by means of a selective electrode. CO concentration ranged from non-detectable to 2,531 ppmv, with a median of 24.3 ppmv. The highest observed Hg0 concentration in the surface landfill gas is 0.004 ppbv, while H2S concentration reached levels up to 12 ppmv. NH3 contents were lower than 1 ppmv. CO, Hg0, H2S and NH3 fluxes have been estimated by multiplying CO2 efflux times (Tox.I.C.)i/CO2 where (Tox.I.C.)i is the concentration of CO, Hg0, H2S and NH3. The highest efflux values for CO, Hg0, H2S and NH3 were 6.8 gm-2d-1, 0.04 µ gm-2d-1, 1.7 mgm-2d-1 and 0.23 gm-2d-1, respectively.

  15. Array analyses of volcanic earthquakes and tremor recorded at Las Cañadas caldera (Tenerife Island, Spain) during the 2004 seismic activation of Teide volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendros, Javier; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Carmona, Enrique; Zandomeneghi, Daria

    2007-02-01

    We analyze data from three seismic antennas deployed in Las Cañadas caldera (Tenerife) during May-July 2004. The period selected for the analysis (May 12-31, 2004) constitutes one of the most active seismic episodes reported in the area, except for the precursory seismicity accompanying historical eruptions. Most seismic signals recorded by the antennas were volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes. They usually exhibited low magnitudes, although some of them were large enough to be felt at nearby villages. A few long-period (LP) events, generally associated with the presence of volcanic fluids in the medium, were also detected. Furthermore, we detected the appearance of a continuous tremor that started on May 18 and lasted for several weeks, at least until the end of the recording period. It is the first time that volcanic tremor has been reported at Teide volcano. This tremor was a small-amplitude, narrow-band signal with central frequency in the range 1-6 Hz. It was detected at the three antennas located in Las Cañadas caldera. We applied the zero-lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) method to estimate the propagation parameters (back-azimuth and apparent slowness) of the recorded signals. For VT earthquakes, we also determined the S-P times and source locations. Our results indicate that at the beginning of the analyzed period most earthquakes clustered in a deep volume below the northwest flank of Teide volcano. The similarity of the propagation parameters obtained for LP events and these early VT earthquakes suggests that LP events might also originate within the source volume of the VT cluster. During the last two weeks of May, VT earthquakes were generally shallower, and spread all over Las Cañadas caldera. Finally, the analysis of the tremor wavefield points to the presence of multiple, low-energy sources acting simultaneously. We propose a model to explain the pattern of seismicity observed at Teide volcano. The process started in early April with a deep magma

  16. Seroprevalence of canine heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) on Tenerife Island: an epidemiological update.

    PubMed

    Montoya, J A; Morales, M; Juste, M C; Bañares, A; Simon, F; Genchi, C

    2006-12-01

    Blood samples from 823 dogs were tested for circulating Dirofilaria immitis antigen during a 1-year period (May 2002 to May 2003) on Tenerife Island, Canary Islands, Spain. Seroprevalence of heartworm infection was 21%. Heartworm infection was similar in males and females and was more common in dogs aged >6 years. Distribution of infection in varying climatic zones was not statistically different.

  17. Santa Cruz River Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes qualitative research insights gained during development of a nonmarket valuation survey for changes to the Santa Cruz River in Southern Arizona. Qualitative research provides an important avenue for understanding how the public interprets valuation s...

  18. Santa Cruz River Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes qualitative research insights gained during development of a nonmarket valuation survey for changes to the Santa Cruz River in Southern Arizona. Qualitative research provides an important avenue for understanding how the public interprets valuation s...

  19. The Impact of Solution-Focused Training on Professionals' Beliefs, Practices and Burnout of Child Protection Workers in Tenerife Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Antonio; Beyebach, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of a large-scale research project on the child protection services in Tenerife, Spain. In Study 1, the professional beliefs and practices of 152 child protection workers, as measured by a Professional Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire, were correlated with their scores on the Maslach Burnout Inventory.…

  20. The Impact of Solution-Focused Training on Professionals' Beliefs, Practices and Burnout of Child Protection Workers in Tenerife Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Antonio; Beyebach, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of a large-scale research project on the child protection services in Tenerife, Spain. In Study 1, the professional beliefs and practices of 152 child protection workers, as measured by a Professional Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire, were correlated with their scores on the Maslach Burnout Inventory.…

  1. Spain.

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    Spain is a constitutional monarchy with a population of 38.3 million growing at .5%/year. The most striking topographical features are the high plateaus and internal compartmentalization by mountain and river barriers. Nearly 3/4 of the country is arid. The Iberian peninsula was the scene of successive invasions and warfare for centuries. Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians, Moors, Celts, Romans, and Visigoths all invaded at some time. The present language, religion, and laws stem from the Roman Period. The Reconquest from the North African Moors lasted over 700 years until they were driven out in 1492. The unification of present day Spain was complete by 1512. A period of dictatorial rule from 1923-31 ended with establishment of the Second Republic which saw increasing political polarization culminating in the Spanish Civil War. Franco's victory in 1939 was followed by official neutrality but pro-Axis policies during World War II. Spain's economy began to recover during the 1950s, but large scale modernization and development did not occur until the 1960s. Prince Juan Carlos de Borbon y Borbon, Franco's personally designated heir, assumed the title of king and chief of state with Franco's death in 1975. Franco's last prime minister was replaced in July 1976 in order to speed the pace of post-Franco liberalization. Spain's 1st parliamentary elections since 1936 were held in 1977, and a new constitution protecting human and civil rights and granting due process was overwhelmingly approved in 1978. The constitution also authorized creation of regional autonomous governments. By the mid-1970s, Spain had developed a strong and diversified industrial sector and a thriving tourist industry. From 1975-83, there were 8 years of double-digit inflation, an average growth rate of 1.5% in real terms, and an increase in unemployment from about 4.7% to 18.4%. By 1984 there was substantial improvement in inflation and the balance of payments. Goals of current government economic

  2. Source areas and long-range transport of pollen from continental land to Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, Rebeca; Belmonte, Jordina; Avila, Anna; Alarcón, Marta; Cuevas, Emilio; Alonso-Pérez, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The Canary Islands, due to their geographical position, constitute an adequate site for the study of long-range pollen transport from the surrounding land masses. In this study, we analyzed airborne pollen counts at two sites: Santa Cruz de Tenerife (SCO), at sea level corresponding to the marine boundary layer (MBL), and Izaña at 2,367 m.a.s.l. corresponding to the free troposphere (FT), for the years 2006 and 2007. We used three approaches to describe pollen transport: (1) a classification of provenances with an ANOVA test to describe pollen count differences between sectors; (2) a study of special events of high pollen concentrations, taking into consideration the corresponding meteorological synoptic pattern responsible for transport and back trajectories; and (3) a source-receptor model applied to a selection of the pollen taxa to show pollen source areas. Our results indicate several extra-regional pollen transport episodes to Tenerife. The main provenances were: (1) the Mediterranean region, especially the southern Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, through the trade winds in the MBL. These episodes were characterized by the presence of pollen from trees ( Casuarina, Olea, Quercus perennial and deciduous types) mixed with pollen from herbs ( Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae and Poaceae wild type). (2) The Saharan sector, through transport at the MBL level carrying pollen principally from herbs (Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type) and, in one case, Casuarina pollen, uplifted to the free troposphere. And (3) the Sahel, characterized by low pollen concentrations of Arecaceae, Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type in sporadic episodes. This research shows that sporadic events of long-range pollen transport need to be taken into consideration in Tenerife as possible responsible agents in respiratory allergy episodes. In particular, it is estimated that 89-97% of annual counts of the highly allergenous Olea

  3. Source areas and long-range transport of pollen from continental land to Tenerife (Canary Islands).

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Rebeca; Belmonte, Jordina; Avila, Anna; Alarcón, Marta; Cuevas, Emilio; Alonso-Pérez, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The Canary Islands, due to their geographical position, constitute an adequate site for the study of long-range pollen transport from the surrounding land masses. In this study, we analyzed airborne pollen counts at two sites: Santa Cruz de Tenerife (SCO), at sea level corresponding to the marine boundary layer (MBL), and Izaña at 2,367 m.a.s.l. corresponding to the free troposphere (FT), for the years 2006 and 2007. We used three approaches to describe pollen transport: (1) a classification of provenances with an ANOVA test to describe pollen count differences between sectors; (2) a study of special events of high pollen concentrations, taking into consideration the corresponding meteorological synoptic pattern responsible for transport and back trajectories; and (3) a source-receptor model applied to a selection of the pollen taxa to show pollen source areas. Our results indicate several extra-regional pollen transport episodes to Tenerife. The main provenances were: (1) the Mediterranean region, especially the southern Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, through the trade winds in the MBL. These episodes were characterized by the presence of pollen from trees (Casuarina, Olea, Quercus perennial and deciduous types) mixed with pollen from herbs (Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae and Poaceae wild type). (2) The Saharan sector, through transport at the MBL level carrying pollen principally from herbs (Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type) and, in one case, Casuarina pollen, uplifted to the free troposphere. And (3) the Sahel, characterized by low pollen concentrations of Arecaceae, Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type in sporadic episodes. This research shows that sporadic events of long-range pollen transport need to be taken into consideration in Tenerife as possible responsible agents in respiratory allergy episodes. In particular, it is estimated that 89-97% of annual counts of the highly allergenous Olea

  4. The Teide Observatory Tenerife Asteroid Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschny, D.; Busch, M.

    2014-07-01

    Since 2010, the near-Earth object (NEO) segment of ESA's Space Situational Awareness programme has been using a 1-m telescope on Tenerife regularly for asteroid observations. The emphasis of the observations are follow-up of objects on the NEO Confirmation Page [1] of the Minor Planet Center and of objects on the priority list of the Spaceguard Central Node [2], now hosted by ESA. Part of the time is used to demonstrate and test strategies to search for NEOs. The telescope is a 1-m Zeiss Ritchey-Cretien telescope (IAU observatory code J04), called the Optical Ground Station (OGS). It is used with a field flattener/reducer at f/4.4. With a 4k×4k CCD camera it reaches a field of view with a diagonal of about 1 degree. The search programme is called TOTAS (Teide Observatory Tenerife Asteroid Survey). It is based on a software developed by one of us (MB) for the Starkenburg Observatory Heppenheim and later adapted to be able to control the OGS. Until March 2014, the survey has discovered more than 1500 asteroids and 5 NEOs in about 300 hours of total observing time. This paper will describe the survey strategy and the setup of the data processing pipeline used within the programme.

  5. Assessment of Prenatal Exposure to Arsenic in Tenerife Island

    PubMed Central

    Vall, Oriol; Gómez-Culebras, Mario; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Joya, Xavier; Velez, Dinoraz; Rodríguez-Carrasco, Eva; Puig, Carme

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Increasing awareness of the potential chronic health effects of arsenic (As) at low exposure levels has motivated efforts to better understand impaired child development during pregnancy by biomarkers of exposure. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prenatal exposure to As by analysis of an alternative matrix (meconium), to examine its effects on neonatal outcomes and investigate the association with maternal lifestyle and dietary habits during pregnancy. Methods A transversal descriptive study was conducted in Tenerife (Spain). A total of 96 mother-child pairs participated in the study. A questionnaire on sociodemographic, lifestyle and dietary habits during pregnancy was administered the day after the delivery. Analysis of total As in meconium was performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer. Results Total As was detected in 37 (38.5%) meconium samples. The univariate logistic regression model indicates that prenatal exposure to As was associated with a low intake of eggs per week (OR 0.56; CI (95%): 0.34–0.94) during pregnancy. Conversely, frequent intake of vegetables was associated with prenatal As exposure (OR: 1.19; CI (95%): 1.01–1.41) and frequent intake of processed meat (as bacon, Frankfurt’s sausage, and hamburger) shows a trend to As prenatal exposure (OR: 8.54; CI (95%): 0.80–90.89). The adjusted multivariate logistic regression model indicates that only frequent intake of vegetables maintains the association (OR: 1.31; CI (95%): 1.02–1.68). Conclusion The studied population presented a low As exposure and was not associated with neonatal effects. Maternal consumption of vegetables during pregnancy was associated with detectable meconium As levels; however the concentration detected in meconium was too low to be considered a major public health concern in this geographical area. PMID:23209747

  6. The 1909 Chinyero eruption on Tenerife (Canary Islands): insights from historical accounts, and tephrostratigraphic and geochemical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Roberto, A.; Bertagnini, A.; Del Carlo, P.; Meletlidis, S.; Pompilio, M.

    2016-12-01

    The last eruption on Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) started on 18 November 1909 from the El Chinyero vent on the northwestern Santiago rift. This fissural eruption was well documented by scientists and eyewitnesses, but there is a lack of data on the high-energy phase that produced the most significant emissions of ash and lapilli at the onset of the eruption. Here, we review historical documents (e.g. newspapers, dispatches, telegrams); eyewitness accounts and scientific reports were reviewed from a volcanological perspective and integrated with data from the analysis of deposit features, allowing an accurate reconstruction of the eruption and its dynamics. The 1909 eruption of Chinyero was fed by a compositionally discrete magma batch that ascended rapidly within the crust, producing rather violent pulsating Strombolian explosive activity in the early phases of the eruption. This activity produced a ca. 80 m high scoria cone and heavy fallout of lapilli and ash over the entire northern sector of the island of Tenerife. The energy of explosive activity waned after 3 days, giving way to the weak Strombolian explosive activity that contributed to a lesser extent to the buildup of the pyroclastic pile. Eruptions such as those from the Chinyero vent in 1909 are representative of rift activity on Tenerife and constitute a volcanic hazard for present-day inhabitants.

  7. Mercury content in tinned molluscs (mussel, cockle, variegated scallop, and razor shell) normally consumed in Spain, 2005.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Angel José; Lozano, Gonzalo; González, Tomás; Ignacio Reguera, Juan; Hardisson, Arturo

    2006-09-01

    Concentrations of mercury were determined for tinned molluscs (Mollusca, Bivalvia), i.e., mussels (Mytilus spp.), cockles (Cerastoderma edule), variegated scallops (Chlamys varia), and razor shells (Ensis spp.), consumed in Spain. A total of 220 samples were analyzed: 120 mussels, 40 cockles, 24 variegated scallops, and 36 razor shells. Samples were obtained weekly from markets in Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands) over a period of 12 months. All observed concentrations of mercury were below the maximum permitted for human consumption (0.5 mg/kg) as defined by European Community Decision 93/ 351/CE. Mercury concentrations were 27.28 +/- 12.43 microg/kg for mussels, 66.59 +/- 23.53 microg/kg for cockles, 33.68 +/- 15.76 microg/kg for variegated scallops, and 21.26 +/- 12.24 microg/kg for razor shells. To evaluate the importance of mercury as a food contaminant, the percentage ingested daily, the weight of mercury in the diet, and the calculated percentage of this metal in the diet contributed by reference species were estimated.

  8. Characterizing rainfall in the Tenerife island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez-Sierra, Javier; del Jesus, Manuel; Losada Rodriguez, Inigo

    2017-04-01

    In many locations, rainfall data are collected through networks of meteorological stations. The data collection process is nowadays automated in many places, leading to the development of big databases of rainfall data covering extensive areas of territory. However, managers, decision makers and engineering consultants tend not to extract most of the information contained in these databases due to the lack of specific software tools for their exploitation. Here we present the modeling and development effort put in place in the Tenerife island in order to develop MENSEI-L, a software tool capable of automatically analyzing a complete rainfall database to simplify the extraction of information from observations. MENSEI-L makes use of weather type information derived from atmospheric conditions to separate the complete time series into homogeneous groups where statistical distributions are fitted. Normal and extreme regimes are obtained in this manner. MENSEI-L is also able to complete missing data in the time series and to generate synthetic stations by using Kriging techniques. These techniques also serve to generate the spatial regimes of precipitation, both normal and extreme ones. MENSEI-L makes use of weather type information to also provide a stochastic three-day probability forecast for rainfall.

  9. The Queen's Two Bodies: Sor Juana and New Spain's Vicereines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, George Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz contains many examples of positive representations of the Queens of Spain and the Vicereines of New Spain. These poetic portraits serve to counter the primarily misogynistic portrayals of ruling women of the seventeenth century. Most importantly, Sor Juana increased the visibility of the vicereine in colonial…

  10. The Queen's Two Bodies: Sor Juana and New Spain's Vicereines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, George Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz contains many examples of positive representations of the Queens of Spain and the Vicereines of New Spain. These poetic portraits serve to counter the primarily misogynistic portrayals of ruling women of the seventeenth century. Most importantly, Sor Juana increased the visibility of the vicereine in colonial…

  11. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the Santa Cruz Harbor East Breakwater to Santa Cruz Harbor West...

  12. Geographic variability of fatal road traffic injuries in Spain during the period 2002–2004: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Jimenez-Puente, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study is to describe the inter-province variability of Road Traffic Injury (RTI) mortality on Spanish roads, adjusted for vehicle-kilometres travelled, and to assess the possible role played by the following explicative variables: sociodemographic, structural, climatic and risk conducts. Methods An ecological study design was employed. The mean annual rate of RTI deaths was calculated for the period 2002–2004, adjusted for vehicle-kilometres travelled, in the 50 provinces of Spain. The RTI death rate was related with the independent variables described above, using simple and multiple linear regression analysis with backward step-wise elimination. The level of statistical significance was taken as p < 0.05. Results In the period 2002–2004 there were 12,756 RTI deaths in Spain (an average of 4,242 per year, SD = 356.6). The mean number of deaths due to RTI per 100 million vehicle-kilometres (mvk) travelled was 1.76 (SD = 0.51), with a minimum value of 0.66 (in Santa Cruz de Tenerife) and a maximum of 3.31 (in the province of Lugo). All other variables being equal, a higher proportion of kilometres available on high capacity roads, and a higher cultural and education level were associated with lower death rates due to RTI, while the opposite was true for the rate of alcohol consumers and the road traffic volume of heavy vehicles. The variables included in the model accounted for 55.4% of the variability in RTI mortality. Conclusion Adjusting RTI mortality rates for the number of vehicle-kilometres travelled enables us to identify the high variability of this cause of death, and its relation with risk factors other than those inherent to human behaviour, such as the type of roads and the type of vehicles using them. PMID:17897449

  13. USEPA Santa Cruz River Public Survey Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Office of Research and Development, Western Ecology Division is investigating how urban households value different possibilities for the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona. A random sample of households in the Phoenix and Tucson areas are being asked to provide their ...

  14. USEPA Santa Cruz River Public Survey Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Office of Research and Development, Western Ecology Division is investigating how urban households value different possibilities for the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona. A random sample of households in the Phoenix and Tucson areas are being asked to provide their ...

  15. Characterization of optical turbulence at the solar observatory at the Mount Teide, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Detlev; Sucher, Erik

    2013-10-01

    Optical turbulence represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn2 is regarded as one of the chief causes of image degradation of ground-based astronomical telescopes operating in visible or infrared wavebands. Especially, it affects the attainable spatial resolution. Therefore since the middle of September 2012 the optical turbulence has been monitored between two German solar telescopes at the Observatory in Tenerife /Canary Islands /Spain. It comprises the solar telescope GREGOR and the vacuum tower telescope VTT mounted on two 30 m high towers. Between the two towers at the level of the telescopes, Cn2 was measured using a Laser-Scintillometer SLS40 (Scintec, Rottenburg, Germany). The horizontal distance of the measurement path was 75 m. The first results of the measurements starting from the 15th September 2012 up to the end of December 2012 are presented and analyzed using simultaneous measured meteorological data of wind, temperature and humidity. Daily and seasonal variations are shown and discussed.

  16. Volatile budget of Tenerife phonolites inferred from combined haüyne-apatite mineral records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Lauren B.; Bachmann, Olivier; Huber, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Intermediate to silicic volcanic eruptions often emit more S than predicted by petrological models -- this is called the "excess S problem." While most common minerals in these magmas are poor in volatile elements, the occurrence of large phenocrysts of S-rich haüyne (up to ~13 wt% SO3) in phonolites holds much promise for better constraining volcanic volatile budgets in differentiated alkaline magmatic systems. We have examined textural zonation patterns in haüyne separates from Tenerife (Spain), using mineral oil to enhance grain transparency. Included phases were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray maps, and Raman spectroscopy. Slow growth of haüyne, inferred from zones with few inclusions, likely represents cooling-induced crystallization from S-rich melt during storage in the upper crust. By contrast, rapid growth of phenocrystic haüyne, generating "wispy" zones containing Fe-rich haüyne laths and zones rich in melt inclusions, fluid inclusions, and Fe-sulfide inclusions, may be associated with magma recharge and/or upward percolation of a low-density fluid phase (i.e., "gas sparging"). Both processes could bring new pulses of S from deep within the magmatic system. Zones containing thousands of fluid inclusions provide direct physical evidence that the melt was fluid-saturated during periods of rapid haüyne growth. Transfer of S-rich fluid should occur in all volatile-rich magmatic systems, including dacitic-rhyolitic arc systems with large S excesses, but is difficult to document in such magmas devoid of a large S-rich mineral phase like haüyne. Apatite, a mineral present in all volcanic rocks, may also contain information about S. We have observed intricate chemical zonation in backscattered electron images of apatite microphenocrysts from the same Tenerife samples. Variations in volatile and trace element concentrations between successive zones (measured via wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and laser ablation-inductively coupled

  17. Archaeoastronomy and sacred places in Tenerife (Canary Islands).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, J. J.; Esteban, C.; Febles, J. V.; Belmonte, J. A.

    For the last few years the authors have been investigating (with work still in progress) several archaeological sites of the indigenous culture of the island of Tenerife, in search of possible astronomical connections, be these of a calendric or religious nature. Of these sites, the authors will concentrate, within their archaeological context, on those containing small channels and carved "basins" (or "hollows") and interpreted as probable cultic sites. The present work constitutes and initial approach to the contrasting of different aspects, such as location, celestial horizon, morphology, the visibility of Mount Teide and burials.

  18. Multiconjugate adaptive optics at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkefeld, Thomas; Soltau, Dirk; von der Luehe, Oskar

    2002-02-01

    We present the optical setup and wavefront reconstruction algorithms for the multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system at the 70 cm German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife. The system is designed to increase the corrected field of view (FOV) from about 10 arcseconds to 30 arcseconds in the visible. It will consist of two Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and two deformable mirrors (DMs). Both wavefront sensors will be situated in the pupil plane of the telescope. One determines the high order wavefront aberrations for the center of the FOV, the other measures only low order wavefront aberrations, but covers a large FOV in each subaperture. A 35 actuator bimorph mirror and a micro mirror will correct the ground layer and the tropopause, respectively. The system will have first light in early 2002. Scientific operation is expected to start in the second half of 2002.

  19. Public Values Related to the Santa Cruz River

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Santa Cruz Basin is a focus geography for EPA Southwestern ecosystem services research, and the focal resource is water. The goal of one component of the Santa Cruz effort is to characterize the ways in which basin residents value the river, and environmental resources relate...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138 Section 80.1138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138 Section 80.1138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138 Section 80.1138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138 Section 80.1138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn from...

  4. Public Values Related to the Santa Cruz River

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Santa Cruz Basin is a focus geography for EPA Southwestern ecosystem services research, and the focal resource is water. The goal of one component of the Santa Cruz effort is to characterize the ways in which basin residents value the river, and environmental resources relate...

  5. Reconnaissance Report for Navigation Improvements (Reduction of Shoaling) at Santa Cruz Harbor Santa Cruz County, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Sincerely, Stephen B. Scheiblauer Harbormaster I SBS:keb Enclosures: 3 Photos I I .... -’ ."• ,I • , -4. - Il "e I -- " ," ’e . m ..- ,... .. ... ,••. ___-a a...visit on 14 December 1991. There we met with personnel from the Corps (Jeff Cole) and the Santa Cruz Port District (Brian Foss, Director; Stephen ...fish such as the northern anchovy, Pacific herring, jack mackerel,Pacific sardine, king salmon, add juvenile sablefish. Rocky Intertidal I The rocky

  6. Variation resources at UC Santa Cruz.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daryl J; Trumbower, Heather; Kern, Andrew D; Rhead, Brooke L; Kuhn, Robert M; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2007-01-01

    The variation resources within the University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser include polymorphism data drawn from public collections and analyses of these data, along with their display in the context of other genomic annotations. Primary data from dbSNP is included for many organisms, with added information including genomic alleles and orthologous alleles for closely related organisms. Display filtering and coloring is available by variant type, functional class or other annotations. Annotation of potential errors is highlighted and a genomic alignment of the variant's flanking sequence is displayed. HapMap allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium (LD) are available for each HapMap population, along with non-human primate alleles. The browsing and analysis tools, downloadable data files and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/.

  7. Columbus's Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soria, Jose Manuel Nieto

    1991-01-01

    Describes fifteenth-century Spain's tendencies that proved central to the Columbian enterprise: experience as a conquering and colonizing kingdom, interest in Atlantic expansion, and missionary inclination. Argues that Columbus's arrival in Spain came at the perfect time in Spanish history. Stresses Spain's long history of religious war, conquest,…

  8. STELLA: 10 years of robotic observations on Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Michael; Granzer, Thomas; Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2016-07-01

    STELLA is a robotic observatory on Tenerife housing two 1.2m robotic telescopes. One telescope is fibre-feeding a high-resolution (R=55,000) échelle spectrograph (SES), while the other telescope is equipped with a visible wide- field (FOV=22' x 22') imaging instrument (WiFSIP). Robotic observations started mid 2006, and the primary scientific driver is monitoring of stellar-activity related phenomena. The STELLA Control System (SCS) software package was originally tailored to the STELLA roll-off style building and high-resolution spectroscopy, but was extended over the years to support the wide-field imager, an off-axis guider for the imager, separate acquisition telescopes, classical domes, and targets-of-opportunity. The SCS allows for unattended, off-line operation of the observatory, targets can be uploaded at any time and are selected based on merit-functions in real-time (dispatch scheduling). We report on the current status of the observatory and the current capabilities of the SCS.

  9. 27 CFR 9.31 - Santa Cruz Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...—Santa Cruz County”; (7) “Franklin Point Quadrangle, California”; (8) “Half Moon Bay Quadrangle... 400-foot contour line intersect (Half Moon Bay Quadrangle), the boundary line follows Highway 92...

  10. 27 CFR 9.31 - Santa Cruz Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...—Santa Cruz County”; (7) “Franklin Point Quadrangle, California”; (8) “Half Moon Bay Quadrangle... 400-foot contour line intersect (Half Moon Bay Quadrangle), the boundary line follows Highway 92...

  11. 27 CFR 9.31 - Santa Cruz Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...—Santa Cruz County”; (7) “Franklin Point Quadrangle, California”; (8) “Half Moon Bay Quadrangle... 400-foot contour line intersect (Half Moon Bay Quadrangle), the boundary line follows Highway 92...

  12. 27 CFR 9.31 - Santa Cruz Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...—Santa Cruz County”; (7) “Franklin Point Quadrangle, California”; (8) “Half Moon Bay Quadrangle... 400-foot contour line intersect (Half Moon Bay Quadrangle), the boundary line follows Highway 92...

  13. Streamflow in the upper Santa Cruz River basin, Santa Cruz and Pima Counties, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condes de la Torre, Alberto

    1970-01-01

    Streamflow records obtained in the upper Santa Cruz River basin of southern Arizona, United States, and northern Sonora, Mexico, have been analyzed to aid in the appraisal of the surface-water resources of the area. Records are available for 15 sites, and the length of record ranges from 60 years for the gaging station on the Santa .Cruz River at Tucson to 6 years for Pantano Wash near Vail. The analysis provides information on flow duration, low-flow frequency magnitude, flood-volume frequency and magnitude, and storage requirements to maintain selected draft rates. Flood-peak information collected from the gaging stations has been projected on a regional basis from which estimates of flood magnitude and frequency may be made for any site in the basin. Most streams in the 3,503-square-mile basin are ephemeral. Ground water sustains low flows only at Santa Cruz River near Nogales, Sonoita Creek near Patagonia, and Pantano Wash near Vail. Elsewhere, flow occurs only in direct response to precipitation. The median number of days per year in which there is no flow ranges from 4 at Sonoita Creek near Patagonia to 335 at Rillito Creek near Tomson. The streamflow is extremely variable from year to year, and annual flows have a coefficient of variation close to or exceeding unity at most stations. Although the amount of flow in the basin is small most of the time, the area is subject to floods. Most floods result from high-intensity precipitation caused by thunderstorms during the period ,July to September. Occasionally, when snowfall at the lower altitudes is followed by rain, winter floods produce large volumes of flow.

  14. Monitoring fugitive CH4 and CO2 emissions from a closed landfill at Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio-Ramos, María; Tompkins, Mitchell R. K.; Turtle, Lara A. K.; García-Merino, Marta; Amonte, Cecilia; Rodrígez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Melián, Gladys V.; Padilla, Germán; Barrancos, José; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Solid waste must be managed systematically to ensure environmental best practices. One of the ways to manage this huge problem is to systematic dispose waste materials in locations such as landfills. However, landfills could face possible threats to the environment such as groundwater pollution and the release of landfill gases (CH4, volatile organic compounds, etc.) to the atmosphere. These structures should be carefully filled, monitored and maintained while they are active and for up to 30 years after they are closed. Even after years of being closed, a systematically amount of landfill gas could be released to the atmosphere through its surface in a diffuse and fugitive form. During the period 1999-2016, we have studied the spatial-temporal distribution of the surface fugitive emission of CO2 and CH4 into the atmosphere in a cell in the Arico's municipal landfill (0.3 km2) at Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. This cell was operative until 2004, when it was filled and closed. Monitoring these diffuse landfill emissions provides information of how the closed landfill is degassing. To do so, we have performed 9 gas emission surveys during the period 1999-2016. Surface landfill CO2 efflux measurements were carried out at around 450 sampling site by means of a portable non-dispersive infrared spectrophotometer (NDIR) model LICOR Li800 following the accumulation chamber method. Landfill gases taken in the chamber were analyzed using a double channel VARIAN 4900 micro-GC. CH4 efflux measurements were computed combining CO2 efflux measurements and CH4/CO2 ratio in the landfill's surface gas. To quantify the total CH4 emission, CH4 efflux contour map was constructed using sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) as interpolation method. In general, a decrease in the CO2 emission is observed since the cell was closed (2004) to the present. The total CO2 and CH4 diffuse emissions estimated in the 2016 survey were 4.54 ± 0.14 t d-1 and 268.65 ± 17.99 t d-1, respectively

  15. Energy released at Teide Volcano,Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, D. L.; Perez, N. M.; Marrero, R.

    2003-12-01

    Teide volcano (3715 m high) is located at the northern scarp of the Las Ca¤adas caldera, a large depression at the center of Tenerife Island. Las Ca¤adas has been produced by multiple episodes of caldera collapse and giant landslides. The basanite-phonolite magmatic system associated with Teide volcano is emitting gases that reach the summit producing weak fumaroles. The chemical composition of these fumaroles and the flux of diffuse soil CO2 degassing at the summit cone (0.5 km2) has been used to determine the energy released as passive degassing in this volcano. Previous investigations show that Teide's summit is emitting 400 tons m2 day-1 of CO2 to the atmosphere. The composition of CH4, CO2, CO, and H2O indicate a chemical equilibrium temperature of 234° C and 75% condensation of water vapor within the volcanic edifice (Chiodini and Marini, 1998). The composition of the gases before condensation was restored and assumed to represent the composition at the equilibrium zone. The energy stored by the gases at the equilibration zone is assumed to be released as the gases move towards the discharge zone. The following processes are considered: change in pressure and temperature for water from the equilibration zone to the zone of condensation, latent heat released during the water condensation process, cooling of the condensed water from the condensation temperature to ambient temperature, and change of pressure and temperature for CO2 from the equilibrium to the discharge zone. Thermodynamic calculations of the energy released in each one of these processes indicate that 144 MW are released at Teide. Energy flux is 288 MW m-2. Most of this energy is released during the condensation process. This energy output compares with other hydrothermal systems of the world. These results show that during periods of passive degassing, fumarolic activity is limited by the geometry and elevation of the volcanic structure and the internal thermodynamic conditions.

  16. Fire effects on physical properties of Andisols (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neris, J.; Tejedor, M.; Jiménez, C.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fires modify the main properties of affected soils. Soil physical properties of Andisols with pine forest burned were evaluated. Five burned zones were compared to unburned counterparts. Soil texture, structure, bulk density, water retention capacity and water repellency were determined. As most studies report, soils showed an increase in the sand and/or silt content related to a noticeably reduction in clay content in the zones affected by fire. According to these reports, cementation processes involving Al and Si hydroxides as cements during the fire are the main factors controlling this behaviour. Regarding to soil structure, aggregation and aggregate stability decreased considerably in burned zones, as is usually reported. The decrease in soil binding such as organic matter, clay content and short-range order products explains this trend. Nevertheless, bulk density and water retention capacity, some of the main characteristic properties of Andisols, showed contradictory patterns compared to most studies. Water retention capacity at -33 kPa increases considerably after fire, whereas at -1500 kPa no major changes were observed. Preliminary conclusions indicate that the high water retention of ashes included into the soil explains this trend at -33 kPa. On the other side, the decrease in organic matter and clay content offsets the water retention increase at -1500 kPa due the ash incorporation. In opposition to most studies, an important reduction in bulk density was observed in burned soils. Some authors have reported that the desiccation process leads to a loss of aggregation resulting in low-density microaggregates in Andisols of Tenerife. These soils are known locally as "dusty-soils". Finally, a decrease of soil water repellency was also observed in most zones after fire, despite a large number of studies reporting the opposite. The soil organic matter decline might be the key factor of this trend.

  17. Earthquake site response in Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carver, D.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Aftershocks of the 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake are used to estimate site response in a 12-km2 area centered on downtown Santa Cruz. A total of 258 S-wave records from 36 aftershocks recorded at 33 sites are used in a linear inversion for site-response spectra. The inversion scheme takes advantage of the redundancy of the large data set for which several aftershocks are recorded at each site. The scheme decomposes the observed spectra into source, path, and site terms. The path term is specified before the inversion. The undetermined degree of freedom in the decomposition into source and site spectra is removed by specifying the site-response factor to be approximately 1.0 at two sites on crystalline bedrock. The S-wave site responses correlate well with the surficial geology and observed damage pattern of the mainshock. The site-response spectra of the floodplain sites, which include the heavily damaged downtown area, exhibit significant peaks. The largest peaks are between 1 and 4 Hz. Five floodplain sites have amplification factors of 10 or greater. Most of the floodplain site-response spectra also have a smaller secondary peak between 6 and 8 Hz. Residential areas built on marine terraces above the flood-plain experienced much less severe damage. Site-response spectra for these areas also have their largest peaks between 1 and 4 Hz, but the amplification is generally below 6. Several of these sites also have a secondary peak between 6 and 8 Hz. The response peaks seen at nearly all sites between 1 and 4 Hz are probably caused by the natural resonance of the sedimentary rock column. The higher amplifications at floodplain sites may be caused by surface waves generated at the basin margins. The secondary peak between 6 and 8 Hz at many sites may be a harmonic of the 1- to 4-Hz peaks. We used waveforms from a seven-station approximately linear array located on the floodplain to calculate the apparent velocity and azimuth of propagation of coherent

  18. Diffuse CO2 flux emissions from the soil in Las Cañadas caldera (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo-Oroz, Natividad; Torres, Pedro A.; Moure, David; D'Alessandro, Walter; Liuzzo, Marco; Longo, Manfredi; Pecoraino, Giovannella

    2014-05-01

    Starting in April 2004, unusual seismic activity was observed in the interior of the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) with much evidence pointing to a reawakening of volcanic activity. During this seismic crisis, several events were felt by the population. Since then, a dense multiparametric monitoring network has been deployed all over the island by Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN). In the framework of this volcanic surveillance project, several geochemical studies have been accomplished. Measurements of diffuse CO2 flux from the soil have been carried out in some zones inside Las Cañadas caldera. This study has been performed during three different field campaigns in November 2012 and June and November 2013. The studied area includes two different zones known as Roques de García and Los Azulejos. Since several authors have reported the existence of fractures and faults all along both structures, the objectives of this work were to find anomalous CO2 fluxes from the soil and preferential degassing areas, identify possible hidden faults and study the origin of gas emanations in order to detect the presence of magmatic sources. More than 600 sampling sites have been measured with the accumulation chamber method in an area of about 1 km2. Soil gas has been sampled in points where high CO2 fluxes were detected for the determination of chemical and isotopic composition. The results of the gas prospection confirm the existence of CO2 degassing in the area. Some anomalous fluxes have been measured along previously inferred volcano-tectonic structures. The highest anomalies were found in Los Azulejos with values up to 1774 g/m2.d. Chemical analysis did not reveal significant concentrations of magmatic or geothermal gases except CO2. The latter showed concentrations at 50 cm depth within the soils up to 48% and a C-isotopic composition between -4.72 and -3.67 o indicating a prevailing magmatic origin.

  19. Are closed landfills free of CH_{4} emissions? A case study of Arico's landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrancos, José; Cook, Jenny; Phillips, Victoria; Asensio-Ramos, María; Melián, Gladys; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    Landfills are authentic chemical and biological reactors that introduce in the environment a wide amount of gas pollutants (CO2, CH4, volatile organic compounds, etc.) and leachates. Even after years of being closed, a significant amount of landfill gas could be released to the atmosphere through the surface in a diffuse form, also known as non-controlled emission. The study of the spatial-temporal distribution of diffuse emissions provides information of how a landfill degassing takes place. The main objective of this study was to estimate the diffuse uncontrolled emission of CH4 into the atmosphere from the closed Arico's landfill (0.3 km2) in Tenerife Island, Spain. To do so, a non-controlled biogenic gas emission survey of nearly 450 sampling sites was carried out during August 2015. Surface gas sampling and surface landfill CO2 efflux measurements were carried out at each sampling site by means of a portable non-dispersive infrared spectrophotometer (NDIR) model LICOR Li800 following the accumulation chamber method. Landfill gases, CO2 and CH4, were analyzed using a double channel VARIAN 4900 micro-GC. The CH4 efflux was computed combining CO2 efflux and CH4/CO2 ratio in the landfill's surface gas. To quantify the total CH4 emission, CH4 efflux contour map was constructed using sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) as interpolation method. The total diffuse CH4 emission was estimated in 2.2 t d-1, with CH4 efflux values ranging from 0-922 mg m-2 d-1. This type of studies provides knowledge of how a landfill degasses and serves to public and private entities to establish effective systems for extraction of biogas. This aims not only to achieve higher levels of controlled gas release from landfills resulting in a higher level of energy production but also will contribute to minimize air pollution caused by them.

  20. Seafloor off Lighthouse Point Park, Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The seafloor off Lighthouse Point Park, Santa Cruz, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet).

  1. Seafloor off Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The seafloor off Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet).

  2. Seafloor off Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The seafloor off Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet)

  3. Wide-angle seismic constraints on the internal structure of Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. P.; Dañobeitia, J. J.; Watts, A. B.

    2000-12-01

    We have used wide-angle seismic data to constrain the internal structure of Tenerife, Canary Islands. The experiment was designed as a seismic fan profile to detect azimuthal variations in the seismic structure of the volcanic edifice and its flanks. Seismic energy was generated using a 75-l airgun-array on board the RRS Charles Darwin fired every 40 s along a quasi-circular profile around the island of Tenerife, centered on Teide volcano. We present the results obtained from the data recorded by five portable land stations distributed on the island. The travel-times indicate that the averaged P-wave velocity within the volcanic edifice is greater than 6 km/s. The observed travel-times were reduced to residual travel-times by removing the effects of variations in the bathymetry along the profile, variations in the shot-receiver distance, and from local heterogeneities. Negative residual travel-times up to 0.8 s in amplitude indicate that the southwestern part of Tenerife is characterized by a high P-wave velocity zone, coincident with a gravity maximum that was previously modeled as a high-density body forming the core of an old, large mafic volcano. We estimate velocities greater than 7.3 km/s within the anomalous body, suggesting that it represents an intrusive plutonic complex. This high-velocity, high-density body may have played an important role in the evolution of Tenerife, buttressing Las Cañadas edifice and preventing the occurrence of landslides in the southern and western areas of Tenerife. The bathymetric high between Tenerife and La Gomera is associated with travel-time delays up to 0.4 s, suggesting that it may be composed of large deposits of lava flows and volcaniclastic materials, probably erupted from the shield massifs of Teno, Roque del Conde, and La Gomera. The post-shield volcanic zones of Santiago and Dorsal rifts also seem to be characterized by moderate high P-wave velocities.

  4. Explosive eruption, flank collapse and megatsunami at Tenerife ca. 170 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Raphaël; Bravo, Juan J. Coello; González, María E. Martín; Kelfoun, Karim; Nauret, François

    2017-05-01

    Giant mass failures of oceanic shield volcanoes that generate tsunamis potentially represent a high-magnitude but low-frequency hazard, and it is actually difficult to infer the mechanisms and dynamics controlling them. Here we document tsunami deposits at high elevation (up to 132 m) on the north-western slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands, as a new evidence of megatsunami generated by volcano flank failure. Analyses of the tsunami deposits demonstrate that two main tsunamis impacted the coasts of Tenerife 170 kyr ago. The first tsunami was generated during the submarine stage of a retrogressive failure of the northern flank of the island, whereas the second one followed the debris avalanche of the subaerial edifice and incorporated pumices from an on-going ignimbrite-forming eruption. Coupling between a massive retrogressive flank failure and a large explosive eruption represents a new type of volcano-tectonic event on oceanic shield volcanoes and a new hazard scenario.

  5. Assessing the potential for pesticide leaching for the pine forest areas of Tenerife.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Diaz, R; Loague, K

    2001-09-01

    Currently, no guidelines cover use of pesticides in the forested areas of the Canary island of Tenerife. An index-based model (Li) was used to rank the leaching potential of 50 pesticides that are, or could be, used for management purposes in the pine forest areas of Tenerife. Once the pesticides with the greatest leaching potential were identified, regional-scale groundwater vulnerability assessments, with consideration for data uncertainties, were generated using soil, climatic, and chemical information in a geographic information system framework for all pine forest areas of the island. Process-based simulations with the pesticide root zone model for the areas and pesticides of highest vulnerability were conducted to quantitatively characterize the leaching potentials. Carbofuran, hexazinone, picloram, tebuthiuron, and triclopyr were each identified as being potential leachers.

  6. Object-based detection of LUCC with special regard to agricultural abandonment on Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günthert, Sebastian; Siegmund, Alexander; Thunig, Holger; Michel, Ulrich

    2011-11-01

    The island Tenerife has always been used for intensive agriculture, whereby the natural landscape was continuously altered. Especially mountainous areas with suitable climate conditions have been drastically transformed for agricultural use by building of large terraces to get flat surfaces. In recent decades political and economic developments lead to a transformation process (especially inducted by an expansive tourism), which caused concentration- and intensificationtendencies of agricultural land use as well as agricultural set-aside and rural exodus. In order to get information about the land use and land cover (LULC) patterns and especially the agricultural dynamics on Tenerife, a multi-scale, knowledge-based classification procedure for recent RapidEye data was developed. Furthermore, a second detection technique was generated, which allows an exact identification of the total ever utilised agricultural area on Tenerife, also containing older agricultural fallow land or agricultural set-aside with a higher level of natural succession (under the assumption that long-term fallow areas can be detected mainly together with old agricultural terraces and its specific linear texture). These areas can hardly be acquired in the used satellite imagery. The method consists of an automatic texture-oriented detection and area-wide extraction of linear agricultural structures (plough furrows and field boundaries of arable land, utilised and non-utilised agricultural terraces) in current orthophotos of Tenerife. Through the detection of recent agricultural land use in the satellite imagery and total ever utilised agricultural area in the orthophotos, it is possible to define the total non-active agricultural land as well as hot spots of agricultural decrease.

  7. Geochemistry of Isla Santa Cruz, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. L.; Schwartz, D. M.; Van Kirk, R.; Harpp, K.

    2012-12-01

    The geochemistry of Galapagos volcanoes extends to more depleted signatures than most hotspots, and do not appear to follow a classical tholeiitic to alkalic evolutionary sequence (i.e., Hawaiian Islands). Thus far, no such predictable sequence has been identified for Galapagos volcanoes. Isla Santa Cruz is one of the oldest volcanoes in the archipelago. Bow (1979) identified 3 volcanic stages: the Platform Series, the Shield Series, and the Shield-Modifying stage. The Platform Series defines a liquid line of descent that differs from the one shared by the Shield and Shield-Modifying units, which are genetically related to each other. Within the Shield and Shield-Modifying lavas, K2O/TiO2 ratios reveal three distinct compositional sub-groups: 1) a MORB-like, low-K suite (<0.10); 2) a tholeiitic suite (0.10-0.25); and 3) an alkaline suite (>0.25). These 3 sub-groups are geographically distributed across the island; the low-K suite is only in the north, whereas the alkaline suite constitutes the center highlands and the tholeiitic suite is on the eastern and northern flanks. Variations in La/Sm and Sm/Yb indicate that the magmas supplying the Shield and Shield-Modifying units were generated over a wide range of melting conditions: the alkaline suite melts were generated at the greatest depths and from the smallest melt fraction of the three suites, whereas the low-K suite originates from shallower, greater extents of melting; the tholeiitic lavas were generated at depths intermediate between the other 2 sub-groups. None of the lavas from Santa Cruz resemble material erupted at Fernandina volcano, the presumed center of the plume; radiogenic isotope ratios from previous research indicate that all Santa Cruz lavas are significantly more depleted than western Galapagos lavas. The ~1.2 Ma Platform Series is the most enriched of the Santa Cruz units. The Shield and Shield-Modifying lavas are all shifted towards more depleted signatures, approaching those of MORB, in terms

  8. Reappraisal of the extinction of Canariomys bravoi, the giant rat from Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rando, Juan Carlos; Alcover, Josep Antoni; Galván, Bertila; Navarro, Juan Francisco

    2014-06-01

    All the Quaternary endemic rodents of the Canary Islands are currently extinct. The Lava Mouse Malpaisomys insularis inhabited the easternmost islands, whereas the giant rats Canariomys bravoi and Canariomys tamarani lived in the central islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, respectively. Bones of C. bravoi have appeared in archaeological sites together with shellfish and butchery remains. Traditionally, they have been considered as an evidence of the sporadic consumption of C. bravoi by the aboriginal people, in some instances as recently as the time of the first European contact (14th century AD). Accordingly, the extinction of C. bravoi has been linked to the European colonization of Tenerife. The plausibility of this extinction date has been explored through new radiocarbon dates obtained on selected C. bravoi bones and through a reappraisal of the published dates. Our analysis allowed us to establish an earlier last documented occurrence age for C. bravoi, prior to the third century cal BC, much earlier than previously assumed. The analysis of formerly published 14C dates of archaeological remains from Tenerife shows that samples with confidence intervals (95.54%) that are older or overlap with the last documented record of C. bravoi were performed on materials with large sources of error (such as wood, charcoal or bulk ash-sediments). Conversely, the new radiocarbon dates and analyses presented herein are in agreement with the occurrence of an earlier rapid extinction linked to the first human presence on the island.

  9. Mycobacterium fortuitum Cruz from the tropical fish Hyphessobrycon innesi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.; Brancato, F.P.

    1959-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapid-growing, acid-fast bacillus, isolated from a cold abscess of human origin was described by Cruz (1938). Gordon and Smith (1955), in a taxonomic study embracing a group of acid-fast bacteria capable of relatively rapid growth on ordinary media, classified a number of cultures in their collection as M. fortuitum Cruz. In this group were strains isolated from human beings, cattle, soil, and cold-blooded animals including marine fishes. The present study was undertaken to determine the identity of a rapid-growing, acid-fast bacillus isolated at the New York Aquarium from lesions present in a population of freshwater tropical fishes commonly known as the Neon Tetra (Hyphessobrycon innesi). The symptomatology and pathology of this disease have been described by Nigrelli (1953).

  10. Soil chemistry and mineralogy of the Santa Cruz coastal terraces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinney, Colin; Aniku, Jacob; Burke, Raymond; Harden, Jennifer; Singer, Michael; Munster, Jennie

    2002-01-01

    Marine terraces in the central coast of California provide an opportunity to study a soil chronosequence in which similar materials (beach deposits) have been weathered under similar slope, climatic, and vegetation conditions during the Quaternary. The terraces between Santa Cruz and Año Nuevo, California, have been studied for decades and are thought to be one of the best example of marine terraces in California {Lawson (1893), Wilson (1907); Branner and others (1909), Rode (1930) Page and Holmes (1945), Alexander (1953), Bradley (1956, 1957, 1958, and 1965), Bradley and Addicott (1968), Clark (1966 and 1970), Jahns and Hamilton (1971), Lajoie and others (1972), Bradley and Griggs (1976). Hanks and others (1986), Aniku (1986), Fine and others (1988), Anderson (1990 and 1994), and Rosenbloom and Anderson (1994).} Here we report morphological, chemical, physical, and mineralogical data for the soils that were formed in deposits on the Santa Cruz marine terraces in order to examine soil characteristics as a function of increasing terrace age.

  11. Late Quaternary slip on the Santa Cruz Island fault, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinter, N.; Lueddecke, S.B.; Keller, E.A.; Simmons, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    The style, timing, and pattern of slip on the Santa Cruz Island fault were investigated by trenching the fault and by analysis of offset late Quaternary landforms. A trench excavated across the fault at Christi Beach, on the western coast of the island, exposed deformation of latest Pleistocene to Holocene sediments and pre-Quaternary rocks, recording repeated large-magnitude rupture events. The most recent earthquake at this site occurred ca. 5 ka. Coastal terraces preserved on western Santa Cruz Island have been dated using the uranium-series technique and by extrapolation using terrace elevations and the eustatic record. Offset of terraces and other landforms indicates that the Santa Cruz Island fault is predominantly left lateral, having a horizontal slip rate of not more than 1.1 mm/yr and probably about 0.8 mm/yr. The fault also has a smaller reverse component, slipping at a rate of between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/yr. Combined with measurements of slip per event, this information suggests a long-term average recurrence interval of at least 2.7 k.y. and probably 4-5 k.y., and average earthquake magnitudes of Mw 7.2-7.5. Sense of slip, recurrence interval, and earthquake magnitudes calculated here for the Santa Cruz Island fault are very similar to recent results for other faults along the southern margin of the western Transverse Range, including the Malibu Coast fault, the Santa Monica fault, the Hollywood fault, and the Raymond fault, supporting the contention that these faults constitute a continuous and linked fault system, which is characterized by large but relatively infrequent earthquakes.

  12. A quantitative analysis of surgical capacity in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Markin, Abraham; Barbero, Roxana; Leow, Jeffrey J; Groen, Reinou S; Skow, Evan J; Apelgren, Keith N; Kushner, Adam L; Nwomeh, Benedict C

    2013-11-01

    This investigation aimed to document surgical capacity at public medical centers in a middle-income Latin American country using the Surgeons OverSeas (SOS) Personnel, Infrastructure, Procedures, Equipment, and Supplies (PIPES) survey tool. We applied the PIPES tool at six urban and 25 rural facilities in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Outcome measures included the availability of items in five domains (Personnel, Infrastructure, Procedures, Equipment, and Supplies) and the PIPES index. PIPES indices were calculated by summing scores from each domain, dividing by the total number of survey items, and multiplying by 10. Thirty-one of the 32 public facilities that provide surgical care in Santa Cruz were assessed. Santa Cruz had at least 7.8 surgeons and 2.8 anesthesiologists per 100,000 population. However, these providers were unequally distributed, such that nine rural sites had no anesthesiologist. Few rural facilities had blood banking (4/25), anesthesia machines (11/25), postoperative care (11/25), or intensive care units (1/25). PIPES indices ranged from 5.7-13.2, and were significantly higher in urban (median 12.6) than rural (median 7.8) areas (P < 0.01). This investigation is novel in its application of a Spanish-language version of the PIPES tool in a middle-income Latin American country. These data document substantially greater surgical capacity in Santa Cruz than has been reported for Sierra Leone or Rwanda, consistent with Bolivia's development status. Unfortunately, surgeons are limited in rural areas by deficits in anesthesia and perioperative services. These results are currently being used to target local quality improvement initiatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Urbanisation of yellow fever in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Van der Stuyft, P; Gianella, A; Pirard, M; Cespedes, J; Lora, J; Peredo, C; Pelegrino, J L; Vorndam, V; Boelaert, M

    1999-05-08

    Until recently, urban yellow fever had not been reported from the Americas since 1954, but jungle yellow fever increasingly affects forest dwellers in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. The reinvasion by Aedes aegypti of cities in the Americas now threatens to urbanize yellow fever. After yellow fever infection was identified in a resident of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, in December 1997, all subsequent suspected cases were investigated. Active surveillance of yellow fever was introduced in the Santa Cruz area, with hospitals and selected urban and rural health centers reporting all suspected cases. Patients were serologically screened for yellow fever, dengue, hepatitis A and B, and leptospirosis; clinical and epidemiological data were collected from patients' records and through interviews; and a population-based serosurvey was conducted in the neighborhood of one case. Between December 1997 and June 1998, symptomatic yellow fever infection was confirmed in 6 residents of Santa Cruz, of whom 5 died. 5 lived in the southern sector of the city. 2 cases did not leave the city during their incubation period, and 1 had visited only an area in which sylvatic transmission was deemed impossible. Of the 281 people covered in the serosurvey, 16 (6%) were positive for IgM antibody to yellow fever. Among 5 people for whom that result could not be explained by recent vaccination, there were 2 pairs of neighbors. This instance of urban yellow fever transmission was limited in both time and space.

  14. Historical review of clinical vaccine studies at Oswaldo Cruz Institute and Oswaldo Cruz Foundation - technological development issues

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Reinaldo de Menezes; Possas, Cristina de Albuquerque; Homma, Akira

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents, from the perspective of technological development and production, the results of an investigation examining 61 clinical studies with vaccines conducted in Brazil between 1938-2013, with the participation of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute (IOC) and the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz). These studies have been identified and reviewed according to criteria, such as the kind of vaccine (viral, bacterial, parasitic), their rationale, design and methodological strategies. The results indicate that IOC and Fiocruz have accumulated along this time significant knowledge and experience for the performance of studies in all clinical phases and are prepared for the development of new vaccines products and processes. We recommend national policy strategies to overcome existing regulatory and financing constraints. PMID:25742271

  15. Fractal Analysis of Enclaves as a New Tool for Estimating Rheological Properties of Magmas During Mixing: The Case of Montaña Reventada (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Helena; Perugini, Diego; Martí, Joan

    2015-07-01

    The volcanic unit of Montaña Reventada on the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) is an example of magma mingling and mixing in which the eruptive process was triggered by an intrusion of basanite into a phonolite magma chamber. The eruption started with emplacement of a basanitic scoria deposit followed by emplacement of a phonolitic lava flow characterized by the presence of mafic enclaves. These enclaves represent approximately 1 % of the outcrop and are basanitic, phono-tephritic and tephri-phonolitic in composition. The morphology of each enclave is different, varying from rounded to complex finger-like structures usually with cuspate terminations. In this study we quantified textural heterogeneity related to the enclaves generated by the mixing process and thus provided a new perspective on the 1100 Ad Montaña Reventada eruption. The textural study was performed by use of fractal geometry methods and the results show that the logarithm of the viscosity ratio between the phonolitic magma and the enclaves ranges between 0.39 and 0.81, with a mode at 0.49. This enables us to infer the water content is 2-2.5 wt% for the phonolitic magma and 1.5-2 wt% for the basanitic magma and the enclaves.

  16. Surface geochemical survey for geothermal exploration in the south-east zone of Tenerife Island, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Requejo, M.; Marrero, R.; Padron, E.; Melian, G.; Guerrero, V.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Perez, N.; Hidalgo, R.

    2009-12-01

    Water and gas sampling of natural discharges are the most common type of geochemical surveys for geothermal exploration. However, these natural discharges are generally scarces at geothermal exploration areas where the extent of the field is not known. Therefore, soil-volatile (Hg, As, Sb, NH3 and B) and soil-gas surveys (222Rn, CO2, He, H2, CH4, O2, Ar) are becoming a useful geochemical tool to identify permeable areas and potential upflow or boiling zones. These surveys can also help to delineate the margins of a geothermal system, and therefore often complement geophysical surveys particularly where the interpretation of geophysical data shows some difficulties. During July and August, 2008, a surface geochemical survey was undertaken in a ~120 km2 area at the south-east slope of Tenerife Island, Spain. In order to obtain a representative distribution of the whole study area, during the field work a total of 577 sampling points were performed. In-situ measurement of radon (222Rn) and thoron (220Rn) activities together with Hg0 and H2S gas concentration and CO2 and H2S soil effluxes were performed at each sampling point. At the same time, gas samples were taken from the soil atmosphere at 40 cm depth for subsequent chemical analysis by means of micro-gas chromatography and quadrupole mass spectrometry (He, H2, Ne, N2, CO2, CH4, Ar and CO2). At least two geochemical anomalous zones have been identified in the present work: (A) one close to Siete Fuentes-Fasnia historical vents (1704-1705 AD) and (B) located on the southwestern limit of the study area. Relatively high concentrations of H2 and ΔHe as well as high H2/Ar and He/CO2 ratios were observed at both zones, indicating a clear evidence of the existence of an upflow zone with an important contribution of endogenous gases. The existence of a volcanic-hydrothermal system coupled with a vertical permeability structures in both zones could explain these geochemical anomalies observed in the surface environment

  17. The late Quaternary Diego Hernandez Formation, Tenerife: Volcanology of a complex cycle of voluminous explosive phonolitic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, C. J.; Wolff, J. A.; Olin, P. H.; Nichols, H. J.; Pittari, A.; Cas, R. A. F.; Reiners, P. W.; Spell, T. L.; Martí, J.

    2007-02-01

    The Diego Hernandez Formation (DHF; 600-ca. 180 ka) represents the products of the most recent complete cycle of phonolitic explosive volcanism on Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). We provide a revised and detailed stratigraphy, new 40Ar/ 39Ar and (U-Th)/He age determinations for major eruptive units, a summary of new chemical data and an overview of the key characteristics of the cycle, including volume estimates, dispersal patterns, eruption styles, phreatomagmatic influences and caldera collapse episodes. The complex stratigraphy of the DHF is divided into 20 named members, each representing a major eruption, as well as numerous unnamed members of limited present-day exposure. The major eruptions are represented by the Fortaleza (370 ka), Roque (347 ka, 3 km 3), Aldea (319 ka, 3 km 3), Fasnia (309 ka, 13 km 3), Poris (268 ka, 3.5 km 3), Arafo (4 km 3), Caleta (223 ka, 3.5 km 3) and Abrigo (between 196 and 171 ka, 20 km 3) Members. The Aldea, Fasnia and Poris Members consist of highly complex successions of plinian fall, surge and flow deposits and several of the eruptions produced widespread and internally complex ignimbrite sheets. Phreatomagmatism occurred most frequently in the opening phase of the eruptions but also recurred repeatedly throughout many of the sequences. Inferred sources of water include a shallow caldera lake and groundwater, and intermittent phreatomagmatic activity was an important influence on eruption style. Another important factor was conduit and vent instability, which frequently loaded the eruption column with dense lithic debris and occasionally triggered column collapse and ignimbrite formation. Most of the major DHF eruptions were triggered by injection of mafic magma into existing phonolitic magma bodies. Two phonolitic magma types were available for eruption during the lifetime of the DHF, but each was dominant at different times. The results presented here support a caldera collapse rather than a landslide model for the origin

  18. Estimating building exposure and impact to volcanic hazards in Icod de los Vinos, Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, J.; Spence, R.; Calogero, E.; Ordoñez, A.; Felpeto, A.; Baxter, P.

    2008-12-01

    Principal and subsidiary building structure characteristics and their distribution have been inventoried in Icod, Tenerife (Canary Islands) and used to evaluate the vulnerability of individual buildings to three volcanic hazards: tephra fallout, volcanogenic earthquakes and pyroclastic flows. The procedures described in this paper represent a methodological framework for a comprehensive survey of all the buildings at risk in the area around the Teide volcano in Tenerife. Such a methodology would need to be implemented for the completion of a comprehensive risk assessment for the populations under threat of explosive eruptions in this area. The information presented in the paper is a sample of the necessary data required for the impact estimation and risk assessment exercises that would need to be carried out by emergency managers, local authorities and those responsible for recovery and repair in the event of a volcanic eruption. The data shows there are micro variations in building stock characteristics that would influence the likely impact of an eruption in the area. As an example of the use of this methodology for vulnerability assessment, we have applied a deterministic simulation model of a volcanic eruption from Teide volcano and its associated ash fallout which, when combined with the vulnerability data collected, allows us to obtain the vulnerability map of the studied area. This map is obtained by performing spatial analysis with a Geographical Information System (GIS). This vulnerability analysis is included in the framework of an automatic information system specifically developed for hazard assessment and risk management on Tenerife, but which can be also applied to other volcanic areas. The work presented is part of the EU-funded EXPLORIS project (Explosive Eruption Risk and Decision Support for EU Populations Threatened by Volcanoes, EVR1-2001-00047).

  19. Microseismicity in Tenerife and its relation with the volcanic activity in the last 20 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza; del Fresno, Carmen; Carretero Medina, Laura; Rueda, Juan; José Blanco, María; López, Carmen; Abella, Rafael; González Martín, Daniel; Rodríguez, Rosa

    2017-04-01

    During the last 20 years, the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands) has suffered some low magnitude and sporadic seismic swarms related with its volcanic activity. The most intense and longer swarm was registered from April to October 2004, when more than 120 earthquakes were located in the center of the island, less than 30 km away from Teide volcano. A previous work showed out that during 2004-2005 at least 3600 earthquakes were manually detected at the seismic station of CCAN belonging to the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN). However, apart from this period, very little is known about Tenerife's microseismicity. Moreover, the seismic network at the island has changed in the last 20 years being CCAN the only permanent station during the whole period. Thus, the seismic catalog may have important gaps of information, mostly before 2004 when the seismic network in the island included only two seismic stations. In order to complete and homogenize the seismic catalog, we have performed a manual detection of seismicity at CCAN station. We combine these detections with seismic locations obtained during periods when temporal seismic networks were deployed. These periods include 18 months from June 2007 to December 2008 and also the whole year of 2010. The resulting catalog shows a background seismic activity of around 1000 microearthquakes per year, most of them with magnitudes lower than 1. The peak of the microseismicity was 2004, with more than 2000 events detected. Periods with improved seismic network show few hundreds of earthquakes located with enough quality (observed at least in three seismic stations). There is some seismicity located under the summit of Teide peak and also under NE Rift. We compare these results with the seismicity detected and located during the last year in Tenerife thanks to the new IGN's seismic network.

  20. What is controlling spectral reflectance of lava flows? First results of a field spectrometric survey of volcanic surfaces on Tenerife Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Kervyn, Matthieu; Solana, Carmen; Canters, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Space-based remote sensing techniques have demonstrated their great value in volcanic studies thanks to their synoptic spatial coverage and the repeated acquisitions. On satellite images, volcanic surfaces display a wide range of colors, and therefore contrasted reflectance spectra. Understanding the factors controlling the spectral reflectance of volcanic materials at different wavelength is essential to mapping volcanic areas. Detailed investigation into spectra of volcanic materials are, however, restricted due to the trade-off between spatial and spectral resolution of space-based sensors, such as Hyperion imagery that allows resolving 220 spectral bands ranging from 400 to 2500 nm with a spatial resolution of 30 meters. In order to better understand reflectance of volcanic materials, especially lava, a field campaign was launched in Tenerife Island, Spain in November 2013 with an ASD FieldSpec 3 to document the reflectance spectra of historical mafic lava flow surfaces. 20 specific lava and lapilli surfaces, with contrasted age, surface roughness, weathering condition and vegetation coverage were characterized, using a systematic recording method documenting the spectra's variability within a 15×15 m2 area. Results show that all the volcanic materials have great differences in spectral reflectance. Among them, lava's reflectance is low but still slightly higher than that of lapilli. Comparison of rough and smooth lava surfaces on the same lava flow suggests that roughness tends to increase the reflectance of lava surfaces. Also, vegetation and lichen alter lava's reflectance in some spectral regions, especially through a rise in the near infrared part of the spectrum. It is therefore suggested that reflectance spectra of lava evolve over time due to weathering processes, such as chemical alteration and growth of lichen and moss. In addition, it is possible to compare field measurements with spectra derived from Hyperion imagery, resulting in a strong match

  1. Dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton spp. in a Tenerife Lizard (Gallotia galloti): an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Orós, J; Hernández, J D; Gallardo, J; Lupiola, P; Jensen, H E

    2013-01-01

    Reports of dermatophytosis in reptiles are rare. This report describes the microscopical and immunohistochemical findings in a case of dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton spp. in a 2-year-old Tenerife lizard (Gallotia galloti) with ulcerative and pustular skin lesions. Microscopically, the lesions were characterized by superficial epidermal pustules containing heterophils with numerous fungal hyphae that stained by periodic acid-Schiff and Grocott's stain. Fungal culture was not performed, but a panel of polyclonal antibodies specific for different fungal genera was applied to tissue sections. These immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactivity of the hyphae only with antiserum specific for Trichophyton spp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Space Radar Image of Santa Cruz Island, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This space radar image shows the rugged topography of Santa Cruz Island, part of the Channel Islands National Park in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Santa Barbara and Ventura, Calif. Santa Cruz, the largest island of the national park, is host to hundreds of species of plants, animals and birds, at least eight of which are known nowhere else in the world. The island is bisected by the Santa Cruz Island fault, which appears as a prominent line running from the upper left to the lower right in this image. The fault is part of the Transverse Range fault system, which extends eastward from this area across Los Angeles to near Palm Springs, Calif. Color variations in this image are related to the different types of vegetation and soils at the surface. For example, grass-covered coastal lowlands appear gold, while chaparral and other scrub areas appear pink and blue. The image is 35 kilometers by 32 kilometers (22 miles by 20 miles) and is centered at 33.8 degrees north latitude, 119.6 degrees west longitude. North is toward upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is C-band, horizontally transmitted and received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on October 10, 1994, onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  3. Tucson's Santa Cruz River and the Arroyo Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, Julio Luis

    1990-01-01

    Between 1865 and 1915, arroyos developed in the southwestern United States across diverse hydrological, ecological and cultural settings. That they developed simultaneously has encouraged the search for a common cause --some phenomenon that was equally widespread and synchronous. There are few southwestern streams for which we have even a qualitative understanding of timelines and processes involved in initiation and extension of historic arroyos. Tucson's Santa Cruz River, often cited in the arroyo literature, offers a unique opportunity to chronicle the arroyo legacy and evaluate its causes. The present study reconstructs both the physical and cultural circumstances of channel entrenchment along the Santa Cruz River. Primary data include newspaper accounts, notes and plants of General Land Office surveys, eyewitness accounts, legal depositions, and repeat photography. On the Santa Cruz River, arroyo initiation and extension happened during relatively wet decades associated with frequent warm episodes in the tropical Pacific (El Nino conditions). Intensified El Nino activity during the period 1864-1891 may be symptomatic of long-term climatic change, perhaps indicative of global warming and destabilization of Pacific climate at the end of the Little Ice Age. During this period all but one of the years registering more than three days with rain exceeding 2.54 cm (1 in) in Tucson were El Nino events. The one exception was the summer of 1890, when the central equatorial Pacific was relatively cold but when prevailing low-surface pressures and low -level winds nevertheless steered tropical moisture from the west coast of Mexico into southern Arizona. In the twentieth century, catastrophic channel widening was caused by floods during El Nino events in 1905, 1915, 1977 and 1983. The Santa Cruz River arroyo formed when climatic conditions heightened the probabilities for occurrence of large floods in southern Arizona. Inadequate engineering of ditches that resulted in

  4. Prevalence of Diabetes on Santa Cruz Island in Galapagos Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tahseen

    2015-01-01

    This was an observational study offering a screening program for diabetes in a health clinic in Puerto Ayora town on Santa Cruz Island to determine the prevalence of this disorder and identify those at risk. A 1-month screening program was undertaken. Of 141 patients screened, 85% of men and 83% of women were overweight or obese; 16 (11%) had suspected undiagnosed diabetes and 22 (16%) were at high risk of developing diabetes. This is the first reported study of glucose intolerance prevalence in Galapagos. Urgent education and prevention programs are required to address this public health problem. PMID:26086607

  5. The Santa Cruz eddy and United States wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Cristina Lozej

    In the first part of this dissertation, a shallow cyclonic circulation that occurs in the summer over the Monterey Bay (California) is investigated. Since it is often centered over the city of Santa Cruz, it was named "Santa Cruz Eddy" (SCE). Its horizontal size is 10--40 km and its vertical extent 100--200 m. The SCE is unique because it forms 75--79% of the days during the summer, more frequently than any other known vortex. The SCE frequency was determined after analyzing two years of satellite imagery and data from an observational network. Simulations with the MM5 model showed that two eddies form, one in the early evening and one at night. Both eddies are formed by the vorticity generated baroclinically by the interaction of the synoptic northwesterly flow and the western side of the Santa Cruz mountains. Friction against these mountains further enhances vorticity production. In the late afternoon, the sea breeze and a favorable pressure gradient cause more vorticity to form near Santa Cruz. Since the latter two mechanisms do not act at night, the evening eddy is stronger, deeper, and larger than the nocturnal one. The second part of this dissertation aims at quantifying U.S. wind power at 80 m (the hub height of large wind turbines) and investigating whether winds from a network of farms can provide electric power steadily and reliably. A new method to extrapolate 10-m wind measurements (from 1327 surface stations and 88 soundings) to 80 m was introduced, which resulted in 80-m wind speeds that are, on average, 1.3--1.7 m/s faster than those obtained from other methods. It was found that 22% of all stations (and 35% of all coastal/offshore stations) are suitable for wind power generation. The greatest previously uncharted reservoir of wind power is offshore and near shore along the southeastern and southern U.S. coasts. When multiple wind sites are considered, the number of days with no wind power and the standard deviation of the wind speed are

  6. 75 FR 22835 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits, Santa Cruz County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Stanton and the San Lorenzo Valley Water District (applicants) for incidental take permits under the... applicants' take of the Federally endangered Mount Hermon June beetle (Polyphylla barbata) incidental to...)) of Mount Hermon June beetle habitat near Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California. We invite...

  7. Sung with Ink and Paper: Nicomedes Santa Cruz and the African Strand in Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Swanson, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    The poem "Ritmos negros del Perú" by Afro-Peruvian writer Nicomedes Santa Cruz recovers Afro-Peruvian history and agency through the retelling of the journey of a mythical grandmother. Through the retelling of her story, the poet claims blackness and African roots as pillars of Peruvian culture. In so doing, Santa Cruz opens the door not…

  8. New Cosmological Structures on Medium Angular Scales Detected with the Tenerife Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, C. M.; Hancock, S.; Davies, R. D.; Rebolo, R.; Watson, R. A.; Hoyland, R. J.; Lasenby, A. N.; Jones, A. W.

    1997-05-01

    We present observations at 10 and 15 GHz taken with the Tenerife experiments in a band of the sky at declination +35°. These experiments are sensitive to multipoles in the range l = 10-30. The sensitivities per beam are 56 and 20 μK for the 10 and 15 GHz data, respectively. After subtraction of the prediction of known radio sources, the analysis of the data at 15 GHz at high Galactic latitude shows the presence of a signal with amplitude ΔTrms ~ 32 μK. In the case of a Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum for the primordial fluctuations, a likelihood analysis shows that this signal corresponds to a quadrupole amplitude Qrms-PS = 20.1+7.1-5.4 μK, in agreement with our previous results at declination +40° and with the results of the COBE DMR. There is clear evidence for the presence of individual features in the right ascension range 190°-250° with a peak-to-peak amplitude of ~110 μK. A preliminary comparison between our results and COBE DMR predictions for the Tenerife experiments clearly indicates the presence of individual features common to both. The constancy in amplitude over such a large range in frequency (10-90 GHz) is strongly indicative of an intrinsic cosmological origin for these structures.

  9. Explosive eruption, flank collapse and megatsunami at Tenerife ca. 170 ka

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Raphaël; Bravo, Juan J. Coello; González, María E. Martín; Kelfoun, Karim; Nauret, François

    2017-01-01

    Giant mass failures of oceanic shield volcanoes that generate tsunamis potentially represent a high-magnitude but low-frequency hazard, and it is actually difficult to infer the mechanisms and dynamics controlling them. Here we document tsunami deposits at high elevation (up to 132 m) on the north-western slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands, as a new evidence of megatsunami generated by volcano flank failure. Analyses of the tsunami deposits demonstrate that two main tsunamis impacted the coasts of Tenerife 170 kyr ago. The first tsunami was generated during the submarine stage of a retrogressive failure of the northern flank of the island, whereas the second one followed the debris avalanche of the subaerial edifice and incorporated pumices from an on-going ignimbrite-forming eruption. Coupling between a massive retrogressive flank failure and a large explosive eruption represents a new type of volcano-tectonic event on oceanic shield volcanoes and a new hazard scenario. PMID:28504256

  10. Volcano monitoring with a multiparametric station placed inside a subhorizontal gallery in Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-González, Pedro; Moure-García, David; Luengo-Oroz, Natividad; Jiménez-Mejías, María; Jiménez-Abizanda, Ana Isabel; García-Fraga, Jose Manuel; Soler-Javaloyes, Vicente; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2017-04-01

    Measuring gaseous emissions from a volcano is one of the main tasks in volcano monitoring. These emissions can occur inside an active crater as fumaroles or plumes or along the whole volcanic area as diffuse emissions through porous soils or using preferential paths like dikes, faults or fractures. H2O, CO2, SO2 and H2S are the main species released by volcanoes. Among them, CO2 has received special attention in the last years. It has been used as an unrest and/or eruption early warning signal due to his low magma solubility and easily measurement. In the Canary Islands (oceanic volcanic islands) during the last century hundreds of galleries, subhorizontal drillings with lengths from few meters to kilometers and a 2x2 meters mean section, have been drilled to obtain groundwater. In the island of Tenerife there are about 1200. These infrastructures can cut across some preferential rising paths like dikes or fractures, so they turn to be optimum places to measure volcanic gas emissions. In addition, atmospheric parameters influence significantly decreases inside the galleries. In this work, we present data analysis from a three years registration period of a station placed at 1600 meters from the entrance of a gallery in Tenerife. This station measures several parameters like ambient and soil temperature and CO2 and Radon air concentrations inside the gallery. We also show how outside atmospheric parameters affect the microclimate inside the gallery.

  11. Bimodal magmatism during the Diego Hernández Formation, Tenerife, Canary Islands: genesis and eruption-triggering of phonolitic magmas during ongoing mafic volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olin, P. H.; Wolff, J. A.; Edgar, C. J.; Cas, R.; Martí, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Diego Hernández Formation (DHF) represents the explosive eruption of nearly 70 cubic km of phonolite over approximately 200 k.y. from the Las Cañadas caldera on Tenerife. Four chemostratigraphic units are distinguished on the basis of trace element contents: DHF bs (represented by the 370 ka Fortaleza and 347 ka Roque Members), DHF I (319 ka Aldea, 309 ka Fasnia, and 268 ka Poris Members), DHF II (Arafo and 223 ka Caleta Members), and DHF III (Cruz Sequence and the 196 ka Abrigo Member); all named units involve plinian and/or ignimbrite components that devastated a significant fraction of the island [1]. These chemostratigraphic units demarcate two dominant compositional trends distinct in incompatible element contents, and in Nb/Ta and REE ratios. DHF bs and DHF III plot along a high-Nb trend, and DHF I and DHF II plot along a low-Nb trend, a feature consistent with divergent fractionation histories involving titanite. Mafic magma was an important component of the DHF magmatic system and flanking mafic volcanism was ongoing during DHF time. Major phonolitic eruptions are conformably bounded by basanitic lavas and scoria deposits. Mafic magmatic components are identifiable in many of the phonolitic pyroclastic deposits as mafic, mingled and banded pumices, or as quenched mafic enclaves. Mafic components in the Abrigo, Caleta, and Poris Members are nearly geochemically identical to the underlying scoria or lava, suggesting that flanking mafic volcanism may in some cases be associated with subcaldera intrusive events that remobilize phonolitic magma to trigger major explosive eruptions. We envisage that the DHF represents a time when the intrusion of mantle-derived mafic magma in the lower crust supplied heat sufficient for the generation of intermediate tephriphonolite and phonotephrite magmas via melting of gabbroic/basaltic crust. Some of these intermediate magmas evolved to phonolite by crystal fractionation, a scenario consistent with DHF III

  12. Non-Controlled Biogenic Emission of CO, H2S, NH3 and Hg0 from Lazareto's Landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolasco, D.; Lima, R.; Salazar, J.; Hernández, P. A.; Pérez, N. M.

    2002-12-01

    Landfills are important sources of contaminant gases to the surrounding environment and a significant amount of them could be released to the atmosphere through the surface environment in a diffuse form, also known as non-controlled emission of landfill gases. CH4 and CO2 are major components in landfill gases and other gas species are only present in minor amounts. Trace compounds include both inorganic and a large number of volatile organic components. The goal of this study is to evaluate the non-controlled biogenic emission of inorganic toxic gases from Lazareto's landfill. Which is located in the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, with a population of about 150,000, and is used as a Palm tree park. Lazareto's landfill has an extension of 0.22 Km2 and it is not operative since 1980. A non-controlled biogenic gas emission survey of 281 sampling sites was carried out from February tod March, 2002. Surface CO2 efflux measurements were performed by means of a portable NDIR sensor according with the accumulation chamber method. Surface CO2 efflux ranged from negligible values up to 30,600 gm-2d-1. At each sampling site, surface landfill gas samples were collected at 40 cm depth using a metallic soil probe. These gas samples were analyzed within 24 hours for major and inorganic toxic gas species by means of microGC and specific electrochemical sensors. The highest concentrations of CO, H2S, NH3 and Hg0 were 3, 20, 2,227, 0.010 ppmV, respectively. Non-controlled biogenic emission rate of CO, H2S, NH3, and Hg0 were estimated by multiplying the observed surface CO2 efflux times (Inorganic Toxic Gas)i/CO2 weight ratio at each sampling site, respectively. The highest surface inorganic toxic gas efllux rates were 699 gm-2d-1 for NH3, 81, 431 and 4 mgm-2d-1 for CO, H2S and Hg0, respectively. Taking into consideration the spatial distribution of the inorganic toxic gas efflux values as well as the extension of the landfill, the non-controlled biogenic emission of CO, H2S, NH3

  13. Anomalous changes of diffuse CO_{2} emission and seismic activity at Teide volcano, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, Rubén; Melián, Gladys; D'Auria, Luca; Asensio-Ramos, María; Alonso, Mar; Padilla, Germán D.; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Barrancos, José; García-Merino, Marta; Amonte, Cecilia; Pérez, Aarón; Calvo, David; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Tenerife (2034 km2) is the largest of the Canary Islands and hosts four main active volcanic edifices: three volcanic rifts and a central volcanic complex, Las Cañadas, which is characterized by the eruption of differentiated magmas. Laying inside Las Cañadas a twin stratovolcanoes system, Pico Viejo and Teide, has been developed. Although there are no visible gas emanations along the volcanic rifts of Tenerife, the existence of a volcanic-hydrothermal system beneath Teide volcano is suggested by the occurrence of a weak fumarolic system, steamy ground and high rates of diffuse CO2 degassing all around the summit cone of Teide. Soil CO2 efflux surveys have been performed at the summit crater of Teide volcano since 1999, to determine the diffuse CO2 emission from the summit crater and to evaluate the temporal variations of CO2 efflux and their relationships with seismic-volcanic activity. Soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature have been always measured at the same 38 observation sites homogeneously distributed within an area of about 6,972 m2 inside the summit crater. Soil CO2 diffuse effluxes were estimated according to the accumulation chamber method by means of a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) LICOR-820 CO2 analyzer. Historical seismic activity in Tenerife has been characterized by low- to moderate-magnitude events (M <2.5), and most of the earthquake's epicenters have been clustered in an offshore area SE of Tenerife. However, very few earthquakes have occurred in other areas, including Teide volcano. At 12:18 of January 6, 2017, the Canary Seismic Network belonged to the Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN) registered an earthquake of M 2.5 located in the vertical of Teide volcano with a depth of 6.6 km. It was the strongest earthquake located inside Cañadas caldera since 2004. Between October 11 and December 13, 2016, a continuous increase on the diffuse CO2 emission was registered, from 21.3 ± 2.0 to 101.7 ± 20.7 t d-1, suggesting the occurrence

  14. Hazard assessment at Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Joan; Sobradelo, Rosa; Felpeto, Alicia

    2010-05-01

    Mid to long-term hazard assessment is conducted at Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex as a first step to evaluate volcanic risk in Tenerife, a densely populated island that is one of the biggest tourist destinations in Europe. Teide-Pico Viejo stratovolcanoes started to grow up in the interior of the Las Cañadas caldera, in the central part of Tenerife, about 190 ka ago, after the formation of the youngest sector of the caldera. Since then they have produced more than 150 km3 of rocks which represent a complete basanite to phonolite series. Eruptive activity at Teide-Pico Viejo complex has been traditionally considered as mostly effusive, but new field data has revealed that explosive activity of phonolitic and basaltic magmas, including plinian and subplinian eruptions and the generation of a wide range of PDCs, has also been significant, particularly during the last 30 ka. Most of the Teide products have been emplaced towards the north, inside the Icod and La Orotava valleys, or at the interior of the caldera, while towards the south the caldera wall has stopped the emplacement of such products from going further. The last eruption from the Teide-Pico Viejo central vents, the Lavas Negras eruption, took place about 1000 years ago, but younger eruptive episodes have occurred along the flanks of these stratovolcanoes. Despite the occurrence of numerous eruptions during the last 30 ka and the existence of unequivocal signs of activity in historical times (fumaroles, seismicity) and, even, a clear unrest episode that started in 2004 and is still ongoing, Teide-Pico Viejo stratovolcanoes have not been considered as a major threat by some scientists and also by the local authorities who have dedicated minimum attention to them in the recently approved regional emergency plan. If this view prevails it is obvious that risk mitigation in Tenerife will not succeed. In order to contribute to change that view on the danger potential of Teide-Pico Viejo, and to insist on the

  15. [Don Rodolfo Armas Cruz: physician, professor and teacher].

    PubMed

    1996-05-01

    The present issue of Revista Médica de Chile contains tributes to the late Profesor Rodolfo Armas Cruz prepared by the Editors and, by invitation by two of his closest disciples and collaborators. With the decease of Professor Dr Rodolfo Armas Cruz on November 26, 1995, disappeared a representative of a medical generation, whose unique work transformed national medical tasks, lending prestige to Chilean medicine. His peers recognized in him as a distinguished master and his work was so vast that is difficult to underscore a particular aspect. Over and above his books and scientific reports, remains the testimony of hundreds of his disciples distributed along Chile that, marked by his teachings trying to follow his path. The honors, awards and titles never separated him from an austere way of life, dedicated to work besides the ill, his students and his beloved Medical Service at the San Juan de Dios Hospital. His transcendental name and work, incorporated to the history of Chilean medicine, will be an example for actual and future medical generations.

  16. 77 FR 49863 - Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC and Permian Basin Railways-Continuance in Control Exemption-Santa Cruz...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Control Exemption--Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Railway Company Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC, and Permian....2(d)(2) to continue in control of Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Railway Company (SCMB) upon SCMB's... Pacific Railroad Company (UP). The Line, known as the Santa Cruz Branch, extends from milepost 0.433...

  17. 77 FR 49862 - Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Railway Company-Assignment of Lease Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Surface Transportation Board Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Railway Company--Assignment of Lease Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company and Sierra Northern Railway Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Railway Company...) owned by Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP). The Line, known as the Santa Cruz Branch, extends...

  18. 76 FR 6154 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Bid Sale of Public Lands in Santa Cruz County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Lands in Santa Cruz County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of realty... public land consisting of approximately 12.55 acres in Santa Cruz County, California, for not less than..., 2, and 9. The area described contains 12.55 acres, more or less, in Santa Cruz County. The...

  19. Detection and assessment of land use dynamics on Tenerife (Canary Islands): the agricultural development between 1986 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günthert, Sebastian; Naumann, Simone; Siegmund, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    Since Spanish colonial times, the Canary Islands and especially Tenerife have always been used for intensive agriculture. Today almost 1/4 of the total area of Tenerife are agriculturally affected, whereas especially mountainous areas with suitable climate conditions are drastically transformed for agricultural use by building of large terraces. In recent years, political and economical developments lead to a further transformation process, especially inducted by an expansive tourism, which caused concentration- and intensification-tendencies of agricultural land use in lower altitudes as well as agricultural set-aside and rural exodus in the hinterland. The overall aim of the research at hand is to address the agricultural land use dynamics of the past decades, to statistically assess the causal reasons for those changes and to model the future agricultural land use dynamics on Tenerife. Therefore, an object-based classification procedure for recent RapidEye data (2010), Spot 4 (1998) as well as SPOT 1 (1986-88) imagery was developed, followed by a post classification comparison (PCC). Older agricultural fallow land or agricultural set-aside with a higher level of natural succession can hardly be acquired in the used medium satellite imagery. Hence, a second detection technique was generated, which allows an exact identification of the total agriculturally affected area on Tenerife, also containing older agricultural fallow land or agricultural set-aside. The method consists of an automatic texture-oriented detection and area-wide extraction of linear agricultural structures (plough furrows and field boundaries of arable land, utilised and non-utilised agricultural terraces) in current orthophotos of Tenerife. Once the change detection analysis is realised, it is necessary to identify the different driving forces which are responsible for the agricultural land use dynamics. The statistical connections between agricultural land use changes and these driving forces

  20. Loma Prieta earthquake, October 17, 1989, Santa Cruz County, California

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, S.

    1990-01-01

    On Tuesday, October 17, 1989 at 5:04 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time, a magnitude 7.1 earthquake occurred on the San Andreas fault 10 miles northeast of Santa Cruz. This earthquake was the largest earthquake to occur in the San Francisco Bay area since 1906, and the largest anywhere in California since 1952. The earthquake was responsible for 67 deaths and about 7 billion dollars worth of damage, making it the biggest dollar loss natural disaster in United States history. This article describes the seismological features of the earthquake, and briefly outlines a number of other geologic observations made during study of the earthquake, its aftershocks, and its effects. Much of the information in this article was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

  1. Geothermal development plan: Cochise-Santa Cruz counties

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    A total of five hot springs and 25 thermal wells are located within the combined counties. The water discharged from these hot springs and wells may be suitable for applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Within Cochise county there are two large firms which are capable of using 70/sup 0/C (158/sup 0/F) geothermal water for their process heat requirements but the potential use of geothermal energy in Santa Cruz county is limited due to the absence of industry within the county. The amount of geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development is also predicted using a computer simulation model.

  2. A deep scar in the flank of Tenerife (Canary Islands): Geophysical contribution to tsunami hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppo, Nicolas P.; Schnegg, Pierre-André; Falco, Pierik; Costa, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    Among the high-intensity on-Earth tsunami generating events, seismicity, submarine landslides, and volcano lateral collapses are the most important [Ward, S.H., 2001. Landslide tsunami. J. Geophy. Res. 106, 11201-11215; Holcomb, R.T., Searle, R.C., 1991. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes. Mar. Geotech. 10, 19-32; Tinti, S., Bortolucci, E., Romagnoli, C., 2000. Computer simulations of tsunamis due to the sector collapse ar Stromboli, Italy. J. Volcano. Geotherm. Res. 96, 103-128; Ward, S.N., Day, S., 2003. Ritter Island Volcano — lateral collapse and the tsunami of 1888. Geophys. J. Int. 154, 891-902; MacGuire, W.J., 2003. Volcano instability and lateral collapse. Revista 1, 33-45]. Offshore bathymetry studies highlighted huge accumulations of large mass-waste flows (up to thousands cubic kilometres) inherited from past lateral collapses or submarine landslides [ Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Deplus, C., Villemant, B., 2003. Large-scale flank collapse events during the activity of Montagne Pelée, Martinique, Lesser Antilles. J. Geophys. Res. 108, ECV13; Moore, J.G. et al., 1989. Prodigious submarine Landslides on the Hawaiian ridge. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 17465-17484] which spread over more than 100 km off the northern Tenerife (Canary Islands) coastline [Watts, A.B., Masson, D.G., 1995. A giant landslide on the north flank of Tenerife, Canary Islands. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 24487-24498]. Although mechanics and dynamics triggering such catastrophic events follow from combined complex processes and interactions [Hürlimann, M., Garcia-Piera, J.-O., Ledesma, A., 2000. Causes and mobility of large volcanic landslides: application to Tenerife, Canary Islands. J. Volcano. Geotherm. Res. 103, 121-134; Masson, D.G. et al., 2002. Slope failures on the flanks of the western Canary Islands. Earth-Sci. Rev. 57, 1-35; Reid, M.E., Sisson, T.W., Brien, D.L., 2001. Volcano collapse promoted by hydrothermal alteration and edifice shape, Mount Rainier, Washington. Geology 29, 779

  3. Lead and cadmium levels in coastal benthic algae (seaweeds) of Tenerife, Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Gonzalo; Hardisson, Arturo; Gutiérrez, Angel José; Lafuente, María Anunciación

    2003-01-01

    Lead and cadmium levels of some species of brown-algae (Phaeophyta) from the mesolittoral (intertidal area) of the Island of Tenerife (central-eastern Atlantic) were determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The quality control was carried out using a standard "CRM 279 Ulva lactuca". The mean, minimum and maximum concentrations were 11.21, 2.090 and 81.795 microg/g/dw; and 1.13, 0.190 and 5.130 microg/g/dw for lead and cadmium, respectively. The fact that samples registering the highest cadmium concentrations were the same as those which showed the highest lead level corresponding to a sampling station nearby an urban water outlet could be relevant.

  4. The Mono Lake excursion recorded in phonolitic lavas from Tenerife (Canary Islands): Paleomagnetic analyses and coupled K/Ar and Ar/Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, C.; Guillou, H.; Laj, C.; Carracedo, J. C.; Nomade, S.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Wandres, C.

    2011-08-01

    We present a coupled paleomagnetic/dating investigation conducted on three different lava flows from the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands; Spain) erupted during the Mono Lake excursion (MLE). Paleomagnetic analyses consist in zero field demagnetizations (AF and/or thermal) and of Thellier and Thellier experiments using the PICRIT-03 set of criteria to select reliable intensity determinations. One of the flows is characterized by a direction largely deviated from the one expected from an axial geocentric dipole (GAD) field. Its paleointensity value is very low (7.8 μT). The two other sites are characterized by inclinations slightly shallower than the GAD value and by low intensity values (about 12 and 21 μT; present value: 38 μT). The three K/Ar ages combined with two 40Ar/ 39Ar ages range from 32.0 to 33.2 ka and they are not statistically distinguishable from one another. It therefore appears that these lavas have recorded the MLE (the only excursion in this time interval) confirming its brief duration (shorter than the minimum age uncertainties available). The mean age is younger but, within the uncertainties, consistent with the age of the 10Be peak and of the marine intensity low when reported in the most recent ice age model. These new results are the first ones with radiometric dating produced from the northern hemisphere. Combined with existing cosmogenic, marine and volcanic paleomagnetic data, these results are discussed in terms of dating, and geometry of the earth magnetic field during the excursion.

  5. Tracking Pyroxenes Through a Magma System Using Trace Elements: an Example From Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olin, P.; Wolff, J.; Knaack, C.

    2003-12-01

    Although much attention is currently focused on applications of radiogenic isotope microanalysis to petrogenetic problems, many volcanic suites do not exhibit a large enough range in, for example, Sr isotope ratios for the technique to be useful. Advances in LA-ICPMS instrumentation allow rapid and routine trace element microanalyisis of minerals and glasses at a spatial resolution approaching that of the electron microprobe, providing a microanalytical complement to isotope studies in igneous petrogenesis. We apply this approach to clinopyroxenes from the basanitic through phonolitic mixed-magma rocks of the bimodal Diego Hernandez Formation (DHF), Tenerife, Canary Islands. Two distinct phonolite types, distinguished on the basis of REE and HFSE abundances, have alternated in volumetric significance during the ~180 ky eruptive history of the DHF. Also, there is abundant petrographic evidence for repeated mingling of phonolitic and basanitic magmas prior to explosive eruptions, while whole-rock compositions of several associated mafic lavas are consistent with more complete hybridization of basanitic and phonolitic liquids. Clinopyroxenes from the suite fall into three groups: 1) titanaugites with unremarkable REE patterns; 2) salites with elevated REE contents and negative Eu anomalies; 3) salites with negative Eu anomalies and strong MREE depletion. Type 1 titanaugites crystallized from basanitic liquids, Type 2 salites from tephriphonolitic and phonolitic liquids, and Type 3 from highly-evolved phonolitic melts saturated with titanite. All three types are found, as discrete grains and as zones within complex grains, in the products of the largest explosive eruptions in the DHF, clearly demonstrating repeated crystal transfer between basanite, phonolite, and highly evolved phonolite, prior to the mingling events that triggered the individual eruptions. The ability to fingerprint crystals derived from different phonolite types is an important step in unravelling

  6. Priority River Metrics for Urban Residents of the Santa Cruz River Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indicator selection is a persistent question in river and stream assessment and management. We employ qualitative research techniques to identify features of rivers and streams important to urban residents recruited from the general public in the Santa Cruz watershed. Interviews ...

  7. Priority River Metrics for Urban Residents of the Santa Cruz River Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indicator selection is a persistent question in river and stream assessment and management. We employ qualitative research techniques to identify features of rivers and streams important to urban residents recruited from the general public in the Santa Cruz watershed. Interviews ...

  8. Relationship between the fractal dimension of the enclaves and the volumes of magmas in Montaña Reventada (Tenerife)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Helena; Perugini, Diego; Martí, Joan

    2014-05-01

    The volcanic unit of Montaña Reventada is an example of magma mixing in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). The eruptive process has been detonated by a basanite intruding into a phonolite magma chamber. This eruption started with a basanite followed by a phonolite. Montaña Reventada phonolite is characterized by the presence of mafic enclaves. These enclaves represent about the 2% of the outcrop and have been classified like basanites, phono-tephrite and tephri-phonolite. The enclaves have different morphologies, from rounded to complex fingers-like structures, and usually exhibit cuspate terminations. This study aims to provide a new perspective on the 1100 AD Montaña Reventada eruption quantifying the textural heterogeneities related to the enclaves generated by the mixing process. The textural study was carried out using a fractal geometry approach, and its results were used to calculate some parameters related to magma chamber dynamics. Photographs of 67 samples were taken normal to the surface of the enclaves with the aim of delineating the contact between the enclaves and the host rocks. The resulted pictures were processed with the NIH (National Institutes of Health) image analysis software to generate binary images in which enclaves and host rock were replaced by black and white pixels, respectively. The fractal dimension (Dbox) has been computed by using the box-counting method in order to quantify the complexity of the enclaves morphology. Viscosity ratio (μR) between the phonolite and the enclaves has been calculated as follows: log(μR) = 0.013e3.34Dbox PIC The viscosity of the enclaves has been calculated according to the μRvalue with the higher frequency and to the calculated viscosity of the phonolite between 900° and 1200° . We hypothesized that this value corresponds to the amount of mafic magma present in the system, while the other values represent different degrees of mingling and chemical diffusion. Viscosity of the basanite can be

  9. Conservation efforts and possibilities for increased collaboration in the Santa Cruz River watershed

    Treesearch

    Claire A. Zugmeyer; Emily M. Brott

    2013-01-01

    Attendees of the annual Santa Cruz River Researchers’ Day meetings have identified a need to expand collaboration, partnership, and sharing of lessons learned across the watershed. To help guide this interest, Sonoran Institute organized a symposium on 2 May 2012 entitled “Santa Cruz River Conservation.” The symposium had simultaneous Spanish/English translation and...

  10. Diversity hotspots of the laurel forest on Tenerife, Canary Islands: a phylogeographic study of Laurus and Ixanthus

    PubMed Central

    Betzin, Anja; Thiv, Mike; Koch, Marcus A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Macaronesian laurel forest is among the worldwide hotspots of threatened biodiversity. With increasing evidence that woodland composition on the Canary Islands changed dramatically during the last few thousand years, the aim of this study was to find evidence for substantial recent population dynamics of two representative species from laurel forest. Methods Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to evaluate fine-scaled genetic variation of the paradigmatic tree Laurus novocanariensis (Lauraceae) and a long-lived herbaceous gentian from core laurel forest, Ixanthus viscosus (Gentianaceae), on Tenerife. Bioclimatic variables were analysed to study the respective climate niches. A chloroplast DNA screening was performed to evaluate additional genetic variation. Key Results Genetic diversity of the laurel tree showed severe geographic partitioning. On Tenerife, fine-scaled Bayesian clustering of genetic variation revealed a western and an eastern gene pool, separated by a zone of high admixture and with a third major gene pool. Compared with genetic clusters found on the other Canary Islands, the East–West differentiation on Tenerife seems to be more recent than differentiation between islands. This is substantiated by the finding of extremly low levels of chloroplast DNA-based polymorphisms. Ixanthus showed no geographic structuring of genetic variation. Conclusions Genetic data from Tenerife indicate contemporary gene flow and dispersal on a micro/local scale rather than reflecting an old and relic woodland history. In particular for Laurus, it is shown that this species occupies a broad bioclimatic niche. This is not correlated with its respective distribution of genetic variation, therefore indicating its large potential for contemporary rapid and effective colonization. Ixanthus is more specialized to humid conditions and is mostly found in the natural Monteverde húmedo vegetation types, but even for this species indications

  11. Source process for the 2013 Santa Cruz Islands earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eun Hee; Park, Sun-Cheon; Lee, Jun-Whan

    2015-04-01

    Many places in the world have experienced damage from tsunami. Most tsunamis are induced by large earthquakes that occur under the sea along the trench. Therefore understanding the characteristics of large earthquakes is important to evaluate tsunami hazard as well as earthquake damage. In order to understand the characteristics of large tsunamigenic earthquakes, in this study we analyzed the source process of the 2013 Santa Cruz earthquake (M8.0) on Feb. 6, 2013. According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), 56 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 5.5 occurred in Jan. 27 - March 8, 2013. Among them, eleven events happened for a week before the mainshock and the maximum magnitude was 6.4. A large aftershock with magnitude of 7.1 occurred immediately after the mainshock, about 10 minutes later. Including this event, the 2013 Santa Cruz event seems to be followed by two large aftershocks of M~7. The length of spatial distribution of aftershocks in 30 days was about 200 km. And this value of the length was used for rough estimation of the fault length during the waveform inversion process. We carried out teleseismic body-wave inversion to obtain the slip distribution of the 2013 earthquake. Teleseismic P waveform data from 19 stations in the epicentral distance between 30° and 90° were used and band-pass filter at 0.005 - 1.0 Hz was applied. And focal depth was assumed to be 28.7 km, according the USGS catalog. And the initial value of source time window was assumed as 120 seconds by the duration of high-frequency energy radiation. According to our inversion results, the fault plane seems the northwesterly striking (strike = 291) and shallowly dipping (dip = 24) fault plane. Large slip area was seen near the hypocenter. Rupture velocity was obtained to be 2.0 km/s. And moment magnitude of 7.9 and maximum dislocation of 1.4 m had the smallest variance between the observed and synthetic waveforms. These values were smaller than the result of previous study. To

  12. [Tap water as a dietary source of exposure to fluoride in Tenerife; risk assessment].

    PubMed

    González Sacramento, Nazaret; Rubio Armendáriz, Carmen; Gutiérrez Fernández, Ángel José; Luis González, Gara; Hardisson de la Torre, Arturo; Revert Girones, Consuelo

    2015-04-01

    Introducción: el agua de consumo humano es la principal fuente de exposición al fluoruro para la población. De acuerdo con el Real Decreto 140/2003, el contenido en fluoruro en el agua de consumo humano no debe superar el valor paramétrico de 1,5 mg/L. Históricamente, ciertas aguas de consumo en Tenerife han superado este valor debido a sus características geológicas/volcánicas. El flúor juega un papel importante en la prevención de la caries dental. Sin embargo, la exposición crónica a concentraciones superiores a 1,5 mg/L en el agua de bebida puede provocar trastornos como la fluorosis dental. Objetivos: determinar la cantidad de fluoruro en el agua de consumo humano de 11 municipios del norte de la isla de Tenerife que en el momento del estudio superaba el valor paramétrico de fluoruro y estimar y evaluar toxicológicamente las ingestas diarias a partir del consumo de agua considerando las IDR (Ingestas Diarias Recomendadas) establecidas en España para distintos grupos poblacionales. Método: 44 muestras de aguas de abastecimiento público recogidas en los 11 municipios objeto del estudio fueron analizadas usando la determinación potenciométrica de fluoruro mediante el uso de un electrodo de ión selectivo. Resultados: 9 de los 11 municipios las aguas de abasto presentaron concentraciones de fluoruro medias que superaron el valor paramétrico fijado por la legislación española. Considerando un consumo medio diario de agua de 2 L, la ingesta diaria recomendada (IDR) para mujeres (3 mg/día) es superada en 9 de los 11 municipios y la IDR para hombres (4 mg/día) es superada en 5 de los 11 municipios. Considerando un consumo medio diario de agua de 1,5 L, la IDR establecida para los niños de 2 a 3 años (0,7 mg/día) es superada ampliamente en todos los municipios. Conclusiones: los resultados obtenidos evidencian el problema de salud pública existente en la isla de Tenerife y justifican las restricciones de consumo establecidas por la Direcci

  13. Women of Apelo Cruz. Organizing for change: the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Bolido, L

    1995-01-01

    In the Philippines, the Apelo Women's Health Association (AWHA) was organized in 1991 to help economically depressed women take control of their lives, their health, and their fertility. One woman being helped by AWHA is 17-year-old Vilma, who was married and separated at 13, became a bar girl at 14, miscarried at 15, bore a son at 16, and had an abortion. Because of AWHA, Vilma is now using oral contraceptives and insisting that her customers use condoms. AWHA was set up by GABRIELA (the General Assembly Binding Women for Reforms, Integrity, Equality, Leadership, and Action) to replace the free, occasional medical care formerly available in the slum area of Apelo Cruz, in Pasay City. The free medical care fostered dependency instead of self-reliance among the women. AWHA, therefore, is a health cooperative which requires members to pay a minimal amount for services. AWHA also runs monthly educational activities to inform women of their rights, duties, and responsibilities. It provides a forum for the women in the neighborhood to speak their minds freely. The women are also grateful for the ability to control their fertility through the use of contraception.

  14. Geothermal development plan: Cochise/Santa Cruz Counties

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The Cochise/Santa Cruz Counties Area Development Plan evaluated the regional market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified three potential geothermal resource areas with potential for resource temperatures less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F). Geothermal resources are found to occur near the towns of Willcox, San Simon, and Bowier. Population growth rates are expected to average three percent per year over the next 30 years in Willcox; Bowie and San Simon are expected to grow much slower. Regional employment is based on agriculture and copper mining, though future growth in trade, services and international trade is expected. A regional energy-use analysis is also included. Urban use, copper mining and agriculture are the principal water users in the region and substantial reductions in water use are anticipated in the future. The development plan also contains a section identifying potential geothermal energy users in the region. Geothermal energy utilization projections suggest that by the year 2000, geothermal energy might economically provide the energy equivalent of 3,250,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector. In addition, geothermal energy utilization might help stimulate an agricultural and livestock processing industry.

  15. 3D Attenuation Tomography of the Volcanic Island of Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, J.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Del Pezzo, E.; Martí, J.; García-Yeguas, A.; De Siena, L.

    2015-09-01

    This paper shows a new multidisciplinary interpretation approach to the internal structure of Tenerife Island. The central core of this work is the determination of the three-dimensional attenuation structure of the region using P-waves and the coda normalization method. This study has been performed using 45,303 seismograms recorded at 85 seismic stations from an active experiment (air gun shots) conducted in January 2007. The interpretation of these new results is done combining the new images with previous studies performed in the area such as seismic velocity tomography, magnetic structure, magnetotelluric surveys or gravimetric models. Our new 3D images indicate the presence of seismic attenuation contrasts, with areas of high and low seismic attenuation patterns. High seismic attenuation zones are observed both in shallow and in deeper areas. The shallowest area of Las Cañadas caldera complex (1-3 km thick) is dominated by high attenuation behavior, and it is interpreted as the combined effect of sedimentary and volcanoclastic deposits, multifracture systems and the presence of shallow aquifers. At the same time, the deeper analyzed area, more than 8 km below sea level, is dominated by a high attenuation pattern, and it is interpreted as the consequence of the effect of high-temperature rocks in the crustal-mantle boundary. This interpretation is compatible and confirmed by previous models that indicate the presence of underplating magma in this region. On the contrary, some low attenuation bodies and structures have been identified at different depths. A deep low attenuation central body is interpreted as the original central structure associated with the early stage of Tenerife Island. At shallower depths, some low attenuation bodies are compatible with old intermediate magmatic chambers postulated by petrological studies. Finally, in the north of the island (La Orotava valley) we can interpret the low attenuation structure as the headwall of this valley

  16. Constraints on the geometry of the shallow magmatic system of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragó, Silvia; Geyer, Adelina; Marti, Joan

    2014-05-01

    The geological evolution of Tenerife (Canary Island) involves the construction of a basaltic shield (<12Ma to Present) and the Central Complex (> 3.5 Ma to Present). Towards the end of the main shield-building episode (Old Basaltic Series), volcanic activity migrated to the central part of the island. This lead to the formation of shallow magma chambers and the construction of the Central Volcanic Complex through a series of cycles always characterized by a similar events sequence: 1) continuous ascent of mantle-derived basaltic magmas; 2) formation of discrete shallow phonolitic magma chambers and related eruptions; 3) a final caldera-forming event destroying the constructed volcanic edifice and the associated magmatic reservoir; 4) eruption of basaltic magmas in the central part of the island; and 5) formation of a new shallow magma chamber. As the latter may emplace at a new location, the locus of phonolitic volcanic activity migrated to other sectors of the central part of Tenerife. During the last 1.56 Ma years, this long-term (>200 ka) cycle of phonolitic explosive activity has repeated thrice culminating in the Ucanca, Guajara and Diego Hernandez overlapping vertical collapses; altogether referred to as Las Cañadas Caldera. The present Teide-Pico Viejo complex is interpreted to be the beginning of the fourth cycle. The objective of this work is to determine the geometrical constraints (including volume, depth, location and shape) of the shallow magmatic reservoirs active during each eruptive cycle. For this, we use new fieldwork data collected along Las Cañadas caldera wall where an important amount of phonolitic dykes have been identified. These include cone-sheets, radial and concentric dykes. The cross cutting relationship between the different dyke families indicate several intrusion episodes from diverse magma sources during the construction of the Central Complex. New 3D Finite Element Model results obtained provide a first-order characterization of

  17. Monitoring Domoic Acid production by Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking off the Santa Cruz Municipal Warf, Santa Cruz, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, M.; Ziccarelli, L.; Kudela, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Certain species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia are producers of the neurotoxin, domoic acid (DA). DA is known to cause amnesic shellfish poisoning also known as domoic acid poisoning, which can lead to permanent brain damage in humans and marine mammals. DA accumulates at higher trophic levels, generally due to consumption of toxic cells or through trophic transfer, and can potentially cause death of both humans and marine wildlife. The Santa Cruz Municipal Warf experiences periodic rises in DA concentrations, which can reach toxic levels in shellfish, fish, and other marine organisms. While these increases in toxicity often occur during Pseudo-nitzschia blooms, several periods of elevated DA have occurred when diatom abundance is restricted and/or dominated by non-toxic species, and there is increasing evidence that DA dissolved in seawater may be prevalent. One theory suggests that senescent or dead Pseudo-nitzschia cells sink to the benthos while retaining their toxin and are buried in sediment following the death of a bloom. Therefore, DA may accumulate in the benthos, where it is eventually released during storms or wave and tide conditions that disturb the sediment. We sampled DA in situ using Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking (SPATT) bags SPATT uses a synthetic resin to capture dissolved DA, allowing for the determination of integrated DA concentrations at known time intervals. The alternative method is mussel biotoxin monitoring, but it is less accurate due to uncertainties in the time of DA accumulation within the mussel, and the lack of uptake of dissolved DA by the mussel. We deployed and collected SPATT off the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf at multiple depths beginning in February 2013. We expect to see increasing DA following the death of a harmful algal bloom. Under pre-bloom conditions, little to no DA has been detected in mussels or surface SPATT, but DA from SPATT is frequently observed at depth, suggesting that the sediment is exposed to

  18. Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkefeld, Thomas; Soltau, Dirk; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2003-02-01

    We present an overview of the optical setup and control algorithms for the multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system of the 70cm German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife. The system is designed to remove the strong differential tip/tilt of the present AO system across a field of 30 arcseconds at visible wavelengths. It will consist of two Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and two deformable mirrors (DM) plus a separate Tip/Tilt mirror. Both wavefront sensors will be situated in the pupil plane of the telescope. One determines the high order wavefront aberrations for the center of the field of view (FOV), the other measures only low order wavefront aberrations, but covers a large FOV in each subaperture. A 35 actuator bimorph mirror and a 37 actuator membrane mirror will correct the ground layer and the tropopause, respectively. For wavefront reconstruction, the mirror eigenmodes will be used. The system will have first light in the first quarter of 2003. Scientific operation is expected to start in April 2003 or July 2003.

  19. Inbreeding Depression under Drought Stress in the Rare Endemic Echium wildpretii (Boraginaceae) on Tenerife, Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    Sedlacek, Janosch; Schmid, Bernhard; Matthies, Diethart; Albrecht, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    How climate-change induced environmental stress may alter the effects of inbreeding in patchy populations of rare species is poorly understood. We investigated the fitness of progeny from experimental self- and cross-pollinations in eight populations of different size of Echium wildpretii, a rare endemic plant of the arid subalpine zone of the Canarian island of Tenerife. As control treatments we used open pollination and autonomous selfing. The seed set of open-pollinated flowers was 55% higher than that of autonomously selfed flowers, showing the importance of animal pollination for reproductive success. The seed set, seed mass and germination rate of seedlings of hand-selfed flowers was similar to that of hand-crossed flowers, indicating weak inbreeding depression (seed set –4.4%, seed mass –4.1%, germination –7.3%). Similarly, under normal watering there were no significant effects of inbreeding on seedling survival (–3.0%). However, under low watering of seedlings inbreeding depression was high (survival –50.2%). Seed set of open- and hand-outcrossed-pollinated flowers was higher in large than in small populations, possibly due to more frequent biparental inbreeding in the latter. However, later measures of progeny fitness were not significantly influenced by population size. We predict that increasing drought duration and frequency due to climate change and reductions of population sizes may increase inbreeding depression in this charismatic plant species and thus threaten its future survival in the longer term. PMID:23115645

  20. Advective and diapycnal diffusive oceanic flux in Tenerife - La Gomera Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Díaz, A.; Rodriguez-Santana, A.; Hernández-Arencibia, M.; Machín, F.; García-Weil, L.

    2012-04-01

    During the year 2008, using the commercial passenger ship Volcán de Tauce of the Naviera Armas company several months, it was possible to obtain vertical profiles of temperature from expandable bathythermograph probes in eight stations across the Tenerife - La Gomera channel. With these data of temperature we have been estimated vertical sections of potential density and geostrophic transport with high spatial and temporal resolution (5 nm between stations, and one- two months between cruises). The seasonal variability obtained for the geostrophic transport in this channel shows important differences with others Canary Islands channels. From potential density and geostrophic velocity data we estimated the vertical diffusion coefficients and diapycnal diffusive fluxes, using a parameterization that depends of Richardson gradient number. In the center of the channel and close to La Gomera Island, we found higher values for these diffusive fluxes. Convergence and divergence of these fluxes requires further study so that we can draw conclusions about its impact on the distribution of nutrients in the study area and its impact in marine ecosystems. This work is being used in research projects TRAMIC and PROMECA.

  1. Limitations of biodiversity databases: case study on seed-plant diversity in Tenerife, Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Hortal, Joaquín; Lobo, Jorge M; Jiménez-Valverde, Alberto

    2007-06-01

    Databases on the distribution of species can be used to describe the geographic patterns of biodiversity. Nevertheless, they have limitations. We studied three of these limitations: (1) inadequacy of raw data to describe richness patterns due to sampling bias, (2) lack of survey effort assessment (and lack of exhaustiveness in compiling data about survey effort), and (3) lack of coverage of the geographic and environmental variations that affect the distribution of organisms. We used a biodiversity database (BIOTA-Canarias) to analyze richness data from a well-known group (seed plants) in an intensively surveyed area (Tenerife Island). Observed richness and survey effort were highly correlated. Species accumulation curves could not be used to determine survey effort because data digitalization was not exhaustive, so we identified well-sampled sites based on observed richness to sampling effort ratios. We also developed a predictive model based on the data from well-sampled sites and analyzed the origin of the geographic errors in the obtained extrapolation by means of a geographically constrained cross-validation. The spatial patterns of seed-plant species richness obtained from BIOTA-Canarias data were incomplete and biased. Therefore, some improvements are needed to use this database (and many others) in biodiversity studies. We propose a protocol that includes controls on data quality, improvements on data digitalization and survey design to improve data quality, and some alternative data analysis strategies that will provide a reliable picture of biodiversity patterns.

  2. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  3. HTTP-based remote operational options for the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staiger, J.

    2012-09-01

    We are currently developing network based tools for the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Tenerife which will allow to operate the telescope together with the newly developed 2D-spectrometer HELLRIDE under remote control conditions. The computational configuration can be viewed as a distributed system linking hardware components of various functionality from different locations. We have developed a communication protocol which is basically an extension of the HTTP standard. It will serve as a carrier for command- and data-transfers. The server-client software is based on Berkley-Unix sockets in a C++ programming environment. A customized CMS will allow to create browser accessible information on-the-fly. Java-based applet pages have been tested as optional user access GUI's. An access tool has been implemented to download near-realtime, web-based target information from NASA/SDO. Latency tests have been carried out at the VTT and the Swedish STT at La Palma for concept verification. Short response times indicate that under favorable network conditions remote interactive telescope handling may be possible. The scientific focus of possible future remote operations will be set on the helioseismology of the solar atmosphere, the monitoring of flares and the footpoint analysis of coronal loops and chromospheric events.

  4. Congenital Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission in Santa Cruz, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Verastegui, Manuela; Gilman, Robert H.; LaFuente, Carlos; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Calderon, Maritza; Pacori, Juan; Abastoflor, Maria del Carmen; Aparicio, Hugo; Brady, Mark F.; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Angulo, Noelia; Marcus, Sarah; Sterling, Charles; Maguire, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Background We conducted a study of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Our objective was to apply new tools to identify weak points in current screening algorithms, and find ways to improve them. Methods Women presenting for delivery were screened by rapid and conventional serological tests. For infants of infected mothers, blood specimens obtained on days 0, 7, 21, 30, 90, 180, and 270 were concentrated and examined microscopically; serological tests were performed for the day 90, 180, and 270 specimens. Maternal and infant specimens, including umbilical tissue, were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the kinetoplast minicircle and by quantitative PCR. Results Of 530 women, 154 (29%) were seropositive. Ten infants had congenital T. cruzi infection. Only 4 infants had positive results of microscopy evaluation in the first month, and none had positive cord blood microscopy results. PCR results were positive for 6 (67%) of 9 cord blood and 7 (87.5%) of 8 umbilical tissue specimens. PCR-positive women were more likely to transmit T. cruzi than were seropositive women with negative PCR results (P < .05). Parasite loads determined by quantitative PCR were higher for mothers of infected infants than for seropositive mothers of uninfected infants (P < .01). Despite intensive efforts, only 58% of at-risk infants had a month 9 specimen collected. Conclusions On the basis of the low sensitivity of microscopy in cord blood and high rate of loss to follow-up, we estimate that current screening programs miss one-half of all infected infants. Molecular techniques may improve early detection. PMID:19877966

  5. Channel change on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Santa Cruz River, an ephemeral river that drains 8,581 square miles in southeastern Arizona, has a long history of channel instability. Since the late 19th century, lateral channel erosion has caused extensive property damage, particularly in Pima County. During the flood of 1983, about $100 million damage was caused in the Tucson area alone; most damage resulted from bank erosion on the Santa Cruz River and its tributaries. The nature, magni- tude, location, and frequency of channel change on the Santa Cruz River were highly variable in time and space from 1936 through 1986 along a 70-mile reach in Pima County, Arizona. Four mechanisms of lateral channel change--channel migration, avulsion and meander cutoff, channel widening, and arroyo widening--were identified on the Santa Cruz River. The dominant mechanism in a reach depends on channel morphology and flood magnitude. The dominant vertical change has been degradation. The timing and magnitude of channel change at a particular location are controlled primarily by hydroclimatic factors such as magnitude, duration, intensity, and frequency of precipitation and floods. The location of channel change and its magnitude in response to a given discharge are controlled largely by topographic, geologic, hydraulic, and artificial factors. Although much of the present morphology of the Santa Cruz River is the result of recent large floods, a direct link between hydroclimatic con- ditions and channel change is not always evident because resistance of the channel to erosion varies with time. (USGS)

  6. Continuous monitoring of the C isotope composition of CO_{2}-rich subsurface degassing at Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padrón, Eleazar; Barrancos, José; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Tenerife is the largest island of the Canarian archipelago and several volcanic eruptions have occurred in the last 500 years, the last one in 1909. The main volcano-tectonic features of Tenerife Island are three main volcano-tectonic rifts trending N-E, N-W and N-S where, at the interception center is located Las Cañadas caldera and the stratovolcano Teide-Pico Viejo. Due to the approximately 1,500 wells and water galleries (1650 km) drilled during the last 150 years tapping the island's volcanic aquifer at different depths, Tenerife is a unique natural-scale laboratory for hydrological studies in oceanic volcanic islands. Ground waters are mainly Na+-HCO3- water type, mainly due to the continuous volcanic CO2 supply from the volcanic-hydrothermal system. A signi?cant number of these galleries show a CO2-rich inner atmosphere, and gas bubbling has also been detected inside some galleries. Since 2002, an automatic geochemical station installed at the entrance of the horizontal drilling "Fuente del Valle" (TFE02 station), Arona, Tenerife, measures the activities of 222Rn and 220Rn in the gas discharged from a CO2-rich gas bubbling spot located at 2.850 m depth. Interesting variations were recorded in the 222Rn/220Rn ratio after the period of 2004 anomalous seismicity and it has been demonstrated that this is a good control spot for volcanic surveillance (Pérez et al., 2007). Thus, in November 2016, a new type of laser based isotopic analyzer, a DeltaRayTM (Thermo Fisher Scientific) was installed in the TFE02 station to measure δ13C(CO2) directly in the gas discharged from the water. The gas, collected by means of an inverted funnel, is pumped (3 L min-1) towards the gallery entrance, where the instrumentation is located, through a polyamide pipe. During the study period the recorded data show a range of δ13C(CO2) from -6.2 to -4.2‰ vs. VPDB, with an average value of -5.1‰Ṫhese values are comparable to those ones measured in the gas sampled directly at the

  7. 77 FR 49862 - Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Railway Company-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Union Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Surface Transportation Board Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Railway Company--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Railway Company (SCMB), a noncarrier... Company (UP) and operate a permanent and exclusive operating easement over a 31.0-mile line (the Line...

  8. Morphometric interpretation of the northwest and southeast slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teide Group,

    Both the northwest and southeast slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands, owe their morphology to catastrophic sediment failures. An area of 4100 km2 and a volume of about 2362 km3 were involved in the failure. A 100- to 600-m-high scarp on the upper slope separates the sediment failures in the Orotova and Icod de los Vinos Valleys on the northwest coast from those on the slope. A similar (700 m high) scarp also separates the failures on the southeast slope from the failure in Güimar Valley on land. The sediment failure off Las Bandas Del Sur volcanic fan does not have any land counterparts and was the result of the failure of the front (1700 m high) of this depocenter; two generations of debris flows are mappable off this depocenter. We infer that the slopes off Orotova, Icod, and Güimar represent the front of the debris avalanche and/or creep deposits that were created during the formation of the valleys. Downslope from the debris avalanche fronts are irregular surfaced masses extending to the base of the slope. The front may define the contact between the more dense deposits onshore and upper slope and the more fluid deposits on the lower slope. Incised on the debris avalanche on the northwest lower slope are three channeled debris flows grading seaward into turbidites. Only one of these channels occurs on the southeast slope. The breakaway surface of these sediment failures was the front of the debris avalanches and/or creep. We ascribe the failure of this front mainly to its rapid buildup, although groundwater sapping also may have contributed to its failure. On the southeast slope, movement along the northeast trending fault between Gran Canaria and Tenerife also may have been a contributing factor to the failure of the front. The debris flow deposits triggered by the failure of the sediment front on the northwest slope are characterized by ridges formed either by pressure between flows moving at different velocities or by scouring; at least one volcanic edifice

  9. Morphometric interpretation of the northwest and southeast slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Both the northwest and southeast slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands, owe their morphology to catastrophic sediment failures. An area of 4100 km2 and a volume of about 2362 km3 were involved in the failure. A 100- to 600-m-high scarp on the upper slope separates the sediment failures in the Orotova and Icod de los Vinos Valleys on the northwest coast from those on the slope. A similar (700 m high) scarp also separates the failures on the southeast slope from the failure in Güimar Valley on land. The sediment failure off Las Bandas Del Sur volcanic fan does not have any land counterparts and was the result of the failure of the front (1700 m high) of this depocenter; two generations of debris flows are mappable off this depocenter. We infer that the slopes off Orotova, Icod, and Güimar represent the front of the debris avalanche and/or creep deposits that were created during the formation of the valleys. Downslope from the debris avalanche fronts are irregular surfaced masses extending to the base of the slope. The front may define the contact between the more dense deposits onshore and upper slope and the more fluid deposits on the lower slope. Incised on the debris avalanche on the northwest lower slope are three channeled debris flows grading seaward into turbidites. Only one of these channels occurs on the southeast slope. The breakaway surface of these sediment failures was the front of the debris avalanches and/or creep. We ascribe the failure of this front mainly to its rapid buildup, although groundwater sapping also may have contributed to its failure. On the southeast slope, movement along the northeast trending fault between Gran Canaria and Tenerife also may have been a contributing factor to the failure of the front. The debris flow deposits triggered by the failure of the sediment front on the northwest slope are characterized by ridges formed either by pressure between flows moving at different velocities or by scouring; at least one volcanic edifice

  10. Environmental correlates of life history pattern in ground-beetles on Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de los Santos Gómez, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    The spatial and temporal structure of Carabus ( Nesaeocarabus) interruptus Dejean, 1831 populations and the independent effects of climate along altitudinal gradients in the island of Tenerife, especially whether environmental preferences constrains the species breeding patterns at local and regional scales were evaluated. Ground-beetles were sampled with twenty-one pitfall traps in each of the forty-one plots during one year study. Some sampled specimens were dissected and dried to determine sex, weight and ovarian maturation. The populations were restricted to the middle climatic zone (600-1700 m). There was a long adult activity period from October to June and the changes in the weekly capture success were strongly correlated with the rainfall and temperature. Overall the males during winter were more active than the females. The emergence of new adults occurred only in spring and the body dry weight peaked in April-May. From start of autumn the weight was recovered to the initial values of the cycle, increased and peaked in January. The females prolonged its oviposition period from mid-autumn to the starting of spring. The species showed a winter breeding pattern and the seasonal variations in multiple life history traits could correspond with the changing conditions of the microclimatic variables. An evolutionary ecological model could help explain the life history pattern variability among the Carabus species in South-western Europe. The species could tackle the geographic dispersion of their populations for the single purpose of seeking a suitable hydrothermal environment (high rainfall and mild temperatures) if the food was insured.

  11. Radial variation in sap flow in five laurel forest tree species in Tenerife, Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M. Soledad; Nadezhdina, Nadezhda; Cermák, Jan; Morales, Domingo

    2000-11-01

    Variations in radial patterns of xylem water content and sap flow rate were measured in five laurel forest tree species (Laurus azorica (Seub.) Franco, Persea indica (L.) Spreng., Myrica faya Ait., Erica arborea L. and Ilex perado Ait. ssp. platyphylla (Webb & Berth.) Tutin) growing in an experimental plot at Agua García, Tenerife, Canary Islands. Measurements were performed around midday during warm and sunny days by the heat field deformation method. In all species, water content was almost constant (around 35% by volume) over the whole xylem cross-sectional area. There were no differences in wood color over the whole cross-sectional area of the stem in most species with the exception of E. arborea, whose wood became darker in the inner layers. Radial patterns of sap flow were highly variable and did not show clear relationships with tree diameter or species. Sap flow occurred over the whole xylem cross-sectional area in some species, whereas it was limited to the outer xylem layers in others. Sap flow rate was either similar along the xylem radius or exhibited a peak in the outer part of the xylem area. Low sap flow rates with little variation in radial pattern were typical for shaded suppressed trees, whereas dominant trees exhibited high sap flow rates with a peak in the radial pattern. Stem damage resulted in a significant decrease in sap flow rate in the outer xylem layers. The outer xylem is more important for whole tree water supply than the inner xylem because of its larger size. We conclude that measurement of radial flow pattern provides a reliable method of integrating sap flow from individual measuring points to the whole tree.

  12. Comparison between observation and simulation of sodium LGS return flux with a 20W CW laser on Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzlöhner, R.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Bello, D.; Budker, D.; Centrone, M.; Guidolin, I.; Hackenberg, W.; Lewis, S.; Lombardi, G.; Montilla, I.; Pedichini, F.; Pedreros Bustos, F.; Pfrommer, T.; Reyes Garcia Talavera, M.; Rochester, S.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the comparison between observations and simulations of a completed 12-month field observation campaign at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, using ESO's transportable 20 watt CW Wendelstein laser guide star system. This mission has provided sodium photon return flux measurements of unprecedented detail regarding variation of laser power, polarization and sodium D2b repumping. The Raman fiber laser and projector technology are very similar to that employed in the 4LGSF/AOF laser facility, recently installed and commissioned at the VLT in Paranal. The simulations are based on the open source LGSBloch density matrix simulation package and we find good overall agreement with experimental data.

  13. The thirty gigahertz instrument receiver for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment: concept and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Villa, Enrique; Cano, Juan L; Cagigas, Jaime; Ortiz, David; Casas, Francisco J; Pérez, Ana R; Aja, Beatriz; Terán, J Vicente; de la Fuente, Luisa; Artal, Eduardo; Hoyland, Roger; Mediavilla, Ángel

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the analysis, design, and characterization of the thirty gigahertz instrument receiver developed for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment. The receiver is aimed to obtain polarization data of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the sky, obtaining the Q, U, and I Stokes parameters of the incoming signal simultaneously. A comprehensive analysis of the theory behind the proposed receiver is presented for a linearly polarized input signal, and the functionality tests have demonstrated adequate results in terms of Stokes parameters, which validate the concept of the receiver based on electronic phase switching.

  14. Bone trace element pattern in an 18th century population sample of Tenerife (Canary Islands): comparison with a prehistoric one.

    PubMed

    Arnay-de-la-Rosa, M; Gonzalez-Reimers, E; Velasco-Vazquez, J; Barros-Lopez, N; Galindo-Martin, L

    1998-10-01

    We have determined bone strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), calcium (Ca), and zinc (Zn) content in 24 samples belonging to adult individuals who died toward the end of the 18th century and were interred in a church's floor on the island of Tenerife, comparing the results with those obtained in 14 prehistoric samples of the same island and also with those of 7 modern controls. No differences were observed between the two ancient groups, which showed higher bone strontium and barium than the modern sample, and a slightly lower Ba/Sr ratio, thus pointing to consumption of marine sources.

  15. The thirty gigahertz instrument receiver for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment: Concept and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Enrique Cano, Juan L.; Cagigas, Jaime; Pérez, Ana R.; Aja, Beatriz; Terán, J. Vicente; Fuente, Luisa de la; Artal, Eduardo; Mediavilla, Ángel

    2015-02-15

    This paper presents the analysis, design, and characterization of the thirty gigahertz instrument receiver developed for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment. The receiver is aimed to obtain polarization data of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the sky, obtaining the Q, U, and I Stokes parameters of the incoming signal simultaneously. A comprehensive analysis of the theory behind the proposed receiver is presented for a linearly polarized input signal, and the functionality tests have demonstrated adequate results in terms of Stokes parameters, which validate the concept of the receiver based on electronic phase switching.

  16. The De-Genderization of Knowledge Production: The Case of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Norma

    1994-01-01

    All societies have official knowledge. Life of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 17th-century nun and literary genius, illustrates who discovers knowledge is more important than what knowledge is promulgated. Real issue was not what Sor Juana wrote but whether nun or woman should engage in producing and publishing knowledge. Her efforts have inspired…

  17. CruzDB: software for annotation of genomic intervals with UCSC genome-browser database

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Brent S.; Yang, Ivana V.; De, Subhajyoti

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The biological significance of genomic features is often context dependent. Annotating a particular dataset with existing external data can provide insight into function. Results: We present CruzDB, a fast and intuitive programmatic interface to the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) genome browser that facilitates integrative analyses of diverse local and remotely hosted datasets. We showcase the syntax of CruzDB using microRNA binding sites as examples, and further demonstrate its utility with three biological discoveries. First, DNA replication timing is stratified in gene regions—exons tend to replicate early and introns late during S phase. Second, several non-coding variants associated with cognitive functions map to lincRNA transcripts of relevant function, suggesting potential function of these regulatory RNAs in neuronal diseases. Third, lamina-associated genomic regions are highly enriched in olfaction-related genes, indicating a role of nuclear organization in their regulation. Availability: CruzDB is available at https://github.com/brentp/cruzdb under the MIT open-source license. Contact: bpederse@gmail.com or subhajyoti.de@ucdenver.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24037212

  18. Special Education Management System Project Document. 2. Santa Cruz BCP Observation Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented in booklet and chart form is the Behavioral Characteristics Progression (BCP), part of the Santa Cruz Special Education Management Project, consisting of 2400 observable traits grouped into 50 behavioral strands. The BCP is seen to be a nonstandardized criterion referenced tool which replaces conventional age and disability labels with…

  19. 75 FR 20619 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, Santa Cruz County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... the permanent loss of 483 square feet of habitat for the species in Scotts Valley, Santa Cruz County... result in permanent impacts to a total of 483 square feet of habitat for the Mount Hermon June beetle... Mount Hermon June beetle habitat within the permit area: (1) Applicants will purchase 483 square feet of...

  20. 75 FR 52969 - Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Wetland Restoration, Santa Cruz Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Wetland Restoration, Santa... coastal wetland on Santa Cruz Island, Channel Islands National Park. The requisite no-action ``wait period... restoration of palustrine wetlands and deepwater habitat at Prisoners Harbor, as well as remove a...

  1. 75 FR 35504 - San Rafael Cattle Company; Habitat Conservation Plan; Santa Cruz County, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Rafael Cattle Company; Habitat Conservation Plan; Santa Cruz County, AZ AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; Draft Low-Effect Habitat... habitat from specified actions conducted under the authority of the San Rafael Cattle Company. We invite...

  2. A Historical Perspective on the University of California, Santa Cruz 1965-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Lynda M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to trace the organizational history of the University of California Santa Cruz from its inception in 1965 to its 40th anniversary in 2005. The study investigated the original vision of small residential colleges as modeled after the Oxford University plan. The study chronicled the critical turning points of…

  3. Holistically Evaluating the Impact of Water and Land Use Management in the Santa Cruz Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Governments, tribal leaders and citizens within the Santa Cruz watershed (United States, Mexico, the Tohono O'odham and the Pascua Yaqui Tribes) face environmental and economic issues of ensuring people have access to clean water and sanitation while vital ecosystems are protect...

  4. A Historical Perspective on the University of California, Santa Cruz 1965-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Lynda M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to trace the organizational history of the University of California Santa Cruz from its inception in 1965 to its 40th anniversary in 2005. The study investigated the original vision of small residential colleges as modeled after the Oxford University plan. The study chronicled the critical turning points of…

  5. The De-Genderization of Knowledge Production: The Case of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Norma

    1994-01-01

    All societies have official knowledge. Life of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 17th-century nun and literary genius, illustrates who discovers knowledge is more important than what knowledge is promulgated. Real issue was not what Sor Juana wrote but whether nun or woman should engage in producing and publishing knowledge. Her efforts have inspired…

  6. Holistically Evaluating the Impact of Water and Land Use Management in the Santa Cruz Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Governments, tribal leaders and citizens within the Santa Cruz watershed (United States, Mexico, the Tohono O'odham and the Pascua Yaqui Tribes) face environmental and economic issues of ensuring people have access to clean water and sanitation while vital ecosystems are protect...

  7. Structural controls on diffuse degassing in the Las Cañadas caldera, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, I.; Soriano, C.; Martí, J.; Pérez, N.

    2003-04-01

    The Las Cañadas caldera is an elliptical depression located in the central part of the Tenerife Island. The active Teide stratovolcano stands in the centre of the depression, which is limited to the south by the caldera wall, up to 500 m high above the caldera floor. Mapping most of the caldera wall at 1:5000 has provided new insights on its stratigraphy, structure, and geological evolution. Three major ENE-WSW normal faults have been mapped on the caldera wall in the area comprised between El Llano de Ucanca and Los Azulejos, where an intense hydrothermal alteration affects the lower stratigraphic levels of the caldera wall. Hydrothermal alteration is rather distinctive in this area, showing bluish to greenish colours. Most of the phonolitic cone sheets and radial dykes of the caldera wall do not show distinctive hydrothermal features, as do show the phonolitic pyroclastic rocks and lavas of the lower parts of the caldera wall. This suggests the main episodes of dyke intrusion in the Las Cañadas caldera postdate hydrothermal alteration. ENE-WSW normal faults involve dyke swarms and rocks of the upper stratigraphic levels of the caldera wall, and show displacements of up to 100 m. Unfortunately the upper possible age of these faults is poorly constrained since no contact relationship has been observed between fault planes and the rocks of the uppermost stratigraphic levels of the caldera wall. The rocks of the caldera wall adjacent to the faults are intensely fractured at the macro and mesoscale. In addition to field mapping, a soil gas survey was carried out at the caldera depression. Soil CO2 efflux and H2 concentration were measured reaching values of 12 gm-2d-1 and 4 ppmV, respectively. Spatial distribution of these species showed that positive anomalies coincide with the surface expression of the three major faults and their adjacent intensely fractured zone. The high CO2 and H2 values and their coincidence with major normal faults suggests that degassing in

  8. Low Prevalence of Sleep Disorders in Demyelinating Disease in a Northern Tenerife Population

    PubMed Central

    González-Platas, Montserrat; González-Platas, Javier; Bermúdez-Hernández, Moises; Pérez-Martín, Maria Yaiza; Croissier-Elías, Cristina; Pérez-Lorensu, Pedro Javier

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disorders are seen in patients with demyelinating disease (DD) more often than in the general population. Combination of physical and psychological factors such as pain, spasms, nocturia, depression, anxiety, or medication effects could contribute to sleep disruption. Frequently, these disturbances have a major impact on health and quality of life of patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of sleep disorders in patients seen in the DD consultation. Methods: 240 patients; mean age 43 years, 187 women; 163 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS): 144 relapsing-remitting, 19 progressive forms, 36 clinically isolated syndrome, 26 radiological isolated syndrome, and 15 patients with others DD. All participants completed questionnaires: Pittsburgh, Epworth, and Stanford scales, indirect symptoms of RLS and Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Fatigue Severity Scale, and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54. Results: Moderate/severe insomnia 12.5%, OSA 5.8%, RLS 9.6% (confirmed 3 cases), narcolepsy 0, fatigue (> 4) 24.6%. Physical QoL 66.6 ± 19.6, Mental QoL 66.1 ± 21.9. Patients with an established diagnosis showed higher scores on insomnia compared to the group of CIS and RIS (F = 3.85; p = 0.023), no differences were in the other parameters. Fatigue showed high correlation with insomnia (r = 0.443; p < 0.001), RLS (r = 0.513; p < 0.001), and sleepiness (r = 0.211; p = 0.001). None of the variables included in the regression model were shown to be predictors of Physical and Mental QoL. Conclusions: A high percentage of our sample sleeps well. Emphasize the low prevalence of sleep disorders (insomnia, fatigue, RLS, etc). We detected an overestimation in the RLS questionnaire and the low QoL recorded. Citation: González-Platas M, González-Platas J, Bermúdez-Hernández M, Pérez-Martín MY, Croissier-Elías C, Pérez-Lorensu PJ. Low prevalence of sleep disorders in demyelinating disease in a northern tenerife population. J Clin Sleep

  9. Variation in sunspot properties between 1999 and 2011 as observed with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, R.; Beck, C.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: We study the variation in the magnetic field strength and the umbral intensity of sunspots during the declining phase of the solar cycle No. 23 and in the beginning of cycle No. 24. Methods: We analyze a sample of 183 sunspots observed from 1999 until 2011 with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). The magnetic field strength is derived from the Zeeman splitting of the Stokes-V signal in one near-infrared spectral line, either Fe i 1564.8 nm, Fe i 1089.6 nm, or Si i 1082.7 nm. This avoids the effects of the unpolarized stray light from the field-free quiet Sun surroundings that can affect the splitting seen in Stokes-I in the umbra. The minimum umbral continuum intensity and umbral area are also measured. Results: We find that there is a systematic trend for sunspots in the late stage of the solar cycle No. 23 to be weaker, i.e., to have a smaller maximum magnetic field strength than those at the start of the cycle. The decrease in the field strength with time of about 94 Gyr-1 is well beyond the statistical fluctuations that would be expected because of the larger number of sunspots close to cycle maximum (14 Gyr-1). In the same time interval, the continuum intensity of the umbra increases with a rate of 1.3 (±0.4)% of Ic yr-1, while the umbral area does not show any trend above the statistical variance. Sunspots in the new cycle No. 24 show higher field strengths and lower continuum intensities than those at the end of cycle No. 23, interrupting the trend. Conclusions: Sunspots have an intrinsically weaker field strength and brighter umbrae at the late stages of solar cycles compared to their initial stages, without any significant change in their area. The abrupt increase in field strength in sunspots of the new cycle suggests that the cyclic variations are dominating over any long-term trend that continues across cycles. We find a slight decrease in field strength and an increase in intensity as a long

  10. Coupled paleomagnetic/dating investigation of the Upper Jaramillo reversal from lava sequences (Tenerife, Canary islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo; Kissel, Catherine; Guillou, Herve; Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Perez-Torrado, Francisco; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Wandres, Camille; Nomade, Sebastien

    2013-04-01

    A sequence of lava flows has been emplaced during the transition between the Jaramillo subchron and the Matuyama chron in Tenerife (Canary island). This sequence is located along the flank of the collapse of Güimar, in the south central part of the island. It includes 26 flows from the full normal polarity to the full reverse polarity. On the basis of K/Ar dating, the section is bracketed between 1012 ± 18 ka and 975 ± 17 ka. Additional coupled K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating have been obtained through the sequence and place the reversal itself between 992 ± 12 ka and 979 ± 10 ka consistently with previous dating of the upper Jaramillo reversal. They indicate a particularly high extrusion rate at this site (Guillou et al., session IG9/GMPV7/PS9.6). Full paleomagnetic analyses have been conducted on these lava flows including rock magnetic analyses (thermomagnetic curves, hysteresis curves, FORC diagrams, k-T curves), zero-field stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetizations. Thellier and Thellier paleointensity (PI) determinations were also performed and based on the selection criteria defined by Kissel and Laj (2004), only 30% of the samples yielded reliable results. The first 9 flows at the bottom of the sequence are characterized by a normal polarity. Only two of them yield PI consistent with the present day field intensity in the Canary islands. The two following flows are deviated from the magnetic pole, beyond the secular variation but their VGP is still in the northern hemisphere, over northeastern Pacific. The associated intensity drops significantly to about 11 µT that is less than 30% of the present dipole value. The following flows have all a negative inclination and their PI remain low (around 8-12 µT). The virtual geomagnetic poles are first over East Antarctica before describing a northward loop almost up to New Zealand. The VGPs then go back close to the southern pole, and mark a second loop to southeastern Pacific associated with little

  11. The dynamics of fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Conaway, Christopher H.; Presto, M. Katherine; Logan, Joshua B.; Cronin, Katherine; van Ormondt, Maarten; Lescinski, Jamie; Harden, E. Lynne; Lacy, Jessica R.; Tonnon, Pieter K.

    2011-01-01

    In the fall and early winter of 2009, a demonstration project was done at Santa Cruz Harbor, California, to determine if 450 m3/day of predominantly (71 percent) mud-sized sediment could be dredged from the inner portion of the harbor and discharged to the coastal ocean without significant impacts to the beach and inner shelf. During the project, more than 7600 m3 of sediment (~5400 m3 of fine-grain material) was dredged during 17 days and discharged approximately 60 m offshore of the harbor at a depth of 2 m on the inner shelf. The U.S. Geological Survey's Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center was funded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Santa Cruz Port District to do an integrated mapping and process study to investigate the fate of the mud-sized sediment dredged from the inner portion of Santa Cruz Harbor and to determine if any of the fine-grain material settled out on the shoreline and/or inner shelf during the fall and early winter of 2009. This was done by collecting highresolution oceanographic and sediment geochemical measurements along the shoreline and on the continental shelf of northern Monterey Bay to monitor the fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor and discharged onto the inner shelf. These in place measurements, in conjunction with beach, water column, and seabed surveys, were used as boundary and calibration information for a three-dimensional numerical circulation and sediment dynamics model to better understand the fate of the fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor and the potential consequences of disposing this type of material on the beach and on the northern Monterey Bay continental shelf.

  12. The role of nitrification in silicate hydrolysis in soils near Santa Cruz, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyker-Snowman, E.; White, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Schulz, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    In some ecosystems, nitrification (microbial conversion of ammonium to nitrate) may supplant carbonic acid as a source of acidity and drive silicate weathering. Recent studies have explored the impact that ammonium fertilizer addition to soils has on weathering of various mineral types (Pacheco et al. 2013) and demonstrated directly that ammonium addition to soils can increase carbonate weathering (Gandois et al. 2011). Some evidence points to a role for nitrification in silicate weathering at a series of coastal grassland terraces near Santa Cruz, CA. Weathering rates in these soils have been estimated using the byproducts of silicate hydrolysis (Cl--adjusted Na+ and other cations). If carbonic acid from dissolved CO2 is the source of acidity in silicate hydrolysis, bicarbonate should balance the cations produced during weathering. However, in the Santa Cruz soils nitrate is the dominant anion balancing cation concentrations. High concentrations of CO2 (>1%) at depths greater than 1m may provide additional support for nitrification-based silicate hydrolysis at Santa Cruz. We evaluate the role of nitrification in silicate weathering for soils from the Santa Cruz Marine Terrace Chronosequence using a column ammonium-addition experiment and a basic weathering model. The column experiment uses ammonium inputs in excess of natural inputs and measures weathering products in eluted fluids over time. The model incorporates more realistic estimates of ammonium input and explores whether the observed concentrations of cations, nitrate and CO2 seen at Santa Cruz can be explained by nitrification-driven acidity or if other inputs need to be considered. Gandois, L, Perrin, A-S, and Probst, A. 2011. Impact of nitrogenous fertiliser-induced proton release on cultivated soils with contrasting carbonate contents: A column experiment. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 75 pp. 1185-1198. Pacheco, F, Landim, P, and Szocs, T. 2013. Anthropogenic impacts on mineral weathering: A

  13. Solar Power, Seville, Spain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-01

    The world largest solar power tower recently began operating outside Seville, Spain -- and it marks a historic moment in the saga of renewable energy. This image was acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  14. Rio Tinto, Spain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-02

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer instrument aboard NASA Terra spacecraft captured this image of the Rio Tinto river in southwestern Spain which originates in the Sierra Morena mountains of Andalusia.

  15. How to define nativeness in vagile organisms: lessons from the cosmopolitan moss Bryum argenteum on the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands).

    PubMed

    Pisa, S; Vanderpoorten, A; Patiño, J; Werner, O; González-Mancebo, J M; Ros, R M

    2015-09-01

    The distinction between native and introduced biotas presents unique challenges that culminate in organisms with high long-distance dispersal capacities in a rapidly changing world. Bryophytes, in particular, exhibit large distribution ranges, and some species can truly be qualified as cosmopolitan. Cosmopolitan species, however, typically occur in disturbed environments, raising the question of their nativeness throughout their range. Here, we employ genetic data to address the question of the origin of the cosmopolitan, weedy moss Bryum argenteum on the island of Tenerife. The genetic diversity of B. argenteum on Tenerife was comparable to that found in continental areas due to recurrent colonisation events, erasing any signature of a bottleneck that would be expected in the case of a recent colonisation event. The molecular dating analyses indicated that the first colonisation of the island took place more than 100,000 years ago, i.e. well before the first human settlements. Furthermore, the significant signal for isolation-by-distance found in B. argenteum within Tenerife points to the substantial role of genetic drift in establishing the observed patterns of genetic variation. Together, the results support the hypothesis that B. argenteum is native on Tenerife; although the existence of haplotypes shared between Tenerife and continental areas suggests that more recent, potentially man-mediated introduction also took place. While defining nativeness in organisms that are not deliberately introduced, and wherein the fossil record is extremely scarce, is an exceedingly challenging task, our results suggest that population genetic analyses can represent a useful tool to help distinguish native from alien populations.

  16. Event-stratigraphy of a caldera-forming ignimbrite eruption on Tenerife: the 273 ka Poris Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Richard J.; Branney, Michael J.

    The 273 ka Poris Formation in the Bandas del Sur Group records a complex, compositionally zoned explosive eruption at Las Cañadas caldera on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The eruption produced widespread pyroclastic density currents that devastated much of the SE of Tenerife, and deposited one of the most extensive ignimbrite sheets on the island. The sheet reaches 40-m thick, and includes Plinian pumice fall layers, massive and diffuse-stratified pumiceous ignimbrite, widespread lithic breccias, and co-ignimbrite ashfall deposits. Several facies are fines-rich, and contain ash pellets and accretionary lapilli. Eight brief eruptive phases are represented within its lithostratigraphy. Phase 1 comprised a fluctuating Plinian eruption, in which column height increased and then stabilized with time and dispersed tephra over much of the southeastern part of the island. Phase 2 emplaced three geographically restricted ignimbrite flow-units and associated extensive thin co-ignimbrite ashfall layers, which contain abundant accretionary lapilli from moist co-ignimbrite ash plumes. A brief Plinian phase (Phase 3), again dispersing pumice lapilli over southeastern Tenerife, marked the onset of a large sustained pyroclastic density current (Phase 4), which then waxed (Phase 5), covering increasingly larger areas of the island, as vents widened and/or migrated along opening caldera faults. The climax of the Poris eruption (Phase 6) was marked by widespread emplacement of coarse lithic breccias, thought to record caldera subsidence. This is inferred to have disturbed the magma chamber, causing mingling and eruption of tephriphonolite magma, and it changed the proximal topography diverting the pyroclastic density current(s) down the Güimar valley (Phase 7). Phase 8 involved post-eruption erosion and sedimentary reworking, accompanied by minor down-slope sliding of ignimbrite. This was followed by slope stabilization and pedogenesis. The fines-rich lithofacies with abundant ash

  17. The gravimetric picture of magmatic and hydrothermal sources driving hybrid unrest on Tenerife in 2004/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prutkin, Ilya; Vajda, Peter; Gottsmann, Jo

    2014-08-01

    We present results from the inversion of gravity changes observed at the central volcanic complex (CVC) of Tenerife, Canary Islands, between May 2004 and July 2005. Marking a period of elevated activity and a reawakening of the volcanic system, the data depict spatial and temporal variations in the sub-surface processes that defined this period of unrest at the Pico Viejo (PV)-Pico Teide (PT) complex, after the last volcanic eruption on Tenerife in 1909. An initial non-linear inversion, based on 3D line segments approximation, yielded three line segments at depths between 1 km a.s.l. and 2 km b.s.l. Our interpretation of the initial inversion results is that the line segments represent apparent composite sources, a superposition of deep and shallow seated sources. We therefore decomposed the gravity changes into shallow and deep parts (fields) using a procedure based on triple harmonic continuation. The shallow and deep fields could then be inverted separately, using the same inversion methodology. The deep field constrains two connected line segments at the depth of about 6 km b.s.l., in the center of the NW seismogenic zone of VT event swarm of the seismic unrest, that we interpret as magma input. The inversion of the shallow field images three weak line segments that are all situated at very shallow, near-surface depths. We interpret the weak segments as hydrothermal sources potentially excited by the deeper magma injection. Our results indicate no significant input into the shallow phonolitic plumbing system of the PV-PT complex, but rather a deeper-seated rejuvenation of the mafic feeder reservoir. The emerging picture from our analysis is that the 2004/5 unrest on Tenerife was of a hybrid nature due to the combination of a deep magma injection (failed eruption?) coupled with fluid migration to shallow depths. The identified causative link between deep and shallow unrest sources indicates the presence of permeable pathways for shallow fluid migration at the

  18. Source and significance of pumices in tsunami deposits: examples from Tenerife (Canary Islands), Santorini (Greece) and Krakatau (Indonesia) volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, R.; Nauret, F.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are quite often associated with tsunamis, and particularly caldera-forming eruptions near the coasts (e.g. Santorini, Krakatau, Aniakchak, Kikai). The main tsunamigenic processes are the entrance of massive pyroclastic flows in water, and flank instability, even if other processes might be involved (e.g. explosions). Fresh tephras are often preserved in sedimentary deposits left inland by tsunamis associated with volcanic eruptions. We review the different sources and incorporation mechanisms of pumices in tsunami deposits, and their significance in terms of volcanic processes, hydrodynamic processes (tsunami inundation) and their possible interactions. Three examples are adressed: the Krakatau 1883 eruption, the Minoan Thera eruption, and the El Abrigo eruption / Teno tsunami in Tenerife.

  19. Seventeen years of monitoring diffuse CO2 emission from the Tenerife North-West Rift Zone (NWRZ) volcano, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Germán D.; Evans, Bethany J.; Provis, Aaron R.; Asensio, María; Alonso, Mar; Calvo, David; Hernández, Pedro; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Tenerife together and Gran Canaria are the central islands of the Canarian archipelago, which have developed a central volcanic complex characterized by the eruption of differentiated magmas. Tenerife is the largest of the Canary Islands (2100 km2) and at present, the North-West Rift-Zone (NWRZ) is one of the most active volcanic structures of the three volcanic rift-zone of the island, which has hosted two historical eruptions (Arenas Negras in 1706 and Chinyero in 1909). In order to monitor the volcanic activity of NWRZ, since the year 2000, 49 soil CO2 efflux surveys have been performed at NWRZ (more than 300 observation sites each one) to evaluate the temporal an spatial variations of CO2 efflux and their relationships with the volcanic-seismic activity. Measurements were performed in accordance with the accumulation chamber method. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. To quantify the total CO2 emission from the studied area, 100 simulations for each survey have been performed. We report herein the results of the last diffuse CO2 efflux surveys at the NWRZ undertaken in July and October 2016 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area. During July and October 2016 surveys, soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 32.4 and 53.7 g m-2 d-1, respectively. The total diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere were estimated at 255 ± 9 and 338 ± 18 t d-1, respectively, values higher than the background CO2 emission estimated on 144 t d-1. Since 2000, soil CO2 efflux values have ranged from non-detectable up to 141 g m-2 d-1, with the highest values measured in May 2005 whereas total CO2 output ranged between 52 and 867 t d-1. Long-term variations in the total CO2 output have shown a temporal correlation with the onsets of seismic activity at Tenerife, supporting unrest of the volcanic system, as is also suggested by anomalous seismic activity recorded in the studied area

  20. Damage and mortality assessment of redwood and mixed conifer forest types in Santa Cruz County following wildfire

    Treesearch

    Steve R. Auten; Nadia. Hamey

    2012-01-01

    On August 12, 2009, the Lockheed Fire ignited the west slope of the Santa Cruz Mountains burning approximately 7,819 acres. A mixture of vegetation types were in the path of the fire, including approximately 2,420 acres of redwood forest and 1,951 acres of mixed conifer forest types representative of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Foresters and land managers were left with...

  1. [A critical appraisal of an institutional journal: Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz].

    PubMed

    de Lemos, A A

    1993-01-01

    The journal Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, founded and maintained over the course of many years for the exclusive publication of research results from one single institution, has undergone changes over the last decade which have resulted in an open journal. Conditions leading to the journal's founding and the excellent role it has played in the dissemination of knowledge produced by the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz are examined. The fact that it has differed from journals published by scientific societies does not diminish its importance. The present option to give this journal an international slant, with possibilities for competing on the foreign market, and which would be facilitated by the preference given to papers written in English, raises some questions about the role of Brazilian specialized journals within the framework of our scientific development.

  2. Population size of island loggerhead shrikes on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Teel, Susan; Hall, Linnea S.; Dye, Linda C.; Laughrin, Lyndal L.

    2012-01-01

    Island loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi) are an endemic, genetically distinct subspecies of loggerhead shrike on California's Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, and Santa Catalina Islands (USA). This subspecies is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Game and has been petitioned for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act. The combination of suspected low numbers and the possibility of federal listing, prompted us to undertake a study to rigorously estimate the number of remaining individuals on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands. During the 2009 and 2010 breeding seasons, we surveyed sample units on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands using a double-observer method with independent observers to estimate joint detection probabilities (p), where we selected units under a stratified random sampling design. We estimated shrike abundance to be 169 in 2009 (p = 0.476) and 240 in 2010 (p = 0.825) for Santa Rosa Island, and 35 in 2009 (p = 0.816) and 42 in 2010 (p = 0.710) for Santa Cruz Island. These numbers, especially for Santa Rosa Island, are higher than previously reported but nevertheless are still low. Rapid vegetation change on both islands due to recent removal of nonnative herbivores may threaten the habitat and status of this subspecies and, therefore, we suggest that intensive demographic and habitat use research be initiated immediately to obtain additional information vital for the management of this subspecies. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Effects of climate change and population growth on the transboundary Santa Cruz aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Christopher A.; Megdal, Sharon; Oroz, Lucas Antonio; Callegary, James; Vandervoet, Prescott

    2012-01-01

    The USA and Mexico have initiated comprehensive assessment of 4 of the 18 aquifers underlying their 3000 km border. Binational management of groundwater is not currently proposed. University and agency researchers plus USA and Mexican federal, state, and local agency staff have collaboratively identified key challenges facing the Santa Cruz River Valley Aquifer located between the states of Arizona and Sonora. The aquifer is subject to recharge variability, which is compounded by climate change, and is experiencing growing urban demand for groundwater. In this paper, we briefly review past, current, and projected pressures on Santa Cruz groundwater. We undertake first-order approximation of the relative magnitude of climate change and human demand drivers on the Santa Cruz water balance. Global circulation model output for emissions scenarios A1B, B1, and A2 present mixed trends, with annual precipitation projected to vary by ±20% over the 21st century. Results of our analysis indicate that urban water use will experience greater percentage change than climate-induced recharge (which remains the largest single component of the water balance). In the Mexican portion of the Santa Cruz, up to half of future total water demand will need to be met from non-aquifer sources. In the absence of water importation and with agricultural water use and rights increasingly appropriated for urban demand, wastewater is increasingly seen as a resource to meet urban demand. We consider decision making on both sides of the border and conclude by identifying short- and longer-term opportunities for further binational collaboration on transboundary aquifer assessment.

  4. Channel change on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.

    1995-01-01

    The Santa Cruz River in southeastern Arizona has a long history of channel instability. Since the late 19th century, lateral channel erosion has caused extensive property damage, particularly in Pima County. The dominant mechanism of channel change in a reach depends on channel morphology and flood magnitude. The timing and magnitude of channel change are controlled primarily by hydroclimatic factors. The location of change is controlled largely by topographic, geologic, hydraulic, and artificial factors.

  5. Field-trip guide to the geology of the Lexington Reservoir and Loma Prieta areas in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.; Messina, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This guide contains a road log and five stop descriptions for a field trip in the southern Santa Cruz Mountains. The trip officially begins at the boat dock parking area on Alma Bridge Road near the dam of Lexington Reservoir. Stop 1 involves a walk up the Limekiln Trail to examine a large landslide in serpentinite that frequently takes out the trail. Stop 2 is at Miller Point picnic area along the shore of the reservoir where exposures of massive, fractured graywacke sandstone are capped with terrace gravel deposits. Stop 3 is along Highland Way in the Santa Cruz Mountains where large landslides have occasionally force the closure of the road. Stop 4A-C are several closely spaced outcrop areas along Loma Prieta Avenue and Summit-Mt. Madonna Road in the Loma Prieta summit area. A walk to scenic vista points provide opportunity to discuss the evolution of regional landscape along the crest of the Sierra Azul. In addition, a variety of rock types are exposed in the Stop 4 area along a series of road cuts, including Cretaceous age conglomerate, turbidites (consisting of interbedded sandstone and shale), and fossiliferous mudstone. Stop 5 involves returning to the boat dock parking area to examine geology and the placement of the Lexington Dam in the Los Gatos Creek canyon.

  6. Primary medical care in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J T

    1990-01-01

    The extremely complex and rapidly but unevenly developing system of primary care in Spain is described. The health centre movement in Spain merits close attention, and could be a useful model for our own service. PMID:2117951

  7. Spain to Join ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-02-01

    Today, during a ceremony in Madrid, an agreement was signed by the Spanish Minister of Education and Science, Mrs. María Jesús San Segundo, and the ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, affirming their commitment to securing Spanish membership of ESO. ESO PR Photo 05a/06 ESO PR Photo 05a/06 Signature Event in Madrid Following approval by the Spanish Council of Ministers and the ratification by the Spanish Parliament of the ESO Convention and the associated protocols, Spain intends to become ESO's 12th member state on 1 July 2006. "Since long Spain was aware that entering ESO was a logical decision and it was even necessary for a country like Spain because Spain is ranked 8th in astrophysical research", said Mrs. María Jesús San Segundo. "The large scientific installations are not only necessary for research in different fields but are also partners and customers for hi-tech companies, helping to increase the funding of R&D." "Spanish Astronomy has made tremendous strides forward and we are delighted to welcome Spain as a new member of ESO. We very much look forward to working together with our excellent Spanish colleagues," said Dr. Cesarsky. "For ESO, the Spanish accession means that we can draw on the scientific and technological competences, some of them unique in Europe, that have been developed in Spain and, of course, for Europe the Spanish membership of ESO is an important milestone in the construction of the European Research Area." ESO PR Photo 05b/06 ESO PR Photo 05b/06 Signature Event in Madrid Indeed, Spain is an important member of the European astronomical community and has developed impressively over the last three decades, reaching maturity with major contributions in virtually all subjects of astronomy. In addition, Spain hosts, operates or owns a number of competitive facilities dedicated to foster astronomical research, among which the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos at La Palma, certainly the premier optical

  8. Evidence for latest Pleistocene to Holocene movement on the Santa Cruz Island fault, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pinter, N.; Sorlien, C. )

    1991-09-01

    Timing of the latest movement on the Santa Cruz Island fault, a dramatic physiographic feature of the southern boundary of the California Transverse Ranges, is demonstrated to be latest Pleistocene to Holocene in age. Faulting of dated terrace gravels confirms that the most recent rupture on the fault is no older than 11.78 {plus minus}0.1 ka. This represents an order of magnitude increase over the recency suggested by previous work and requires proportional increases in estimates of the minimum slip rate and seismic hazard posed by the fault. Uplifted latest Pleistocene to Holocene fill terraces are consistent with models of high rates of uplift and high sediment supply. Numerical solution of the interaction of sea-level rise with uplift at the west end of Santa Cruz Island predicts that the youngest strata in the faulted terrace sequence are about 6.1 ka. Reevaluation of high-resolution seismic sections just west of the island supports the latest Pleistocene to Holocene timing of the most recent rupture on the fault. The Santa Cruz Island fault apparently represents an active seismogenic element of southern California, the recent and high rate of activity of which have not been previously recognized.

  9. Estimating the population size of island loggerhead shrikes on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Teel, Susan; Hall, Linnea S.; Dye, Linda C.; Laughrin, Lyndal L.

    2012-01-01

    Island loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi) are an endemic, genetically distinct subspecies of loggerhead shrike on California’s Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands. This subspecies is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Game and has been petitioned for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act. Because of suspected low numbers and the possibility of federal listing, there was an urgent need to rigorously estimate the number of remaining individuals on the Islands. In 2009 and 2010, biologists from the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service surveyed sample units on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands using a double-observer method with independent observers, where units were selected under a stratified random sampling design. Shrike abundance was estimated to be 169 in 2009 and 240 in 2010 for Santa Rosa Island, and 35 in 2009 and 42 in 2010 for Santa Cruz Island. These numbers, especially for Santa Rosa Island, are higher than previously reported but nevertheless are still low. Rapid vegetation change on both islands due to recent removal of non-native herbivores may threaten the habitat and status of this subspecies. In view of this circumstance and the still-low numbers of shrikes, additional intensive demographic and habitat-use studies are critical for obtaining information vital for the perpetuation of this subspecies.

  10. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Santa Cruz, Bolivia: outbreak investigation and antibody prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Joel M; Blair, Patrick J; Carroll, Darin S; Mills, James N; Gianella, Alberto; Iihoshi, Naomi; Briggiler, Ana M; Felices, Vidal; Salazar, Milagros; Olson, James G; Glabman, Raisa A; Bausch, Daniel G

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of a small outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in 2002 in the Department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, where the disease had not previously been reported. Two cases were initially reported. The first case was a physician infected with Laguna Negra virus during a weekend visit to his ranch. Four other persons living on the ranch were IgM antibody-positive, two of whom were symptomatic for mild hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The second case was a migrant sugarcane worker. Although no sample remained to determine the specific infecting hantavirus, a virus 90% homologous with Río Mamoré virus was previously found in small-eared pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys microtis) trapped in the area. An antibody prevalence study conducted in the region as part of the outbreak investigation showed 45 (9.1%) of 494 persons to be IgG positive, illustrating that hantavirus infection is common in Santa Cruz Department. Precipitation in the months preceding the outbreak was particularly heavy in comparison to other years, suggesting a possible climatic or ecological influence on rodent populations and risk of hantavirus transmission to humans. Hantavirus infection appears to be common in the Santa Cruz Department, but more comprehensive surveillance and field studies are needed to fully understand the epidemiology and risk to humans.

  11. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Santa Cruz, Bolivia: Outbreak Investigation and Antibody Prevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Joel M.; Blair, Patrick J.; Carroll, Darin S.; Mills, James N.; Gianella, Alberto; Iihoshi, Naomi; Briggiler, Ana M.; Felices, Vidal; Salazar, Milagros; Olson, James G.; Glabman, Raisa A.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of a small outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in 2002 in the Department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, where the disease had not previously been reported. Two cases were initially reported. The first case was a physician infected with Laguna Negra virus during a weekend visit to his ranch. Four other persons living on the ranch were IgM antibody-positive, two of whom were symptomatic for mild hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The second case was a migrant sugarcane worker. Although no sample remained to determine the specific infecting hantavirus, a virus 90% homologous with Río Mamoré virus was previously found in small-eared pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys microtis) trapped in the area. An antibody prevalence study conducted in the region as part of the outbreak investigation showed 45 (9.1%) of 494 persons to be IgG positive, illustrating that hantavirus infection is common in Santa Cruz Department. Precipitation in the months preceding the outbreak was particularly heavy in comparison to other years, suggesting a possible climatic or ecological influence on rodent populations and risk of hantavirus transmission to humans. Hantavirus infection appears to be common in the Santa Cruz Department, but more comprehensive surveillance and field studies are needed to fully understand the epidemiology and risk to humans. PMID:23094116

  12. U-Pb geochronology of the Santa Cruz Formation (early Miocene) at the Río Bote and Río Santa Cruz (southernmost Patagonia, Argentina): Implications for the correlation of fossil vertebrate localities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuitiño, José I.; Fernicola, Juan Carlos; Kohn, Matthew J.; Trayler, Robin; Naipauer, Maximiliano; Bargo, M. Susana; Kay, Richard F.; Vizcaíno, Sergio F.

    2016-10-01

    The early Miocene Santa Cruz Formation (SCF) in southern Patagonia hosts the Santacrucian South American Land Mammal Age (SALMA), whose age is known mainly from exposures along the Atlantic coast. Zircon U-Pb ages were obtained from intercalated tuffs from four inland sections of the SCF: 17.36 ± 0.63 Ma for the westernmost Río Bote locality, and 17.04 ± 0.55 Ma-16.32 ± 0.62 Ma for central Río Santa Cruz localities. All ages agree with the bounding age of underlying marine units and with equivalent strata in coastal exposures. New ages and available sedimentation rates imply time spans for each section of ∼18.2 to 17.36 Ma for Río Bote and 17.45-15.63 Ma for central Río Santa Cruz (Burdigalian). These estimates support the view that deposition of the SCF began at western localities ∼1 Ma earlier than at eastern localities, and that the central Río Santa Cruz localities expose the youngest SCF in southern Santa Cruz Province. Associated vertebrate faunas are consistent with our geochronologic synthesis, showing older (Notohippidian) taxa in western localities and younger (Santacrucian) taxa in central localities. The Notohippidian fauna (19.0-18.0 Ma) of the western localities is synchronous with Pinturan faunas (19.0-18.0 Ma), but older than Santacrucian faunas of the Río Santa Cruz (17.2-15.6 Ma) and coastal localities (18.0-16.2 Ma). The Santacrucian faunas of the central Río Santa Cruz localities temporally overlap Colloncuran (15.7 Ma), Friasian (16.5 Ma), and eastern Santacrucian faunas.

  13. Test Reviewing in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniz, Jose; Fernandez-Hermida, Jose R.; Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Campillo-Alvarez, Angela; Pena-Suarez, Elsa

    2012-01-01

    The proper use of psychological tests requires that the measurement instruments have adequate psychometric properties, such as reliability and validity, and that the professionals who use the instruments have the necessary expertise. In this article, we present the first review of tests published in Spain, carried out with an assessment model…

  14. Supported Employment in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdugo, Miguel Angel; Borja, F.; de Urries, Jordan; Bellver, Fernando; Martinez, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    Supported employment is growing in Spain, assisted by models from other countries and national legislation. The Spanish Association of Supported Employment is providing a framework for program development. The field must deal with the lack of systematic evaluation and with funding problems. (SK)

  15. Vocational Training in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genovard, Candido; And Others

    Vocational training in Spain suffers from a fundamental initial disadvantage, namely the subsidiary position that it occupies in the general structure of the country's educational system. The situation has been aggravated by the sector's relative neglect by the government, which has been forced to concentrate its efforts on secondary and…

  16. Embassy of Spain visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-29

    Delegates from the Embassy of Spain visited Goddard on Sept 29, 2016. Center Director Chris Scolese gave a brief overview of the Center and the guests then toured B29 James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in clean room, and B28 Hyperwall.

  17. Career Development in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talavera, Elvira Repetto; Moreno, Luisa Rodriguez; Romeo, Javier; Malik, Beatriz

    In Spain, the term "career development" refers to vocational or career guidance services. The 1983 Law on University Reform conferred on universities the freedom of teaching, endowing them with legal status and administrative powers. Thus, there are no regulations regarding guidance at this educational level. Guidance departments in…

  18. [Foreign immigration in Spain].

    PubMed

    Serra Yoldi, I

    1997-01-01

    This article, translated from the original Spanish, analyzes recent trends in immigration to Spain. Information is provided on annual totals of immigrants and emigrants, 1976-1991; resident foreigners by nationality, 1990-1994; resident foreigners by province and continent of origin, 1991; occupations of immigrants, 1990-1991; migrant characteristics; attitudes toward immigration; and assimilation of immigrants.

  19. Test Reviewing in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniz, Jose; Fernandez-Hermida, Jose R.; Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Campillo-Alvarez, Angela; Pena-Suarez, Elsa

    2012-01-01

    The proper use of psychological tests requires that the measurement instruments have adequate psychometric properties, such as reliability and validity, and that the professionals who use the instruments have the necessary expertise. In this article, we present the first review of tests published in Spain, carried out with an assessment model…

  20. Interpretation of analytical data on n-alkanes and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in Arbacia lixula from the coasts of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) by multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Peña-Méndez, E M; Astorga-España, M S; García-Montelongo, F J

    1999-12-01

    The hydrocarbons contents (n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) were determined in the sea urchin Arbacia lixula. Multivariate data analysis as principal component analysis, factor analysis and, cluster analysis were applied to elucidate sources of pollution. PCA and FA were performed to establish the relationships between variables (hydrocarbons), samples (sea urchin) and sources of pollution.

  1. [Fertility decline in Spain].

    PubMed

    Arango, J

    1987-01-01

    The historical processes of secular fertility decline in Spain and Portugal are not well understood. Very few microdemographic studies of small geographic regions or particular social strata have been done. A contribution by David Reher to the First Spanish-Portuguese-Italian Historical Demography Conference on the fertility decline in the interior province of Cuenca, Spain, uses the own-children method to analyze changes in marital fertility in the 19th and 20th centuries. Reher discovered a slight fertility decline of perhaps 15% which occurred between the end of the 18th century and 1860-75. The fertility decline did not resume until after the Spanish Civil War, and then it was a very gradual and continuous process. When instead of the total female population, women aged 35-39 were studied, unequivocal signs of fertility control appeared. Conscious fertility control thus appears to have begun among older women limiting rather than spacing births. Reher's analysis by social groups demonstrates that fertility declined first and more rapidly in the nonagricultural and urban populations and among the higher income groups. The fertility decline in Cuenca was certainly not identical to that in most of Spain, but may have been fairly typical of a large part of the interior. Another contribution to the Historical Demography Conference, by Anna Cabre and Isabel Pujadas, analyzes fertility trends and cyclical fluctuations in 20th century Cataluna, arguing that they must be placed in historical perspective if recent changes are to be understood and plausible projections made. Their work demonstrates the value of selecting a relatively homogeneous geographic unit for analysis. The contribution of Margarita Delgado to the conference analyzed interregional fertility differences in contemporary Spain. The high legitimate fertility of the south of Spain is accentuated by high nuptiality rates. In central Spain, the combination of high legitimate fertility rates and low

  2. Antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tenerife cheese: initial characterization of plantaricin TF711, a bacteriocin-like substance produced by Lactobacillus plantarum TF711.

    PubMed

    Hernández, D; Cardell, E; Zárate, V

    2005-01-01

    The screening and initial characterization of bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from raw Tenerife goats' cheese with possible application as biopreservatives or ripening accelerators for Tenerife cheese. One hundred and eighty LAB of the genera Lactobacillus (95), Leuconostoc (64) and Lactococcus (21) isolated from raw Tenerife goats' cheese were screened for the production of antimicrobial substances. Lactobacillus plantarum TF711, which had the broadest spectrum of antimicrobial activity, was selected for further characterization. The antimicrobial compound was determined as a proteinaceous substance, as it was sensitive to proteases. The bacteriocin-like substance, which we called plantaricin TF711, was active against the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus cereus, Clostridium sporogenes and Staphylococcus aureus; and against the Enterobacteriaceae Shigella sonnei and Klebsiella pneumoniae. It was stable to heat and to treatment with surfactants and organic solvents. Highest antimicrobial activity was found between pH 1 and 9. Plantaricin TF711 exhibited primary metabolite kinetics, a bacteriostatic mode of action and a molecular mass of c. 2.5 kDa as determined by tricine SDS-PAGE. Lact. plantarum TF711 produces a low molecular mass bacteriocin-like compound with a wide spectrum of activity and interesting technological properties (thermostability, good pH stability and stability against surfactants and organic solvents). Plantaricin TF711 was found to have potential for use as a biopreservative in the food industry.

  3. Soil CO2 efflux measurement network by means of closed static chambers to monitor volcanic activity at Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amonte, Cecilia; García-Merino, Marta; Asensio-Ramos, María; Melián, Gladys; García-Hernández, Rubén; Pérez, Aaron; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Tenerife (2304 km2) is the largest of the Canary Islands and has developed a central volcanic complex (Cañadas edifice), that started to grow about 3.5 My ago. Coeval with the construction of the Cañadas edifice, shield basaltic volcanism continued until the present along three rift zones oriented NW-SE, NE-SW and NS (hereinafter referred as NW, NE and NS respectively). Main volcanic historical activity has occurred along de NW and NE rift-zones, although summit cone of Teide volcano, in central volcanic complex, is the only area of the island where surface geothermal manifestations are visible. Uprising of deep-seated gases occurs along the aforementioned volcanic structures causing diffuse emissions at the surface environment of the rift-zones. In the last 20 years, there has been considerable interest in the study of diffuse degassing as a powerful tool in volcano monitoring programs. Diffuse degassing studies are even more important volcanic surveillance tool at those volcanic areas where visible manifestations of volcanic gases are absent. Historically, soil gas and diffuse degassing surveys in volcanic environments have focused mainly on CO2 because it is, after water vapor, the most abundant gas dissolved in magma. One of the most popular methods used to determine CO2 fluxes in soil sciences is based on the absorption of CO2 through an alkaline medium, in its solid or liquid form, followed by gravimetric, conductivity, or titration analyses. In the summer of 2016, a network of 31 closed static chambers was installed, covering the three main structural zones of Tenerife (NE, NW and NS) as well as Cañadas Caldera with volcanic surveillance porpoises. 50 cc of 0.1N KOH solution is placed inside the chamber to absorb the CO2 released from the soil. The solution is replaced weekly and the trapped CO2 is then analyzed at the laboratory by titration. The are expressed as weekly integrated CO2 efflux values. The CO2 efflux values ranged from 3.2 to 12.9 gṡm-2

  4. Physical data of soil profiles formed on late Quaternary marine terraces near Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munster, Jennie; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2002-01-01

    The marine terraces in and around Santa Cruz, California, represent a set of well-preserved terraces formed as a product of geology, sea level, and climate. A marine terrace begins as a wave cut platform. Eustatic sea level changes, seacliff erosion, and tectonic uplift work together to generate marine terraces. "When a wave-cut platform is raised (due to tectonic activity) above sea level and cliffed by wave action it becomes a marine terrace" (Bradley, 1957, p. 424). During glacial periods, eustatic sea level is estimated to have dropped by 150 meters (Fairbanks, 1989). Cliff retreat measured from aerial photographs between 1930 and 1980 vary from 0.0 to 0.2 m yr–1 (Best and Griggs, 1991). Estimates of uplift rates along the Santa Cruz coastline vary from 0.10 to 0.48 m kyr–1 (Bradley and Griggs, 1976; Weber and others, 1999). Uplift mechanisms include coseismic uplift associated both with a reverse component of slip on the steeply SW dipping Loma Prieta fault in the restraining bend of the San Andreas Fault and a small component of reverse slip on the steeply SE dipping San Gregorio fault (Anderson and Menking 1994). Previous work studying physical properties on these terraces include Pinney and others (in press) and Aniku (1986) and Bowman and Estrada (1980). Sedimentary deposits of the marine terraces are a mixture of terrestrial and marine sediments but generally consist of a sheet of marine deposits overlying the old platform and a wedge of nonmarine deposits banked against the old sea cliff (Bradley, 1957). Bedrock underlying the terraces in the Santa Cruz area is generally either Santa Margarita Sandstone or Santa Cruz Mudstone. The Santa Margarita Sandstone represents an upper Miocene, transgressive, tidally dominated marine-shelf deposit with crossbedded sets of sand and gravel and horizontally stratified and bioturbated invertebrate-fossils beds (Phillips, 1990). The siliceous Santa Cruz Mudstone, of late Miocene age, conformably overlies the Santa

  5. Non-controlled biogenic emissions to the atmosphere from Lazareto landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Nolasco, Dácil; Lima, R Noemí; Hernández, Pedro A; Pérez, Nemesio M

    2008-01-01

    [corrected] Historically, landfills have been the simplest form of eliminating urban solid waste with the minimum cost. They have been the most usual method for discarding solid waste. However, landfills are considered authentic biochemical reactors that introduce large amounts of contaminants into the environment in the form of gas and leachates. The dynamics of generation and the movement of gas in landfills depend on the input and output parameters, as well as on the structure of the landfill and the kind of waste. The input parameters include water introduced through natural or artificial processes, the characteristics of the urban solid waste, and the input of atmospheric air. The main output parameters for these biochemical reactors include the gases and the leachates that are potentially pollutants for the environment. Control systems are designed and installed to minimize the impact on the environment. However, these systems are not perfect and a significant amount of landfill gas could be released to the atmosphere through the surface in a diffuse form, also known as Non-controlled emission. In this paper, the results of the Non-controlled biogenic gas emissions from the Lazareto landfill in Tenerife, Canary Islands, are presented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concentration of CH4 and CO2 in the soil gas of the landfill cover, the CH4 and CO2 efflux from the surface of the landfill and, finally, to compare these parameters with other similar landfills. In this way, a better understanding of the process that controls biogenic gas emissions in landfills is expected. A Non-controlled biogenic gas emission survey of 281 sampling sites was carried out during February and March, 2002. The sampling sites were selected in order to obtain a well-distributed sampling grid. Surface landfill CO2 efflux measurements were carried out at each sampling site on the surface landfill together with soil gas collection and ground temperatures at a depth of 30

  6. Crystal Zoning Constrains on the Processes and Time Scales Involved in Monogenetic Mafic Volcanism (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, H.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Marti, J.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the historical eruptive activity in Tenerife has been relatively mafic and mildly-explosive monogenetic eruptions, and thus it seems that this activity is the most likely in the near future. Here we investigate the processes and time scales that lead to such eruptions with the aim to better interpret and plan for any possible unrest in the island. We focus on three historical eruptions: Siete Fuentes (December 31 1704-January 1705), Fasnia (January 5-January 13 1705) and Arafo (February 2-February 26 1705) issued from a 10 km long basaltic fissure eruption oriented N45E and covering an area of 10.4 km2. The erupted volume increases by 5-fold from the first to the last eruption. All magmas are tephritic, although the bulk-rock becomes more mafic with time due to accumulation of olivine with Cr-spinel inclusions, and clinopyroxene rather than to the appearance of a truly more primitive melt. Olivine core compositions of the three eruptions range between Fo79 and Fo87. Frequency histograms show three main populations: at Fo79-80, Fo80-82 and Fo84-87 displaying normal and reverse zoning. Thermodynamic calculations show that only cores with Fo80-82 are in equilibrium with the whole rock. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts can have large pools of matrix glass and show rims of different composition. Only the rims, with Mg#84-86, are in equilibrium with the whole-rock. Considering olivine cores and clinopyroxene rims in equilibrium we obtained a temperature range of 1150-1165°C, and MELTS calculations suggest pressures of 1 to 5 kbar. The variety of olivine core populations reflects mixing and mingling between three different magmas, and their proportions have changed with time from Siete Fuentes to Arafo. Most crystals have complex zoning profiles that record two events: (1) one of magma mixing/mingling at depth, (2) another of magma transport and ascent to the surface. Magma mixing at depth ranges from about 3 months to two years and is similar for the three eruptions

  7. A combined paleomagnetic/dating investigation of the upper Jaramillo transition from a volcanic section at Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, C.; Guillou, H.; Laj, C.; Carracedo, J. C.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Wandres, C.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Nomade, S.

    2014-11-01

    A coupled paleomagnetic/dating investigation has been conducted on a sequence of 25 successive lava flows, emplaced during the upper transition of the Jaramillo subchron in Tenerife, Canary Islands. This sequence is located along the western wall of the Güímar collapse scar, in the south central part of the island. Nine flows distributed throughout this sequence were dated using unspiked K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar methods. They bracket the section between 1009±22 ka and 971±21 ka (2σ). A first group of 8 flows at the bottom of the sequence is characterized by normal polarity with paleointensity values of the order of present-day field intensity in the Canary Islands. The virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP) of these 8 flows describe a short loop at high latitudes. Seven overlying flows are transitional in directions and dated between 991±14 ka and 1002±11 ka consistently with published ages of the upper Jaramillo reversal. This second group of flows is characterized by low paleointensity values (around 8-12 μT) that are less than 30% of the present dipole value in Tenerife. The VGPs of the first two transitional flows lie over northeastern Pacific whereas the five following transitional flows have all negative inclinations and their VGPs lie initially over East Antarctica, then describe a northward loop almost reaching New Zealand. The final group of ten flows yield intensities varying between 20 and 35 μT and VGPs close to the southern pole with two of them describing a small amplitude second loop to southeastern Pacific. Assuming a constant extrusion rate as a very first approximation, the distribution of the obtained ages suggests a duration of 7.6±5.6 ka for the transitional interval. The obtained transitional positions of VGPs are consistent with the path reported for the same reversal from North Atlantic sediments but are different from the only other volcanic record from Tahiti. The intensity low characterizing the transitional interval remains the best tie

  8. Spain: NATO or Neutrality,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    is tied up first and foremost with Western Europe, its geographi- cal, historical, cultural , and social context. It is natural, then, that the defence...forcibly but it is more forcibly stated by the facts of economic and cultural links. The Spanish democracy, new but impressive, finds its obvious political...political, economic, cultural and social ones. A last point might be made on this matter. It is surely in the Interests of the Alliance that Spain, whether in

  9. Hematology and serum chemistry of the island spotted skunk on Santa Cruz Island.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Kevin R; Garcelon, D K; Scott, Cheryl A; Wilcox, Jeffery T; Timm, Steven F; Van Vuren, Dirk H

    2003-04-01

    We determined serum biochemistry and hematologic values for island spotted skunks (Spilogale gracilis amphiala) on Santa Cruz Island (California, USA). Samples were collected from island spotted skunks chemically restrained with ketamine hydrochloride and acepromazine in August 1999 (dry season) and from skunks manually restrained in August 2000 (dry season) and January 2001 (wet season). One parameter, glucose, significantly differed with season, with higher levels during the wet season. Serum chemistry and hematologic profiles suggest that method of restraint (manual or chemical), as well as other methodologic details, may influence blood characteristics in the island spotted skunk.

  10. Energy future Santa Cruz: A citizens' plan for energy self-reliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, J.; Stayton, R.

    The results of a grassroots energy conservation project which involved more than 3,100 residents of Santa Cruz, California, is discussed. Citizens attended forums and town meetings to suggest ideas for solving the community's energy problems. These ideas were then evaluated by the Energy Future Advisory Board and compiled into the Energy Future Plan. The energy plan covers such topics as new residences, residential retrofit, automobile efficiency, farm efficiency, commercial greenhouses, local food production, commercial efficiency, land use planning, energy education and financing, and solar, wind, and ocean energy. An energy implementation guide and glossary are included.

  11. Simulation of ground-water flow and potential land subsidence, upper Santa Cruz Basin, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Benedict, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical ground-water flow model of the upper Santa Cruz basin in Pinal, Pima, and Santa Cruz Counties was developed to evaluate predevelopment conditions in 1940, ground-water withdrawals for 1940-86, and potential water-level declines and land subsidence for 1987-2024. Simulations of steady-state ground-water conditions indicate 12,900 acre-feet of ground-water inflow, 15,260 acre-feet of outflow, 53,000 acre-feet of pre- development pumpage, 29,840 acre-feet of mountain- front recharge, and 34,020 acre-feet of streamflow infiltration in 1940. Simulations of transient ground-water conditions indicate a total of 6.6 million acre-feet of net pumpage and 3.4 million acre-feet of water removed from aquifer storage for 1941-86. A difference of 1.2 million acre-feet between estimated and net pumpage is attributed to increased recharge from irrigation return flow, mine return flow, and infiltration of sewage effluent. Estimated natural recharge represents 40 percent of pumpage for 1966-86 and averaged 63,860 acre-feet per year for 1940-57 and 76,250 acre-feet per year for 1958-86. The increase in recharge after 1958 was coincident with above- average winter streamflow in the Santa Cruz River for 1959-86. Increased recharge after 1958 and decreased pumpage after 1975 contributed to decreased water-level declines or to recoveries after 1977 in wells near the Santa Cruz River and its tributaries. The results of projection simu- lations indicate that a maximum potential subsi- dence for 1987-2024 ranges from 1.2 feet for an inelastic specific storage of .0001 ft to 12 feet for an inelastic specific storage of .0015 ft. The simulations were made on the basis of pumpage and recharge rates from 1986 and by using a preconso- lidation-stress threshold of 100 feet. A permanent reduction in acquitard storage can range from 1 to 12 percent of the potential loss of 3.9 million acre-feet in aquifer-system storage for 1987-2024.

  12. Pyrenees Mtns., Spain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    This ASTER image, acquired on August 1, 2000, covers an area of 57 by 29 km and covers part of the central Pyrenees in Spain. The Pyrenees in southwestern Europe extend for about 435 kilometers (about 270 miles) from the Bay of Biscay to the Mediterranean Sea, separating the Iberian Peninsula from the rest of Europe. The Pyrenees form most of the boundary between France and Spain, and encompass the tiny principality of Andorra. Approximately two-thirds of the mountains lie in Spain. The central Pyrenees extend to the Collines du Perche and contain the highest peaks of the system, including Pico de Aneto, the highest at 3,404 meters (11,168 feet). ASTER bands 4, 3 and 2 were displayed in red, green and blue. In this combination, snow is blue, vegetation is green, bare rocks are pink and dark blue, and clouds are white. The image is located at 42.6 degrees north latitude and 0.6 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11162

  13. Occupational cancer in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    González, C A; Agudo, A

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of specific problems of occupational cancer in Spain is scarce. The environment of the workplace has improved over the last few years after a long period distinguished by bad working conditions, incomplete legislation, and insufficient safety measures and control. It has been estimated that 3,083,479 workers (25.4% of employees) were exposed to carcinogens. The most common occupational exposures to carcinogenic agents were solar radiation, environmental tobacco smoke, silica, and wood dust. The highest number of employees were exposed to silica crystalline (404,729), diesel engine exhaust (274,321), rubber products (99,804), benzene (89,932), ethylene dibromide (81,336), agents used in furniture and cabinet making (72,068), and formaldehyde (71,189). The percentage of total cancer deaths attributed to occupational exposure was 4% (6% in men, 0.9% in women). Compared with other European countries, the incidence of lung cancer and leukemia in Spain are one of the lowest, but it is rapidly increasing. The incidence of urinary bladder and larynx cancer, on the contrary, are one of the highest. Few studies on occupational cancer have been conducted in Spain. The main problems are the availability of death certificates and the quality of the information on occupation in mortality of statistics. It is necessary to improve methods of assessment of exposures using expert hygienists and biologic markers of exposure and diseases. Reduction of cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to known occupational carcinogens is still necessary. PMID:10350510

  14. Object-oriented image analysis and change detection of land-use on Tenerife related to socio-economic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Simone; Siegmund, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    The island Tenerife is characterized by an increasing tourism, which causes an enormous change of the socio-economic situation and a rural exodus. This development leads - beside for example sociocultural issues - to fallow land, decreasing settlements, land wasting etc., as well as to an economic and ecological problem. This causes to a growing interest in geoecological aspects and to an increasing demand for an adequate monitoring database. In order to study the change of land use and land cover, the technology of remote sensing (LANDSAT 3 MSS and 7 ETM+, orthophotos) and geographical information systems were used to analyze the spatial pattern and its spatial temporal changes of land use from end of the 70s to the present in different scales. Because of the heterogeneous landscape and the unsatisfactory experience with pixel-based classification of the same area, object-oriented image analysis techniques have been applied to classify the remote sensed data. A post-classification application was implemented to detect spatial and categorical land use and land cover changes, which have been clipped with the socio-economic data within GIS to derive the driving forces of the changes and their variability in time and space.

  15. The use of biotite trace element compositions for fingerprinting magma batches at Las Cañadas volcano, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwinski, J. T.; Ellis, B. S.; Dávila-Harris, P.; Wolff, J. A.; Olin, P. H.; Bachmann, O.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate identification of individual volcanic events in the field is crucial for constraining eruption volumes and calculating recurrence intervals between eruptive episodes. Due to complexities of pyroclastic transport and deposition and intra-unit textural variability, such identification can be challenging. We present a novel method for fingerprinting ignimbrites via trace element chemistry (V, Co, Nb) in biotite by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Using samples from the alkaline magmatic series of Tenerife, we are able to demonstrate (1) clustering of previously characterized units into distinct, homogeneous groups based on V, Co, and Nb concentrations in biotite, despite the presence of extreme variation and zonation in other trace elements (Ba, Sr, Rb) that indicate complex petrogenetic processes, and (2) biotite compositions are similar throughout a deposit and relatively independent of stratigraphic height or juvenile clast texture (crystal-rich vs crystal-poor). Our results show that trace elements in biotite can be used to fingerprint eruptions and correlate geographically separated volcanic deposits, including those preserved in offshore turbidite records.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and phylogeography of Pimelia darkling beetles on the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands).

    PubMed

    Juan, C; Ibrahim, K M; Oromi, P; Hewitt, G M

    1996-12-01

    Four morphological taxa of the beetle genus Pimelia (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) are known to exist on the Atlantic island of Tenerife. We have obtained DNA sequences for 61 individuals from these taxa across the island for a 200 bp long fragment of the mitochondrial COI gene. In addition, a restriction site polymorphism in the nuclear rRNA ITS-1 sequence was identified and screened in a sample of these individuals using the enzyme Kpn2I. The results were analysed using approaches which allow inferences to be made about the population genetic structure and the mitochondrial genealogy of these closely related beetles. The mtDNA haplotype distribution and the estimates of sequence divergence revealed the presence of two ancient mtDNA lineages which coincide with the disjunct volcanic evolution of the island. The ITS-1 polymorphism was found to be diagnostic of these two lineages. However, the morphological and mitochondrial phylogenies were found to be discordant. We argue that this is possibly the result of rapid morphological change, produced by selection in different habitats, which has been recently superimposed on an older mitochondrial DNA divergence.

  17. Epiphytic bryophytes growing on Laurus azorica (Seub.) Franco in three laurel forest areas in Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Mancebo, Juana M.; Romaguera, Francisco; Losada-Lima, Ana; Suárez, Andrés

    2004-05-01

    We examined bryophyte species growing on Laurus azorica, in three localities of the laurel forest in Tenerife (Canary Islands), in order to determine differences in species composition, richness and cover, that depend on variations in mist frequency and density. Among the 35 bryophyte species found (26 liverworts and nine mosses), 16 occurred in all three locations while nine species occurred in only one location. Detrended correspondence analysis and canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the epiphyte-phorophyte relationship varied in terms of cover, richness and bryophyte composition, depending on the humidity conditions (related to mist frequency and plot height) and tree age. In spite of differences in the dominant species found at each locality, the community types have many species in common and may be seen as a natural unit of the communities involved. Variation in the dominant species at each locality is mainly related to a trade off between humidity conditions and tree diameter, and the speed of the successional processes. Plot aspect was the only variable among those considered with no significant influence, which might be related to the closed canopy conditions. Variation in cover, richness and bryophyte composition related to plot height and tree diameter increased in the drier location. Cover was positively related to species richness in all analyses. This is related to low diversity during initial colonization and the fact that the highest biomass species, related to later successional stages, also occur on younger trees, especially in the more humid areas.

  18. Using FORSEE and continuous forest inventory information to evaluate implementation of uneven-aged management in Santa Cruz County coast redwood forests

    Treesearch

    Douglas D. Piirto; Scott Sink; Dominic Ali; Steve Auten; Christopher Hipkin; Reid. Cody

    2012-01-01

    Swanton Pacific Ranch in northern Santa Cruz County has been owned and managed by California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) Foundation since 1987. The California Forest Practice Rules specific to Santa Cruz County limit harvest rate and opening size. Cal Poly forest managers are implementing uneven-aged forest management on 1,182 acres of 80 to 110...

  19. Biologic origin of iron nodules in a marine terrace chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.; Schulz, C.; Fitzpatrick, J.; White, A.

    2010-01-01

    The distribution, chemistry, and morphology of Fe nodules were studied in a marine terrace soil chronosequence northwest of Santa Cruz, California. The Fe nodules are found at depths <1 m on all terraces. The nodules consisted of soil mineral grains cemented by Fe oxides. The nodules varied in size from 0.5 to 25 mm in diameter. Nodules did not occur in the underlying regolith. The Fe-oxide mineralogy of the nodules was typically goethite; however, a subset of nodules consisted of maghemite. There was a slight transformation to hematite with time. The abundance of soil Fe nodules increased with terrace age on the five terraces studied (aged 65,000-226,000 yr). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed Fe-oxide-containing fungal hyphae throughout the nodules, including organic structures incorporating fine-grained Fe oxides. The fine-grained nature of the Fe oxides was substantiated by M??ssbauer spectroscopy. Our microscopic observations led to the hypothesis that the nodules in the Santa Cruz terrace soils are precipitated by fungi, perhaps as a strategy to sequester primary mineral grains for nutrient extraction. The fungal structures are fixed by the seasonal wetting and dry cycles and rounded through bioturbation. The organic structures are compacted by the degradation of fungal C with time. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  20. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Greene, H. Gary; Dieter, Bryan E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Endris, Charles A.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-03-24

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Santa Cruz map area is located in central California, on the Pacific Coast about 98 km south of San Francisco. The city of Santa Cruz (population, about 63,000), the largest incorporated city in the map area and the county seat of Santa Cruz County, lies on uplifted marine terraces between the shoreline and the northwest-trending Santa Cruz Mountains, part of California’s Coast Ranges. All of California’s State Waters in the map area is part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.The map area is cut by an offshore section of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, and it lies about 20 kilometers southwest of the San Andreas Fault Zone. Regional folding and uplift along the coast has been attributed to a westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone and to right-lateral movement along the San Gregorio Fault Zone. Most of the coastal zone is characterized by low, rocky cliffs and sparse, small pocket beaches backed by low, terraced hills. Point Santa Cruz, which forms the north edge of Monterey Bay, provides protection for the beaches in the easternmost part of the map area by sheltering them from the predominantly northwesterly waves.The shelf in the map area is underlain by variable amounts (0 to 25 m) of

  1. Radon Indicates Hydrological Connection between the Ocean and Lagoon, Santa Cruz, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vattadi, N.; Foley, N.; Lecher, A.; Murray, J.

    2013-12-01

    Lagoons are common along the coastline of Santa Cruz, CA. In the summer dry season, Corcoran Lagoon in Santa Cruz, California is separated from the ocean by a 100 meter long sand berm. Because sand is a porous medium, water can flow through the berm with a maximum calculated speed of 0.427 meters per hour at Corcoran Lagoon. Previous studies have shown that radon can be used as an indicator of submarine groundwater discharge into the ocean and that discharge into the ocean fluctuates as a function of tide. We used similar techniques in the lagoon to measure 222Rn as groundwater stored in the berm is pushed into the lagoon by the advancing tide. We also measured the salinity of water stored in the berm water at three temporary wells and compared it to seawater and lagoon water at the same time as our radon measurements. As the tide advanced, we observed a radon and salinity increase near the midpoint of the lagoon. The highest salinity measurements, which were higher than both the ocean and the lagoon, were recorded in the berm at the temporary well nearest to the lagoon. These data indicate that the berm stores high salinity and radon rich groundwater which is then pushed into the lagoon with a rising tide which demonstrates the hydrological connection between the lagoon and the ocean.

  2. Configuration of Miocene Basins Along the Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, California Continental Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoller, A. R.; Legg, M.; Malone, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Miocene basins associated with the oblique rifting of the Inner Continental Borderland offshore Southern California are preserved along the flanks of the transpressional Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge. Using 184 lines of two-dimensional seismic data including high resolution records from Oregon State University and deep penetration data from Western Geco archived in USGS/NAMSS, we were able to map the configuration of the Miocene basin along the flanks of the northern core complex on the Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge. There are distinct early and middle Miocene basins along the flanks of the ridge, which we are using to try to define the initial configuration of the Inner Borderland Rift. Along the hinge, between the uplifted ridge and the sub-horizontal basement in the Santa Monica Basin, lies the thickest part of the sequence. Pliocene to Recent sediments lap on to the tilted and uplifted Miocene basin sequences and constrain timing of uplift when transpression commenced. Segmentation and other distinctive character of the basin along the ridge flank may be correlated with similar features in the Miocene basin on the conjugate margin of the rift. Our working model for oblique rifting in the Borderland resembles of the Gulf of California, where right-stepping echelon transform faults link left-stepping extensional basins. The objective of our project is to reconstruct the configuration of the middle Miocene rift and to further our quest to understand the rifting process and tectonic evolution of the Pacific-North American plate boundary.

  3. Rapid assessment of drug consumption at Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Caris, L; Suarez, R; Covarrubias, G; Fernández, E; Roca, E

    1996-01-01

    The present paper describes a rapid assessment carried out in 1996 at Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, with a view to defining the sociocultural groups at risk and gaining insight, through the comments of those interviewed, into their perceptions of the phenomenon of drug abuse, their reasons for abusing drugs, the drugs most frequently abused and the psychological and social factors involved when they enter, remain in and finally leave drug-abusing circles. By using qualitative methodology and techniques it was possible to gain access to the typical world inhabited by the interviewees, and thus to characterize the subjects of the study in the light of their closest social reference points (family, peer group, education and work). Among the conclusions of the study are the following: drug abuse is a complex and dynamic phenomenon that has occurred throughout the society of Santa Cruz, fostered by cultural and economic factors; there is a need for society, and especially the Government, to devise a specific, focused and diversified range of services, both in prevention and in rehabilitation, with integration and participation being key features of such initiatives; and the mechanisms for controlling the production of drugs and drug trafficking need to be strengthened.

  4. Evaluation of ground-water monitoring network, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blankenbaker, G.G.; Farrar, Christopher D.

    1981-01-01

    The Santa Cruz County Flood Control and Water Conservation District seeks to improve the existing network of observation wells to monitor water levels and ground-water quality in the Pajaro Valley subarea and the Aptos-Soquel, San Lorenzo, and Santa Cruz Coastal subbasins in California. The proposed network , consisting of 92 wells, is designed to monitor changes in storage and quality of ground water resulting from climatic changes and management-induced stresses. In the proposed network , water levels in all wells would be measured semiannually, in April and September, and monthly in a few key wells. The water-level measurements would provide data that could be used to determine changes in ground-water storage. In addition to the currently monitored characteristics--temperature, specific conductance, pH, and chloride ion concentration--inclusion of annual sampling and analysis for major ions and nutrients is proposed. The network would also include sampling and analysis for trace elements once every 4 years. More frequent analyses are proposed in areas where water-quality problems are known to exist or where potential water-quality problems are recognized. Analyses for major ions, nutrients, and trace elements are included in the proposed network to provide baseline data for monitoring long-term changes in water quality and to detect any unexpected changes in quality. (USGS)

  5. Genetic Status and Timing of a Weevil Introduction to Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Successful invasive species can overcome or circumvent the potential genetic loss caused by an introduction bottleneck through a rapid population expansion and admixture from multiple introductions. We explore the genetic makeup and the timing of a species introduction to Santa Cruz Island in the Galápagos archipelago. We investigate the presence of processes that can maintain genetic diversity in populations of the broad-nosed weevil Galapaganus howdenae howdenae. Analyses of combined genotypes for 8 microsatellite loci showed evidence of past population size reductions through moment and likelihood-based estimators. No evidence of admixture through multiple introductions was found, but substantial current population sizes (N0 298, 95% credible limits 50–2300), genetic diversity comparable with long-established endemics (Mean number of alleles = 3.875), and lack of genetic structure across the introduced range (F ST = 0.01359) could suggest that foundations are in place for populations to rapidly recover any loss of genetic variability. The time estimates for the introduction into Santa Cruz support an accidental transfer during the colonization period (1832–1959) predating the spurt in human population growth. Our evaluation of the genetic status of G. h. howdenae suggests potential for population growth in addition to our field observations of a concurrent expansion in range and feeding preferences towards protected areas and endemic host plants. PMID:24399746

  6. The Solomon Islands tsunami of 6 February 2013 field survey in the Santa Cruz Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H. M.; Papantoniou, A.; Biukoto, L.; Albert, G.

    2013-12-01

    On February 6, 2013 at 01:12:27 UTC (local time: UTC+11), a magnitude Mw 8.0 earthquake occurred 70 km to the west of Ndendo Island (Santa Cruz Island) in the Solomon Islands. The under-thrusting earthquake near a 90° bend, where the Australian plate subducts beneath the Pacific plate generated a locally focused tsunami in the Coral Sea and the South Pacific Ocean. The tsunami claimed the lives of 10 people and injured 15, destroyed 588 houses and partially damaged 478 houses, affecting 4,509 people in 1,066 households corresponding to an estimated 37% of the population of Santa Cruz Island. A multi-disciplinary international tsunami survey team (ITST) was deployed within days of the event to document flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, sediment and coral boulder depositions, land level changes, damage patterns at various scales, performance of the man-made infrastructure and impact on the natural environment. The 19 to 23 February 2013 ITST covered 30 locations on 4 Islands: Ndendo (Santa Cruz), Tomotu Noi (Lord Howe), Nea Tomotu (Trevanion, Malo) and Tinakula. The reconnaissance completely circling Ndendo and Tinakula logged 240 km by small boat and additionally covered 20 km of Ndendo's hard hit western coastline by vehicle. The collected survey data includes more than 80 tsunami runup and flow depth measurements. The tsunami impact peaked at Manoputi on Ndendo's densely populated west coast with maximum tsunami height exceeding 11 m and local flow depths above ground exceeding 7 m. A fast tide-like positive amplitude of 1 m was recorded at Lata wharf inside Graciosa Bay on Ndendo Island and misleadingly reported in the media as representative tsunami height. The stark contrast between the field observations on exposed coastlines and the Lata tide gauge recording highlights the importance of rapid tsunami reconnaissance surveys. Inundation distance and damage more than 500 m inland were recorded at Lata airport on Ndendo Island. Landslides were

  7. On New Spain and Mexican medicinal botany in cardiology.

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo Alessandro; Izaguirre-Ávila, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Towards the middle of the XVI century, the empirical physician Martín de la Cruz, in New Spain, compiled a catalogue of the local medicinal herbs and plants, which was translated into Latin by Juan Badiano, professor at the Franciscan college of Tlatelolco. On his side, Dr. Francisco Hernández, the royal physician (protomédico) from 1571 until 1577, performed a systematic study of the flora and fauna in this period. His notes and designs were not published at that time, but two epitomes of Hernández' works appeared, respectively, in 1615 in Mexico and in 1651 in Rome. During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived to these lands. They were led, respectively, by the Spanish naturalist Martín Sessé and the Italian seaman, Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. These expeditions collected and carried rich scientific material to Spain. At the end of that century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his botanic work. In the last years of the colonial period, the fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland on the geographic distribution of the American plants were published. In the modern age, the first research about the Mexican medicinal botany was performed in the laboratory of the Instituto Médico Nacional [National Medical Institute] under the leadership of Dr. Fernando Altamirano, who started pharmacological studies in this country. Later, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico City, on Dr. Ignacio Chávez' initiative. The Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition persists alive and vigorous at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología and other scientific institutions of the country.

  8. Oesophageal cancer mortality in Spain: a spatial analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aragonés, Nuria; Ramis, Rebeca; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Lope, Virginia; Boldo, Elena Isabel; García-Pérez, Javier; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2007-01-01

    Background Oesophageal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Its incidence and mortality rates show a wide geographical variation at a world and regional level. Geographic mapping of age-standardized, cause-specific death rates at a municipal level could be a helpful and powerful tool for providing clues leading to a better understanding of its aetiology. Methods This study sought to describe the geographic distribution of oesophageal cancer mortality for Spain's 8077 towns, using the autoregressive spatial model proposed by Besag, York and Mollié. Maps were plotted, depicting standardised mortality ratios, smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the spatial pattern of the posterior probability of RR being greater than 1. Results Important differences associated with area of residence were observed in risk of dying from oesophageal cancer in Spain during the study period (1989–1998). Among men, excess risk appeared across the north of the country, along a band spanning the length of the Cantabrian coastline, Navarre, the north of Castile & León and the north-west of La Rioja. Excess risk was likewise observed in the provinces of Cadiz and part of Seville in Andalusia, the islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, and some towns in the Barcelona and Gerona areas. Among women, there was a noteworthy absence of risk along the mid-section of the Cantabrian seaboard, and increases in mortality, not observed for men, in the west of Extremadura and south-east of Andalusia. Conclusion These major gender- and area-related geographical differences in risk would seem to reflect differences in the prevalence of some well-established and modifiable risk factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity and diet. In addition, excess risks were in evidence for both sexes in some areas, possibly suggesting the implication of certain local environmental or socio-cultural factors. From a public health standpoint, small-area studies could be very useful for

  9. Liver transplantation in Spain.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Gloria; Fondevila, Constantino; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) activity started in Spain in 1984 and has exceeded 23,700 interventions, with more than 1000 transplants performed yearly. Every hospital needs official authorization to perform a LT, which implies the obligation to register all patients on the national waiting list. The Spanish National Transplant Organization (ONT) provides essential support for organ procurement, allocation, and management of the waiting list at a national level. Liver allocation is center-oriented as all available organs are referred to the ONT for the whole country. The allocation rules for LT are made according to disease severity after consensus among professionals from every transplant center and ratified by representatives of the regional health authorities. Authorization and location/distribution of transplant centers are regulated by the country (Spain) and by the different regions according to the Real Decreto 1723/2012. For a total population of 47,850,795 inhabitants, there are 24 centers for LT for adults (1 team/2 million people) and 5 for LT for children (1 team/9.5 million people). Nonbiliary cirrhosis, particularly alcohol- and hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis (60%), and tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (19%), are the most common indications for LT in Spain. Unusual causes of LT include metabolic diseases like Wilson's disease, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and hyperoxaluria type I, polycystic kidney and liver disease, and some tumors (epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and neuroendocrine tumors). Important efforts are now being undertaken to improve the quality and transplantability of extended criteria livers, in particular those arising from DCD, which represent the greatest opportunity to expand the donor pool. These efforts have to be addressed to adapt the organ preservation procedures, be it through the application of regional perfusion in situ or the use of machine perfusion preservation ex situ. Liver Transplantation 22 1259-1264 2016

  10. [Suicide in Spain today].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Pérez, Isabel; Olry de Labry-Lima, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    Spain presents one of the lowest suicide rates (8.7 per 100,000) but, as well as Ireland, it has also experienced one of the highest rate increases both within Europe and within the world. In our country, it can be observed an increase in the suicide rates from 1975 to 1994, being this increase greater in men than in women. It can also be noted that there was a stabilisation in the following years. Social factors, specially those which have to deal with gender roles and changes in these roles, are the most common explanations. Another possible explanation for the observed increase in mortality due to suicide among young men could be the AIDS epidemic and intravenous drug addiction, that was observed in Spain during the eighties and nineties. Furthermore, we are witnessing an epidemic related to violence against children and women. Literature strongly suggests that child abuse (psychological and sexual) is associated with increased suicide risk in adolescent or adult life. Women experience violence from their intimate partners and have a greater risk of suffering from chronic pain, diverse somatisations, greater substance use like drugs and alcohol, depression and suicide attempt. The association between work precariousness and suicide seems to be due to economic and social and family support factors, which can lead to greater vulnerability to mental health problems. These factors are of great relevance, since Spain presents one of the highest unemployment and temporary employment rates in the European Union. It seems reasonable that, due to the individualism that characterises the contemporary society, its demands and the new role of women in the work market that cause, among others, a greater difficulty in combining work and family life, are factors that could explain the lack of decrease in suicide rates.

  11. Ranching and conservation in the Santa Cruz River Region, Sonora: Milpillas Case Study (Ganaderia y Conservacion en la Region del Rio Santa Cruz, Sonora: El Caso del Grupo Milpillas)

    Treesearch

    Joaquin Murrieta-Saldivar

    2006-01-01

    The Sonoran Institute (SI) is a non-profit organization working with people toward common conservation goals. Two objectives guide the work of the Sonoran Institute in the Santa Cruz River Region in Sonora, Mexico: to establish projects with community participation that can result in tangible and long-lasting benefits to the environment, and to ensure success by...

  12. Surgery in Spain.

    PubMed

    Trias, M; Targarona, E M; Moral, A; Pera, C

    1998-02-01

    The Iberian Peninsula-the southwestern point of Europe, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean-was visited and settled in ancient times by a variety of peoples. Phoenicians, Carthaginians, Celts, Greeks, Romans, Visigoths, and Arabs all left their mark on the peninsula, and their cultures blended together to found, among other things, a rich tradition in medicine and surgery. During the Renaissance, the fluid exchange of technical skills and knowledge with the rest of Europe and the emergence of universities ensured the development of a high level of medical expertise. Today, surgery in Spain is at the forefront of innovations in the field.

  13. [Resident foreigners in Spain].

    PubMed

    Solana, A M; Pascual De Sans, A

    1994-01-01

    The authors review trends in the size of the resident foreign population in Spain over time since the 1940s. A continuing growth over time, with temporal fluctuations, is noted, with a rapid rise in immigration in the 1980s, leading to new legislation designed to control immigration in 1985-1986 and 1991. The authors note that Europeans, particularly from countries of the European Union, make up a large percentage of the foreign population, but that the number of immigrants from developing countries has increased significantly in the last 10 years.

  14. Negotiated Program Evaluation in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saez Brezmes, Maria J.; Carretero, Antonio J.

    A concise overview is provided of the history of evaluation, focusing on educational evaluation, followed by some observations on program evaluation in Spain and possible future developments. Evaluation was a new concept in Spain at the end of the Franco era, at a time when its development was beginning to gain momentum in the United States. The…

  15. Early Childhood Inclusion in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giné, Climent; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Cañadas, Margarita; Paniagua, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This article describes early childhood inclusion in educational settings in Spain. First, we address the legislative framework of preschool education in Spain and offer a brief analysis of some relevant issues, including the current situation of early childhood education and inclusion at this stage. Second, current policies and practices relating…

  16. Early Childhood Inclusion in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giné, Climent; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Cañadas, Margarita; Paniagua, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This article describes early childhood inclusion in educational settings in Spain. First, we address the legislative framework of preschool education in Spain and offer a brief analysis of some relevant issues, including the current situation of early childhood education and inclusion at this stage. Second, current policies and practices relating…

  17. Spatial and temporal variations of diffuse CO_{2} degassing at the Tenerife North-South Rift Zone (NSRZ) volcano (Canary Islands) during the period 2002-2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Fátima; McCollum, John J. K.; Orland, Elijah D. M.; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán D.; Calvo, David; Amonte, Cecilia; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Subaerial volcanic activity on Tenerife (2034 km2), the largest island of the Canary archipelago, started 14 My ago and 4 volcanic eruptions have occurred in historical times during the last 300 years. The main volcano-structural and geomorphological features of Tenerife are (i) the central volcanic complex, nowadays formed by Las Cañadas caldera, a volcanic depression measuring 16×9 km that resulted from multiple vertical collapses and partially filled by post-caldera volcanic products and (ii) the triple junction-shaped rift system, formed by numerous aligned monogenetic cones. Up to 297 mafic monogenetic cones have been recognized on Tenerife, and they represent the most common eruptive activity occurring on the island during the last 1 My (Dóniz et al., 2008). The North-South Rift Zone (NSRZ) of Tenerife comprises at least 139 cones. The main structural characteristic of the NSRZ of the island is an apparent absence of a distinct ridge, and a fan shaped distribution of monogenetic cones. Since there are currently no visible gas emissions at the NSRZ, diffuse degassing surveys have become an important geochemical tool for the surveillance of this volcanic system. Five diffuse CO2 degassing surveys have been carried out at NSRZ of Tenerife since 2002, the last one in the summer period of 2016, to evaluate the spatio-temporal variations of CO2 degassing as a volcanic surveillance tool for the NSRZ of Tenerife. At each survey, around 600 sampling sites were selected to cover homogenously the study area (325 km2) using the accumulation chamber method. The diffuse CO2 output ranged from 78 to 707 t/d in the study period, with the highest emission rate measured in 2015. The backgroung emission rate was estimated in 300 t/d. The last results the soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 24.7 g m-2 d-1. The spatial distribution map, constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure, showed the highest CO2 values as multiple

  18. Short-term variations of diffuse CO2 emission from the summit crater of Teide volcano, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melián, Gladys V.; Ocampo, Stephany; Nisbet, Andrew; McKnight, Samara; Monzón, Tania; Asensio-Ramos, María; Alonso, Mar; Rodríguez, Fátima; García-Merino, Marta; Amonte, Cecilia; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Teide volcano in Tenerife, Canary Islands, is characterized by the presence of a weak fumarolic system, steamy ground, and high rates of diffuse CO2 degassing all around this area. The temperature of the fumaroles (83˚ C) corresponds to the boiling point of water at discharge conditions. Previous diffuse CO2 surveys have shown to be an important tool to detect early warnings of possible impending volcanic unrests at Tenerife Island (Melián et al., 2012; Pérez et al., 2013). During June, July and August 2016, twelve soil gas surveys were performed at the summit crater of Teide volcano in order to evaluate short-term variations of diffuse CO2 degassing pattern. Soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature were always measured at the same 38 observation sites homogeneously distributed within an area of about 6,972 m2 inside the summit crater. Soil CO2 diffuse effluxes were estimated according to the accumulation chamber method and using a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) LICOR-820 CO2analyzer. Soil CO2 efflux values presented a range from non-detectable (˜0.5 gṡm-2ṡd-1) to 10.8 kgṡm-2ṡd-1, with an average value of 2.7 kgṡm-2ṡd-1, while soil temperature ranged from 13.1 to 83.6˚ C with a mean value of 55.6˚ C. Sequential Gaussian simulations (sGs) were used for mapping and estimate the volcanic diffuse CO2 emission at each survey. The highest values of diffuse CO2 efflux were measured along the east (>8 kgṡm-2ṡd-1) and west (>5 kgṡm-2ṡd-1) sectors of the crater. Areas with highest diffuse CO2 effluxes were also characterized by a relatively high soil temperature (>60˚ C) and by an intense hydrothermal alteration. Weekly diffuse CO2 emission variations from the summit crater during the study period showed a range between 13.5 and 24.7 tṡd-1 with an average value of 18.9 tṡd-1. During these 3 months, the seismic activity rate was about 10 seismic events per month registered by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN; http://www.ign.es). We compared

  19. Evaluation of morphometry-based dating of monogenetic volcanoes—a case study from Bandas del Sur, Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan; Németh, Károly; Dóniz-Páez, F. Javier

    2013-07-01

    Morphometry-based dating provides a first-order estimate of the temporal evolution of monogenetic volcanic edifices located within an intraplate monogenetic volcanic field or on the flanks of a polygenetic volcano. Two widely used morphometric parameters, namely cone height/width ratio ( H max/ W co) and slope angle, were applied to extract chronological information and evaluate their accuracy for morphometry-based ordering. Based on these quantitative parameters extracted from contour-based Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), two event orders for the Bandas del Sur in Tenerife (Canary Islands) were constructed and compared with the existing K-Ar, paleomagnetic and stratigraphic data. The results obtained suggest that the commonly used H max/ W co ratio is not reliable, leading to inappropriate temporal order estimates, while the slope angle gives slightly better results. The overall performance of such descriptive parameters was, however, generally poor (i.e. there is no strong correlation between morphometry and age). The geomorphic/morphometric mismatches could be the result of (1) the diversity of syn-eruptive processes (i.e. diverse initial morphologies causing geomorphic/morphometric variability), (2) contrasting, edifice-specific degradation that depends partly upon the inner facies architecture of the volcanic edifices, (3) various external environmental controls (e.g. tephra mantling from pyroclastic density currents unrelated to the edifice evaluated) and (4) differences in the scale/resolution of input data. The observed degradation trend and changes in morphometric parameters over time do not support a simple degradation model for monogenetic scoria cones volcanoes.

  20. Are both sympatric species Ilex perado and Ilex canariensis secretly hybridizing? Indication from nuclear markers collected in Tenerife

    PubMed Central

    Manen, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    Background Intra-specific and intra-individual polymorphism is frequently observed in nuclear markers of Ilex (Aquifoliaceae) and discrepancy between plastid and nuclear phylogenies is the rule in this genus. These observations suggest that inter-specific plastid or/and nuclear introgression played an important role in the process of evolution of Ilex. With the aim of a precise understanding of the evolution of this genus, two distantly related sympatric species collected in Tenerife (Canary Islands), I. perado and I. canariensis, were studied in detail. Introgression between these two species was previously never reported. One plastid marker (the atpB-rbcL spacer) and two nuclear markers, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the nuclear encoded plastid glutamine synthetase (nepGS) were analyzed for 13 and 27 individuals of I. perado and I. canariensis, respectively. Results The plastid marker is intra-specifically constant and correlated with species identity. On the other hand, whereas the nuclear markers are conserved in I. perado, they are highly polymorphic in I. canariensis. The presence of pseudogenes and recombination in ITS sequences of I. canariensis explain this polymorphism. Ancestral sequence polymorphism with incomplete lineage sorting, or past or recent hybridization with an unknown species could explain this polymorphism, not resolved by concerted evolution. However, as already reported for many other plants, past or recent introgression of an alien genotype seem the most probable explanation for such a tremendous polymorphism. Conclusions Data do not allow the determination with certitude of the putative species introgressing I. canariensis, but I. perado is suspected. The introgression would be unilateral, with I. perado as the male donor, and the paternal sequences would be rapidly converted in highly divergent and consequently unidentifiable pseudogenes. At least, this study allows the establishment of precautionary measures when

  1. Are both sympatric species Ilex perado and Ilex canariensis secretly hybridizing? Indication from nuclear markers collected in Tenerife.

    PubMed

    Manen, Jean-François

    2004-11-18

    Intra-specific and intra-individual polymorphism is frequently observed in nuclear markers of Ilex (Aquifoliaceae) and discrepancy between plastid and nuclear phylogenies is the rule in this genus. These observations suggest that inter-specific plastid or/and nuclear introgression played an important role in the process of evolution of Ilex. With the aim of a precise understanding of the evolution of this genus, two distantly related sympatric species collected in Tenerife (Canary Islands), I. perado and I. canariensis, were studied in detail. Introgression between these two species was previously never reported. One plastid marker (the atpB-rbcL spacer) and two nuclear markers, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the nuclear encoded plastid glutamine synthetase (nepGS) were analyzed for 13 and 27 individuals of I. perado and I. canariensis, respectively. The plastid marker is intra-specifically constant and correlated with species identity. On the other hand, whereas the nuclear markers are conserved in I. perado, they are highly polymorphic in I. canariensis. The presence of pseudogenes and recombination in ITS sequences of I. canariensis explain this polymorphism. Ancestral sequence polymorphism with incomplete lineage sorting, or past or recent hybridization with an unknown species could explain this polymorphism, not resolved by concerted evolution. However, as already reported for many other plants, past or recent introgression of an alien genotype seem the most probable explanation for such a tremendous polymorphism. Data do not allow the determination with certitude of the putative species introgressing I. canariensis, but I. perado is suspected. The introgression would be unilateral, with I. perado as the male donor, and the paternal sequences would be rapidly converted in highly divergent and consequently unidentifiable pseudogenes. At least, this study allows the establishment of precautionary measures when nuclear markers are used in

  2. Prehispanic (Guanches) mummies and natrium salts in burial caves of Las Cañadas del Teide (Tenerife).

    PubMed

    Arnay-de-la-Rosa, Matilde; González-Reimers, Emilio; Pou-Hernández, Sergio; Marrero-Salas, Efraím; García-Avila, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    The prehispanic population of Tenerife (Guanches) buried their dead in caves. Many corpses are totally or partially mummified. Embalming procedures are largely unknown, besides some information recorded by chroniclers and the general idea that environmental conditions in some areas may favour natural mummification. Detailed observation of burial caves containing mummified corpses revealed the presence of a white mineral in form of crusts or powder that was not present in the vast majority of non-burial caves, especially in basaltic and trachybasaltic lava flows. We analysed these crusts and they consist of natrium carbonate salts. Therefore, we conducted a search visiting 30 caves, 3 of them harbouring mummified corpses, and made analyses if there were natrium salts in these caves and their amount. One burial cave was located in trachyphonolitic lava flow, and two further caves in trachybasaltic and basaltic lava flows. There was a significant association between presence of natrium salts and use of the cave as a burial site (χ(2) = 9.37; p = 0.0259). The semiquantitatively assessed amount of natrium salts was also by far higher in burial caves than in non-burial ones (Z = 2.58, p = 0.01). There are no reports that support the use of natrium salts in the embalming process among the Guanches, but we found a clear-cut relationship between the presence and/or amount of natrium salts in caves and their use as burial sites by the prehispanic population buried in the central highlands, suggesting an intentional use of caves containing this mineral as burial caves, based perhaps on the observation of the ability of natrium salts to preserve corpses.

  3. The 5,660 yBP Boquerón explosive eruption, Teide-Pico Viejo complex, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Olaya; Bonadonna, Costanza; Martí, Joan; Pioli, Laura

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative hazard assessments of active volcanoes require an accurate knowledge of the past eruptive activity in terms of eruption dynamics and the stratified products of eruption. Teide-Pico Viejo (TPV) is one of the largest volcanic complexes in Europe, but the associated eruptive history has only been constrained based on very general stratigraphic and geochronological data. In particular, recent studies have shown that explosive activity has been significantly more frequently common than previously thought. Our study contributes to characterization of explosive activity of TPV by describing for the first time the subplinian eruption of El Boquerón (5,660 yBP), a satellite dome located on the northern slope of the Pico Viejo stratovolcano. Stratigraphic data suggest complex shifting from effusive phases with lava flows to highly explosive phase that generated a relatively thick and widespread pumice fallout deposit. This explosive phase is classified as a subplinian eruption of VEI 3 that lasted for about 9-15 h and produced a plume with a height of up to 9 km above sea level (i.e. 7 km above the vent; MER of 6.9-8.2 × 105 kg/s). The tephra deposit (minimum bulk volume of 4-6 × 107 m3) was dispersed to the NE by up to 10 m/s winds. A similar eruption today would significantly impact the economy of Tenerife (e.g. tourism and aviation), with major consequences mainly for the communities around the Icod Valley, and to a minor extent, the Orotava Valley. This vulnerability shows that a better knowledge of the past explosive history of TPV and an accurate estimate of future potentials to generate violent eruptions is required in order to quantify and mitigate the associated volcanic risk.

  4. Geochemical and geophysical approach to the Tenerife (Canary Islands) anomalous seismic swarm on the 2nd October 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo-Oroz, Natividad; Torres-González, Pedro; Domíguez Cerdeña, Itahiza; Moure, David; Villasante-Marcos, Víctor; Jiménez-Mejías, María; del Fresno, Carmen; García-Cañada, Laura

    2017-04-01

    On the 2nd October 2016, anomalous seismic activity took place in the volcanic island of Tenerife. During 5 hours, 96 low magnitude earthquakes (<1mbLg) were located in the SW zone of the island with an average depth of 10 km, close to the area where a seismic crisis took place in 2004. Seismic analysis of the swarm reveals more than 800 events manually detected showing a high correlation between their waveforms. Relocation by double differences shows all hypocenters situated in a small cluster with a radius of a few hundred meters. Magnitudes ranged between 0 and 0.9 but the time evolution shows a variation in narrow bands of ±0.2 magnitudes. In order to better understand the origin and main causes of such anomalous behavior in the volcanic island, data obtained from different volcano monitoring techniques were analyzed. GPS deformation data did not show anomalous changes related to the studied phenomena. In the aim of this interdisciplinary interpretation, available geochemical data from the IGN volcano monitoring network were also revised. Values of several geochemical parameters previous to the seismic swarm have been studied. Chemical and isotopic analysis from fumaroles and soil gases, groundwater physicochemical parameters, CO2 diffuse emissions from the soil, Rn and CO2 concentrations inside a gallery and soil temperature in the summit of Teide volcano did not revealed significant geochemical changes clearly related to the seismic activity on the 2thOctober 2016. However, this conclusion could be reconsidered in the future since upcoming events may show new insights into past circumstances.

  5. Pavlov in Spain.

    PubMed

    Bandrés, Javier; Llavona, Rafael

    2003-11-01

    Reflexology has been present throughout Spanish science since the last third of the nineteenth century and its importance can be seen in the works of authors such as Martín Salazar, Ramón y Cajal, Gómez Ocaña, Simarro and Turró. The most important research in Reflexology in Spain takes place a) at the Schools of Neurophysiology and Psychology in Barcelona and Madrid, b) with a group of authors specializing in pathological medicine and c) in the Military's Health Department, Pavlov's work was received in Spain with special interest. Fernández-España, who could be considered the "first Spanish Pavlovian," emphasized Pavlov's work in a series dedicated to the study of objective psychology which was published between 1914 and 1924. Planelles was the first investigator to develop a program in pavlovian experimentation, presenting his results in 1935. The Civil War (1936-1939) ended these and many other Spanish projects in psychology. After the war, interest in Reflexology and Pavlov's theories slowly rose again, first through psychosomatic medicine and then in the 60's because of the works of such authors as Monserrat-Esteve, Rof Carballo and Colodrón. The progressive inclusion of psychology in the Schools of Philosophy and Arts after 1968 marked the beginning of a new era.

  6. 78 FR 35951 - Proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the City of Santa Cruz Graham Hill Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Graham Hill Water Treatment Plant, Santa Cruz County, California AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... existing Graham Hill Water Treatment Plant, construction of new facilities, which have the potential for... system, the applicant operates the Graham Hill Water Treatment Plant. The Graham Hill Water...

  7. Implementation of a thinning and burning study in tanoak-redwood stands in Santa Cruz and Mendocino counties

    Treesearch

    Kevin L. O?Hara; Kristen M. Waring

    2008-01-01

    Three silvicultural treatment study sites are being established to examine the effects of thinning and prescribed burning on infection and spread of Phytophthora ramorum. Study sites are located in Mendocino and Santa Cruz counties, California. Stands are even-aged redwood/tanoak mixtures.

  8. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Santa Cruz County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, Rex L.; Schuster, Robert L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $14.5 million in damages were assessed in Santa Cruz County.

  9. List of the type-specimens of Reduviidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) in the Triatomines Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Juliana Mourão Dos Santos; Moreira, Felipe Ferraz Figueiredo; Cordeiro, Isabelle Da Rocha Silva; De Almeida, Magaly Dolsan; Jurberg, José

    2015-03-19

    The Triatomines Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute (CTIOC) holds 90 holotypes, seven syntypes, and 619 paratypes of the family Reduviidae, distributed in 44 genera and nine subfamilies: Chryxinae, Emesinae, Hammacerinae, Harpactorinae, Peiratinae, Reduviinae, Stenopodainae, Triatominae, and Vesciinae. A detailed list containing nomenclatural, taxonomic, and locality information about all these types is herein presented for the first time.

  10. High-resolution topographic, bathymetric, and oceanographic data for the Pleasure Point Area, Santa Cruz County, California: 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Collins, Brian D.; Finlayson, David P.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hatcher, Gerry A.; Kayen, Robert E.; Ruggiero, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The County of Santa Cruz Department of Public Works and the County of Santa Cruz Redevelopment Agency requested the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Coastal and Marine Geology Team (WCMG) to provide baseline geologic and oceanographic information on the coast and inner shelf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. The rationale for this proposed work is a need to better understand the environmental consequences of a proposed bluff stabilization project on the beach, the nearshore and the surf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. To meet these information needs, the USGS-WCMG Team collected baseline scientific information on the morphology and waves at Pleasure Point. This study provided high-resolution topography of the coastal bluffs and bathymetry of the inner shelf off East Cliff Drive between 32nd Avenue and 41st Avenue. The spatial and temporal variation in waves and their breaking patterns at the study site were documented. Although this project did not actively investigate the impacts of the proposed bluff stabilization project, these data provide the baseline information required for future studies directed toward predicting the impacts of stabilization on the sea cliffs, beach and nearshore sediment profiles, natural rock reef structures, and offshore habitats and resources. They also provide a basis for calculating potential changes to wave transformations into the shore at Pleasure Point.

  11. Fire History in Coast Redwood Stands in San Mateo County Parks and Jasper Ridge, Santa Cruz Mountains

    Treesearch

    Scott L. Stephens; Danny L. Fry

    2007-01-01

    Fire regimes in coast redwood forests in the northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains were determined by ring counts from 46 coast redwood stumps and live trees. The earliest recorded fire from two live samples was in 1615 and the last fire recorded was in 1884, although samples were not crossdated. For all sites combined, the mean fire return interval (FRI) was 12.0 years;...

  12. The Border Environmental Health Initiative: Investigation of the Transboundary Santa Cruz Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, L. M.; Callegary, J. B.; van Riper, C.; Gray, F.; Paretti, N.; Villarreal, M.

    2009-12-01

    In the borderland region of the desert southwest, human health and the ecosystems upon which humans rely largely depend on the quality, quantity, and distribution of water resources. In the Santa Cruz River Watershed (SCW), located in the Arizona and Sonora, Mexico border region, surface water is scarce and unreliable, and, during much of the year, is composed of effluent from the local wastewater treatment plant. This makes groundwater the preferred and, consequently, primary source for industrial, agricultural, and domestic use. USGS scientists are using an integrative approach, incorporating the expertise of the Geography, Water, Biology, and Geology disciplines to identify risks to water resources in the SCW, and the potential for impacts to riparian ecosystems and ultimately, human health. This includes tracking organic and inorganic contaminants and their effects from sources to sinks in sediment, water, plants, and animals. Existing ground- and surface-water models will be used and modified to assess contaminant and sediment transport. Water quality, sediment, aquatic macro invertebrates, aquatic plants (macrophytes), algae, riparian grasses, fish, and birds will be sampled at five locations along the Santa Cruz River. Field sampling data will be obtained at sites that coincide with historical sampling programs. Site locations include (i.) the Santa Cruz River headwaters (which should be unaffected by downstream contaminant sources), (ii.) a tributary routed through an abandoned mining district, (iii.) a binational tributary that flows though highly urbanized areas, (iv.) effluent from the local wastewater treatment plant, and (v.) the downstream confluence of the first four sources. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model will be used in combination with field data to identify key sources of contaminants, contributing areas, and transport modes to track their movement to surface waters. These data will be used together to test relationships between

  13. Blaming Machismo: How the Social Imaginary is Failing Men with HIV in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Heckert, Carina

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from an ethnography of HIV care in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, in this article I explore how the social imaginary surrounding gender relations shapes men's experiences of seeking care for and living with HIV. Popular understandings of gender relations, which draw heavily on the machismo concept, intersect with a global health master narrative that frames women as victims in the AIDS epidemic in a way that generates a strong sentiment of blaming machismo within local HIV/AIDS-related services. Statements such as, "it's because of machismo" are used to explain away epidemiological trends. Participant observation in the context of HIV care, coupled with illness narrative interviews, illuminate how blaming machismo shapes men's experiences of care and the ways that they feel excluded from various forms of support. Thus, the illness experiences of men with HIV problematize the machismo concept and how it is drawn upon in the context of care.

  14. Lamniform Shark Teeth from the Late Cretaceous of Southernmost South America (Santa Cruz Province, Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Elena R.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Ibiricu, Lucio M.; Lacovara, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report multiple lamniform shark teeth recovered from fluvial sediments in the (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Cerro Fortaleza Formation, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. This small tooth assemblage is compared to various lamniform sharks possessing similar dental morphologies, including Archaeolamna, Cretalamna, Dwardius, Dallasiella, and Cretodus. Although the teeth share numerous morphological features with the genus Archaeolamna, including a developed neck that maintains a relatively consistent width along the base of the crown, the small sample size and incomplete nature of these specimens precludes definitive taxonomic assignment. Regardless, the discovery of selachian teeth unique from those previously described for the region broadens the known diversity of Late Cretaceous South American sharks. Additionally, the discovery of the teeth in fluvial sandstone may indicate a euryhaline paleobiology in the lamniform taxon or taxa represented by this tooth assemblage. PMID:25141301

  15. Free-living marine nematodes from San Julián Bay (Santa Cruz, Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Pastor de Ward, Catalina; Lo Russo, Virginia; Villares, Gabriela; Milano, Viviana; Miyashiro, Lidia; Mazzanti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The free-living marine nematodes of San Julián Bay dataset is based on sediment samples collected in January 2009 during the project PICT AGENCIA-FONCYT 2/33345-2005. A total of 36 samples have been taken at three locations in the San Julián Bay, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina on the coastal littoral at three tidal levels. This presents a unique and important collection for the nematode benthic biodiversity assessment as this area remains one of the least known regions in Patagonia. In total 10,030 specimens of free-living marine nematodes belonging to 2 classes, 9 orders, 35 families, 78 genera and 125 species were collected. The San Julián city site presented a very high species richness. PMID:25878534

  16. Assessment of benthic changes during 20 years of monitoring the Mexican Salina Cruz Bay.

    PubMed

    González-Macías, C; Schifter, I; Lluch-Cota, D B; Méndez-Rodríguez, L; Hernández-Vázquez, S

    2009-02-01

    In this work a non-parametric multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of metals and organic compounds in the macro infaunal component of the mollusks benthic community using surface sediment data from several monitoring programs collected over 20 years in Salina Cruz Bay, Mexico. The data for benthic mollusks community characteristics (richness, abundance and diversity) were linked to multivariate environmental patterns, using the Alternating Conditional Expectations method to correlate the biological measurements of the mollusk community with the physicochemical properties of water and sediments. Mollusks community variation is related to environmental characteristics as well as lead content. Surface deposit feeders are increasing their relative density, while subsurface deposit feeders are decreasing with respect to time, these last are expected to be more related with sediment and more affected then by its quality. However gastropods with predatory carnivore as well as chemosymbiotic deposit feeder bivalves have maintained their relative densities along time.

  17. Bacterial community profiles before, during, and after Pseudo-nitzschia bloom events in Santa Cruz, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehic, S.; Sison-Mangus, M. P.; Jiang, S.; Kudela, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Pseudo-nitzschia blooms are known to occur in coastal environments, sometimes leading to the production of the neurotoxin domoic acid. Various environmental factors (nutrients, temperature, pH, UV radiation etc.) have been implicated in the promotion and demise of these blooms but it is currently unknown if bacteria also plays a role in this ecological phenomenon. Studies suggest that bacteria have a profound effect on Pseudo-nitzschia physiology and toxin production, which influences its dominance in coastal environment. Here, we investigate the microbial assemblages before, during and after toxic and nontoxic Pseudo-nitzschia blooms to determine the patterns of bacterial succession in these events. Bacterial community profiles were determined weekly at the Santa Cruz Wharf using next generation sequencing and analyzed together with domoic acid levels, nutrients, temperature and phytoplankton structure. Bacterial structures and environmental trends will be correlated with the bloom events and will be subsequently discussed.

  18. Analysis of Pollution Potential of the Upper San Pedro and Upper Santa Cruz Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincicome, A. D.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Transboundary aquifers along the U.S.-Mexico border are subject to unique demands and constraints, and are a focus of priority assessment under the auspices of the Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Program. The Upper Santa Cruz and Upper San Pedro basins in southern Arizona are experiencing rapid population growth and development, and the associated water and environmental resource demands are stressors to water resource sustainability. A groundwater vulnerability assessment was performed to evaluate groundwater resources within these two basins using DRASTIC (Depth to water, net Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media, Topography, Impact of vadose zone media, and hydraulic Conductivity of the aquifer). DRASTIC analysis is a standardized method developed by the Environmental Protection Agency for evaluating groundwater pollution potential. DRASTIC was used to characterize the potential for contamination of groundwater by land surface sources. Data layers for the DRASTIC analysis were compiled and analyzed separately based on rating methods from DRASTIC. These methods rate each layer on a scale of one to ten, one being the least vulnerable to contamination and ten being the most vulnerable. Weights for each layer were also provided by DRASTIC based on each layer's contribution to the overall vulnerability of the aquifer. These layers were then analyzed using the equation: DRDW+RRRW+ARAw+SRSW+TRTW+IRIW+CRCW = Pollution Potential, where R = rating, and W = weight. This assessment was coupled with current knowledge of groundwater contamination and current land use practices to identify zones of potential concern. This information can be used to better direct city planning, zoning programs, and groundwater monitoring and remediation efforts throughout the Upper Santa Cruz and Upper San Pedro basins.

  19. Reconnaissance of alluvial fans as potential sources of gravel aggregate, Santa Cruz River valley, Southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Melick, Roger

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to provide information on the aggregate potential of alluvial fan sediments in the Santa Cruz River valley. Pebble lithology, roundness, and particle size were determined in the field, and structures and textures of alluvial fan sediments were photographed and described. Additional measurements of particle size on digital photographs were made on a computer screen. Digital elevation models were acquired and compiled for viewing the areal extent of selected fans. Alluvial fan gravel in the Santa Cruz River valley reflects the lithology of its source. Gravel derived from granitic and gneissic terrane of the Tortolita, Santa Catalina, and Rincon Mountains weathers to grus and is generally inferior for use as aggregate. Gravel derived from the Tucson, Sierrita, and Tumacacori Mountains is composed mostly of angular particles of volcanic rock, much of it felsic in composition. This angular volcanic gravel should be suitable for use in asphalt but may require treatment for alkali-silica reaction prior to use in concrete. Gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains is of mixed plutonic (mostly granitic rocks), volcanic (mostly felsic rocks), and sedimentary (sandstone and carbonate rock) composition. The sedimentary component tends to make gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains slightly more rounded than other fan gravel. The coarsest (pebble, cobble, and boulder) gravel is found near the heads (proximal part) of alluvial fans. At the foot (distal part) of alluvial fans, most gravel is pebble-sized and interbedded with sand and silt. Some of the coarsest gravel was observed near the head of the Madera Canyon, Montosa Canyon, and Esperanza Wash fans. The large Cienega Creek fan, located immediately south and southeast of Tucson, consists entirely of distal-fan pebble gravel, sand, and silt.

  20. Climatic variability and flood frequency of the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Robert H.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    1992-01-01

    Past estimates of the 100-year flood for the Santa Cruz River at Tucson, Arizona, range from 572 to 2,780 cubic meters per second. An apparent increase in flood magnitude during the past two decades raises concern that the annual flood series is nonstationary in time. The apparent increase is accompanied by more annual floods occurring in fall and winter and fewer in summer. This greater mixture of storm types that produce annual flood peaks is caused by a higher frequency of meridional flow in the upper-air circulation and increased variance of ocean-atmosphere conditions in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Estimation of flood frequency on the Santa Cruz River is complicated because climate affects the magnitude and frequency of storms that cause floods. Mean discharge does not change significantly, but the variance and skew coefficient of the distribution of annual floods change with time. The 100-year flood during El Niffo-Southern Oscillation conditions is 1,300 cubic meters per second, more than double the value for other years. The increase is mostly caused by an increase in recurvature of dissipating tropical cyclones into the Southwestern United States during El Niffo-Southern Oscillation conditions. Flood frequency based on hydroclimatology was determined by combining populations of floods caused by monsoonal storms, frontal systems, and dissipating tropical cyclones. For 1930-59, annual flood frequency is dominated by monsoonal floods, and the estimated 100-year flood is 323 cubic meters per second. For 1960-86, annual flood frequency at recurrence intervals of greater than 10 years is dominated by floods caused by dissipating tropical cyclones, and the estimated 100-year flood is 1,660 cubic meters per second. For design purposes, 1,660 cubic meters per second might be an appropriate value for the 100-year flood at Tucson, assuming that climatic conditions during 1960-86 are representative of conditions expected in the immediate future.

  1. Geochemistry of oil from Santa Cruz basin, Bolivia: case study of migration-fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Illich, H.A.; Haney, F.R.; Mendoza, M.

    1981-11-01

    Geochemical studies provide important data relevant to the origin of the oils in the Santa Cruz basin, Bolivia. Production from this basin occurs from rocks of Devonian, Carboniferous, Cretaceous, and Tertiary ages. The productive structures are usually undisturbed by major faulting. The Devonian sediments are composed of sandstones and dark marine shales. The post-Devonian rocks are generally oxidized and probably nonmarine. The Tertiary and Cretaceous reservoirs usually contain the highest API/sup 0/ gravity oils. Comparison of geochemical data (N/sub 5/-N/sub 10/ molecular weight range) shows that the oils are very similar; however, systematic compositional trends occur as a function of API/sup 0/ gravity. These trends are interpreted from gross structural group data. Isoparaffins and cycloparaffins increase in relative abundance, while normal paraffins and aromatics decrease with increasing API/sup 0/ gravity. A model is proposed that rationalizes these compositional trends by a mechanism of accommodation in water. The model requires enrichment of hydrocarbons of intermediate solubility, partial exclusion of hydrocarbons of low solubility, and retention in solution of the more soluble hydrocarbons. Processes such as thermal fractionation and biodegradation fail to account satisfactorily for the observed compositional trends. The compositional interrelationships of the oils coupled with the geologic framework suggest that these oils have a common source, most probably the Devonian. Differences between the oils are attributed to fractionation occurring during migration. Exploration risk for areas such as the Santa Cruz basin can be substantially reduced by use of the knowledge derived from petroleum geochemistry.

  2. Evaluation of toxicity of polluted marine sediments from Bahia Salina Cruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Lozano, Maria Cristina; Mendez-Rodriguez, Lia C; Maeda-Martinez, Alejandro M; Murugan, Gopal; Vazquez-Botello, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Bahia Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, Mexico is a major center of oil and refined product distribution on the Mexican Pacific coast. From the start of oil industry operations in 1979, negative effects from discharges of treated effluents in the bay have been a constant concern for local communities. We analyzed 28 surface sediment samples obtained in June, 2002 to evaluate the level of toxicity in the littoral zone, port-harbor, and La Ventosa estuary in Bahia Salina Cruz. The extractable organic matter concentration was high (1,213 to 7,505 micro g g(-1)) in 5 of 7 stations from the port and harbor, whereas it was low in 12 of 16 stations in the littoral zone (36 to 98 micro g g(-1)). The total aromatic hydrocarbon concentration was highest (57 to 142 micro g g(-1)) in the port and harbor compared to the La Ventosa estuary and the littoral zone. Among the heavy metals analyzed, cadmium exceeded the effects range-low values associated with adverse biological effects. The geo-accumulation index of sediments was moderate to strong contamination at 5 stations in the nonlittoral and 6 stations in the littoral zone. The enrichment of lead, zinc, and cadmium at 5 stations from the littoral, port, and harbor suggest that these metals are of anthropogenic origin. Bioassay tests of elutriates of sediments on nauplii of Artemia franciscana and Artemia sp. showed that the port and harbor were more toxic than the La Ventosa estuary and the coastal zone. The Microtox test (Vibrio fischeri) did not show a similar response with the solid phase of the sediments. The results of this study indicate that the high levels of organic content and metals in the sediments of port-harbor and the La Ventosa estuary are mainly caused by anthropogenic activities.

  3. Reconnaissance of alluvial fans as potential sources of gravel aggregate, Santa Cruz River valley, Southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Melick, Roger

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to provide information on the aggregate potential of alluvial fan sediments in the Santa Cruz River valley. Pebble lithology, roundness, and particle size were determined in the field, and structures and textures of alluvial fan sediments were photographed and described. Additional measurements of particle size on digital photographs were made on a computer screen. Digital elevation models were acquired and compiled for viewing the areal extent of selected fans. Alluvial fan gravel in the Santa Cruz River valley reflects the lithology of its source. Gravel derived from granitic and gneissic terrane of the Tortolita, Santa Catalina, and Rincon Mountains weathers to grus and is generally inferior for use as aggregate. Gravel derived from the Tucson, Sierrita, and Tumacacori Mountains is composed mostly of angular particles of volcanic rock, much of it felsic in composition. This angular volcanic gravel should be suitable for use in asphalt but may require treatment for alkali-silica reaction prior to use in concrete. Gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains is of mixed plutonic (mostly granitic rocks), volcanic (mostly felsic rocks), and sedimentary (sandstone and carbonate rock) composition. The sedimentary component tends to make gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains slightly more rounded than other fan gravel. The coarsest (pebble, cobble, and boulder) gravel is found near the heads (proximal part) of alluvial fans. At the foot (distal part) of alluvial fans, most gravel is pebble-sized and interbedded with sand and silt. Some of the coarsest gravel was observed near the head of the Madera Canyon, Montosa Canyon, and Esperanza Wash fans. The large Cienega Creek fan, located immediately south and southeast of Tucson, consists entirely of distal-fan pebble gravel, sand, and silt.

  4. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seabright Beach, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented sea cliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the sea cliffs where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence. This is the third map in a series of maps prepared to document the processes of short-term sea cliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot. This map presents sea cliff failure and retreat data from the Seabright Beach section, California, which is located on the east side of Santa Cruz along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of sea cliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the sea cliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. During this study we developed a method for investigating short-term processes of sea cliff evolution using rectified photographic stereo models. This method allows us to document the linear extent of cliff failures, the spatial and temporal relationship between failures, and

  5. Dual diagnosis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gual, Antoni

    2007-01-01

    Our aim is to describe the current situation regarding the diagnosis and treatment of addiction in a variety of settings in Spain. Four-hundred and twenty-seven physicians known to treat addicted patients in non-private settings were recruited and agreed to participate. Each physician provided clinical and anonymous information on the first 6 consecutive patients who attended on a scheduled day. A total of 2361 patients were interviewed (92.1%) and data were obtained concerning gender, age, work, educational level, civil status, addiction diagnosis, type of treatment and psychiatric comorbidity. Seven-hundred and ninety-eight out of 2361 addicts (33.8%) presented with a dual diagnosis. Depression was the most prevalent disorder (21.6%), followed by anxiety disorders (11.7%). Comorbidity was found to be related to age, female gender, divorce and widowhood, and higher educational levels. Alcoholics who abused other drugs showed the highest rates of comorbidity (48.5%), while opiate addicts were at the lower end of the spectrum (27.4%). No differences were found related to the treatment setting, the doctor's medical specialty, or the geographical area. Finally, doctors tended to perceive that dual diagnosis was related to a worse psychiatric prognosis but not to higher relapse rates. Antidepressants were the most commonly prescribed drugs (62.4% of co-morbid patients) and anticraving agents were prescribed equally to comorbid and non-comorbid patients. Within the limitations of a descriptive study, our data show that comorbidity is a common clinical problem in patients who access addiction treatment. Affective and anxiety disorders are the most common comorbid diseases, and comorbidity rates seem to be unrelated to regional differences, medical settings or doctor's professional background. Dual diagnosis patients thus account for one third of the clinical workload of addiction specialists in Spain.

  6. A direct approach to estimating the number of potential fatalities from an eruption: Application to the Central Volcanic Complex of Tenerife Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, J. M.; García, A.; Llinares, A.; Rodriguez-Losada, J. A.; Ortiz, R.

    2012-03-01

    One of the critical issues in managing volcanic crises is making the decision to evacuate a densely-populated region. In order to take a decision of such importance it is essential to estimate the cost in lives for each of the expected eruptive scenarios. One of the tools that assist in estimating the number of potential fatalities for such decision-making is the calculation of the FN-curves. In this case the FN-curve is a graphical representation that relates the frequency of the different hazards to be expected for a particular volcano or volcanic area, and the number of potential fatalities expected for each event if the zone of impact is not evacuated. In this study we propose a method for assessing the impact that a possible eruption from the Tenerife Central Volcanic Complex (CVC) would have on the population at risk. Factors taken into account include the spatial probability of the eruptive scenarios (susceptibility) and the temporal probability of the magnitudes of the eruptive scenarios. For each point or cell of the susceptibility map with greater probability, a series of probability-scaled hazard maps is constructed for the whole range of magnitudes expected. The number of potential fatalities is obtained from the intersection of the hazard maps with the spatial map of population distribution. The results show that the Emergency Plan for Tenerife must provide for the evacuation of more than 100,000 persons.

  7. Human Gongylonema infection in Spain.

    PubMed

    Illescas-Gómez, M P; Rodriguez Osorio, M; Gómez Garcia, V; Gómez Morales, M A

    1988-03-01

    A case of gongylonemiasis in a 31-year-old woman of Granada, Spain, is reported. The worm, clearly belonging to Gongylonema genus, could not be identified definitively as Gongylonema pulchrum, the species usually described in humans.

  8. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - I: model and the case of Tenerife Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Ibáñez, Jesús M.

    2013-12-01

    The complex volcanic system of Tenerife Island is known to have a highly heterogeneous character, as recently confirmed by velocity tomography. We present new information derived from intrinsic quality factor inverse maps (Qi-1), scattering quality factor inverse maps (Qs-1) and total quality factor inverse maps (Qt-1) obtained for the same region. The data set used in this work is the result of the analysis of an active seismic experiment carried out, using offshore shots (air guns) recorded at over 85 onshore seismic stations. The estimates of the attenuation parameters are based on the assumption that the seismogram energy envelopes are determined by seismic energy diffusion processes occurring inside the island. Diffusion model parameters, proportional to Qi-1 and to Qs-1, are estimated from the inversion of the energy envelopes for any source-receiver couple. They are then weighted with a new graphical approach based on a Gaussian space probability function, which allowed us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' representing the space distribution of the attenuation parameters. The 2-D images obtained reveal the existence of a zone in the centre of the island characterized by the lowest attenuation effects. This effect is interpreted as highly rigid and cooled rocks. This low-attenuation region is bordered by zones of high attenuation, associated with the recent historical volcanic activity. We calculate the transport mean free path obtaining a value of around 4 km for the frequency range 6-12 Hz. This result is two orders of magnitude smaller than values calculated for the crust of the Earth. An absorption length between 10 and 14 km is associated with the average intrinsic attenuation parameter. These values, while small in the context of tectonic regions, are greater than those obtained in volcanic regions such as Vesuvius or Merapi. Such differences may be explained by the magnitude of the region of study, over three times larger than the aforementioned study

  9. [Allergenic pollens in Spain].

    PubMed

    Subiza Garrido-Lestache, J

    2004-01-01

    Allergenic pollens that cause rhinoconjuctivitis and/or asthma are those from trees or plants that pollinate through the air (anemophilic pollination) and not through insects (entomophilic pollination). Although pollen grains would seem to be too large to easily reach the intrapulmonary airways, the relationship between pollen counts and the presence of asthmatic symptoms is only too evident. This is probably because the allergens inducing seasonal asthma are not only found within pollen grains but also outside the grains in particles of less than 10 mm that are freely found in the atmosphere. The most important pollens producing pollinosis in Spain are those from cypress trees from January-March, birch trees in April (macizo galaico), Platanus hispanica (March-April), grasses and olive trees from April-June, Parietaria from April-July and Chenopodium and/or Salsola from July-September. By geographical areas, the main cause of pollinosis are grasses in the center and north of the peninsula, olive trees in the south (Jaén, Sevilla, Granada, Córdoba) and Parietaria in the Mediterranean coast (Barcelona, Murcia, Valencia).

  10. Biogerontology research in Spain.

    PubMed

    Solana, Rafael

    2003-08-01

    The article describes the features of biogerontology research in Spain and outlines the research in the biology of ageing, covering a wide spectrum of areas and topics. Research in biogerontology has expanded notably in quality and quantity in the last decades with the development of internationally recognized research groups actively working in the analysis of the complex process of ageing. In the last few years research in ageing has become a priority area in the National Program of Research which has substantially increased funds specifically allocated to biogerontology and biological research on senescence. Despite these improvements, special efforts have to be made not only to consolidate the existing groups but also to facilitate the initiation and development of new research groups in Universities, Hospitals and research institutions with capacity to incorporate trained researchers in this area. It would promote the continuous incorporation of technical and scientific advances in other disciplines to the understanding the biology of ageing and the molecular basis of cellular senescence, that will benefit actual and future ageing population.

  11. Large-scale mapping of landslides in the epicentral area Loma Prieta earthquake of October 17, 1989, Santa Cruz County

    SciTech Connect

    Spittler, T.E.; Sydnor, R.H.; Manson, M.W.; Levine, P.; McKittrick, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Loma Prieta earthquake of October 17, 1989 triggered landslides throughout the Santa Cruz Mountains in central California. The California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) responded to a request for assistance from the County of Santa Cruz, Office of Emergency Services to evaluate the geologic hazard from major reactivated large landslides. DMG prepared a set of geologic maps showing the landslide features that resulted from the October 17 earthquake. The principal purpose of large-scale mapping of these landslides is: (1) to provide county officials with regional landslide information that can be used for timely recovery of damaged areas; (2) to identify disturbed ground which is potentially vulnerable to landslide movement during winter rains; (3) to provide county planning officials with timely geologic information that will be used for effective land-use decisions; (4) to document regional landslide features that may not otherwise be available for individual site reconstruction permits and for future development.

  12. Challenges and Perspectives for Tertiary Level Hospitals in Bolivia: The case of Santa Cruz de La Sierra Department.

    PubMed

    Medici, André

    2015-01-01

    Current legislation transferred public tertiary hospitals in Bolivia from the Municipalities to the Regional Level. However, the Regional Governments are experiencing technical and financial constraints to reform infrastructure, modernize equipment and introduce reforms to allow better governance, management and sustainability of these hospitals. This articles summarizes the recent experience of the Government of Santa Cruz de la Sierra in Bolivia where five tertiary hospitals and blood bank (most of them in precarious working conditions) has been transferred in 2012 from the Municipal Government of Santa Cruz (the capital) to the Regional Government of Santa Cruz. To face the challenges, the Regional Government of Santa Cruz implement several improvements, such as contract new clinical and administrative personal, increases hospital budgetary autonomy, outsource hospitals' auxiliary services, take measures to eliminate waiting lists and make several new investments to modernize and equip the hospitals. The World Bank was contracted to evaluated the future financial sustainability of these investments and to advice the Government to propose changes to increase the hospitals' management performance. The article describes the remaining challenges in these hospitals and the proposals from the World Bank Study. In the area of quality of care, the main challenge is to improve client satisfaction and continuous outcomes monitoring and evaluation according quality standards. In the area of financing, the challenge is how to assure the sustainability of these hospitals with the current level of health financing and the insufficient financial transfers from the National Government. In the area of Governance, reforms to streamline and simplify internal processes need to be introduced in order to establish mechanisms to increase transparency and accountability, allowing the hospital to have a good administration and adequate participation of the main actors in the guidance of

  13. Geologic map of the Rio Rico and Nogales 7.5’ quadrangles, Santa Cruz County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Menges, Christopher M.; Gray, Floyd; Berry, Margaret E.; Bultman, Mark W.; Cosca, Michael A.; VanSistine, D. Paco

    2016-04-15

    The objectives of our mapping were to define the geologic framework for the Nogales area and the upper Santa Cruz basin to support ongoing multidisciplinary projects. This new work will improve understanding of the Nogales Formation to more fully assess its groundwater resource potential. We significantly revised the Miocene Nogales Formation based on geologic mapping combined with new geochronologic, geophysical, and petrographic studies. 

  14. Scientific collections, tropical medicine and the development of entomology in Brazil: the contribution of Instituto Oswaldo Cruz.

    PubMed

    Sá, M Romero

    2008-12-01

    The entomological collection of the Institute Oswaldo Cruz is one of the most representative of neotropical insects, comprising a diverse variety of specimens of distinct taxonomic groups, including those not linked to research in tropical medicine. The present work retraces the history of the collection and reports on its main actors and their professional relationships, emphasizing the peculiarity of such an important collection still being housed in a medical research institution.

  15. A remarkable seismo-volcanic swarm at Teide volcano (Tenerife, Canary Islands): insight into a transient in the volcano degassing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, Luca; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán D.; Asensio-Ramos, María; García-Hernández, Rubén; Hernández, Pedro A.; Padrón, Eleazar

    2017-04-01

    On 02/10/2016, various seismic stations deployed in Tenerife (Canary Islands) recorded an intense swarm of small-amplitude long-period events. Weak long-period events and tremor were recorded also during an unrest in 2004. The Oct. 2016 swarm, however, is unique because of its remarkable seismological features. The sequence, lasting for about 6 hours, consisted of more than 400 events and toward the end of the sequence, events merged into a continuous tremor whose amplitude progressively vanished after 30 minutes. We analysed waveforms from two broadband stations, located within 15 km from the crater of Mt. Teide (the most promiment volcano of the island) and seismic phase pickings from 3 more stations. Event waveforms show a remarkable similarity, hinting for a common source for all the events. Probabilistic locations show that the source is located few km south of the Mt. Teide crater. Even if the hypocentral depth is affected by a significant uncertainty, events do not seem to be located within the shallow hydrothermal system of the volcano. The complex spectral analysis of the waveforms shows distinct spectral components which are compatible with the resonance of a fracture filled with a mixture of H2O-CO2 in supercritical conditions. The temporal pattern of amplitudes and inter-event times can be intepreted using a chocked-flow model. The progressive opening of the fracture and the subsequent decay of the differential pressure explains the progressive emergence of events and the merging into a continuous, waning tremor, in the final part of the episode. We intepret this sequence as a transient fluid discharge episode occurring in the deep hydrothermal system of the Tenerife volcanic system. This working hypothesis is discussed in a more general framework involving continuous GPS data, which shows no significant deformation and various geochemical parameters which, conversely, have shown important anomalies before and after the swarm. Furthermore this episode

  16. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  17. The Border Environmental Health Initiative-investigating the transboundary Santa Cruz watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, Laura M.; Callegary, James; van Riper, Charles; Gray, Floyd

    2010-01-01

    In 2004 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) launched the Border Environmental Health Initiative (BEHI), a major project encompassing the entire U.S.-Mexico border region. In 2009, a study of the Santa Cruz River Watershed (SCW), located in the border region of Arizona and Sonora, Mexico, was initiated as part of the BEHI. In this borderland region of the desert Southwest, human health and the ecosystems on which humans rely depend critically on limited water resources. Surface water is scarce during much of the year, and groundwater is the primary source for industrial, agricultural, and domestic use. In order to identify risks to water resources in the SCW, and the potential consequences to riparian ecosystems and ultimately human health, the USGS is using an interdisciplinary and integrative approach that incorporates the expertise of geographers, hydrologists, biologists, and geologists to track organic and inorganic contaminants and their effects from sources to sinks in sediment, water, plants, and animals. Existing groundwater and surface-water models are being used and modified to assess contaminant and sediment transport.

  18. Macrohabitat of Sonora Chub (Gila ditaenia) in Sycamore Creek, Santa Cruz County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, Jeanette; Maughan, O. Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Physical characteristics and persistence of macrohabitat used by different life stages of Sonora chub (Gila ditaenia) were determined by repeatedly measuring distinct reaches in Sycamore Creek, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, in 1990 and 1991. At the beginning of summer drought, habitats occupied by adult Sonora chub were deeper and larger than areas with only immature fish and unoccupied areas. The medians of maximum depth were 47.0 cm (1990) and 39.7 cm (1991) for habitats with adults, 21.3 cm (1990) and 22.9 cm (1991) for habitats with only immature fish, and 14.6 cm (1990) and 19.7 cm (1991) for unoccupied areas. At the end of summer drought, adults occupied habitats that were deeper and larger, and the percent decrease in area and depth was less than areas containing only immature fish or no fish. The medians of percent decrease in maximum depth were 13% (1990) and 21% (1991) for habitats with adults, 48% (1990) and 41% (1991) for habitats with only immature fish, and 42% (1990) and 33% (1991) for unoccupied areas. By the end of summer drought, habitats with only immature fish were not physically different from unoccupied areas. Loss of total surface area was highest in reaches that contained only immature fish or no fish (range = 36% to 94%). Most Sonora chub lost from evaporating surface waters were immature fish. Ephemeral and unoccupied areas had higher percentages of floating cover and coarser substrates than persistent, occupied areas.

  19. Data collection at the Lockheed Santa Cruz facility using midwave hyperspectral imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, William A.; Schaum, Alan P.; Hinnrichs, Michelle; Massie, Mark A.; Fields, David

    1995-02-01

    From September 12-15, 1994, two midwave hyperspectral imagers (the Infrared Multispectral Sensor (IMSS) of Pacific Advanced Technology and the Livermore Imaging Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (LIFTIRS) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) made measurements of particular patches of forest background and a Lockheed Santa Cruz Facility test stand at various times of day and observed the firing of the rocket engine from a sensitive piece of hardware mounted in the Lockheed test stand. The hyperspectral image cubes of the same patch of background observed at various times will be used to investigate the temporal nature of the constituent-temperature interaction. The data of the rocket firing was collected as part of a classified program of the U.S. Army Missile Command. Two sets of data cubes taken of the same background region by IMSS and LIFTIRS simultaneously will be used both to compare the two instruments and to aid in instrument characterization. This paper describes the instruments used in this data collection, the types of backgrounds observed and the experiments performed, and the data collected.

  20. [History of the scientific work of Eduardo Cruz-Coke Lassabe].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Coke, R

    2001-04-01

    Eduardo Cruz Coke M.D., (1899-1974) was one of the precursors and pioneers of biomedical research in Chile, as professor of Physiological and Pathological Chemistry at the University of Chile, from 1925 to 1962. He was a disciple of Dr. Juan Noe and studied in Europe with the Nobel Prize winners Otto Warburg, Jean Perrin, Louis de Broglie and Frederic G. Hopkins. In Chile, he founded a scientific academy with disciples that later obtained the National Sciences Award, such as Hector Croxatto, Jorge Mardones, Hermann Niemeyer, Luis Vargas and Jorge Allende. He carried out pioneering research in metabolism, nutrition, endocrinology, oncology and nephrogenic hypertension. He published more than 50 scientific papers in French, English and Spanish. He founded scientific societies, edited journals and created the National Commission of Nuclear Energy. His books were "The ionic acidity in the clinic", "Preventive and directed medicine", "The adrenal cortex". He was Ministry of Health between 1937 and 1938 and passed important socio-medical bills. He obtained the distinguished international awards in Europe, the U.S.A. and Latin America. The Biomedical Sciences Institute of the University of Chile carries his name.

  1. Geochemistry of soils from the San Rafael Valley, Santa Cruz County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Folger, Helen W.; Gray, Floyd

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether surficial geochemical methods can be used to identify subsurface mineraldeposits covered by alluvium derived from surrounding areas. The geochemical investigation focused on an anomalous geo-physical magnetic high located in the San Rafael Valley in Santa Cruz County, Arizona. The magnetic high, inferred to be asso-ciated with a buried granite intrusion, occurs beneath Quaternary alluvial and terrace deposits. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 10 to 30 centimeters below land surface along transects that traverse the inferred granite. The samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and by the partial-leach Mobile Metal Ion™ method. Principal component and factor analyses showed a strong correlation between the soils and source rocks hosting base-metal replacement deposits in the Harshaw and Patagonia Mining Districts. Factor analysis also indicated areas of high metal concentrations associated with the Meadow Valley Flat. Although no definitive geochemical signature was identified for the inferred granite, concentrations otungsten and iron in the surrounding area were slightly elevated.

  2. The Santa Cruz - Tarija Province of Central South America: Los Monos - Machareti(!) Petroleum System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindquist, Sandra J.

    1999-01-01

    The Los Monos - Machareti(!) total petroleum system is in the Santa Cruz - Tarija Province of Bolivia, Argentina and Paraguay. Province history is that of a Paleozoic, intracratonic, siliciclastic rift basin that evolved into a Miocene (Andean) foreland fold and thrust belt. Existing fields are typified by alternating reservoir and seal rocks in post-Ordovician sandstones and shales on anticlines. Thick Devonian and Silurian shale source rocks, depositionally and erosionally confined to this province, at a minimum have generated 4.1 BBOE known ultimate recoverable reserves (as of 1995, 77% gas, 15% condensate, 8% oil) into dominantly Carboniferous reservoirs with average 20% porosity and 156 md permeability. Major detachment surfaces within the source rocks contributed to the thin-skinned and laterally continuous nature of the deformation. Tertiary foreland burial adequate for significant source maturation coincided with the formation of compressional traps. Further hydrocarbon discovery in the fold and thrust belt is expected. In the foreland basin, higher thermal gradients and variable burial history - combined with the presence of unconformity and onlap wedges - create potential there for stratigraphic traps and pre-Andean, block-fault and forced-fold traps.

  3. Channel-changing processes on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.C.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Lateral channel change on the mainly ephemeral Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, causes damage and has spawned costly efforts to control bank erosion. Aerial photographs, historical data, and field observations are used to document the history of channel change since 1936. Variability in the nature and degree of channel change over time and space is shown. Three major channel change processes are: (1) migration by bank erosion during meander migration or initiation; (2) avulsion by overbank flooding and flood plain incision; (3) widening by erosion of low, cohesionless banks during floods and arroyo widening by undercutting and mass wasting of deeply incised vertical walls. The first process generally is a product of low to moderate flows or waning high flows; the others result mainly from higher flows, though sensitive arroyo walls may erode during relatively low flows. Channel morphology, bank resistance, and hydrology are factors determining the dominant channel-changing process on a particular reach of the river. Present river morphology reflects high flows since the 1960's.

  4. Geochemical monitoring of the Tenerife North-East Rift Zone (NERZ) volcano (Canary Islands) by means of diffuse CO_{2} degassing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrancos, José; O'Neill, Ryan; Gould, Catherine E.; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Amonte, Cecilia; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Tenerife is the largest of the Canary Islands (2100 km2) and the North East Rift (NERZ) volcano is one of the three active volcanic rift-zones of the island (210 km2). The last eruptive activity at NERZ volcano occurred in 1704 and 1705, with three volcanic eruptions: Siete Fuentes, Fasnia and Arafo. In order to provide a multidisciplinary approach to monitor potential volcanic activity changes at the NERZ volcano, diffuse CO2 emission surveys have been undertaken in a yearly basis since 2001. This study shows the results of the last soil CO2 efflux survey undertaken in summer 2016, with 600 soil gas sampling sites homogenously distributed. Soil CO2 efflux measurements were performed at the surface environment by means of a portable non-dispersive infrared spectrophotometer (NDIR) LICOR Li800 following the accumulation chamber method. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m-2 d-1) up to 70 g m-2 d-1, with an average value of 8.8 g m-2 d-1. In order to distinguish the existence of different geochemical populations on the soil CO2 efflux data, a Sinclair graphical analysis was done. The average value of background population was 2.9 g m-2 d-1 and that of peak population was 67.8 g m-2 d-1, value that has been increasing since the year 2014. To quantify the total CO2 emission rate from the NERZ volcano a sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) was used as interpolation method to construct soil CO2 emission contour maps. The diffuse CO2 emission rate for the studied area was estimated in 1,675 ± 47 t d-1. If we compare the 2016 results with those ones obtained in previous surveys since 2001, two main pulses on diffuse CO2 emission are identified, the first one in 2007 and the second one between during 2014 and 2016. This long-term variation on the diffuse CO2 emission doesn't seem to be masked by the external-meteorological variations. However, the first peak precedes the anomalous seismicity recorded in and around Tenerife Island between 2009 and

  5. Evaluation of the levels of alcohol sulfates and ethoxysulfates in marine sediments near wastewater discharge points along the coast of Tenerife Island.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ramos, C; Ballesteros, O; Zafra-Gómez, A; Camino-Sánchez, F J; Blanc, R; Navalón, A; Pérez-Trujillo, J P; Vílchez, J L

    2014-02-15

    Alcohol sulfates (AS) and alcohol ethoxysulfates (AES) are all High Production Volume and 'down-the-drain' chemicals used globally in detergent and personal care products, resulting in low levels ultimately released to the environment via wastewater treatment plant effluents. They have a strong affinity for sorption to sediments. Almost 50% of Tenerife Island surface area is environmentally protected. Therefore, determination of concentration levels of AS/AES in marine sediments near wastewater discharge points along the coast of the Island is of interest. These data were obtained after pressurized liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Short chains of AES and especially of AS dominated the homologue distribution for AES. The Principal Components Analysis was used. The results showed that the sources of AS and AES were the same and that both compounds exhibit similar behavior. Three different patterns in the distribution for homologues and ethoxymers were found.

  6. Quantification of ozone uptake at the stand level in a Pinus canariensis forest in Tenerife, Canary Islands: an approach based on sap flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Gerhard; Luis, Vanessa C; Cuevas, Emilio

    2006-04-01

    Ozone uptake was studied in a pine forest in Tenerife, Canary Islands, an ecotone with strong seasonal changes in climate. Ambient ozone concentration showed a pronounced seasonal course with high concentrations during the dry and warm period and low concentrations during the wet and cold season. Ozone uptake by contrast showed no clear seasonal trend. This is because canopy conductance significantly decreased with soil water availability and vapour pressure deficit. Mean daily ozone uptake averaged 1.9 nmol m(-2) s(-1) during the wet and cold season, and 1.5 nmol m(-2) s(-1) during the warm and dry period. The corresponding daily mean ambient ozone concentrations were 42 and 51 nl l(-1), respectively. Thus we conclude that in Mediterranean type forest ecosystems the flux based approach is more capable for risk assessment than an external, concentration based approach.

  7. Light pollution in Spain 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Zamorano, J.; Pila-Díez, B.; Rubio, J.; Ruiz, R.; Rodríguez-Herranz, I.; González-Pérez, A.

    2011-11-01

    The most recent data on electricity consumption for public lighting inSpain is presented and compared with light pollution measurements asderived from night satellite imagery. NOAA-MSP images (low-resolution)and higher resolution images obtained with conventional DSLR cameras on board the International Space Station (ISS) have been used.We show that the data can be related to night sky brightness maps with a study conducted within the Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid. Weintend to extend our work to the rest of Spain through tight collaborationwith amateur astronomers.

  8. [Intensive medicine in Spain].

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    the future of intensive care medicine in Spain and in Europe, recommendations are made towards specialization in intensive care medicine incorporating in the training program those competences (knowledge, skills and attitudes) that should be present an intensivist in Europe and that are extensively fulfilled by the current Spanish training program. The trajectory followed by intensive care medicine in Europe and recently in China, shows the increasing need of intensive care and the progressive recognition of the specialty in economically growing countries, and emphasizes the need of homogenization in the training of future specialists in intensive care medicine globally.

  9. [The odysseys of Ulysses. A study of tales in a normal working day of the family doctor in Paraguay, Mexico, Peru, and Spain].

    PubMed

    Báez-Montiel, Brenda Beatriz; Gutiérrez-Islas, Elizabeth; Bolaños-Maldonado, Margarita; Samarín, Elena; Turabián, José Luis

    2014-02-01

    To examine the professional profile of the family doctor in different countries and the social welfare context where their work is carried out. Qualitative Methodology of production of field diaries of a normal day. Primary Heath Care of Toledo and Tenerife in Spain, and Paraguay, Mexico, and Peru. Non-random sampling, intentional, followed by snowball sample until data saturation. Participants wrote a diary of a typical day's work, their circumstances and socio-health context, and were studied by content analysis. Techniques to control the biases were used the check the participants and the triangulation between the obtained results and the existing bibliography, and data found on the Internet daily. We performed a mental map to transcribe the results graphically and in a comprehensive form. A total of 24 diaries of a normal day were obtained (9 doctors in Spain, 7 in Mexico, 4 in Paraguay, and 4 in Peru). We found some similarities, but many differences between countries. In contexts of humble but spirited, rural, with traditional roots and undemanding, there was a wider range of tasks of the family doctor, the coexistence of public and private work, and modern and traditional medicine, with greater presence of family and community care, more physician satisfaction and better patient-physician relationship. The professional profile of the family doctor is diverse and a context-dependent variable, and is not derived directly from external theory of family medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. In Spain, Inbreeding Threatens Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocca, Francis X.

    2007-01-01

    With 25 years of teaching experience at Spain's top-ranked veterinary school, 58 articles in prestigious international journals, and numerous patents to her name, Victoria Lopez Rodas would be a strong candidate for any academic job in her field. So when she took a national qualifying examination for a full professorship in animal science last…

  11. In Spain, Inbreeding Threatens Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocca, Francis X.

    2007-01-01

    With 25 years of teaching experience at Spain's top-ranked veterinary school, 58 articles in prestigious international journals, and numerous patents to her name, Victoria Lopez Rodas would be a strong candidate for any academic job in her field. So when she took a national qualifying examination for a full professorship in animal science last…

  12. English Language Teaching Profile: Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    The role of English in Spain is discussed, with attention directed to (1) English within the educational system, (2) inspection of teachers and teaching methods, (3) commercial English, (4) adult education, (5) radio and television instruction in English, (6) English teachers, (7) English outside the educational system, and (8) British and…

  13. Novel Lyssavirus in Bat, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Morón, Sonia Vázquez; Berciano, José M.; Nicolás, Olga; López, Carolina Aznar; Juste, Javier; Nevado, Cristina Rodríguez; Setién, Álvaro Aguilar; Echevarría, Juan E.

    2013-01-01

    A new tentative lyssavirus, Lleida bat lyssavirus, was found in a bent-winged bat (Miniopterus schreibersii) in Spain. It does not belong to phylogroups I or II, and it seems to be more closely related to the West Causasian bat virus, and especially to the Ikoma lyssavirus. PMID:23648051

  14. Sedimentary paleoenvironments of fossil platyrrhine localities, Miocene Pinturas Formation, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pinturas Formation is a pyroclastic and epiclastic aeolian deposit of Miocene age lying discordantly upon Jurassic rocks in the elevated Andean precordillera of northwest Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The history of development of the Pinturas Formation was significantly affected by the gradual, though sporadic, draping of this aeolian sediment across a profound, slowly filling paleotopography. The Pinturas depositional cycle consisted of: (1) minor aeolian deposition followed by soil formation, and (2) major aeolian deposition followed by intervals of regional erosion. Fluvial action seems to have been almost wholly confined to intraformational erosion, and two significant intraformational erosional unconformities divide the Pinturas Formation into three sequences. The lower sequence is dominated by pyroclastic mudrocks upon which were formed very mature, probably mollic, paleosols; the middle sequence is composed largely of epiclastic sand occurring as barchanoid paleodunes; and the upper sequence consists of massive, poorly bedded pyroclastic mudrocks. Many Pinturas lacunae were reconstructed on the basis of locally preserved strata, and a novel method of holostrome reconstruction using relative paleosol maturities places Pinturas sedimentation in a more accurate temporal light. It also indicates: (1) that the Pinturas sediment accumulation rate increased with time; (2) that regional erosive intervals are correlated directly with major influxes of pyroclastic material; and (3) that the introduction of the Pinturas platyrrhine primates occurred in the sequence:Carlocebus carmenensis, C. intermedius andSoriacebus ameghinorum. Soriacebus adrianae. Pinturas paleosols appear to have formed under moist conditions, and both mature and immature varieties yield a host of ichnofossils. These include the burrows and nests of bees, scarabeid beetles, termites, and at least two different kinds of colonial rodents, in addition to rhizoliths and the calcified boles and

  15. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seacliff State Beach, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the second map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Seacliff State Beach, California, which is located seven kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig. 1) along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998; Feb. 9, 1998

  16. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Depot Hill, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the first map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Depot Hill, California, which is located five kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig.1) near the town of Capitola, along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El NiOos; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998

  17. Paleogeodesy of the Southern Santa Cruz Mountains Frontal Thrusts, Silicon Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, F.; Johnstone, S. A.; Mavrommatis, A. P.; Sare, R.; Hilley, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present a method to infer long-term fault slip rate distributions using topography by coupling a three-dimensional elastic boundary element model with a geomorphic incision rule. In particular, we used a 10-m-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) to calculate channel steepness (ksn) throughout the actively deforming southern Santa Cruz Mountains in Central California. We then used these values with a power-law incision rule and the Poly3D code to estimate slip rates over seismogenic, kilometer-scale thrust faults accommodating differential uplift of the relief throughout geologic time. Implicit in such an analysis is the assumption that the topographic surface remains unchanged over time as rock is uplifted by slip on the underlying structures. The fault geometries within the area are defined based on surface mapping, as well as active and passive geophysical imaging. Fault elements are assumed to be traction-free in shear (i.e., frictionless), while opening along them is prohibited. The free parameters in the inversion include the components of the remote strain-rate tensor (ɛij) and the bedrock resistance to channel incision (K), which is allowed to vary according to the mapped distribution of geologic units exposed at the surface. The nonlinear components of the geomorphic model required the use of a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, which simulated the posterior density of the components of the remote strain-rate tensor and values of K for the different mapped geologic units. Interestingly, posterior probability distributions of ɛij and K fall well within the broad range of reported values, suggesting that the joint use of elastic boundary element and geomorphic models may have utility in estimating long-term fault slip-rate distributions. Given an adequate DEM, geologic mapping, and fault models, the proposed paleogeodetic method could be applied to other crustal faults with geological and morphological expressions of long-term uplift.

  18. Slope Stability Analysis for Shallow Landslides using TRIGRS: A Case Study for Sta. Cruz, Zambales, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, J. P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Philippines, being located in the circum-Pacific, bounded by multiple subduction zones, open seas and ocean, is one of the most hazard-prone countries in the world (Benson, 1997). This widespread recurrence of natural hazards in the country requires much attention for disaster management (Aurelio, 2006). On the average, 21 typhoons enter the Philippine area of responsibility annually with 6-9 making a landfall. Several rainfall-induced landslide events are reported annually particularly during and after the inundation of major typhoons which imposes hazards to communities and causes destruction of properties due to the moving mass and possible flash floods it may induce. Shallow landslides are the most commonly observed failure involving soil-mantled slopes and are considered major geohazards, often causing property damage and other economic loss. Hence numerous studies on landslide susceptibility including numerical models based on infinite slope equation are used in order to identify slopes prone to occurrences of shallow landslides. The study aims to determine the relationships between the slope and elevation to the factor of safety for laterite-mantled topography by incorporating precipitation values in the determination of landslide susceptibility. Using a DEM, flow direction map and slope map of the Sta Cruz (Zambales, Philippines), the FORTRAN based program TRIGRS, was used to generate the values for the factors of safety in the study area. Overlays with a generated slope map and elevation map were used to determine relationships of the mentioned factors and the factors of safety. A slope in a topography mantled with lateritic soil will fail at a slope angle higher than 20 degrees. Generally, the factor of safety decreases as the slope angle increases; this increases the probability and risk of slope failure. Elevation has no bearing on the computation for the factor of safety. The factor of safety is heavily dependent on the slope angle. The value of

  19. Native plant recovery in study plots after fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) control on Santa Cruz Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, Paula; Stanley, Thomas R.; Cowan, Clark; Robertson, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Santa Cruz Island is the largest of the California Channel Islands and supports a diverse and unique flora which includes 9 federally listed species. Sheep, cattle, and pigs, introduced to the island in the mid-1800s, disturbed the soil, browsed native vegetation, and facilitated the spread of exotic invasive plants. Recent removal of introduced herbivores on the island led to the release of invasive fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), which expanded to become the dominant vegetation in some areas and has impeded the recovery of some native plant communities. In 2007, Channel Islands National Park initiated a program to control fennel using triclopyr on the eastern 10% of the island. We established replicate paired plots (seeded and nonseeded) at Scorpion Anchorage and Smugglers Cove, where notably dense fennel infestations (>10% cover) occurred, to evaluate the effectiveness of native seed augmentation following fennel removal. Five years after fennel removal, vegetative cover increased as litter and bare ground cover decreased significantly (P < 0.0001) on both plot types. Vegetation cover of both native and other (nonfennel) exotic species increased at Scorpion Anchorage in both seeded and nonseeded plots. At Smugglers Cove, exotic cover decreased significantly (P = 0.0001) as native cover comprised of Eriogonum arborescensand Leptosyne gigantea increased significantly (P < 0.0001) in seeded plots only. Nonseeded plots at Smugglers Cove were dominated by exotic annual grasses, primarily Avena barbata. The data indicate that seeding with appropriate native seed is a critical step in restoration following fennel control in areas where the native seed bank is depauperate.

  20. Nine endangered taxa, one recovering ecosystem: Identifying common ground for recovery on Santa Cruz Island, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEachern, A. Kathryn; Wilken, Dieter H.

    2011-01-01

    It is not uncommon to have several rare and listed taxa occupying habitats in one landscape or management area where conservation amounts to defense against the possibility of further loss. It is uncommon and extremely exciting, however, to have several listed taxa occupying one island that is managed cooperatively for conservation and recovery. On Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the northern California island group in the Santa Barbara Channel, we have a golden opportunity to marry ecological knowledge and institutional "good will" in a field test of holistic rare plant conservation. Here, the last feral livestock have been removed, active weed control is underway, and management is focused on understanding and demonstrating system response to conservation management. Yet funding limitations still exist and we need to plan the most fiscally conservative and marketable approach to rare plant restoration. We still experience the tension between desirable quick results and the ecological pace of system recovery. Therefore, our research has focused on identifying fundamental constraints on species recovery at individual, demographic, habitat, and ecosystem levels, and then developing suites of actions that might be taken across taxa and landscapes. At the same time, we seek a performance middle ground that balances an institutional need for quick demonstration of hands-on positive results with a contrasting approach that allows ecosystem recovery to facilitate species recovery in the long term. We find that constraints vary across breeding systems, life-histories, and island locations. We take a hybrid approach in which we identify several actions that we can take now to enhance population size or habitat occupancy for some taxa by active restoration, while allowing others to recover at the pace of ecosystem change. We make our recommendations on the basis of data we have collected over the last decade, so that management is firmly grounded in ecological observation.

  1. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism.

    PubMed

    Pfattheicher, Stefan; Schindler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR) to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk) rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR) and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley, and Bernie Sanders) and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump). Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley. Overall, small

  2. Source of the 6 February 2013 Mw 8.0 Santa Cruz Islands Tsunami.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F.; Molinari, I.; Lorito, S.; Piatanesi, A.

    2014-12-01

    On February 6, 2013 a Mw8.0 interplate earthquake occurred in the Santa Cruz Islands region. The epicenter is located near a complex section of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary, where a short segment of dominantly strike-slip plate motion links the Solomon Trench to the New Hebrides Trench. In this region, the Australia plate subducts beneath the Pacific plate with a convergence rate of ~9cm/yr. This earthquake generated a tsunami that struck the city of Lata and several villages located on the Nendo island with tsunami height exceeding 11m (Fritz et al.,2014). The tsunami has been distinctly recorded by 5 DART buoys in the Pacific Ocean and by some tide-gauges at Solomon Islands, Fiji Islands, and New Caledonia. In this work we retrieve the source of the tsunami by inverting the signals recorded by both DART buoys and tide-gauges, and using an earthquake fault model that accounts for the variability of the subduction plate geometry. We compare and discuss our tsunamigenic slip model with previous coseismic slip models obtained by teleseismic data (Hayes et al.,2013) and telesismic data constrained by tsunami records (Lay et al.,2013). Our preferred tsunami source (maximum slip value of ~10m) is located southeast from the hypocenter and the slip direction is in agreement with the convergence direction that becomes progressively more oblique in the NW segment. We find a tsunami source roughly consistent to a possible source of low frequency radiation (http://www.iris.edu/spud/backprojection) and/or to the region of aseismic slip argued by Hayes et al. (2013). However, we do not find significantly tsunamigenic slip in the region of seismic high frequency radiation around the hypocenter.

  3. Viral aetiology influenza like illnesses in Santa Cruz, Bolivia (2010–2012)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections represent a serious public health issue worldwide but virological aetiologies of Influenza Like Illnesses (ILIs) remain largely unknown in developing countries. This study represents the first attempt to characterise viral aetiologies of ILIs in Bolivia. Methods It was performed in Santa Cruz city from January 2010 to September 2012, based on 564 naso-pharyngeal swabs collected in a National Reference Laboratory and real-time PCR techniques, viral cultures and phylogenetic analyses. Results 50.2% of samples were positive for at least one virus with influenza viruses (Flu A: ~15%; Flu B: ~9%), rhinoviruses (~8%), coronaviruses (~5%) and hRSV (~4%) being the most frequently identified. The pattern of viral infections varied according to age groups. The elucidation rate was the highest (>60%) amongst patients under 10 yo and the lowest (<40%) amongst patients ≥60 yo. Nearly 3% of samples showed dual viral infections. Epidemiological peaks were associated with a predominant virus but generally included 30-50% of infections by different viruses. Unexpectedly, the frequency of influenza in the 0–4 yo population was very low and a complete hRSV eclipse occurred in 2011. Genetic analyses indicated that distinct evolutionary lineages of Flu A(H1N1)pdm2009, Flu A/H3N2 and Flu B have co-circulated in Bolivia in the study period, originating from Central and North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Conclusion Our results emphasise the requirement for a reinforced epidemiological and genetic follow-up of influenza and other ILIs in Bolivia to further inform the preparation of vaccines used in the region, guide vaccination campaigns and improve the medical management of patients. PMID:24564892

  4. The Purisima Formation at Capitola Beach, Santa Cruz County, CA: A Deeper Examination of Pliocene Fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, L. D.; Brooks, K.; Chen, R.; Chen, T.; James, T.; Gonzales, J.; Schumaker, D.; Williams, D.

    2005-12-01

    Fossil samples from the Pliocene Purisima Formation at Capitola Beach in Santa Cruz County, CA were collected in July-August 2005. The Purisima Formation composes the bulk of the cliffs exposed at Capitola Beach and a rich assemblage of well-preserved fossils occur in gray to brown sandstone and siltstone. Erosion of the cliff face averages 0.3 meter/year and fresh cliff falls in the winter and spring months of 2005 provided an excellent opportunity to resample the Capitola Beach section of the Purisima Formation previously documented by Perry (1988). Organisms were identified from information in Perry (1988) and were compared with collections at the California Academy of Sciences. The most abundant fossils found are from the phylum Mollusca, classes Bivalvia and Gastropoda. Abundant bivalve taxa are: Anadara trilineata, Clinocardium meekianum, Macoma sp., Protothaca staleyi, and Tresus pajaroanus. Also common are the gastropods, Calyptraea fastigata, Crepdiula princeps, Mitrella gausapata, Nassarius grammatus, Nassarius californianus, Natica clausa, and Olivella pedroana. Less common invertebrate fossils are from the phylum Echinodermata ( Dendraster sp., the extinct fossil sand dollar) and from the phylum Arthropoda ( Crustacea), crab fragments ( Cancer) and barnacles ( Balanus). Because numerous fossils are concentrated as fragments in shell beds, Norris (1986) and Perry (1988) believe many were redeposited as storm beds during strong current events that promoted rapid burial. In contrast, whale and other vertebrate bones are common in certain horizons and their presence may be related to the conditions that promoted phosphate mineralization, such as episodes of low sedimentation rates and prolonged exposure on the seafloor (Föllmi and Garrison, 1991). The bone beds, together with the rich infaunal and epifaunal invertebrate assemblages, represent a community of invertebrate organisms that thrived in a shallow marine sea during the Pliocene epoch, approximately

  5. Evolution of dengue disease and entomological monitoring in Santa Cruz, Bolivia 2002 - 2008.

    PubMed

    Brémond, Philippe; Roca, Yelin; Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Walter, Annie; Barja-Simon, Zaira; Fernández, Roberto Torres; Vargas, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In the context of a rapid increase of dengue cases in the Americas, a monitoring system based on systematic serological control (IgM) of patients consulting for suspected dengue was developed in Bolivia at the end of the 1990s. In the most affected city of Santa Cruz, this system was complemented by an entomological surveillance program based on periodical search for immature stages of Aedes aegypti in dwelling water-holding containers. Here, we analyze these data and describe dengue patterns over 6 years (2002-2008), highlighting the spatial distribution of patients and vectors. Data mining concerned six annual epidemic cycles (2002-2008), with continuous serological and clinical results and entomological data from 16 surveys, examined at the scales of 36 urban areas and four concentric areas covering the entire city. Annual incidence varied from 0.28‰ to 0.95‰; overall incidence was higher in women and adults, and dengue dynamics followed successive periods of high (January-June) and low (July-December) transmission. Lower numbers of cases from the city center to the periphery were observed, poorly related to the more homogeneous and permanent distribution of A. aegypti. "Plant pots" were a major vector source in the city center, and "Tires" and "Odds and ends" beyond the second ring of the city. Over the years, the increasing trend of dengue cases has been highlighted as well as its widespread distribution over the entire city, but an underestimation of the number of cases is strongly suspected. Contrary to popular belief, the city center appears more affected than the periphery, and dengue is not particularly related to waste. Interestingly, the clinical diagnosis of dengue by physicians improved over the years, whatever the gender, age and residential area of suspected cases.

  6. Evolution of Dengue Disease and Entomological Monitoring in Santa Cruz, Bolivia 2002 – 2008

    PubMed Central

    Brémond, Philippe; Roca, Yelin; Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Walter, Annie; Barja-Simon, Zaira; Fernández, Roberto Torres; Vargas, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of a rapid increase of dengue cases in the Americas, a monitoring system based on systematic serological control (IgM) of patients consulting for suspected dengue was developed in Bolivia at the end of the 1990s. In the most affected city of Santa Cruz, this system was complemented by an entomological surveillance program based on periodical search for immature stages of Aedes aegypti in dwelling water-holding containers. Here, we analyze these data and describe dengue patterns over 6 years (2002–2008), highlighting the spatial distribution of patients and vectors. Methodology /Principal Findings Data mining concerned six annual epidemic cycles (2002–2008), with continuous serological and clinical results and entomological data from 16 surveys, examined at the scales of 36 urban areas and four concentric areas covering the entire city. Annual incidence varied from 0.28‰ to 0.95‰; overall incidence was higher in women and adults, and dengue dynamics followed successive periods of high (January–June) and low (July–December) transmission. Lower numbers of cases from the city center to the periphery were observed, poorly related to the more homogeneous and permanent distribution of A. aegypti. "Plant pots" were a major vector source in the city center, and "Tires" and "Odds and ends" beyond the second ring of the city. Conclusions/Significance Over the years, the increasing trend of dengue cases has been highlighted as well as its widespread distribution over the entire city, but an underestimation of the number of cases is strongly suspected. Contrary to popular belief, the city center appears more affected than the periphery, and dengue is not particularly related to waste. Interestingly, the clinical diagnosis of dengue by physicians improved over the years, whatever the gender, age and residential area of suspected cases. PMID:25706631

  7. Viral aetiology influenza like illnesses in Santa Cruz, Bolivia (2010-2012).

    PubMed

    Delangue, Julie; Roca Sanchez, Yelin; Piorkowski, Géraldine; Bessaud, Maël; Baronti, Cécile; Thirion-Perrier, Laurence; Mafayle, Roxana Loayza; Ardaya, Cinthia Avila; Aguilera, Gabriela Añez; Guzman, Jimmy Revollo; Riera, Javier Lora; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2014-02-24

    Acute respiratory infections represent a serious public health issue worldwide but virological aetiologies of Influenza Like Illnesses (ILIs) remain largely unknown in developing countries. This study represents the first attempt to characterise viral aetiologies of ILIs in Bolivia. It was performed in Santa Cruz city from January 2010 to September 2012, based on 564 naso-pharyngeal swabs collected in a National Reference Laboratory and real-time PCR techniques, viral cultures and phylogenetic analyses. 50.2% of samples were positive for at least one virus with influenza viruses (Flu A: ~15%; Flu B: ~9%), rhinoviruses (~8%), coronaviruses (~5%) and hRSV (~4%) being the most frequently identified. The pattern of viral infections varied according to age groups. The elucidation rate was the highest (>60%) amongst patients under 10 yo and the lowest (<40%) amongst patients ≥60 yo. Nearly 3% of samples showed dual viral infections. Epidemiological peaks were associated with a predominant virus but generally included 30-50% of infections by different viruses. Unexpectedly, the frequency of influenza in the 0-4 yo population was very low and a complete hRSV eclipse occurred in 2011. Genetic analyses indicated that distinct evolutionary lineages of Flu A(H1N1)pdm2009, Flu A/H3N2 and Flu B have co-circulated in Bolivia in the study period, originating from Central and North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Our results emphasise the requirement for a reinforced epidemiological and genetic follow-up of influenza and other ILIs in Bolivia to further inform the preparation of vaccines used in the region, guide vaccination campaigns and improve the medical management of patients.

  8. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism

    PubMed Central

    Pfattheicher, Stefan; Schindler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR) to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk) rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR) and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O’Malley, and Bernie Sanders) and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump). Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O’Malley. Overall

  9. Cancer incidence in Spain, 2015.

    PubMed

    Galceran, J; Ameijide, A; Carulla, M; Mateos, A; Quirós, J R; Rojas, D; Alemán, A; Torrella, A; Chico, M; Vicente, M; Díaz, J M; Larrañaga, N; Marcos-Gragera, R; Sánchez, M J; Perucha, J; Franch, P; Navarro, C; Ardanaz, E; Bigorra, J; Rodrigo, P; Bonet, R Peris

    2017-07-01

    Periodic cancer incidence estimates of Spain from all existing population-based cancer registries at any given time are required. The objective of this study was to present the current situation of cancer incidence in Spain. The Spanish Network of Cancer Registries (REDECAN) estimated the numbers of new cancer cases occurred in Spain in 2015 by applying the incidence-mortality ratios method. In the calculus, incidence data from population-based cancer registries and mortality data of all Spain were used. In 2015, nearly a quarter of a million new invasive cancer cases were diagnosed in Spain, almost 149,000 in men (60.0%) and 99,000 in women. Globally, the five most common cancers were those of colon-rectum, prostate, lung, breast and urinary bladder. By gender, the four most common cancers in men were those of prostate (22.4%), colon-rectum (16.6%), lung (15.1%) and urinary bladder (11.7%). In women, the most common ones were those of breast (28.0%), colon-rectum (16.9%), corpus uteri (6.2%) and lung (6.0%). In recent years, cancer incidence in men seems to have stabilized due to the fact that the decrease in tobacco-related cancers compensates for the increase in other types of cancer like those of colon and prostate. In women, despite the stabilization of breast cancer incidence, increased incidence is due, above all, to the rise of colorectal and tobacco-related cancers. To reduce these incident cancer cases, improvement of smoking control policies and extension of colorectal cancer screening should be the two priorities in cancer prevention for the next years.

  10. Bedrock morphology and structure, upper Santa Cruz Basin, south-central Arizona, with transient electromagnetic survey data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, Mark W.; Page, William R.

    2016-10-31

    The upper Santa Cruz Basin is an important groundwater basin containing the regional aquifer for the city of Nogales, Arizona. This report provides data and interpretations of data aimed at better understanding the bedrock morphology and structure of the upper Santa Cruz Basin study area which encompasses the Rio Rico and Nogales 1:24,000-scale U.S. Geological Survey quadrangles. Data used in this report include the Arizona Aeromagnetic and Gravity Maps and Data referred to here as the 1996 Patagonia Aeromagnetic survey, Bouguer gravity anomaly data, and conductivity-depth transforms (CDTs) from the 1998 Santa Cruz transient electromagnetic survey (whose data are included in appendixes 1 and 2 of this report).Analyses based on magnetic gradients worked well to identify the range-front faults along the Mt. Benedict horst block, the location of possibly fault-controlled canyons to the west of Mt. Benedict, the edges of buried lava flows, and numerous other concealed faults and contacts. Applying the 1996 Patagonia aeromagnetic survey data using the horizontal gradient method produced results that were most closely correlated with the observed geology.The 1996 Patagonia aeromagnetic survey was used to estimate depth to bedrock in the upper Santa Cruz Basin study area. Three different depth estimation methods were applied to the data: Euler deconvolution, horizontal gradient magnitude, and analytic signal. The final depth to bedrock map was produced by choosing the maximum depth from each of the three methods at a given location and combining all maximum depths. In locations of rocks with a known reversed natural remanent magnetic field, gravity based depth estimates from Gettings and Houser (1997) were used.The depth to bedrock map was supported by modeling aeromagnetic anomaly data along six profiles. These cross sectional models demonstrated that by using the depth to bedrock map generated in this study, known and concealed faults, measured and estimated magnetic

  11. Influence of the Nogales International Wastewater Treatment Plant on surface water in the Santa Cruz River and local aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrie, H. M.; Brusseau, M. L.; Huth, H.

    2015-12-01

    As water resources become limited in Arizona due to drought and excessive use of ground water, treated wastewater effluent is becoming essential in creating natural ecosystems and recharging the decreasing groundwater supplies. Therefore, future water supplies are heavily dependent of the flow (quantity) and quality of the treated effluent. The Nogales International Wastewater Treatment Plant (NIWTP) releases treated wastewater from both Nogales, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico into the Santa Cruz River. This released effluent not only has the potential to impact surface water, but also groundwater supplies in Southern Arizona. In the recent past, the NIWTP has had reoccurring issues with elevated levels of cadmium, in addition to other, more infrequent, releases of high amounts of other metals. The industrial demographic of the region, as well as limited water quality regulations in Mexico makes the NIWTP and its treated effluent an important area of study. In addition, outdated infrastructure can potentially lead to damaging environmental impacts, as well as human health concerns. The Santa Cruz River has been monitored and studied in the past, but in recent years, there has been a halt in research regarding the state of the river. Data from existing water quality databases and recent sampling reports are used to address research questions regarding the state of the Santa Cruz River. These questions include: 1) How will change in flow eventually impact surface water and future groundwater supplies 2) What factors influence this flow (such as extreme flooding and drought) 3) What is the impact of effluent on surface water quality 4) Can changes in surface water quality impact groundwater quality 5) How do soil characteristics and surface flow impact the transport of released contaminants Although outreach to stakeholders across the border and updated infrastructure has improved the quality of water in the river, there are many areas to improve upon as the

  12. [Characteristics and limits of Professional Master in the Health area: study with alumni from Oswaldo Cruz Foundation].

    PubMed

    Hortale, Virginia Alonso; Leal, Maria do Carmo; Moreira, Carlos Otávio Fiúza; de Aguiar, Adriana Cavalcanti

    2010-07-01

    This paper discuss findings of a follow-up study with alumni of three graduate courses known as "professional master" oriented toward institutional innovation in management of science and technology, offered by Oswaldo Cruz Foundation to its employees. The study analyzed alumni profile and characteristics, identified evidence of changes in their original workplace and assessed the relationship between the courses proposals, institutional needs and alumni expectations. The paper presents limits and possibilities of this new format of graduate courses, emphasizing its evaluation as strategic for institutional development. Despite of respondents' satisfaction with the courses, this inquiry discloses institutional difficulties to incorporate some innovations, including those concerned to its institutional management.

  13. Data report for seismic refraction surveys conducted from 1980 to 1982 in the Livermore Valley and the Santa Cruz Mountains, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Angela J.; Brocher, Thomas M.; Mooney, Walter D.; Boken, Annette

    1999-01-01

    We provide documentation for two seismic refraction profiles acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey in the San Francisco Bay area between 1980 and 1982 in Livermore Valley and the Santa Cruz Mountains. We also include the waveforms and travel times from five aftershocks of the April 1980 Livermore earthquake that were recorded on temporary seismic stations and that have not been published. Although seismic refraction profiles from the 1980 Livermore study have been published, none of the other data for this experiment, including shot times and locations, receiver locations, data quality, and travel times, have been reported. Similarly, such data from the 1981 to 1982 seismic refraction survey in the Santa Cruz Mountains included here have not been published. The first-arrival travel times from these profiles are reported in the hope that they can be used for three-dimensional velocity models in the San Francisco Bay area, particularly for the Livermore Valley and Santa Cruz Mountains.

  14. Environmental engineering education in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Roda, I; Castells, F; Flotats, X; Lema, J; Tejero, I

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing demand for engineers and technologists who show multidisciplinary expertise to deal with environmental issues. As a result of this demand, most countries are adapting their old university programs on environmental engineering education. In Spain an official environmental engineering degree does not yet exist, but the Council of Universities is working to present a proposal, based on Bologna agreement concepts. The paper summarizes not only the future perspectives of environmental engineering education in Spain, but also the evolution of the approach during the last decades, which includes the role of the private initiative, the environmental sciences degree, and the intensification in different traditional engineering degrees. Finally, the paper briefly details and compares the syllabus developed in the only four Spanish universities where environmental engineering is offered as a non-official post-graduate course lasting two years.

  15. Animal-based remedies as complementary medicines in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Rômulo RN; Lima, Helenice N; Tavares, Marília C; Souto, Wedson MS; Barboza, Raynner RD; Vasconcellos, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of animal products in healing is an ancient and widespread cross-cultural practice. In northeastern Brazil, especially in the semi-arid region, animals and plants are widely used in traditional medicine and play significant roles in healing practices. Zootherapies form an integral part of these cultures, and information about animals is passed from generation to generation through oral folklore. Nevertheless, studies on medicinal animals are still scarce in northeastern Brazil, especially when compared to those focusing on medicinal plants. This paper examines the use and commercialization of animals for medicinal purposes in Brazil's semi-arid caatinga region. Methods Data was obtained through field surveys conducted in the public markets in the city of Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco State, Brazil. We interviewed 16 merchants (9 men and 7 women) who provided information regarding folk remedies based on animal products. Results A total of 37 animal species (29 families), distributed among 7 taxonomic categories were found to be used to treat 51 different ailments. The most frequently cited treatments focused on the respiratory system, and were mainly related to problems with asthma. Zootherapeutic products are prescribed as single drugs or are mixed with other ingredients. Mixtures may include several to many more valuable medicinal animals added to other larger doses of more common medicinal animals and plants. The uses of certain medicinal animals are associated with popular local beliefs known as 'simpatias'. We identified 2 medicinal species (Struthio camelus and Nasutitermes macrocephalus) not previously documented for Brazil. The use of animals as remedies in the area surveyed is associated with socio economic and cultural factors. Some of the medicinal animal species encountered in this study are included in lists of endangered species. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that a large variety of animals are used in traditional

  16. Potential for Large Transpressional Earthquakes along the Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, California Continental Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, M.; Kohler, M. D.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Castillo, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Transpressional fault systems comprise networks of high-angle strike-slip and more gently-dipping oblique-slip faults. Large oblique-slip earthquakes may involve complex ruptures of multiple faults with both strike-slip and dip-slip. Geophysical data including high-resolution multibeam bathymetry maps, multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) profiles, and relocated seismicity catalogs enable detailed mapping of the 3-D structure of seismogenic fault systems offshore in the California Continental Borderland. Seafloor morphology along the San Clemente fault system displays numerous features associated with active strike-slip faulting including scarps, linear ridges and valleys, and offset channels. Detailed maps of the seafloor faulting have been produced along more than 400 km of the fault zone. Interpretation of fault geometry has been extended to shallow crustal depths using 2-D MCS profiles and to seismogenic depths using catalogs of relocated southern California seismicity. We examine the 3-D fault character along the transpressional Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge (SCCR) section of the fault system to investigate the potential for large earthquakes involving multi-fault ruptures. The 1981 Santa Barbara Island (M6.0) earthquake was a right-slip event on a vertical fault zone along the northeast flank of the SCCR. Aftershock hypocenters define at least three sub-parallel high-angle fault surfaces that lie beneath a hillside valley. Mainshock rupture for this moderate earthquake appears to have been bilateral, initiating at a small discontinuity in the fault geometry (~5-km pressure ridge) near Kidney Bank. The rupture terminated to the southeast at a significant releasing step-over or bend and to the northeast within a small (~10-km) restraining bend. An aftershock cluster occurred beyond the southeast asperity along the East San Clemente fault. Active transpression is manifest by reverse-slip earthquakes located in the region adjacent to the principal displacement zone

  17. Hydrodynamic properties of the basal aquifer of Santa Cruz Island using seismic refraction, Galapagos - Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, S.; Fortin, J.; Adelinet, M.; Guéguen, Y.; Violette, S.

    2012-04-01

    Santa Cruz Island is the most inhabited of the Galapagos archipelago, Ecuador. It faces important water resource problems which might lead to a major impact on their unique and pristine ecosystem, Endangered World Heritage list (2007). The scarcity of geological and hydrological data combined with the difficulty of access for field measurements lead to a poor understanding of the island hydrogeology. The Island is formed by series of thick fractured basaltic lava flows dissected by faults. The low-lying, extensive "basal" aquifer is the unique groundwater body identified on the island. This basal aquifer is subjected to sea-water intrusion, which has been mapped from electrical resistivity imaging with an airborne electromagnetic SkyTEM survey (D'Ozouville et al. 2008). In order to better understand the hydrodynamic properties of the basal aquifer, we acquired, in summer 2011, geophysical data based on seismic refraction. The experiment was conducted on three study sites located at different altitudes above the see level (Beagle site altitude +7m , Mirador +20m, and Villacis +393m). The P-wave refraction data were obtained using 24 geophones (1 component) and an acquisition system Daklink III. A hammer was used as an energy source. This source was the most environmentally friendly source that could be obtained and used in the Galapagos Island. Geophone spacing for the spreads was 1.2 or 5 m depending on the site. From our geophysical data, we could identify the different geological layers that constitute this basal aquifer and to estimate the thickness of these layers. We could as well clearly see the water level in the aquifer. More interesting, we found a P-wave velocity of ~1600 m/s in the dry fractured basalt lava flow, and a P-wave velocity of ~2700 m/s in the water saturated fractured basalt lava flow. The same velocity values were obtained in the different sites. This tends to show that the elastic properties of the aquifer are homogeneous and isotropic (at

  18. Trends in landscape and vegetation change and implications for the Santa Cruz Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villarreal, Miguel; Norman, Laura M.; Webb, Robert H.; Turner, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring and characterizing the interactive effects of land use and climate on land surface processes is a primary focus of land change science, and of particular concern in arid Wells Distribution in Shallow Groundwater Areas Pumping Trends Increase Streamflow Extent Declines 27 environments where both landscapes and livelihoods can be impacted by short-term climate variability. Using a multi-observational approach to land-change analysis that included landownership data as a proxy for land-use practices, multitemporal land-cover maps, and repeat photography dating to the late 19th century, we examine changing spatial and temporal distributions of two vegetation types with high conservation value in the southwestern United States: grasslands and riparian vegetation. Our study area is the bi-national Santa Cruz Watershed, a topographically complex watershed that straddles the Sonoran Desert and the Madrean Archipelago Ecoregions. In this presentation we focus on historical changes in vegetation and land use in grasslands and riparian areas of the Madrean Ecoregion (San Raphael Valley, Cienega Creek, Sonoita), and compare changes in these areas to changes in the warmer and drier Sonoran Ecoregion. Analysis of historical photography confirms major 20th century vegetation shifts documented in other research: woody plant encroachment, desertification of grasslands, and changing riparian and xeroriparian vegetation occurred in both ecoregions following human settlement. However, vegetation changes over the past decade appear to be more subtle and some of the past trajectories appear to be reversing; most notable are recent mesquite declines in xeroriparian and upland areas, and changes from shrubland to grassland area in the Madrean ecoregion. Land cover changes were temporally variable, reflecting broad climate changes. The most dynamic cover changes occurred during the period from 1989 to 1999, a period with two intense droughts. The degree of vegetation change

  19. Biotechnical performance of vegetal species in slope conservation in Cruz Alta, RS, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates Bisso, Fernando; Durlo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of biotechnical performance of different vegetal species growth in the slope soil conservation and reforest (revegetate). The study was performed with oxic soil talus, in Cruz Alta - RS, Brazil (28°23'28.14" S and 53°22'25.61" W) and began in January 2010. The sow treatments employed were: 1) cuttings of Ateleia glazioveana; 2) cuttings of Pyrostegia venusta; 3) seedlings of Baccharis trimera; 4) Seedlings of Cynodom plectostachyus; 5) blank, no sow. The evaluated parameters were: plant survival ratio (%); vegetal covered percentage; natural revegetation (plants/m2); the slope soil level reduction (cm); and water and soil runoff. C. plectostachyus and B. trimera afforded considerable higher survival (92% and 78.5%, respectively) and vegetation cover of the slope (99.6% and 82.9%) than other species. The natural revegetation showed an increase according to the ground above the slope (146.9 plants/m2) compared with the slope ramp (22.1 plants/m2). Moreover, C. plectostachyus, A. glazioveana, P. venusta, B. trimera and C. plectostachyus treatments showed 34.9, 28.6, 23.0 and 21.0 plants/m2, respectively, when compared with the blank (2.5 plants/m2) in the slope ramp region. Furthermore, the sow line regions gave 91.2 plants/m2) whereas the regions among lines afforded 8.6 plants/m2. Additionally, C. plectostachyus showed soil average drawdown profile decrease of 12.8 mm after 360 days after planting, and A. glazioveana reached 16.9 mm after 540 days according to the blank (34.0 mm). Considering the period of 60 to 360 days, it was observed significant differences in the soil loss estimative and reduction percentage compared to blank were: Blank 127.9 ton/ha/year; A. glazioveana, 117.9 ton/ha/year (-8%); P. venusta, 116.3 ton/ha/year (-9%); B. trimera, 106.7 ton/ha/year (-17%); and C. plectostachyus, 73.2 ton/ha/year (-43%). Thus, C. plectostachyus showed the best survival and vegetal coverage producing significant reduction of

  20. Animal-based remedies as complementary medicines in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rômulo R N; Lima, Helenice N; Tavares, Marília C; Souto, Wedson M S; Barboza, Raynner R D; Vasconcellos, Alexandre

    2008-07-22

    The use of animal products in healing is an ancient and widespread cross-cultural practice. In northeastern Brazil, especially in the semi-arid region, animals and plants are widely used in traditional medicine and play significant roles in healing practices. Zootherapies form an integral part of these cultures, and information about animals is passed from generation to generation through oral folklore. Nevertheless, studies on medicinal animals are still scarce in northeastern Brazil, especially when compared to those focusing on medicinal plants. This paper examines the use and commercialization of animals for medicinal purposes in Brazil's semi-arid caatinga region. Data was obtained through field surveys conducted in the public markets in the city of Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco State, Brazil. We interviewed 16 merchants (9 men and 7 women) who provided information regarding folk remedies based on animal products. A total of 37 animal species (29 families), distributed among 7 taxonomic categories were found to be used to treat 51 different ailments. The most frequently cited treatments focused on the respiratory system, and were mainly related to problems with asthma. Zootherapeutic products are prescribed as single drugs or are mixed with other ingredients. Mixtures may include several to many more valuable medicinal animals added to other larger doses of more common medicinal animals and plants. The uses of certain medicinal animals are associated with popular local beliefs known as 'simpatias'. We identified 2 medicinal species (Struthio camelus and Nasutitermes macrocephalus) not previously documented for Brazil. The use of animals as remedies in the area surveyed is associated with socio economic and cultural factors. Some of the medicinal animal species encountered in this study are included in lists of endangered species. Our results demonstrate that a large variety of animals are used in traditional medicinal practices in Brazil's semi

  1. Determination of source process and the tsunami simulation of the 2013 Santa Cruz earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. C.; Lee, J. W.; Park, E.; Kim, S.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of large tsunamigenic earthquakes, we analyzed the earthquake source process of the 2013 Santa Cruz earthquake and simulated the following tsunami. We first estimated the fault length of about 200 km using 3-day aftershock distribution and the source duration of about 110 seconds using the duration of high-frequency energy radiation (Hara, 2007). Moment magnitude was estimated to be 8.0 using the formula of Hara (2007). From the results of 200 km of fault length and 110 seconds of source duration, we used the initial value of rupture velocity as 1.8 km/s for teleseismic waveform inversions. Teleseismic body wave inversion was carried out using the inversion package by Kikuchi and Kanamori (1991). Teleseismic P waveform data from 14 stations were used and band-pass filter of 0.005 ~ 1 Hz was applied. Our best-fit solution indicated that the earthquake occurred on the northwesterly striking (strike = 305) and shallowly dipping (dip = 13) fault plane. Focal depth was determined to be 23 km indicating shallow event. Moment magnitude of 7.8 was obtained showing somewhat smaller than the result obtained above and that of previous study (Lay et al., 2013). Large slip area was seen around the hypocenter. Using the slip distribution obtained by teleseismic waveform inversion, we calculated the surface deformations using formulas of Okada (1985) assuming as the initial change of sea water by tsunami. Then tsunami simulation was carred out using Conell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model (COMCOT) code and 1 min-grid topographic data for water depth from the General Bathymetric Chart of the Ocenas (GEBCO). According to the tsunami simulation, most of tsunami waves propagated to the directions of southwest and northeast which are perpendicular to the fault strike. DART buoy data were used to verify our simulation. In the presentation, we will discuss more details on the results of source process and tsunami simulation and compare them

  2. Spain: Democracy and the Military.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Advocates of "ruptura" were represented by the Spanish Left, primarily the " Partido Socialista Obrero Espa’nol" (Socialist Workers Party or PSOE) headed by...Felipe Gonzalez and the " Partido Comunista de Espaia" (Communist Party of Spain or PCE) led by Santiago Carrillo. Those desiring "continuismo...privileges. [106] An organized Basque nationalist movement emerged toward the end of the 19th century when Sabino Arona Goiri * Ii founded the " Partido

  3. [Foreigners in Spain in 1991].

    PubMed

    Lora-tamayo D'ocon, G

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of the foreign population living in Spain in 1991 is presented using data from two sources, the 1991 census and the system for regularization of the status of foreign workers, which was brought up to date the same year. The characteristics analyzed include country of origin, current province of residence, and occupation. The differences between the data obtained from the two sources are discussed. (ANNOTATION)

  4. Construction industry accidents in Spain.

    PubMed

    Camino López, Miguel A; Ritzel, Dale O; Fontaneda, Ignacio; González Alcantara, Oscar J

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzed industrial accidents that take place on construction sites and their severity. Eighteen variables were studied. We analyzed the influence of each of these with respect to the severity and fatality of the accident. This descriptive analysis was grounded in 1,630,452 accidents, representing the total number of accidents suffered by workers in the construction sector in Spain over the period 1990-2000. It was shown that age, type of contract, time of accident, length of service in the company, company size, day of the week, and the remainder of the variables under analysis influenced the seriousness of the accident. IMPACT ON INJURY PREVENTION: The results obtained show that different training was needed, depending on the severity of accidents, for different age, length of service in the company, organization of work, and time when workers work. The research provides an insight to the likely causes of construction injuries in Spain. As a result of the analysis, industries and governmental agencies in Spain can start to provide appropriate strategies and training to the construction workers.

  5. Education in the Spain of Autonomous Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido, Jose Luis Garcia

    1983-01-01

    Describes change in education in Spain since the break with socialism in terms of new structural bases, democratic center's decentralization policy, and socialist government's educational program. (AH)

  6. Sole Marks at the base of the late Pleistocene Abrigo Ignimbrite, Tenerife: implications for transport and depositional processes at the base of pyroclastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittari, Adrian; Cas, R. A. F.

    Sole marks, which are common in turbidites, have been observed as casts at the base of the Abrigo Ignimbrite on Tenerife, Canary Islands. They have been engraved by pebble to cobble-sized lithic tools in a soft, cohesive fine-grained substrate. The casts range from long, parallel groove marks, often with the tool embedded at their termination, to short, elongate impact marks and are useful as a flow-direction marker. They were formed from a highly energetic pyroclastic flow pulse and were almost immediately infilled with ash after rapid waning of flow. Large lithic tools, which formed groove marks, were held in place under high gas and grain dynamic pressures and moved forward by their own momentum and the drag force exerted by a highly concentrated granular flow. Impact marks were formed by smaller lithic tools, which had more freedom of movement within the agitated, chaotic flow. Scour structures on the lee side of stationary lithic tools may have formed by local turbulence in their wake.

  7. Altitude Differentiated Aerosol Extinction Over Tenerife (North Atlantic Coast) During ACE-2 by Means of Ground and Airborne Photometry and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formenti, P.; Elias, T.; Welton, J.; Diaz, J. P.; Exposito, F.; Schmid, B.; Powell, D.; Holben, B. N.; Smirnov, A.; Andreae, M. O.; hide

    2000-01-01

    Retrievals of spectral aerosol optical depths (tau(sub a)) by means of sun photometers have been undertaken in Tenerife (28 deg 16' N, 16 deg 36' W) during ACE-2 (June-July 1997). Five ground-based sites were located at four different altitudes in the marine boundary layer and in the free troposphere, from 0 to 3570 m asl. The goal of the investigation was to provide estimates of the vertical aerosol extinction over the island, both under clean and turbid conditions. Inversion of spectral tau(sub a) allowed to retrieve size distributions, from which the single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) and the asymmetry factor g could be estimated as a function of altitude. These parameters were combined to calculate aerosol forcing in the column. Emphasis is put on episodes of increased turbidity, which were observed at different locations simultaneously, and attributed to outbreaks of mineral dust from North Africa. Differentiation of tau(sub a) as a function of altitude provided the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient sigma(sub e). For dust outbreaks, aerosol extinction is concentrated in two distinct layers above and below the strong subsidence inversion around 1200 m asl. Vertical profiles of tau(sub a) and sigma(sub e) are shown for July 8. In some occasions, vertical profiles are compared to LIDAR observations, performed both at sea level and in the low free troposphere, and to airborne measurements of aerosol optical depths.

  8. Altitude Differentiated Aerosol Extinction Over Tenerife (North Atlantic Coast) During ACE-2 by Means of Ground and Airborne Photometry and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formenti, P.; Elias, T.; Welton, J.; Diaz, J. P.; Exposito, F.; Schmid, B.; Powell, D.; Holben, B. N.; Smirnov, A.; Andreae, M. O.; Devaux, C.; Voss, K.; Lelieveld, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Retrievals of spectral aerosol optical depths (tau(sub a)) by means of sun photometers have been undertaken in Tenerife (28 deg 16' N, 16 deg 36' W) during ACE-2 (June-July 1997). Five ground-based sites were located at four different altitudes in the marine boundary layer and in the free troposphere, from 0 to 3570 m asl. The goal of the investigation was to provide estimates of the vertical aerosol extinction over the island, both under clean and turbid conditions. Inversion of spectral tau(sub a) allowed to retrieve size distributions, from which the single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) and the asymmetry factor g could be estimated as a function of altitude. These parameters were combined to calculate aerosol forcing in the column. Emphasis is put on episodes of increased turbidity, which were observed at different locations simultaneously, and attributed to outbreaks of mineral dust from North Africa. Differentiation of tau(sub a) as a function of altitude provided the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient sigma(sub e). For dust outbreaks, aerosol extinction is concentrated in two distinct layers above and below the strong subsidence inversion around 1200 m asl. Vertical profiles of tau(sub a) and sigma(sub e) are shown for July 8. In some occasions, vertical profiles are compared to LIDAR observations, performed both at sea level and in the low free troposphere, and to airborne measurements of aerosol optical depths.

  9. The Solomon Islands Tsunami of 6 February 2013 in the Santa Cruz Islands: Field Survey and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Papantoniou, Antonios; Biukoto, Litea; Albert, Gilly; Wei, Yong

    2014-05-01

    On February 6, 2013 at 01:12:27 UTC (local time: UTC+11), a magnitude Mw 8.0 earthquake occurred 70 km to the west of Ndendo Island (Santa Cruz Island) in the Solomon Islands. The under-thrusting earthquake near a 90° bend, where the Australian plate subducts beneath the Pacific plate generated a locally focused tsunami in the Coral Sea and the South Pacific Ocean. The tsunami claimed the lives of 10 people and injured 15, destroyed 588 houses and partially damaged 478 houses, affecting 4,509 people in 1,066 households corresponding to an estimated 37% of the population of Santa Cruz Island. A multi-disciplinary international tsunami survey team (ITST) was deployed within days of the event to document flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, sediment and coral boulder depositions, land level changes, damage patterns at various scales, performance of the man-made infrastructure and impact on the natural environment. The 19 to 23 February 2013 ITST covered 30 locations on 4 Islands: Ndendo (Santa Cruz), Tomotu Noi (Lord Howe), Nea Tomotu (Trevanion, Malo) and Tinakula. The reconnaissance completely circling Ndendo and Tinakula logged 240 km by small boat and additionally covered 20 km of Ndendo's hard hit western coastline by vehicle. The collected survey data includes more than 80 tsunami runup and flow depth measurements. The tsunami impact peaked at Manoputi on Ndendo's densely populated west coast with maximum tsunami height exceeding 11 m and local flow depths above ground exceeding 7 m. A fast tide-like positive amplitude of 1 m was recorded at Lata wharf inside Graciosa Bay on Ndendo Island and misleadingly reported in the media as representative tsunami height. The stark contrast between the field observations on exposed coastlines and the Lata tide gauge recording highlights the importance of rapid tsunami reconnaissance surveys. Inundation distance and damage more than 500 m inland were recorded at Lata airport on Ndendo Island. Landslides were

  10. Documentation of model input and output values for the geohydrology and mathematical simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitten, H.T.; Londquist, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains listings of the model input and sample output for simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties, California. The files are contained on a 5 1/4-inch diskette. The decompressed files require approximately 5.3 megabytes of disk space on an IBM-compatible microcomputer. (USGS)

  11. [List of the type species of Ceratopogonidae (Diptera, Nematocera) deposited in the Entomological Collection of Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Felippe-Bauer, M; Oliveira Sd, S

    2001-11-01

    A list of all type specimens of the Family Ceratopogonidae, present in the Entomological Collection of Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil is presented. This list includes the genera Bahiahelea, Culicoides, Dasyhelea, Downeshelea, Forcipomyia, Leptoconops, Mallochohelea, Monohelea, Neobezzia, Palpomyia and Sphaerohelea.

  12. Digital Compilation of "Preliminary Map of Landslide Deposits in Santa Cruz County, California, By Cooper-Clark and Associates, 1975": A Digital Map Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Report by Roberts, Sebastian; Barron, Andrew D.; Preface by Brabb, Earl E.; Pike, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    A 1:62,500-scale black-and-white map identifying some 2,000 landslides of various types in Santa Cruz County, California, has been converted to a digital-map database that can be acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey over the Internet or on magnetic tape.

  13. Metasomatic processes within the fertile lithospheric Mantle beneath Don Camilo, Santa Cruz, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntaflos, Th.; Mundl, A.; Bjerg, E. A.; Tschegg, C.; Kosler, J.

    2009-04-01

    formed from residual melts. In contrast, clinopyroxene from mantle dunites enriched LREE (10 x PM) and LILE suggesting that the metasomatic agent was fluid-rich silicate melt. Calculated equilibrium P-T conditions cover a wide range from 800 to 1100 °C. Considering the crustal thickness in the area being around 35 km, a pressure between 12 and 17 kbar could be assumed as reasonable, indicating that these xenoliths were extracted from shallow depths of 40 to 60 km. Model calculations have shown that the lithospheric Mantle beneath Don Camilo, in Santa Cruz province is fertile and that spinel peridotites experienced low degrees of partial melting (2-8% batch melting in the spinel peridotite field). The metasomatic agent was a fluid-rich silicate melt of alkalibasaltic composition, presumably similar to this, which affected the Cerro Clark xenoliths north of Don Camilo locality. Don Camilo mantle xenoliths, like Tres Lagos, Cerro Redondo and Gobernador Gregores, does not show evidence for interaction of the lithospheric Mantle in southern Patagonia with subduction related components.

  14. Hydrogeologic investigations of the Miocene Nogales Formation in the Nogales Area, Upper Santa Cruz Basin, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Gray, Floyd; Bultman, Mark W.; Menges, Christopher M.

    2016-07-28

    and mixed-layer clay. X-ray diffraction analyses verified clinoptilolite as the only zeolite in Nogales Formation samples; they also verified the presence of smectite and illite clay and some kaolinite. Samples which contain greater amounts of clinoptilolite and lesser amounts of smectite have high porosity and SHC in narrow ranges. However, samples with abundant smectite and lesser amounts of clinoptilolite span the entire ranges of porosity and SHC for the formation.All members of the Nogales Formation are fractured and faulted as a result of Tertiary Basin and Range extensional deformation, which was broadly contemporaneous with deposition of the formation. These structures may have significant influence on groundwater flow in the upper Santa Cruz basin because, although many of the sediments in the formation have characteristics indicating they may be productive aquifers based only on porous-media flow, fracturing in these sediments may further enhance permeability and groundwater flow in these basin-fill aquifers by orders of magnitude.

  15. How do Rivers Meander in Rock? Insights from the Santa Cruz Mountains, CA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. N.; Finnegan, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    Meandering in bedrock rivers is not well understood, despite the fact that both sinuosity and strath terraces (both products of meandering) are commonly interpreted in tectonic or climatic contexts. To better understand bedrock river meandering, here we compare a meandering bedrock river in the Santa Cruz Mountains, USA (Pescadero Creek) to an adjacent river (Butano Creek) that does not meander. This natural experiment allows us to isolate the effects of lithology on lateral erosion processes since these two adjacent rivers have similar driving stress, valley orientation to prevailing weather systems, and structural setting, but incise contrasting lithologies: weak sandstone along Butano and weak mudstone along Pescadero. Building on published observations that some mudstones lose strength when subjected to wetting and drying of expansive clay minerals, we test the hypothesis that lateral bank erosion occurs in Pescadero Creek because wetting and drying of mudstone above the low water line weakens bank rock to the point where it can easily be detached by clear water flows on the exposed outside banks of river bends. We collected rock from below low summer water levels in order to explore how drying and rewetting influence the mechanical properties of the two sampled lithologies. Tensile strength measurements reveal that the mudstone was weak (~ 0.2 MPa, n = 6) before drying, visibly fractured but slightly stronger when measured dry (~ 0.6 MPa, n = 11), and upon rewetting disintegrated to washload, making strength testing impossible. Sandstone strength varied between sample sites (~0.1 - 0.8MPa, n=12) but has no consistent relationship to wetting, drying or rewetting. In the field, we tested the detachability of bedrock under a calibrated water jet and found that only mudstone above low water levels (subjected to repeated wetting and drying) was detachable by clear water flows. Saturated mudstone (from at the low water line) and sandstone (both dry and wet) did not

  16. Field Surveys of Rare Plants on Santa Cruz Island, California, 2003-2006: Historical Records and Current Distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEachern, A. Kathryn; Chess, Katherine A.; Niessen, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Santa Cruz Island is the largest of the northern Channel Islands located off the coast of California. It is owned and managed as a conservation reserve by The Nature Conservancy and the Channel Islands National Park. The island is home to nine plant taxa listed in 1997 as threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act, because of declines related to nearly 150 years of ranching on the island. Feral livestock were removed from the island as a major conservation step, which was part of a program completed in early 2007 with the eradication of pigs and turkeys. For the first time in more than a century, the rare plants of Santa Cruz Island have a chance to recover in the wild. This study provides survey information and living plant materials needed for recovery management of the listed taxa. We developed a database containing information about historical collections of the nine taxa and used it to plan a survey strategy. Our objectives were to relocate as many of the previously known populations as possible, with emphasis on documenting sites not visited in several decades, sites that were poorly documented in the historical record, and sites spanning the range of environmental conditions inhabited by the taxa. From 2003 through 2006, we searched for and found 39 populations of the taxa, indicating that nearly 80 percent of the populations known earlier in the 1900s still existed. Most populations are small and isolated, occupying native-dominated habitat patches in a highly fragmented and invaded landscape; they are still at risk of declining through population losses. Most are not expanding beyond the edges of their habitat patches. However, most taxa appeared to have good seed production and a range of size classes in populations, indicating a good capacity for plant recruitment and population growth in these restricted sites. For these taxa, seed collection and outplanting might be a good strategy to increase numbers of populations for species

  17. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total

  18. Teaching for democracy in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Isabel Cárdenas; Sanchez, Concepción Martin

    1995-05-01

    As part of the process of re-establishing democracy, Spain is reforming its educational system to promote democratic values. This article describes an experiment in education for democracy that was carried out among 86 pupils, between 12 and 14 years old, in the Spanish region of Murcia. A teaching programme was developed, in which students were encouraged to study how power is exercised in the home, the school, the community, the nation and the world. Results have been generally positive in arousing pupils' interest in democracy and helping them to understand democratic processes.

  19. [Marseille fever imported from Spain].

    PubMed

    Freibergerová, Michaela; Parízková, Radana; Husa, Petr; Burget, Ivo; Chalupa, Pavel

    2004-08-01

    The authors are presenting a case of young female with Marseille fever contracted in Spain. The clinical manifestation of the illness was characterized by fevers, exanthema, headache and a typical skin rash ("the black spot") and prompted the authors to strongly consider the diagnosis of Marseille fever and to initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed later by serology. The article introduces new taxonomy of Rickettsial species and presents an overview and epidemiological aspects of specific diseases caused by them. The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of Marseille fever are discussed in greater detail.

  20. [Nuclear medicine in Spain: high technology 2013].

    PubMed

    Soriano Castrejón, A M; Prats Rivera, E; Alonso Farto, J C; Vallejo Casas, J A; Rodriguez Gasen, A; Setoain Perego, J; Arbizu Lostao, J

    2014-01-01

    This article details the high technology equipment in Spain obtained through a survey sent to the three main provider companies of equipment installed in Spain. The geographical distribution of high technology by Autonomous Communities and its antiquity have been analyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. The Dance of Spain: Classical Folkloric Flamenco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Clifford J.

    A text on the classical and folk dance of Spain includes a pretest, provided in both English and Spanish; text about the dance in general and the dance of Spain, both classical and folkloric; tests on the text, in both English and Spanish; more specific readings about the traditions of flamenco, castanets, and "el jaleo"; a glossary of…

  2. Teaching Gender and Geography in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Ramon, Maria-Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of gender themes into university teaching in geography in Spain in 1989, significant gains have been made but challenges remain in relation to placing gender into undergraduate curricula and developing teaching resources in local languages. Geographers in Spain have to meet those challenges in the near future in order to…

  3. Digital Economy and Management in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Aguila, Ana R.; Padilla, Antonio; Serarols, Christian; Veciana, Jose M.

    2003-01-01

    Explains the digital economy and its impact on the firm. Highlights include subsectors of the digital economy, including infrastructure; analysis of the digital economy in Spain; analysis of the ICT (information and communication technology) sector in Spain; and electronic commerce through the Internet. (LRW)

  4. Teaching Gender and Geography in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Ramon, Maria-Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of gender themes into university teaching in geography in Spain in 1989, significant gains have been made but challenges remain in relation to placing gender into undergraduate curricula and developing teaching resources in local languages. Geographers in Spain have to meet those challenges in the near future in order to…

  5. Digital Economy and Management in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Aguila, Ana R.; Padilla, Antonio; Serarols, Christian; Veciana, Jose M.

    2003-01-01

    Explains the digital economy and its impact on the firm. Highlights include subsectors of the digital economy, including infrastructure; analysis of the digital economy in Spain; analysis of the ICT (information and communication technology) sector in Spain; and electronic commerce through the Internet. (LRW)

  6. The Politics of Language: Spain's Minority Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mar-Molinero, Clare

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the linguistic and legal framework in Spain and its attempts to define nationhood and a collective identity that encompasses its three major linguistic minority groups. The four major language groups of Spain are discussed with regard to official language policy and legislation. Article 3 of the 1978 Spanish constitution was…

  7. The Dance of Spain: Classical Folkloric Flamenco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Clifford J.

    A text on the classical and folk dance of Spain includes a pretest, provided in both English and Spanish; text about the dance in general and the dance of Spain, both classical and folkloric; tests on the text, in both English and Spanish; more specific readings about the traditions of flamenco, castanets, and "el jaleo"; a glossary of…

  8. Multi-gauge Calibration for modeling the Semi-Arid Santa Cruz Watershed in Arizona-Mexico Border Area Using SWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niraula, Rewati; Norman, Laura A.; Meixner, Thomas; Callegary, James B.

    2012-01-01

    In most watershed-modeling studies, flow is calibrated at one monitoring site, usually at the watershed outlet. Like many arid and semi-arid watersheds, the main reach of the Santa Cruz watershed, located on the Arizona-Mexico border, is discontinuous for most of the year except during large flood events, and therefore the flow characteristics at the outlet do not represent the entire watershed. Calibration is required at multiple locations along the Santa Cruz River to improve model reliability. The objective of this study was to best portray surface water flow in this semiarid watershed and evaluate the effect of multi-gage calibration on flow predictions. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated at seven monitoring stations, which improved model performance and increased the reliability of flow, in the Santa Cruz watershed. The most sensitive parameters to affect flow were found to be curve number (CN2), soil evaporation and compensation coefficient (ESCO), threshold water depth in shallow aquifer for return flow to occur (GWQMN), base flow alpha factor (Alpha_Bf), and effective hydraulic conductivity of the soil layer (Ch_K2). In comparison, when the model was established with a single calibration at the watershed outlet, flow predictions at other monitoring gages were inaccurate. This study emphasizes the importance of multi-gage calibration to develop a reliable watershed model in arid and semiarid environments. The developed model, with further calibration of water quality parameters will be an integral part of the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM), an online decision support tool, to assess the impacts of climate change and urban growth in the Santa Cruz watershed.

  9. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at

  10. Description of a New Galapagos Giant Tortoise Species (Chelonoidis; Testudines: Testudinidae) from Cerro Fatal on Santa Cruz Island

    PubMed Central

    Chiari, Ylenia; Garrick, Ryan C.; Russello, Michael A.; Benavides, Edgar; Watkins-Colwell, Gregory J.; Glaberman, Scott; Tapia, Washington; Gibbs, James P.; Cayot, Linda J.; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomy of giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) is currently based primarily on morphological characters and island of origin. Over the last decade, compelling genetic evidence has accumulated for multiple independent evolutionary lineages, spurring the need for taxonomic revision. On the island of Santa Cruz there is currently a single named species, C. porteri. Recent genetic and morphological studies have shown that, within this taxon, there are two evolutionarily and spatially distinct lineages on the western and eastern sectors of the island, known as the Reserva and Cerro Fatal populations, respectively. Analyses of DNA from natural populations and museum specimens, including the type specimen for C. porteri, confirm the genetic distinctiveness of these two lineages and support elevation of the Cerro Fatal tortoises to the rank of species. In this paper, we identify DNA characters that define this new species, and infer evolutionary relationships relative to other species of Galapagos tortoises. PMID:26488886

  11. Push moraines in the upper valley of Santa Cruz river, southwest Argentina. Structural analysis and relationship with Late Pleistocene paleoclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyanes, Gabriel; Massabie, Armando

    2015-01-01

    The upper cliff of the Santa Cruz River was used to assess the proglacial environments of the Argentino Glacier outlet of Late Pleistocene age. These cliffs show glaciolacustrine, fluvioglacial and till deposits, where only the first one are deformed. Glacial landforms in the area and these structures suggest that the ice mass advanced, topographically controlled, towards the east from the Patagonian Ice Sheet pushing up the proglacial sediments. The spatial arrangement of thrusts and overturned folds, the drumlins-flutes moraine directions and the end moraines shape, allow inferring the dynamic and the Argentino glacier profile. Detailed analyses of the glaciotectonic structures indicate that these have two origins: load in the north with stress transfer to the southeast, and push from the west. Through the analysis of deformed sediments, their thickness and their sedimentary and structural features, three zones of deformations were recognized. Each of these zones was associated to glacial advances because of changes of the regional climate conditions.

  12. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the lower Santa Cruz area, Pinal, Pima, and Maricopa Counties, Arizona, 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konieczki, A.D.; English, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    The lower Santa Cruz area includes about 5,400 square miles in south-central Arizona and is the second largest agricultural area in the State. The area depends mainly on ground water for irrigation, and in 1976 about 966,000 acre-feet of ground water was pumped from the area. As a result of the large-scale long-term withdrawal of ground water, water levels have declined , and the direction of ground-water flow has changed. Since 1923 , declines of nearly 500 feet have occurred near Stanfield. Information shown on the maps (scale 1:125,000) includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, specific conductance, fluoride concentration, change in water level (1923-77), and land use. Hydrographs of the water level in selected wells and a table of historical pumpage also are included. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Processing and interpretation of aeromagnetic data for the Santa Cruz Basin - Patagonia Mountains area, south-central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted with Sial Geosciences Inc. for a detailed aeromagnetic survey of the Santa Cruz basin and Patagonia Mountains area of south-central Arizona. The contractor's Operational Report is included as an Appendix in this report. This section describes the data processing performed by the USGS on the digital aeromagnetic data received from the contractor. This processing was required in order to remove flight line noise, estimate the depths to the magnetic sources, and estimate the locations of the magnetic contacts. Three methods were used for estimating source depths and contact locations: the horizontal gradient method, the analytic signal method, and the local wavenumber method. The depth estimates resulting from each method are compared, and the contact locations are combined into an interpretative map showing the dip direction for some contacts.

  14. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Kate; Steefel, Carl I.; White, Art F.; Stonestrom, Dave A.

    2009-05-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the

  15. Field-trip guide to the southeastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains in Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.; Messina, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This field trip is an introduction to the geology of the southeastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains in southern Santa Clara County. Seven stops include four short hikes to access rock exposures and views of the foothills east of Loma Prieta Peak between Gilroy and San José. Field-trip destinations highlight the dominant rock types of the "Franciscan assemblage" including outcrops of serpentinite, basalt, limestone, ribbon chert, graywacke sandstone, and shale. General discussions include how the rocks formed, and how tectonism and stream erosion have changed the landscape through time. All field trip stops are on public land; most are near reservoir dams of the Santa Clara Valley Water District. In addition, stops include examination of an Ohlone Indian heritage site and the New Almaden Mining Museum.

  16. Description of a New Galapagos Giant Tortoise Species (Chelonoidis; Testudines: Testudinidae) from Cerro Fatal on Santa Cruz Island.

    PubMed

    Poulakakis, Nikos; Edwards, Danielle L; Chiari, Ylenia; Garrick, Ryan C; Russello, Michael A; Benavides, Edgar; Watkins-Colwell, Gregory J; Glaberman, Scott; Tapia, Washington; Gibbs, James P; Cayot, Linda J; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomy of giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) is currently based primarily on morphological characters and island of origin. Over the last decade, compelling genetic evidence has accumulated for multiple independent evolutionary lineages, spurring the need for taxonomic revision. On the island of Santa Cruz there is currently a single named species, C. porteri. Recent genetic and morphological studies have shown that, within this taxon, there are two evolutionarily and spatially distinct lineages on the western and eastern sectors of the island, known as the Reserva and Cerro Fatal populations, respectively. Analyses of DNA from natural populations and museum specimens, including the type specimen for C. porteri, confirm the genetic distinctiveness of these two lineages and support elevation of the Cerro Fatal tortoises to the rank of species. In this paper, we identify DNA characters that define this new species, and infer evolutionary relationships relative to other species of Galapagos tortoises.

  17. Nearshore disposal of fine-grained sediment in a high-energy environment: Santa Cruz Harbor case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Katherine; van Ormondt, Maarten; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Presto, Katherine; Tonnon, Pieter K.; Rosati, Julie D.; Wang, Ping; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Current regulations in California prohibit the disposal of more than 20% fine-grained sediment in the coastal zone; this threshold is currently being investigated to determine if this environmental regulation can be improved upon. A field monitoring and numerical modeling experiment took place late 2 009 to determine the fate of fine-grained dredge disposal material from Santa Cruz Harbor, California, U.S.A. A multi-nested, hydrodynamic-sediment transport modeling approach was used to simulate the direction and dispersal of the dredge plume. Result s show that the direction and dispersal of the plume was influenced by the wave  climate, a large proportion of which moved in a easterly direction during wave events. Therefore it is vitally important to accurately simulate the tides, waves, currents, temperature and salinity when modeling the dispersal of the fine-grained dredge plume. 

  18. Graben structure in the Las Cañadas edifice (Tenerife, Canary Islands): implications for active degassing and insights on the caldera formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Inés; Soriano, Carles; Martí, Joan; Pérez, Nemesio

    2005-06-01

    A graben structure has been identified at the western area of the Las Cañadas caldera wall, here referred as the Los Azulejos Graben. This graben is 1 km wide and is bounded by two major normal faults trending NE-SW, the Los Azulejos Fault and the Ucanca Fault. The graben was active for at least 0.5 Ma, from the end of the Ucanca Fm to the end of the Guajara Fm, and before the collapse of the Las Cañadas edifice that formed the western caldera. A right-lateral transtension regime operated in the graben as suggested by small fault orientations and kinematics. The prolongation of the NE rift zone of Tenerife to the Cañadas edifice is the most likely volcano-tectonic scenario for the graben. In this context, inflation of phonolitic shallow magma chambers may have produced reverse faults and reactivation of normal faults. An intense and widespread hydrothermal alteration, here called Azulejos-type, occurred mainly before the graben formation, while a fault-related hydrothermal alteration occurred during and after the graben. Diffuse carbon dioxide and hydrogen degassing in and around the Las Cañadas caldera show relatively enriched values along a NE-SW trend suggesting that faults in the Los Azulejos Graben act as a pathway for deep-seated gases to the surface. Diffuse degassing and hydrothermalism indicate that the graben area has been a zone of intense fluid circulation during the evolution of the Las Cañadas edifice.

  19. A complex Quaternary ignimbrite-forming phonolitic eruption: the Poris Member of the Diego Hernández Formation (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, C. J.; Wolff, J. A.; Nichols, H. J.; Cas, R. A. F.; Martí, J.

    2002-11-01

    The Poris Member (0.28 Ma) of the Diego Hernández Formation (Tenerife, Canary Islands) is a widespread succession of plinian fall, surge and non-welded ignimbrite deposits. It was erupted from the northeastern sector of the multicyclic Las Cañadas Caldera, the summit caldera complex of the Las Cañadas Edifice. We present new stratigraphic data which allow the evolution of the eruption to be divided into six main stages: (1) an initial surge-producing phreatomagmatic phase. (2) Generation of a buoyant plinian column culminating in vent-wall collapse and temporary vent blockage. (3) A resumption of phreatomagmatic activity, producing accretionary lapilli-bearing ash surges and a phreatomagmatic ignimbrite. (4) Sustained column collapse, resulting in the progressive aggradation of a complex, compositionally layered ignimbrite sequence. (5) A late plinian phase marked by sharp chemical zonation. (6) Final vent destruction and the generation of multiple surges and pyroclastic flows. Volume calculations indicate a total erupted volume in the order of 13-14 km 3 (3-4 km 3 dense rock equivalent), which together with facies and lithic analysis implies that a small-scale caldera collapse occurred, contributing to the incremental enlargement of the Las Cañadas Caldera. The geochemistry and mingling inter-relationships of four magmatic endmembers, ranging from alkaline mafic to evolved phonolitic liquids, indicate that two magma chambers fed stages 4 and 5 of the eruption sequence. The eruption was triggered when mafic magma intruded the two-chamber system.

  20. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31... from Spain. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) may be imported into the United States from Spain only... subpart: (a) The peppers must be grown in the Alicante or Almeria Province of Spain in...

  1. Evolution of the Cañadas edifice and its implications for the origin of the Cañadas Caldera (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancochea, E.; Huertas, M. J.; Cantagrel, J. M.; Coello, J.; Fúster, J. M.; Arnaud, N.; Ibarrola, E.

    1999-02-01

    The volcano-stratigraphic and geochronologic data presented in this work show that the Tenerife central zone has been occupied during the last 3 Ma by shield or central composite volcanoes which reached more than 3000 m in height. The last volcanic system, the presently active Teide-Pico Viejo Complex began to form approximately 150 ka ago. The first Cañadas Edifice (CE) volcanic activity took place between about 3.5 Ma and 2.7 Ma. The CE-I is formed mainly by basalts, trachybasalts and trachytes. The remains of this phase outcrop in the Cañadas Wall (CW) sectors of La Angostura (3.5-3.0 Ma and 3.0-2.7 Ma), Boca de Tauce (3.0 Ma), and in the bottom of some external radial ravines (3.5 Ma). The position of its main emission center was located in the central part of the CC. The volcano could have reached 3000 m in height. This edifice underwent a partial destruction by failure and flank collapse, forming debris-avalanches during the 2.6-2.3 Ma period. The debris-avalanche deposits can be seen in the most distal zones in the N flank of the CE-I (Tigaiga Breccia). A new volcanic phase, whose deposits overlie the remains of CE-I and the former debris-avalanche deposits, constituted a new volcanic edifice, the CE-II. The dyke directions analysis and the morphological reconstruction suggest that the CE-II center was situated somewhat westward of the CE-I, reaching some 3200 m in height. The CE-II formations are well exposed on the CW, especially at the El Cedro (2.3-2.00 Ma) sector. They are also frequent in the S flank of the edifice (2.25-1.89 Ma) in Tejina (2.5-1.87 Ma) as well as in the Tigaiga massif to the N (2.23 Ma). During the last periods of activity of CE-II, important explosive eruptions took place forming ignimbrites, pyroclastic flows, and fall deposits of trachytic composition. Their ages vary between 1.5 and 1.6 Ma (Adeje ignimbrites, to the W). In the CW, the Upper Ucanca phonolitic Unit (1.4 Ma) could be the last main episode of the CE-II. Afterwards

  2. Clinical biochemistry education in Spain.

    PubMed

    Queraltó, J M

    1994-12-31

    Clinical biochemistry in Spain was first established in 1978 as an independent specialty. It is one of several clinical laboratory sciences specialties, together with haematology, microbiology, immunology and general laboratory (Clinical analysis, análisis clinicos). Graduates in Medicine, Pharmacy, Chemistry and Biological Sciences can enter post-graduate training in Clinical Chemistry after a nation-wide examination. Training in an accredited Clinical Chemistry department is 4 years. A national committee for medical and pharmacist specialties advises the government on the number of trainees, program and educational units accreditation criteria. Technical staff includes nurses and specifically trained technologists. Accreditation of laboratories is developed at different regional levels. The Spanish Society for Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Pathology (SECQ), the national representative in the IFCC, has 1600 members, currently publishes a scientific journal (Química Clinica) and a newsletter. It organizes a continuous education program, a quality control program and an annual Congress.

  3. Malignant external otitis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Espejo, Antonio; Valenciano-Moreno, Inmaculada; Ramírez-Llorens, Rafael; Pérez-Monteagudo, Palmira

    Malignant external otitis is a necrotizing infection, which extends from the squamous epithelium of the ear canal to the adjacent tissue. The objective of the study was to investigate its incidence and other epidemiological data in Spain, reporting the largest case series to date. A descriptive, retrospective study of the Spanish population was carried out using the minimum basic data set (MBDS) based on data of patients admitted to hospitals in the 2008-2013 period. Patients whose diagnosis (principal or secondary) at discharge was encoded as 380.14 (malignant external otitis), according to ICD-9-CM, were included as cases. The Spanish incidence rate was calculated for all its communities and provinces, as well as by season and mortality. A total of 355 patients (302 as principal diagnosis and 53 as secondary) were diagnosed. The incidence rate was 1.30 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.44) per 106 inhabitants and year, although there were variations among geographical areas. The median age of cases with main diagnosis was 74 years (range 10-95 years). The predominant age group was in patients over 84 years old (19.3 cases per 10(6) inhabitants and year). The incidence was higher in men and the male-female relative risk was 2.4. Diabetes was present in 74.6% of patients. The diagnosis was predominant in the last quarter of the year. The gross in-hospital mortality rate was 3.7%. Malignant external otitis is seen mostly among male elderly and diabetic patients. The incidence and mortality rate are low in Spain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of content and estimation of daily intake of cadmium and lead in several varieties of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivated in the Canary Islands (Spain).

    PubMed

    Luis, G; Rubio, C; González-Weller, D; Gutiérrez, A J; Revert, C; Hardisson, A

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring the metal content in foods such as potatoes is an important aspect of food safety and regulation. Samples of nine varieties of potatoes (73 samples of local potatoes and 77 samples of imported potatoes) were randomly obtained from supermarkets, farmers markets, and farmer plots in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). The edible portion (pulp) was the only part considered for analysis because Spaniards traditionally eat only peeled potatoes. Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Cd concentrations ranged from 0.006 mg/kg in the Cara and Negra varieties to 0.019 mg/kg in the Bonita variety, and Pb concentrations ranged from 0.007 mg/kg in the Up-to-date variety to 0.023 mg/kg in the Recara variety. The mean concentrations of Cd (0.01 mg/kg) and Pb (0.014 mg/kg) were below the limits established by European regulations for potatoes (0.1 mg/kg of wet weight for each metal). Based on a mean consumption of 143.2 g of potato per person per day for the Canary Islands population, the mean daily intakes of Cd (0.015 mg/day) and Pb (0.023 mg/day) were below the legislated respective tolerable weekly intakes. Thus, the samples analyzed were considered safe to eat with regard to the metal concentrations found.

  5. The New Science Policy in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Julio R.

    1987-01-01

    Spain has begun a serious effort to increase its scientific and technological research efforts and to develop a large body of qualified researchers to participate in areas of science important to the European Economic Community. (MSE)

  6. Recent migrations from Morocco to Spain.

    PubMed

    Bodega, I; Cebrian, J A; Franchini, T; Lora-tamayo, G; Martin-lou, A

    1995-01-01

    "This study addressed the problem of the Moroccan immigration into Spain within the context of South-North movements, focusing on analyzing provisional data from the last immigrant regularization in the country completed during the end months of 1991."

  7. A Multi-Gage Calibration Approach for Modeling a Semiarid Santa Cruz watershed in Arizona-Mexico Border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, R.; Meixner, T.; Norman, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Flow at the outlet does not sufficiently represent underlying processes for an entire watershed in semiarid climates, where the flow from much of the catchment may not reach the outlet most of the time. For modeling these watersheds, calibration to discharge is required not only at the watershed outlet but also in various locations within the watershed to best capture real watershed conditions. The objective of this study is to develop a reliable model for the Santa Cruz watershed to analyze the impact of land use and climate change on hydrology and water quality in this semiarid basin. The semiarid Santa Cruz watershed (Lat:34oN and Long:-111oW) is 9,000 km2 and located in southern Arizona, United States (85%) and northern Sonora, Mexico (15%). In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to calibrate the flow at seven monitoring stations to increase the reliability of flow and therefore water quality predictions for the entire basin. The model performance was evaluated based on observed hydrograph, Mass balance error (MBE) coefficient of determination (R2) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE). We began the calibration by identifying the most sensitive parameters using the Latin hypercube global sensitivity approach, identifying that the baseflow recession coefficient, the effective hydraulic conductivity in main channel (transmission loss), the curve number and the soil evaporation compensation factor as the most sensitive parameters. Next, we manually calibrated the model at the USGS gage near the outlet by modifying these parameters. Although the model was validated well at the outlet, the model was not able to validate the flow at other USGS gages inside the watershed. Thus we calibrated the model in sequential order from upstream to downstream gages by further adjusting these parameters. A significant amount of water is lost through transmission loss in our modeling of the Santa Cruz. In SWAT, by default the loss from the streambed is set

  8. Comparative study of two tsunamigenic earthquakes in the Solomon Islands: 2015 Mw 7.0 normal-fault and 2013 Santa Cruz Mw 8.0 megathrust earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Harada, Tomoya; Satake, Kenji; Ishibe, Takeo; Gusman, Aditya Riadi

    2016-05-01

    The July 2015 Mw 7.0 Solomon Islands tsunamigenic earthquake occurred ~40 km north of the February 2013 Mw 8.0 Santa Cruz earthquake. The proximity of the two epicenters provided unique opportunities for a comparative study of their source mechanisms and tsunami generation. The 2013 earthquake was an interplate event having a thrust focal mechanism at a depth of 30 km while the 2015 event was a normal-fault earthquake occurring at a shallow depth of 10 km in the overriding Pacific Plate. A combined use of tsunami and teleseismic data from the 2015 event revealed the north dipping fault plane and a rupture velocity of 3.6 km/s. Stress transfer analysis revealed that the 2015 earthquake occurred in a region with increased Coulomb stress following the 2013 earthquake. Spectral deconvolution, assuming the 2015 tsunami as empirical Green's function, indicated the source periods of the 2013 Santa Cruz tsunami as 10 and 22 min.

  9. Soils of the coastal area of Santa Fé and Santa Cruz islands (Galápagos). Their micromorphology, mineralogy and genesis compared.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoops, Georges; Dumon, Mathijs; Van Ranst, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Santa Fé is a small island situated about 15 km SW of Santa Cruz and has a similar petrographic composition. The centre of Santa Cruz reaches up to 950 m a.s.l., Santa Fé is nowhere higher that 255 m. Even in the dry season the high mountain region of Santa Cruz profits therefore of an almost continuous drizzly rain (garrúa) resulting from the cooling of the rising moist air. The dry coastal zones are covered by sparse Opuntia vegetation. In the coastal soils a double to open spaced porphyric c/f related distribution pattern prevails. The micromass is greyish to yellowish brown on Santa Fé, reddish on Santa Cruz. The b-fabric is weakly granostriated, rarely calcitic crystallitic. The coarse material is restricted to fresh grains of plagioclase > iddingsite > augite > rare olivine, and some fresh basalt fragments. Remnants of illuvial clay coatings are more common on Santa Cruz. Only on Santa Fé hard, yellowish nodules (up to 700 µm) with a strongly mosaic speckled b-fabric and first order grey interference colours occur; their nature and genesis is a point of discussion. X-ray diffraction revealed the clay fraction of these soils to be comparable: poorly crystalline 2:1 phyllosilicates with broad irregular 001 reflections swelling to 1.8 nm after glycolation and collapsing to 1.0 nm after K-saturation and heating. Poorly crystalline kaolinite reflections are more prominent on Santa Cruz, whereas mica-like components (1.00 nm reflections) are restricted to Santa Fé. The presence of unweathered coarse material in an abundant micromass of alteration clay indicates a disequilibrium, and points to a transport of the fine material, in solid phase (colluvium) and/or as solution rather than an in situ weathering. Comparing the total chemical composition (corrected for LOI) of the coastal soils of Santa Cruz and Santa Fé with the average rock composition of both islands, one notes in the soils an increase in Al, Fe, Ti and K, and a loss of Mg, Ca and Na. On Santa F

  10. Measuring the impacts of natural amenities and the US-Mexico Border, on housing values in the Santa Cruz Watershed, using spatially-weighted hedonic modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amaya, Gladys; Norman, Laura M.; Frisvold, George

    2011-01-01

    This presentation will provide a synopsis of the quality of life and hedonics literature review used to develop this research agenda. Variables relevant for local environmental management, having significant effects on property values, will be discussed. The final results obtained from this study can be used determine the benefits of preserving or developing land binationally and will be uploaded to the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM), an online Ecosystem Services tool, being created to promote sustainable development in the Borderlands.

  11. Fossil localities of the Santa Cruz Formation (Early Miocene, Patagonia, Argentina) prospected by Carlos Ameghino in 1887 revisited and the location of the Notohippidian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernicola, Juan Carlos; Cuitiño, José I.; Vizcaíno, Sergio F.; Bargo, M. Susana; Kay, Richard F.

    2014-07-01

    Between January and September of 1887 Carlos Ameghino carried out his first geologic and paleontological expedition to the Río Santa Cruz, Patagonia. Based on the fossils and geologic information compiled, in 1887 and 1889, Florentino Ameghino named more than 120 new species of extinct mammals and his Formación Santacruceña and Piso Santacruceño (Santacrucian stage). Data published by both brothers state that the specimens were collected in outcrops by the Río Santa Cruz, between 90 and 200 km west of its mouth. However, information in the posthumously published letters and Travel Diary of C. Ameghino allows us to recognize a fourth locality, Río Bote, at about 50 km further southwest. In 1900, 1902, F. Ameghino divided the Piso Santacruceño in a younger étage Santacruzienne and older étage Notohippidéen, restricting the geographical distribution of the latter to Kar Aiken locality, northeast of Lago Argentino. However, 15 of the 54 species that F. Ameghino listed as exclusively Notohippidian stage already had been named on specimens collected South to the Río Santa Cruz in 1887, two year prior to C. Ameghino's first visit to Kar Aiken. Based on historical information and several expeditions to the Río Santa Cruz and its environs, in this contribution we establish the geographical locations of the 1887 localities, formalize their names, evaluate the stratigraphic position of the fossil-bearing levels, and analyze the geographic extension of the Notohippidian, inferring that Río Bote is where C. Ameghino first collected species that came to define the Notohippidian.

  12. Type material of Platyhelminthes (Monogenoidea) housed in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1979 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Daniela A; Mainenti, Adriana; Sanches, Magda; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    A catalogue of type material of monogenoids deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), between 1979 and 2016, is presented, given that the last list of types was produced in 1979. The monogenoid collection comprises type lots for 203 species, distributed across 14 families and 68 genera. Specific names are listed systematically, followed by type host, infection site, type locality, specimens with the collection numbers and references. The classification and the nomenclature of the species have been updated.

  13. Causes of mortality of wild birds submitted to the Charles Darwin Research Station, Santa Cruz, Galapagos, Ecuador from 2002-2004.

    PubMed

    Gottdenker, Nicole L; Walsh, Timothy; Jiménez-Uzcátegui, Gustavo; Betancourt, Franklin; Cruz, Marilyn; Soos, Catherine; Miller, R Eric; Parker, Patricia G

    2008-10-01

    Necropsy findings were reviewed from wild birds submitted to the Charles Darwin Research Station, Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos Archipelago between 2004 and 2006. One hundred and ninety cases from 27 different species were submitted, and 178 of these cases were evaluated grossly or histologically. Trauma and trauma-related deaths (n=141) dominated necropsy submissions. Infectious causes of avian mortality included myiasis due to Philornis sp. (n=6), avian pox (n=1), and schistosomosis (n=1).

  14. Development of a high-resolution binational vegetation map of the Santa Cruz River riparian corridor and surrounding watershed, southern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Norman, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the development of a binational vegetation map developed for the Santa Cruz Watershed, which straddles the southern border of Arizona and the northern border of Sonora, Mexico. The map was created as an environmental input to the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM) that is being created by the U.S. Geological Survey for the watershed. The SCWEPM is a map-based multicriteria evaluation tool that allows stakeholders to explore tradeoffs between valued ecosystem services at multiple scales within a participatory decision-making process. Maps related to vegetation type and are needed for use in modeling wildlife habitat and other ecosystem services. Although detailed vegetation maps existed for the U.S. side of the border, there was a lack of consistent data for the Santa Cruz Watershed in Mexico. We produced a binational vegetation classification of the Santa Cruz River riparian habitat and watershed vegetation based on NatureServe Terrestrial Ecological Systems (TES) units using Classification And Regression Tree (CART) modeling. Environmental layers used as predictor data were derived from a seasonal set of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images (spring, summer, and fall) and from a 30-meter digital-elevation-model (DEM) grid. Because both sources of environmental data are seamless across the international border, they are particularly suited to this binational modeling effort. Training data were compiled from existing field data for the riparian corridor and data collected by the NM-GAP (New Mexico Gap Analysis Project) team for the original Southwest Regional Gap Analysis Project (SWReGAP) modeling effort. Additional training data were collected from core areas of the SWReGAP classification itself, allowing the extrapolation of the SWReGAP mapping into the Mexican portion of the watershed without collecting additional training data.

  15. Panmixia supports divergence with gene flow in Darwin's small ground finch, Geospiza fuliginosa, on Santa Cruz, Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Galligan, Toby H; Donnellan, Stephen C; Sulloway, Frank J; Fitch, Alison J; Bertozzi, Terry; Kleindorfer, Sonia

    2012-05-01

    The divergence-with-gene-flow model of speciation has a strong theoretical basis with a growing number of plausible examples in nature, but remains hotly debated. Darwin's finches of the Galápagos Archipelago have played an important role in our understanding of speciation processes. Recent studies suggest that this group may also provide insights into speciation via divergence with gene flow. On the island of Santa Cruz, recent studies found evidence for adaptive divergence in Darwin's small ground finch, Geospiza fuliginosa, between ecologically contrasting arid and humid zones. Despite the short geographical distance between these zones, strong disruptive selection during low rainfall periods is expected to generate and maintain adaptive divergence. Conversely, during high rainfall periods, when disruptive selection is predicted to be weakened, population divergence in adaptive traits is expected to break down. Because periods of low and high rainfall irregularly alternate, the geographical pattern of adaptive divergence can be assumed to break down and, importantly, regenerate in situ. Here, we use microsatellite allele frequency data to assess the genetic population structure of G. fuliginosa on Santa Cruz. We sample 21 sites and four ecological zones across the island. We reject hypotheses of population substructure linked to ecological and geographical differences among sites in favour of a single panmictic population. Panmixia implies high levels of gene flow within Santa Cruz, which favours selection over genetic drift as a valid process generating phenotypic divergence in G. fuliginosa on Santa Cruz. We discuss how our findings may support classic adaptation, phenotypic plasticity, matching habitat choice or any combination of these three processes.

  16. Dog overpopulation and burden of exposure to canine distemper virus and other pathogens on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Nicole M; Mendez, Gabriella S; Grijalva, C Jaime; Walden, Heather S; Cruz, Marilyn; Aragon, Eduardo; Hernandez, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Dog overpopulation and diseases are hazards to native island species and humans on the Galapagos. Vaccination and importation of dogs are prohibited on the Galapagos. Risk management of these hazards requires the use of science-based risk assessment and risk communication. The objectives of the study reported here were (i) to estimate the human:dog ratio and (ii) the prevalence of and identify exposure factors associated with positive antibody titers to canine distemper virus (CDV) and other pathogens, as well as infection with intestinal parasites in owned dogs on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos in September 2014. The observed human:dog ratio was 6.148:1 which extrapolates to 2503 dogs (two times more than a recent dog count conducted by Galapagos Biosecurity Agency in March 2014). The proportion of spayed female dogs (50%) was higher, compared to neutered male dogs (30%) (p=0.04). Prevalence of dogs with positive antibody titers to CDV was 36% (95% CI=26, 46%), to canine parvovirus was 89% (95% CI=82, 95%), and to canine adenovirus was 40% (95% CI=30, 51%). The frequency of seropositive dogs to CDV was lower in urban dogs (26%), compared to rural dogs (53%) (p<0.05). A positive interaction effect between rural residence and spay/neuter status on seropositivity to CDV was observed, which we discuss in this report. Because vaccination is prohibited, the dog population on Santa Cruz is susceptible to an outbreak of CDV (particularly among urban dogs) with potential spill over to marine mammals. Dog's age (1-2 or 3-14 years old, compared to younger dogs), and residence (rural, urban) were associated with positive antibody titers to parvovirus, adenovirus, Ehrlichia spp., or Anaplasma spp., as well as infection with Ancylostoma spp., an intestinal parasite in dogs that can be transmitted to humans, particularly children. These results provide the most comprehensive assessment of dog overpopulation and exposure to CDV and other pathogens on the Galapagos to date

  17. Hydrates in the California Borderlands Revisited: Results from a Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Survey of the Santa Cruz Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannberg, P. K.; Constable, S.

    2014-12-01

    Methane hydrate, an ice-like clathrate of water and methane, forms in shallow continental slope sediments, and is both a potential energy source and geologic hazard. Hydrates presence is traditionally inferred from the presence of the bottom simulating reflector (BSR), a seismic velocity inversion resulting from free gas pooling at the base of the hydrate stability field. The BSR is not a measure of hydrate, but rather a proxy for free gas presence. Whereas seismic methods are sensitive to velocity anomalies, controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods are sensitive to conductivity anomalies. The electrically resistive methane hydrate makes a favorable target for CSEM surveys, which are capable of detecting and potentially quantifying the presence of methane hydrate directly. Building on previous work 100km to the south in the San Nicolas Basin, we present initial results from a 6-day June 2014 survey in the Santa Cruz Basin, located 100km west of Los Angeles. CSEM surveys are performed by deep-towing an EM source that is transmitting a known signal; this signal is detected by towed and seafloor receivers. The initial EM source signal is altered by the electrical properties of the surrounding environment. Conductors such as brine and seawater are attenuating mediums, while resistors such as methane hydrate, gas, and oil are preservative of the original signal. Twenty-one seafloor receivers, as well as a 4 receiver towed array were deployed to image the resistivity structure of the Santa Cruz Basin. Using 30-year-old 2D seismic profiles as a guide, potential hydrate targets were identified, and the transmitter and array were towed over 150 km on 6 lines with 5 seafloor receivers each. The 6 towed lines were coincident with legacy seismic lines. The towed array is sensitive to sediment depths less than 1km, allowing for high data density through the hydrate stability field. The larger transmitter-receiver offsets of the seafloor receivers allow sensitivity to at

  18. Hydrogeologic Framework of the Upper Santa Cruz Basin (Arizona and Sonora) using Well Logs, Geologic Mapping, Gravity, Magnetics, and Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegary, J. B.; Page, W. R.; Megdal, S.; Gray, F.; Scott, C. A.; Berry, M.; Rangel, M.; Oroz Ramos, L.; Menges, C. M.; Jones, A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Congress passed the U.S.-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Act which provides a framework for study of aquifers shared by the United States and Mexico. The aquifer of the Upper Santa Cruz Basin was chosen as one of four priority aquifers for several reasons, including water scarcity, a population greater than 300,000, groundwater as the sole source of water for human use, and a riparian corridor that is of regional significance for migratory birds and other animals. Several new mines are also being proposed for this area which may affect water quality and availability. To date, a number of studies have been carried out by a binational team composed of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Mexican National Water Commission, and the Universities of Arizona and Sonora. Construction of a cross-border hydrogeologic framework model of the basin between Amado, Arizona and its southern boundary in Sonora is currently a high priority. The relatively narrow Santa Cruz valley is a structural basin that did not experience the same degree of late Cenozoic lateral extension and consequent deepening as found in other basin-and-range alluvial basins, such as the Tucson basin, where basin depth exceeds 3000 meters. This implies that storage may be much less than that found in other basin-and-range aquifers. To investigate the geometry of the basin and facies changes within the alluvium, a database of over one thousand well logs has been developed, geologic mapping and transient electromagnetic (TEM) surveys have been carried out, and information from previous electromagnetic, magnetic, and gravity studies is being incorporated into the hydrogeologic framework. Initial geophysical surveys and analyses have focused on the portion of the basin west of Nogales, Arizona, because it supplies approximately 50% of that city's water. Previous gravity and magnetic modeling indicate that this area is a narrow, fault-controlled half graben. Preliminary modeling of airborne

  19. [Reform of psychiatry in Spain].

    PubMed

    Pedrosa Gil, F; Luderer, H J

    2000-11-01

    Since the 1980's psychiatric care in Spain changed considerably (Reforma psiquiátrica española). In the course of this reform, many positive results were achieved. An extensive community network of mental health centres was build up which resulted in the majority of psychiatric patients being integrated in the Spanish general health care system and making a better organized mental health care structure possible. New legislation also improved the care and civil rights of patients. An analysis of the experiences of the Spanish psychiatric reform shows that the tendency to retain the old mental hospitals, alongside the other institutions still exists. The process of deinstitutionalization and the original aims of the psychiatric reform cannot only be satisfied by the closure of large psychiatric hospitals as during the reform new aspects and problems as well the great complexity of the task have become apparent. This article together with the details of the Spanish sources gives the German public a good overview of the developments in Spanish psychiatry.

  20. Doctorate nursing degree in Spain

    PubMed Central

    López-Montesinos, Mª José; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    Analytical and descriptive study of the process of change being experienced in the Spanish university system over the last decade (2005-2014). OBJECTIVE: To describe the structural changes occurring in Nursing Education in Spain, reaching access to doctoral studies from the European Convergence Process and the subsequent legislative development. METHODOLOGY: Bibliographical review of royal decrees and reference literature on the subject of study and descriptive analysis of the situation. RESULTS: Carries various changes suffered in the curricula of nursing education in the last decade, the legislation of the European Higher Education sets the guidelines for current studies of Masters and Doctorates. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of the Master and Doctorate stages after a basic degree, which is now possible with the new legislation. A formal beginning made of scientific nursing in order to generate their own lines of research led by Doctors of nursing who can integrate in research groups under the same condition as other researcher, yet now, from the nursing discipline itself. PMID:26312628

  1. Genetic characterization and molecular identification of the bloodmeal sources of the potential bluetongue vector Culicoides obsoletus in the Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Martínez, Javier; Ferraguti, Martina; Morales-de la Nuez, Antonio; Castro, Noemí; Figuerola, Jordi

    2012-07-24

    Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are vectors for a diversity of pathogens including bluetongue virus (BTV) that generate important economic losses. BTV has expanded its range in recent decades, probably due to the expansion of its main vector and the presence of other autochthonous competent vectors. Although the Canary Islands are still free of bluetongue disease (BTD), Spain and Europe have had to face up to a spread of bluetongue with disastrous consequences. Therefore, it is essential to identify the distribution of biting midges and understand their feeding patterns in areas susceptible to BTD. To that end, we captured biting midges on two farms in the Canary Islands (i) to identify the midge species in question and characterize their COI barcoding region and (ii) to ascertain the source of their bloodmeals using molecular tools. Biting midges were captured using CDC traps baited with a 4-W blacklight (UV) bulb on Gran Canaria and on Tenerife. Biting midges were quantified and identified according to their wing patterns. A 688 bp segment of the mitochondrial COI gene of 20 biting midges (11 from Gran Canaria and 9 from Tenerife) were PCR amplified using the primers LCO1490 and HCO2198. Moreover, after selected all available females showing any rest of blood in their abdomen, a nested-PCR approach was used to amplify a fragment of the COI gene from vertebrate DNA contained in bloodmeals. The origin of bloodmeals was identified by comparison with the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST). The morphological identification of 491 female biting midges revealed the presence of a single morphospecies belonging to the Obsoletus group. When sequencing the barcoding region of the 20 females used to check genetic variability, we identified two haplotypes differing in a single base. Comparison analysis using the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST) showed that both haplotypes belong to Culicoides obsoletus, a

  2. Genetic characterization and molecular identification of the bloodmeal sources of the potential bluetongue vector Culicoides obsoletus in the Canary Islands, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are vectors for a diversity of pathogens including bluetongue virus (BTV) that generate important economic losses. BTV has expanded its range in recent decades, probably due to the expansion of its main vector and the presence of other autochthonous competent vectors. Although the Canary Islands are still free of bluetongue disease (BTD), Spain and Europe have had to face up to a spread of bluetongue with disastrous consequences. Therefore, it is essential to identify the distribution of biting midges and understand their feeding patterns in areas susceptible to BTD. To that end, we captured biting midges on two farms in the Canary Islands (i) to identify the midge species in question and characterize their COI barcoding region and (ii) to ascertain the source of their bloodmeals using molecular tools. Methods Biting midges were captured using CDC traps baited with a 4-W blacklight (UV) bulb on Gran Canaria and on Tenerife. Biting midges were quantified and identified according to their wing patterns. A 688 bp segment of the mitochondrial COI gene of 20 biting midges (11 from Gran Canaria and 9 from Tenerife) were PCR amplified using the primers LCO1490 and HCO2198. Moreover, after selected all available females showing any rest of blood in their abdomen, a nested-PCR approach was used to amplify a fragment of the COI gene from vertebrate DNA contained in bloodmeals. The origin of bloodmeals was identified by comparison with the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST). Results The morphological identification of 491 female biting midges revealed the presence of a single morphospecies belonging to the Obsoletus group. When sequencing the barcoding region of the 20 females used to check genetic variability, we identified two haplotypes differing in a single base. Comparison analysis using the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST) showed that both haplotypes belong to

  3. A multitemporal (1979-2009) land-use/land-cover dataset of the binational Santa Cruz Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2011-01-01

    Trends derived from multitemporal land-cover data can be used to make informed land management decisions and to help managers model future change scenarios. We developed a multitemporal land-use/land-cover dataset for the binational Santa Cruz watershed of southern Arizona, United States, and northern Sonora, Mexico by creating a series of land-cover maps at decadal intervals (1979, 1989, 1999, and 2009) using Landsat Multispectral Scanner and Thematic Mapper data and a classification and regression tree classifier. The classification model exploited phenological changes of different land-cover spectral signatures through the use of biseasonal imagery collected during the (dry) early summer and (wet) late summer following rains from the North American monsoon. Landsat images were corrected to remove atmospheric influences, and the data were converted from raw digital numbers to surface reflectance values. The 14-class land-cover classification scheme is based on the 2001 National Land Cover Database with a focus on "Developed" land-use classes and riverine "Forest" and "Wetlands" cover classes required for specific watershed models. The classification procedure included the creation of several image-derived and topographic variables, including digital elevation model derivatives, image variance, and multitemporal Kauth-Thomas transformations. The accuracy of the land-cover maps was assessed using a random-stratified sampling design, reference aerial photography, and digital imagery. This showed high accuracy results, with kappa values (the statistical measure of agreement between map and reference data) ranging from 0.80 to 0.85.

  4. Framework for incorporating climate change on flood magnitude and frequency analysis in the upper Santa Cruz River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jennifer G.; Bai, Yang; Dominguez, F.; Rivera, E.; Meixner, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Hourly precipitation for one historical (1991-2000) and two future periods (2031-2040 and 2071-2079) were generated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Climate Model (RCM). The climate simulations were conducted for the Southwest region of the United States using an hourly temporal and 10 km spatial resolution grid. The boundary forcing for the WRF model was developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research/Met Office's HadCM3 model with A2 emission scenario. The precipitation from the RCM-WRF model was bias-corrected using the observed data, and then used to quantify the impact of climate change on the magnitude and frequency of flood flow in the upper Santa Cruz River watershed (USCRW) in southern Arizona. The Computational Hydraulics and River Engineering two-dimensional (CHRE2D) model, a two-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment transport model, was adapted for surface flow routing. The CHRE2D model was first calibrated using a storm event on July 15th, 1999, and then applied to the watershed for three selected periods. The simulated annual maximum discharges in two future periods were added to the historical records to obtain the flood frequency curve. Results indicate the peak discharges of 100-year, 200-year, and 500-year flood only increased slightly, and the increase is within the 90% confidence interval limits. Therefore, the flood magnitude and frequency curve will not change with the inclusion of projected future climate data for the study watershed.

  5. Conceptual Morphologic Consideration for Long-term Hydrodynamics Simulation in the Pirai River in Santa Cruz-Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villazon, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Santa Cruz city is built along the Piraí River, part of the Amazonas basin, which has tremendous discharge variability from10 to almost 2000 m3/s. The width goes from 50 to 500 metres. Inflows were calculated and calibrated using a conceptual rainfall-runoff model in hourly time step for 14 years. A hydrodynamic model (Mike11) of the river is implemented and calibrated with two stations. It was found that the roughness coefficient decreases with increasing water level; therefore bed resistance equation in function of the velocity were calibrated for different historical events. The last part of the river has important morphological process during flood events, conceptual modification of the wet area and the hydraulic radio (in different cross sections) is proposed in order to estimate in a better way the water level changes. Even when the model (Mike11) is running with fixed bed, the water levels are well represented. The shape and the time of occurrence of the peak flow in outlet station were well represented with EF greater than 0,7.

  6. A new genus and species of Planopinae (Xenarthra: Tardigrada) from the Miocene of Santa Cruz Province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Alfredo A; Brandoni, Diego; Dal Molin, Carlos N

    2013-01-01

    Prepoplanops boleadorensis, a new genus and species of Planopinae (Xenarthra, Tardigrada), is described herein. The new taxon is based on a nearly complete specimen recovered from the Cerro Boleadoras Formation (Miocene, Rio Zeballos Group), in northwestern Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The shape and length of the predentary region of the skull and the length of the diastema of Prepoplanops boleadorensis differ from those present in the species of Planops. The posterolateral opening of the mandibular canal and the position of the posterior margin of the mandibular symphysis differ from those of species of Prepotherium. In addition, Prepoplanops boleadorensis differs from Planops martini in the size of the humeral tuberosities, the development of the deltoid crest, the position of the distal margin of the humeral trochlea, the shape and position of the olecranon, the development of the femoral epicondyles, and the shape of the medial margins of the patellar trochlea and medial condyle. On the other hand, it differs from Prepotherium potens in the shape of the medial margin of the medial condyle. The recognition of Prepoplanops boleadorensis increases the diversity of Planopinae for the Miocene of Patagonia, Argentina.

  7. Geology and ground-water in western Santa Cruz County, California, with particular emphasis on the Santa Margarita Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.; Jackson, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    The water-bearing potential of the geologic formations in the western part of Santa Cruz County, Calif., is evaluated. Most of the sedimentary formations in this area are fine-grained rocks of Tertiary age that have been folded and faulted. These rocks, in general, yield supplies of water sufficient only for individual domestic supplies. The Lompico and Santa Margarita Sandstones, however, are coarser grained and have the potential to yield moderate quantities of water (50-100 gallons per minute). Areas where the Lompico Sandstone might warrant explorations are (1) near and on the west side of the Ben Lomond fault, (2) near and south of the outcrop of the Lompico Sandstone between Ben Lomond and Felton, and (3) in the area near Bald Mountain School. The Santa Margarita Sandstone should be explored by test drilling in the area between Davenport and Bonnie Doon. The quality of ground water is generally good, although saline water occurs in the San Lorenzo Formation near Redwood Grove and Riverside Grove. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. The distribution and extent of heavy metal accumulation in song sparrows along Arizona's upper Santa Cruz River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lester, Michael B.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are persistent environmental contaminants, and transport of metals into the environment poses a threat to ecosystems, as plants and wildlife are susceptible to long-term exposure, bioaccumulation, and potential toxicity. We investigated the distribution and cascading extent of heavy metal accumulation in southwestern song sparrows (Melospiza melodia fallax), a resident riparian bird species that occurs along the US/Mexico border in Arizona’s upper Santa Cruz River watershed. This study had three goals: (1) quantify the degree of heavy metal accumulation in sparrows and determine the distributional patterns among study sites, (2) compare concentrations of metals found in this study to those found in studies performed prior to a 2009 international wastewater facility upgrade, and (3) assess the condition of song sparrows among sites with differing potential levels of exposure. We examined five study sites along with a reference site that reflect different potential sources of contamination. Body mass residuals and leukocyte counts were used to assess sparrow condition. Birds at our study sites typically had higher metal concentrations than birds at the reference site. Copper, mercury, nickel, and selenium in song sparrows did exceed background levels, although most metals were below background concentrations determined from previous studies. Song sparrows generally showed lower heavy metal concentrations compared to studies conducted prior to the 2009 wastewater facility upgrade. We found no cascading effects as a result of metal exposure.

  9. late Pleistocene and Holocene pollen record from Laguna de las Trancas, northern coastal Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adam, David P.; Byrne, Roger; Luther, Edgar

    1981-01-01

    A 2.1-m core from Laguna de las Trancas, a marsh atop a landslide in northern Santa Cruz County, California, has yielded a pollen record for the period between about 30,000 B. P. and roughly 5000 B. P. Three pollen zones are recognized. The earliest is characterized by high frequencies of pine pollen and is correlated with a mid-Wisconsinan interstade of the mid-continent. The middle zone contains high frequencies of both pine and fir (Abies, probably A. grandis) pollen and is correlated with the last full glacial interval (upper Wisconsinan). The upper zone is dominated by redwood (Sequoia) pollen and represents latest Pleistocene to middle Holocene. The past few thousand years are not represented in the core. The pollen evidence indicates that during the full glacial period the mean annual temperature at the site was about 2°C to 3°C lower than it is today. We attribute this small difference to the stabilizing effect of marine upwelling on the temperature regime in the immediate vicinity of the coast. Precipitation may have been about 20 percent higher as a result of longer winter wet seasons.

  10. Triggered aseismic slip adjacent to the 6 February 2013 Mw 8.0 Santa Cruz Islands megathrust earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew W.

    2014-02-01

    Aseismic or slow slip events have been observed in many subduction zones, but whether they affect the occurrence of earthquakes or result from stress changes caused by nearby events is unclear. In an area lacking direct geodetic observations, inferences can be made from seismological studies of co-seismic slip, associated stress changes and the spatiotemporal nature of aftershocks. These observations indicate that the February 2013 Mw 8.0 Santa Cruz Islands earthquake may have triggered slow or aseismic slip on an adjacent section of the subduction thrust over the following hours to days. This aseismic event was equivalent to Mw 7.6, significantly larger than any earthquakes in the aftershock sequence. The aseismic slip was situated within the seismogenic portion of the subduction interface, and must have occurred to the south of the main seismic slip and most aftershocks in order to promote right-lateral faulting in the upper plate, the dominant deformation style of the aftershock sequence. This plate boundary segment can support either stable sliding (aseismic) or stick-slip (seismic) deformation in response to different driving conditions. The complete lack of aftershocks on the thrust interface implies this pair of megathrust slip episodes (seismic and aseismic) released a substantial portion of the stored strain on the northernmost section of the Vanuatu subduction zone.

  11. Triggered aseismic slip adjacent to the 6 February 2013 Mw 8.0 Santa Cruz Islands megathrust earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Aseismic or slow slip events have been observed in many subduction zones, but whether they affect the occurrence of earthquakes or result from stress changes caused by nearby events is unclear. In an area lacking direct geodetic observations, inferences can be made from seismological studies of co-seismic slip, associated stress changes and the spatiotemporal nature of aftershocks. These observations indicate that the February 2013 Mw 8.0 Santa Cruz Islands earthquake may have triggered slow or aseismic slip on an adjacent section of the subduction thrust over the following hours to days. This aseismic event was equivalent to Mw 7.6, significantly larger than any earthquakes in the aftershock sequence. The aseismic slip was situated within the seismogenic portion of the subduction interface, and must have occurred to the south of the main seismic slip and most aftershocks in order to promote right-lateral faulting in the upper plate, the dominant deformation style of the aftershock sequence. This plate boundary segment can support either stable sliding (aseismic) or stick-slip (seismic) deformation in response to different driving conditions. The complete lack of aftershocks on the thrust interface implies this pair of megathrust slip episodes (seismic and aseismic) released a substantial portion of the stored strain on the northernmost section of the Vanuatu subduction zone.

  12. Slip history of the La Cruz fault: Development of a late Miocene transform in response to increased rift obliquity in the northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Scott E. K.; Oskin, Michael E.; Iriondo, Alexander; Kunk, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    The Gulf of California rift has accommodated oblique divergence of the Pacific and North America plates in northwestern México since Miocene time. Due to its infancy, its rifted margins preserve a rare onshore record of early continental break-up processes and an opportunity to investigate the role of rift obliquity in strain localization. We map rift-related structures and syn-tectonic basins on southern Isla Tiburón, a proximal onshore exposure of the rifted North America margin. We integrate analysis and geochronology of syn-tectonic sedimentary basins and mapping of crosscutting relationships to characterize the style and timing of fault activity. On southern Isla Tiburón, an early phase of extension initiated between 19-17 Ma and 12.2 Ma. Subsequently, these normal faults and related basins were cut by the La Cruz strike-slip fault and buried by deposits of the La Cruz basin, an elongate, fault-controlled trough coextensive with the La Cruz fault. Crosscutting relationships show that the NW-striking La Cruz fault accrued 5 ± 2 km of dextral slip 8-4 Ma. The La Cruz fault and parallel Tiburón transform were kinematically linked to detachment faulting that accommodated latest Miocene to Pliocene oblique opening of the offshore Upper Tiburón pull-apart basin. The onset of strike-slip faulting on Isla Tiburón was synchronous with the 8-6 Ma onset of transform faulting and basin formation along > 1000 km of the reconstructed Pacific-North America plate boundary. This transition coincides with the commencement of a clockwise azimuthal shift in Pacific-North America relative plate motion that increased the obliquity of the Gulf of California rift and formed the Gulf of California shear zone. The record from the proto-Gulf of California illustrates how highly oblique rift geometries, where transform faults are kinematically linked to pull-apart basins, enhance the ability of continental lithosphere to rupture and, ultimately, hasten the formation of new oceanic

  13. Uses of plasma in Spain.

    PubMed

    Algora, M; Barbolla, L

    2007-12-01

    In Spain, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) currently recovered either by whole blood centrifugation or by apheresis is mainly considered as a source of plasma derivates rather than a product to be transfused. Upon this consideration, the amount of plasma transfused in the last two decades has remained stable, while the production of FFP has grown steadily during all these years. Thus, much more plasma has been derived to industry for manufacturing. Although, since 1993 a consensus conference established the clinical situation where plasma has demonstrated its efficacy, the true situation is that many indications seem not to be supported on a scientific evidence basis. Only a few studies have been performed in the last years to assess the appropriateness of these indications. We present the initial result of an ongoing survey addressed by the Madrid Blood Transfusion Centre. Based on the criteria of total amount of RBC transfused per year, large hospitals (more than 10,000 units of RBC) transfused an average of 23.87% of FFP, while medium hospitals (5000-10,000 units of RBC) used 19.5% and small ones (less than 5000) about 12.5%. It is important to point out that inside each group there were some important differences in ratio values for similar hospitals. This could indicate that much more is necessary to cope with indications. Although national figures of uses of FFP, whether in ratio or absolute terms, show a moderate consumption in comparison with published figures of other European countries, there can be no doubt that plasma overuses still seem to be present.

  14. Deteriorating effects of lichen and microbial colonization of carbonate building rocks in the Romanesque churches of Segovia, Spain.

    PubMed

    de Los Ríos, Asunción; Cámara, Beatriz; García Del Cura, M A Angeles; Rico, Víctor J; Galván, Virginia; Ascaso, Carmen

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the deterioration effects of lichens and other lithobionts in a temperate mesothermal climate were explored. We examined samples of dolostone and limestone rocks with visible signs of biodeterioration taken from the exterior wall surfaces of four Romanesque churches in Segovia (Spain): San Lorenzo, San Martín, San Millán and La Vera Cruz. Biofilms developing on the lithic substrate were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The most common lichen species found in the samples were recorded. Fungal cultures were then obtained from these carbonate rocks and characterized by sequencing Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS). Through scanning electron microscopy in back-scattered electron mode, fungi (lichenized and non-lichenized) were observed as the most frequent microorganisms occurring at sites showing signs of biodeterioration. The colonization process was especially conditioned by the porosity characteristics of the stone used in these buildings. While in dolostones, microorganisms mainly occupied spaces comprising the rock's intercrystalline porosity, in bioclastic dolomitized limestones, fungal colonization seemed to be more associated with moldic porosity. Microbial biofilms make close contact with the substrate, and thus probably cause significant deterioration of the underlying materials. We describe the different processes of stone alteration induced by fungal colonization and discuss the implications of these processes for the design of treatments to prevent biodeterioration.

  15. Interhospital spread of NDM-7-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae belonging to ST437 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Seara, Nieves; Oteo, Jesús; Carrillo, Raquel; Pérez-Blanco, Verónica; Mingorance, Jesús; Gómez-Gil, Rosa; Herruzo, Rafael; Pérez-Vázquez, María; Astray, Jenaro; García-Rodríguez, Julio; Ruiz-Velasco, Luis Moisés; Campos, José; de Burgos, Carmen; Ruiz-Carrascoso, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    This study describes an interhospital spread of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) producing NDM-7 carbapenemase that started in December 2013 in Madrid, Spain. NDM-7-producing CRKP were isolated from urine, rectal swabs or blood samples from seven patients admitted to three different hospitals (Hospital Universitario La Paz, Hospital de Cantoblanco and Hospital Central de la Cruz Roja). The isolates were resistant to all antimicrobials tested except colistin and fosfomycin. One blood isolate was susceptible to minocycline and tigecycline but was resistant to fosfomycin. All isolates were closely related by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DiversiLab(®) analysis and belonged to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence type 437. In addition, blaNDM-7, blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M-15 and aac(3)-IIa were identified. Family contacts of the index case were negative for NDM-producing bacteria. The outbreak occurred in two separate waves and the cases associated with Hospital de Cantoblanco had been admitted to the same room. Environmental samples from the trap of a sink and a shower in this room were positive for NDM-7-producing CRKP. To our knowledge, this is the first reported worldwide outbreak of NDM-7-producing CRKP. No relationship with the Indian continent, the Balkans or the Middle East could be established. Frequent transfer of aged or chronically ill patients between the facilities involved may have favoured the spread of NDM-7-producing CRKP. The spread of the second wave in Hospital de Cantoblanco probably occurred as a result of transmission from an environmental reservoir.

  16. Nursing Education in Spain--Past, Present and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnoz, Adelaida Zabalegui

    2002-01-01

    In Spain, the nursing diploma is inadequate for current health care needs. To meet the demand, Spain is developing baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs using European Union guidelines to ensure the preparation of a professional nursing work force. (SK)

  17. Observed changes of the diffuse H_{2} emission at the summit cone of Teide volcano (Tenerife, Canary Islands): a geochemical evidence of processes operating deep in the magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys V.; Padrón, Eleazar; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Calvo, David; Barrancos, José; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the hydrothermal reservoir gas (Giggenbach 1987; Chiodini and Marini 1998). Because of its chemical and physical characteristics such as low weight and low solubility in groundwater and hydrothermal fluids, H2 moves rapidly within the crust and escapes easily to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2a potentially excellent tracer of processes operating deep in magmatic systems. Most of the diffuse degassing studies on active volcanic-hydrothermal systems is primarily focused on CO2, the second major component of volcanic gases. Unfortunately however, few studies of surface H2efflux measurements at active volcanoes have been performed to evaluate diffuse H2 emission rates from active volcanic systems. Here, we report a time series on diffuse H2 emission rates from surveys carried out in yearly basis at the summit cone of Teide volcano, where most obvious geothermal features at Tenerife occurs, during the 2006-2016 period. Thousands of samples of volcanic gases from the surface environment, at 40 cm depth, have been collected during this 2006-2016 period to estimate surface H2 efflux values from 150 observation sites selected to cover the 0.5 Km2 area of the summit cone Teide volcano. Most of the surveys showed diffuse H2 emission rate values lower than 40 kgṡd-1 from the summit cone of Teide volcano. On the contrary, an increasing trend of diffuse H2 emission rate from 35 ± 7 to 122 ± 36 kgṡd-1 was observed during the 2006 to 2009 period. This increase trend of diffuse H2 emission rate was detected before a raise of seismic activity in and around Tenerife from November 2009 to June 2011, with about 1176 seismic events recorded by Spanish-IGN in 2010 (Pérez and Schmincke, 2016). The observed increased trend of diffuse H2 emission occurs simultaneously with an increase trend of diffuse CO2 emission at the summit

  18. Mathematics education and learning disabilities in Spain.

    PubMed

    Casas, Ana Miranda; Castellar, Rosa García

    2004-01-01

    In the first part of this article, we describe the basic objectives of the math curriculum in Spain as well as the basic contents, teacher resources, and obstacles perceived in mathematics instruction. Second, we briefly describe the concept of learning disabilities (LD) as they are currently defined in Spain. As stated in the recent educational reform, a student with LD is any student with special educational needs. The emphasis is placed on the educational resources that these students need in order to achieve the curricular objectives that correspond to their age group or grade. Third, we comment specifically on the educational services model and the evaluation and instructional procedures for students with math learning disabilities. Finally, we describe some lines of research that have appeared in the last few years in Spain that have led to the development of new evaluation and intervention procedures for students with LD in computation and problem solving.

  19. [Incidence study of listeriosis in Spain].

    PubMed

    Valero, Fernando Parrilla; Rafart, Josep Vaqué

    2014-01-01

    We performed a descriptive retrospective study of cases of listeriosis occurring in Spain from 2001 to 2007 to determine the burden and trend of this disease in our setting. Several sources of information were used. Epidemiological information was collected from 1.242 cases of listeriosis, representing a mean incidence rate of 0,56 cases per 100.000 inhabitants per year, which was extrapolated as an overall estimate for Spain. The annual incidence showed a statistically significant increasing trend (p <0,001) over the study period. This figure was higher than that reported in Spain (0,16) by the Microbiological Information System, which is voluntary, showing that underreporting exists. The inclusion of listeriosis in the Mandatory Notification System would allow determination of the distribution and characteristics of this infection in humans, as well as promotion of effective prevention and control.

  20. The costs of schizophrenia in Spain.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Moreno, Juan; López-Bastida, Julio; Osuna-Guerrero, Rubén; Montejo-González, Angel Luis; Duque-González, Beatriz

    2006-09-01

    This study estimated the economic impact of schizophrenia-related direct costs (medical and nonmedical costs) in Spain. Direct medical costs (hospitalizations, outpatient consultations, drug costs) and direct nonmedical costs (costs of informal care) were estimated based on prevalence costs for 2002. The total costs of schizophrenia were estimated at euro 1,970.8 million; direct medical costs accounted for 53% and informal care costs 47%. Despite having implemented a conservative approach, the health care costs associated with schizophrenia account for 2.7% of total public health care expenditure in Spain. The sum of medical and nonmedical costs give us a better definition of the magnitude of the problem in Spain as well as contributing to helping make the debate on this issue more transparent.

  1. Leaving home in Spain: a regional analysis.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, C

    1998-12-01

    "This paper compares regional patterns of leaving home in Spain during the 1970s and 1980s based on analysis of the 1991 Spanish Sociodemographic Survey. The purpose of this analysis is to demonstrate that while nationally Spain is representative of a southern European pattern of leaving home, (i.e. relatively late and closely associated with partnership formation), there is considerable regional variation in timing, incidence and initial destinations on leaving home. These differences are explored using hazard rates of leaving home by destination and birth cohort for 11 Spanish regions."

  2. 48 CFR 252.229-7005 - Tax exemptions (Spain).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tax exemptions (Spain... of Provisions And Clauses 252.229-7005 Tax exemptions (Spain). As prescribed in 229.402-70(e), use the following clause: Tax Exemptions (Spain) (JUN 1997) (a) The Contractor represents that...

  3. 48 CFR 252.229-7005 - Tax exemptions (Spain).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tax exemptions (Spain... of Provisions And Clauses 252.229-7005 Tax exemptions (Spain). As prescribed in 229.402-70(e)(1), use the following clause: Tax Exemptions (Spain) (MAR 2012) (a) As the Contractor represented in its...

  4. 48 CFR 252.229-7005 - Tax exemptions (Spain).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tax exemptions (Spain... of Provisions And Clauses 252.229-7005 Tax exemptions (Spain). As prescribed in 229.402-70(e)(1), use the following clause: Tax Exemptions (Spain) (MAR 2012) (a) As the Contractor represented in its...

  5. 7 CFR 319.56-64 - Avocados from continental Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Avocados from continental Spain. 319.56-64 Section 319... Avocados from continental Spain. Fresh avocados (Persea americana P. Mill.) may be imported into the United... accordance with § 319.56-6. (2) The avocados must be grown at places of production in continental Spain...

  6. 48 CFR 252.229-7005 - Tax exemptions (Spain).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tax exemptions (Spain... of Provisions And Clauses 252.229-7005 Tax exemptions (Spain). As prescribed in 229.402-70(e)(1), use the following clause: Tax Exemptions (Spain) (MAR 2012) (a) As the Contractor represented in its...

  7. 75 FR 51113 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Spain

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... COMMISSION Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Spain AGENCY: United States International Trade... chlorinated isocyanurates from China and Spain. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice of the scheduling... from China and Spain would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within...

  8. 75 FR 61772 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Spain; Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... COMMISSION Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Spain; Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping duty orders on chlorinated isocyanurates from China and Spain would be likely to lead to... antidumping duty order on chlorinated isocyanurates from Spain would not be likely to lead to continuation...

  9. 78 FR 6222 - Importation of Avocados From Continental Spain

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... of Avocados From Continental Spain AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... importation of avocados from continental Spain (excluding the Balaeric Islands and Canary Islands) into the United States. As a condition of entry, avocados from Spain would have to be produced in accordance with...

  10. Analysis of methods to determine storage capacity of, and sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir, Santa Cruz County, California, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Kelly R.; Freeman, Lawrence A.; Flint, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Santa Cruz, conducted bathymetric and topographic surveys to determine the water storage capacity of, and the loss of capacity owing to sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California. The topographic survey was done as a supplement to the bathymetric survey to obtain information about temporal changes in the upper reach of the reservoir where the water is shallow or the reservoir may be dry, as well as to obtain information about shoreline changes throughout the reservoir. Results of a combined bathymetric and topographic survey using a new, state-of-the-art method with advanced instrument technology indicate that the maximum storage capacity of the reservoir at the spillway altitude of 577.5 feet (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929) was 8,646 ±85 acre-feet in March 2009, with a confidence level of 99 percent. This new method is a combination of bathymetric scanning using multibeam-sidescan sonar, and topographic surveying using laser scanning (LiDAR), which produced a 1.64-foot-resolution grid with altitudes to 0.3-foot resolution and an estimate of total water storage capacity at a 99-percent confidence level. Because the volume of sedimentation in a reservoir is considered equal to the decrease in water-storage capacity, sedimentation in Loch Lomond Reservoir was determined by estimating the change in storage capacity by comparing the reservoir bed surface defined in the March 2009 survey with a revision of the reservoir bed surface determined in a previous investigation in November 1998. This revised reservoir-bed surface was defined by combining altitude data from the 1998 survey with new data collected during the current (2009) investigation to fill gaps in the 1998 data. Limitations that determine the accuracy of estimates of changes in the volume of sedimentation from that estimated in each of the four previous investigations (1960, 1971, 1982, and 1998

  11. Preliminary report on geology and ground water of the Pajaro Valley area, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muir, K.S.

    1972-01-01

    The Pajaro Valley area, California, covering about 120 square miles, extends from the southern part of Santa Cruz County to several miles south of the county line into Monterey County. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the east. The city of Watsonville is the largest center of population. Deposits that range in age from Pliocene to Holocene make up the ground-water reservoir. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Purisima Formation, Aromas Red Sands of Allen (1946), terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. These deposits underlie an area of about 80 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 4,000 feet. The alluvium yields most of the water pumped from wells in the area. Pre-Pliocene rocks underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir. These rocks contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, they are not an important source of ground water. There is close continuity between the geology of the Pajaro Valley area and that of the Soquel-Aptos area, which is contiguous on the north. Ground water in the Pajaro Valley area is derived from three sources: (1) Precipitation within the Pajaro Valley area that reaches the ground-water body by direct infiltration or by seepage from streams, (2) seepage from the Pajaro River as it crosses the Pajaro Valley carrying runoff which originates upstream from the valley, and (3) precipitation in the Soquel-Aptos area that infiltrates and then moves southeastward at depth into the Pajaro Valley area. Ground water in most wells in the Pajaro Valley area occurs under confined (artesian) conditions; the only exception is ground water in the upper, near-surface part of the alluvium and that in the dune sand. It moves south from the north part of the area and southwest away from the San Andreas fault toward and out under Monterey Bay. In the south part of the area, ground-water movement is almost due west. The San Andreas fault probably is the only

  12. Watching the Moon from Tenerife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baruch, John; Machell, James; Norris, Kath

    2005-01-01

    "Where does the Sun go at night?" or "Why don't the Australians fall off?" are typical of the innocent questions that children ask. A new "Earth and Beyond" primary science learning programme from the University of Bradford is piloting some exciting ways to engage children with these questions and providing…

  13. Watching the Moon from Tenerife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baruch, John; Machell, James; Norris, Kath

    2005-01-01

    "Where does the Sun go at night?" or "Why don't the Australians fall off?" are typical of the innocent questions that children ask. A new "Earth and Beyond" primary science learning programme from the University of Bradford is piloting some exciting ways to engage children with these questions and providing…

  14. Use of remotely sensed imagery to map Sudden Oak Death (Phytophthora ramorum) in the Santa Cruz Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Trinka

    This project sought a method to map Sudden Oak Death distribution in the Santa Cruz Mountains of California, a coastal mountain range and one of the locations where this disease was first observed. The project researched a method to identify forest affected by SOD using 30 m multi-spectral Landsat satellite imagery to classify tree mortality at the canopy-level throughout the study area, and applied that method to a time series of data to show pattern of spread. A successful methodology would be of interest to scientists trying to identify areas which escaped disease contagion, environmentalists attempting to quantify damage, and land managers evaluating the health of their forests. The more we can learn about the disease, the more chance we have to prevent further spread and damage to existing wild lands. The primary data source for this research was springtime Landsat Climate Data Record surface reflectance data. Non-forest areas were masked out using data produced by the National Land Cover Database and supplemental land cover classification from the Landsat 2011 Climate Data Record image. Areas with other known causes of tree death, as identified by Fire and Resource Assessment Program fire perimeter polygons, and US Department of Agriculture Forest Health Monitoring Program Aerial Detection Survey polygons, were also masked out. Within the remaining forested study area, manually-created points were classified based on the land cover contained by the corresponding Landsat 2011 pixel. These were used to extract value ranges from the Landsat bands and calculated vegetation indices. The range and index which best differentiated healthy from dead trees, SWIR/NIR, was applied to each Landsat scene in the time series to map tree mortality. Results Validation Points, classified using Google Earth high-resolution aerial imagery, were created to evaluate the accuracy of the mapping methodology for the 2011 data.

  15. Rabies-vaccination coverage and profiles of the owned-dog population in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Pereira, J A C; Frías, L A; López, R; Mutinelli, L E; Pons, E R

    2008-05-01

    The Bolivian government issued a regulation for rabies control in November 2005, owing to increasing the prevalence of dog and human rabies cases in recent years. An assessment of rabies-vaccination coverage and other factors that might influence the success of the on-going vaccination campaign was needed. The objective of this study was to investigate dog rabies vaccination coverage and risk factors associated with dogs being unvaccinated against rabies, and profiles of the owned-dog population in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, where dog rabies was endemic. Mainly due to logistical reasons, the WHO's expanded programme on immunization cluster-survey method was used. The 390 households were included in the study. Information about dog population and management characteristics was obtained for 542 dogs from 301 households. On average, households had 1.4 dogs and 1.8 dogs per dog-owning household (median = 1). The human-to-dog ratio was 4.6 : 1. During the last 1 year prior to the study, of the 539 dogs aged >or=1 month, 463 (85%; 95% CI 79-91; design effect 3.6) were classified as vaccinated. Amongst the study dogs, dogs aged 1-11 months were the higher risk of dogs not being vaccinated (OR = 8.2; 95% CI 4.3-15.6; P < 0.01). Almost two-thirds of the study dogs were allowed to roam freely throughout the day or in part. Community education efforts should address the importance of dog ownership and movement restriction, and the need to vaccinate young dogs.

  16. Earthquake Recurrence and Deformation in the Last Four Events on the Santa Cruz Mountains Section of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streig, A. R.; Dawson, T. E.; Weldon, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Paleoseismic investigations at the Hazel Dell site on the Santa Cruz Mountains section (SAS) of the San Andreas fault has yielded evidence of four earthquakes. We present evidence of the 1906 surface rupture (E1), and 3 earlier events, including new evidence for two 1800's earthquakes. Evidence for the penultimate event, E2, is expressed as upward fault terminations within a massive sand infilling a topographic low. This sand infilled a depression formed by the pre-penultimate earthquake, E3. We identified axe-cut wood stratigraphically below the pre-penultimate earthquake horizon, which suggests that surface rupturing earthquakes E2 and E3 occurred after deposition of the cut wood stratigraphic unit. Lumber harvesting began in the area around 1832, and new radiocarbon dates sampled from redwood growth rings demonstrate that earthquakes E2 and E3 are historical. E4 occurred between A.D. 1651 and 1497. These new event data for the SAS suggest more frequent surface rupturing earthquakes within historical time than previously recognized. The data require at least two modes of behavior in strain release on the SAS through time. One mode of strain release, is through large multi-segment earthquakes; the 1906 event was a large multi-segment earthquake that dominates the moment budget of the fault. During the period prior to 1906, analysis of the historic record suggests that the SAS was characterized by a second mode of moderate seismicity, with six M≥ 6 earthquakes between 1838 and 1890 (Bakun, 1999), all located along the southern half of the segment near the Hazel Dell study area. The two 1800's earthquakes identified in this study support this second mode of moderate seismicity on the SAS.

  17. Using dye tracing to establish groundwater flow paths in a limestone marble aquifer, University of California, Santa Cruz, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.; Bertschinger, V. ); Aley, T. )

    1993-04-01

    Areas underlain by karst aquifers are characterized by soluble rock with sinkholes, caves, and a complex underground drainage network. Groundwater issues such as flow direction, well pumping impacts, spring recharge areas, and potential contamination transport routes are greatly complicated by the unique structure of karst aquifers. Standard aquifer analysis techniques cannot be applied unless the structure of the karst aquifer is understood. Water soluble fluorescent dyes are a powerful tool for mapping the irregular subsurface connections and flow paths in karst aquifers. Mapping the subsurface connections allows reasonable estimates of the hydrologic behavior of the aquifer. Two different fluorescent dyes were injected at two points in a limestone karst aquifer system beneath the University of California, Santa Cruz campus. Flow paths in the marble were thought to be closely tied to easily recognized geomorphic alignments of sinkholes associated with fault and fracture zones. The dye tests revealed unexpected and highly complex interconnections. These complex flow paths only partially corresponded to previous surface mapping and aerial photo analysis of fracture systems. Several interfingering but hydrologically unconnected flow paths evidently exist within the cavernous aquifer. For example, dye did not appear at some discharge springs close to the dye injection points, but did appear at more distant springs. This study shows how a dye tracing study in a small, well-defined limestone body can shed light on a variety of environmental and hydrological issues, including potential well pumping impact areas, wellhead protection and recharge areas, parking lot runoff injection to aquifers, and drainage routes from hazardous materials storage areas.

  18. Density and reproduction of the Queen Conch EUSTROMBUS gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) at Cabo Cruz, Desembarco del Granma National Park, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Cala, Yuself R; de Jesús-Navarrete, Alberto; Ocaña, Frank A; Oliva-Rivera, José

    2013-06-01

    The queen conch Eustrombus gigas is an important fisheries resource in the Caribbean region. In Cuba Island the studies about this resource are very scarce and particularly in the Southeastern regions of the country. With the aim to get important fishery information about this gastropod, adult Queen Conch density and frequency of reproductive activity were evaluated in Cabo Cruz, Cuba, during 2009-2010. Data from three seasons were obtained (rainy, dry and cold fronts periods) from three different areas: Farito, Guafe and Laguna. The highest density was observed in cold fronts season (468.5 ind./ha) and the lowest occurred during the dry season (268.5 ind./ha). The highest density was reported at Laguna (520.4 ind./ha) and the lowest at Farito (290.9ind./ha). In total, 158 reproductive events were observed. The highest frequency was reported in rainy season (36%), followed by dry (9%) and cold fronts (5%) seasons. Reproductive behavior (mating and egg laying) was related to temperature and photoperiod. Reproductive activity was observed during the whole year, which suggests the existence of an important Queen Conch reserve in the Southeastern region of Cuba and an apparently self-sufficient population for recruitment. From our results we may conclude that, the population's sustainable exploitation is viable if the following management measures are observed: functional zoning within the area, rotation of fishing areas and a closed season. We recommend that the Laguna site should be protected as a reproduction zone and banned for fishing activities.

  19. Investigating tree mortality at multiple spatial and temporal scales in the Bishop pine forest on Santa Cruz Island, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baguskas, S. A.; Bookhagen, B.; Peterson, S. H.; Asner, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    The rate of tree mortality has increased across the western United States in recent decades, and many studies attribute the cause to water stress induced by regional warming. To date, the geographical scope of study regions affected by widespread tree mortality in the American West has largely been limited to continental, montane climates. Much less is known about mortality events in other climatic regions, such as coastal forests. The relatively unvarying nature of the coastal, maritime climate has traditionally been assumed to buffer these forests from large climate variations; however, we have observed rapid tree mortality in this region which suggests coastal forests may be as susceptible to drought-induced mortality as inland forest locations. Santa Cruz Island (SCI), one of the California Channel Islands, harbors numerous relict and endemic plant species, including Bishop pine (Pinus muricata). Following extreme drought in southern California in two of the last three years (2007-2009), widespread mortality of Bishop pines has become evident. Bishop pine populations are restricted to the fog belt of coastal California and northern Baja California; therefore, a major reduction of existing populations on SCI would greatly reduce the distribution of the species as a whole. The focus of my research is to investigate the mechanisms underlying spatial and temporal patterns of Bishop pine mortality on SCI. I used remote sensing techniques to characterize spatiotemporal patterns of tree mortality and I have performed ground-data collection to validate remote-sensing results. Remote sensing in combination with field verification is a valuable tool to understand the spatiotemporal pattern of tree mortality and is a necessary step to help elucidate potential environmental and biological controls on tree mortality.

  20. Biomarkers in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected and uninfected individuals with varying severity of cardiomyopathy in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Emi E; Sherbuk, Jacqueline E; Clark, Eva H; Marks, Morgan A; Gandarilla, Omar; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Vasquez-Villar, Angel; Choi, Jeong; Crawford, Thomas C; Do, Rose Q; Q, Rose; Fernandez, Antonio B; Colanzi, Rony; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2014-10-01

    Twenty to thirty percent of persons with Trypanosoma cruzi infection eventually develop cardiomyopathy. If an early indicator were to be identified and validated in longitudinal studies, this could enable treatment to be prioritized for those at highest risk. We evaluated cardiac and extracellular matrix remodeling markers across cardiac stages in T. cruzi infected (Tc+) and uninfected (Tc-) individuals. Participants were recruited in a public hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia and assigned cardiac severity stages by electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. BNP, NTproBNP, CKMB, troponin I, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, TGFb1, and TGFb2 were measured in specimens from 265 individuals using multiplex bead systems. Biomarker levels were compared between Tc+ and Tc- groups, and across cardiac stages. Receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curves were created; for markers with area under curve>0.60, logistic regression was performed. Analyses stratified by cardiac stage showed no significant differences in biomarker levels by Tc infection status. Among Tc+ individuals, those with cardiac insufficiency had higher levels of BNP, NTproBNP, troponin I, MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 than those with normal ejection fraction and left ventricular diameter. No individual marker distinguished between the two earliest Tc+ stages, but in ROC-based analyses, MMP-2/MMP-9 ratio was significantly higher in those with than those without ECG abnormalities. BNP, NTproBNP, troponin I, MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 levels rose with increasing severity stage but did not distinguish between Chagas cardiomyopathy and other cardiomyopathies. Among Tc+ individuals without cardiac insufficiency, only the MMP-2/MMP-9 ratio differed between those with and without ECG changes.

  1. Decompressional Volcanism Following Giant Landslide Events at a Miocene Shield- Volcano, Teno, Tenerife: Evidence From Field Observations, Augite and Olivine Chemistry, and Chemical Thermobarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansteen, T. H.; Longpré, M.; Troll, V. R.; Walter, T. R.

    2006-12-01

    Giant landslides play a major role in the evolution of large oceanic shield-volcanoes around the globe. The removal of a significant portion of the volcanic edifice due to lateral collapse is thought to supersede the effect of erosion and subsidence in the process of island decay. On the other hand, rapid constructional phases appear to frequently follow giant mass-wasting and are generally concentrated in the region affected by the collapse (e.g. Réunion, La Palma, Fogo). The rapid unloading of up to thousands of km3 of near-surface rocks must decompress parts of the volcanic edifice, which in turn may affect the magmatic system [1,2]. Located in north-western Tenerife, Teno is a deeply eroded Miocene shield-volcano which has suffered at least two giant lateral collapses between 5-6 Ma [3]. Incised valleys dissect the structure of the old volcano and expose ancient landslide scars. Extensive debris avalanche deposits typically include juvenile pyroclastic material, suggesting that explosive volcanic activity was contemporaneous with landsliding. Moreover, post- collapse stratigraphy is marked by numerous thick ultramafic lava flows (basanites, ankaramites, picrites, SiO2 < 45 wt%, MgO = 8-17 wt%), characterised by extremely high crystal contents (up to 60% augite and olivine) and megacrysts up to 3 cm in size, that immediately overlie the debris avalanche deposits and pyroclastics. These are gradually replaced by relatively differentiated, crystal-poor or plagioclase-phyric basalts before another landslide unconformity is encountered. Chemical thermobarometry [4] using augite and olivine rims, fused groundmass, and whole rock compositions indicates that crystallisation for the ultramafic lavas mostly occurred in the uppermost mantle at pressures and temperatures in the range of 6-15 kbar and 1175-1295°C. The more evolved samples indicate lower crystallisation pressures and temperatures (4-8 kbar, 1150-1180°C). Most samples include several crystal populations

  2. Earthquake travel time tomography of the southern Santa Cruz Mountains: Control of fault rupture by lithological heterogeneity of the San Andreas fault zone

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W.; Michelini, A.; McEvilly, T.V.

    1993-10-10

    The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake occurred along the stretch of the San Andreas fault zone within the southern Santa Cruz Mountains that last failed as a major earthquake in 1906. The southeastern end of the 1989 rupture marks the transition from stable, aseismic slip on the central creeping section of the San Andreas fault to unstable failure on the locked 1906 segment. The authors investigate this transition and the rupture characteristics of the 1989 earthquake using a 3-D P wave velocity model of the southern Santa Cruz Mountains section of the fault zone. The model images a large anomalous high-velocity body at midcrustal depths within the rupture zone of the 1989 earthquake that the available evidence suggests might have gabbroic or other mafic composition. On the basis of the relationship of the lithological features interpreted from the velocity model to the seismicity and surface creep the authors propose a model in which the high-velocity body is primarily responsible for the transition from stable to unstable fault slip at Pajaro Gap. The active plane of the San Andreas fault cuts throughout the body. The fault system attempts to circumvent this barrier by transferring slip to secondary faults, including splay faults that have propagated along the frictionally favorable contact between the high-velocity rock mass and Franciscan country rocks. However, the near arrest of the stable sliding causes stress to concentrate within the body, and the high-strength, unstable contact within it evolves from a barrier to the asperity that failed in the 1989 earthquake. The general features of the 1989 rupture predicted by this asperity model agree with several rupture histories computed for the earthquake. The model implies that as proposed by other workers, the Loma Prieta earthquake did not involve a repeat of the 1906 slip, which has an important bearing on earthquake recurrence estimates for the Santa Cruz Mountains segment of the fault. 114 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Road accidents and business cycles in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Jesús; Marrero, Gustavo A; González, Rosa Marina; Leal-Linares, Teresa

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores the causes behind the downturn in road accidents in Spain across the last decade. Possible causes are grouped into three categories: Institutional factors (a Penalty Point System, PPS, dating from 2006), technological factors (active safety and passive safety of vehicles), and macroeconomic factors (the Great recession starting in 2008, and an increase in fuel prices during the spring of 2008). The PPS has been blessed by incumbent authorities as responsible for the decline of road fatalities in Spain. Using cointegration techniques, the GDP growth rate, the fuel price, the PPS, and technological items embedded in motor vehicles appear to be statistically significantly related with accidents. Importantly, PPS is found to be significant in reducing fatal accidents. However, PPS is not significant for non-fatal accidents. In view of these results, we conclude that road accidents in Spain are very sensitive to the business cycle, and that the PPS influenced the severity (fatality) rather than the quantity of accidents in Spain. Importantly, technological items help explain a sizable fraction in accidents downturn, their effects dating back from the end of the nineties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Does Education Affect Happiness? Evidence for Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunado, Juncal; de Gracia, Fernando Perez

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the impact of education on happiness in Spain using individual-level data from the European Social Survey, by means of estimating Ordinal Logit Models. We find both direct and indirect effects of education on happiness. First, we find an indirect effect of education on happiness through income and labour status. That is, we…

  5. Foundations of Laic Moral Education in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soria, Juan Manuel Fernandez

    2008-01-01

    This article studies the foundations of laic moral education in Spain. Some aspects of laic moral education can also be found in other nations, including the emergence of the laic man or the need for an educating State; other aspects of laic moral education, however, are peculiar to the Spanish case, such as the influence of Krausoinstitutionism…

  6. Does Education Affect Happiness? Evidence for Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunado, Juncal; de Gracia, Fernando Perez

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the impact of education on happiness in Spain using individual-level data from the European Social Survey, by means of estimating Ordinal Logit Models. We find both direct and indirect effects of education on happiness. First, we find an indirect effect of education on happiness through income and labour status. That is, we…

  7. Higher Education and Employment in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuente, Gloria de la

    1995-01-01

    An examination of the relationship of higher education and employment in Spain looks at: issues in the internal debate over the relationship; the evolution of the job market within the Spanish economy; existing analyses of employment trends and labor needs; and the response of Spanish universities to graduate employment problems and the…

  8. The 1918 "Spanish flu" in Spain.

    PubMed

    Trilla, Antoni; Trilla, Guillem; Daer, Carolyn

    2008-09-01

    The 1918-1919 influenza pandemic was the most devastating epidemic in modern history. Here, we review epidemiological and historical data about the 1918-1919 influenza epidemic in Spain. On 22 May 1918, the epidemic was a headline in Madrid's ABC newspaper. The infectious disease most likely reached Spain from France, perhaps as the result of the heavy railroad traffic of Spanish and Portuguese migrant workers to and from France. The total numbers of persons who died of influenza in Spain were officially estimated to be 147,114 in 1918, 21,235 in 1919, and 17,825 in 1920. However, it is likely that >260,000 Spaniards died of influenza; 75% of these persons died during the second period of the epidemic, and 45% died during October 1918 alone. The Spanish population growth index was negative for 1918 (net loss, 83,121 persons). Although a great deal of evidence indicates that the 1918 A(H1N1) influenza virus unlikely originated in and spread from Spain, the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic will always be known as the Spanish flu.

  9. [Smoking-attributable deaths in Spain, 2006].

    PubMed

    Banegas, José R; Díez-Gañán, Lucía; Bañuelos-Marco, Beatriz; González-Enríquez, Jesús; Villar-Álvarez, Fernando; Martín-Moreno, José M; Córdoba-García, Rodrigo; Pérez-Trullén, Alfonso; Jiménez-Ruiz, Carlos

    2011-02-12

    This study estimates smoking-attributable mortality in Spain in 2006. Source data included 1) smoking prevalence in Spain; 2) deaths occurred in Spain; and 3) relative risks of mortality by tobacco-caused diseases drawn from the Cancer Prevention Study II. All data corresponded to individuals aged 35 years and older. In 2006, 53,155 smoking-attributable deaths were estimated (14.7% of all deaths occurred in individuals≥35 years; 25.1% in men and 3.4% in women). Almost 90% (47,174) of these attributable deaths corresponded to men, and 11.3% (5,981) to women. The most frequent attributable deaths were: cancer (24,058), specially lung cancer (16,482), cardiovascular disease (17,560), specially ischemic heart disease (6,263) and stroke (4,283), and respiratory disease (11,537), specially chronic obstructive lung disease (9,886). Since 2001, a decrease in smoking-attributable mortality was observed in men and an increase in women. About one out of 7 deaths occurring annually in individuals≥35 years in Spain is attributable to smoking (one in 4 in men and one in 29 in women). Despite a decreasing trend in the number of smoking-attributable deaths over time (except in women, where they increase), the toll of estimated attributable deaths is still very high. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  10. Melioidosis in Traveler from Africa to Spain

    PubMed Central

    Quereda, Carmen; Gil, Horacio; Anda, Pedro; Núñez-Murga, María; Cantón, Rafael; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemiology of melioidosis is changing. We describe a case of acute melioidosis in Spain in a patient who had traveled to Africa. A novel sequence type of Burkholderia pseudomallei was identified in this patient. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of melioidosis in travelers returning from melioidosis-nonendemic regions. PMID:24047798

  11. Spain: Restructuring, Reform and Research Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Julio

    1984-01-01

    Scientific and technological research in Spain has been hindered more by lack of organization than by lack of funds. The 1983 Universty Reform Act to restructure the curriculum and improve research quality represents a major step in bringing Spanish research up to the levels of other modern university systems and to promote economic development.…

  12. Foundations of Laic Moral Education in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soria, Juan Manuel Fernandez

    2008-01-01

    This article studies the foundations of laic moral education in Spain. Some aspects of laic moral education can also be found in other nations, including the emergence of the laic man or the need for an educating State; other aspects of laic moral education, however, are peculiar to the Spanish case, such as the influence of Krausoinstitutionism…

  13. Reviews of National Policies for Education: Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    Recent reforms affecting every aspect of Spain's educational system are reviewed in this report. The first part presents the observations of three educators from other European countries ("The Examiners' Report"). Part 2 is a "Record of the Review Meeting" held in Paris in December of 1985 10 months after the examiners' visit…

  14. Economic crisis and nursing in Spain.

    PubMed

    Zabalegui, Adelaida; Cabrera, Esther

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe the economic context in Spain and its impact on the health care sector and in nursing schools. The global economic crisis is affecting nursing in Spain. This study analyses and compares indicators related to health care and nursing schools among European countries. Some new strategies to cope with the challenges arising from the health care crisis are suggested. Health care costs are increasing as a result of the ageing of the Spanish population, immigration, chronicity of health problems and new medical technology. Nursing education has changed in 2010 from a 3-year diploma programme to a 4-year University degree in Nursing. This change requires new resources involving staff, facilities and equipment, all of which are lacking because of the economic crisis in Spain. The worldwide economic crisis has affected Spain more than it has other European Union (EU) countries. This global crisis has an impact on the health care sector as well on nursing schools. It is essential for nursing management to develop creative approaches to maintain cost effective patient care. New programmes and technology must be carefully evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness before being implemented. All health care professionals should be well informed and have a solid understanding of this situation.

  15. Melioidosis in traveler from Africa to Spain.

    PubMed

    Morosini, María I; Quereda, Carmen; Gil, Horacio; Anda, Pedro; Núñez-Murga, María; Cantón, Rafael; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-10-01

    The worldwide epidemiology of melioidosis is changing. We describe a case of acute melioidosis in Spain in a patient who had traveled to Africa. A novel sequence type of Burkholderia pseudomallei was identified in this patient. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of melioidosis in travelers returning from melioidosis-nonendemic regions.

  16. Classification of four ordinary chondrites from Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, T. J.; Keil, Klaus; Casanova, I.; Wieler, R.

    1990-01-01

    Based on optical microsocpy and electron microprobe analysis of mafic minerals, four previously poorly described ordinary chondrites from Spain are classified. The classifications of Guarena (H6), Olmedilla de Alarcon (H5) and Reliegos (L5) are confirmed. Molina is reclassified as H5, based on new data.

  17. [Tuberculosis and immigration in Spain: scoping review].

    PubMed

    Casals, Martí; Rodrigo, Teresa; Camprubí, Esteve; Orcau, Angels; Caylà, Joan A

    2014-01-01

    Immigration is a fairly recent phenomenon in Spain and there are still few scientific publications on tuberculosis (TB) and immigration. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe the differential characteristics of TB in the immigrant population with respect to natives in Spain. Literature review of original articles written in Spanish or English and published 1998-2012 about TB among immigrant population. The articles with the key words "Tuberculosis", "immigrants" and "Spain" were included. Literature search was performed in Medline and MEDES. A total of 72,087 articles on TB were detected worldwide, 6% of them dealt with the immigration issue. Regarding Spain we found 2,917 articles representing 4% of the papers published worldwide, and in 219 (7.5%) immigration was considered. Of the 219 articles, 48% were published in Spanish journals and the 52% remaining in Anglo-Saxon journals. 93.5% of immigrants with TB were younger than 51, whereas this percentage was 64.9% in natives. Drug resistance can be seen in 7.8% of the immigrant population but in only 3.8% of natives. It was also detected that the unavailability of a health card could be a problem. Immigrants with TB were characterized by being younger and having more drug resistance and coming mostly from Latin America, Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. It was also detected that the unavailability of a health card could be a problem.

  18. Educational Reform and Renewal in Contemporary Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickman, William W.

    This study is one of a series of Office of Education publications on educational developments in other countries. It describes and analyzes in social, economic, and historical context the educational changes mandated in Spain by the Education Reform Law of 1970, one of contemporary Europe's most far-reaching plans for educational reform and…

  19. Vocational Education and Training in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quero, Manuel Lopez; Elorriaga y Uzquiano, Francisco Javier Lopez; Reyes, Julian Blanco; Lausin, Felix Garcia; Lopez, Felix Martinez; Rodriguez, Ines Touza

    This document describes the vocational education and training system in Spain, beginning in chapter 1 with the administrative, demographic, and economic background in which the training system exists. Chapter 2 provides a brief historical review of the development of the training systems; discusses regulated vocational education and training;…

  20. Tarasca: ritual monster of Spain.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, David D

    2008-09-01

    Let us now revisit our original assumptions. First, we note that for the participants in Hacinas Carnival the Tarasca is a figure of fun and joy, but it also exudes a strain of aggressive misogyny that many female residents, not to mention tourists, find somewhat unsettling. In the spirit of feminist currents in Spain, a group of young women protested in 1992 to town officials and, when rebuffed, sought to build their own female monster, which they intended to use to attack boys and men. While their plan was never carried out, and indeed met with stiff opposition from officialdom and, especially, from older women, some of the younger, more modern girls find the Tarasca appalling, and they told me so without compunction. Accordingly, today the festival tends to polarize the sexes as well as the generations. Also, many children are frightened by the gigantic mock-up with its snapping teeth and foul breath, and many of them burst into tears at the roaring of the demons. But despite these negatives--or perhaps because of them--the Tarasca breaks down boundaries between things normally kept separate in the mind: humor and terror, man and beast, order and disorder, old and young, life and death, and so on. In so collapsing opposites, the Tarasca causes people to pause and to think about and question everyday reality in the non-Carnival universe. All these observations of course support the structural arguments of our four theorists above and in particular seem to corroborate Bloch's concept (1992) of the regenerative power of "rebounding violence." However, there are three specific features here that need psychological amplification beyond simply confirming the work of previous theorists. We must first note that like most grotesque fantasies, the Hacinas monster combines disparate organic "realities" into a bizarre and monstrous image that by its very oddness and the resulting "cognitive mismatch" captures people's attention and sparks the imagination, especially that of

  1. Structure and Velocities of the Northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and the Western Santa Clara Valley, California, from the SCSI-LR Seismic Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The Santa Clara Valley is located in the southern San Francisco Bay area of California and generally includes the area south of the San Francisco Bay between the Santa Cruz Mountains on the southwest and the Diablo Ranges on the northeast. The area has a population of approximately 1.7 million including the city of San Jose, numerous smaller cities, and much of the high-technology manufacturing and research area commonly referred to as the Silicon Valley. Major active strands of the San Andreas Fault system bound the Santa Clara Valley, including the San Andreas fault to the southwest and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the northeast; related faults likely underlie the alluvium of the valley. This report focuses on subsurface structures of the western Santa Clara Valley and the northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and their potential effects on earthquake hazards and ground-water resource management in the area. Earthquake hazards and ground-water resources in the Santa Clara Valley are important considerations to California and the Nation because of the valley's preeminence as a major technical and industrial center, proximity to major earthquakes faults, and large population. To assess the earthquake hazards of the Santa Clara Valley better, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has undertaken a program to evaluate potential earthquake sources and potential effects of strong ground shaking within the valley. As part of that program, and to better assess water resources of the valley, the USGS and the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) began conducting collaborative studies to characterize the faults, stratigraphy, and structures beneath the alluvial cover of the Santa Clara Valley in the year 2000. Such geologic features are important to both agencies because they directly influence the availability and management of groundwater resources in the valley, and they affect the severity and distribution of strong shaking from local or regional

  2. Type material of Platyhelminthes (Monogenoidea) housed in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1979 to 2016

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Daniela A.; Mainenti, Adriana; Sanches, Magda; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A catalogue of type material of monogenoids deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), between 1979 and 2016, is presented, given that the last list of types was produced in 1979. The monogenoid collection comprises type lots for 203 species, distributed across 14 families and 68 genera. Specific names are listed systematically, followed by type host, infection site, type locality, specimens with the collection numbers and references. The classification and the nomenclature of the species have been updated. PMID:27667946

  3. Type material of Platyhelminthes housed in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1979 to 2016 (Rhabditophora, Trematoda and Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Daniela A; Mainenti, Adriana; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2017-01-01

    The second part of the catalogue of type material deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), between 1979 and 2016, is presented, to complement the first list of all types that was published in 1979. This part includes Platyhelminthes other than monogenoids, which were covered in the first part published in September 2016. The present catalogue comprises type material for 104 species, distributed across three classes, 40 families and 75 genera. Species names are listed systematically, followed by type host, infection site, type locality and specimens with their collection numbers and references. The classification and the nomenclature of the species have been updated.

  4. Type material of Platyhelminthes housed in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1979 to 2016 (Rhabditophora, Trematoda and Cestoda)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Daniela A.; Mainenti, Adriana; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The second part of the catalogue of type material deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), between 1979 and 2016, is presented, to complement the first list of all types that was published in 1979. This part includes Platyhelminthes other than monogenoids, which were covered in the first part published in September 2016. The present catalogue comprises type material for 104 species, distributed across three classes, 40 families and 75 genera. Species names are listed systematically, followed by type host, infection site, type locality and specimens with their collection numbers and references. The classification and the nomenclature of the species have been updated. PMID:28769607

  5. Description of industrial pollution in Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Javier; Boldo, Elena; Ramis, Rebeca; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2007-03-21

    Toxic substances released into the environment (to both air and water) by many types of industries might be related with the occurrence of some malignant tumours and other diseases. The publication of the EPER (European Pollutant Emission Register) Spanish data allows to investigate the presence of geographical mortality patterns related to industrial pollution. The aim of this paper is to describe industrial air and water pollution in Spain in 2001, broken down by activity group and specific pollutant, and to plot maps depicting emissions of carcinogenic substances. All information on industrial pollution discharge in 2001 was drawn from EPER-Spain public records provided by the European Commission server. We described the distribution of the number of industries and amounts discharged for each pollutant, as well as emission by pollutant group and the industrial activities associated with each pollutant. Maps of Spain were drawn up, with UTM coordinates being used to plot pollutant foci, and circles with an area proportional to the emission to depict pollution emission values. The EPER-Spain contained information on 1,437 industrial installations. The industrial plants that discharge pollutant substances into air and water above the pollutant-specific EPER threshold were mainly situated in the Autonomous Regions of Aragon, Andalusia and Catalonia and in Catalonia, the Basque Country and Andalusia respectively. Pollution released in 2001 into air approached 158 million Mt. Emissions into water were over 8 million Mt. A few single industrial plants are responsible for the highest percentage of emissions, thus rendering monitoring of their possible health impact on the surrounding population that much simpler. Among European countries Spain is the leading polluter in almost one third of all EPER-registered pollutant substances released into the air and ranks among the top three leading polluters in two-thirds of all such substances. Information obtained through

  6. [Neurological investigation in Spain. Present and future].

    PubMed

    Bermejo Pareja, F

    2004-09-01

    To analyze the situation of neurological research in relationship to the biomedical and neuroscience research in Spain. To discuss alternatives of neurology research for the future. Author review. Review of neurology research bibliography by means of three quantitative bibliometric indexes of neurological publications in Medline (research in neurology, neurology evidence-based medicine publications, and clinical trials); and review of the database of grants funded by the FIS (Health Research Fund) in 1989 and in the 1994-2000 period. Spain is in a middle position in country biomedical publication ranking in Europe, although the Spanish expenditure from GNP granted to research is lower than the mean situation among EU countries. Investigation in neurosciences stands out in biomedical research in Spain, however the bibliometric indexes analyzed and the study performed of the database of the FIS are not favorable for Spanish Neurology. This study shows that, for the 1994-2000 period, the neurologists only performed 32.1% of the projects funded in clinical research, 6% in neurosciences; 66.7% in epidemiology; and 4.3% in management-public health. The expenditure for biomedical research should be increased in Spain. Furthermore, clinical research and neurological clinical management research should be intensified. One of the better strategies to achieve this objective is to obtain medical part-time schedules for patient oriented research in hospitals. To solve this situation and to set up communication networks among basic neuro-scientific, clinicians and epidemiologists is one of the major challenges of the current neurological research in Spain.

  7. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of the essential oils from the aerial parts of Pimpinella anagodendron Bolle and Pimpinella rupicola Svent., two endemic species to the Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Negueruela, A; Pérez-Alonso, M J; de Paz, P L Pérez; Palá-Paúl, J; Sanz, J

    2005-11-18

    The essential oils from the aerial parts of Pimpinella anagodendron Bolle and Pimpinella rupicola Svent., two endemic species growing in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, were studied by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major components of the flowering tops (flowers+unripe fruits) of P. rupicola (PRFT) were found to be beta-bisabolene (34.8%), limonene (10.9%) and alpha-zingiberene (10.5%), whereas in the flowering tops of P. anagodendron (PAFT), the main constituents were alpha-zingiberene (32.9%), beta-bisabolene (17.9%), beta-pinene (15.8%) and ar-curcumene (11.5%). The major compounds found in the stems+leaves of P. rupicola (PRSL) were beta-bisabolene (31.6%), alpha-zingiberene (11.4%) and limonene (10.8%), whereas those of P. anagodendron (PASL) were alpha-zingiberene (32.3%), beta-bisabolene (14.0%) and ar-curcumene (12.6%). In all the oils were found the characteristic constituents of genus Pimpinella, the pseudoisoeugenol esters. In accordance with the morphological, chorological and chemical differences between both species, we suggest that P. rupicola Svent. is a good taxon and not a synonym of P. anagodendron.

  8. First observations of tropospheric δD data observed by ground- and space-based remote sensing and surface in-situ measurement techniques at MUSICA's principle reference station (Izaña Observatory, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Yenny; Schneider, Matthias; Christner, Emanuel; Rodríguez, Omaira E.; Sepúlveda, Eliezer; Dyroff, Christoph; Wiegele, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of the project MUSICA (Multiplatform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) is the generation of a quasi global tropospheric water vapor isototopologue dataset of a good and well-documented quality. Therefore, new ground- and space-based remote sensing observations (NDACC-FTIR and IASI/METOP) are combined with in-situ measurements. This work presents the first comparison between in-situ and remote sensing observations made at the Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain). The in-situ measurements are made by a Picarro L2120-i water vapor isotopologue analyzer. At Izaña the in-situ data are affected by local small-scale mixing processes: during daylight, the thermally buoyant upslope flow prompts the mixing between the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) and the low Free Troposphere (FT). However, the remote sensors detect δD values averaged over altitudes that are more representative for the free troposphere. This difference has to be considered for the comparison. In general, a good agreement between the MUSICA remote sensing and the in situ H2O-versus-δD plots is found, which demonstrates that the MUSICA δD remote sensing products add scientifically valuable information to the H2O data.

  9. Pharmaceutical costs of assisted reproduction in Spain.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Maria-Reyes; Hernández, Juana; Antoñanzas, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Assisted reproduction is one of the health services currently being considered for possible limitation or exclusion from the public health services portfolio in Spain. One of the main reasons claimed for this is the impact on the budget for pharmaceutical expenditure. The objective of this study was to assess the significance of the pharmaceutical costs of assisted reproduction in Spain. This study focused on medical practice in Spain, and is based on the opinions of experts in assisted reproduction and the results provided by professional societies' publications. The reference year is 2012 and the setting was secondary care. We have included all existing pharmaceutical modalities for assisted reproduction, as well as the most common drug for each modality. We have considered the pharmaceutical cost per cycle for artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF_ICSI), and cryotransfer and donated fresh oocytes reception. In Spain, artificial insemination has a pharmaceutical cost per cycle of between €69.36 and €873.79. This amounts to an average cycle cost of €364.87 for partner's sperm and €327.10 for donor sperm. The pharmaceutical cost of IVF_ICSI ranges between €278.16 and €1,902.66, giving an average cost per cycle of €1,139.65. In the case of cryotransfer and donated fresh oocytes reception, the pharmaceutical cost per cycle is between €22.61 and €58.73, yielding an average cost of €40.67. The budgetary impact of pharmaceutical expenditure for assisted reproduction in Spain for the year 2012 was estimated at €98.7 million. In Spain, the total pharmaceutical cost of assisted reproduction is substantial. According to our results, we can say that about 29% of the total pharmaceutical expenditure for assisted reproduction techniques is funded by the National Health System and the rest represents 2.4% of the total annual out-of-pocket family expenditure on drugs.

  10. Geochemical characterization of tarballs on beaches along the California coast. Part I - Shallow seepage impacting the Santa Barbara Channel Islands, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Miguel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostettler, F.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Lorenson, T.D.; Dougherty, J.

    2004-01-01

    Tarballs are common along the southern California coastline. This study investigates tarballs from beaches along this coastline, with a focus on Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and San Miquel Islands in the Santa Barbara Channel. The tarballs were fingerprinted using biomarker and stable carbon isotope parameters, and then grouped according to genetic similarities. The data show that the tarballs are of natural and not anthropogenic origin and that all originate from source rock within the Miocene Monterey Formation via shallow seeps offshore. Sterane biomarker parameters were found to vary widely in the sample set. Biodegradation, especially of the regular steranes, is the primary process impacting the biomarker distributions in a large group of samples. The most common tarball occurrences appear to come from offshore seepage near the west end of Santa Cruz Island. Another major group most likely was transported north from near Santa Monica Bay. Several individual occurrences of some of these tarball groups also were found on beaches as far north as Pt. Reyes and as far south as San Diego, indicating significant long-distance dispersal by ocean currents. This study begins a library of tarball fingerprints to be used as a database to help distinguish between natural and anthropogenic tar occurrences all along the California coast, and to compare shallow seepage with future samples of deeper production oils from the same area.

  11. Changing levels of heavy metal accumulation in birds at Tumacacori National Historic Park along the Upper Santa Cruz River Watershed in southern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Riper, Charles; Lester, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    National Parks and other protected areas can be influenced by contamination from outside their boundaries. This is particularly true of smaller parks and those in riparian ecosystems, a habitat that in arid environments provides critical habitat for breeding, migratory, and wintering birds. Animals living in contaminated areas are susceptible to adverse health effects as a result of long-term exposure and bioaccumulation of heavy metals. We investigated the distribution and cascading extent of heavy metal accumulation in Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia) at Tumacacori National Historic Park (TUMA) along the upper Santa Cruz River watershed in southern Arizona. This study had three goals: (1) quantify the concentrations and distributional patterns of heavy metals in blood and feathers of Song Sparrows at Tumacacori National Historic Park, (2) quantify hematocrit values, body conditions (that is, residual body mass), and immune conditions of Song Sparrows in the park (3) compare our findings with prior studies at the park to assess the extent of heavy metal accumulation in birds at downstream sites after the 2009 wastewater treatment plant upgrade, and (4) quantify concentrations and distributional patterns of heavy metals in blood and feathers of Song Sparrows among six study sites throughout the upper Santa Cruz River watershed. This study design would allow us to more accurately assess song sparrow condition and blood parameters among sites with differing potential sources of contamination exposure, and how each location could have contributed to heavy metal levels of birds in the park.

  12. Effects of environmental amenities and locational disamenities on home values in the Santa Cruz watershed: a hedonic analysis using census data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arora, Gaurav; Frisvold, George; Norman, Laura

    2014-01-01

    For this study, we used the hedonic pricing method to measure the effects of natural amenities on home prices in the U.S-side of the Santa Cruz Watershed. We employed multivariate spatial regression techniques to estimate how difference factors affect median home values in 613 census block groups of the 2000 Census, accounting for spatial autocorrelation, spatial lags, and/or spatial heterogeneity in the data. Diagnostic tests suggest that failure to account for the hedonic model can be classified as (1) physical features of the housing stock, (2) neighborhood characteristics, and (3) environmental attributes. Census data was combined with GIS data for vegetation and land cover, land administration, measures of species richness and open space, and proximity to amenities and disamenities. Census block groups close to the US-Mexico border of airports/air bases were negative. Results suggest that policies to maintain biodiversity and open space provide economic benefits to homeowners, reflected in higher home values. Future research will quantify the marginal effects of regression explanatory variables on home values to assess their economic and policy significant. These marginal effects will be used as input indicators to discern potential economic impacts of various scenarios in the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM). Future research will also expand this effort into the Mexican-portion of the watershed.

  13. Patents, antibiotics, and autarky in Spain.

    PubMed

    Romero De Pablos, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Patents on antibiotics were introduced in Spain in 1949. Preliminary research reveals diversification in the types of antibiotics: patents relating to penicillin were followed by those relating to streptomycin, erythromycin and tetracycline. There was also diversification in the firms that applied for patents: while Merck & Co. Incorporated and Schenley Industries Inc. were the main partners with Spanish antibiotics manufacturers in the late 1940s, this industrial space also included many others, such as Eli Lilly & Company, Abbott Laboratories, Chas. Pfizer & Co. Incorporated, and American Cyanamid Company in the mid-1970s. The introduction of these drugs in Spain adds new elements to a re-evaluation of the autarkic politics of the early years of the Franco dictatorship.

  14. Training in breast surgery in Spain.

    PubMed

    Miguelena, José M; Domínguez Cunchillos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Breast surgery is a key part of training and competency in general surgery in Spain and is a "frontier area" that can be efficiently managed by general surgeons and gynecologists. The main objective of the training process consists of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, including conservative surgery, oncoplastic and reconstructive techniques. This article analyses the current status of breast surgery training in Spain and schematically proposes potential targets of the different training programs, to improve access and training for surgeons and residents in this area, taking into account the RD 639/2014 and European regulation. The priority is to specify the level of training that should be achieved, in relation to the group of professionals involved, considering their area of competency: surgery resident, educational programs, and surgeons with special dedication to this area.

  15. Young people's heroes in France and Spain.

    PubMed

    Gash, Hugh; Domínguez Rodríguez, Pilar

    2009-05-01

    Heroes play collectivist or individualist roles in imagination and self-development. Representations of heroic figures in questionnaires given to French (n = 241) and Spanish (n = 227) samples of 10 and 15-year-olds were examined to assess the extent that heroes originated in digital media, and whether they were proximal or distal personalities. There is strong evidence that heroes in this sample were largely learned about in digital media (France 45%, Spain 50%): family and community heroes were a minority (France 11%, Spain 9%). Male heroes were more important to Spanish participants compared to their French peers. The acquisition sequence for hero type reported in the pre-television era, proximal (family and community) to distal (beyond the neighbourhood), is reversed in this study. Generally, 10-year-olds preferred heroes with collectivist qualities and 15-year-olds with individualised qualities. Findings are discussed in terms of the emergence of social capital.

  16. Entrepreneurship research in Spain: developments and distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, José C; Gutiérrez, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    This article presents a review of research on entrepreneurship in Spain, paying particular attention to its beginnings, nature and main focus of interest. We have developed a database based on the review of 471 works produced between 1977 and 2009, including articles published in national and international journals and dissertations (read in Spain) that allowed us to extract the following results. There is a preference for qualitative methods, conceptual contributions and the entrepreneurial process as the privileged research theme. There is also a strong focus of interest on micro and small enterprises. These characteristics of Spanish research in areas of entrepreneurship can make a distinctive contribution to international research. However, the dissemination of knowledge and inadequate strategies for international publication limit the diffusion of Spanish research in entrepreneurship. Lastly, we discuss the implications for future research.

  17. [Foreign immigration in Spain (1985-1994)].

    PubMed

    Gozalvez Perez, V

    1996-01-01

    "During the decade 1985-94, Spain [has had]...some growing and unexpected flows of foreign immigrations. The tradition of emigration of Spanish people, some grave difficulties of [the] employment market in the country, irregular entrance of workers from developing countries, the fear of a very rapid growth of these immigrants, the instability and marginality of their work, and the agreement of Spain in the European Union have led the government to develop an active migratory policy, first against the illegal flows and, more recently, in direction of the integration of immigrants in Spanish society.... The article analyzes main features from some different groups of foreign workers, and in particular Africans: spatial repartition, demographic profile, migratory strategies and trajectories, uneasy insertion in the national employment market, and draws lastly the main features of the Spanish migratory policy." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND SPA)

  18. [Intake of trans fats; situation in Spain].

    PubMed

    Riobó, Pilar; Breton, Irene

    2014-04-01

    Current nutritional recommendations include decreasing the intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), since there exists sufficient scientific evidence of its influence to cardiovascular disease. During the last decades, in many European countries the TFA intake has considerably decreased through the established legislation and changes in the technological processes developed by the food industry. In Spain, just 2.1 g/day, a 0.7% of the daily energy intake comes from TFA, a lower value than the recommended maximum (<1%), according to data from TRANSFAIR study. The TFA content of processed products such as margarines, factory-baked goods and etc, has declined over recent years and is less than 1% in more than 90% of all these products in Spain. However, it is necessary to develop and implement regulations, governing the TFA content in the products sold in our country, in which there should be the requirement to include this information in the label too.

  19. [Arrival of the psychoanalysis in Spain].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Granjel, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The first real news about the Psychoanalysis in Spain was spread by Ortega y Gasset in 1911 and the neuropsychiatrists Valle Aldabalde and especially Fernández Sanz also spread that information in the medical world in 1914. It was introduced in the University field by Novoa Santos. The castilian edition of the works written by Freud aroused great interest, more cultural than professional, among the psychiatrists in Madrid, who were at that time very much influenced by Cajal and the German Psychiatry; Fernández Sanz made an understanding review about those works while Fernández Villaverde was not interested in them and made an ideological negation. In Barcelona, the Psychoanalysis, was supported by Emilio Mira. The first Freudian Psychoanalyst, called Angel Garma, left Spain because of the war and he was the beginner of a strong psychoanalytic School in Buenos Aires. The influence of the Psychoanalysis was obvious in different cultural fields.

  20. HTLV-1 infection and disease in Spain.

    PubMed

    de Mendoza, Carmen; Caballero, Estrella; Aguilera, Antonio; Requena, Silvia; de Lejarazu, Raúl Ortiz; Pirón, María; González, Rocío; Jiménez, Ana; Roc, Lourdes; Treviño, Ana; Benito, Rafael; Fernández-Alonso, Miriam; Aguinaga, Aitziber; Rodríguez, Carmen; García-Costa, Juan; Blanco, Lidia; Ramos, José M; Calderón, Enrique; Eirós, José M; Sauleda, Silvia; Barreiro, Pablo; Soriano, Vicente

    2017-05-01

    : Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is a neglected disease despite roughly 15 million people are chronically infected worldwide. Lifelong less than 10% of carriers develop life-threatening diseases, mostly a subacute myelopathy known as tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) and a lymphoproliferative disorder named adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 is efficiently transmitted perinatally (breastfeeding), sexually (more from male to female) and parenterally (transfusions, injection drug use and transplants). To date there is neither prophylactic vaccine nor effective antiviral therapy.A total of 327 cases of HTLV-1 infection had been reported at the HTLV-1 Spanish registry until December 2016, of whom 34 had been diagnosed with TSP and 25 with ATL. Overall 62% were Latin American immigrants and 13% were persons of African origin. The incidence of HTLV-1 in Spain has remained stable for nearly a decade with 20-25 new cases yearly. Of the 21 newly diagnosed HTLV-1 cases during year 2016, one was a native Spaniard pregnant woman, and four presented with symptomatic disease, including three with ATL and one with TSP.Underdiagnosis of HTLV-1 in Spain must be high (iceberg model), which may account for the disproportionate high rate of symptomatic cases (almost 20%) and the late recognition of preventable HTLV-1 transmissions in special populations, such as newborns and transplant recipients. Our current estimate is of 10,000 persons living with HTLV-1 infection in Spain. Given the large flux of immigrants and visitors from HTLV-1 endemic regions to Spain, the expansion of HTLV-1 screening policies is warranted. At this time, it seems worth recommending HTLV testing to all donor/recipient organ transplants and pregnant women regardless place of birth. Although current leukoreduction procedures largely prevent HTLV-1 transmission by blood transfusions, HTLV testing of all first-time donors should be cost-effective contributing to unveil asymptomatic unaware

  1. Legislating tolerance: Spain's national public smoking law.

    PubMed

    Muggli, Monique E; Lockhart, Nikki J; Ebbert, Jon O; Jiménez-Ruiz, Carlos A; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; Hurt, Richard D

    2010-02-01

    While Spain's national tobacco control legislation prohibits smoking in many indoor public places, the law provides for an exception to the prohibition of smoking by allowing separate seating sections and ventilation options in certain public places such as bars and restaurants, hotels and airports. Accordingly, Spain's law is not aligned with Article 8 Guidelines of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which requires parties to ensure universal protection against secondhand smoke exposure in all enclosed public places, workplaces and on all means of public transport. Spain's law is currently being promoted by the tobacco companies in other countries as a model for smoke-free legislation. In order to prevent weakening of smoke-free laws in other countries through industry-supported exceptions, we investigated the tactics used by the tobacco companies before the implementation of the new law and assessed the consequences of these actions in the hospitality sector. Internal tobacco industry documents made public through US litigation settlements dating back to the 1980s were searched in 2008-9. Documents show that tobacco companies sought to protect hospitality venues from smoking restrictions by promoting separate seating for smokers and ineffective ventilation technologies, supporting an unenforceable voluntary agreement between the Madrid local government and the hospitality industry, influencing ventilation standards setting and manipulating Spanish media. The Spanish National Assembly should adopt comprehensive smoke-free legislation that does not accommodate the interests of the tobacco industry. In doing so, Spain's smoke-free public places law would be better aligned with the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

  2. Sociological Profile of Astronomers in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias de Ussel, Julio; Trinidad, Antonio; Ruiz, Diego; Battaner, Eduardo; Delgado, Antonio J.; Rodriguez-Espinosa, José M.; Salvador-Solé, Eduard; Torrelles, José M.

    In this paper the main findings are presented of a recent study made by a team of sociologists from the University of Granada on the professional astronomers currently working in Spain. Despite the peculiarities of this group - its youth, twentyfold increase in size over the last 20 years, and extremely high rate of specialization abroad - in comparison with other Spanish professionals, this is the first time that the sociological characteristics of the group have been studied discretely. The most significant results of the study are presented in the following sections. Section 1 gives a brief historical background of the development of Astronomy in Spain. Section 2 analyzes the socio-demographic profile of Spanish Astronomy professionals (sex, age, marital status, etc.). Sections 3-5 are devoted to the college education and study programs followed by Spanish astronomers, focusing on the features and evaluations of the training received, and pre- and postdoctoral study trips made to research centers abroad. The results for the latter clearly show the importance that Spanish astronomers place on having experience abroad. Special attention is paid to scientific papers published as a result of joint research projects carried out with colleagues from centers abroad as a result of these study trips. Section 6 describes the situation of Astronomy professionals within the Spanish job market, the different positions available and the time taken to find a job after graduation. Section 7 examines Astronomy as a discipline in Spain, including the astronomers' own opinions of the social status of the discipline within Spanish society. Particular attention is paid to how Spanish astronomers view the status of Astronomy in Spain in comparison with that of other European countries.

  3. Sociological profile of astronomers in Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ussel, J. I.; Trinidad, A.; Ruíz, D.; Battaner, E.; Delgado, A. J.; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J. M.; Salvador-Solé, E.; Torrelles, J. M.

    In this paper the main findings are presented of a recent study made by a team of sociologists from the University of Granada on the professional astronomers currently working in Spain. Despite the peculiarities of this group - its youth, twentyfold increase in size over the last 20 years, and extremely high rate of specialization abroad - in comparison with other Spanish professionals, this is the first time that the sociological characteristics of the group have been studied discretely. The most significant results of the study are presented in the following sections. Section 1 gives a brief historical background of the development of astronomy in Spain. Section 2 analyzes the socio-demographic profile of Spanish astronomy professionals (sex, age, marital status, etc.). Sections 3-5 are devoted to the college education and study programs followed by Spanish astronomers, focusing on the features and evaluations of the training received, and pre- and postdoctoral study trips made to research centers abroad. The results for the latter clearly show the importance that Spanish astronomers place on having experience abroad. Special attention is paid to scientific papers published as a result of joint research projects carried out with colleagues from centers abroad as a result of these study trips. Section 6 describes the situation of astronomy professionals within the Spanish job market, the different positions available and the time taken to find a job after graduation. Section 7 examines astronomy as a discipline in Spain, including the astronomers' own opinions of the social status of the discipline within Spanish society. Particular attention is paid to how Spanish astronomers view the status of astronomy in Spain in comparison with that of other European countries.

  4. National registry of hemoglobinopathies in Spain (REPHem).

    PubMed

    Cela, Elena; Bellón, José M; de la Cruz, María; Beléndez, Cristina; Berrueco, Rubén; Ruiz, Anna; Elorza, Izaskun; Díaz de Heredia, Cristina; Cervera, Aurea; Vallés, Griselda; Salinas, J Antonio; Coll, M Teresa; Bermúdez, Mar; Prudencio, Marta; Argilés, Bienvenida; Vecilla, Cruz

    2017-07-01

    Although highly prevalent throughout the world, the accurate prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in Spain is unknown. This study presents data on the national registry of hemoglobinopathies of patients with thalassemia major (TM), thalassemia intermedia (TI), and sickle cell disease (SCD) in Spain created in 2014. Fifty centers reported cases retrospectively. Data were registered from neonatal screening or from the first contact at diagnosis until last follow-up or death. Data of the 715 eligible patients were collected: 615 SCD (497 SS, 64 SC, 54 SBeta phenotypes), 73 thalassemia, 9 CC phenotype, and 18 other variants. Most of the SCD patients were born in Spain (65%), and 51% of these were diagnosed at newborn screening. Median age at the first diagnosis was 0.4 years for thalassemia and 1.0 years for SCD. The estimated incidence was 0.002 thalassemia cases and 0.03 SCD cases/1,000 live births. Median age was 8.9 years (0.2-33.7) for thalassemia and 8.1 years (0.2-32.8) for SCD patients. Stroke was registered in 16 SCD cases. Transplantation was performed in 43 TM and 23 SCD patients at a median age of 5.2 and 7.8 years, respectively. Twenty-one patients died (3 TM, 17 SCD, 1 CC) and 200 were lost to follow-up. Causes of death were related to transplantation in three patients with TM and three patients with SCD. Death did not seem to be associated with SCD in six patients, but nine patients died secondary to disease complications. Overall survival was 95% at 15 years of age. The registry provides data about the prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in Spain and will permit future cohort studies and the possibility of comparison with other registries. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Essential and toxic metals in taros (Colocasia esculenta) cultivated in the Canary Islands (Spain): evaluation of content and estimate of daily intake.

    PubMed

    Luis-González, Gara; Rubio, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Ángel; González-Weller, Dailos; Revert, Consuelo; Hardisson, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Taros are a staple in the diet of many people around the world, and they are an excellent source of minerals. Monitoring the levels of metals in food provides basic information that is useful from the perspectives of safety, regulation, and nutrition. Forty-two samples of taros were randomly obtained from supermarkets, vegetable markets, and farmer's plots on the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). The edible portion (pulp) was the only part considered for analysis. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was used to determine the contents of Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn. The levels of Cr, Ni, Cd, and Pb were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Mean concentrations (mg/kg) were 565.6 Na, 2947 K, 231.4 Ca, 364.5 Mg, 1.224 Cu, 3.818 Fe, 1.408 Mn, 2.242 Zn, 0.044 Cr, 0.021 Ni, 0.003 Cd, and 0.006 Pb. The mean concentrations of Cd and Pb were well below the accepted European Commission limits (0.1 mg/kg weight for both metals, respectively). Daily consumption of taro (10.41 g taro/person/day) contributes to the dietary intake of essential metals and trace elements, mainly Mg (1.265% in adult women and 1.084% in adult men) and Cu (1.182% for adult men and women). The average daily intakes of Cd (0.031 μg/day) and Pb (0.062 μg/day) from taro were below the legislated respective tolerable weekly intakes (TWIs). Thus, the samples analyzed were considered safe to eat based on their metal concentrations and legislated allowable intakes.

  6. [Medicine and enlightenment in New Spain].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A

    1998-01-01

    Fundamental ideas of the cultural movement of Enlightenment were drawn up and encouraged in England by John Locke and introduced into continental Europe by Voltaire. The essence of this movement was defined by I. Kant in 1784. These new ideas were projected into the field of medicine initially with the systematization of anatomical studies by Winslow, Vicq d' Azyr and Sénac in France, by S. Th. Sömmerring and von Haller in Germany, and by Paolo Mascagni and other anatomists in Italy. This movement settled in Spain toward the middle of the XVIII century, due to Father Feijóo and his pupils such as Piquer and Casal. In New Spain, which maintained cultural and scientific relationship with the Old World, the leaders of the movement were José Antonio Alzate in the field of biology and José Ignacio Bartolache in that of medicine. These were the founders of the first scientific journals: the "Diario Literario" (Literary Journal) by Alzate (1768) and the "Mercurio Volante" (Flying Mercury) by Bartolache (1772). Latter this physician had to face the great epidemic outbreak of smallpox in 1779. Due to that, he attributed great importance to the psychological aspect of the problem and supported the variolization proceeding introduced into Mexico by Doctor Henri Morel. Moreover, two scientific expeditions, which reached New Spain at the end of the XVIII century, allowed to systematize the study of the American vegetables and to acknowledge the usefulness of botany and chemistry as auxiliary sciences of medicine.

  7. [The cost of arterial hypertension in Spain].

    PubMed

    Badía, X; Rovira, J; Tresserras, R; Trinxet, C; Segú, J L; Pardell, H

    1992-12-12

    High blood pressure has a high incidence and produces a high morbidity and mortality due to associated diseases: cerebrovascular disease, ischemic cardiopathy, and cardiac failure. The socioeconomic impact of high blood pressure in Spain was estimated during 1985 in primary, hospitalary and pharmaceutical health care, to provide a framework for decision making and to determine strategies for reducing the costs of this entity. The methodology of analysis of the cost of the disease was followed with the aim of quantifying the socioeconomic consequences of an entity, disease or risk factor with prevalence being the focus of the study. The socioeconomic impact estimated was situated between 95,000 and 124,000 millions of pesetas according to the different hypothesis adopted in the analysis of sensitivity. The direct health care costs represented between 2.6 and 3.9% of the global health care costs for Spain in 1985. Health care funding consumed by high blood pressure in primary health care was higher (between 4.5 and 6.7%) than hospital attendance (between 1.0 and 1.5%) and pharmaceutical care (between 2.3 and 3.5%), with respect to the total costs of each category. The reduction of the costs related with high blood pressure in Spain must be obtained from improvement of efficacy of interventions carried out in health care education and primary health care. The economic evaluation of the primary and secondary prevention programs may aid in determining more cost-effective strategies.

  8. Description of industrial pollution in Spain

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Javier; Boldo, Elena; Ramis, Rebeca; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2007-01-01

    Background Toxic substances released into the environment (to both air and water) by many types of industries might be related with the occurrence of some malignant tumours and other diseases. The publication of the EPER (European Pollutant Emission Register) Spanish data allows to investigate the presence of geographical mortality patterns related to industrial pollution. The aim of this paper is to describe industrial air and water pollution in Spain in 2001, broken down by activity group and specific pollutant, and to plot maps depicting emissions of carcinogenic substances. Methods All information on industrial pollution discharge in 2001 was drawn from EPER-Spain public records provided by the European Commission server. We described the distribution of the number of industries and amounts discharged for each pollutant, as well as emission by pollutant group and the industrial activities associated with each pollutant. Maps of Spain were drawn up, with UTM coordinates being used to plot pollutant foci, and circles with an area proportional to the emission to depict pollution emission values. Results The EPER-Spain contained information on 1,437 industrial installations. The industrial plants that discharge pollutant substances into air and water above the pollutant-specific EPER threshold were mainly situated in the Autonomous Regions of Aragon, Andalusia and Catalonia and in Catalonia, the Basque Country and Andalusia respectively. Pollution released in 2001 into air approached 158 million Mt. Emissions into water were over 8 million Mt. Conclusion A few single industrial plants are responsible for the highest percentage of emissions, thus rendering monitoring of their possible health impact on the surrounding population that much simpler. Among European countries Spain is the leading polluter in almost one third of all EPER-registered pollutant substances released into the air and ranks among the top three leading polluters in two-thirds of all such

  9. [Moroccan migration to Spain. Data, opinions, and predictions].

    PubMed

    Cazorla, J

    1995-01-01

    "In this article, the author analyzes the migration flows between Spain and [Morocco] within the most general context of relations between European Union (EU) and the Maghrebian countries. Since the beginning of the eighties the migration flows toward and from Spain changed [dramatically], so... Spanish society has shifted toward an inmigration country. [The author analyzes] where such inmigrants come from and their motivations to choose Spain [as a] destination. The results of a survey financed partly by the EU...[for] institutions related directly with the migration problem from [Morocco] to Spain are the base of the information included in this article." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  10. Developing an Ecosystem Services online Decision Support Tool to Assess the Impacts of Climate Change and Urban Growth in the Santa Cruz Watershed; Where We Live, Work, and Play

    EPA Science Inventory

    Processes through which ecosystems provide goods or benefit people can be referred to as "ecosystems services”, which may be quantified to clarify decision-making, with techniques including cost-benefit analysis. We are developing an online decision support tool, the Santa Cruz W...

  11. Passing the Baton: A New Program from ACSA and the New Teacher Center at UC Santa Cruz Is Improving the Way a New Generation of Site Leaders is Prepared and Supported

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Gary; Danilovich, Duff L.; Fogel, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Through a collaborative effort, the New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz and the Association of California School Administrators are offering intensive, coaching-based induction support to first- and second-year administrators that is integral to their professional certification. This program rests on the commitment and…

  12. Developing an Ecosystem Services online Decision Support Tool to Assess the Impacts of Climate Change and Urban Growth in the Santa Cruz Watershed; Where We Live, Work, and Play

    EPA Science Inventory

    Processes through which ecosystems provide goods or benefit people can be referred to as "ecosystems services”, which may be quantified to clarify decision-making, with techniques including cost-benefit analysis. We are developing an online decision support tool, the Santa Cruz W...

  13. High Resolution Mapping of an Alleged Chemical Weapons Dump Site in the Santa Cruz Basin, offshore California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    Nautical charts record seven locations off the coast of California labeled as 'Chemical Munitions Dumping Area, Disused' that together cover some 12,000 km2 of sea floor. However only one such chemical munitions site is officially documented and no record exists of any chemical munitions disposed of at other locations, thus creating confusion. We have executed a one day AUV mapping survey of a corner of one such site in the Santa Cruz Basin, south of Port Hueneme, to examine and investigate the debris field. The region is covered with soft sediment and the overlying water is very low in oxygen at ~10 μmol/kg. The processed 110 kHz sidescan data revealed some 754 targets in 25.6 km2 for an average of 29 targets per km2. This was followed by two ROV dives to investigate the targets identified. We found but one false positives among the over 40 targets visited, and found items ranging from two distinct lines of unmarked or labeled and now empty barrels, two target drones, and much miscellaneous debris including 4-packs of cat food cans and a large ships mast over 30m in length. There was zero evidence of chemical weapons materiel as expected given the lack of official records. Almost all of the targets were covered in dense and colorful assemblages of invertebrates: sponges, anemones, and crabs. Where barrels were sufficiently open for full visual inspection, the interior sea floor appeared to have become fully anoxic and was covered in white and yellow bacterial mat. The area chosen for our survey (centered at 33.76 deg N 119.56 deg W) was across the north western boundary of the marked site, and represents only ~ 10% percent of the designated area. Our expectation, that human nature would drive the disposal activities to the nearest corner of the chosen area rather than the center of the field appears to have been confirmed. Objects were found both within and outside of the boundary of the dump site. We have not surveyed the full marked area but there appears to be

  14. Time-domain electromagnetic signatures of polymetallic vein deposits in Cottonwood Canyon area, Santa Cruz County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, Mark W.

    2002-01-01

    This report tests the usefulness of airborne time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) data on three mineral-resource-related issues: (1) to test whether known mineral deposits at or near the surface display any signal in the TEM data; 2) determine whether TEM data can be used to locate bedrock concealed by basin fill; and (3) if the exposed mineral deposits display a signal in the TEM data, to determine if whether deposits are recognizable at depth in outcropping bedrock or in bedrock concealed beneath basin fill. Because Earth's total-intensity magnetic field data are also acquired with the TEM data, these data are included in the analysis. The Cottonwood Canyon area in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, contains several polymetallic vein deposits, including those of the Tyndall, Salero, and Wrightson mining districts, all of which have had significant mineral production. Polymetallic vein deposits, which generally consist of veins of disseminated metallic minerals, commonly exhibit a response to electrical geophysical methods. Also, on the basis of other studies, the conditions that produced the polymetallic vein mineralization in the region are believed to extend offshore into the bedrock concealed by basin fill. The polymetallic vein deposits of the Cottonwood Canyon area all display a geophysical signature in the TEM data. These deposits occur in bedrock that has, in general, a very low resistivity. The polymetallic vein deposits are associated with high-conductivity regions that extend from deep in the bedrock to the surface. These high-conductivity regions can be quite narrow (100 m) or quite wide (1 km); most are relatively narrow. Every known mineral deposit or prospect is associated with a high-conductivity feature. High-conductivity regions can also occur without an association with known mineral deposits. Airborne TEM data appear to be able to locate the basin fill/bedrock contact beneath basin fill. The basin fill (both dry and saturated) is generally more

  15. Geohydrologic Framework of Recharge and Seawater Intrusion in the Pajaro Valley, Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.

    2003-01-01

    Pajaro Valley is a coastal watershed of 160 square miles located along Monterey Bay north of Elkhorn Slough and south of the city of Santa Cruz. The valley has been predominantly developed for agriculture since the late 1800s. In 1984 the Pajaro Valley Water Management Agency (PVWMA) was formed and was delegated with the responsibility of the management of the water resources within the Pajaro Valley by the State of California. About 84 percent of the water is used for agriculture and 16 percent is used for industrial and municipal water supply; almost all of the demand is supplied by ground water. Ground-water pumpage varies with seasonal and climatic periods. The alluvial aquifers are composed of Quaternary- and Tertiary-aged sediments that are layered marine and terrestrial coarse-grained deposits separated by extensive fine-grained deposits that potentially restrict vertical movement of ground water and seawater intrusion in the coastal subareas. The coarse-grained deposits, which persist over large areas, control pumpage and related seawater intrusion. The Aromas Sand crops out throughout the north and central parts of the PVWMA area and offshore on the continental shelf and in Monterey submarine canyon. Because many of the wells in the coastal and inland subregions are screened at depths of 200 to 400 feet below land surface, a direct avenue is provided for seawater intrusion through the coarse-grained deposits of the shallower alluvium and Aromas Sand. Geophysical logs from monitoring wells indicate discrete zones of saline water that are related to pumpage and seawater intrusion in the aquifers of the shallower alluvium and upper Aromas Sand in the upper-aquifer system and to deeper saline waters in the lower Aromas Sand within the lower-aquifer system. The precipitation data indicate that there were at least nine dry and nine wet periods that range from 2 to 19 years during the period of record, 1880?1997. The ground-water pumpage, runoff, streamflow and

  16. 78 FR 72633 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From Spain: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... International Trade Administration Chlorinated Isocyanurates From Spain: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... chlorinated isocyanurates (chlorinated isos) from Spain.\\1\\ The period of review (``POR'') is June 1, 2011... notice. \\1\\ See Chlorinated Isocyanurates from Spain: Preliminary Results of the Antidumping...

  17. Paleoseismic investigations in the Santa Cruz mountains, California: Implications for recurrence of large-magnitude earthquakes on the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, D.P.; Pantosti, D.; Okumura, K.; Powers, T.J.; Hamilton, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Trenching, microgeomorphic mapping, and tree ring analysis provide information on timing of paleoearthquakes and behavior of the San Andreas fault in the Santa Cruz mountains. At the Grizzly Flat site alluvial units dated at 1640-1659 A.D., 1679-1894 A.D., 1668-1893 A.D., and the present ground surface are displaced by a single event. This was the 1906 surface rupture. Combined trench dates and tree ring analysis suggest that the penultimate event occurred in the mid-1600s, possibly in an interval as narrow as 1632-1659 A.D. There is no direct evidence in the trenches for the 1838 or 1865 earthquakes, which have been proposed as occurring on this part of the fault zone. In a minimum time of about 340 years only one large surface faulting event (1906) occurred at Grizzly Flat, in contrast to previous recurrence estimates of 95-110 years for the Santa Cruz mountains segment. Comparison with dates of the penultimate San Andreas earthquake at sites north of San Francisco suggests that the San Andreas fault between Point Arena and the Santa Cruz mountains may have failed either as a sequence of closely timed earthquakes on adjacent segments or as a single long rupture similar in length to the 1906 rupture around the mid-1600s. The 1906 coseismic geodetic slip and the late Holocene geologic slip rate on the San Francisco peninsula and southward are about 50-70% and 70% of their values north of San Francisco, respectively. The slip gradient along the 1906 rupture section of the San Andreas reflects partitioning of plate boundary slip onto the San Gregorio, Sargent, and other faults south of the Golden Gate. If a mid-1600s event ruptured the same section of the fault that failed in 1906, it supports the concept that long strike-slip faults can contain master rupture segments that repeat in both length and slip distribution. Recognition of a persistent slip rate gradient along the northern San Andreas fault and the concept of a master segment remove the requirement that

  18. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the coastal Monte Léon and Santa Cruz formations (Early Miocene) at Rincón del Buque, Southern Patagonia: A revisited locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raigemborn, M. Sol; Matheos, Sergio D.; Krapovickas, Verónica; Vizcaíno, Sergio F.; Bargo, M. Susana; Kay, Richard F.; Fernicola, Juan C.; Zapata, Luciano

    2015-07-01

    Sedimentological, ichnological and paleontological analyses of the Early Miocene uppermost Monte León Formation and the lower part of the Santa Cruz Formation were carried out in Rincón del Buque (RDB), a fossiliferous locality north of Río Coyle in Santa Cruz Province, Patagonia, Argentina. This locality is of special importance because it contains the basal contact between the Monte Léon (MLF) and the Santa Cruz (SCF) formations and because it preserves a rich fossil assemblage of marine invertebrates and marine trace fossils, and terrestrial vertebrates and plants, which has not been extensively studied. A ˜90 m-thick section of the MLF and the SCF that crops out at RDB was selected for this study. Eleven facies associations (FA) are described, which are, from base to top: subtidal-intertidal deposits with Crassotrea orbignyi and bioturbation of the Skolithos-Cruziana ichnofacies (FA1); tidal creek deposits with terrestrial fossil mammals and Ophiomorpha isp. burrows (FA2); tidal flat deposits with Glossifungites ichnofacies (FA3); deposits of tidal channels (FA4) and tidal sand flats (FA5) both with and impoverish Skolithos ichnofacies associated; marsh deposits (FA6); tidal point bar deposits recording a depauperate mixture of both the Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies (FA7); fluvial channel deposits (FA8); fluvial point bar deposits (FA9); floodplain deposits (FA10); and pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits of the floodplain where terrestrial fossil mammal remains occur (FA11). The transition of the MLF-SCF at RDB reflects a changing depositional environment from the outer part of an estuary (FA1) through the central (FA2-6) to inner part of a tide-dominated estuary (FA7). Finally a fluvial system occurs with single channels of relatively low energy and low sinuosity enclosed by a broad, low-energy floodplain dominated by partially edaphized ash-fall, sheet-flood, and overbank deposits (FA8-11). Pyroclastic and volcaniclastic materials throughout the

  19. The Interplay Between Deformation and Volcanism on Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos: A Multidisciplinary Study Using Structural, Geophysical, and Geochronological Analyses of Faults and Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. M.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Santa Cruz Island is one of the oldest volcanoes in the Galápagos Archipelago; little is known about its history or its evolutionary relationship to the younger western shield volcanoes. Of particular note, the island's northern and southern flanks are deformed by a series of major normal faults of unknown origin. Using an array of multidisciplinary tools, including field mapping, GPS, gravity, Ar-Ar and geochronology, and 3He exposure dating, we construct a structural and volcanic history of Santa Cruz. The Ar-Ar ages reveal that since ~1.5 Ma, the island has experienced two phases of volcanism, separated by ~0.4 My. The first occurred from 1620 ± 15 to 1160 ± 35 ka (1σ); the second lasted from 699 ± 45 to 74 ± 19 ka. Volcanism during the second phase was focused along an E-W trending summit vent system, from which all <200 ka lavas were deposited on the southern flank. Structural observations suggest that the island has experienced two major faulting episodes. North flank faults formed after 1160 ± 35 ka, whereas the southern faults were initiated between 416 ± 18 and 27 ± 16 ka. Gravity results indicate two E-W trending, intrusive complexes; one is centered north of the island's summit and the other is beneath the southern flank. When integrated, our data are consistent with a model wherein the northern faults are associated with regional uplift occurring after 1.1 Ma and before 0.78 Ma (paleomag.; Bow, 1979). This deformation event may be related to the formation of the summit vent system and the initiation of the second phase of volcanism. The second volcanism phase is coincident with the formation of the southern faults. Southward spreading along the island's southern flank accommodated extension initiated by intrusions, which ceased with volcanism at ~20 ka. The extended volcanic activity characteristic of Santa Cruz and of other older Galapagos Islands may be the result of rejuvenated volcanism linked to regional uplift event(s); it may also

  20. Social Inclusion and Multicultural Perspectives in Spain: Three Case Studies in Northern Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zufiaurre, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Immigration is the challenge that faces European countries in the immediate future. Spain, a former exporter of migrants, has recently become a host country, which must be taken into account if we wish to promote a multicultural, integrative school system. The aim in this article is to reach some conclusions about the integration of immigrants,…

  1. Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the structure of the benthic macroinvertebrate community in an effluent-dominated reach of the Santa Cruz River, AZ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyle, T.P.; Fraleigh, H.D.

    2003-01-01

    This study provides an assessment of the ecological conditions of a 46-km effluent-dominated stream section of the Santa Cruz River in the vicinity of the International Waste Water Treatment Plant, Nogales, AZ. We associated changes in the structure of the macroinvertebrate community to natural and anthropogenic chemical and physical variables using multivariate analysis. The analysis shows that biological criteria for effluent-dominated streams can be established using macroinvertebrate community attributes only with an understanding of the contribution of three classes of variables on the community structure: (1) low flow hydrological discharge as affected by groundwater withdrawals, treatment plant discharge, and subsurface geomorphology; (2) chemical composition of the treatment plant discharge and natural dilution; and (3) naturally produced floods resulting from seasonality of precipitation. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Production of sulfur gases and carbon dioxide by synthetic weathering of crushed drill cores from the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit near Casa Grande, Pinal County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, M.E.; Ryder, J.L.; Sutley, S.J.; Botinelly, T.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of ground drill cores from the southern part of the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit, Casa Grande, Arizona, were oxidized in simulated weathering experiments. The samples were also separated into various mineral fractions and analyzed for contents of metals and sulfide minerals. The principal sulfide mineral present was pyrite. Gases produced in the weathering experiments were measured by gas chromatography. Carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and carbon disulfide were found in the gases; no hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides, or mercaptans were detected. Oxygen concentration was very important for production of the volatiles measured; in general, oxygen concentration was more important to gas production than were metallic element content, sulfide mineral content, or mineral fraction (oxide or sulfide) of the sample. The various volatile species also appeared to be interactive; some of the volatiles measured may have been formed through gas reactions. ?? 1990.

  3. Report of the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Modeling Workshop, Pacific Marine Science Center, Santa Cruz, CA, March 22-23, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2006-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology (CMG) Modeling Workshop was held to discuss the general topic of coastal modeling, defined broadly to include circulation, waves, sediment transport, water quality, ecology, sediment diagenesis, morphology change, and coastal evolution, on scales ranging from seconds and a few centimeters (individual ripples) to centuries (coastal evolution) and thousands of kilometers (tsunami propagation). The workshop was convened at the suggestion of CMG Program Management to improve communication among modelers and model users, assess modeling-related activities being conducted at the three centers (Florida Integrated Science Center, FISC; Pacific Marine Science Center; PMSC; and Woods Hole Science Center; WHSC), and develop goals, strategies, and plans for future modeling activities. The workshop represents a step toward developing a five-year strategic plan, and was timed to provide input for the FY06 prospectus. The workshop was held at the USGS Pacific Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz on March 22-23, 2005.

  4. Swath Bathymetry Surveys of the Monterey Bay Area from Point Ano Nuevo to Moss Landing, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes swath bathymetry and backscatter data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey on the continental shelf within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary between Point A?o Nuevo and Moss Landing, in San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, Calif. The survey was done for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), in field activities S-7-09-MB and S-10-09-MB, by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data were aquired in two seperate surveys: (1) between August 13, 2009 and September 3, 2009, personnel from WCMG completed field activity S-7-09-MB, from Point A?o Nuevo south to Table Rock, as well as a block west of Soquel Canyon; (2) between October 12 and December 16, 2009, WCMG conducted field activity S-10-09-MB, surveying between Table Rock and Moss Landing.

  5. A personal view of nutrition in Spain.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Salvador

    2014-04-01

    This paper stems from the special lecture given by the author at 20th International Congress of Nutrition, held from 16 to 20 September 2013 in Granada (Spain), following for his appointment as "Living Legend" of the International Union of nutritional sciences (IUNS), in recognition of his outstanding contribution to research and development in nutritional science. The development of nutrition in Spain from the 1960s to the present, which the author had the opportunity to experience first hand, is described. The contribution covers an extensive period in the history of this science, and highlights the advances made in our knowledge of nutrition and several of the misunderstandings that existed and still exist in this science: 1) The Anglo-Saxon dietary pattern and the high incidence of death from myocardial infarction, and the subsequent recognition of the Mediterranean diet as a model of a varied and balanced and healthy eating. 2) The relationship between cardiovascular disease and the consumption of oily fish. Since the discovery of the syn - thesis of prostaglandins makes it clear that fish fat is heart-healthy. 3) The epidemic of prosperity, overweight and obesity and the appearance of miracle diets. However, there are not miracles, the only solution being a healthy lifestyle and a balanced hypocaloric diet. 4) In the field of nutrition, diet and health, the harmful effect of: "In my opinion", a single allusion that undermines all science. The author also acknowledges all the researchers whose efforts, tenacity and enthusiasm have contributed to the advances made in nutrition science in Spain. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Uneven chances of breastfeeding in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background No large scale studies on breastfeeding onset patterns have been carried out in Spain. This work aims to explore the prevalence and the risk factors for not initiating breastfeeding in hospitals from Catalonia (CAT) and Valencia (V), two regions accounting approximately for 30% of the annual births in Spain. Methods The prevalence of not initiating breastfeeding was calculated by maternal/neonatal characteristics and type of hospital, and logistic regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted risks of not breastfeeding in each region. Results Prevalence of breastfeeding initiation was 81.7% and 82.5% in Catalonia and Valencia, respectively. We identified conspicuous regional differences in the adjusted-risk of not breastfeeding, especially for multiple [CAT = 3.12 (95% CI: 2.93, 3.31), V = 2.44 (95% CI: 2.23, 2.67)] and preterm and low birth weight deliveries [very preterm and very low birth weight: CAT = 7.61 (95% CI: 6.50, 8.92), V = 4.03 (95% CI: 3.13, 5.19); moderate preterm and moderate low birth weight: CAT = 4.28 (95% CI: 4.01, 4.57), V = 2.55 (95% CI:2.34, 2.79)]. Conclusions Our results suggest the existence of regional variations in breastfeeding initiation in Spain. Taking into account the known short and long-term benefits of breastfeeding it is recommended that further research should explore these differences in order to prevent potential inequities in neonatal, child and adult health. PMID:23270558

  7. Uneven chances of breastfeeding in Spain.

    PubMed

    Río, Isabel; Luque, Alvaro; Castelló-Pastor, Adela; Sandín-Vázquez, María Del Val; Larraz, Rosana; Barona, Carmen; Jané, Mireia; Bolúmar, Francisco

    2012-12-27

    No large scale studies on breastfeeding onset patterns have been carried out in Spain. This work aims to explore the prevalence and the risk factors for not initiating breastfeeding in hospitals from Catalonia (CAT) and Valencia (V), two regions accounting approximately for 30% of the annual births in Spain. The prevalence of not initiating breastfeeding was calculated by maternal/neonatal characteristics and type of hospital, and logistic regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted risks of not breastfeeding in each region. Prevalence of breastfeeding initiation was 81.7% and 82.5% in Catalonia and Valencia, respectively. We identified conspicuous regional differences in the adjusted-risk of not breastfeeding, especially for multiple [CAT = 3.12 (95% CI: 2.93, 3.31), V = 2.44 (95% CI: 2.23, 2.67)] and preterm and low birth weight deliveries [very preterm and very low birth weight: CAT = 7.61 (95% CI: 6.50, 8.92), V = 4.03 (95% CI: 3.13, 5.19); moderate preterm and moderate low birth weight: CAT = 4.28 (95% CI: 4.01, 4.57), V = 2.55 (95% CI:2.34, 2.79)]. Our results suggest the existence of regional variations in breastfeeding initiation in Spain. Taking into account the known short and long-term benefits of breastfeeding it is recommended that further research should explore these differences in order to prevent potential inequities in neonatal, child and adult health.

  8. Priorities for cancer control in Spain.

    PubMed

    Borràs, J M; Colomer, C; Soria, P; López, R

    2010-05-01

    Spanish cancer strategy is being developed in the context of a decentralised health care system. The advantages and challenges posed by this system are reviewed, particularly vis-à-vis the need to build consensus among regional health services as regards priorities in cancer control. Analysis of the impact of cancer in Spain enables smoking prevention and obesity reduction to be highlighted, especially among adolescents, as targets for primary prevention. Two-yearly colorectal cancer screening using the faecal occult blood test and targeting persons aged 50-69 years is a new goal that should be pursued countrywide, as should population-based breast cancer screening. Insofar as health care is concerned, the focus is on promoting and consolidating multidisciplinary cancer care based on evidence-based clinical guidelines, and on ensuring that cancer patients enjoy prompt access to diagnosis and therapy. Psychosocial support, with experience gained in several health services, should be expanded. Palliative care must be consolidated as a necessary therapy for patients who require it. Finally, the important boost to cancer research witnessed in recent years should be sustained. The approach adopted is based on building a co-operative strategy among all of Spain's autonomous regions (Comunidades Autónomas), which must then apply the interventions in their respective health services. A shared understanding of the main priorities for cancer control, through a review of the evidence and a consensus embracing all stakeholders, including scientific societies and patients' associations, is an essential step in the implementation of cancer strategy in Spain.

  9. Infant botulism in Andalusia (Southern Spain).

    PubMed

    López-Laso, Eduardo; Roncero-Sánchez-Cano, Inés; Arce-Portillo, Elena; Ley-Martos, Myriam; Aguirre-Rodríguez, Javier; García-Ron, Adrián; Mora-Navarro, David; Méndez-García, Mario; Camino-León, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    Infant botulism (IB) is caused by the intestinal colonization by Clostridium botulinum in the first year of life and its subsequent production of neurotoxins. Traditionally, IB has been associated to honey consumption. IB cases tend to cluster in geographic regions. In Europe, IB is a rare disorder. From 1976 through 2006, 65 cases were identified in 13 European countries. In Spain, in the last 15 years, most of the cases have been reported in one region, Andalusia (Southern Spain). A specific treatment for IB type A and type B (BabyBIG) is available outside of the United States since 2005. and aims: We performed a retrospective review of IB cases detected in Andalusia since 1997 and compare them with the cases of IB reported in Europe. We identified 11 confirmed cases of IB in Andalusia since 1997, and 14 cases in Spain. Nine out of 11 cases were detected since 2007; none of these infants had been exposed to honey consumption. One case in 1997 and another in 2000 were associated to honey. Two cases were treated with BabyBIG in 2007. In the period 2006-2012 the cases of IB reported in Europe were 54. We identified a considerable increase in the incidence of IB since 2006. A tendency to a reduction in the number of cases of IB linked to honey consumption has also been identified. An increase in the exposure to these bacteria from the environment could be presumed. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for this treatable disorder. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Spain.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Antonio; Mazon, Angel; Martin-Mateos, Maria Anunciacion; Plaza, Ana-Maria; Garde, Jesus; Alonso, Elena; Martorell, Antonio; Boquete, Manuel; Lorente, Felix; Ibero, Marcel; Bone, Javier; Pamies, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Miguel; Echeverria, Luis; Nevot, Santiago; Martinez-Cañavate, Ana; Fernandez-Benitez, Margarita; Garcia-Marcos, Luis

    2011-11-01

    The data of the ISAAC project in Spain show a prevalence of childhood asthma ranging from 7.1% to 15.3%, with regional differences; a higher prevalence, 22.6% to 35.8%, is described for rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is found in 4.1% to 7.6% of children. The prevalence of food allergy is 3%. All children in Spain have the right to be visited in the National Health System. The medical care at the primary level is provided by pediatricians, who have obtained their titles through a 4-yr medical residency training program. The education on pediatric allergy during that period is not compulsory and thus very variable. There are currently 112 certified European pediatric allergists in Spain, who have obtained the accreditation of the European Union of Medical Specialist for proven skills and experience in pediatric allergy. Future specialists in pediatric allergy should obtain their titles through a specific education program to be developed in one of the four accredited training units on pediatric allergy, after obtaining the title on pediatrics. The Spanish Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEICAP) gathers over 350 pediatric allergists and pediatricians working in this field. SEICAP has a growing activity including yearly congresses, continued education courses, elaboration of technical clinical documents and protocols, education of patients, and collaboration with other scientific societies and associations of patients. The official journal of SEICAP is Allergologia et Immunophatologia, published every 2 months since 1972. The web site of SEICAP, http://www.seicap.es, open since 2004, offers information for professionals and extensive information on pediatric allergic and immunologic disorders for the lay public; the web site is receiving 750 daily visits during 2011. The pediatric allergy units are very active in clinical work, procedures as immunotherapy or induction of oral tolerance in food allergy, contribution to scientific literature, and

  11. Active shortening along the northern edge of the western Transverse Ranges recorded by deformed fluvial terraces along Santa Cruz Creek in the eastern Santa Ynez Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Vertical-axis rotation of the western Transverse Ranges in southern California was accompanied by folding and reverse faulting at the northern edge of the rotated domain during late Miocene to Pliocene time. Deformed Pleistocene strata in the Santa Ynez Valley suggest that this rotational folding and faulting is still occurring. Fluvial terraces are present along several major drainages that cross the faults and folds and provide an opportunity to evaluate the timing and magnitude of Late Quaternary deformation at the northern edge of the rotated western Transverse Ranges. Three flights of well-preserved fluvial strath terraces are exposed along a 9.3 km stretch of the Santa Cruz Creek drainage in the eastern Santa Ynez Valley. Fluvial deposits that make up the terrace treads have been lifted 18.5 m (T-1) to 110m (T-3) above the active channel and are unpaired across the drainage. The terrace surfaces are underlain by a thin 0.6m-6m veneer of fluvial deposits resting on an erosional surface cut into the underlying Pleistocene Paso Robles Formation. GPS profiles (accurate to .1m) of the terrace surfaces and the Santa Cruz Creek stream profile show evidence of Late Quaternary deformation. The T1 surface (lowest terrace surface) is offset vertically 3.5m across the Los Alamos/Baseline fault, the T2 surface is offset 7m vertically across this feature, and the T2 and T3 terraces terminate abruptly at the Little Pine Fault indicating Quaternary displacement across these structures. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating is being used to date the terraces in order to calculate rates of uplift and deformation.

  12. Determination of the fault plane and rupture size of the 2013 Santa Cruz earthquake, Bolivia, 5.2 Mw, by relative location of the aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivadeneyra-Vera, C.; Assumpção, M.; Minaya, E.; Aliaga, P.; Avila, G.

    2016-11-01

    The Central Andes of southern Bolivia is a highly seismic region with many active faults, that could generate earthquakes up to 8.9 Mw. In 2013, an earthquake of 5.2 Mw occurred in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, in the sub-Andean belt, close to the Mandeyapecua fault, one of the most important reverse faults in Bolivia. Five larger aftershocks were reported by the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and 33 smaller aftershocks were recorded by the San Calixto Observatory (OSC) in the two months after the mainshock. Distances between epicenters of the events were up to 36 km, which is larger than expected for an earthquake of this magnitude. Using data from South American regional stations and the relative location technique with Rayleigh waves, the epicenters of the five larger aftershocks of the Santa Cruz series were determined in relation to the mainshock. This method enabled to achieve epicentral locations with uncertainties smaller than 1 km. Additionally, using data of three Bolivian stations (MOC, SIV and LPAZ) eight smaller aftershocks, recorded by the OSC, were relocated through correlation of P and S waves. The results show a NNW-SSE trend of epicenters and suggest an E dipping plane. The maximum distance between the aftershocks is 14 km, which is not consistent with the expected subsurface rupture length, in accordance with the magnitude of the mainshock. The events are located away from the Mandeyapecua fault and show an opposite dip, demonstrating that these events were generated by another fault in the area, that had not been well studied yet.

  13. Household water saving: Evidence from Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisa, Rosa; Larramona, Gemma

    2012-12-01

    This article focuses on household water use in Spain by analyzing the influence of a detailed set of factors. We find that, although the presence of both water-saving equipment and water-conservation habits leads to water savings, the factors that influence each are not the same. In particular, our results show that those individuals most committed to the adoption of water-saving equipment and, at the same time, less committed to water-conservation habits tend to have higher incomes.

  14. Major tanker spill off Spain under control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-14

    This paper reports that a 23 sq mile oil slick along Spain's northwest coast, spreading form the wreckage of the Greek oil tanker Aegean Sea, was for the most part under control as of Dec. 10, Spanish authorities reported. Various press reports put the total spill volume at 490,000 bbl, about double that leaked by the Exxon Valdez supertanker off Alaska in 1989. If initial reports of the spill volume are borne out, the Aegean Sea spill would rank at least as one of the 10 biggest tanker spills.

  15. Involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Viadel, M; Cañete-Nicolás, C; Bellido-Rodriguez, C; Asensio-Pascual, P; Lera-Calatayud, G; Calabuig-Crespo, R; Leal-Cercós, C

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades there have been significant legislative changes in Spain. Society develops faster than laws, however, and new challenges have emerged. In 2004, the Spanish Association of Relatives of the Mentally Ill (FEAFES) proposed amending the existing legislation to allow for the implementation of involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) for patients with severe mental illness. Currently, and after having made several attempts at change, there is no specific legislation governing the application of this measure. Although IOT may be implemented in local programmes, we consider legal regulation to be needed in this matter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality of death certificates in Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, F G; Bolumar, F; Peris, R

    1989-01-01

    Certificates of 1,454 deaths occurring over 11 months were retrieved from the Civil Register in Valencia, Spain. Relevant medical information was systematically gathered from hospital records, questionnaires, and Coroner reports. We compared the underlying cause of death (UCD) from the original death certificate, and a reference cause of death (RCD) determined by a panel of experts based on all available information. Overall, 80.2 percent of the certificates were concordant for disease category, but there was a great disparity among some specific disease categories. PMID:2782500

  17. Evaporation and reference evapotranspiration trends in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Wild, Martin; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Calbó, Josep; Revuelto, Jesús; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Moran-Tejeda, Enrique; Martín-Hernández, Natalia; Peñuelas, Josep

    2015-04-01

    Interest is growing in the trends of atmospheric evaporation demand, increasing the need for long-term time series. In this study, we first describe the development of a dataset on evaporation in Spain based on long-term series of Piché and pan measurement records. Piché measurements have been reported for >50 stations since the 1960s. Measurements of pan evaporation, which is a much more widely studied variable in the literature, are also available, but only since 1984 for 21 stations. Particular emphasis was placed on the homogenization of this dataset (for more details, we refer to Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2014, Clim Res, 61: 269-280). Both the mean annual Piché and pan series over Spain showed evaporative increases during the common study period (1985-2011). Furthermore, using the annual Piché records since the 1960s, an evaporation decline was detected from the 1960s to the mid-1980s, which resulted in a non-significant trend over the entire 1961-2011 period. Our results indicate agreement between the decadal variability of reference evapotranspiration (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2014, Glob Planet Chang, 121: 26-40) and surface solar radiation (Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2013, Glob Planet Chang, 100: 343-352) and the evaporation from Piché and pan measurements since the mid-1980s, especially during summer. Nevertheless, this agreement needs attention, as Piché evaporimeters are inside meteorological screens and not directly exposed to radiation. Thus, as Piché readings are mainly affected by the aerodynamic term in Penman's evaporation equation and pan records are affected by both the heat balance and aerodynamic terms, the results suggest that both terms must be highly and positively correlated in Spain. In order to check this hypothesis, the radiative and aerodynamic components were estimated using the Penman's equation. The results show that the relationship with the radiative components is weaker than that with the aerodynamic component for both pan and

  18. 78 FR 32183 - Importation of Avocados From Continental Spain

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 319 RIN 0579-AD63 Importation of Avocados From... allow the importation of avocados from continental Spain (excluding the Balearic Islands and Canary... vegetables regulations to allow the importation of avocados from continental Spain (excluding the...

  19. Teaching Digital Libraries in Spain: Context and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Marco, Francisco-Javier

    2009-01-01

    The situation of digital libraries teaching and learning in Spain up to 2008 is examined. A detailed analysis of the different curricula and subjects is provided both at undergraduate and postgraduate level. Digital libraries have been mostly a postgraduate topic in Spain, but they should become mainstream, with special subjects devoted to them,…

  20. Educational Conditions in Spain. Bulletin, 1919, No. 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Walter A.

    1919-01-01

    Though Spain maintained her neutrality throughout the World War, her educational, economic, and political conditions--in all countries inextricably bound up with each other--were affected nearly as much as those of the nations participating in it. The educational conditions of Spain are discussed in this bulletin. The following contents are…