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Sample records for cruzi circulante post-terapia

  1. Nucleologenesis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Hernández, Roberto; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Jiménez-García, Luis F

    2016-06-01

    Nucleolar assembly is a cellular event that requires the synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA, in addition to the participation of pre-nucleolar bodies (PNBs) at the end of mitosis. In mammals and plants, nucleolar biogenesis has been described in detail, but in unicellular eukaryotes it is a poorly understood process. In this study, we used light and electron microscopy cytochemical techniques to investigate the distribution of nucleolar components in the pathway of nucleolus rebuilding during closed cell division in epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of American trypanosomiasis. Silver impregnation specific for nucleolar organizer regions and an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid regressive procedure to preferentially stain ribonucleoprotein revealed the conservation and dispersion of nucleolar material throughout the nucleoplasm during cell division. Furthermore, at the end of mitosis, the argyrophilic proteins were concentrated in the nucleolar organizer region. Unexpectedly, accumulation of nucleolar material in the form of PNBs was not visualized. We suggest that formation of the nucleolus in epimastigotes of T. cruzi occurs by a process that does not require the concentration of nucleolar material within intermediate nuclear bodies such as mammalian and plant PNBs. PMID:27126372

  2. Autochthonous Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Perniciaro, Leon; Yabsley, Michael J.; Roellig, Dawn M.; Balsamo, Gary; Diaz, James; Wesson, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    Autochthonous transmission of the Chagas disease parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, was detected in a patient in rural New Orleans, Louisiana. The patient had positive test results from 2 serologic tests and hemoculture. Fifty-six percent of 18 Triatoma sanguisuga collected from the house of the patient were positive for T. cruzi by PCR. PMID:17553277

  3. Intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Urbina, J A

    1994-03-01

    In this article, Julio Urbino discusses the characteristics o f the intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas disease), which are responsible for the unusual capacity of this parasite to use carbohydrates or amino acids as carbon and energy sources without drastic changes in its catabolic enzyme levels(1-3). Many, but not all, o f the metabolic capabilities of this organism are shared with Leishmania and the procyclic form o f the African trypanosomes, and the reviewer presents a metabolic model which is also consistent with the information available on these other parasites(2,4). PMID:15275492

  4. Unveiling the Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Proteome.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Júnior, Agenor de Castro Moreira; Kalume, Dário Eluan; Camargo, Ricardo; Gómez-Mendoza, Diana Paola; Correa, José Raimundo; Charneau, Sébastien; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; de Lima, Beatriz Dolabela; Ricart, Carlos André Ornelas

    2015-01-01

    Replication of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, displays peculiar features, such as absence of chromosome condensation and closed mitosis. Although previous proteome and subproteome analyses of T. cruzi have been carried out, the nuclear subproteome of this protozoan has not been described. Here, we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the isolation and proteome analysis of T. cruzi nuclear fraction. For that, T. cruzi epimastigote cells were lysed and subjected to cell fractionation using two steps of sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The purity of the nuclear fraction was confirmed by phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed the identification of 864 proteins. Among those, 272 proteins were annotated as putative uncharacterized, and 275 had not been previously reported on global T. cruzi proteome analysis. Additionally, to support our enrichment method, bioinformatics analysis in DAVID was carried out. It grouped the nuclear proteins in 65 gene clusters, wherein the clusters with the highest enrichment scores harbor members with chromatin organization and DNA binding functions. PMID:26383644

  5. Review on Trypanosoma cruzi: Host Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; Barrias, Emile Santos

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which affects a large number of individuals in Central and South America, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are metacyclic and bloodstream trypomastigote and amastigote. Metacyclic trypomastigotes are released with the feces of the insect while amastigotes and bloodstream trypomastigotes are released from the infected host cells of the vertebrate host after a complex intracellular life cycle. The recognition between parasite and mammalian host cell involves numerous molecules present in both cell types. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between Trypanosoma cruzi and its host cells, mainly emphasizing the mechanisms and molecules that participate in the T. cruzi invasion process of the mammalian cells. PMID:20811486

  6. Biological characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, R A; Escario, J A; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Gómez-Barrio, A

    2001-01-01

    Biological parameters of five Trypanosoma cruzi strains from different sources were determined in order to know the laboratory behaviour of natural populations. The parameters evaluated were growth kinetics of epimastigotes, differentiation into metacyclic forms, infectivity in mammalian cells grown in vitro and parasite susceptibility to nifurtimox, benznidazole and gentian violet. Differences in transformation to metacyclic, in the percentage of infected cells as well as in the number of amastigotes per cell were observed among the strains. Regarding to pharmacological assays, Y strain was the most sensitive to the three assayed compounds. These data demonstrate the heterogeneity of natural populations of T. cruzi, the only responsible of infection in humans. PMID:11285475

  7. Susceptibility of radiation chimeras to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Trischmann, T.M.

    1982-05-01

    Reciprocal bone marrow transfers were performed with C3H/HeJ mice, which are susceptible to infection with the Brazil strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, and resistant F1 (C3H/HeJ X C57BL/6J) mice. Mice reconstituted after lethal irradiation with syngeneic bone marrow displayed the resistance phenotype of the strain used, but neither C3H mice reconstituted with F1 bone marrow cells nor F1 mice reconstituted with C3H bone marrow cells survived challenge. Resistance to T. cruzi appears to be dependent upon factors associated both with host background and with bone marrow-derived cells.

  8. Inducible suicide vector systems for Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanfen; Weiss, Louis M; Huang, Huan

    2015-06-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a major neglected tropical parasitic disease. The pathogenesis of this infection remains disputable. There is no suitable vaccine for the prevention. Attenuated live vaccines can provide strong protection against infection; however, there are the concerns about latent infection or reversion to virulence in such attenuated strains. A method to induce T. cruzi death would provide a critical tool for research into the pathophysiological mechanisms and provide a novel design of safe live attenuated vaccines. We established effective inducible systems for T. cruzi employing the degradation domain based on the Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR). The DHFR degradation domain (DDD) can be stabilized by trimethoprim-lactate and can be used to express detrimental or toxic proteins. T. cruzi lines with Alpha-toxin, Cecropin A and GFP under the control of DDD with a hemagglutinin tag (HA) were developed. Interestingly, amastigotes bearing GFP-DDDHA, Alpha-toxin-DDDHA, Cecropin A-DDDHA and DDDHA all resulted in inducible cell death with these fusions, indicating that DDDHA protein is also detrimental to amastigotes. Furthermore, these strains were attenuated in mouse experiments producing no pathological changes and inoculation with these DDDHA strains in mice provided strong protection against lethal wild type infection.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Neotropical Wild Carnivores (Mammalia: Carnivora): At the Top of the T. cruzi Transmission Chain

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Fabiana Lopes; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; de Lima, Juliane Saab; Cheida, Carolina Carvalho; Lemos, Frederico Gemesio; de Azevedo, Fernanda Cavalcanti; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa; Bilac, Daniele; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Mourão, Guilherme; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Little is known on the role played by Neotropical wild carnivores in the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles. We investigated T. cruzi infection in wild carnivores from three sites in Brazil through parasitological and serological tests. The seven carnivore species examined were infected by T. cruzi, but high parasitemias detectable by hemoculture were found only in two Procyonidae species. Genotyping by Mini-exon gene, PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) and kDNA genomic targets revealed that the raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus) harbored TcI and the coatis (Nasua nasua) harbored TcI, TcII, TcIII-IV and Trypanosoma rangeli, in single and mixed infections, besides four T. cruzi isolates that displayed odd band patterns in the Mini-exon assay. These findings corroborate the coati can be a bioaccumulator of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTU) and may act as a transmission hub, a connection point joining sylvatic transmission cycles within terrestrial and arboreal mammals and vectors. Also, the odd band patterns observed in coatis’ isolates reinforce that T. cruzi diversity might be much higher than currently acknowledged. Additionally, we assembled our data with T. cruzi infection on Neotropical carnivores’ literature records to provide a comprehensive analysis of the infection patterns among distinct carnivore species, especially considering their ecological traits and phylogeny. Altogether, fifteen Neotropical carnivore species were found naturally infected by T. cruzi. Species diet was associated with T. cruzi infection rates, supporting the hypothesis that predator-prey links are important mechanisms for T. cruzi maintenance and dispersion in the wild. Distinct T. cruzi infection patterns across carnivore species and study sites were notable. Musteloidea species consistently exhibit high parasitemias in different studies which indicate their high infectivity potential. Mesocarnivores that feed on both invertebrates and mammals, including the coati, a host that can be

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in neotropical wild carnivores (Mammalia: Carnivora): at the top of the T. cruzi transmission chain.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Fabiana Lopes; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; de Lima, Juliane Saab; Cheida, Carolina Carvalho; Lemos, Frederico Gemesio; de Azevedo, Fernanda Cavalcanti; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa; Bilac, Daniele; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Mourão, Guilherme; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Little is known on the role played by Neotropical wild carnivores in the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles. We investigated T. cruzi infection in wild carnivores from three sites in Brazil through parasitological and serological tests. The seven carnivore species examined were infected by T. cruzi, but high parasitemias detectable by hemoculture were found only in two Procyonidae species. Genotyping by Mini-exon gene, PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) and kDNA genomic targets revealed that the raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus) harbored TcI and the coatis (Nasua nasua) harbored TcI, TcII, TcIII-IV and Trypanosoma rangeli, in single and mixed infections, besides four T. cruzi isolates that displayed odd band patterns in the Mini-exon assay. These findings corroborate the coati can be a bioaccumulator of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTU) and may act as a transmission hub, a connection point joining sylvatic transmission cycles within terrestrial and arboreal mammals and vectors. Also, the odd band patterns observed in coatis' isolates reinforce that T. cruzi diversity might be much higher than currently acknowledged. Additionally, we assembled our data with T. cruzi infection on Neotropical carnivores' literature records to provide a comprehensive analysis of the infection patterns among distinct carnivore species, especially considering their ecological traits and phylogeny. Altogether, fifteen Neotropical carnivore species were found naturally infected by T. cruzi. Species diet was associated with T. cruzi infection rates, supporting the hypothesis that predator-prey links are important mechanisms for T. cruzi maintenance and dispersion in the wild. Distinct T. cruzi infection patterns across carnivore species and study sites were notable. Musteloidea species consistently exhibit high parasitemias in different studies which indicate their high infectivity potential. Mesocarnivores that feed on both invertebrates and mammals, including the coati, a host that can be

  11. Predominance of Trypanosoma cruzi I among Panamanian sylvatic isolates.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Franklyn; Ortega-Barría, Eduardo; Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, Jose

    2007-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is throughout Panama, which is in agreement with the widespread of the sylvatic vectors implicated in the transmission. Eco-epidemiological changes in some regions of the country have led to a successful dissemination of the palm-tree Attalea butyracea and a possible adaptation of the primary vector of Chagas' disease to human settlements. These facts might increase both vector-human contact and human infection with different potentials T. cruzi genotypes and make therefore necessary a study to disclose Panamanian T. cruzi make-up. In this study, 71 T. cruzi isolates from Rhodnius pallescens were analyzed using mini-exon gene and sequence-characterized amplified region markers. The analyzed strains were T. cruzi lineage I. This finding along with prior results indicates that T. cruzi I is the principal genotype circulating in both sylvatic and domestic/peridomestic cycles and consequently responsible for the disease in the country.

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi screening in Texas blood donors, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M N; Woc-Colburn, L; Rossmann, S N; Townsend, R L; Stramer, S L; Bravo, M; Kamel, H; Beddard, R; Townsend, M; Oldham, R; Bottazzi, M E; Hotez, P J; Murray, K O

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease is an important emerging disease in Texas that results in cardiomyopathy in about 30% of those infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Between the years 2008 and 2012, about 1/6500 blood donors were T. cruzi antibody-confirmed positive. We found older persons and minority populations, particularly Hispanic, at highest risk for screening positive for T. cruzi antibodies during routine blood donation. Zip code analysis determined that T. cruzi is associated with poverty. Chagas disease has a significant disease burden and is a cause of substantial economic losses in Texas.

  13. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi, cancer and the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Krementsov, Nikolai

    2009-07-01

    In the summer of 1946, the international community of cancer researchers was inspired by the announcement that two Soviet scientists, Nina Kliueva and Grigorii Roskin, had discovered anticancer properties in culture extracts made from the South American protozoan, Trypanosoma cruzi, and had produced a preparation--named after its discoverers KR--which showed clear therapeutic effects on cancer patients. Research teams from various countries enthusiastically pursued the promising new line of investigation. The story of the rise and fall of interest in the anticancer properties of T. cruzi in different countries suggests that during the second half of the twentieth century, the Cold War competition between the superpowers played an important role in shaping the research agendas of cancer studies.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi, cancer and the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Krementsov, Nikolai

    2009-07-01

    In the summer of 1946, the international community of cancer researchers was inspired by the announcement that two Soviet scientists, Nina Kliueva and Grigorii Roskin, had discovered anticancer properties in culture extracts made from the South American protozoan, Trypanosoma cruzi, and had produced a preparation--named after its discoverers KR--which showed clear therapeutic effects on cancer patients. Research teams from various countries enthusiastically pursued the promising new line of investigation. The story of the rise and fall of interest in the anticancer properties of T. cruzi in different countries suggests that during the second half of the twentieth century, the Cold War competition between the superpowers played an important role in shaping the research agendas of cancer studies. PMID:20027919

  16. The N-myristoylome of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Adam J; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation is catalysed by N-myristoyltransferase (NMT), an essential and druggable target in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. Here we have employed whole cell labelling with azidomyristic acid and click chemistry to identify N-myristoylated proteins in different life cycle stages of the parasite. Only minor differences in fluorescent-labelling were observed between the dividing forms (the insect epimastigote and mammalian amastigote stages) and the non-dividing trypomastigote stage. Using a combination of label-free and stable isotope labelling of cells in culture (SILAC) based proteomic strategies in the presence and absence of the NMT inhibitor DDD85646, we identified 56 proteins enriched in at least two out of the three experimental approaches. Of these, 6 were likely to be false positives, with the remaining 50 commencing with amino acids MG at the N-terminus in one or more of the T. cruzi genomes. Most of these are proteins of unknown function (32), with the remainder (18) implicated in a diverse range of critical cellular and metabolic functions such as intracellular transport, cell signalling and protein turnover. In summary, we have established that 0.43-0.46% of the proteome is N-myristoylated in T. cruzi approaching that of other eukaryotic organisms (0.5-1.7%). PMID:27492267

  17. The N-myristoylome of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Adam J.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation is catalysed by N-myristoyltransferase (NMT), an essential and druggable target in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. Here we have employed whole cell labelling with azidomyristic acid and click chemistry to identify N-myristoylated proteins in different life cycle stages of the parasite. Only minor differences in fluorescent-labelling were observed between the dividing forms (the insect epimastigote and mammalian amastigote stages) and the non-dividing trypomastigote stage. Using a combination of label-free and stable isotope labelling of cells in culture (SILAC) based proteomic strategies in the presence and absence of the NMT inhibitor DDD85646, we identified 56 proteins enriched in at least two out of the three experimental approaches. Of these, 6 were likely to be false positives, with the remaining 50 commencing with amino acids MG at the N-terminus in one or more of the T. cruzi genomes. Most of these are proteins of unknown function (32), with the remainder (18) implicated in a diverse range of critical cellular and metabolic functions such as intracellular transport, cell signalling and protein turnover. In summary, we have established that 0.43–0.46% of the proteome is N-myristoylated in T. cruzi approaching that of other eukaryotic organisms (0.5–1.7%). PMID:27492267

  18. Genotypic variation among lineages of Trypanosoma cruzi and its geographic aspects.

    PubMed

    Higo, Hiroo; Miura, Sachio; Horio, Masahiro; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Hamano, Shinjiro; Agatsuma, Takeshi; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Cruz-Reyes, Arejandro; Uyema, Norma; Rojas de Arias, A; Matta, Vivian; Akahane, Hiroshige; Hirayama, Kenji; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Tada, Isao; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2004-12-01

    Isozyme analysis with 18 enzyme loci was conducted on 146 isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi from Mexico, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay and Chile. Forty-four different MLGs (groups of isolates with identical multilocus genotypes) were identified and a phylogeny was constructed. The phylogenetic tree consisted of two main groups (T. cruzi I, T. cruzi II), and the latter was further divided into two subgroups (T. cruzi IIa, T. cruzi IIb-e). Evidence of hybridization between different MLGs of T. cruzi II was found, which means that genetic exchanges seem to have occurred in South American T. cruzi. On the other hand, the persistence of characteristic T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II isozyme patterns in single small villages in Bolivia and Guatemala suggested that genetic exchange is very rare between major lineages. A significant difference in genetic diversity was shown between T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II from several indices of population genetics. Two possibilities could explain this genetic variation in the population: differences in evolutionary history and/or different tendencies to exchange genetic material. Broad-scale geographic distributions of T. cruzi I and T. cruzi IIb-e were different; T. cruzi I occurred in Central America and south to Bolivia and Brazil, while T. cruzi IIb-e occurred in the central and southern areas of South America, overlapping with T. cruzi I in Brazil and Bolivia.

  19. Shelter Dogs as Sentinels for Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission across Texas

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, Trevor D.; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Snowden, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, an infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is increasingly diagnosed among humans in the southern United States. We assessed exposure of shelter dogs in Texas to T. cruzi; seroprevalence across diverse ecoregions was 8.8%. Canine serosurveillance is a useful tool for public health risk assessment. PMID:25062281

  20. How Trypanosoma cruzi feasts upon its mammalian host.

    PubMed

    Carter, Nicola S; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-01-16

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex relationship with its mammalian host in which parasite and host metabolic networks are intertwined. A genome-wide functional screen of T. cruzi infection in HeLa cells (Caradonna et al., 2013) divulges host metabolic functions and signaling pathways that impact intracellular parasite replication and reveals potential targets for therapeutic exploitation. PMID:23332151

  1. Shelter dogs as sentinels for Trypanosoma cruzi transmission across Texas.

    PubMed

    Tenney, Trevor D; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Snowden, Karen F; Hamer, Sarah A

    2014-08-01

    Chagas disease, an infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is increasingly diagnosed among humans in the southern United States. We assessed exposure of shelter dogs in Texas to T. cruzi; seroprevalence across diverse ecoregions was 8.8%. Canine serosurveillance is a useful tool for public health risk assessment.

  2. Human Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Seropositivity in Dogs, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Diaz-Albiter, Hector; Ochoa-Garcia, Laucel; Barbabosa, Alberto; Vazquez-Chagoyan, Juan C.; Martinez-Perez, Miguel A.; Guzman-Bracho, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    We used 5 diagnostic tests in a cross-sectional investigation of the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Tejupilco municipality, State of Mexico, Mexico. Our findings showed a substantial prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies to T. cruzi in human (n = 293, IgG 2.05%, IgM 5.5%, both 7.1%) and dog (n = 114, IgG 15.8%, IgM 11.4%, both 21%) populations. We also found antibodies to T. cruzi (n = 80, IgG 10%, IgM 15%, both 17.5%) in dogs from Toluca, an area previously considered free of T. cruzi. Our data demonstrate the need for active epidemiologic surveillance programs in these regions. A direct correlation (r2 = 0.955) of seropositivity between humans and dogs suggests that seroanalysis in dogs may help identify the human prevalence of T. cruzi infection in these areas. PMID:16704811

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi infection results in an increase in intracellular cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Johndrow, Christopher; Nelson, Randin; Tanowitz, Herbert; Weiss, Louis; Nagajyothi, Fnu

    2014-01-01

    Chagasic cardiomyopathy caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a major health concern in Latin America and among immigrant populations in non-endemic areas. T. cruzi has a high affinity for host lipoproteins and uses the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) for invasion. Herein, we report that T. cruzi infection is associated with an accumulation of LDL and cholesterol in tissues in both acute and chronic murine Chagas disease. Similar findings were observed in tissue samples from a human case of Chagasic cardiomyopathy. T. cruzi infection of cultured cells displayed increased invasion with increasing cholesterol levels in the medium. Studies of infected host cells demonstrated alterations in their cholesterol regulation. T. cruzi invasion/infection via LDLr appears to be involved in changes in intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. The observed changes in intracellular lipids and associated oxidative stress due to these elevated lipids may contribute to the development of Chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24486184

  4. Desaturation of fatty acids in Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    de Lema, M.G.; Aeberhard, E.E.

    1986-11-01

    Uptake and metabolism of saturated (16:0, 18:0) and unsaturated (18:1(n-9), 18:2(n-6), 18:3(n-3)) fatty acids by cultured epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were studied. Between 17.5 and 33.5% of the total radioactivity of (1-/sup 14/C)labeled fatty acids initially added to the culture medium was incorporated into the lipids of T. cruzi and mostly choline and ethanolamine phospholipids. As demonstrated by argentation thin layer chromatography, gas liquid chromatography and ozonolysis of the fatty acids synthesized, exogenous palmitic acid was elongated to stearic acid, and the latter was desaturated to oleic acid and 18:2 fatty acid. The 18:2 fatty acid was tentatively identified as linoleic acid with the first bond in the delta 9 position and the second bond toward the terminal methyl end. Exogenous stearic acid was also desaturated to oleic and 18:2 fatty acid, while oleic acid was only converted into 18:2. All of the saturated and unsaturated fatty acids investigated were also converted to a small extent (2-4%) into polyunsaturated fatty acids. No radioactive aldehyde methyl ester fragments of less than nine carbon atoms were detected after ozonolysis of any of the fatty acids studied. These results demonstrate the existence of delta 9 and either delta 12 or delta 15 desaturases, or both, in T. cruzi and suggest that delta 6 desaturase or other desaturases of the animal type are likely absent in cultured forms of this organism.

  5. Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Bruce, J.I.

    1962-01-01

    During 1954-1960, 2005 mammals of 18 species collected at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland, were examined for trypanosomes. T. cruzi was found in 10 raccoons between October 31 and November 30. Infection occurred in 2 percent of all raccoons sampled, and in 11.3 percent of the 80 raccoons sampled in November. Examination was by direct smears, stained smears and cultures of heart blood. Although, in previous studies, at least two experimentally infected raccoons exhibited extended parasitemia (14 and 8 weeks), no such continuing parasitemia was observed in the natural infections. No trypanosomes were found in any of the other mammals examined.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  7. Interferon-Gamma Promotes Infection of Astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M.; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  8. Interferon-gamma promotes infection of astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  9. Serologic survey of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi in coyotes and red foxes from Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Smith, Trynecia; Alexander, Andrew; Weaver, Melanie; Stewart, Richard; Houston, Allan; Gerhold, Richard; Van Why, Kyle; Dubey, Jitender P

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a zoonotic parasite of humans and other mammalian hosts with distribution throughout the Americas. Domestic and wild canine species are reservoirs for human T. cruzi infections. The present study examined the prevalence of antibodies to T. cruzi in wild canids from the United States. Sera from 13 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 263 coyotes (Canis latrans), originating in Pennsylvania and Tennessee, were assayed for antibodies to T. cruzi with immunochromatographic tests. Antibodies to T. cruzi were found in 2 of 276 (0.72%) of all wild canids tested. Both T. cruzi-positive wild canids were coyotes and represented 2 of 21 (9.52%) wild canids assayed from Tennessee. Antibodies to T. cruzi were not detected in red fox. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were not found in any wild canids from Pennsylvania. These results suggest that coyotes are exposed to T. cruzi in Tennessee but not in Pennsylvania.

  10. Serologic survey of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi in coyotes and red foxes from Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Smith, Trynecia; Alexander, Andrew; Weaver, Melanie; Stewart, Richard; Houston, Allan; Gerhold, Richard; Van Why, Kyle; Dubey, Jitender P

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a zoonotic parasite of humans and other mammalian hosts with distribution throughout the Americas. Domestic and wild canine species are reservoirs for human T. cruzi infections. The present study examined the prevalence of antibodies to T. cruzi in wild canids from the United States. Sera from 13 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 263 coyotes (Canis latrans), originating in Pennsylvania and Tennessee, were assayed for antibodies to T. cruzi with immunochromatographic tests. Antibodies to T. cruzi were found in 2 of 276 (0.72%) of all wild canids tested. Both T. cruzi-positive wild canids were coyotes and represented 2 of 21 (9.52%) wild canids assayed from Tennessee. Antibodies to T. cruzi were not detected in red fox. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were not found in any wild canids from Pennsylvania. These results suggest that coyotes are exposed to T. cruzi in Tennessee but not in Pennsylvania. PMID:25632700

  11. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway.

  12. Subcellular proteomics of Trypanosoma cruzi reservosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Celso; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Pereira, Miria G.; Lourenço, Daniela; de Souza, Wanderley; Almeida, Igor C.; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa L.

    2009-01-01

    Reservosomes are the endpoint of the endocytic pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. These organelles have the particular ability to concentrate proteins and lipids obtained from medium together with the main proteolytic enzymes originated from the secretory pathway, being at the same time a storage organelle and the main site of protein degradation. Subcellular proteomics have been extensively used for profiling organelles in different cell types. Here, we combine cell fractionation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify reservosome-resident proteins. Starting from a purified reservosome fraction, we established a protocol to isolate reservosome membranes. Transmission electron microscopy was applied to confirm the purity of the fractions. To achieve a better coverage of identified proteins we analyzed the fractions separately and combined the results. LC-MS/MS analysis identified in total 709 T. cruzi-specific proteins; of these, 456 had predicted function and 253 were classified as hypothetical proteins. We could confirm the presence of most of the proteins validated by previous work and identify new proteins from different classes such as enzymes, proton pumps, transport proteins and others. The definition of the reservosome protein profile is a good tool to assess their molecular signature, identify molecular markers, and understand their relationship with different organelles. PMID:19288526

  13. Contemporary cryptic sexuality in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Juan David; Guhl, Felipe; Messenger, Louisa A; Lewis, Michael D; Montilla, Marleny; Cucunuba, Zulma; Miles, Michael A; Llewellyn, Martin S

    2012-09-01

    Clonal propagation is considered to be the predominant mode of reproduction among many parasitic protozoa. However, this assumption may overlook unorthodox, infrequent or cryptic sexuality. Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease, is known to undergo non-Mendelian genetic exchange in the laboratory. In the field, evidence of extant genetic exchange is limited. In this study, we undertook intensive sampling of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Unit I in endemic eastern Colombia. Using Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we generated 269 biological clones from 67 strains. Each clone was genotyped across 24 microsatellite loci. Subsequently, 100 representative clones were typed using 10 mitochondrial sequence targets (3.76 Kbp total). Clonal diversity among humans, reservoir hosts and vectors suggested complex patterns of superinfection and/or coinfection in oral and vector-borne Chagas disease cases. Clonal diversity between mother and foetus in a congenital case demonstrates that domestic TcI genotypes are infective in utero. Importantly, gross incongruence between nuclear and mitochondrial markers is strong evidence for widespread genetic exchange throughout the data set. Furthermore, a confirmed mosaic maxicircle sequence suggests intermolecular recombination between individuals as a further mechanism of genetic reassortment. Finally, robust dating based on mitochondrial DNA indicates that the emergence of a widespread domestic TcI clade that we now name TcI(DOM) (formerly TcIa/VEN(Dom)) occurred 23 000 ± 12 000 years ago and was followed by population expansion, broadly corresponding with the earliest human migration into the Americas. PMID:22774844

  14. Phosphatidylinositol kinase activities in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Alba Marina; Gesumaría, María Celeste; Schoijet, Alejandra C; Alonso, Guillermo D; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Racagni, Graciela E; Machado, Estela E

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) metabolism through phosphatidylinositol kinase (PIKs) activities plays a central role in different signaling pathways. In Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, PIKs have been proposed as target for drug design in order to combat this pathogen. In this work, we studied the classes of PI4K, PIPK and PI3K that could participate in signaling pathways in T. cruzi epimastigote forms. For this reason, we analyzed their enzymatic parameters and detailed responses to avowed kinase inhibitors (adenosine, sodium deoxycholate, wortmannin and LY294002) and activators (Ca(2+), phosphatidic acid, spermine and heparin). Our results suggest the presence and activity of a class III PI4K, a class I PIPK, a class III PI3K previously described (TcVps34) and a class I PI3K. Class I PI3K enzyme, here named TcPI3K, was cloned and expressed in a bacterial system, and their product was tested for kinase activity. The possible participation of TcPI3K in central cellular events of the parasite is also discussed. PMID:26493613

  15. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway. PMID:25851259

  16. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Renzo; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Tustin, Aaron W; Borrini-Mayorí, Katty; Náquira, César; Levy, Michael Z

    2015-02-01

    Populations of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, have recently undergone explosive growth. Bed bugs share many important traits with triatomine insects, but it remains unclear whether these similarities include the ability to transmit Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Here, we show efficient and bidirectional transmission of T. cruzi between hosts and bed bugs in a laboratory environment. Most bed bugs that fed on experimentally infected mice acquired the parasite. A majority of previously uninfected mice became infected after a period of cohabitation with exposed bed bugs. T. cruzi was also transmitted to mice after the feces of infected bed bugs were applied directly to broken host skin. Quantitative bed bug defecation measures were similar to those of important triatomine vectors. Our findings suggest that the common bed bug may be a competent vector of T. cruzi and could pose a risk for vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease. PMID:25404068

  17. Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius) as Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Renzo; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Tustin, Aaron W.; Borrini-Mayorí, Katty; Náquira, César; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, have recently undergone explosive growth. Bed bugs share many important traits with triatomine insects, but it remains unclear whether these similarities include the ability to transmit Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Here, we show efficient and bidirectional transmission of T. cruzi between hosts and bed bugs in a laboratory environment. Most bed bugs that fed on experimentally infected mice acquired the parasite. A majority of previously uninfected mice became infected after a period of cohabitation with exposed bed bugs. T. cruzi was also transmitted to mice after the feces of infected bed bugs were applied directly to broken host skin. Quantitative bed bug defecation measures were similar to those of important triatomine vectors. Our findings suggest that the common bed bug may be a competent vector of T. cruzi and could pose a risk for vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease. PMID:25404068

  18. Sarcocystis cruzi infection in wood bison (Bison bison athabascae).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Verma, Shiv K; Seaton, C Tom; Sinnett, David; Ball, Erin; Dunams, Detiger; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-05-30

    Endangered wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) is the largest terrestrial mammal in the American continent. Animal health is an important issue in their conservation, and Sarcocystis cruzi may be a cause of clinical disease in Bovidae. Hearts of eight wood bison from Alaska, USA were examined for sarcocysts by histology, transmission electron microscopy, pepsin digestion, and molecularly. Sarcocystis bradyzoites were found in pepsin digests of all eight and sarcocysts were found in histologic sections of myocardium of four bison. Sarcocysts were thin-walled and ultrastructurally consistent with S. cruzi. Characterization of DNA obtained from lysis of pepsin liberated bradyzoites by PCR-RFLP and subsequent phylogenetic analyses matched with that previously reported for S. cruzi infecting cattle in the USA. Collectively, data indicate that wood bison is a natural intermediate host for S. cruzi.

  19. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  20. Host metabolism regulates intracellular growth of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Engel, Juan C; Jacobi, David; Lee, Chih-Hao; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2013-01-16

    Metabolic coupling of intracellular pathogens with host cells is essential for successful colonization of the host. Establishment of intracellular infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi leads to the development of human Chagas' disease, yet the functional contributions of the host cell toward the infection process remain poorly characterized. Here, a genome-scale functional screen identified interconnected metabolic networks centered around host energy production, nucleotide metabolism, pteridine biosynthesis, and fatty acid oxidation as key processes that fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Additionally, the host kinase Akt, which plays essential roles in various cellular processes, was critical for parasite replication. Targeted perturbations in these host metabolic pathways or Akt-dependent signaling pathways modulated the parasite's replicative capacity, highlighting the adaptability of this intracellular pathogen to changing conditions in the host. These findings identify key cellular process regulating intracellular T. cruzi growth and illuminate the potential to leverage host pathways to limit T. cruzi infection. PMID:23332160

  1. Host metabolism regulates intracellular growth of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Kacey L.; Engel, Juan C.; Jacobi, David; Lee, Chih-Hao; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolic coupling of intracellular pathogens with host cells is essential for successful colonization of the host. Establishment of intracellular infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi leads to the development of human Chagas disease, yet the functional contributions of the host cell toward the infection process remain poorly characterized. Here, a genome-scale functional screen identified interconnected metabolic networks centered around host energy production, nucleotide metabolism, pteridine biosynthesis, and fatty acid oxidation as key processes that fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Additionally, the host kinase Akt, which plays essential roles in various cellular processes, was critical for parasite replication. Targeted perturbations in these host metabolic pathways or Akt-dependent signaling pathways modulated the parasite’s replicative capacity, highlighting the adaptability of this intracellular pathogen to changing conditions in the host. These findings identify key cellular process regulating intracellular T. cruzi growth and illuminate the potential to leverage host pathways to limit T. cruzi infection. PMID:23332160

  2. Sarcocystis cruzi infection in wood bison (Bison bison athabascae).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Verma, Shiv K; Seaton, C Tom; Sinnett, David; Ball, Erin; Dunams, Detiger; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-05-30

    Endangered wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) is the largest terrestrial mammal in the American continent. Animal health is an important issue in their conservation, and Sarcocystis cruzi may be a cause of clinical disease in Bovidae. Hearts of eight wood bison from Alaska, USA were examined for sarcocysts by histology, transmission electron microscopy, pepsin digestion, and molecularly. Sarcocystis bradyzoites were found in pepsin digests of all eight and sarcocysts were found in histologic sections of myocardium of four bison. Sarcocysts were thin-walled and ultrastructurally consistent with S. cruzi. Characterization of DNA obtained from lysis of pepsin liberated bradyzoites by PCR-RFLP and subsequent phylogenetic analyses matched with that previously reported for S. cruzi infecting cattle in the USA. Collectively, data indicate that wood bison is a natural intermediate host for S. cruzi. PMID:25868849

  3. Potential sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diana L; Lowe, Kory R; McNeill, Tyana; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Roellig, Dawn M; Zajdowicz, Jan; Hunter, Shawn A; Brubaker, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of human Chagas disease, results in life-long infection. Infective trypomastigotes circulate in the bloodstream and have the capacity to infect any cell type, including reproductive tissue. This study sought to assess the potential for sexual transmission of T. cruzi in an experimental mouse model. The conditions used in this study, in which acutely infected males and immunosuppressing the females, created a worst-case scenario allowing for the greatest chance of measuring transmission through intercourse. Male BALB/c mice were infected and mated with uninfected females, and the females were subsequently examined for T. cruzi tissue parasitism. A single transmission event of 61 total matings was observed, indicating a low but non-zero risk potential for male-to-female sexual transmission of T. cruzi.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Patel, Shital M; Flash, Charlene A; Stager, Charles E; Goodman, Jerry C; Woc-Colburn, Laila

    2014-07-01

    As a result of global migration, a significant number of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection now live in the United States, Canada, many countries in Europe, and other non-endemic countries. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis is a rare cause of ring-enhancing lesions in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that can closely mimic central nervous system (CNS) toxoplasmosis. We report a case of CNS Chagas reactivation in an AIDS patient successfully treated with benznidazole and antiretroviral therapy in the United States.

  5. Inositolphosphoceramide metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi as compared with other trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    De Lederkremer, Rosa M; Agusti, Rosalía; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and is endemic to North, Central and South American countries. Current therapy against this disease is only partially effective and produces adverse side effects. Studies on the metabolic pathways of T. cruzi, in particular those with no equivalent in mammalian cells, might identify targets for the development of new drugs. Ceramide is metabolized to inositolphosphoceramide (IPC) in T. cruzi and other kinetoplastid protists whereas in mammals it is mainly incorporated into sphingomyelin. In T. cruzi, in contrast to Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp., IPC functions as lipid anchor constituent of glycoproteins and free glycosylinositolphospholipids (GIPLs). Inhibition of IPC and GIPLs biosynthesis impairs differentiation of trypomastigotes into the intracellular amastigote forms. The gene encoding IPC synthase in T. cruzi has been identified and the enzyme has been expressed in a cell-free system. The enzyme involved in IPC degradation and the remodelases responsible for the incorporation of ceramide into free GIPLs or into the glycosylphosphatidylinositols anchoring glycoproteins, and in fatty acid modifications of these molecules of T. cruzi have been understudied. Inositolphosphoceramide metabolism and remodeling could be exploited as targets for Chagas disease chemotherapy.

  6. Role of dystrophin in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Malvestio, Lygia M; Celes, Mara R N; Milanezi, Cristiane; Silva, João S; Jelicks, Linda A; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Rossi, Marcos A; Prado, Cibele M

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated loss/reduction of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes in both acute and chronic stages of experimental Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection in mice. The mechanisms responsible for dystrophin disruption in the hearts of mice acutely infected with T. cruzi are not completely understood. The present in vivo and in vitro studies were undertaken to evaluate the role of inflammation in dystrophin disruption and its correlation with the high mortality rate during acute infection. C57BL/6 mice were infected with T. cruzi and killed 14, 20 and 26 days post infection (dpi). The intensity of inflammation, cardiac expression of dystrophin, calpain-1, NF-κB, TNF-α, and sarcolemmal permeability were evaluated. Cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocytes were incubated with serum, collected at the peak of cytokine production and free of parasites, from T. cruzi-infected mice and dystrophin, calpain-1, and NF-κB expression analyzed. Dystrophin disruption occurs at the peak of mortality and inflammation and is associated with increased expression of calpain-1, TNF-α, NF-κB, and increased sarcolemmal permeability in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice at 20 dpi confirmed by in vitro studies. The peak of mortality occurred only when significant loss of dystrophin in the hearts of infected animals occurred, highlighting the correlation between inflammation, dystrophin loss and mortality.

  7. Pentamidine exerts in vitro and in vivo anti Trypanosoma cruzi activity and inhibits the polyamine transport in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Díaz, María V; Miranda, Mariana R; Campos-Estrada, Carolina; Reigada, Chantal; Maya, Juan D; Pereira, Claudio A; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Pentamidine is an antiprotozoal and fungicide drug used in the treatment of leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis. Despite its extensive use as antiparasitic drug, little evidence exists about the effect of pentamidine in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Recent studies have shown that pentamidine blocks a polyamine transporter present in Leishmania major; consequently, its might also block these transporters in T. cruzi. Considering that T. cruzi lacks the ability to synthesize putrescine de novo, the inhibition of polyamine transport can bring a new therapeutic target against the parasite. In this work, we show that pentamidine decreases, not only the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes, but also the parasite burden of infected cells. In T. cruzi-infected mice pentamidine decreases the inflammation and parasite burden in hearts from infected mice. The treatment also decreases parasitemia, resulting in an increased survival rate. In addition, pentamidine strongly inhibits the putrescine and spermidine transport in T. cruzi epimastigotes and amastigotes. Thus, this study points to reevaluate the utility of pentamidine and introduce evidence of a potential new action mechanism. In the quest of new therapeutic strategies against Chagas disease, the extensive use of pentamidine in human has led to a well-known clinical profile, which could be an advantage over newly synthesized molecules that require more comprehensive trials prior to their clinical use.

  8. Type I interferons increase host susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Chessler, Anne-Danielle C; Caradonna, Kacey L; Da'dara, Akram; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes human Chagas' disease, induces a type I interferon (IFN) (IFN-α/β) response during acute experimental infection in mice and in isolated primary cell types. To examine the potential impact of the type I IFN response in shaping outcomes in experimental T. cruzi infection, groups of wild-type (WT) and type I IFN receptor-deficient (IFNAR(-/-)) 129sv/ev mice were infected with two different T. cruzi strains under lethal and sublethal conditions and several parameters were measured during the acute stage of infection. The results demonstrate that type I IFNs are not required for early host protection against T. cruzi. In contrast, under conditions of lethal T. cruzi challenge, WT mice succumbed to infection whereas IFNAR(-/-) mice were ultimately able to control parasite growth and survive. T. cruzi clearance in and survival of IFNAR(-/-) mice were accompanied by higher levels of IFN-γ production by isolated splenocytes in response to parasite antigen. The suppression of IFN-γ in splenocytes from WT mice was independent of IL-10 levels. While the impact of type I IFNs on the production of IFN-γ and other cytokines/chemokines remains to be fully determined in the context of T. cruzi infection, our data suggest that, under conditions of high parasite burden, type I IFNs negatively impact IFN-γ production, initiating a detrimental cycle that contributes to the ultimate failure to control infection. These findings are consistent with a growing theme in the microbial pathogenesis field in which type I IFNs can be detrimental to the host in a variety of nonviral pathogen infection models. PMID:21402764

  9. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in raccoons from Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Jenny; Newsome, Anthony; Huang, Junjun; Kirby, Jordona; Kranz, Melissa; Wateska, Angela; Dunlap, Brett; Yabsley, Michael J; Dunn, John R; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

    2010-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Autochthonous human and canine transmission of T. cruzi has been documented in Tennessee, but little is known about its ecology, including the prevalence of T. cruzi among wildlife in Tennessee. Serum samples from 706 raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 10 counties in the Ridge and Valley and Blue Ridge Mountains ecoregions of eastern Tennessee were tested for antibodies reactive with T. cruzi using the indirect fluorescent antibody assay. Two hundred six (29.2%) samples were seropositive, with 9 counties yielding positive samples (range 14.6-63.6%). Significantly more raccoons from rural habitats (35.1%) were found positive for T. cruzi exposure than were those from suburban habitats (23.1%, P < 0.001). Land cover class was not associated with seropositivity status (P = 0.441), even though deciduous forest was the most common site from where raccoons were trapped and the most common site of positive raccoons in rural areas (42%). Interestingly, age was positively associated with seropositivity. Raccoons older than 1 yr (adults) were 40.1% seropositive compared to 12.2% of those less than 1 yr (juveniles; P < 0.001). Female adults were significantly more likely to be exposed to T. cruzi than were male adult raccoons (P < 0.001). No significant seroprevalence difference was seen among male and female juveniles. This study contributes to understanding the dynamics of T. cruzi exposure within raccoon populations in Tennessee. The importance of habitat (rural vs. suburban) and microhabitat (dens) in risk of exposure to these populations is also discussed.

  10. Mechanisms of host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    One of the more accepted concepts in our understanding of the biology of early Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interactions is that the mammalian-infective trypomastigote forms of the parasite must transit the host cell lysosomal compartment in order to establish a productive intracellular infection. The acidic environment of the lysosome provides the appropriate conditions for parasite-mediated disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and release of T. cruzi into the host cell cytosol, where replication of intracellular amastigotes occurs. Recent findings indicate a level of redundancy in the lysosome-targeting process where T. cruzi trypomastigotes exploit different cellular pathways to access host cell lysosomes in non-professional phagocytic cells. In addition, the reversible nature of the host cell penetration process was recently demonstrated when conditions for fusion of the nascent parasite vacuole with the host endosomal-lysosomal system were not met. Thus, the concept of parasite retention as a critical component of the T. cruzi invasion process was introduced. Although it is clear that host cell recognition, attachment and signalling are required to initiate invasion, integration of this knowledge with our understanding of the different routes of parasite entry is largely lacking. In this chapter, we focus on current knowledge of the cellular pathways exploited by T. cruzi trypomastigotes to invade non-professional phagocytic cells and to gain access to the host cell lysosome compartment. PMID:21884886

  11. Transcriptional and phenotypical heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Seco-Hidalgo, Víctor; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Osuna, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex life cycle comprising pools of cell populations which circulate among humans, vectors, sylvatic reservoirs and domestic animals. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated the importance of clonal variations for parasite population dynamics, survival and evolution. By limiting dilution assays, we have isolated seven isogenic clonal cell lines derived from the Pan4 strain of T. cruzi. Applying different molecular techniques, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the expression heterogeneity in the mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) gene family, where all the clonal isogenic populations were transcriptionally different. Hierarchical cluster analysis and sequence comparison among different MASP cDNA libraries showed that, despite the great variability in MASP expression, some members of the transcriptome (including MASP pseudogenes) are conserved, not only in the life-cycle stages but also among different strains of T. cruzi. Finally, other important aspects for the parasite, such as growth, spontaneous metacyclogenesis or excretion of different catabolites, were also compared among the clones, demonstrating that T. cruzi populations of cells are also phenotypically heterogeneous. Although the evolutionary strategy that sustains the MASP expression polymorphism remains unknown, we suggest that MASP clonal variability and phenotypic heterogeneities found in this study might provide an advantage, allowing a rapid response to environmental pressure or changes during the life cycle of T. cruzi. PMID:26674416

  12. Evaluation of high efficiency gene knockout strategies for Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, a kinetoplastid protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, infects approximately 15 million people in Central and South America. In contrast to the substantial in silico studies of the T. cruzi genome, transcriptome, and proteome, only a few genes have been experimentally characterized and validated, mainly due to the lack of facile methods for gene manipulation needed for reverse genetic studies. Current strategies for gene disruption in T. cruzi are tedious and time consuming. In this study we have compared the conventional multi-step cloning technique with two knockout strategies that have been proven to work in other organisms, one-step-PCR- and Multisite Gateway-based systems. Results While the one-step-PCR strategy was found to be the fastest method for production of knockout constructs, it does not efficiently target genes of interest using gene-specific sequences of less than 80 nucleotides. Alternatively, the Multisite Gateway based approach is less time-consuming than conventional methods and is able to efficiently and reproducibly delete target genes. Conclusion Using the Multisite Gateway strategy, we have rapidly produced constructs that successfully produce specific gene deletions in epimastigotes of T. cruzi. This methodology should greatly facilitate reverse genetic studies in T. cruzi. PMID:19432966

  13. Infection of Kissing Bugs with Trypanosoma cruzi, Tucson, Arizona, USA

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Gena; Guerenstein, Pablo G.; Gregory, Teresa; Dotson, Ellen; Hildebrand, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Triatomine insects (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), commonly known as kissing bugs, are a potential health problem in the southwestern United States as possible vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Although this disease has been traditionally restricted to Latin America, a small number of vector-transmitted autochthonous US cases have been reported. Because triatomine bugs and infected mammalian reservoirs are plentiful in southern Arizona, we collected triatomines inside or around human houses in Tucson and analyzed the insects using molecular techniques to determine whether they were infected with T. cruzi. We found that 41.5% of collected bugs (n = 164) were infected with T. cruzi, and that 63% of the collection sites (n = 22) yielded >1 infected specimens. Although many factors may contribute to the lack of reported cases in Arizona, these results indicate that the risk for infection in this region may be higher than previously thought. PMID:20202413

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi invasion is associated with trogocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shankar; Mukhopadhyay, Aparna; Andriani, Grasiella; Machado, Fabiana Simño; Ashton, Anthony W.; Huang, Huan; Weiss, Louis M; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2014-01-01

    Trogocytosis was originally thought to be restricted to the interaction of cells of the immune system and interactions of these cells with cancer cells. Such membrane exchanges are probably a general process in cell biology, and membrane exchange has been demonstrated to occur between non-immune cells within an organism. Herein, we report that membrane and protein exchange, consistent with trogocytosis, between Trypanosoma cruzi (both the Brazil and Tulahuen strains) and the mammalian cells it infects. Transfer of labeled membrane patches was monitored by labeling of either parasites or host cells, i.e. human foreskin fibroblasts and rat myoblasts. Trypomastigotes and amastigotes transferred specific surface glycoproteins to the host cells along with membranes. Exchange of membranes between the parasite and host cells occurred during successful invasion. Extracellular amastigotes did not transfer membrane patches and heat killed trypomastigotes were did not transfer either membranes or proteins to the host cells. Membrane exchange was also found to occur between interacting epimastigotes in cell-free culture and may be important in parasite-parasite interactions as well. Further studies should provide new insights into pathogenesis and provide targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25448052

  15. Aspirin treatment exacerbates oral infections by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cossentini, Luana Aparecida; Da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; De Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2016-05-01

    Oral transmission of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been documented in Latin American countries. The reported cases of infection were due to the ingestion of contaminated fresh fruit, juices, or sugar cane juice. There have been few studies on the physiopathology of the disease in oral transmission cases. Gastritis is a common ailment that can be caused by poor dietary habits, intake of alcohol or other gastric irritants, bacterial infection, or by the widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This study investigated in a mouse model whether gastric mucosal injury, induced by aspirin, would affect the course of disease in animals infected with T. cruzi by the oral route. The CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi, both of low infectivity, were used. To this end, groups of BALB/c mice were treated during 5 days with aspirin (100 mg kg(-1)) before oral infection with T. cruzi metacyclic forms (4 × 10(5) or 5 × 10(7) parasites/mouse). Histological analysis and determination of nitric oxide and TNF-α were performed in gastric samples obtained 5 days after infection. Parasitemia was monitored from the thirteenth day after infection. The results indicate that aspirin treatment of mice injured their gastric mucosa and facilitated invasion by both CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi. Strain CL14 caused more severe infection compared to the G strain, as larger numbers of amastigote nests were found in the stomach and parasitemia levels were higher. Our study is novel in that it shows that gastric mucosal damage caused by aspirin, a commonly used NSAID, facilitates T. cruzi infection by the oral route.

  16. Aspirin treatment exacerbates oral infections by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cossentini, Luana Aparecida; Da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; De Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2016-05-01

    Oral transmission of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been documented in Latin American countries. The reported cases of infection were due to the ingestion of contaminated fresh fruit, juices, or sugar cane juice. There have been few studies on the physiopathology of the disease in oral transmission cases. Gastritis is a common ailment that can be caused by poor dietary habits, intake of alcohol or other gastric irritants, bacterial infection, or by the widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This study investigated in a mouse model whether gastric mucosal injury, induced by aspirin, would affect the course of disease in animals infected with T. cruzi by the oral route. The CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi, both of low infectivity, were used. To this end, groups of BALB/c mice were treated during 5 days with aspirin (100 mg kg(-1)) before oral infection with T. cruzi metacyclic forms (4 × 10(5) or 5 × 10(7) parasites/mouse). Histological analysis and determination of nitric oxide and TNF-α were performed in gastric samples obtained 5 days after infection. Parasitemia was monitored from the thirteenth day after infection. The results indicate that aspirin treatment of mice injured their gastric mucosa and facilitated invasion by both CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi. Strain CL14 caused more severe infection compared to the G strain, as larger numbers of amastigote nests were found in the stomach and parasitemia levels were higher. Our study is novel in that it shows that gastric mucosal damage caused by aspirin, a commonly used NSAID, facilitates T. cruzi infection by the oral route. PMID:26826555

  17. Cruzipain Promotes Trypanosoma cruzi Adhesion to Rhodnius prolixus Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Lívia Almeida; Moreira, Otacílio C.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Azambuja, Patrícia; Lima, Ana Paula Cabral Araujo; Britto, Constança; dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Branquinha, Marta Helena; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Cysteine peptidases are relevant to several aspects of the T. cruzi life cycle and are implicated in parasite-mammalian host relationships. However, little is known about the factors that contribute to the parasite-insect host interaction. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have investigated whether cruzipain could be involved in the interaction of T. cruzi with the invertebrate host. We analyzed the effect of treatment of T. cruzi epimastigotes with anti-cruzipain antibodies or with a panel of cysteine peptidase inhibitors (cystatin, antipain, E-64, leupeptin, iodocetamide or CA-074-OMe) on parasite adhesion to Rhodnius prolixus posterior midgut ex vivo. All treatments, with the exception of CA074-OMe, significantly decreased parasite adhesion to R. prolixus midgut. Cystatin presented a dose-dependent reduction on the adhesion. Comparison of the adhesion rate among several T. cruzi isolates revealed that the G isolate, which naturally possesses low levels of active cruzipain, adhered to a lesser extent in comparison to Dm28c, Y and CL Brener isolates. Transgenic epimastigotes overexpressing an endogenous cruzipain inhibitor (pCHAG), chagasin, and that have reduced levels of active cruzipain adhered to the insect gut 73% less than the wild-type parasites. The adhesion of pCHAG parasites was partially restored by the addition of exogenous cruzipain. In vivo colonization experiments revealed low levels of pCHAG parasites in comparison to wild-type. Parasites isolated after passage in the insect presented a drastic enhancement in the expression of surface cruzipain. Conclusions/Significance These data highlight, for the first time, that cruzipain contributes to the interaction of T. cruzi with the insect host. PMID:23272264

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi: Oxidative stress induces arginine kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Mariana R; Canepa, Gaspar E; Bouvier, Leon A; Pereira, Claudio A

    2006-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase is a key enzyme in cell energy management and is also involved in pH and nutritional stress response mechanisms. T. cruzi epimastigotes treated with hydrogen peroxide presented a time-dependent increase in arginine kinase expression, up to 10-fold, when compared with untreated parasites. Among other oxidative stress-generating compounds tested, only nifurtimox produced more than 2-fold increase in arginine kinase expression. Moreover, parasites overexpressing arginine kinase showed significantly increased survival capability during hydrogen peroxide exposure. These findings suggest the participation of arginine kinase in oxidative stress response systems. PMID:16725140

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda

    2016-01-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol. PMID:26975994

  20. Surveillance of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission by serological screening of schoolchildren.

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, A. L.; Zicker, F.; Luquetti, A. O.; Oliveira, R. M.; Silva, S. A.; Souza, J. M.; Martelli, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among children is a sensitive indicator for assessing the effectiveness of programmes for control of Chagas disease. In this study we report the result of a cross-sectional serological survey carried out among schoolchildren living in a poor rural area in central Brazil. Eluates of blood collected on filter-paper were tested for anti-T. cruzi antibodies using immunofluorescence, haemagglutination, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The overall seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection was 7.9%, which compared with the findings of the national survey carried out in 1975-80 indicates that a twofold-to-threefold reduction in prevalence has occurred over the last 10 years. This is consistent with a reduction of transmission in the area, probably related to vector control efforts. Based on our results, the incidence of new cases was estimated to be 44 per annum in the study region. In rural areas with a scattered population, surveillance of T. cruzi transmission by serological screening of children at school entry is more practical and economical than entomological evaluation for assessing both the risk of transmission in the community and the efficacy of vector control measures. A sample size of around 1000 schoolchildren is sufficient to detect prevalences as low as 2%, and such an approach would be practical and applicable to most areas where Chagas disease is endemic. PMID:1464149

  1. Preferential brain homing following intranasal administration of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey; Pereiraperrin, Mercio

    2009-04-01

    The Chagas' disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi commonly infects humans through skin abrasions or mucosa from reduviid bug excreta. Yet most studies on animal models start with subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injections, a distant approximation of the skin abrasion route. We show here that atraumatic placement of T. cruzi in the mouse nasal cavity produced low parasitemia, high survival rates, and preferential brain invasion compared to the case with subcutaneously injected parasites. Brain invasion was particularly prominent in the basal ganglia, peaked at a time when parasitemia was no longer detectable, and elicited a relatively large number of inflammatory foci. Yet, based on motor behavioral parameters and staining with Fluoro-Jade C, a dye that specifically recognizes apoptotic and necrotic neurons, brain invasion did not cause neurodegenerative events, in contrast to the neurodegeneration in the enteric nervous system. The results indicate that placement of T. cruzi on the mucosa in the mouse nasal cavity establishes a systemic infection with a robust yet harmless infection of the brain, seemingly analogous to disease progression in humans. The model may facilitate studies designed to understand mechanisms underlying T. cruzi infection of the central nervous system. PMID:19168740

  2. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiribao, María Laura; Libisch, Gabriela; Parodi-Talice, Adriana; Robello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response), a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members), and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids). These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination. PMID:24812617

  3. Presence of histone H2B in Trypanosoma cruzi chromatin.

    PubMed

    Toro, G C; Wernstedt, C; Hellman, U; Galanti, N

    1993-01-01

    The organization of chromatin in protists presents some characteristic features. In Trypanosoma cruzi, no condensation of chromatin into chromosomes is observed during cell division. A systematic characterization of histones should provide information on this peculiar behaviour. Histone H2B from this parasite was characterized by selective dissociation from chromatin in 0.8 M NaCl, by its elution pattern in narrow-bore reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by partial sequencing of its amino terminal domain. This chromosomal protein differs from histone H2B of other species. The first 12 amino acids are missing which explains its lower molecular weight when compared to human histone H2B. Correspondingly, the amino terminal domain of T. cruzi histone H2B is 25-30% shorter than other histones H2B. Moreover, three out of four acetylation sites present in human histone H2B are missing in T. cruzi histone H2B. The differences in size and in acceptor sites for acetylation of T. cruzi histone H2B when compared to human histone H2B may represent a functional feature to consider for the understanding of the chromatin cycle of condensation in this parasite.

  4. Development and interactions of Trypanosoma cruzi within the insect vector.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E S; Azambuja, P

    1991-09-01

    Transmission of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis depends on Trypanosoma cruzi development and differentiation within its triatomine insect vector. In this review, Eloi Garcia and Patricia de Azambuja aim to outline the current areas of research that may explain aspects of the parasite-vector interaction. PMID:15463507

  5. Sarcocystis cruzi: comparative studies confirm natural infections of buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; He, Yongshu; Zhao, Hui; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dunams, Detiger B; Li, Xiaomei; Zuo, Yangxian; Feng, Guohua; Cui, Liwang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2011-02-01

    Controversy exists concerning whether cattle and water buffalo sustain infections with cysts of distinct arrays of species in the genus Sarcocystis. In particular, morphologically similar parasites have been alternately ascribed to Sarcocystis cruzi or to Sarcocystis levinei, depending on their occurrence in cattle or water buffalo. We used light and transmission electron microscopy, genetic analysis, and experimental infections of definitive canine hosts to determine whether consistent differences could be identified from parasites derived from several natural infections of each host, examining several tissue types (esophagus, skeletal muscles, and heart). Cysts derived from cattle and water buffalo shared similar structure; variation among 18S rRNA sequences did not segregate consistently according to intermediate host type; parasites derived from cattle and water buffalo induced similar outcomes in the canine definitive host. One cattle specimen harbored unusually large (macroscopic) sarcocysts which nonetheless conformed to previously reported ultrastructural and genetic features of S. cruzi. Finding no consistent basis to differentiate between them, we conclude that the parasites infecting each host and tissue type correspond to S. cruzi. In our sample, no phylogenetically distinct taxon was sampled which might correspond to a distinct taxon previously described as S. levinei. Either that taxon was missed by our sampling effort, or it may represent a junior synonym to S. cruzi, which would then cycle between dogs and a broader range of intermediate bovine hosts than was previously considered.

  6. Nitric oxide-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabra, A. B.; Kitice, N. A.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Lancheros, C. A. C.; Yamauchi, L. M.; Pinge-Filho, P.; Yamada-Ogatta, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), and the disease remains a major health problem in many Latin American countries. Several papers report that the killing of the parasite is dependent on the production of nitric oxide (NO). The endogenous free radical NO is an important cellular signalling molecule that plays a key role in the defense against pathogens, including T. cruzi. As T. cruzi is able to compromise host macrophages decreasing endogenous NO production, the administration of exogenous NO donors represents an interesting strategy to combat Chagas disease. Thus, the aims of this study were to prepare and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of NO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against T. cruzi. Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles composed of chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate(TPP) were prepared and used to encapsulate mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which is a thiol-containing molecule. Nitrosation of free thiols (SH) groups of MSA were performed by the addition of equimolar amount of sodium nitrite (NaNO2), leading to the formation of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles. These polymeric nanoparticles act as spontaneous NO donors, with free NO release. The results show the formation of nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 270 to 500 nm, average of polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency in the range of 99%. The NO release kinetics from the S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. The microbicidal activity of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles was evaluated by incubating NO-releasing nanoparticles (200 - 600 μg/mL) with replicative and non-infective epimastigote, and non-replicative and infective trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. In addition, a significant decrease in the percentage of macrophage-infected (with amastigotes) and

  7. Landscape ecology of Trypanosoma cruzi in the southern Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    López-Cancino, Sury Antonio; Tun-Ku, Ezequiel; De la Cruz-Felix, Himmler Keynes; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos Napoleón; Izeta-Alberdi, Amaia; Pech-May, Angélica; Mazariegos-Hidalgo, Carlos Jesús; Valdez-Tah, Alba; Ramsey, Janine M

    2015-11-01

    Landscape interactions of Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) with Triatoma dimidiata (Td) depend on the presence and relative abundance of mammal hosts. This study analyzed a landscape adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, composed of conserved areas, crop and farming areas, and the human community of Zoh Laguna with reported Chagas disease cases. Sylvatic mammals of the Chiroptera, Rodentia, and Marsupialia orders were captured, and livestock and pets were sampled along with T. dimidiata in all habitats. Infection by T. cruzi was analyzed using mtDNA markers, while lineage and DTU was analyzed using the mini-exon. 303 sylvatic specimens were collected, corresponding to 19 species during the rainy season and 114 specimens of 18 species during dry season. Five bats Artibeus jamaicensis, Artibeus lituratus, Sturnira lilium, Sturnira ludovici, Dermanura phaeotis (Dp) and one rodent Heteromys gaumeri were collected in the three habitats. All but Dp, and including Carollia brevicauda and Myotis keaysi, were infected with predominately TcI in the sylvatic habitat and TcII in the ecotone. Sigmodon hispidus was the rodent with the highest prevalence of infection by T. cruzi I and II in ecotone and domestic habitats. Didelphis viginiana was infected only with TcI in both domestic and sylvatic habitats; the only two genotyped human cases were TcII. Two main clades of T. cruzi, lineages I (DTU Ia) and II (DTU VI), were found to be sympatric (all habitats and seasons) in the Zoh-Laguna landscape, suggesting that no species-specific interactions occur between the parasite and any mammal host, in any habitat. We have also found mixed infections of the two principal T. cruzi clades in individuals across modified habitats, particularly in livestock and pets, and in both haplogroups of T. dimidiata. Results are contradictory to the dilution hypothesis, although we did find that most resilient species had an important role as T. cruzi hosts. Our study detected some complex trends in

  8. Landscape ecology of Trypanosoma cruzi in the southern Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    López-Cancino, Sury Antonio; Tun-Ku, Ezequiel; De la Cruz-Felix, Himmler Keynes; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos Napoleón; Izeta-Alberdi, Amaia; Pech-May, Angélica; Mazariegos-Hidalgo, Carlos Jesús; Valdez-Tah, Alba; Ramsey, Janine M

    2015-11-01

    Landscape interactions of Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) with Triatoma dimidiata (Td) depend on the presence and relative abundance of mammal hosts. This study analyzed a landscape adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, composed of conserved areas, crop and farming areas, and the human community of Zoh Laguna with reported Chagas disease cases. Sylvatic mammals of the Chiroptera, Rodentia, and Marsupialia orders were captured, and livestock and pets were sampled along with T. dimidiata in all habitats. Infection by T. cruzi was analyzed using mtDNA markers, while lineage and DTU was analyzed using the mini-exon. 303 sylvatic specimens were collected, corresponding to 19 species during the rainy season and 114 specimens of 18 species during dry season. Five bats Artibeus jamaicensis, Artibeus lituratus, Sturnira lilium, Sturnira ludovici, Dermanura phaeotis (Dp) and one rodent Heteromys gaumeri were collected in the three habitats. All but Dp, and including Carollia brevicauda and Myotis keaysi, were infected with predominately TcI in the sylvatic habitat and TcII in the ecotone. Sigmodon hispidus was the rodent with the highest prevalence of infection by T. cruzi I and II in ecotone and domestic habitats. Didelphis viginiana was infected only with TcI in both domestic and sylvatic habitats; the only two genotyped human cases were TcII. Two main clades of T. cruzi, lineages I (DTU Ia) and II (DTU VI), were found to be sympatric (all habitats and seasons) in the Zoh-Laguna landscape, suggesting that no species-specific interactions occur between the parasite and any mammal host, in any habitat. We have also found mixed infections of the two principal T. cruzi clades in individuals across modified habitats, particularly in livestock and pets, and in both haplogroups of T. dimidiata. Results are contradictory to the dilution hypothesis, although we did find that most resilient species had an important role as T. cruzi hosts. Our study detected some complex trends in

  9. The potential of canine sentinels for reemerging Trypanosoma cruzi transmission

    PubMed Central

    Neyra, Ricardo Castillo; Chu, Lily Chou; Quispe-Machaca, Victor; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Malaga Chavez, Fernando S.; Mazuelos, Milagros Bastos; Naquira, Cesar; Bern, Caryn; Gilman, Robert H.; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, a vector-borne disease transmitted by triatomine bugs and caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, affects millions of people in the Americas. In Arequipa, Peru, indoor residual insecticide spraying campaigns are routinely conducted to eliminate Triatoma infestans, the only vector in this area. Following insecticide spraying, there is risk of vector return and reinitiation of parasite transmission. Dogs are important reservoirs of T. cruzi and may play a role in reinitiating transmission in previously sprayed areas. Dogs may also serve as indicators of reemerging transmission. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional serological screening to detect T. cruzi antibodies in dogs, in conjunction with an entomological vector collection survey at the household level, in a disease endemic area that had been treated with insecticide 13 years prior. Spatial clustering of infected animals and vectors was assessed using Ripley’s K statistic, and the odds of being seropositive for dogs proximate to infected colonies was estimated with multivariate logistic regression. Results There were 106 triatomine-infested houses (41.1%), and 45 houses infested with T. cruzi-infected triatomine insects (17.4%). Canine seroprevalence in the area was 12.3% (n=154); all seropositive dogs were 9 months old or older. We observed clustering of vectors carrying the parasite, but no clustering of seropositive dogs. The age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio between seropositivity to T. cruzi and proximity to an infected triatomine (≤50m) was 5.67 (95% CI: 1.12 – 28.74; p=0.036). Conclusions Targeted control of reemerging transmission can be achieved by improved understanding of T. cruzi in canine populations. Our results suggest that dogs may be useful sentinels to detect re-initiation of transmission following insecticide treatment. Integration of canine T. cruzi blood sampling into existing interventions for zoonotic disease control (e.g. rabies vaccination programs

  10. Biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Livore, Verónica I; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi showed similar fatty acid (FA) compositions, having a high proportion of unsaturated FAs, mainly 18:2Δ9,12 (23-39%) and 18:1Δ9 (11-17%). C22 polyunsaturated FAs are in significant amounts only in T. brucei (12-20%) but represent a mere 2% of total FAs in T. cruzi. Both species have also similar profiles of medium- and long-chain saturated FAs, from 14:0 to 20:0. Interestingly, procyclic and bloodstream forms of T. brucei lack very long chain FAs (VLCFAs), whereas epimastigotes and trypomastigotes of T. cruzi contain 22:0 (0.1-0.2%), 24:0 (1.5-2%), and 26:0 (0.1-0.2%). This is in agreement with the presence of an additional FA elongase gene (TcELO4) in T. cruzi. TcELO4 was expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking the endogenous ScELO3, rescuing the synthesis of saturated and hydroxylated C26 FAs in the yeast. Expression of TcELO4 also rescued the synthetic lethality of a ScELO2, ScELO3 double mutation, and the VLCFA profile of the transformed yeast was similar to that found in T. cruzi. By identifying TcELO4 as the enzyme responsible for the elongation of FA from 16:0 and 18:0 up to 26:0, with 24:0 being the preferred product, this work completed the characterization of FA elongases in Trypanosoma spp. PMID:25339514

  11. Biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Livore, Verónica I; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi showed similar fatty acid (FA) compositions, having a high proportion of unsaturated FAs, mainly 18:2Δ9,12 (23-39%) and 18:1Δ9 (11-17%). C22 polyunsaturated FAs are in significant amounts only in T. brucei (12-20%) but represent a mere 2% of total FAs in T. cruzi. Both species have also similar profiles of medium- and long-chain saturated FAs, from 14:0 to 20:0. Interestingly, procyclic and bloodstream forms of T. brucei lack very long chain FAs (VLCFAs), whereas epimastigotes and trypomastigotes of T. cruzi contain 22:0 (0.1-0.2%), 24:0 (1.5-2%), and 26:0 (0.1-0.2%). This is in agreement with the presence of an additional FA elongase gene (TcELO4) in T. cruzi. TcELO4 was expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking the endogenous ScELO3, rescuing the synthesis of saturated and hydroxylated C26 FAs in the yeast. Expression of TcELO4 also rescued the synthetic lethality of a ScELO2, ScELO3 double mutation, and the VLCFA profile of the transformed yeast was similar to that found in T. cruzi. By identifying TcELO4 as the enzyme responsible for the elongation of FA from 16:0 and 18:0 up to 26:0, with 24:0 being the preferred product, this work completed the characterization of FA elongases in Trypanosoma spp.

  12. The characterization of anti-T. cruzi activity relationships between ferrocenyl, cyrhetrenyl complexes and ROS release.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Romero, Valentina; Arancibia, Rodrigo; Klahn, Hugo; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisen, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Simon, Felipe; Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Nifurtimox is the most used drug against the T. cruzi, this drug increases intermediaries nitro group, being mainly responsible for the high toxicity component, for this reason it is important to study new organic compounds and thus improve therapeutic strategies against Chagas disease. The electronic effects of ferrocenyl and cyrhetrenyl fragments were investigated by DFT calculation. A close correlation was found between HOMO-LUMO gap of nitro radical NO 2 (-) with the experimental reduction potential found for nitro group and IC50 of two forms the T. cruzi (epimastigote and trypomastigote). The IC50 on human hepatoma cells is higher for both compounds compared to IC50 demonstrated in the two forms the T. cruzi, and additionally show reactive oxygen species release. The information obtained in this paper could generate two new drugs with anti-T. cruzi activity, but additional studies are needed.

  13. Bioenergetic profiling of Trypanosoma cruzi life stages using Seahorse extracellular flux technology.

    PubMed

    Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Pereira, Camila F A; Dumoulin, Peter C; Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2016-08-01

    Energy metabolism is an attractive target for the development of new therapeutics against protozoan pathogens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of human Chagas disease. Despite emerging evidence that mitochondrial electron transport is essential for the growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes in mammalian cells, fundamental knowledge of mitochondrial energy metabolism in this parasite life stage remains incomplete. The Clark-type electrode, which measures the rate of oxygen consumption, has served as the traditional tool to study mitochondrial energetics and has contributed to our understanding of it in T. cruzi. Here, we evaluate the Seahorse XF(e)24 extracellular flux platform as an alternative method to assess mitochondrial bioenergetics in isolated T. cruzi parasites. We report optimized assay conditions used to perform mitochondrial stress tests with replicative life cycle stages of T. cruzi using the XF(e)24 instrument, and discuss the advantages and potential limitations of this methodology, as applied to T. cruzi and other trypanosomatids.

  14. Bioenergetic profiling of Trypanosoma cruzi life stages using Seahorse extracellular flux technology.

    PubMed

    Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Pereira, Camila F A; Dumoulin, Peter C; Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2016-08-01

    Energy metabolism is an attractive target for the development of new therapeutics against protozoan pathogens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of human Chagas disease. Despite emerging evidence that mitochondrial electron transport is essential for the growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes in mammalian cells, fundamental knowledge of mitochondrial energy metabolism in this parasite life stage remains incomplete. The Clark-type electrode, which measures the rate of oxygen consumption, has served as the traditional tool to study mitochondrial energetics and has contributed to our understanding of it in T. cruzi. Here, we evaluate the Seahorse XF(e)24 extracellular flux platform as an alternative method to assess mitochondrial bioenergetics in isolated T. cruzi parasites. We report optimized assay conditions used to perform mitochondrial stress tests with replicative life cycle stages of T. cruzi using the XF(e)24 instrument, and discuss the advantages and potential limitations of this methodology, as applied to T. cruzi and other trypanosomatids. PMID:27392747

  15. The characterization of anti-T. cruzi activity relationships between ferrocenyl, cyrhetrenyl complexes and ROS release.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Romero, Valentina; Arancibia, Rodrigo; Klahn, Hugo; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisen, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Simon, Felipe; Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Nifurtimox is the most used drug against the T. cruzi, this drug increases intermediaries nitro group, being mainly responsible for the high toxicity component, for this reason it is important to study new organic compounds and thus improve therapeutic strategies against Chagas disease. The electronic effects of ferrocenyl and cyrhetrenyl fragments were investigated by DFT calculation. A close correlation was found between HOMO-LUMO gap of nitro radical NO 2 (-) with the experimental reduction potential found for nitro group and IC50 of two forms the T. cruzi (epimastigote and trypomastigote). The IC50 on human hepatoma cells is higher for both compounds compared to IC50 demonstrated in the two forms the T. cruzi, and additionally show reactive oxygen species release. The information obtained in this paper could generate two new drugs with anti-T. cruzi activity, but additional studies are needed. PMID:27460450

  16. Structures of prostaglandin F synthase from the protozoa Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with NADP.

    PubMed

    Moen, Spencer O; Fairman, James W; Barnes, Steve R; Sullivan, Amy; Nakazawa-Hewitt, Stephen; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Staker, Bart L; Lorimer, Donald D; Myler, Peter J; Edwards, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    The crystal structures of prostaglandin F synthase (PGF) from both Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with and without their cofactor NADP have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 Å for T. cruzi PGF, 1.25 Å for T. cruzi PGF with NADP, 1.6 Å for L. major PGF and 1.8 Å for L. major PGF with NADP. These structures were determined by molecular replacement to a final R factor of less than 18.6% (Rfree of less than 22.9%). PGF in the infectious protozoa L. major and T. cruzi is a potential therapeutic target.

  17. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi: single cell live imaging inside infected tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Bianca Lima; Orikaza, Cristina Mary; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although imaging the live Trypanosoma cruzi parasite is a routine technique in most laboratories, identification of the parasite in infected tissues and organs has been hindered by their intrinsic opaque nature. We describe a simple method for in vivo observation of live single‐cell Trypanosoma cruzi parasites inside mammalian host tissues. BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice infected with DsRed‐CL or GFP‐G trypomastigotes had their organs removed and sectioned with surgical blades. Ex vivo organ sections were observed under confocal microscopy. For the first time, this procedure enabled imaging of individual amastigotes, intermediate forms and motile trypomastigotes within infected tissues of mammalian hosts. PMID:26639617

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi in Persons without Serologic Evidence of Disease, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Basquiera, Ana L.; Sembaj, Adela; Aguerri, Ana M.; Reyes, María E.; Omelianuk, Mirtha; Fernández, Ruth A.; Enders, Julio; Palma, Atilio; Barral, José Moreno; Madoery, Roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    Current diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease relies on serologic detection of specific immunoglobulin G against Trypanosoma cruzi. However, the presence of parasites detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients without positive conventional serologic testing has been observed. We determined the prevalence and clinical characteristics of persons with seronegative results for T. cruzi DNA detected by PCR in a population at high risk for chronic American trypanosomiasis. We studied a total of 194 persons from two different populations: 110 patients were recruited from an urban cardiology clinic, and 84 persons were nonselected citizens from a highly disease-endemic area. Eighty (41%) of persons had negative serologic findings; 12 (15%) had a positive PCR. Three patients with negative serologic findings and positive PCR results had clinical signs and symptoms that suggested Chagas cardiomyopathy. This finding challenges the current recommendations for Chagas disease diagnosis, therapy, and blood transfusion policies. PMID:14720396

  20. The inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol signalling pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Docampo, R; Pignataro, O P

    1991-01-01

    Using [32P]Pi and [3H]inositol as precursors, we have detected the presence of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and their derivatives inositol phosphate, inositol 1,4-bisphosphate and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate respectively, in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. Using digitonin-permeabilized cells it was possible to detect a stimulation in the formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and inositol 1,4-bisphosphate as well as an increased generation of diacylglycerol in the presence of 1 mM-CaCl2. These results are consistent with the operation of a functional inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol pathway in T. cruzi, and constitute the first demonstration of the presence and activation of this pathway in a parasitic protozoan. These results also indicate that this pathway is conserved during evolution from lower to higher eukaryotic organisms. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2025225

  1. Novel drug design for Chagas disease via targeting Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin: Homology modeling and binding pocket prediction on Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition by naphthoquinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ogindo, Charles O; Khraiwesh, Mozna H; George, Matthew; Brandy, Yakini; Brandy, Nailah; Gugssa, Ayele; Ashraf, Mohammad; Abbas, Muneer; Southerland, William M; Lee, Clarence M; Bakare, Oladapo; Fang, Yayin

    2016-08-15

    Chagas disease, also called American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Recent findings have underscored the abundance of the causative organism, (T. cruzi), especially in the southern tier states of the US and the risk burden for the rural farming communities there. Due to a lack of safe and effective drugs, there is an urgent need for novel therapeutic options for treating Chagas disease. We report here our first scientific effort to pursue a novel drug design for treating Chagas disease via the targeting of T. cruzi tubulin. First, the anti T. cruzi tubulin activities of five naphthoquinone derivatives were determined and correlated to their anti-trypanosomal activities. The correlation between the ligand activities against the T. cruzi organism and their tubulin inhibitory activities was very strong with a Pearson's r value of 0.88 (P value <0.05), indicating that this class of compounds could inhibit the activity of the trypanosome organism via T. cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition. Subsequent molecular modeling studies were carried out to understand the mechanisms of the anti-tubulin activities, wherein, the homology model of T. cruzi tubulin dimer was generated and the putative binding site of naphthoquinone derivatives was predicted. The correlation coefficient for ligand anti-tubulin activities and their binding energies at the putative pocket was found to be r=0.79, a high correlation efficiency that was not replicated in contiguous candidate pockets. The homology model of T. cruzi tubulin and the identification of its putative binding site lay a solid ground for further structure based drug design, including molecular docking and pharmacophore analysis. This study presents a new opportunity for designing potent and selective drugs for Chagas disease. PMID:27345756

  2. Novel drug design for Chagas disease via targeting Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin: Homology modeling and binding pocket prediction on Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition by naphthoquinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ogindo, Charles O; Khraiwesh, Mozna H; George, Matthew; Brandy, Yakini; Brandy, Nailah; Gugssa, Ayele; Ashraf, Mohammad; Abbas, Muneer; Southerland, William M; Lee, Clarence M; Bakare, Oladapo; Fang, Yayin

    2016-08-15

    Chagas disease, also called American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Recent findings have underscored the abundance of the causative organism, (T. cruzi), especially in the southern tier states of the US and the risk burden for the rural farming communities there. Due to a lack of safe and effective drugs, there is an urgent need for novel therapeutic options for treating Chagas disease. We report here our first scientific effort to pursue a novel drug design for treating Chagas disease via the targeting of T. cruzi tubulin. First, the anti T. cruzi tubulin activities of five naphthoquinone derivatives were determined and correlated to their anti-trypanosomal activities. The correlation between the ligand activities against the T. cruzi organism and their tubulin inhibitory activities was very strong with a Pearson's r value of 0.88 (P value <0.05), indicating that this class of compounds could inhibit the activity of the trypanosome organism via T. cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition. Subsequent molecular modeling studies were carried out to understand the mechanisms of the anti-tubulin activities, wherein, the homology model of T. cruzi tubulin dimer was generated and the putative binding site of naphthoquinone derivatives was predicted. The correlation coefficient for ligand anti-tubulin activities and their binding energies at the putative pocket was found to be r=0.79, a high correlation efficiency that was not replicated in contiguous candidate pockets. The homology model of T. cruzi tubulin and the identification of its putative binding site lay a solid ground for further structure based drug design, including molecular docking and pharmacophore analysis. This study presents a new opportunity for designing potent and selective drugs for Chagas disease.

  3. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M; Temanni, M Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2016-04-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  4. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A. Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M.; Temanni, M. Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  5. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M; Temanni, M Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2016-04-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  6. Interactions Between Trypanosoma cruzi the Chagas Disease Parasite and Naturally Infected Wild Mepraia Vectors of Chile.

    PubMed

    Campos-Soto, Ricardo; Ortiz, Sylvia; Cordova, Ivan; Bruneau, Nicole; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Solari, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease, which ranks among the world's most neglected diseases, is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Mepraia species are the wild vectors of this parasite in Chile. Host-parasite interactions can occur at several levels, such as co-speciation and ecological host fitting, among others. Thus, we are exploring the interactions between T. cruzi circulating in naturally infected Mepraia species in all areas endemic of Chile. We evaluated T. cruzi infection rates of 27 different haplotypes of the wild Mepraia species and identified their parasite genotypes using minicircle PCR amplification and hybridization tests with genotype-specific DNA probes. Infection rates were lower in northern Chile where Mepraia gajardoi circulates (10-35%); in central Chile, Mepraia spinolai is most abundant, and infection rates varied in space and time (0-55%). T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII, TcV, and Tc VI were detected. Mixed infections with two or more DTUs are frequently found in highly infected insects. T. cruzi DTUs have distinct, but not exclusive, ecological and epidemiological associations with their hosts. T. cruzi infection rates of M. spinolai were higher than in M. gajardoi, but the presence of mixed infection with more than one T. cruzi DTU was the same. The same T. cruzi DTUs (TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI) were found circulating in both vector species, even though TcI was not equally distributed. These results suggest that T. cruzi DTUs are not associated with any of the two genetically related vector species nor with the geographic area. The T. cruzi vectors interactions are discussed in terms of old and recent events. By exploring T. cruzi DTUs present in Mepraia haplotypes and species from northern to central Chile, we open the analysis on these invertebrate host-parasite interactions.

  7. Geographical Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Hernán J.; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E.; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A.; Feliciangeli, M. Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI – TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela. PMID:22745843

  8. Molecular mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi infection by oral route.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Nobuko

    2009-07-01

    Frequent reports on outbreaks of acute Chagas' disease by ingestion of food contaminated with parasites from triatomine insects illustrate the importance of this mode of transmission. Studies on oral Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice have indicated that metacyclic trypomastigotes invade the gastric mucosal epithelium. A key molecule in this process is gp82, a stage-specific surface glycoprotein that binds to both gastric mucin and to target epithelial cells. By triggering Ca2+ signalling, gp82 promotes parasite internalisation. Gp82 is relatively resistant to peptic digestion at acidic pH, thus preserving the properties critical for oral infection. The infection process is also influenced by gp90, a metacyclic stage-specific molecule that negatively regulates the invasion process. T. cruzi strains expressing high gp90 levels invade cells poorly in vitro. However, their infectivity by oral route varies considerably due to varying susceptibilities of different gp90 isoforms to peptic digestion. Parasites expressing pepsin-susceptible gp90 become highly invasive against target cells upon contact with gastric juice. Such is the case of a T. cruzi isolate from an acute case of orally acquired Chagas' disease; the gp90 from this strain is extensively degraded upon short period of parasite permanence in the gastric milieu. If such an exacerbation of infectivity occurs in humans, it may be responsible for the severity of Chagas' disease reported in outbreaks of oral infection.

  9. Conservation and divergence within the clathrin interactome of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Ligia Cristina; Frederico, Yohana Camila A; Boehm, Cordula; Moreira, Claudia Maria do Nascimento; Soares, Maurilio José; Field, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protozoa with a significant burden on human health. African and American trypanosomes are causative agents of Nagana and Chagas disease respectively, and speciated about 300 million years ago. These parasites have highly distinct life cycles, pathologies, transmission strategies and surface proteomes, being dominated by the variant surface glycoprotein (African) or mucins (American) respectively. In African trypanosomes clathrin-mediated trafficking is responsible for endocytosis and post-Golgi transport, with several mechanistic aspects distinct from higher organisms. Using clathrin light chain (TcCLC) and EpsinR (TcEpsinR) as affinity handles, we identified candidate clathrin-associated proteins (CAPs) in Trypanosoma cruzi; the cohort includes orthologs of many proteins known to mediate vesicle trafficking, but significantly not the AP-2 adaptor complex. Several trypanosome-specific proteins common with African trypanosomes, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy revealed localisations for TcEpsinR, TcCLC and TcCHC at the posterior region of trypomastigote cells, coincident with the flagellar pocket and Golgi apparatus. These data provide the first systematic analysis of clathrin-mediated trafficking in T. cruzi, allowing comparison between protein cohorts and other trypanosomes and also suggest that clathrin trafficking in at least some life stages of T. cruzi may be AP-2-independent. PMID:27502971

  10. Altered Cardiomyocyte Function and Trypanosoma cruzi Persistence in Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Santos-Miranda, Artur; Sales-Junior, Policarpo Ademar; Monti-Rocha, Renata; Campos, Paula Peixoto; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2016-05-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the triatominae Trypanosoma cruzi, is one of the leading causes of heart malfunctioning in Latin America. The cardiac phenotype is observed in 20-30% of infected people 10-40 years after their primary infection. The cardiac complications during Chagas disease range from cardiac arrhythmias to heart failure, with important involvement of the right ventricle. Interestingly, no studies have evaluated the electrical properties of right ventricle myocytes during Chagas disease and correlated them to parasite persistence. Taking advantage of a murine model of Chagas disease, we studied the histological and electrical properties of right ventricle in acute (30 days postinfection [dpi]) and chronic phases (90 dpi) of infected mice with the Colombian strain of T. cruzi and their correlation to parasite persistence. We observed an increase in collagen deposition and inflammatory infiltrate at both 30 and 90 dpi. Furthermore, using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we detected parasites at 90 dpi in right and left ventricles. In addition, we observed action potential prolongation and reduced transient outward K(+) current and L-type Ca(2+) current at 30 and 90 dpi. Taking together, our results demonstrate that T. cruzi infection leads to important modifications in electrical properties associated with inflammatory infiltrate and parasite persistence in mice right ventricle, suggesting a causal role between inflammation, parasite persistence, and altered cardiomyocyte function in Chagas disease. Thus, arrhythmias observed in Chagas disease may be partially related to altered electrical function in right ventricle.

  11. Blood viscosity changes in experimentally Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rats.

    PubMed

    Berra, H H; Piaggio, E; Revelli, S S; Luquita, A

    2005-01-01

    Microcirculatory alterations would explain focal lesions found in Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection induces host blood properties modifications and defensive responses capable of producing blood hyperviscosity, an ischemic risk factor able to affect microvascular blood flow. We studied whole blood viscosity (eta(b)) and plasmatic and cellular factors influencing it in rats, 7 and 14 days after experimental infection with T. cruzi. Increased plasma viscosity (eta(p)) was found in infected versus control rats and it was correlated with high blood parasite levels at 7 days and enhanced gamma-globulin fraction concentration at 14 days. The hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and eta(b) were higher in 14 days infected rats vs. 7 days and control animals. Also, electron microscopy observation showed morphological changes in red blood cells (RBC) at 7 and 14 days post-infection, with increased proportion of echinocyte and stomatocyte shapes transformation. In our rat model of Chagas' disease, BPL, increased plasmatic protein concentration, enhanced MCV and RBC shapes transformation would determine blood hyperviscosity, cause of microvascular blood flow abnormalities. PMID:15851836

  12. Blood viscosity changes in experimentally Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rats.

    PubMed

    Berra, H H; Piaggio, E; Revelli, S S; Luquita, A

    2005-01-01

    Microcirculatory alterations would explain focal lesions found in Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection induces host blood properties modifications and defensive responses capable of producing blood hyperviscosity, an ischemic risk factor able to affect microvascular blood flow. We studied whole blood viscosity (eta(b)) and plasmatic and cellular factors influencing it in rats, 7 and 14 days after experimental infection with T. cruzi. Increased plasma viscosity (eta(p)) was found in infected versus control rats and it was correlated with high blood parasite levels at 7 days and enhanced gamma-globulin fraction concentration at 14 days. The hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and eta(b) were higher in 14 days infected rats vs. 7 days and control animals. Also, electron microscopy observation showed morphological changes in red blood cells (RBC) at 7 and 14 days post-infection, with increased proportion of echinocyte and stomatocyte shapes transformation. In our rat model of Chagas' disease, BPL, increased plasmatic protein concentration, enhanced MCV and RBC shapes transformation would determine blood hyperviscosity, cause of microvascular blood flow abnormalities.

  13. Conservation and divergence within the clathrin interactome of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Ligia Cristina; Frederico, Yohana Camila A.; Boehm, Cordula; Moreira, Claudia Maria do Nascimento; Soares, Maurilio José; Field, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protozoa with a significant burden on human health. African and American trypanosomes are causative agents of Nagana and Chagas disease respectively, and speciated about 300 million years ago. These parasites have highly distinct life cycles, pathologies, transmission strategies and surface proteomes, being dominated by the variant surface glycoprotein (African) or mucins (American) respectively. In African trypanosomes clathrin-mediated trafficking is responsible for endocytosis and post-Golgi transport, with several mechanistic aspects distinct from higher organisms. Using clathrin light chain (TcCLC) and EpsinR (TcEpsinR) as affinity handles, we identified candidate clathrin-associated proteins (CAPs) in Trypanosoma cruzi; the cohort includes orthologs of many proteins known to mediate vesicle trafficking, but significantly not the AP-2 adaptor complex. Several trypanosome-specific proteins common with African trypanosomes, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy revealed localisations for TcEpsinR, TcCLC and TcCHC at the posterior region of trypomastigote cells, coincident with the flagellar pocket and Golgi apparatus. These data provide the first systematic analysis of clathrin-mediated trafficking in T. cruzi, allowing comparison between protein cohorts and other trypanosomes and also suggest that clathrin trafficking in at least some life stages of T. cruzi may be AP-2-independent. PMID:27502971

  14. Geographical distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi genotypes in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Hernán J; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A; Feliciangeli, M Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI - TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela.

  15. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread. PMID:26432777

  16. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread.

  17. Diverse Inhibitor Chemotypes Targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan B.; Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Erenburg, Grigori; Gut, Jiri; Engel, Juan C.; Ang, Kenny K. H.; Mulvaney, Joseph; Chen, Steven; Arkin, Michelle R.; McKerrow, James H.; Podust, Larissa M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas Disease, a WHO- and NIH-designated neglected tropical disease, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infection in North America and Europe as a result of population moves. Although a major cause of morbidity and mortality due to heart failure, as well as inflicting a heavy economic burden in affected regions, Chagas Disease elicits scant notice from the pharmaceutical industry because of adverse economic incentives. The discovery and development of new routes to chemotherapy for Chagas Disease is a clear priority. Methodology/Principal Findings The similarity between the membrane sterol requirements of pathogenic fungi and those of the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas human cardiopathy, has led to repurposing anti-fungal azole inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) for the treatment of Chagas Disease. To diversify the therapeutic pipeline of anti-Chagasic drug candidates we exploited an approach that included directly probing the T. cruzi CYP51 active site with a library of synthetic small molecules. Target-based high-throughput screening reduced the library of ∼104,000 small molecules to 185 hits with estimated nanomolar KD values, while cross-validation against T. cruzi-infected skeletal myoblast cells yielded 57 active hits with EC50 <10 µM. Two pools of hits partially overlapped. The top hit inhibited T. cruzi with EC50 of 17 nM and was trypanocidal at 40 nM. Conclusions/Significance The hits are structurally diverse, demonstrating that CYP51 is a rather permissive enzyme target for small molecules. Cheminformatic analysis of the hits suggests that CYP51 pharmacology is similar to that of other cytochromes P450 therapeutic targets, including thromboxane synthase (CYP5), fatty acid ω-hydroxylases (CYP4), 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17) and aromatase (CYP19). Surprisingly, strong similarity is suggested to glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferase, which is unrelated to CYP51 by sequence or

  18. Thrombospondin-1 Interacts with Trypanosoma cruzi Surface Calreticulin to Enhance Cellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Candice A.; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y.; Ikejiani, Adaeze O.; Udoko, Aniekanabasi N.; Cardenas, Tatiana C.; Pratap, Siddharth; Duquette, Mark A.; Lima, Maria F.; Lawler, Jack; Villalta, Fernando; Nde, Pius N.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which is a neglected tropical disease that produces severe pathology and mortality. The mechanisms by which the parasite invades cells are not well elucidated. We recently reported that T. cruzi up-regulates the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) to enhance the process of cellular invasion. Here we characterize a novel TSP-1 interaction with T. cruzi that enhances cellular infection. We show that labeled TSP-1 interacts specifically with the surface of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We used TSP-1 to pull down interacting parasite surface proteins that were identified by mass spectrometry. We also show that full length TSP-1 and the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 (NTSP) interact with T. cruzi surface calreticulin (TcCRT) and other surface proteins. Pre-exposure of recombinant NTSP or TSP-1 to T. cruzi significantly enhances cellular infection of wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) compared to the C-terminal domain of TSP-1, E3T3C1. In addition, blocking TcCRT with antibodies significantly inhibits the enhancement of cellular infection mediated by the TcCRT-TSP-1 interaction. Taken together, our findings indicate that TSP-1 interacts with TcCRT on the surface of T. cruzi through the NTSP domain and that this interaction enhances cellular infection. Thus surface TcCRT is a virulent factor that enhances the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection through TSP-1, which is up-regulated by the parasite. PMID:22808206

  19. Thrombospondin-1 interacts with Trypanosoma cruzi surface calreticulin to enhance cellular infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Candice A; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y; Ikejiani, Adaeze O; Udoko, Aniekanabasi N; Cardenas, Tatiana C; Pratap, Siddharth; Duquette, Mark A; Lima, Maria F; Lawler, Jack; Villalta, Fernando; Nde, Pius N

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which is a neglected tropical disease that produces severe pathology and mortality. The mechanisms by which the parasite invades cells are not well elucidated. We recently reported that T. cruzi up-regulates the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) to enhance the process of cellular invasion. Here we characterize a novel TSP-1 interaction with T. cruzi that enhances cellular infection. We show that labeled TSP-1 interacts specifically with the surface of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We used TSP-1 to pull down interacting parasite surface proteins that were identified by mass spectrometry. We also show that full length TSP-1 and the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 (NTSP) interact with T. cruzi surface calreticulin (TcCRT) and other surface proteins. Pre-exposure of recombinant NTSP or TSP-1 to T. cruzi significantly enhances cellular infection of wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) compared to the C-terminal domain of TSP-1, E3T3C1. In addition, blocking TcCRT with antibodies significantly inhibits the enhancement of cellular infection mediated by the TcCRT-TSP-1 interaction. Taken together, our findings indicate that TSP-1 interacts with TcCRT on the surface of T. cruzi through the NTSP domain and that this interaction enhances cellular infection. Thus surface TcCRT is a virulent factor that enhances the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection through TSP-1, which is up-regulated by the parasite. PMID:22808206

  20. Relationship between biological behaviour and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profiles of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, R A; Escario, J A; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Gómez-Barrio, A

    2001-02-01

    Once known some biological characteristics of six Trypanosoma cruzi strains, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was made. Cluster analysis by UPGMA (unweighted pair group method analysis) was then applied both to biological parameters and RAPD profiles. Inspection of the UPGMA phenograms indicates identical clusters, so supporting that usefulness of biological parameters to characterization of T. cruzi strains still remains. PMID:11285506

  1. Incidence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in triatomines collected at Indio Mountains Research Station.

    PubMed

    Buhaya, Munir H; Galvan, Steven; Maldonado, Rosa A

    2015-10-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an emerging infectious disease in the United States. In our study, 24 out of 39 triatomines, from the specie Triatoma rubida, were infected with T. cruzi. Additionally, only the genotype TcI was characterized among the parasite specimens. Improved knowledge of local epidemiology is needed to prevent transmission of Chagas disease.

  2. Shotgun sequencing analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi I Sylvio X10/1 and comparison with T. cruzi VI CL Brener.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Oscar; Ochaya, Stephen; Sherwood, Ellen; Lewis, Michael D; Llewellyn, Martin S; Miles, Michael A; Andersson, Björn

    2011-03-08

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, which affects more than 9 million people in Latin America. We have generated a draft genome sequence of the TcI strain Sylvio X10/1 and compared it to the TcVI reference strain CL Brener to identify lineage-specific features. We found virtually no differences in the core gene content of CL Brener and Sylvio X10/1 by presence/absence analysis, but 6 open reading frames from CL Brener were missing in Sylvio X10/1. Several multicopy gene families, including DGF, mucin, MASP and GP63 were found to contain substantially fewer genes in Sylvio X10/1, based on sequence read estimations. 1,861 small insertion-deletion events and 77,349 nucleotide differences, 23% of which were non-synonymous and associated with radical amino acid changes, further distinguish these two genomes. There were 336 genes indicated as under positive selection, 145 unique to T. cruzi in comparison to T. brucei and Leishmania. This study provides a framework for further comparative analyses of two major T. cruzi lineages and also highlights the need for sequencing more strains to understand fully the genomic composition of this parasite.

  3. Molecular and serological rapid tests as markers of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in dogs in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Lizundia, Regina; Picado, Albert; Cordero, Marlen; Calderón, Alejandra; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Montenegro, Victor M.; Urbina, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Chagas disease is a zoonotic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and dogs are one of the main domestic reservoirs. Materials and Methods: One molecular (OligoC-TesT, Coris Bioconcept) and one serological (T. cruzi-Detect, Inbios) rapid tests were evaluated as infection markers for T. cruzi in 102 dogs living in eight villages endemic for Chagas in Costa Rica. Results: T. cruzi-Detect performed well as screening tool with 23.3% positive samples. The large number of invalid results (66.7%) observed in samples tested with OligoC-TesT precluded assessing the use of this new method as epidemiological tool to detect T. cruzi infection in dogs. PMID:25250232

  4. The diversity and expansion of the trans-sialidase gene family is a common feature in Trypanosoma cruzi clade members.

    PubMed

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Cortez, Danielle R; Lima, Fábio M; Cortez, Caroline; Ramírez, José Luis; Martins, Andre G; Serrano, Myrna G; Teixeira, Marta M G; da Silveira, José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Trans-sialidase (TS) is a polymorphic protein superfamily described in members of the protozoan genus Trypanosoma. Of the eight TS groups recently described, TS group I proteins (some of which have catalytic activity) are present in the distantly related Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi phylogenetic clades, whereas other TS groups have only been described in some species belonging to the T. cruzi clade. In the present study we analyzed the repertoire, distribution and phylogenetic relationships of TS genes among species of the T. cruzi clade based on sequence similarity, multiple sequence alignment and tree-reconstruction approaches using TS sequences obtained with the aid of PCR-based strategies or retrieved from genome databases. We included the following representative isolates of the T. cruzi clade from South America: T. cruzi, T. cruzi Tcbat, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma conorhini. The cloned sequences encoded conserved TS protein motifs Asp-box and VTVxNVxLYNR but lacked the FRIP motif (conserved in TS group I). The T. conorhini sequences were the most divergent. The hybridization patterns of TS probes with chromosomal bands confirmed the abundance of these sequences in species in the T. cruzi clade. Divergence and relationship analysis placed most of the TS sequences in the groups defined in T. cruzi. Further examination of members of TS group II, which includes T. cruzi surface glycoproteins implicated in host cell attachment and invasion, showed that sequences of T. cruzi Tcbat grouped with those of T. cruzi genotype TcI. Our analysis indicates that different members of the T. cruzi clade, with different vertebrate hosts, vectors and pathogenicity, share the extensive expansion and sequence diversification of the TS gene family. Altogether, our results are congruent with the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade and represent a contribution to the understanding of the molecular

  5. Cellular signaling during the macrophage invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mauricio; Dutra, Juliana M F; Carvalho, Tecia M U; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa L; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Souza, Wanderley

    2002-12-01

    We have reported that protein tyrosine kinases play an important role in the invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi into primary resident macrophages. In the present study we carry out immunofluorescence assays, using monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, to reveal an accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated residues at the site of parasite association with the macrophage surface, colocalizing with host cell F-actin-rich domains. SDS-PAGE analysis of macrophage cell line IC-21 tyrosine phosphoproteins, labeled with [(35)S] L-methionine, revealed several peptides with increased levels of phosphorylation upon interaction with the parasite. Among them, were detected bands of 140, 120, 112, 94, 73, 67, and 56 kDa that match the molecular weights of proteins described as being tyrosine phosphorylated during events that lead to actin assembly in mononuclear phagocytes. The pretreatment of IC-21 macrophages with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin 23 inhibited trypomastigote uptake showing that tyrosine phosphorylation is important for the parasite penetration in this particular cell line. Immunofluorescence microscopy, using antibodies against p85, the regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), placed this enzyme also in the same sites, in accordance to what is reported for phagocytosis. We suggest that once the components of T. cruzi trypomastigotes surface are recognized by macrophage receptors, they trigger the activation of a tyrosine phosphorylation cascade, PI 3-kinase recruitment, and assembly of actin filaments at the site of initial cell-to-cell contact, resembling the events described during phagocytosis. These achievements support the model for a phagocytic-like actin-dependent invasion mechanism for T. cruzi trypomastigotes into macrophages. PMID:12483314

  6. Polyamine depletion inhibits the autophagic response modulating Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vanrell, María C.; Cueto, Juan A.; Barclay, Jeremías J.; Carrillo, Carolina; Colombo, María I.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Romano, Patricia S.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell process that in normal conditions serves to recycle cytoplasmic components and aged or damaged organelles. The autophagic pathway has been implicated in many physiological and pathological situations, even during the course of infection by intracellular pathogens. Many compounds are currently used to positively or negatively modulate the autophagic response. Recently it was demonstrated that the polyamine spermidine is a physiological inducer of autophagy in eukaryotic cells. We have previously shown that the etiological agent of Chagas disease, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, interacts with autophagic compartments during host cell invasion and that preactivation of autophagy significantly increases host cell colonization by this parasite. In the present report we have analyzed the effect of polyamine depletion on the autophagic response of the host cell and on T. cruzi infectivity. Our data showed that depleting intracellular polyamines by inhibiting the biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) suppressed the induction of autophagy in response to starvation or rapamycin treatment in two cell lines. This effect was associated with a decrease in the levels of LC3 and ATG5, two proteins required for autophagosome formation. As a consequence of inhibiting host cell autophagy, DFMO impaired T. cruzi colonization, indicating that polyamines and autophagy facilitate parasite infection. Thus, our results point to DFMO as a novel autophagy inhibitor. While other autophagy inhibitors such as wortmannin and 3-methyladenine are nonspecific and potentially toxic, DFMO is an FDA-approved drug that may have value in limiting autophagy and the spread of the infection in Chagas disease and possibly other pathological settings. PMID:23697944

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M; Rodrigues, Flávia G; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2011-12-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases.

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Response to Ionizing Radiation Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; Grynberg, Priscila; Bitar, Mainá; Pires, Simone da Fonseca; Hilário, Heron Oliveira; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, enduring up to 1.5 kGy of gamma rays. Ionizing radiation can damage the DNA molecule both directly, resulting in double-strand breaks, and indirectly, as a consequence of reactive oxygen species production. After a dose of 500 Gy of gamma rays, the parasite genome is fragmented, but the chromosomal bands are restored within 48 hours. Under such conditions, cell growth arrests for up to 120 hours and the parasites resume normal growth after this period. To better understand the parasite response to ionizing radiation, we analyzed the proteome of irradiated (4, 24, and 96 hours after irradiation) and non-irradiated T. cruzi using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. A total of 543 spots were found to be differentially expressed, from which 215 were identified. These identified protein spots represent different isoforms of only 53 proteins. We observed a tendency for overexpression of proteins with molecular weights below predicted, indicating that these may be processed, yielding shorter polypeptides. The presence of shorter protein isoforms after irradiation suggests the occurrence of post-translational modifications and/or processing in response to gamma radiation stress. Our results also indicate that active translation is essential for the recovery of parasites from ionizing radiation damage. This study therefore reveals the peculiar response of T. cruzi to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism can change its protein expression to survive such a harmful stress. PMID:24842666

  9. Synergistic Effect of Lupenone and Caryophyllene Oxide against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Polanco-Hernández, Glendy; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Rosado, María E.; Guzmán-Marín, Eugenia; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y.; Giménez-Turba, Alberto; Salamanca, Efraín; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro trypanocidal activity of a 1 : 4 mixture of lupenone and caryophyllene oxide confirmed a synergistic effect of the terpenoids against epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi (IC50 = 10.4 μg/mL, FIC = 0.46). In addition, testing of the terpenoid mixture for its capacity to reduce the number of amastigote nests in cardiac tissue and skeletal muscle of infected mice showed a reduction of more than 80% at a dose level of 20.8 mg·kg−1·day−1. PMID:23762135

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in B-cell-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, A M; Santoro, F; Afchain, D; Bazin, H; Capron, A

    1981-01-01

    The effect of neonatally initiated injections of anti-mu rabbit antiserum on immunity of rats against Trypanosoma cruzi infection was investigated in vivo. Anti-mu treatment resulted in a loss of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG2a synthesis and, subsequently, of antibody production. These rats so treated were shown to be significantly more susceptible to the acute phase of the infection than the control rats treated with normal rabbit serum, as measured by increased parasitemia and mortality. These results indicate the essential role of antibodies, probably in association with complement or effector cells or both, in immunity to acute Chagas' disease. PMID:6783543

  11. Is the Antitumor Property of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Mediated by Its Calreticulin?

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Abello, Paula; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eight to 10 million people in 21 endemic countries are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, only 30% of those infected develop symptoms of Chagas’ disease, a chronic, neglected tropical disease worldwide. Similar to other pathogens, T. cruzi has evolved to resist the host immune response. Studies, performed 80 years ago in the Soviet Union, proposed that T. cruzi infects tumor cells with similar capacity to that displayed for target tissues such as cardiac, aortic, or digestive. An antagonistic relationship between T. cruzi infection and cancer development was also proposed, but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained largely unknown. Probably, a variety of T. cruzi molecules is involved. This review focuses on how T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), exteriorized from the endoplasmic reticulum, targets the first classical complement component C1 and negatively regulates the classical complement activation cascade, promoting parasite infectivity. We propose that this C1-dependent TcCRT-mediated virulence is critical to explain, at least an important part, of the parasite capacity to inhibit tumor development. We will discuss how TcCRT, by directly interacting with venous and arterial endothelial cells, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. Thus, these TcCRT functions not only illustrate T. cruzi interactions with the host immune defensive strategies, but also illustrate a possible co-evolutionary adaptation to privilege a prolonged interaction with its host. PMID:27462315

  12. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/host cell interplay.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex biological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or nonphagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the upregulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells.

  13. Is the Antitumor Property of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Mediated by Its Calreticulin?

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Abello, Paula; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eight to 10 million people in 21 endemic countries are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, only 30% of those infected develop symptoms of Chagas' disease, a chronic, neglected tropical disease worldwide. Similar to other pathogens, T. cruzi has evolved to resist the host immune response. Studies, performed 80 years ago in the Soviet Union, proposed that T. cruzi infects tumor cells with similar capacity to that displayed for target tissues such as cardiac, aortic, or digestive. An antagonistic relationship between T. cruzi infection and cancer development was also proposed, but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained largely unknown. Probably, a variety of T. cruzi molecules is involved. This review focuses on how T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), exteriorized from the endoplasmic reticulum, targets the first classical complement component C1 and negatively regulates the classical complement activation cascade, promoting parasite infectivity. We propose that this C1-dependent TcCRT-mediated virulence is critical to explain, at least an important part, of the parasite capacity to inhibit tumor development. We will discuss how TcCRT, by directly interacting with venous and arterial endothelial cells, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. Thus, these TcCRT functions not only illustrate T. cruzi interactions with the host immune defensive strategies, but also illustrate a possible co-evolutionary adaptation to privilege a prolonged interaction with its host. PMID:27462315

  14. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/Host Cell Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Colombo, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Summary The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex bi-ological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or non-phagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the up-regulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells. PMID:22454195

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of the 78-kilodalton glucose-regulated protein of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbetts, R S; Kim, I Y; Olson, C L; Barthel, L M; Sullivan, M A; Winquist, A G; Miller, S D; Engman, D M

    1994-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease, an illness responsible for morbidity and death among millions of Latin Americans. Mice also develop this disease when infected with T. cruzi and are a useful model organism for the study of parasite-specific immune responses. To identify immunogenic T. cruzi antigens, serum from an infected mouse was used to isolate clones from a T. cruzi epimastigote cDNA expression library. One of these clones was found to encode the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (grp78), the endoplasmic reticular member of the 70-kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) family. Like the mammalian and yeast grp78s, the T. cruzi protein contains an endoplasmic reticular leader peptide and a carboxyl-terminal endoplasmic reticular retention sequence. T. cruzi grp78 is encoded by a tandemly arranged family of three genes located on a chromosome of 1.6 Mb. The effects on grp78 expression of heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, the latter of which specifically stimulates mammalian grp78, were investigated. While the level of the grp78 protein remained constant under all circumstances, grp78 mRNA was unaffected by heat shock but induced fivefold by tunicamycin. Finally, we found that grp78 is the most immunogenic of the T. cruzi heat shock proteins we have characterized, reacting strongly in immunoblots with sera from infected mice. Images PMID:8188375

  16. Molecular epidemiology of domestic and sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Marta V.; Lauricella, Marta A.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Lanati, Leonardo; Marcet, Paula L.; Levin, Mariano J.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi populations and parasite transmission dynamics have been well documented throughout the Americas, but few studies have been conducted in the Gran Chaco ecoregion, one of the most highly endemic areas for Chagas disease, caused by T. cruzi. In this study we assessed the distribution of T. cruzi lineages (identified by PCR strategies) in Triatoma infestans, domestic dogs, cats, humans and sylvatic mammals from two neighboring rural areas with different histories of transmission and vector control in northern Argentina. Lineage II predominated among the 99 isolates characterized and lineage I among the six isolates obtained from sylvatic mammals. Trypanosoma cruzi lineage IIe predominated in domestic habitats; it was found in 87% of 54 isolates from Tr. infestans, in 82% of 33 isolates from dogs, and in the four cats found infected. Domestic and sylvatic cycles overlapped in the study area in the late 1980s, when intense domestic transmission occurred, and still overlap marginally. The introduction of T. cruzi from sylvatic into domestic habitats is likely to occur very rarely in the current epidemiological context. The household distribution of T. cruzi lineages showed that Tr. infestans, dogs and cats from a given house compound shared the same parasite lineage in most cases. Based on molecular evidence, this result lends further support to the importance of dogs and cats as domestic reservoir hosts of T. cruzi. We believe that in Argentina, this is the first time that lineage IIc has been isolated from naturally-infected domestic dogs and Tr. infestans. PMID:18585717

  17. Is the Antitumor Property of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Mediated by Its Calreticulin?

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Abello, Paula; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eight to 10 million people in 21 endemic countries are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, only 30% of those infected develop symptoms of Chagas' disease, a chronic, neglected tropical disease worldwide. Similar to other pathogens, T. cruzi has evolved to resist the host immune response. Studies, performed 80 years ago in the Soviet Union, proposed that T. cruzi infects tumor cells with similar capacity to that displayed for target tissues such as cardiac, aortic, or digestive. An antagonistic relationship between T. cruzi infection and cancer development was also proposed, but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained largely unknown. Probably, a variety of T. cruzi molecules is involved. This review focuses on how T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), exteriorized from the endoplasmic reticulum, targets the first classical complement component C1 and negatively regulates the classical complement activation cascade, promoting parasite infectivity. We propose that this C1-dependent TcCRT-mediated virulence is critical to explain, at least an important part, of the parasite capacity to inhibit tumor development. We will discuss how TcCRT, by directly interacting with venous and arterial endothelial cells, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. Thus, these TcCRT functions not only illustrate T. cruzi interactions with the host immune defensive strategies, but also illustrate a possible co-evolutionary adaptation to privilege a prolonged interaction with its host.

  18. Serum Cytokines as Biomarkers of Early Trypanosoma cruzi infection by Congenital Exposure.

    PubMed

    Volta, Bibiana J; Bustos, Patricia L; Cardoni, Rita L; De Rissio, Ana M; Laucella, Susana A; Bua, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, leads to an activation of the immune system in congenitally infected infants. In this study, we measured a set of cytokines/chemokines and the levels of parasitemia by quantitative PCR in the circulation of neonates born to T. cruzi-infected mothers to evaluate the predictive value of these mediators as biomarkers of congenital transmission. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 35 infants with congenital T. cruzi infection, of which 15 and 10 infants had been diagnosed by detection of parasites by microscopy in the first and sixth month after delivery, respectively, and the remaining 10 had been diagnosed by the presence of T. cruzi-specific Abs at 10-12 mo old. Uninfected infants born to either T. cruzi-infected or uninfected mothers were also evaluated as controls. The plasma levels of IL-17A, MCP-1, and monokine induced by IFN-γ were increased in infants congenitally infected with T. cruzi, even before they developed detectable parasitemia or seroconversion. Infants diagnosed between 6 and 12 mo old also showed increased levels of IL-6 and IL-17F at 1 mo of age. Conversely, infants who did not develop congenital T. cruzi infection had higher levels of IFN-γ than infected infants born to uninfected mothers. Monokine induced by IFN-γ, MCP-1, and IFN-γ production induced in T. cruzi-infected infants correlated with parasitemia, whereas the plasma levels of IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-6 were less parasite load dependent. These findings support the existence of a distinct profile of cytokines and chemokines in the circulation of infants born to T. cruzi-infected mothers, which might predict congenital infection. PMID:27183607

  19. Is the infectiousness of dogs naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi associated with poly-parasitism?

    PubMed

    Enriquez, G F; Garbossa, G; Macchiaverna, N P; Argibay, H D; Bua, J; Gürtler, R E; Cardinal, M V

    2016-06-15

    Interactions among different species of parasites co-infecting the same host could be synergistic or antagonistic. These interactions may modify both the frequency of infected hosts and their infectiousness, and therefore impact on transmission dynamics. This study determined the infectiousness of Trypanosoma cruzi-seropositive dogs (using xenodiagnosis) and their parasite load (quantified by qPCR), and tested the association between both variables and the presence of concomitant endoparasites. A cross-sectional serosurvey conducted in eight rural villages from Pampa del Indio and neighboring municipalities (northeastern Argentina) detected 32 T. cruzi-seropositive dogs out of 217 individuals examined for infection. Both the infectiousness to the vector Triatoma infestans and parasite load of T. cruzi-seropositive dogs examined were heterogeneous. A statistically significant, nine-fold higher mean infectiousness was registered in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs co-infected with Ancylostoma caninum and a trematode than in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs without these infections. The median parasite load of T. cruzi was also significantly higher in dogs co-infected with these helminths. An opposite trend was observed in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs that were serologically positive to Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum relative to dogs seronegative for these parasites. Using multiple logistic regression analysis with random effects, we found a positive and significant association between the infectiousness of T. cruzi-seropositive dogs and co-infections with A. caninum and a trematode. Our results suggest that co-infections may be a modifier of host infectiousness in dogs naturally infected with T. cruzi. PMID:27198799

  20. Serum Cytokines as Biomarkers of Early Trypanosoma cruzi infection by Congenital Exposure.

    PubMed

    Volta, Bibiana J; Bustos, Patricia L; Cardoni, Rita L; De Rissio, Ana M; Laucella, Susana A; Bua, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, leads to an activation of the immune system in congenitally infected infants. In this study, we measured a set of cytokines/chemokines and the levels of parasitemia by quantitative PCR in the circulation of neonates born to T. cruzi-infected mothers to evaluate the predictive value of these mediators as biomarkers of congenital transmission. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 35 infants with congenital T. cruzi infection, of which 15 and 10 infants had been diagnosed by detection of parasites by microscopy in the first and sixth month after delivery, respectively, and the remaining 10 had been diagnosed by the presence of T. cruzi-specific Abs at 10-12 mo old. Uninfected infants born to either T. cruzi-infected or uninfected mothers were also evaluated as controls. The plasma levels of IL-17A, MCP-1, and monokine induced by IFN-γ were increased in infants congenitally infected with T. cruzi, even before they developed detectable parasitemia or seroconversion. Infants diagnosed between 6 and 12 mo old also showed increased levels of IL-6 and IL-17F at 1 mo of age. Conversely, infants who did not develop congenital T. cruzi infection had higher levels of IFN-γ than infected infants born to uninfected mothers. Monokine induced by IFN-γ, MCP-1, and IFN-γ production induced in T. cruzi-infected infants correlated with parasitemia, whereas the plasma levels of IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-6 were less parasite load dependent. These findings support the existence of a distinct profile of cytokines and chemokines in the circulation of infants born to T. cruzi-infected mothers, which might predict congenital infection.

  1. In vitro cytocidal effect of novel lytic peptides on Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, J M; Burton, C A; Barr, S B; Jeffers, G W; Julian, G R; White, K L; Enright, F M; Klei, T R; Laine, R A

    1988-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma cruzi were killed by two novel lytic peptides (SB-37 and Shiva-1) in vitro. Human erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum, and Vero cells infected with T. cruzi, were exposed to these peptides. The result, in both cases, was a significant decrease in the level of parasite infection. Furthermore, the peptides had a marked cytocidal effect on trypomastigote stages of T. cruzi in media, whereas host eukaryotic cells were unaffected by the treatments. In view of the worldwide prevalence of these protozoan diseases and the lack of completely suitable treatments, lytic peptides may provide new and unique chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of these infections.

  2. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity

    PubMed Central

    Zingales, Bianca; Miles, Michael A; Moraes, Carolina B; Luquetti, Alejandro; Guhl, Felipe; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ribeiro, Isabela

    2014-01-01

    This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape. PMID:25317712

  3. Retrospective distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in Colombia.

    PubMed

    León, Cielo M; Hernández, Carolina; Montilla, Marleny; Ramírez, Juan David

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately eight million people in the Americas. This parasite exhibits genetic variability, with at least six discrete typing units broadly distributed in the American continent. T. cruzi I (TcI) shows remarkable genetic diversity; a genotype linked to human infections and a domestic cycle of transmission have recently been identified, hence, this strain was named TcIDom. The aim of this work was to describe the spatiotemporal distribution of TcI subpopulations across humans, insect vectors and mammalian reservoirs in Colombia by means of molecular typing targeting the spliced leader intergenic region of mini-exon gene. We analysed 101 TcI isolates and observed a distribution of sylvatic TcI in 70% and TcIDom in 30%. In humans, the ratio was sylvatic TcI in 60% and TcIDom in 40%. In mammal reservoirs, the distribution corresponded to sylvatic TcI in 96% and TcIDom in 4%. Among insect vectors, sylvatic TcI was observed in 48% and TcIDom in 52%. In conclusion, the circulation of TcIDom is emerging in Colombia and this genotype is still adapting to the domestic cycle of transmission. The epidemiological and clinical implications of these findings are discussed herein.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  5. Experimental infections in Venezuelan lizards by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Urdaneta-Morales, S; McLure, I

    1981-06-01

    Virulent trypomastigotes of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi were administered to Tropidurus hispidus, Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus lemniscatus, Polychrus marmoratus, and Phyllodactylus ventralis (Sauria). Intraperitoneal and subcutaneous inoculations of lizards with mouse blood or with feces of infected Rhodnius prolixus (Reduviidae, Triatominae), as well as forced ingestion of triturated Rhodnius, produced no parasitaemias detectable either directly or by xenodiagnosis, while control mice became parasitized. Pretreatment with the immunosuppressive drug Fluocinolone acetonide led to establishing patent infections in inoculated lizards. Cryptic infections were established by inoculation of 1 X 10(6) parasites from Davis' medium, or by 95 X 10(3) parasites from lizard tissue culture. Parasites were not seen in tissues. Mice inoculated with blood or tissue homogenates from these lizards became parasitized. Parasites from Davis' medium inoculated into the peritoneal cavity of lizards were capable, to a very low degree, of penetrating the free peritoneal macrophages and changing into amastigotes. The factors possibly responsible for the natural resistance of poikilothermic vertebrates to T. cruzi are discussed. PMID:6115559

  6. An in vivo role for Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin in antiangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Molina, María C; Ferreira, Viviana; Valck, Carolina; Aguilar, Lorena; Orellana, Juana; Rojas, Alvaro; Ramirez, Galia; Billetta, Rosario; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Lemus, David; Ferreira, Arturo

    2005-04-01

    Angiogenesis leads to neovascularization from existing blood vessels. It is associated with tumor growth and metastasis and is regulated by pro- and antiangiogenic molecules, some of them currently under clinical trials for cancer treatment. During the last few years we have cloned, sequenced and expressed a Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin gene (TcCRT). Its product, TcCRT, a 45 kDa protein, is more than 50% identical to human CRT (HuCRT). TcCRT, present on the surface of trypomastigotes, binds both C1q and mannan binding lectin and inhibits the classical activation pathway of human complement. Since TcCRT is highly homologous to a functional antiangiogenic fragment from HuCRT (aa 120-180), recombinant (r) and native (n) TcCRT were tested in their antiangiogenic effects, in the chick embryonic chorioallantoid membrane (CAM) assay. Both proteins mediated highly significant antiangiogenic effects in the in vivo CAM assay. This effect was further substantiated in experiments showing that the plasmid construct pSecTag/TcCRT also displayed significant antiangiogenic properties, as compared to the empty vector. Most likely, the fact that antiangiogenic substances act preferentially on growing neoplasic tissues, but not on already established tumors, is due to their effects on emerging blood vessels. The results shown here indicate that TcCRT, like its human counterpart, has antiangiogenic properties. These properties may explain, at least partly, the reported antineoplasic effect of experimental T. cruzi infection.

  7. Characterization of inositolphospholipids in Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote forms.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, M L; Couto, A S; Colli, W; de Lederkremer, R M

    1996-05-20

    In vivo labeling experiments with [3H]palmitic acid, [3H]inositol, and [3H]glucose allowed the identification of two main classes of inositolphospholipids (IPLs) from the trypomastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi. Purification of these compounds was achieved by ion-exchange chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and thin layer chromatography. Specific phosphatidyl-inositol phospholipase C digestion, dephosphorylation and acid methanolysis showed a ceramide structure for the lower migrating IPL1. Palmitoyldihydrosphingosine and palmitoylsphingosine were detected by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography. On the other hand, IPL2 showed to be a mixture of diacylglycero- and alkylacylglycero-phospholipids in a 1:1 ratio. After PI-PLC digestion, the lipids were separated by preparative TLC and individually analysed. The diacylglycerol contained mainly C18:0 fatty acid together with a low amount of C16:0. Hexadecylglycerol esterified with the C18:0 fatty acid was the only alkylacylglycerol detected. The C18:2 and C18:1 fatty acids, preponderant in the PI molecules of epimastigote forms, were not detected in trypomastigote forms. This is the first report on inositol phospholipids, putative precursors of lipid anchors in the infective stage of T. cruzi. PMID:8679689

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi: adaptation to its vectors and its hosts

    PubMed Central

    Noireau, François; Diosque, Patricio; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis is a parasitic zoonosis that occurs throughout Latin America. The etiological agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, is able to infect almost all tissues of its mammalian hosts and spreads in the environment in multifarious transmission cycles that may or not be connected. This biological plasticity, which is probably the result of the considerable heterogeneity of the taxon, exemplifies a successful adaptation of a parasite resulting in distinct outcomes of infection and a complex epidemiological pattern. In the 1990s, most endemic countries strengthened national control programs to interrupt the transmission of this parasite to humans. However, many obstacles remain to the effective control of the disease. Current knowledge of the different components involved in elaborate system that is American trypanosomiasis (the protozoan parasite T. cruzi, vectors Triatominae and the many reservoirs of infection), as well as the interactions existing within the system, is still incomplete. The Triatominae probably evolve from predatory reduvids in response to the availability of vertebrate food source. However, the basic mechanisms of adaptation of some of them to artificial ecotopes remain poorly understood. Nevertheless, these adaptations seem to be associated with a behavioral plasticity, a reduction in the genetic repertoire and increasing developmental instability. PMID:19250627

  9. Retrospective distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    León, Cielo M; Hernández, Carolina; Montilla, Marleny; Ramírez, Juan David

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately eight million people in the Americas. This parasite exhibits genetic variability, with at least six discrete typing units broadly distributed in the American continent. T. cruzi I (TcI) shows remarkable genetic diversity; a genotype linked to human infections and a domestic cycle of transmission have recently been identified, hence, this strain was named TcIDom. The aim of this work was to describe the spatiotemporal distribution of TcI subpopulations across humans, insect vectors and mammalian reservoirs in Colombia by means of molecular typing targeting the spliced leader intergenic region of mini-exon gene. We analysed 101 TcI isolates and observed a distribution of sylvatic TcI in 70% and TcIDom in 30%. In humans, the ratio was sylvatic TcI in 60% and TcIDom in 40%. In mammal reservoirs, the distribution corresponded to sylvatic TcI in 96% and TcIDom in 4%. Among insect vectors, sylvatic TcI was observed in 48% and TcIDom in 52%. In conclusion, the circulation of TcIDom is emerging in Colombia and this genotype is still adapting to the domestic cycle of transmission. The epidemiological and clinical implications of these findings are discussed herein. PMID:25946157

  10. Restricted genetic diversity in the ubiquitous cattle parasite, Sarcocystis cruzi.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dunams, Detiger B; Pritt, Bobbi

    2008-09-01

    Although parasites of the genus Sarcocystis have likely cycled between bovine herbivores and canine carnivores for tens of millions of years, humans may have profoundly influenced the ecology and evolution of those prevalent in domesticated dogs and cattle. To preliminarily assess the possibility of such anthropogenic effects, we surveyed genetic variation in conserved (18S small subunit) and variable (ITS-1) portions of ribosomal DNA from a large sample of Sarcocystis cruzi occurring in taurine beef cattle raised in the United States and Uruguay, and compared these data to available homologues, including those reported from zebu cattle, water buffalo, and bison. For additional context, we compared the apparent diversity of cattle parasites to that reported from congeneric parasites in other hosts. We find that the S. cruzi of taurine cattle, whether derived from the Americas or Asia, are devoid of variability in the sequenced portion (80%) of the small subunit rDNA. By contrast, geographically limited samples of related parasites in other hosts, including those of wildlife, are more variable. At the adjacent ITS-1 locus, allelic distribution patterns did not indicate any regional barriers to gene flow, suggesting that the parasite may have been introduced to the Americas via a common source such as domesticated dogs or cattle. Thus, human impact on this parasite's distribution and diversification would seem to have been great.

  11. Immunity and immune modulation in Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cardillo, Fabíola; de Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Antas, Paulo Renato Zuquim; Mengel, José

    2015-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite reaches the secondary lymphoid organs, the heart, skeletal muscles, neurons in the intestine and esophagus among other tissues. The disease is characterized by mega syndromes, which may affect the esophagus, the colon and the heart, in about 30% of infected people. The clinical manifestations associated with T. cruzi infection during the chronic phase of the disease are dependent on complex interactions between the parasite and the host tissues, particularly the lymphoid system that may either result in a balanced relationship with no disease or in an unbalanced relationship that follows an inflammatory response to parasite antigens and associated tissues in some of the host organs and/or by an autoimmune response to host antigens. This review discusses the findings that support the notion of an integrated immune response, considering the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system in the control of parasite numbers and also the mechanisms proposed to regulate the immune response in order to tolerate the remaining parasite load, during the chronic phase of infection. This knowledge is fundamental to the understanding of the disease progression and is essential for the development of novel therapies and vaccine strategies.

  12. Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi isolates: in vitro susceptibility of epimastigotes to anti-trypanosoma cruzi drugs and metacyclic forms to complement-mediated lysis.

    PubMed

    León-Pérez, Floribeth; Gómez-Garcia, Lorena; Alejandre-Aguilar, R; López, R; Monteón, V M

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a clonal organization with an ample array of genetic and phenotypic features and probably anaploid constitution. Consequently, the biological behavior, biochemistry, and molecular attributes may be distinctive for each parasite strain in different geographical regions. As far as we know, there is no published information on the susceptibility of Mexican T. cruzi stocks to anti-T. cruzi drugs such as benznidazole and gentian violet, or on its resistance to complement-mediated lysis. We studied 10 Mexican T. cruzi isolates from different geographical areas, such as the pacific coast (Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Nayarit States), central part of Mexico (Guanajuato State), Gulf of Mexico (Veracruz State), and the Yucatan Peninsula (Campeche State). We searched for the natural resistance to drugs in in vitro assay against the 10 Mexican isolates using epimastigote forms and the complement-mediated lysis using metacyclic trypomastigotes insect-derived in three of them (one for each geographic region). In general, we observed high resistance to benznidazole in all the Mexican isolates tested, but in the complement-mediated lysis test, they showed moderate to high susceptibility. Although it is necessary to expand this study by using trypomastigotes and the intracellular form to verify its biological role, we suggest that Mexican T. cruzi parasites may have a variable susceptibility to antibody-mediated lysis and high resistance to benznidazole.

  13. Regional variation in the correlation of antibody and T-cell responses to Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diana L; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z; Bern, Caryn

    2014-06-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi parasites fight for control of the JAK-STAT pathway by disarming their host

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Philipp; Schwarz, Ralph T; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The zoonotic Chagas’ disease is caused by infections with the hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) which is endemic in Latin America. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, the underlying molecular processes involved in host-parasite interactions are only poorly understood. In particular, the mechanisms for parasite persistence in host cells remain largely unknown. Cytokine-driven transcription factors from the family of STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins appear to play a central role in the fight against T. cruzi infection. However, amastigotes proliferating in the cytoplasm of infected host cells develop effective strategies to circumvent the attack executed by STAT proteins. This review highlights the interactions between T. cruzi parasites and human host cells in terms of cytokine signaling and, in particular, discusses the impact of STATs on the balance between parasite invasion and clearance. PMID:26413423

  15. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in stray and pet dogs in Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Chikweto, A; Kumthekar, S; Chawla, P; Tiwari, K P; Perea, L M; Paterson, T; Sharma, R N

    2014-06-01

    American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic to parts of South America and the Caribbean. Infected dogs are important in the epidemiology of the parasite as they can play a role in the transmission of the parasite to humans. A total of 399 dog sera (242 stray and 157 pet dogs) were examined for T. cruzi infection; using a qualitative immunochromatographic dipstick test, based on recombinant antigens specific for American trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma detect rapid test; InBios international, Inc., Seattle, Washington). Overall seroprevalence for T. cruzi was estimated at 10.5% (95% confidence interval: 7.5% to 13.5%); with stray dogs being significantly more affected (p<0.05, χ2). Results from this study indicate that dogs in Grenada are moderately exposed to T. cruzi compared to other areas in the region.

  16. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Marcia Cristina; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; de Souza, Cíntia Fernandes; Nogueira, Natália Pereira de Almeida; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology. PMID:22007287

  17. Structures of prostaglandin F synthase from the protozoa Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with NADP

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Spencer O.; Fairman, James W.; Barnes, Steve R.; Sullivan, Amy; Nakazawa-Hewitt, Stephen; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Staker, Bart L.; Lorimer, Donald D.; Myler, Peter J.; Edwards, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of prostaglandin F synthase (PGF) from both Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with and without their cofactor NADP have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 Å for T. cruzi PGF, 1.25 Å for T. cruzi PGF with NADP, 1.6 Å for L. major PGF and 1.8 Å for L. major PGF with NADP. These structures were determined by molecular replacement to a final R factor of less than 18.6% (R free of less than 22.9%). PGF in the infectious protozoa L. major and T. cruzi is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25945716

  18. Role of host lysosomal associated membrane protein (LAMP) in Trypanosoma cruzi invasion and intracellular development

    PubMed Central

    Albertti, L.A.G.; Macedo, A.M.; Chiari, E.; Andrews, N.W.; Andrade, L.O.

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi host cell entry depends on lysosomes for the formation of the parasitophorous vacuole. Lysosome internal surface is covered by two major proteins, highly sialilated, Lysosome Associated Membrane Proteins 1 and 2. T. cruzi, on the other hand, needs to acquire sialic acid from its host cell through the activity of trans-sialidase, an event that contributes to host cell invasion and later for parasite vacuole escape. Using LAMP1/2 knock out cells we were able to show that these two proteins are important for T. cruzi infection of host cells, both in entrance and intracellular development, conceivably by being the major source of sialic acid for T. cruzi. PMID:20561595

  19. CC-chemokine receptors: a potential therapeutic target for Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Marino, A P M P; Silva, A A; Santos, P V A; Pinto, L M O; Gazinelli, R T; Teixeira, M M; Lannes-Vieira, J

    2005-03-01

    The comprehension of the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis is crucial to delineate new therapeutic strategies aiming to ameliorate the inflammation that leads to heart dysfunction, without hampering parasite control. The augmented expression of CCL5/RANTES and CCL3/MIP-1alpha, and their receptor CCR5, in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice suggests a role for CC-chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of T. cruzi-elicited myocarditis. Herein, we discuss our recent results using a CC-chemokine receptor inhibitor (Met-RANTES), showing the participation of CC-chemokines in T. cruzi infection and unraveling CC-chemokine receptors as an attractive therapeutic target for further evaluation in Chagas disease.

  20. Heterologous expression of a plant arginine decarboxylase gene in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Carolina; Serra, María P; Pereira, Claudio A; Huber, Alejandra; González, Nélida S; Algranati, Israel D

    2004-11-01

    Wild-type Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes lack arginine decarboxylase (ADC) enzymatic activity. However, the transformation of these parasites with a recombinant plasmid containing the oat ADC cDNA coding region gave rise to the transient heterologous expression of the enzyme, suggesting the absence of endogenous mechanisms that could inhibit the expression of a hypothetical own ADC gene or the assay used to measure its enzymatic activity. The foreign ADC enzyme expressed in the transgenic T. cruzi was characterized by identification of the products, the stoichiometry of the catalysed reaction, the specific inhibition by alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) and the study of its metabolic turnover. The half-life of the heterologous ADC activity in T. cruzi was about 150 min. Bioinformatics studies and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses seem to indicate the absence of ADC-like DNA sequences in the wild-type T. cruzi genome.

  1. Regional Variation in the Correlation of Antibody and T-Cell Responses to Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Diana L.; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H.; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z.; Bern, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses. PMID:24710614

  2. Familial Analysis of Seropositivity to Trypanosoma cruzi and of Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Grecco, Roseane L.; Balarin, Marly A. S.; Correia, Dalmo; Prata, Aluízio; Rodrigues, Virmondes

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in Água Comprida, MG, Brazil, a region previously endemic to Chagas disease whose vectorial transmission was interrupted around 20 year ago. A total of 998 individuals were examined for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Seropositivity was observed in 255 subjects (25.5%), and 743 subjects were negative. Forty-one families with 5–80 individuals with similar environmental conditions were selected for familial analysis. In 15 families, seropositivity to T. cruzi was observed in > 50% of individuals. The segregation analysis confirmed family aggregation for the seropositivity to the T. cruzi. Heart commitment was the major clinical form observed, and in six families, > 50% of the individuals display cardiopathy that may be attributed to T. cruzi infection. Our results support the hypothesis that there is a family aggregation for the seropositivity but without the effect of one major gene. PMID:20064994

  3. Prevalence of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi among solid organ donors in Southern California: a population at risk.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Marek J; Chinchilla, Claudia; Corado, Livier; Matsuoka, Lea; Selby, Rick; Steurer, Frank; Mone, Thomas; Mendez, Robert; Aswad, Sali

    2006-02-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite that causes Chagas' disease, is endemic in parts of Mexico, South America, and Central America. Transmission of T. cruzi infection by solid organ transplantation has been reported in Latin America and recently in the United States. To determine the prevalence of T. cruzi antibodies in Southern California organ donors, 404 samples from deceased organ donors between May 2002 to April 2004 were screened using a qualitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) and confirmed with an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) available through the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Six donors were initially reactive by EIA. Three donors were repeatedly reactive after repeat testing and were sent to the CDC for confirmation. One donor (0.25%) had an IFA-confirmed reactivity to anti-T. cruzi antibodies. In areas where there is a high number of immigrants from T. cruzi endemic countries, screening for anti-T. cruzi donor antibodies may be beneficial. PMID:16477238

  4. CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Single-Gene and Gene Family Disruption in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Duo; Kurup, Samarchith P.; Yao, Phil Y.; Minning, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite of humans and animals, affecting 10 to 20 million people and innumerable animals, primarily in the Americas. Despite being the largest cause of infection-induced heart disease worldwide, even among the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) T. cruzi is considered one of the least well understood and understudied. The genetic complexity of T. cruzi as well as the limited set of efficient techniques for genome engineering contribute significantly to the relative lack of progress in and understanding of this pathogen. Here, we adapted the CRISPR-Cas9 system for the genetic engineering of T. cruzi, demonstrating rapid and efficient knockout of multiple endogenous genes, including essential genes. We observed that in the absence of a template, repair of the Cas9-induced double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in T. cruzi occurs exclusively by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) with various-sized deletions. When a template for DNA repair is provided, DSB repair by homologous recombination is achieved at an efficiency several orders of magnitude higher than that in the absence of CRISPR-Cas9-induced DSBs. We also demonstrate the high multiplexing capacity of CRISPR-Cas9 in T. cruzi by knocking down expression of an enzyme gene family consisting of 65 members, resulting in a significant reduction of enzymatic product with no apparent off-target mutations. Lastly, we show that Cas9 can mediate disruption of its own coding sequence, rescuing a growth defect in stable Cas9-expressing parasites. These results establish a powerful new tool for the analysis of gene functions in T. cruzi, enabling the study of essential genes and their functions and analysis of the many large families of related genes that occupy a substantial portion of the T. cruzi genome. PMID:25550322

  5. Functional characterization of enzymes involved in cysteine biosynthesis and H(2)S production in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Daniela; Santana, Marianela; Nowicki, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is expected to synthetize de novo cysteine by different routes, among which the two-step pathway involving serine acetyltransferase and cysteine synthase (CS) is comprised. Also, cystathionine β synthase (CBS) might contribute to the de novo generation of cysteine in addition to catalyze the first step of the reverse transsulfuration route producing cystathionine. However, neither the functionality of CS nor that of cystathionine γ lyase (CGL) has been assessed. Our results show that T. cruzi CS could participate notably more actively than CBS in the de novo synthesis of cysteine. Interestingly, at the protein level T. cruzi CS is more abundant in amastigotes than in epimastigotes. Unlike the mammalian homologues, T. cruzi CGL specifically cleaves cystathionine into cysteine and is unable to produce H(2)S. The expression pattern of T. cruzi CGL parallels that of CBS, which unexpectedly suggests that in addition to the de novo synthesis of cysteine, the reverse transsulfuration pathway could be operative in the mammalian and insect stages. Besides, T. cruzi CBS produces H(2)S by decomposing cysteine or via condensation of cysteine with homocysteine. The latter reaction leads to cystathionine production, and is catalyzed remarkably more efficiently than the breakdown of cysteine. In T. cruzi like in other organisms, H(2)S could exert regulatory effects on varied metabolic processes. Notably, T. cruzi seems to count on stage-specific routes involved in cysteine production, the multiple cysteine-processing alternatives could presumably reflect this parasite's high needs of reducing power for detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Risk Factors and Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Dutch Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Slot, Ed; Hogema, Boris M.; Molier, Michel; Bart, Aldert; Zaaijer, Hans L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood donors unaware of Trypanosoma cruzi infection may donate infectious blood. Risk factors and the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in at-risk Dutch blood donors were studied to assess whether specific blood safety measures are warranted in the Netherlands. Methodology Birth in a country endemic for Chagas disease (CEC), having a mother born in a CEC, or having resided for at least six continuous months in a CEC were considered risk factors for T. cruzi infection. From March through September 2013, risk factor questions were asked to all donors who volunteered to donate blood or blood components. Serum samples were collected from donors reporting one or more risk factors, and screened for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi by EIA. Results Risk factors for T. cruzi infection were reported by 1,426 of 227,278 donors (0.6%). Testing 1,333 at-risk donors, none (0.0%; 95%, CI 0.0–0.4%) was seroreactive for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi. A total of 472 donors were born in a CEC; 553 donors reported their mother being born in a CEC; and 1,121 donors reported a long-term stay in a CEC. The vast majority of reported risk factors were related to Suriname and Brazil. Overall, the participants resided for 7,694 years in CECs, which equals 2.8 million overnight stays. Of those, 1.9 million nights were spent in Suriname. Conclusions/Significance Asymptomatic T. cruzi infection appears to be extremely rare among Dutch blood donors. Blood safety interventions to mitigate the risk of T. cruzi transmission by transfusion would be highly cost-ineffective in the Netherlands, and are thus not required. PMID:26950434

  7. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  8. The trans-sialidase, the major Trypanosoma cruzi virulence factor: Three decades of studies.

    PubMed

    Freire-de-Lima, L; Fonseca, L M; Oeltmann, T; Mendonça-Previato, L; Previato, J O

    2015-11-01

    Chagas' disease is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the description of Chagas'disease in 1909 extensive research has identified important events in the disease in order to understand the biochemical mechanism that modulates T. cruzi-host cell interactions and the ability of the parasite to ensure its survival in the infected host. Exactly 30 years ago, we presented evidence for the first time of a trans-sialidase activity in T. cruzi (T. cruzi-TS). This enzyme transfers sialic acid from the host glycoconjugates to the terminal β-galactopyranosyl residues of mucin-like molecules on the parasite's cell surface. Thenceforth, many articles have provided convincing data showing that T. cruzi-TS is able to govern relevant mechanisms involved in the parasite's survival in the mammalian host, such as invasion, escape from the phagolysosomal vacuole, differentiation, down-modulation of host immune responses, among others. The aim of this review is to cover the history of the discovery of T. cruzi-TS, as well as some well-documented biological effects encompassed by this parasite's virulence factor, an enzyme with potential attributes to become a drug target against Chagas disease. PMID:26224786

  9. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxigenase (IDO) is critical for host resistance against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Knubel, Carolina Paola; Martínez, Fernando Fabián; Fretes, Ricardo E; Díaz Lujan, Cintia; Theumer, Martín Gustavo; Cervi, Laura; Motrán, Claudia Cristina

    2010-08-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an inflammatory cytokine-inducible rate-limiting enzyme of the tryptophan (Trp) catabolism, which is involved in the inhibition of intracellular pathogen replication as well as in immunomodulation. Here we demonstrated the effect of IDO-dependent Trp catabolism on Trypanosoma cruzi resistance to acute infection. Infection with T. cruzi resulted in the systemic activation of IDO. The blocking of IDO activity in vivo impaired resistance to the infection and exacerbated the parasite load and infection-associated pathology. In addition, IDO activity was critical to controlling the parasite's replication in macrophages (Mos), despite the high production of nitric oxide produced by IDO-blocked T. cruzi-infected Mos. Analysis of the mechanisms by which IDO controls the parasite replication revealed that T. cruzi amastigotes were sensitive to L-kynurenine downstream metabolites 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, while 3-HK also affected the trypomastigote stage. Finally, 3-HK treatment of mice acutely infected with T. cruzi was able to control the parasite and to improve the survival of lethally infected mice. During infection, IDO played a critical role in host defense against T. cruzi; therefore, the intervention of IDO pathway could be useful as a novel antitrypanosomatid therapeutic strategy.

  10. Studying nanotoxic effects of CdTe quantum dots in Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, C. V.; Almeida, D. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Menna-Barreto, R. F. S.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Cesar, C. L.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.

    2010-02-01

    Many studies have been done in order to verify the possible nanotoxicity of quantum dots in some cellular types. Protozoan pathogens as Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas1 disease is transmitted to humans either by blood-sucking triatomine vectors, blood transfusion, organs transplantation or congenital transmission. The study of the life cycle, biochemical, genetics, morphology and others aspects of the T. cruzi is very important to better understand the interactions with its hosts and the disease evolution on humans. Quantum dot, nanocrystals, highly luminescent has been used as tool for experiments in in vitro and in vivo T. cruzi life cycle development in real time. We are now investigating the quantum dots toxicity on T. cruzi parasite cells using analytical methods. In vitro experiments were been done in order to test the interference of this nanoparticle on parasite development, morphology and viability (live-death). Ours previous results demonstrated that 72 hours after parasite incubation with 200 μM of CdTe altered the development of T. cruzi and induced cell death by necrosis in a rate of 34%. QDs labeling did not effect: (i) on parasite integrity, at least until 7 days; (ii) parasite cell dividing and (iii) parasite motility at a concentration of 2 μM CdTe. This fact confirms the low level of cytotoxicity of these QDs on this parasite cell. In summary our results is showing T. cruzi QDs labeling could be used for in vivo cellular studies in Chagas disease.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi elongation factor 1-alpha: nuclear localization in parasites undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Billaut-Mulot, O; Fernandez-Gomez, R; Loyens, M; Ouaissi, A

    1996-09-26

    The cloning and sequencing of the gene coding for Trypanosoma cruzi elongation factor 1 alpha (TcEF-1 alpha) was performed by screening a T. cruzi genomic library with a probe obtained through the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of T. cruzi DNA using two oligonucleotides deduced from the sequence of T. brucei EF-1 alpha. Southern blot analysis of T. cruzi digested genomic DNA and Northern blot hybridized with the labeled probe revealed that one copy of TcEF-1 alpha exist in the genome of the parasite. Indirect immunofluorescence technique using anti-EF-1 alpha antibodies and epimastigotes harvested after different days of in vitro culture showed that EF-1 alpha is localised in the cytoplasm of the parasites from the exponential growth phase. Surprisingly, during the stationary phase (ageing parasites), EF-1 alpha was found in the nucleus. Furthermore, treatment of parasites with the antibiotic drug geneticin (G418) which induces the death of epimastigotes by apoptosis showed selective localization of EF-1 alpha in the nucleus of dying parasites. This observation supports the notion already reported in the case of mammalian cells that EF-1 alpha could participate in the transcription processes and possibly in the case of T. cruzi, in the expression regulation of genes involved in the control of cell death. The possible transfection and genomic manipulation of T. cruzi may provide a model to study the role of TcEF-1 alpha in this phenomenon. PMID:8863724

  12. Temporal variation in Trypanosoma cruzi lineages from the native rodent Octodon degus in semiarid Chile.

    PubMed

    Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Rojo, Gemma; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Alejandra; Peña, Fabiola; Ortiz, Sylvia; Solari, Aldo

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by triatomine insects to several mammalian species acting as reservoir hosts. In the present study, we assess T. cruzi-prevalence and DTU composition of the endemic rodent Octodon degus from a hyper-endemic area of Chagas disease in Chile. Parasite detection is performed by PCR assays on blood samples of individuals captured in the austral summers of 2010-2013. The infection level in rodents differed in the summers of these four years between 18% and 70%. Overall, infected O. degus showed similar T. cruzi-DTU composition (TcI, TcII, TcV and TcVI lineages) among years, corresponding to single and mixed infection, but the relative importance of each DTU changed among years. In 2013, we detected that only three out of the four T. cruzi-DTU found in O. degus were present in the endemic triatomine Mepria spinolai. We suggest that O. degus, an abundant long-lived rodent, is an important native reservoir of T. cruzi in the wild transmission cycle of Chagas disease and it is able to maintain all the T. cruzi-DTUs described in semiarid Chile.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses. PMID:27174360

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses.

  15. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  16. Proteomic analysis of two Trypanosoma cruzi zymodeme 3 strains.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Simone A; Sodré, Cátia L; Kalume, Dário E; Elias, Camila G R; Santos, André L S; de Nazaré Soeiro, Maria; Meuser, Marcus; Chapeaurouge, Alex; Perales, Jonas; Fernandes, Octavio

    2010-12-01

    Two Trypanosoma cruzi Z3 strains, designated as 3663 and 4167, were previously isolated from insect vectors captured in the Brazilian Amazon region. These strains exhibited different infection patterns in Vero, C6/36, RAW 264.7 and HEp-2 cell lineages, in which 3663 trypomastigote form was much less infective than 4167 ones. A proteomic approach was applied to investigate the differences in the global patterns of protein expression in these two Z3 strains. Two-dimensional (2D) protein maps were generated and certain spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Our analyses revealed a significant difference in the expression profile of different proteins between strains 3663 and 4167. Among them, cruzipain, an important regulator of infectivity. This data was corroborated by flow cytometry analysis using anti-cruzipain antibody. This difference could contribute to the infectivity profiles observed for each strain by in vitro assay using different cell lines.

  17. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Andrés B.; Carlevaro, Giannina; Araoz, Beatriz; Ruiz Diaz, Pablo; Camara, María de los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A.; Bossi, Mariano; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Mucci, Juan; Campetella, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS) are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3)Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully soluble form. PMID

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi Induces Regulatory Dendritic Cells In Vitro▿

    PubMed Central

    Poncini, Carolina Verónica; Soto, Catalina Dirney Alba; Batalla, Estela; Solana, Maria Elisa; González Cappa, Stella Maris

    2008-01-01

    A main feature of acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is the presence of immunological disorders. A previous study demonstrated that acute infection with the virulent RA strain downregulates the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) on antigen-presenting cells and impairs the T-cell stimulatory capacity of splenic dendritic cells (DC). In the present work, we assessed the ability of trypomastigotes (Tp) to modulate the differentiation stage and functionality of bone marrow-derived DC in vitro. We observed that the Tp stage of T. cruzi failed to activate DC, which preserved their low expression of MHC-II and costimulatory molecules, as well as their endocytic activity. We also show that Tp induced transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion by DC and enhanced the gap between interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12p70 production, showing a higher IL-10/IL-12p70 ratio upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. In addition, we observed that Tp prevented DC full activation induced by LPS, thereby downregulating their MHC-II surface expression and inhibiting their capacity to stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. In vitro IL-10 neutralization during the differentiation process of DC with Tp+LPS showed a reversion of their inhibitory effect during mixed lymphocyte reaction. In contrast, only simultaneous neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-β, after DC differentiation, was involved in the partial restitution of lymphocyte proliferation. Since both TGF-β and IL-10 are immunosuppressive cytokines essential in the modulation of the immune response and important in the induction of tolerance, our results suggest for the first time that Tp are responsible for the generation of regulatory DC in vitro. PMID:18347042

  19. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Andrés B; Carlevaro, Giannina; Araoz, Beatriz; Ruiz Diaz, Pablo; Camara, María de Los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A; Bossi, Mariano; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Mucci, Juan; Campetella, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS) are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3)Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully soluble form. PMID

  20. Identification of contractile vacuole proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Paul N; Jimenez, Veronica; Park, Miyoung; Martins, Vicente P; Atwood, James; Moles, Kristen; Collins, Dalis; Rohloff, Peter; Tarleton, Rick; Moreno, Silvia N J; Orlando, Ron; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-03-18

    Contractile vacuole complexes are critical components of cell volume regulation and have been shown to have other functional roles in several free-living protists. However, very little is known about the functions of the contractile vacuole complex of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, other than a role in osmoregulation. Identification of the protein composition of these organelles is important for understanding their physiological roles. We applied a combined proteomic and bioinfomatic approach to identify proteins localized to the contractile vacuole. Proteomic analysis of a T. cruzi fraction enriched for contractile vacuoles and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS resulted in the addition of 109 newly detected proteins to the group of expressed proteins of epimastigotes. We also identified different peptides that map to at least 39 members of the dispersed gene family 1 (DGF-1) providing evidence that many members of this family are simultaneously expressed in epimastigotes. Of the proteins present in the fraction we selected several homologues with known localizations in contractile vacuoles of other organisms and others that we expected to be present in these vacuoles on the basis of their potential roles. We determined the localization of each by expression as GFP-fusion proteins or with specific antibodies. Six of these putative proteins (Rab11, Rab32, AP180, ATPase subunit B, VAMP1, and phosphate transporter) predominantly localized to the vacuole bladder. TcSNARE2.1, TcSNARE2.2, and calmodulin localized to the spongiome. Calmodulin was also cytosolic. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining subcellular fractionation, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatic approaches for localization of organellar proteins that are difficult to detect with whole cell methodologies. The CV localization of the proteins investigated revealed potential novel roles of these organelles in phosphate metabolism

  1. Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages by Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Guadalupe; Celentano, Ana M.; Solana, María E.; Cazorla, Silvia I.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Martínez Peralta, Liliana A.; Dolcini, Guillermina L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the major targets of HIV-1 infection and serve as reservoirs for viral persistence in vivo. These cells are also the target of the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, being one of the most important endemic protozoonoses in Latin America. It has been demonstrated in vitro that co-infection with other pathogens can modulate HIV replication. However, no studies at cellular level have suggested an interaction between T. cruzi and HIV-1 to date. Methodology/Principal Findings By using a fully replicative wild-type virus, our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 antigen production by nearly 100% (p<0.001) in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). In different infection schemes with luciferase-reporter VSV-G or BaL pseudotyped HIV-1 and trypomastigotes, T. cruzi induced a significant reduction of luciferase level for both pseudotypes in all the infection schemes (p<0.001), T. cruzi-HIV (>99%) being stronger than HIV-T. cruzi (∼90% for BaL and ∼85% for VSV-G) infection. In MDM with established HIV-1 infection, T. cruzi significantly inhibited luciferate activity (p<0.01). By quantifying R-U5 and U5-gag transcripts by real time PCR, our study showed the expression of both transcripts significantly diminished in the presence of trypomastigotes (p<0.05). Thus, T. cruzi inhibits viral post-integration steps, early post-entry steps and entry into MDM. Trypomastigotes also caused a ∼60-70% decrease of surface CCR5 expression on MDM. Multiplication of T. cruzi inside the MDM does not seem to be required for inhibiting HIV-1 replication since soluble factors secreted by trypomastigotes have shown similar effects. Moreover, the major parasite antigen cruzipain, which is secreted by the trypomastigote form, was able to inhibit viral production in MDM over 90% (p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 replication at several replication stages in

  2. Machine Learning Models and Pathway Genome Data Base for Trypanosoma cruzi Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Laura-Isobel; Sarker, Malabika; Yadav, Maneesh; Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Kallel, E. Adam; Kellar, Danielle; Chen, Steven; Arkin, Michelle; Bunin, Barry A.; McKerrow, James H.; Talcott, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused by the eukaryotic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The current clinical and preclinical pipeline for T. cruzi is extremely sparse and lacks drug target diversity. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we developed a computational approach that utilized data from several public whole-cell, phenotypic high throughput screens that have been completed for T. cruzi by the Broad Institute, including a single screen of over 300,000 molecules in the search for chemical probes as part of the NIH Molecular Libraries program. We have also compiled and curated relevant biological and chemical compound screening data including (i) compounds and biological activity data from the literature, (ii) high throughput screening datasets, and (iii) predicted metabolites of T. cruzi metabolic pathways. This information was used to help us identify compounds and their potential targets. We have constructed a Pathway Genome Data Base for T. cruzi. In addition, we have developed Bayesian machine learning models that were used to virtually screen libraries of compounds. Ninety-seven compounds were selected for in vitro testing, and 11 of these were found to have EC50 < 10μM. We progressed five compounds to an in vivo mouse efficacy model of Chagas disease and validated that the machine learning model could identify in vitro active compounds not in the training set, as well as known positive controls. The antimalarial pyronaridine possessed 85.2% efficacy in the acute Chagas mouse model. We have also proposed potential targets (for future verification) for this compound based on structural similarity to known compounds with targets in T. cruzi. Conclusions/ Significance We have demonstrated how combining chemoinformatics and bioinformatics for T. cruzi drug discovery can bring interesting in vivo active molecules to light that may have been overlooked. The approach we have taken is broadly applicable to other

  3. How Trypanosoma cruzi deals with oxidative stress: Antioxidant defence and DNA repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Machado-Silva, Alice; Cerqueira, Paula Gonçalves; Grazielle-Silva, Viviane; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Peloso, Eduardo de Figueiredo; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is an obligatory intracellular parasite with a digenetic life cycle. Due to the variety of host environments, it faces several sources of oxidative stress. In addition to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by its own metabolism, T. cruzi must deal with high ROS levels generated as part of the host's immune responses. Hence, the conclusion that T. cruzi has limited ability to deal with ROS (based on the lack of a few enzymes involved with oxidative stress responses) seems somewhat paradoxical. Actually, to withstand such variable sources of oxidative stress, T. cruzi has developed complex defence mechanisms. This includes ROS detoxification pathways that are distinct from the ones in the mammalian host, DNA repair pathways and specialized polymerases, which not only protect its genome from the resulting oxidative damage but also contribute to the generation of genetic diversity within the parasite population. Recent studies on T. cruzi's DNA repair pathways as mismatch repair (MMR) and GO system suggested that, besides a role associated with DNA repair, some proteins of these pathways may also be involved in signalling oxidative damage. Recent data also suggested that an oxidative environment might be beneficial for parasite survival within the host cell as it contributes to iron mobilization from the host's intracellular storages. Besides contributing to the understanding of basic aspects of T. cruzi biology, these studies are highly relevant since oxidative stress pathways are part of the poorly understood mechanisms behind the mode of action of drugs currently used against this parasite. By unveiling new peculiar aspects of T. cruzi biology, emerging data on DNA repair pathways and other antioxidant defences from this parasite have revealed potential new targets for a much needed boost in drug development efforts towards a better treatment for Chagas disease. PMID:27036062

  4. Development of a Novel Multiplex Immunoassay Multi-cruzi for the Serological Confirmation of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Granjon, Elodie; Dichtel-Danjoy, Marie-Laure; Saba, Esber; Sabino, Ester; Campos de Oliveira, Lea; Zrein, Maan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is due to the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, a protist disseminated by a Triatome vector. This disease is endemic to Latin America and considered by WHO as one of the 17 world’s neglected diseases. In Europe and in North America, imported cases are also detected, due to migration of population outside of the endemic region. Diagnosis of T. cruzi infection is usually made indirectly by the detection of specific antibodies to T. cruzi antigens. Following initial diagnostic evaluation or screening test (qualifying or discarding blood donation), a confirmation test is performed for samples initially reactive. The test presented in this study aims at the confirmation/refutation of the infectious status of human blood samples and will permit taking appropriate clinical measures. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a novel array of twelve antigens and printed these antigens onto 96-well plates. We tested 248 positive samples T. cruzi, 94 unscreened blood donors’ samples from non-endemic area, 49 seronegative blood donors, 7 false-positive and 3 doubtful samples. The observed reactivities were analyzed to propose a decision-tree algorithm that correctly classifies all the samples, with the potential to discriminate false-positive results and sticky samples. We observed that antibodies levels (Sum of all antigens) was significantly higher for PCR positive than for PCR negative samples in all studied groups with Multi-cruzi. Conclusion/Significance The results described in this study indicate that the Multi-cruzi improves the serological confirmation of Chagas disease. Moreover the “sum of all antigens” detected by Multi-cruzi could reflect parasitemia level in patients–like PCR signals does—and could serve as an indicator of parasite clearance in longitudinal follow-ups. Validation of this assay is still required on an independent large collection of well characterized samples including typical false-reactive samples such as

  5. Type I Interferons Increase Host Susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection▿†

    PubMed Central

    Chessler, Anne-Danielle C.; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Da'dara, Akram; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes human Chagas' disease, induces a type I interferon (IFN) (IFN-α/β) response during acute experimental infection in mice and in isolated primary cell types. To examine the potential impact of the type I IFN response in shaping outcomes in experimental T. cruzi infection, groups of wild-type (WT) and type I IFN receptor-deficient (IFNAR−/−) 129sv/ev mice were infected with two different T. cruzi strains under lethal and sublethal conditions and several parameters were measured during the acute stage of infection. The results demonstrate that type I IFNs are not required for early host protection against T. cruzi. In contrast, under conditions of lethal T. cruzi challenge, WT mice succumbed to infection whereas IFNAR−/− mice were ultimately able to control parasite growth and survive. T. cruzi clearance in and survival of IFNAR−/− mice were accompanied by higher levels of IFN-γ production by isolated splenocytes in response to parasite antigen. The suppression of IFN-γ in splenocytes from WT mice was independent of IL-10 levels. While the impact of type I IFNs on the production of IFN-γ and other cytokines/chemokines remains to be fully determined in the context of T. cruzi infection, our data suggest that, under conditions of high parasite burden, type I IFNs negatively impact IFN-γ production, initiating a detrimental cycle that contributes to the ultimate failure to control infection. These findings are consistent with a growing theme in the microbial pathogenesis field in which type I IFNs can be detrimental to the host in a variety of nonviral pathogen infection models. PMID:21402764

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth.

  7. The adjuvant effect of jacalin on the mouse humoral immune response to trinitrophenyl and Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, D A; Martins, G A; Campos-Neto, A; Silva, J S

    1999-06-01

    We have evaluated the adjuvant action of jacalin, a lectin obtained from seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia, on humoral immune response against the trinitrophenyl (TNP) hapten when conjugated to it and to Trypanosoma cruzi. The protective effect of parasite-specific antibodies generated in mice immunized with epimastigote forms of T. cruzi plus jacalin was also evaluated by determining the parasitemia levels of animals after infection with 1000 trypomastigote forms. Immunization of mice with trinitrophenylated jacalin (TNP-JAC) in saline resulted in an antibody response to the TNP hapten that was eight and 16 times higher than that found in mice immunized with TNP-human gamma globulin (TNP-HGG) or TNP-bovine serum albumin (TNP-BSA), respectively. In addition, immunization with either a lysate or viable epimastigote forms of T. cruzi in the presence of jacalin resulted in a marked increase in the levels of anti-T. cruzi antibodies. The protective action of antibodies against acute infection by T. cruzi was evident when mice were immunized with 1.0 x 10(5) epimastigotes plus jacalin. These animals had a significantly lower parasitemia than those immunized with epimastigotes alone. In contrast, mice immunized with 1.0 x 10(6) epimastigotes developed very low levels of parasitemia, regardless of the presence of jacalin. These data suggest that jacalin is a potent adjuvant in the humoral response to TNP and T. cruzi, and that the protective action of the T. cruzi-specific antibodies depends on the number of parasites used in the immunization protocol.

  8. Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi T. cruzi I Strains with Different Degrees of Virulence Induce Diverse Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in a Murine Experimental Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, B.; Rico, T.; Sosa, S.; Oaxaca, E.; Vizcaino-Castillo, A.; Caballero, M. L.; Martínez, I.

    2010-01-01

    It is has been shown that the majority of T. cruzi strains isolated from Mexico belong to the T. cruzi I (TCI). The immune response produced in response to Mexican T. cruzi I strains has not been well characterized. In this study, two Mexican T. cruzi I strains were used to infect Balb/c mice. The Queretaro (TBAR/MX/0000/Queretaro)(Qro) strain resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, no mortality was observed in mice infected with the Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain. Both strains produced extended lymphocyte infiltrates in cardiac tissue. Ninoa infection induced a diverse humoral response with a higher variety of immunoglobulin isotypes than were found in Qro-infected mice. Also, a stronger inflammatory TH1 response, represented by IL-12p40, IFNγ, RANTES, MIG, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 production was observed in Qro-infected mice when compared with Ninoa-infected mice. We propose that an exacerbated TH1 immune response is a likely cause of pathological damage observed in cardiac tissue and the primary cause of death in Qro-infected mice. PMID:20396398

  9. Genetic Variability and Phylogenetic Relationships within Trypanosoma cruzi I Isolated in Colombia Based on Miniexon Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Claudia; Guhl, Felipe; Falla, Alejandra; Fajardo, Anabella; Montilla, Marleny; Adolfo Vallejo, Gustavo; Bargues, M. Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies of Trypanosoma cruzi have identified the existence of two groups: T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II. There are aspects that still remain unknown about the genetic variability within the T. cruzi I group. Given its epidemiological importance, it is necessary to have a better understanding of T. cruzi transmission cycles. Our purpose was to corroborate the existence of haplotypes within the T. cruzi I group and to describe the genetic variability and phylogenetic relationships, based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the miniexon gene intergenic region, for the isolates from different hosts and epidemiological transmission cycles in Colombian regions. 31 T. cruzi isolates were molecularly characterized. Phylogenetic relationships within T. cruzi I isolates showed four haplotype groups (Ia–Id), associated with their transmission cycle. In previous studies, we reported that haplotype Ia is mainly associated with the domestic cycle and domiciliated Rhodnius prolixus. Haplotype Ib is associated with the domestic cycle and peridomestic cycle, haplotype Ic is closely related with the peridomestic cycle, and haplotype Id is strongly associated with the sylvatic cycle. The phylogenetic methodologies applied in this study are tools that bolster the associations among isolates and thus shed light on Chagas disease epidemiology. PMID:20798881

  10. Synthesis and characterization of potent inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Murugesan, Srinivasan; Senkovich, Olga; Walker, Kiera; Chenna, Bala C.; Shinkre, Bidhan; Desai, Amar; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2010-09-17

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is a potential target for developing drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have undertaken a detailed structure-activity study of this enzyme. We report here synthesis and characterization of six potent inhibitors of the parasitic enzyme. Inhibitory activity of each compound was determined against T. cruzi and human DHFR. One of these compounds, ethyl 4-(5-[(2,4-diamino-6-quinazolinyl)methyl]amino-2-methoxyphenoxy)butanoate (6b) was co-crystallized with the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase enzyme of T. cruzi and the crystal structure of the ternary enzyme:cofactor:inhibitor complex was determined. Molecular docking was used to analyze the potential interactions of all inhibitors with T. cruzi DHFR and human DHFR. Inhibitory activities of these compounds are discussed in the light of enzyme-ligand interactions. Binding affinities of each inhibitor for the respective enzymes were calculated based on the experimental or docked binding mode. An estimated 60-70% of the total binding energy is contributed by the 2,4-diaminoquinazoline scaffold.

  11. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent.

  12. Epidemiology of American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos, Carlos L.; Cajal, Silvana P.; Juarez, Marisa; Marco, Jorge D.; Alberti D'Amato, Anahí M.; Cayo, Melina; Torrejón, Irma; Cimino, Rubén O.; Diosque, Patricio; Nasser, Julio R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endemic areas of tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) in Salta, Argentina, present some overlap zones with the geographical distribution of Chagas disease, with mixed infection cases being often detected. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude of Leishmania sp. infection and potential associated risk factors, the serologic prevalence of T. cruzi, and the presence of T. cruzi-Leishmania sp. mixed infection in a region of the northwest of Argentina. Methods. Cross-sectional studies were conducted to detect TL prevalence and T. cruzi seroprevalence. A case-control study was conducted to examine leishmaniasis risk factors. Results. Prevalence of TL was 0.17%, seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection was 9.73%, and mixed infection proportion—within the leishmaniasic patients group—was 16.67%. The risk factors associated with TL transmission were sex, age, exposure to bites at work, staying outdoors more than 10 hours/day, bathing in the river, and living with people who had lesions or were infected during the study. Discussion. The endemic pattern of TL seems to involve exposure of patients to vectors in wild as well as peridomestic environment. Cases of T. cruzi infection are apparently due to migration. Therefore, a careful epidemiological surveillance is necessary due to the contraindication of antimonial administration to chagasic patients. PMID:27777950

  13. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent. PMID:27080160

  14. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  15. Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Telomere Association Correlates with Redox Status in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  16. Trans-sialidase inhibition assay detects Trypanosoma cruzi infection in different wild mammal species.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Paula A; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Orozco, Marcela M; Cardinal, Marta V; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Leguizamón, María S

    2013-08-01

    The detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mammals is crucial for understanding the eco-epidemiological role of the different species involved in parasite transmission cycles. Xenodiagnosis (XD) and hemoculture (HC) are routinely used to detect T. cruzi in wild mammals. Serological methods are much more limited because they require the use of specific antibodies to immunoglobulins of each mammalian species susceptible to T. cruzi. In this study we detected T. cruzi infection by trans-sialidase (TS) inhibition assay (TIA). TIA is based on the antibody neutralization of a recombinant TS that avoids the use of anti-immunoglobulins. TS activity is not detected in the co-endemic protozoan parasites Leishmania spp and T. rangeli. In the current study, serum samples from 158 individuals of nine wild mammalian species, previously tested by XD, were evaluated by TIA. They were collected from two endemic areas in northern Argentina. The overall TIA versus XD co-reactivity was 98.7% (156/158). All 18 samples from XD-positive mammals were TIA-positive (co-positivity, 100%) and co-negativity was 98.5% (138/140). Two XD-negative samples from a marsupial (Didelphis albiventris) and an edentate (Dasypus novemcinctus) were detected by TIA. TIA could be used as a novel tool for serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in a wide variety of sylvatic reservoir hosts. PMID:23930975

  17. Sympathetic glial cells and macrophages develop different responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Silva, Isabel Cristina Costa; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection. PMID:25075784

  18. Sympathetic glial cells and macrophages develop different responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Silva, Isabel Cristina Costa; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection.

  19. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Josefina; Barisón, María Julia; Pral, Elizabeth M. F.; Silber, Ariel M.; Cricco, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite’s replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE) with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport), which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi. PMID:26752206

  20. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake.

    PubMed

    Merli, Marcelo L; Pagura, Lucas; Hernández, Josefina; Barisón, María Julia; Pral, Elizabeth M F; Silber, Ariel M; Cricco, Julia A

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite's replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE) with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport), which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi. PMID:26752206

  1. Apoptosis differentially regulates mesenteric and subcutaneous lymph node immune responses to Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    de Meis, Juliana; Ferreira, Lidia M S; Guillermo, Landi V C; Silva, Elisabeth M; Dosreis, George A; Lopes, Marcela F

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes expansion of subcutaneous (SLN) and atrophy of mesenteric (MLN) lymph nodes. Here we show that excision of MLN increased parasitemia in T. cruzi-infected mice. We then studied how apoptosis of MLN cells affects immune responses to infection. T cell apoptosis increased in the MLN compared to SLN in T. cruzi-infected mice. Absolute numbers of naïve T cells decreased, and activated T cells failed to accumulate in MLN during infection. In addition, activated T cells from MLN produced less IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10 than T cells from SLN. Treatment with IL-4 or with caspase-9 inhibitor increased the recovery of viable T cells in vitro. Treatment with caspase-9 inhibitor also increased the production of cytokines by MLN T cells from infected mice. Moreover, injection of a pan caspase inhibitor prevented MLN atrophy during T. cruzi infection. Caspase-9, but not caspase-8, inhibitor also reduced MLN atrophy and increased the recovery of naïve and activated T cells from MLN. These findings indicate that caspase-mediated apoptosis and defective cytokine production are implicated in MLN atrophy and affect immune responses to T. cruzi infection.

  2. Identification of a functional prostanoid-like receptor in the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shankar; Sadekar, Nikaeta; Ashton, Anthony W; Huang, Huan; Spray, David C; Lisanti, Michael P; Machado, Fabiana S; Weiss, Louis M; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2013-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans and experimental animals causes Chagas disease which is often accompanied by myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, and vasculopathy. T. cruzi-derived thromboxane A2 (TXA2) modulates vasculopathy and other pathophysiological features of Chagasic cardiomyopathy. Here, we provide evidence that epimastigotes, trypomastigotes, and amastigotes of T. cruzi (Brazil and Tulahuen strains) express a biologically active prostanoid receptor (PR) that is responsive to TXA2 mimetics, e.g. IBOP. This putative receptor, TcPR, is mainly localized in the flagellar membrane of the parasites and shows a similar glycosylation pattern to that of bona fide thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptors obtained from human platelets. Furthermore, TXA2-PR signal transduction activates T. cruzi-specific MAPK pathways. While mammalian TP is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR); T. cruzi genome sequencing has not demonstrated any confirmed GPCRs in these parasites. Based on this genome sequencing it is likely that TcPR is unique in these protists with no counterpart in mammals. TXA2 is a potent vasoconstrictor which contributes to the pathogenesis of Chagasic cardiovascular disease. It may, however, also control parasite differentiation and proliferation in the infected host allowing the infection to progress to a chronic state.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi infection disturbs mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production rate in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivali; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Wen, Jian-jun; Wu, Yewen; Huang, Ming-He; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of Trypanosoma cruzi invasion and inflammatory processes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mouse atrial cardiomyocyte line (HL-1) and primary adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes were incubated with T. cruzi (Tc) trypomastigotes, Tc lysate (TcTL) or Tc secreted proteins (TcSP) for 0-72 h, and ROS measured by amplex red assay. Cardiomyocytes infected by T. cruzi (but not those incubated with TcTL or TcSP) exhibited a linear increase in ROS production during 2-48 h post-infection (max.18-fold increase) which was further enhanced by recombinant cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ). We observed no increase in NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and myeloperoxidase activities, and specific inhibitor of these enzymes did not block the increased rate of ROS production in infected cardiomyocytes. Instead, the mitochondrial membrane potential was perturbed, and resulted in inefficient electron transport chain (ETC) activity, and enhanced electron leakage and ROS formation in infected cardiomyocytes. HL-1 rho (ρ) cardiomyocytes lacked a functional ETC, and exhibited no increase in ROS formation in response to T. cruzi. Together, these results demonstrate that invasion by T. cruzi and inflammatory milieu affect mitochondrial integrity and contribute to electron transport chain inefficiency and ROS production in cardiomyocytes. PMID:19686837

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi strains from triatomine collected in Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Aline Rimoldi; Mendonça, Vagner José; Alves, Renata Tomé; Martinez, Isabel; de Araújo, Renato Freitas; Mello, Fernanda; da Rosa, João Aristeu

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Collection of triatomines in domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments in states of Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul, Northeastern and Southern Brazil respectively, and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi strains. METHODS First, the captured triatomines were identified using insect identification keys, then their intestinal content was examined by abdominal compression, and the samples containing trypanosomatid forms were inoculated in LIT medium and Swiss mice. RESULTS Six triatomine species were collected in cities in Bahia, namely Panstrongylus geniculatus (01), Triatoma melanocephala (11), T. lenti (94), T. pseudomaculata (02), T. sherlocki (26) and T. sordida (460), and two in cities in Rio Grande do Sul, namely T. circummaculata (11) and T. rubrovaria (115). Out of the specimens examined, T. cruzi was isolated from 28 triatomine divided into four different species: T. melanocephala (one), T. lenti (one), T. rubrovaria (16) and T. sordida (10). Their index of natural infection by T. cruzi was 6.4%. CONCLUSIONS The isolation of T. cruzi strains from triatomines found in domestic and peridomestic areas shows the potential risk of transmission of Chagas disease in the studied cities. The maintenance of those T. cruzi strains in laboratory is intended to promote studies that facilitate the understanding of the parasite-vector-host relationship. PMID:24897051

  5. Trans-sialidase inhibition assay detects Trypanosoma cruzi infection in different wild mammal species.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Paula A; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Orozco, Marcela M; Cardinal, Marta V; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Leguizamón, María S

    2013-08-01

    The detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mammals is crucial for understanding the eco-epidemiological role of the different species involved in parasite transmission cycles. Xenodiagnosis (XD) and hemoculture (HC) are routinely used to detect T. cruzi in wild mammals. Serological methods are much more limited because they require the use of specific antibodies to immunoglobulins of each mammalian species susceptible to T. cruzi. In this study we detected T. cruzi infection by trans-sialidase (TS) inhibition assay (TIA). TIA is based on the antibody neutralization of a recombinant TS that avoids the use of anti-immunoglobulins. TS activity is not detected in the co-endemic protozoan parasites Leishmania spp and T. rangeli. In the current study, serum samples from 158 individuals of nine wild mammalian species, previously tested by XD, were evaluated by TIA. They were collected from two endemic areas in northern Argentina. The overall TIA versus XD co-reactivity was 98.7% (156/158). All 18 samples from XD-positive mammals were TIA-positive (co-positivity, 100%) and co-negativity was 98.5% (138/140). Two XD-negative samples from a marsupial (Didelphis albiventris) and an edentate (Dasypus novemcinctus) were detected by TIA. TIA could be used as a novel tool for serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in a wide variety of sylvatic reservoir hosts.

  6. Risk factors associated with Trypanosoma cruzi exposure in domestic dogs from a rural community in Panama

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, José E; Pineda, Vanessa; Perea, Milixa; Rigg, Chystrie; González, Kadir; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Gottdenker, Nicole L; Chaves, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is a zoonosis of humans, wild and domestic mammals, including dogs. In Panama, the main T. cruzi vector is hodnius pallescens, a triatomine bug whose main natural habitat is the royal palm, Attalea butyracea. In this paper, we present results from three T. cruzi serological tests (immunochromatographic dipstick, indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA) performed in 51 dogs from 24 houses in Trinidad de Las Minas, western Panama. We found that nine dogs were seropositive (17.6% prevalence). Dogs were 1.6 times more likely to become T. cruzi seropositive with each year of age and 11.6 times if royal palms where present in the peridomiciliary area of the dog's household or its two nearest neighbours. Mouse-baited-adhesive traps were employed to evaluate 12 peridomestic royal palms. All palms were found infested with R. pallescens with an average of 25.50 triatomines captured per palm. Of 35 adult bugs analysed, 88.6% showed protozoa flagellates in their intestinal contents. In addition, dogs were five times more likely to be infected by the presence of an additional domestic animal species in the dog's peridomiciliary environment. Our results suggest that interventions focused on royal palms might reduce the exposure to T. cruzi infection. PMID:26560985

  7. Risk factors associated with Trypanosoma cruzi exposure in domestic dogs from a rural community in Panama.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, José E; Pineda, Vanessa; Perea, Milixa; Rigg, Chystrie; González, Kadir; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Gottdenker, Nicole L; Chaves, Luis F

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is a zoonosis of humans, wild and domestic mammals, including dogs. In Panama, the main T. cruzi vector is Rhodnius pallescens, a triatomine bug whose main natural habitat is the royal palm, Attalea butyracea. In this paper, we present results from three T. cruzi serological tests (immunochromatographic dipstick, indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA) performed in 51 dogs from 24 houses in Trinidad de Las Minas, western Panama. We found that nine dogs were seropositive (17.6% prevalence). Dogs were 1.6 times more likely to become T. cruzi seropositive with each year of age and 11.6 times if royal palms where present in the peridomiciliary area of the dog's household or its two nearest neighbours. Mouse-baited-adhesive traps were employed to evaluate 12 peridomestic royal palms. All palms were found infested with R. pallescens with an average of 25.50 triatomines captured per palm. Of 35 adult bugs analysed, 88.6% showed protozoa flagellates in their intestinal contents. In addition, dogs were five times more likely to be infected by the presence of an additional domestic animal species in the dog's peridomiciliary environment. Our results suggest that interventions focused on royal palms might reduce the exposure to T. cruzi infection.

  8. Mechanisms of vascular dysfunction in acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Josiane F; Capettini, Luciano S A; da Silva, José F P; Sales-Junior, Policarpo; Cruz, Jader Santos; Cortes, Steyner F; Lemos, Virginia S

    2016-07-01

    Vascular disorders have a direct link to mortality in the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. However, the underlying mechanisms of vascular dysfunction in this phase are largely unknown. We hypothesize that T. cruzi invades endothelial cells causing dysfunction in contractility and relaxation of the mouse aorta. Immunodetection of T. cruzi antigen TcRBP28 was observed in endothelial cells. There was a decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO-dependent vascular relaxation, and increased vascular contractility accompanied by augmented superoxide anions production. Endothelial removal, inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), blockade of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) TP receptors, and scavenger of superoxide normalized the contractile response. COX-2, thromboxane synthase, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), p65 NFκB subunit and p22(phox) of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX) subunit expressions were increased in vessels of chagasic animals. Serum TNF-α was augmented. Basal NO production, and nitrotyrosine residue expression were increased. It is concluded that T. cruzi invades mice aorta endothelial cells and increases TXA2/TP receptor/NOX-derived superoxide formation. Alongside, T. cruzi promotes systemic TNF-α increase, which stimulates iNOS expression in vessels and nitrosative stress. In light of the heart failure that develops in the chronic phase of the disease, to understand the mechanism involved in the increased contractility of the aorta is crucial.

  9. The multiple and complex and changeable scenarios of the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycle in the sylvatic environment.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Ana Maria; Xavier, Samanta C C; Roque, André Luiz R

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report and discuss the results generated from over 20 years of studies of the Trypanosoma cruzi sylvatic transmission cycle. Our results have uncovered new aspects and reviewed old concepts on issues including reservoirs, true generalist species, association of mammalian species with distinct discrete typing units - DTUs, distribution of T. cruzi genotypes in the wild, mixed infections, and T. cruzi transmission ecology. Using parasitological and serological tests, we examined T. cruzi infection in 7,285 mammalian specimens from nine mammalian orders dispersed all over the Brazilian biomes. The obtained T. cruzi isolates were characterized by mini-exon gene sequence polymorphism and PCR RFLP to identify DTUs. Infection by T. cruzi was detected by serological methods in 20% of the examined animals and isolated from 41% of those infected, corresponding to 8% of all the examined mammals. Each mammal taxon responded uniquely to T. cruzi infection. Didelphis spp. are able to maintain high and long-lasting parasitemias (positive hemocultures) caused by TcI but maintain and rapidly control parasitemias caused by TcII to almost undetectable levels. In contrast, the tamarin species Leontopithecus rosalia and L. chrysomelas maintain long-lasting and high parasitemias caused by TcII similarly to Philander sp. The coati Nasua nasua maintains high parasitemias by both parental T. cruzi DTUs TcI or TcII and by TcII/TcIV (formerly Z3) at detectable levels. Wild and domestic canidae seem to display only a short period of reservoir competence. T. cruzi infection was demonstrated in the wild canid species Cerdocyon thous and Chrysocyon brachyurus, and positive hemoculture was obtained in one hyper carnivore species (Leopardus pardalis), demonstrating that T. cruzi transmission is deeply immersed in the trophic net. T. cruzi DTU distribution in nature did not exhibit any association with a particular biome or habitat. TcI predominates throughout (58% of the T. cruzi

  10. Emerging Chagas disease: trophic network and cycle of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi from palm trees in the Amazon.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, A. R.; Monteiro, P. S.; Rebelo, J. M.; Argañaraz, E. R.; Vieira, D.; Lauria-Pires, L.; Nascimento, R.; Vexenat, C. A.; Silva, A. R.; Ault, S. K.; Costa, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A trophic network involving molds, invertebrates, and vertebrates, ancestrally adapted to the palm tree (Attalaea phalerata) microhabitat, maintains enzootic Trypanosoma cruzi infections in the Amazonian county Paço do Lumiar, state of Maranhão, Brazil. We assessed seropositivity for T. cruzi infections in the human population of the county, searched in palm trees for the triatomines that harbor these infections, and gathered demographic, environmental, and socioeconomic data. Rhodnius pictipes and R. neglectus in palm-tree frond clefts or in houses were infected with T. cruzi (57% and 41%, respectively). Human blood was found in 6.8% of R. pictipes in houses, and 9 of 10 wild Didelphis marsupialis had virulent T. cruzi infections. Increasing human population density, rain forest deforestation, and human predation of local fauna are risk factors for human T. cruzi infections. PMID:11266300

  11. Transferability of Trypanosoma cruzi from mixed human host infection to Triatoma infestans and from insects to axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Sylvia; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Saavedra, Miguel; Solari, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    The etiologic agent of Chagas disease is Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan whose life cycle involves obligatory passage through vertebrate and invertebrate hosts in a series of stages. The aim of this study was to explore the transferability of mixed discrete typing units (DTUs) of T. cruzi present in chronic chagasic patients when passed through an invertebrate host during xenodiagnosis (XD) and then when transferred to axenic cultures to obtain T. cruzi isolates. DTUs of T. cruzi present in these two hosts and axenic cultures were identified by kDNA PCR amplification and subsequent hybridization with DTU-specific probes. Mixtures of Tc I, Tc II, Tc V and Tc VI DTUs were detected in blood samples. However as a result of XD and axenic cultures it was possible to identify mostly Tc V. We conclude that the transferability of an isolate of T.cruzi derived from mixed DTUs present in human blood depends upon the starved invertebrate host used for xenodiagnosis.

  12. Bioluminescent imaging of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Usually the analysis of the various developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in the experimentally infected vertebrate and invertebrate hosts is based on the morphological observations of tissue fragments from animals and insects. The development of techniques that allow the imaging of animals infected with parasites expressing luciferase open up possibilities to follow the fate of bioluminescent parasites in infected vectors. Methods D-luciferin (60 μg) was injected into the hemocoel of the whole insect before bioluminescence acquisition. In dissected insects, the whole gut was incubated with D-luciferin in PBS (300 μg/ml) for ex vivo bioluminescence acquisition in the IVIS® Imaging System, Xenogen. Results Herein, we describe the results obtained with the luciferase gene integrated into the genome of the Dm28c clone of T. cruzi, and the use of these parasites to follow, in real time, the infection of the insect vector Rhodnius prolixus, by a non- invasive method. The insects were evaluated by in vivo bioluminescent imaging on the feeding day, and on the 7 th, 14 th, 21 st and 28 th days after feeding. To corroborate the bioluminescent imaging made in vivo, and investigate the digestive tract region, the insects were dissected. The bioluminescence emitted was proportional to the number of protozoans in regions of the gut. The same digestive tracts were also macerated to count the parasites in distinct morphological stages with an optical microscope, and for bioluminescence acquisition in a microplate using the IVIS® Imaging System. A positive correlation of parasite numbers and bioluminescence in the microplate was obtained. Conclusions This is the first report of bioluminescent imaging in Rhodnius prolixus infected with trypomastigotes of the Dm28c-luc stable strain, expressing firefly luciferase. In spite of the distribution limitations of the substrate (D-luciferin) in the insect body, longitudinal evaluation of infected insects by

  13. HygR and PurR plasmid vectors for episomal transfection of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Otávio T; Santana, Jaime M; Sturm, Nancy R; Teixeira, Antônio R L; Campbell, David A

    2004-08-01

    This work describes the development and functional testing of two episomes for stable transfection of Trypanosoma cruzi. pHygD contained the 5'- and 3'- flanking regions of the gene encoding the cathepsin B-like protease of T. cruzi as functional trans-splicing and polyadenylation signals for the hygR ORF. Evidence is presented to support extrachromosomal maintenance and organization as tandem repeats in transfected parasites. pPac was derived from pHygD by replacement of the entire hygR ORF with a purR coding region. The ability to modify pHygD and the availability of the complete DNA sequence make these plasmids useful tools for the genetic manipulation of T. cruzi.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Mepraia gajardoi from Wild Ecotopes in Northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Andrea; Vergara, Fernanda; Campos, Ricardo; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Ortiz, Sylvia; Coronado, Ximena; Solari, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 397 wild Mepraia gajardoi specimens from five coastal localities in northern Chile by detection of minicircle DNA by polymerase chain reaction. The wild capture sites were classified into two ecotopes: a fully wild ecotope (ecotope 1) and a wild ecotope near human dwellings (ecotope 2). Infection rates varied between 11% and 27%. Minicircle hybridization assays showed that T. cruzi lineages Tc II and Tc VI were commonly detected in ecotope 1 and ecotope 2, respectively. These results are discussed in the context of insect proximity to human dwellings, the alimentary profile of Mepraia sp., T. cruzi lineages detected in the past in the same disease-endemic area circulating in humans, and Triatoma infestans. PMID:23249691

  15. Role of Trypanosoma cruzi Trans-sialidase on the Escape from Host Immune Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Nardy, Ana F. F. R.; Freire-de-Lima, Celio G.; Pérez, Ana R.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, affecting millions of people throughout Latin America. The parasite dampens host immune response causing modifications in diverse lymphoid compartments, including the thymus. T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TS) seems to play a fundamental role in such immunopathological events. This unusual enzyme catalyses the transference of sialic acid molecules from host glycoconjugates to acceptor molecules placed on the parasite surface. TS activity mediates several biological effects leading to the subversion of host immune system, hence favoring both parasite survival and the establishment of chronic infection. This review summarizes current findings on the roles of TS in the immune response during T. cruzi infection. PMID:27047464

  16. Gene expression and molecular modeling of the HSP104 chaperone of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Campos, R A; da Silva, M L; da Costa, G V; Bisch, P M; Peralta, J M; Silva, R; Rondinelli, E; Urményi, T P

    2012-08-06

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 104 is a highly conserved molecular chaperone that catalyzes protein unfolding, disaggregation and degradation under stress conditions. We characterized HSP104 gene structure and expression in Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease. The T. cruzi HSP104 is an 869 amino-acid protein encoded by a single-copy gene that has the highest sequence similarity (76%) with that of T. brucei and the lowest (23%) with that of the human protein. HSP104 transcripts were detected at room temperature, and levels increased after incubation at 37° or 40°C. The HSP104 protein was found at low levels in non-heat-shocked cells, and accumulated continuously up to 24 h at elevated temperatures. We developed a predicted structural model of hexameric T. cruzi HSP104, which showed some conserved features.

  17. New 1,3-thiazole derivatives and their biological and ultrastructural effects on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Gomes, Paulo André Teixeira; de Oliveira Barbosa, Miria; Farias Santiago, Edna; de Oliveira Cardoso, Marcos Veríssimo; Capistrano Costa, Natáli Tereza; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; da Silva, Aline Caroline; Dos Santos, Thiago André Ramos; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; Brayner Dos Santosd, Fábio André; do Nascimento Pereira, Glaécia Aparecida; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima

    2016-10-01

    In previous studies, the compound 3-(bromopropiophenone) thiosemicarbazone was described as a potent anti-Trypanosoma cruzi and cruzain inhibitor. In view to optimize this activity, 1,3-thiazole core was used as building-block strategy to access new lead generation of anti T. cruzi agents. In this way a series of thiazole derivatives were synthesized and most of these derivatives exhibited antiparasitic activity similar to benznidazole (Bzd). Among them, compounds (1c) and (1g) presented better selective index (SI) than Bzd. In addition, compounds showed inhibitory activity against the cruzain protease. As observed by electron microscopy, compound (1c) treatment caused irreversible and specific morphological changes on ultrastructure organization of T. cruzi, demonstrating that this class of compounds is killing parasites. PMID:27295485

  18. Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) and HIV co-infection in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carolina; Cucunubá, Zulma; Parra, Edgar; Toro, German; Zambrano, Pilar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2014-09-01

    Chagas disease is a complex zoonotic pathology caused by the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma cruzi. This parasite presents remarkable genetic variability and has been grouped into six discrete typing units (DTUs). The association between the DTUs and clinical outcome remains unknown. Chagas disease and co-infection with HIV/AIDS has been reported widely in Brazil and Argentina. Herein, we present the molecular analyses from a Chagas disease patient with HIV/AIDS co-infection in Colombia who presented severe cardiomyopathy, pleural effusion, and central nervous system involvement. A mixed infection by T. cruzi genotypes was detected. We suggest including T. cruzi in the list of opportunistic pathogens for the management of HIV patients in Colombia. The epidemiological implications of this finding are discussed.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi P21: a potential novel target for chagasic cardiomyopathy therapy.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; Alves da Silva, Aline; Teixeira, Samuel Cota; Borges, Bruna Cristina; Dos Santos, Marlus Alves; Martins, Flávia Alves; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Rodrigues, Adele Aud; Notário, Ana Flávia Oliveira; Ferreira, Bruno Antônio; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Deconte, Simone Ramos; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Ávila, Veridiana Melo Rodrigues; Araújo, Fernanda de Assis; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2015-11-17

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. It is estimated that 10%-30% of all infected individuals will acquire chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). The etiology of CCC is multifactorial and involves parasite genotype, host genetic polymorphisms, immune response, signaling pathways and autoimmune progression. Herein we verified the impact of the recombinant form of P21 (rP21), a secreted T. cruzi protein involved in host cell invasion, on progression of inflammatory process in a polyester sponge-induced inflammation model. Results indicated that rP21 can recruit immune cells induce myeloperoxidase and IL-4 production and decrease blood vessels formation compared to controls in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, T. cruzi P21 may be a potential target for the development of P21 antagonist compounds to treat chagasic cardiomyopathy.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi P21: a potential novel target for chagasic cardiomyopathy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; Alves da Silva, Aline; Teixeira, Samuel Cota; Borges, Bruna Cristina; dos Santos, Marlus Alves; Martins, Flávia Alves; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Rodrigues, Adele Aud; Notário, Ana Flávia Oliveira; Ferreira, Bruno Antônio; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Deconte, Simone Ramos; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Ávila, Veridiana Melo Rodrigues; Araújo, Fernanda de Assis; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. It is estimated that 10%–30% of all infected individuals will acquire chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). The etiology of CCC is multifactorial and involves parasite genotype, host genetic polymorphisms, immune response, signaling pathways and autoimmune progression. Herein we verified the impact of the recombinant form of P21 (rP21), a secreted T. cruzi protein involved in host cell invasion, on progression of inflammatory process in a polyester sponge-induced inflammation model. Results indicated that rP21 can recruit immune cells induce myeloperoxidase and IL-4 production and decrease blood vessels formation compared to controls in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, T. cruzi P21 may be a potential target for the development of P21 antagonist compounds to treat chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26574156

  1. Circulation of Tc Ia discrete type unit Trypanosoma cruzi in Yucatan Mexico.

    PubMed

    Monteón, Victor; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana; Pennignton, Pamela; Ramos-Ligonio, Ángel; Acosta, Karla; Lopez, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    The etiologic agent Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) has been grouped into six discrete type units (DTU I-VI); within DTU-I exists four subgroups defined Ia-Id. In Colombia, the genotype Ia is associated with human infection and domiciliated Rhodnius vector. In the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, the main vector involved in T. cruzi transmission is Triatoma dimidiata predominantly via sylvatic and peridomiciliated cycles. In this study, multiple sequence analysis of mini-exon intergenic regions of T. cruzi isolates obtained from T. dimidiata in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico revealed they belonged to Tc Ia DTU along with two additional Mexican strains located 1,570 km away from Yucatan. In conclusion Tc Ia circulates in the Yucatan peninsula in T. dimidiata vector and likewise in the northwest region of Mexico. PMID:27413339

  2. ORC1/CDC6 and MCM7 distinct associate with chromatin through Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle.

    PubMed

    Calderano, Simone; Godoy, Patricia; Soares, Daiane; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo Augusto; Schenkman, Sergio; Elias, M Carolina

    2014-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi alternates between replicative and non-replicative stages. We analyzed the expression of components of the pre-replication machinery TcORC1/CDC6 and TcMCM7 and their interaction with DNA in all T. cruzi stages. TcORC1/CDC6 remains in the nuclear space during all stages of the life cycle and interacts with DNA in the replicative stages; however, it does not bind to DNA in the non-replicative forms. Moreover, TcMCM7 is not present in the non-replicative stages. These data suggest that the lacking of DNA replication during the T. cruzi life cycle may be a consequence of the blocking of TcORC1/CDC6-DNA interaction and of the down regulation of the TcMCM7 expression. PMID:24681203

  3. New 1,3-thiazole derivatives and their biological and ultrastructural effects on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Gomes, Paulo André Teixeira; de Oliveira Barbosa, Miria; Farias Santiago, Edna; de Oliveira Cardoso, Marcos Veríssimo; Capistrano Costa, Natáli Tereza; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; da Silva, Aline Caroline; Dos Santos, Thiago André Ramos; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; Brayner Dos Santosd, Fábio André; do Nascimento Pereira, Glaécia Aparecida; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima

    2016-10-01

    In previous studies, the compound 3-(bromopropiophenone) thiosemicarbazone was described as a potent anti-Trypanosoma cruzi and cruzain inhibitor. In view to optimize this activity, 1,3-thiazole core was used as building-block strategy to access new lead generation of anti T. cruzi agents. In this way a series of thiazole derivatives were synthesized and most of these derivatives exhibited antiparasitic activity similar to benznidazole (Bzd). Among them, compounds (1c) and (1g) presented better selective index (SI) than Bzd. In addition, compounds showed inhibitory activity against the cruzain protease. As observed by electron microscopy, compound (1c) treatment caused irreversible and specific morphological changes on ultrastructure organization of T. cruzi, demonstrating that this class of compounds is killing parasites.

  4. The population genetics of Trypanosoma cruzi revisited in the light of the predominant clonal evolution model.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    Comparing the population structure of Trypanosoma cruzi with that of other pathogens, including parasitic protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses, shows that the agent of Chagas disease shares typical traits with many other species, related to a predominant clonal evolution (PCE) pattern: statistically significant linkage disequilibrium, overrepresented multilocus genotypes, near-clades (genetic subdivisions somewhat blurred by occasional genetic exchange/hybridization) and "Russian doll" patterns (PCE is observed, not only at the level of the whole species, but also, within the near-clades). Moreover, T. cruzi population structure exhibits linkage with the diversity of several strongly selected genes, with gene expression profiles, and with some major phenotypic traits. We discuss the evolutionary significance of these results, and their implications in terms of applied research (molecular epidemiology/strain typing, analysis of genes of interest, vaccine and drug design, immunological diagnosis) and of experimental evolution. Lastly, we revisit the long-term debate of describing new species within the T. cruzi taxon.

  5. Circulation of Tc Ia discrete type unit Trypanosoma cruzi in Yucatan Mexico.

    PubMed

    Monteón, Victor; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana; Pennignton, Pamela; Ramos-Ligonio, Ángel; Acosta, Karla; Lopez, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    The etiologic agent Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) has been grouped into six discrete type units (DTU I-VI); within DTU-I exists four subgroups defined Ia-Id. In Colombia, the genotype Ia is associated with human infection and domiciliated Rhodnius vector. In the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, the main vector involved in T. cruzi transmission is Triatoma dimidiata predominantly via sylvatic and peridomiciliated cycles. In this study, multiple sequence analysis of mini-exon intergenic regions of T. cruzi isolates obtained from T. dimidiata in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico revealed they belonged to Tc Ia DTU along with two additional Mexican strains located 1,570 km away from Yucatan. In conclusion Tc Ia circulates in the Yucatan peninsula in T. dimidiata vector and likewise in the northwest region of Mexico.

  6. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target. PMID:25317703

  7. Phylogenetic character mapping of proteomic diversity shows high correlation with subspecific phylogenetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Telleria, Jenny; Biron, David G.; Brizard, Jean-Paul; Demettre, Edith; Séveno, Martial; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco J.; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2010-01-01

    We performed a phylogenetic character mapping on 26 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease, and 2 stocks of the sister taxon T. cruzi marinkellei to test for possible associations between T. cruzi–subspecific phylogenetic diversity and levels of protein expression, as examined by proteomic analysis and mass spectrometry. We observed a high level of correlation (P < 10−4) between genetic distance, as established by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and proteomic dissimilarities estimated by proteomic Euclidian distances. Several proteins were found to be specifically associated to T. cruzi phylogenetic subdivisions (discrete typing units). This study explores the previously uncharacterized links between infraspecific phylogenetic diversity and gene expression in a human pathogen. It opens the way to searching for new vaccine and drug targets and for identification of specific biomarkers at the subspecific level of pathogens. PMID:21059959

  8. The isolation and identification of Trypanosoma cruzi from raccoons in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, B.C.; Bauman, P.M.; Diamond, L.S.; Herman, C.M.

    1958-01-01

    Five raccoons trapped at Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland, were found to have trypanosomes in the blood which were morphologically indistinguishable from Trypanosoma cruzi on stained smears. The organism grew well in culture. It developed and reproduced in Triatoma protracta, T. infestans, T. phyllosoma, and Rhodnius prolixus. Experimental infections were produced in raccoons, opossums, mice, rats, and monkeys by inoculation of blood, culture, and triatome forms. Typical leishmaniform bodies were found in tissue sections of cardiac muscle fibers from naturally and experimentally infected animals. Cross agglutinations carried out with Iiving cultural forms and rabbit antisera demonstrated a close antigenic relationship between the raccoon trypanosome and T. cruzi (Brazil strain). On the basis of (1) morphology, (2) presence of leishmaniform tissue stages, (3) development in triatomes, (4) infectivity to a variety of mammals, (5) culture characteristics, and (6) cross reactions in serological tests, this parasite is considered conspecific with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909), the causative agent of American human trypanosomiasis.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi, the Causal Agent of Chagas Disease: Boundaries between Wild and Domestic Cycles in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Leidi

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the etiological agent of American Trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease (ChD) is transmitted by triatomines vectors between mammals including man. T. cruzi has existed for circa 150 Ma in the Americas and nearly 10 million people are currently infected. The overlap between wild and domestic ecotopes where T. cruzi circulates is increasing. Host–parasite interactions have been determined by infection patterns in these cycles, all under natural or laboratorial conditions. This mini-review describes specific parasite niches, such as plant communities or biological corridors between domestic and wild landscapes, in order to help identify risk factors for ChD and define the boundaries between wild and domestic transmission cycles, with an emphasis on research undertaken in Venezuela. PMID:25506587

  10. Effects of platelet-activating factor on the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Luciana T; Folly, Evelize; Gomes, Marta T; Alviano, Daniela S; Alviano, Celuta S; Silva-Filho, Fernando C; Atella, Geórgia C; Lopes, Angela H

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with Rhodnius prolixus. The parasites (epimastigotes) were treated with PAF and/or WEB 2086 (PAF antagonist) for 1 h prior to the interaction experiments. PAF stimulated both in vivo and ex vivo interactions between T. cruzi and R. prolixus while WEB 2086 abrogated these effects. PAF-treated epimastigotes also showed an increase in surface negativity and in the amount of surface sialic acid. Neither of these effects was observed when the epimastigotes were treated with neuraminidase following PAF treatment. In the ex vivo interaction experiments, the number of epimastigotes bound to the midguts of the insects was reduced when the epimastigotes had been treated with neuraminidase. We conclude that PAF modulates the interaction of T. cruzi with R. prolixus by altering the amount of sialyl residues at the surface of the parasite.

  11. ORC1/CDC6 and MCM7 distinct associate with chromatin through Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle.

    PubMed

    Calderano, Simone; Godoy, Patricia; Soares, Daiane; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo Augusto; Schenkman, Sergio; Elias, M Carolina

    2014-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi alternates between replicative and non-replicative stages. We analyzed the expression of components of the pre-replication machinery TcORC1/CDC6 and TcMCM7 and their interaction with DNA in all T. cruzi stages. TcORC1/CDC6 remains in the nuclear space during all stages of the life cycle and interacts with DNA in the replicative stages; however, it does not bind to DNA in the non-replicative forms. Moreover, TcMCM7 is not present in the non-replicative stages. These data suggest that the lacking of DNA replication during the T. cruzi life cycle may be a consequence of the blocking of TcORC1/CDC6-DNA interaction and of the down regulation of the TcMCM7 expression.

  12. Evidence and importance of genetic exchange among field populations of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Louisa A.; Miles, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many eukaryotic pathogenic microorganisms that were previously assumed to propagate clonally have retained cryptic sexual cycles. The principal reproductive mode of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, remains a controversial topic. Despite the existence of two recent natural hybrid lineages, a pervasive view is that recombination has been restrained at an evolutionary scale and is of little epidemiological relevance to contemporary parasite populations. This article reviews the growing number of field studies which indicate that natural hybridization in T. cruzi may be frequent, non-obligatory and idiosyncratic; potentially involving independent exchange of kinetoplast and nuclear genetic material as well as canonical meiotic mechanisms. Together these observations now challenge the traditional paradigm of preponderate clonal evolution in T. cruzi and highlight the need for additional, intensive and appropriately sampled field surveys, complemented by high resolution, combined nuclear and mitochondrial population genetics analyses. PMID:26188331

  13. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-09-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target.

  14. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-09-09

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi. Surface antigens of blood and culture forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, N.; Chaplan, S.; Tydings, J.D.; Unkeless, J.; Cohn, Z.

    1981-03-01

    The surface polypeptides of both cultured and blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi were iodinated by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Blood-form trypomastigotes (BFT) isolated form infected mice displayed a major 90,000-Mr component. In contrast, both epimastigotes and trypomastigotes obtained form acellular cultures expressed a smaller 75,000-Mr peptide. Both major surface components were presumably glycoproteins in terms of their binding to concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B. Within a 3-h period, both blood and culture forms synthesized their respective surface glycoproteins (90,000 Mr and 75,000 Mr, respectively in vitro. (/sub 35/S)methionine-labeled surface peptides were immunoprecipitated with immune sera of both human and murine origin. A panel of sera form patients with chronic Chagas' disease and hyperimmunized mice recognized similar surface peptides. These immunogens were the same components as the major iodinated species. The major BFT surface peptide was readily removed by trypsin treatment of the parasites, although the procedure did not affect the 75,000-Mr peptide from the culture forms. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the 90,000-Mr peptide found on BFT was an acidic protein of isoelectric point (pI) 5.0, whereas, the 75,000-Mr peptide form culture-form trypomastigotes has a pI of 7.2. The 90,000-Mr component is thought to be responsible for the anti-phagocytic properties of the BFT (1).

  16. [Maternal-fetal transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Argentina].

    PubMed

    de Rissio, Ana María; Scollo, Karenina; Cardoni, Rita L

    2009-01-01

    In the neonates born to T. cruzi infected mothers, the diagnosis of the congenital transmission relays on the detection of the parasites and/or the specific antibodies non-transferred by their mothers, in the absence of blood transfusion and vectorial transmission. In the early stage, approximately until the 7th month of life, when maternal immunoglobulins could be present, the diagnosis depends on the detection of the parasite. Then, in the late stage, from the 8th month, the detection of specific antibodies by at least 2 of 3 serological tests confirms the infection in the neonates. The diagnostic follow up of the children born to a group of sero-reactive pregnant women was carried out in the INP. The 11% of the mothers (29 out of 267) transmitted the infection to their children. The neonates of 20 of these mothers were diagnosed in the early stage, 14 and 6 in one or two controls, respectively. In the 9 remaining mothers the children were diagnosed in the late stage of the infection, mainly serologicaly. Our analisis of previously published reports stressed that the maternal-fetal transmission rate depends on the time of diagnostic follow up of the child. In this reports, mean values of mother to child transmission reported was 2% and 9% when the diagnosis of the neonates born to sero-reactive mothers was carried out only in the early stage or in the early and also the late stage, respectively. PMID:19897438

  17. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  18. Factors from Trypanosoma cruzi interacting with AP-1 sequences.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, J; Martinetto, H; Portal, D; D'Angelo, M; Torres, H N; Flawiá, M M

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between factors from Trypanosoma cruzi extracts and AP-1 sequences was studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Using a double-stranded probe carrying the AP-1 sequence from the SV40 promoter, three specific complexes designated A, B, and C were detected. Complexes A and C were formed when using single-stranded probes. The relative amount of complex B, specific for double-stranded DNA, increased as a function of probe length. Complexes were stabilized by cross-linking with UVC irradiation and resolved on denaturing SDS-PAGE. Complex A generated bands of 60- and 39 kDa; complex B produced two bands of 46- and 43 kDa; and complex C generated one band of 43 kDa. The AP-1 binding activity was much higher in purified nuclear preparations than in soluble fractions, and was detected in crude extracts from the three forms of the parasite. The binding signal, however, was much stronger in amastigote and trypomastigote than in the epimastigote forms. Specific binding was increased by oxidative stress. Antibodies raised against peptides corresponding to conserved domains of mammalian c-Jun and c-Fos detected bands of 40- and 60 kDa, respectively, in a nuclear epimastigote preparation. PMID:10519220

  19. Galectin-1 Prevents Infection and Damage Induced by Trypanosoma cruzi on Cardiac Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benatar, Alejandro F.; García, Gabriela A.; Bua, Jacqeline; Cerliani, Juan P.; Postan, Miriam; Tasso, Laura M.; Scaglione, Jorge; Stupirski, Juan C.; Toscano, Marta A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is the result of a pathologic process starting during the acute phase of parasite infection. Among different factors, the specific recognition of glycan structures by glycan-binding proteins from the parasite or from the mammalian host cells may play a critical role in the evolution of the infection. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we investigated the contribution of galectin–1 (Gal–1), an endogenous glycan-binding protein abundantly expressed in human and mouse heart, to the pathophysiology of T. cruzi infection, particularly in the context of cardiac pathology. We found that exposure of HL–1 cardiac cells to Gal–1 reduced the percentage of infection by two different T. cruzi strains, Tulahuén (TcVI) and Brazil (TcI). In addition, Gal–1 prevented exposure of phosphatidylserine and early events in the apoptotic program by parasite infection on HL–1 cells. These effects were not mediated by direct interaction with the parasite surface, suggesting that Gal–1 may act through binding to host cells. Moreover, we also observed that T. cruzi infection altered the glycophenotype of cardiac cells, reducing binding of exogenous Gal–1 to the cell surface. Consistent with these data, Gal–1 deficient (Lgals1-/-) mice showed increased parasitemia, reduced signs of inflammation in heart and skeletal muscle tissues, and lower survival rates as compared to wild-type (WT) mice in response to intraperitoneal infection with T. cruzi Tulahuén strain. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that Gal–1 modulates T. cruzi infection of cardiac cells, highlighting the relevance of galectins and their ligands as regulators of host-parasite interactions. PMID:26451839

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi Experimental Infection Impacts on the Thymic Regulatory T Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    González, Florencia Belén; Calmon-Hamaty, Flavia; Nô Seara Cordeiro, Synara; Fernández Bussy, Rodrigo; Spinelli, Silvana Virginia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Villar, Silvina Raquel; Pérez, Ana Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of regulatory T cells in the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is still debated. We previously demonstrated that acute murine T. cruzi infection results in an impaired peripheral CD4+Foxp3+ T cell differentiation due to the acquisition of an abnormal Th1-like phenotype and altered functional features, negatively impacting on the course of infection. Moreover, T. cruzi infection induces an intense thymic atrophy. As known, the thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which thymic-derived regulatory T cells, known as tTregs, differentiate. Considering the lack of available data about the effect of T. cruzi infection upon tTregs, we examined tTreg dynamics during the course of disease. We confirmed that T. cruzi infection induces a marked loss of tTreg cell number associated to cell precursor exhaustion, partially avoided by glucocorticoid ablation- and IL-2 survival factor depletion. At the same time, tTregs accumulate within the CD4 single-positive compartment, exhibiting an increased Ki-67/Annexin V ratio compared to controls. Moreover, tTregs enhance after the infection the expression of signature markers (CD25, CD62L and GITR) and they also display alterations in the expression of migration-associated molecules (α chains of VLAs and chemokine receptors) such as functional fibronectin-driven migratory disturbance. Taken together, we provide data demonstrating profound alterations in tTreg compartment during acute murine T. cruzi infection, denoting that their homeostasis is significantly affected. The evident loss of tTreg cell number may compromise the composition of tTreg peripheral pool, and such sustained alteration over time may be partially related to the immune dysregulation observed in the chronic phase of the disease. PMID:26745276

  1. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Argentina, Honduras, and Mexico: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi has been divided into Discrete Typing Units I and non-I (II-VI). T. cruzi I is predominant in Mexico and Central America, while non-I is predominant in most of South America, including Argentina. Little is known about congenital transmission of T. cruzi I. The specific aim of this study is to determine the rate of congenital transmission of T. cruzi I compared to non-I. Methods/design We are conducting a prospective study to enroll at delivery, 10,000 women in Argentina, 7,500 women in Honduras, and 13,000 women in Mexico. We are measuring transmitted maternal T. cruzi antibodies by performing two rapid tests in cord blood (Stat-Pak, Chembio, Medford, New York, and Trypanosoma Detect, InBios, Seattle, Washington). If at least one of the results is positive, we are identifying infants who are congenitally infected by performing parasitological examinations on cord blood and at 4–8 weeks, and serological follow-up at 10 months. Serological confirmation by ELISA (Wiener, Rosario, Argentina) is performed in cord and maternal blood, and at 10 months. We also are performing T. cruzi standard PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and genotyping on maternal venous blood and on cord blood, and serological examinations on siblings. Data are managed by a Data Center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Data are entered online at the sites in an OpenClinica data management system, and digital pictures of data forms are sent to the Data Center for quality control. Weekly reports allow for rapid feedback to the sites. Trial registration Observational study with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01787968 PMID:24119247

  2. Development of an Aptamer-Based Concentration Method for the Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Rana; Bist, Vaibhav; Sun, Sirena; Fortes de Araujo, Fernanda; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Debrabant, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a blood-borne parasite, is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. T. cruzi trypomastigotes, the infectious life cycle stage, can be detected in blood of infected individuals using PCR-based methods. However, soon after a natural infection, or during the chronic phase of Chagas disease, the number of parasites in blood may be very low and thus difficult to detect by PCR. To facilitate PCR-based detection methods, a parasite concentration approach was explored. A whole cell SELEX strategy was utilized to develop serum stable RNA aptamers that bind to live T. cruzi trypomastigotes. These aptamers bound to the parasite with high affinities (8–25 nM range). The highest affinity aptamer, Apt68, also demonstrated high specificity as it did not interact with the insect stage epimastigotes of T. cruzi nor with other related trypanosomatid parasites, L. donovani and T. brucei, suggesting that the target of Apt68 was expressed only on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Biotinylated Apt68, immobilized on a solid phase, was able to capture live parasites. These captured parasites were visible microscopically, as large motile aggregates, formed when the aptamer coated paramagnetic beads bound to the surface of the trypomastigotes. Additionally, Apt68 was also able to capture and aggregate trypomastigotes from several isolates of the two major genotypes of the parasite. Using a magnet, these parasite-bead aggregates could be purified from parasite-spiked whole blood samples, even at concentrations as low as 5 parasites in 15 ml of whole blood, as detected by a real-time PCR assay. Our results show that aptamers can be used as pathogen specific ligands to capture and facilitate PCR-based detection of T. cruzi in blood. PMID:22927983

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi Experimental Infection Impacts on the Thymic Regulatory T Cell Compartment.

    PubMed

    González, Florencia Belén; Calmon-Hamaty, Flavia; Nô Seara Cordeiro, Synara; Fernández Bussy, Rodrigo; Spinelli, Silvana Virginia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Villar, Silvina Raquel; Pérez, Ana Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of regulatory T cells in the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is still debated. We previously demonstrated that acute murine T. cruzi infection results in an impaired peripheral CD4+Foxp3+ T cell differentiation due to the acquisition of an abnormal Th1-like phenotype and altered functional features, negatively impacting on the course of infection. Moreover, T. cruzi infection induces an intense thymic atrophy. As known, the thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which thymic-derived regulatory T cells, known as tTregs, differentiate. Considering the lack of available data about the effect of T. cruzi infection upon tTregs, we examined tTreg dynamics during the course of disease. We confirmed that T. cruzi infection induces a marked loss of tTreg cell number associated to cell precursor exhaustion, partially avoided by glucocorticoid ablation- and IL-2 survival factor depletion. At the same time, tTregs accumulate within the CD4 single-positive compartment, exhibiting an increased Ki-67/Annexin V ratio compared to controls. Moreover, tTregs enhance after the infection the expression of signature markers (CD25, CD62L and GITR) and they also display alterations in the expression of migration-associated molecules (α chains of VLAs and chemokine receptors) such as functional fibronectin-driven migratory disturbance. Taken together, we provide data demonstrating profound alterations in tTreg compartment during acute murine T. cruzi infection, denoting that their homeostasis is significantly affected. The evident loss of tTreg cell number may compromise the composition of tTreg peripheral pool, and such sustained alteration over time may be partially related to the immune dysregulation observed in the chronic phase of the disease. PMID:26745276

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi Needs a Signal Provided by Reactive Oxygen Species to Infect Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Grazielle R.; Rocha, Peter S.; Diniz, Aline R. S.; Aguiar, Pedro H. N.; Machado, Carlos R.; Vieira, Leda Q.

    2016-01-01

    Background During Trypanosoma cruzi infection, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a process called respiratory burst. Several works have aimed to elucidate the role of ROS during T. cruzi infection and the results obtained are sometimes contradictory. T. cruzi has a highly efficiently regulated antioxidant machinery to deal with the oxidative burst, but the parasite macromolecules, particularly DNA, may still suffer oxidative damage. Guanine (G) is the most vulnerable base and its oxidation results in formation of 8-oxoG, a cellular marker of oxidative stress. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the contribution of ROS in T. cruzi survival and infection, we utilized mice deficient in the gp91phox (Phox KO) subunit of NADPH oxidase and parasites that overexpress the enzyme EcMutT (from Escherichia coli) or TcMTH (from T. cruzi), which is responsible for removing 8-oxo-dGTP from the nucleotide pool. The modified parasites presented enhanced replication inside murine inflammatory macrophages from C57BL/6 WT mice when compared with control parasites. Interestingly, when Phox KO macrophages were infected with these parasites, we observed a decreased number of all parasites when compared with macrophages from C57BL/6 WT. Scavengers for ROS also decreased parasite growth in WT macrophages. In addition, treatment of macrophages or parasites with hydrogen peroxide increased parasite replication in Phox KO mice and in vivo. Conclusions Our results indicate a paradoxical role for ROS since modified parasites multiply better inside macrophages, but proliferation is significantly reduced when ROS is removed from the host cell. Our findings suggest that ROS can work like a signaling molecule, contributing to T. cruzi growth inside the cells. PMID:27035573

  5. Early Regulation of Profibrotic Genes in Primary Human Cardiac Myocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Dykan, Andrey; Rachakonda, Girish; Villalta, Fernando; Mandape, Sammed N.; Lima, Maria F.; Pratap, Siddharth; Nde, Pius N.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi induced cardiac fibrosis remains to be elucidated. Primary human cardiomyoctes (PHCM) exposed to invasive T. cruzi trypomastigotes were used for transcriptome profiling and downstream bioinformatic analysis to determine fibrotic-associated genes regulated early during infection process (0 to 120 minutes). The identification of early molecular host responses to T. cruzi infection can be exploited to delineate important molecular signatures that can be used for the classification of Chagasic patients at risk of developing heart disease. Our results show distinct gene network architecture with multiple gene networks modulated by the parasite with an incline towards progression to a fibrogenic phenotype. Early during infection, T. cruzi significantly upregulated transcription factors including activator protein 1 (AP1) transcription factor network components (including FOSB, FOS and JUNB), early growth response proteins 1 and 3 (EGR1, EGR3), and cytokines/chemokines (IL5, IL6, IL13, CCL11), which have all been implicated in the onset of fibrosis. The changes in our selected genes of interest did not all start at the same time point. The transcriptome microarray data, validated by quantitative Real-Time PCR, was also confirmed by immunoblotting and customized Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) array showing significant increases in the protein expression levels of fibrogenic EGR1, SNAI1 and IL 6. Furthermore, phosphorylated SMAD2/3 which induces a fibrogenic phenotype is also upregulated accompanied by an increased nuclear translocation of JunB. Pathway analysis of the validated genes and phospho-proteins regulated by the parasite provides the very early fibrotic interactome operating when T. cruzi comes in contact with PHCM. The interactome architecture shows that the parasite induces both TGF-β dependent and independent fibrotic pathways, providing an early molecular foundation for Chagasic cardiomyopathy

  6. Evasion of the Immune Response by Trypanosoma cruzi during Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mariana S.; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease that affects millions of people mainly in Latin America. To establish a life-long infection, T. cruzi must subvert the vertebrate host’s immune system, using strategies that can be traced to the parasite’s life cycle. Once inside the vertebrate host, metacyclic trypomastigotes rapidly invade a wide variety of nucleated host cells in a membrane-bound compartment known as the parasitophorous vacuole, which fuses to lysosomes, originating the phagolysosome. In this compartment, the parasite relies on a complex network of antioxidant enzymes to shield itself from lysosomal oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. Lysosomal acidification of the parasitophorous vacuole is an important factor that allows trypomastigote escape from the extremely oxidative environment of the phagolysosome to the cytoplasm, where it differentiates into amastigote forms. In the cytosol of infected macrophages, oxidative stress instead of being detrimental to the parasite, favors amastigote burden, which then differentiates into bloodstream trypomastigotes. Trypomastigotes released in the bloodstream upon the rupture of the host cell membrane express surface molecules, such as calreticulin and GP160 proteins, which disrupt initial and key components of the complement pathway, while others such as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-mucins stimulate immunoregulatory receptors, delaying the progression of a protective immune response. After an immunologically silent entry at the early phase of infection, T. cruzi elicits polyclonal B cell activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and unspecific anti-T. cruzi antibodies, which are inefficient in controlling the infection. Additionally, the coexpression of several related, but not identical, epitopes derived from trypomastigote surface proteins delays the generation of T. cruzi-specific neutralizing antibodies. Later in the infection, the establishment of an anti-T. cruzi

  7. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  8. Early Regulation of Profibrotic Genes in Primary Human Cardiac Myocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Udoko, Aniekanabassi N; Johnson, Candice A; Dykan, Andrey; Rachakonda, Girish; Villalta, Fernando; Mandape, Sammed N; Lima, Maria F; Pratap, Siddharth; Nde, Pius N

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi induced cardiac fibrosis remains to be elucidated. Primary human cardiomyoctes (PHCM) exposed to invasive T. cruzi trypomastigotes were used for transcriptome profiling and downstream bioinformatic analysis to determine fibrotic-associated genes regulated early during infection process (0 to 120 minutes). The identification of early molecular host responses to T. cruzi infection can be exploited to delineate important molecular signatures that can be used for the classification of Chagasic patients at risk of developing heart disease. Our results show distinct gene network architecture with multiple gene networks modulated by the parasite with an incline towards progression to a fibrogenic phenotype. Early during infection, T. cruzi significantly upregulated transcription factors including activator protein 1 (AP1) transcription factor network components (including FOSB, FOS and JUNB), early growth response proteins 1 and 3 (EGR1, EGR3), and cytokines/chemokines (IL5, IL6, IL13, CCL11), which have all been implicated in the onset of fibrosis. The changes in our selected genes of interest did not all start at the same time point. The transcriptome microarray data, validated by quantitative Real-Time PCR, was also confirmed by immunoblotting and customized Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) array showing significant increases in the protein expression levels of fibrogenic EGR1, SNAI1 and IL 6. Furthermore, phosphorylated SMAD2/3 which induces a fibrogenic phenotype is also upregulated accompanied by an increased nuclear translocation of JunB. Pathway analysis of the validated genes and phospho-proteins regulated by the parasite provides the very early fibrotic interactome operating when T. cruzi comes in contact with PHCM. The interactome architecture shows that the parasite induces both TGF-β dependent and independent fibrotic pathways, providing an early molecular foundation for Chagasic cardiomyopathy

  9. Early Regulation of Profibrotic Genes in Primary Human Cardiac Myocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Udoko, Aniekanabassi N; Johnson, Candice A; Dykan, Andrey; Rachakonda, Girish; Villalta, Fernando; Mandape, Sammed N; Lima, Maria F; Pratap, Siddharth; Nde, Pius N

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi induced cardiac fibrosis remains to be elucidated. Primary human cardiomyoctes (PHCM) exposed to invasive T. cruzi trypomastigotes were used for transcriptome profiling and downstream bioinformatic analysis to determine fibrotic-associated genes regulated early during infection process (0 to 120 minutes). The identification of early molecular host responses to T. cruzi infection can be exploited to delineate important molecular signatures that can be used for the classification of Chagasic patients at risk of developing heart disease. Our results show distinct gene network architecture with multiple gene networks modulated by the parasite with an incline towards progression to a fibrogenic phenotype. Early during infection, T. cruzi significantly upregulated transcription factors including activator protein 1 (AP1) transcription factor network components (including FOSB, FOS and JUNB), early growth response proteins 1 and 3 (EGR1, EGR3), and cytokines/chemokines (IL5, IL6, IL13, CCL11), which have all been implicated in the onset of fibrosis. The changes in our selected genes of interest did not all start at the same time point. The transcriptome microarray data, validated by quantitative Real-Time PCR, was also confirmed by immunoblotting and customized Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) array showing significant increases in the protein expression levels of fibrogenic EGR1, SNAI1 and IL 6. Furthermore, phosphorylated SMAD2/3 which induces a fibrogenic phenotype is also upregulated accompanied by an increased nuclear translocation of JunB. Pathway analysis of the validated genes and phospho-proteins regulated by the parasite provides the very early fibrotic interactome operating when T. cruzi comes in contact with PHCM. The interactome architecture shows that the parasite induces both TGF-β dependent and independent fibrotic pathways, providing an early molecular foundation for Chagasic cardiomyopathy

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi Experimental Infection Impacts on the Thymic Regulatory T Cell Compartment.

    PubMed

    González, Florencia Belén; Calmon-Hamaty, Flavia; Nô Seara Cordeiro, Synara; Fernández Bussy, Rodrigo; Spinelli, Silvana Virginia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Villar, Silvina Raquel; Pérez, Ana Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of regulatory T cells in the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is still debated. We previously demonstrated that acute murine T. cruzi infection results in an impaired peripheral CD4+Foxp3+ T cell differentiation due to the acquisition of an abnormal Th1-like phenotype and altered functional features, negatively impacting on the course of infection. Moreover, T. cruzi infection induces an intense thymic atrophy. As known, the thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which thymic-derived regulatory T cells, known as tTregs, differentiate. Considering the lack of available data about the effect of T. cruzi infection upon tTregs, we examined tTreg dynamics during the course of disease. We confirmed that T. cruzi infection induces a marked loss of tTreg cell number associated to cell precursor exhaustion, partially avoided by glucocorticoid ablation- and IL-2 survival factor depletion. At the same time, tTregs accumulate within the CD4 single-positive compartment, exhibiting an increased Ki-67/Annexin V ratio compared to controls. Moreover, tTregs enhance after the infection the expression of signature markers (CD25, CD62L and GITR) and they also display alterations in the expression of migration-associated molecules (α chains of VLAs and chemokine receptors) such as functional fibronectin-driven migratory disturbance. Taken together, we provide data demonstrating profound alterations in tTreg compartment during acute murine T. cruzi infection, denoting that their homeostasis is significantly affected. The evident loss of tTreg cell number may compromise the composition of tTreg peripheral pool, and such sustained alteration over time may be partially related to the immune dysregulation observed in the chronic phase of the disease.

  11. AFAP-1L1-mediated actin filaments crosslinks hinder Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion and intracellular multiplication.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Karine Canuto Loureiro; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; da Silva, Aline Alves; Quintal, Amanda Pifano Neto; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Host actin cytoskeleton polymerization has been shown to play an important role during Trypanosoma cruzi internalization into mammalian cell. The structure and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in cells are regulated by a vast number of actin-binding proteins. Here we aimed to verify the impact of AFAP-1L1, during invasion and multiplication of T. cruzi. Knocking-down AFAP-1L1 increased parasite cell invasion and intracellular multiplication. Thus, we have shown that the integrity of the machinery formed by AFAP-1L1 in actin cytoskeleton polymerization is important to hinder parasite infection.

  12. Molecular Diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi Detected in the Vector Triatoma protracta from California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Shender, Lisa A.; Lewis, Michael D.; Rejmanek, Daniel; Mazet, Jonna A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, is a vector-borne zoonotic protozoan parasite that can cause fatal cardiac disease. While recognized as the most economically important parasitic infection in Latin America, the incidence of Chagas disease in the United States of America (US) may be underreported and even increasing. The extensive genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Latin America is well-documented and likely influences disease progression, severity and treatment efficacy; however, little is known regarding T. cruzi strains endemic to the US. It is therefore important to expand our knowledge on US T. cruzi strains, to improve upon the recognition of and response to locally acquired infections. Methodology/Principle Findings We conducted a study of T. cruzi molecular diversity in California, augmenting sparse genetic data from southern California and for the first time investigating genetic sequences from northern California. The vector Triatoma protracta was collected from southern (Escondido and Los Angeles) and northern (Vallecito) California regions. Samples were initially screened via sensitive nuclear repetitive DNA and kinetoplast minicircle DNA PCR assays, yielding an overall prevalence of approximately 28% and 55% for southern and northern California regions, respectively. Positive samples were further processed to identify discrete typing units (DTUs), revealing both TcI and TcIV lineages in southern California, but only TcI in northern California. Phylogenetic analyses (targeting COII-ND1, TR and RB19 genes) were performed on a subset of positive samples to compare Californian T. cruzi samples to strains from other US regions and Latin America. Results indicated that within the TcI DTU, California sequences were similar to those from the southeastern US, as well as to several isolates from Latin America responsible for causing Chagas disease in humans. Conclusions/Significance Triatoma protracta populations

  13. Evidence for the existence of an Ns-type regulatory protein in Trypanosoma cruzi membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C D; Paladini, A A; Molina y Vedia, L; Torres, H N; Flawiá, M M

    1986-01-01

    The existence of a GTP-binding protein of the Ns type in Trypanosoma cruzi was explored. Epimastigote membranes were labelled by cholera toxin in the presence of [adenine-14C]NAD+. After SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of extracted membrane proteins, a single labelled polypeptide band of apparent Mr approx. 45,000 was detected. Epimastigote cells were treated with N-ethylmaleimide and electrofused to lymphoma S49 cells lacking the Ns protein. Evidence indicates that in such electrofusion-generated cell hybrids a heterologous adenylate cyclase system was reconstituted with the Ns protein provided by T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3099761

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi: TcRAB7 protein is localized at the Golgi apparatus in epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Araripe, Júlia R; Cunha e Silva, Narcisa L; Leal, Simone T; de Souza, Wanderley; Rondinelli, Edson

    2004-08-20

    In mammalian cells, the Rab7 protein is a key element of late endocytic membrane traffic. Several results suggest that it is involved in the transport from early to late endosome or from late endosome to lysosome. We have previously characterized a Rab7 gene homologue (TcRAB7) in Trypanosoma cruzi. Now, using an affinity-purified antibody specific to TcRAB7 protein we have determined that it is localized at the Golgi apparatus of the parasite. Our results indicate that the T. cruzi Rab7 homologue may function in a different route than its counterparts in mammalian cells.

  15. Real time monitoring of drug action on T. cruzi parasites using a biospeckle laser method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. Z.; Grassi, H. C.; Cabrera, H.; Andrades, E. D. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on a biospeckle laser method used to monitor a specific drug action on T. cruzi parasites. Experimental results from fast biospeckle monitoring of the parasites’ activity under the influence of the drug demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. We measure the speckle parameters such as spatiotemporal correlation and speckle grain size to assess the immediate action of the drug on the parasites during a very short incubation period. From a practical point of view, this aproach allows us to validate biospeckle as a fast, non-invasive and alternative method to test candidate drugs on T. cruzi parasites.

  16. Distribution and pathogenicity of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans and Triatoma guasayana from rural western Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Lauricella, Marta A; Stariolo, Raúl L; Riarte, Adelina R; Segura, Elsa L; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in peridomestic triatomines collected manually at a district-wide scale in rural villages around Olta, western Argentina, and typed the isolated strains according to their pathogenicity to laboratory mice. Of 1623 triatomines examined, only 14 (0.9%) were infected with T. cruzi based on microscopical examination of feces. The prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 0.8% in Triatoma infestans, 2.3% in T. guasayana, and nil in T. garciabesi, T. platensis, and T. eratyrusiformis. Local transmission occurred in kitchens, store-rooms and goat corrals or nearby, though at very low levels. T. cruzi was detected by at least one parasitological method in 11 (79%) of 14 microscope-positive bugs. Hemoculture was the most sensitive method (67%) followed by culture of organ homogenates, histopathology or xenodiagnosis of inoculated suckling mice (55-58%), and culture of microscope-positive bug feces (46%). The evidence suggests that most of the isolated T. cruzi strains would be myotropic type III. Our study establishes for the first time that peridomestic, microscope-positive T. guasayana nymphs were actually infected with T. cruzi, and may be implicated as a putative secondary vector of T. cruzi in domestic or peridomestic sites. PMID:16021298

  17. The ecology of the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycle: Dispersion of zymodeme 3 (Z3) in wild hosts from Brazilian biomes.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Cristiane Varella; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2009-10-28

    Two main genotypes in Trypanosoma cruzi subpopulations can be distinguished by PCR amplification of sequences from the mini-exon gene non-transcribed spacer, respectively, T. cruzi I (TCI) and T. cruzi II (TCII). This technique is also capable of distinguishing a third assemblage of subpopulations that do not fit in these genotypes and that remain known as zymodeme Z3 (Z3). The distribution pattern as well as the mammalian host range of this latter T. cruzi sublineage still remains unclear. Thus, the intention of our study was to increase the information regarding these aspects. The mini-exon analysis of T. cruzi isolates obtained from sylvatic animals in the Amazon Forest, Atlantic Rainforest, Caatinga and Pantanal showed that prevalence of the Z3 subpopulation in nature was low (15 out of 225 isolates, corresponding to 7%). A higher prevalence of Z3 was observed in the Caatinga (15%) and the Pantanal (12%). Infection by Z3 was observed in mammalian hosts included in Carnivora, Chiroptera, Didelphimorphia, Rodentia and Xernathra. The T. cruzi Z3 subpopulation was observed also in mixed infections (33%) with TCI (n=2) and TCII (n=3). These results demonstrate that T. cruzi Z3 displays a wider distribution and host range than formerly understood as it has been demonstrated to be able infect species included in five orders of mammalian host species dispersed through all forest strata of the four Brazilian biomes evaluated.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi infection and benznidazole therapy independently stimulate oxidative status and structural pathological remodeling of the liver tissue in mice.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Santos, Eliziária C; Cupertino, Marli C; Bastos, Daniel S S; Oliveira, Jerusa M; Carvalho, Thaís V; Neves, Mariana M; Oliveira, Leandro L; Talvani, André

    2015-08-01

    This study used a murine model of Chagas disease to investigate the isolated and combined impact of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and benznidazole (BZ) therapy on liver structure and function. Male C57BL/6 mice were challenged with T. cruzi and BZ for 15 days. Serum levels of cytokines and hepatic enzymes, liver oxidative stress, morphology, collagen, and glycogen content were monitored. Separately, T. cruzi infection and BZ treatment resulted in a pro-oxidant status and hepatic reactive damage. Concurrently, both T. cruzi infection and BZ treatment induced upregulation of antioxidant enzymes and pathological reorganization of the liver parenchyma and stroma. T. cruzi infection increased serum levels of Th1 cytokines, which were reduced by BZ in both infected and non-infected animals. BZ also induced functional organ damage, increasing serum levels of liver enzymes. When combined, T. cruzi infection and BZ therapy elicited intense hepatic reactive damage that was not compensated by antioxidant enzymatic reaction, subsequently culminating in more severe morphofunctional hepatic injury. Taken together, these findings indicate that during specific treatment of Chagas disease, hepatic pathology may be a result of an interaction between BZ metabolism and specific mechanisms activated during the natural course of T. cruzi infection, rather than an isolated toxic effect of BZ on liver structure and function.

  19. Frequency of IFNγ-producing T cells correlates with seroreactivity and activated T cells during canine Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Ashley N; Cooley, Gretchen; Gwyn, Sarah; Orozco, Marcela M; Tarleton, Rick L

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans or animals are not available, and in many settings, dogs are an important source of domestic infection for the insect vector. Identification of infected canines is crucial for evaluating peridomestic transmission dynamics and parasite control strategies. As immune control of T. cruzi infection is dependent on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, we aimed to define a serodiagnostic assay and T cell phenotypic markers for identifying infected dogs and studying the canine T. cruzi-specific immune response. Plasma samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from forty-two dogs living in a T. cruzi-endemic region. Twenty dogs were known to be seropositive and nine seronegative by conventional serologic tests two years prior to our study. To determine canine seroreactivity, we tested sera or plasma samples in a multiplex bead array against eleven recombinant T. cruzi proteins. Ninety-four percent (17/18) of dogs positive by multiplex serology were initially positive by conventional serology. The frequency of IFNγ-producing cells in PBMCs responding to T. cruzi correlated to serological status, identifying 95% of multiplex seropositive dogs. Intracellular staining identified CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations as the sources of T. cruzi lysate-induced IFNγ. Low expression of CCR7 and CD62L on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells suggested a predominance of effector/effector memory T cells in seropositive canines. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to correlate T. cruzi-specific antibody responses with T cell responses in naturally infected dogs and validate these methods for identifying dogs exposed to T. cruzi. PMID:24456537

  20. Comparison of the infectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi insect-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes after mucosal and cutaneous contaminative challenges

    PubMed Central

    Eickhoff, Christopher Steven; Dunn, Brian Anthony; Sullivan, Nicole Lea; Hoft, Daniel Fredric

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infects humans when infected triatomine vector excreta contaminate breaks in skin or mucosal surfaces. T. cruzi insect-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes (IMT) invade through gastric mucosa after oral challenges without any visible inflammatory changes, while cutaneous and conjunctival infections result in obvious local physical signs. In this study we compared the infectivity of T. cruzi IMT in mice after cutaneous and oral contaminative challenges simulating natural infections. The 50% infective dose (ID50) for oral challenge was 100 fold lower than the ID50for cutaneous challenge, indicating that oral mucosal transmission is more efficient than cutaneous transmission. PMID:23828001

  1. Identification and detection of Trypanosoma cruzi by using a DNA amplification fingerprint obtained from the ribosomal intergenic spacer.

    PubMed Central

    González, N; Galindo, I; Guevara, P; Novak, E; Scorza, J V; Añez, N; Da Silveira, J F; Ramírez, J L

    1994-01-01

    We designed a PCR assay targeted on repeated elements of the ribosomal intergenic spacer which produces highly polymorphic DNA band patterns for different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi. By labeling the PCR products with digoxigenin and by chemiluminescence detection, we improved the assay sensitivity by three orders of magnitude to get T. cruzi strain fingerprints in feces of the trypanosome-infected triatomine bug vector. We also developed a capture assay for the digoxigenin-labeled PCR products that allowed us to detect T. cruzi in triatomine bug vector feces and in human serum samples with a solid support. Images PMID:8126172

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Entrance through Systemic or Mucosal Infection Sites Differentially Modulates Regional Immune Response Following Acute Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Meis, Juliana; Barreto de Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva dos Santos, Danielle; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Savino, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is characterized by a systemic infection that leads to the strong activation of the adaptive immune response. Outbreaks of oral contamination by the infective protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi are frequent in Brazil and other Latin American countries, and an increased severity of clinical manifestations and mortality is observed in infected patients. These findings have elicited questions about the specific responses triggered after T. cruzi entry via mucosal sites, possibly modulating local immune mechanisms, and further impacting regional and systemic immunity. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of differential lymphoid organ responses in experimental models of acute T. cruzi infection. PMID:23898334

  3. Deficiency of antigen-specific B cells results in decreased Trypanosoma cruzi systemic but not mucosal immunity due to CD8 T cell exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Nicole L.; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Sagartz, John; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against mucosally invasive, intracellular pathogens must induce a myriad of immune responses in order to provide optimal mucosal and systemic protection, including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and antibody-producing B cells. In general, CD4+ T cells are known to provide important helper functions for both CD8+ T cell and B cell responses. However, the relative importance of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and B cells for mucosal protection is less clearly defined. We have studied these questions in detail using the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Despite our initial hypothesis that mucosal antibodies would be important, we show that B cells are critical for systemic, but not mucosal, T. cruzi protective immunity. B cell deficient mice developed normal levels of CD8+ effector T cell responses early after mucosal T. cruzi infection and T. cruzi trans-sialidase vaccination. However, after highly virulent systemic challenge, T. cruzi immune mice lacking T. cruzi-specific B cells failed to control parasitemia or prevent death. Mechanistically, T. cruzi-specific CD8+ T cells generated in the absence of B cells expressed increased PD-1 and Lag-3 and became functionally exhausted after high-level T. cruzi systemic challenge. T. cruzi immune serum prevented CD8+ T cell functional exhaustion and reduced mortality in mice lacking B cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that T. cruzi-specific B cells are necessary during systemic, but not mucosal, parasite challenge. PMID:25595788

  4. The Role of the Trypanosoma cruzi TcNRBD1 Protein in Translation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Camila; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Goldenberg, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in trypanosomatids occurs mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Despite the importance of this type of control in Trypanosoma cruzi, few RNA binding proteins have been characterized. The RRM domain (RNA Recognition Motif) is one of the most abundant domains found in RNA-binding proteins in higher eukaryotes. Proteins containing the RRM domain are involved in the majority of post-transcriptional processes regulating gene expression. In this work, we aimed to characterize the protein TcNRBD1 from T. cruzi. TcNRBD1 is an RNA-binding protein that contains 2 RRM domains and is the ortholog of the P34 and P37 proteins from Trypanosoma brucei. The TcNRBD1 protein is expressed in all developmental stages of T. cruzi, and its localization pattern is concentrated at the perinuclear region. TcNRBD1 is associated with polysomes and with the 80S monosomes. Furthermore, sequencing of the mRNAs bound to TcNRBD1 allowed the identification of several transcripts that encode ribosomal proteins. Immunoprecipitation assays followed by mass spectrometry showed that the protein complexes with several ribosomal proteins from both the 40S and 60S subunits. In summary, the results indicate that TcNRBD1 is associated with different parts of the translation process, either by regulating mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins or by acting in some step of ribosome assembly in T. cruzi. PMID:27760165

  5. Rhodnius prolixus Life History Outcomes Differ when Infected with Different Trypanosoma cruzi I Strains

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jennifer K.; Graham, Andrea L.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Chávez, Omar Triana

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a parasite on the life history of its vector is important for understanding and predicting disease transmission. Chagas disease agent Trypanosoma cruzi is a generalist parasite that is diverse across scales from its genetic diversity to the 100s of mammal and vector species it infects. Its vertebrate hosts show quite variable responses to infection, however, to date there are no studies looking at how T. cruzi variability might result in variable outcomes in its invertebrate host. Therefore, we investigated the effect of different T. cruzi I strains on Rhodnius prolixus survival and development. We found significant variation between insects infected with different strains, with some strains having no effect, as compared with uninfected insects, and others with significantly lower survival and development. We also found that different variables had varying importance between strains, with the effect of time postinfection and the blood:weight ratio of the infective meal significantly affecting the survival of insects infected with some strains, but not others. Our results suggest that T. cruzi can be pathogenic not only to its vertebrate hosts but also to its invertebrate hosts. PMID:26078316

  6. Importation of Hybrid Human-Associated Trypanosoma cruzi Strains of Southern South American Origin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Louisa A; Ramirez, Juan David; Llewellyn, Martin S; Guhl, Felipe; Miles, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    We report the characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi of southern South American origin among humans, domestic vectors, and peridomestic hosts in Colombia using high-resolution nuclear and mitochondrial genotyping. Expanding our understanding of the geographic range of lineage TcVI, which is associated with severe Chagas disease, will help clarify risk of human infection for improved disease control.

  7. Enhancing effects of gamma interferon on phagocytic cell association with and killing of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, J. J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Zlotnik, A.

    1985-01-01

    Results are reported from a study of the influence gamma interferon (GIFN) and interleukin 2 (IL2) have on the capability of P388D1 cells and mouse resident peritoneal macrophages (MPM) to attach to the blood-resident parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and kill them. Cultures of trypomastigote forms of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi grown in bovine serum were introduced into peritoneal cells of mice, along with P388D1 cells incubated with GIFN, IL2 and both. Control cells were also maintained. Statistical analysis were then performed on data on counts of the number of dead T. Cruzi cells. The GIFN enhanced the interaction of MPM and P388D1 cells with the surface of T. Cruzi, provided the interaction was given over 12 hr to take place. A depression of the cytotoxicity of P388D1 cells was attributed to mediation by H2O2, an effect partially offset by incubation with the lymphokine GIFN.

  8. Identification of a Hyperendemic Area for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Central Veracruz, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Ligonio, Angel; López-Monteon, Aracely; Guzmán-Gómez, Daniel; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Limón-Flores, Yairh; Dumonteil, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The state of Veracruz, Mexico, is a well-recognized endemic region for Chagas disease, but the geographic distribution of the disease and its magnitude are still poorly documented. We evaluated the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the sanitary jurisdictions of Cordoba and Cosamaloapan in central Veracruz. A total of 654 serum samples from 19 rural localities were tested by using four tests: two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, an indirect immunofluorescent, and Western blotting. Overall, 110 (16.8%) of 654 samples were positive for T. cruzi by ≥ 2 tests (95% confidence interval = 14.2–19.9%). The municipality of Tezonapa in the jurisdiction of Cordoba was identified as a potential hyperendemic region with seroprevalence rates ≤ 45% in young children. No cases were detected in the jurisdiction of Cosamaloapan. Further studies should help clarify T. cruzi transmission dynamics in Tezonapa. The magnitude of T. cruzi infection rate in this region calls for the urgent implementation of extensive epidemiologic surveillance and control programs. PMID:20595496

  9. IFN-γ Plays a Unique Role in Protection against Low Virulent Trypanosoma cruzi Strain

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Adele A.; Saosa, Jasson S. S.; da Silva, Grace K.; Martins, Flávia A.; da Silva, Aline A.; Souza Neto, Cecílio P. da Silva; Horta, Catarina V.; Zamboni, Dario S.; da Silva, João S.; Ferro, Eloisa A. V.; da Silva, Claudio V.

    2012-01-01

    Background T. cruzi strains have been divided into six discrete typing units (DTUs) according to their genetic background. These groups are designated T. cruzi I to VI. In this context, amastigotes from G strain (T. cruzi I) are highly infective in vitro and show no parasitemia in vivo. Here we aimed to understand why amastigotes from G strain are highly infective in vitro and do not contribute for a patent in vivo infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Our in vitro studies demonstrated the first evidence that IFN-γ would be associated to the low virulence of G strain in vivo. After intraperitoneal amastigotes inoculation in wild-type and knockout mice for TNF-α, Nod2, Myd88, iNOS, IL-12p40, IL-18, CD4, CD8 and IFN-γ we found that the latter is crucial for controlling infection by G strain amastigotes. Conclusions/Significance Our results showed that amastigotes from G strain are highly infective in vitro but did not contribute for a patent infection in vivo due to its susceptibility to IFN-γ production by host immune cells. These data are useful to understand the mechanisms underlying the contrasting behavior of different T. cruzi groups for in vitro and in vivo infection. PMID:22509418

  10. Identification and Characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi B-cell Superantigen Tc24

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Sarah M.; Jones, Kathryn M.; Zhan, Bin; Essigmann, Heather T.; Murray, Kristy O.; Garcia, Melissa N.; Gorchakov, Rodion; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.; Brown, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes life-long disease after infection and leads to cardiac disease in 30% of infected individuals. After infection, the parasites are readily detectable in the blood during the first few days before disseminating to infect numerous cell types. Preliminary data suggested that the Tc24 protein that localizes to the T. cruzi membrane during all life stages possesses B-cell superantigenic properties. These antigens facilitate immune escape by interfering with antibody-mediated responses, particularly the avoidance of catalytic antibodies. These antibodies are an innate host defense mechanism present in the naive repertoire, and catalytic antibody–antigen binding results in hydrolysis of the target. We tested the B-cell superantigenic properties of Tc24 by comparing the degree of Tc24 hydrolysis by IgM purified from either Tc24 unexposed or exposed mice and humans. Respective samples were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, silver stained, and the degree of hydrolysis was measured. Data presented in this report suggest that the T. cruzi Tc24 is a B-cell superantigen based on the observations that 1) Tc24 was hydrolyzed by IgM present in serum of unexposed mice and humans and 2) exposure to Tc24 eliminated catalytic activity as early as 4 days after T. cruzi infection. PMID:26598565

  11. Fibronectin-Degrading Activity of Trypanosoma cruzi Cysteine Proteinase Plays a Role in Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Juliano, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, binds to diverse extracellular matrix proteins. Such an ability prevails in the parasite forms that circulate in the bloodstream and contributes to host cell invasion. Whether this also applies to the insect-stage metacyclic trypomastigotes, the developmental forms that initiate infection in the mammalian host, is not clear. Using T. cruzi CL strain metacyclic forms, we investigated whether fibronectin bound to the parasites and affected target cell invasion. Fibronectin present in cell culture medium bound to metacyclic forms and was digested by cruzipain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase. G strain, with negligible cruzipain activity, displayed a minimal fibronectin-degrading effect. Binding to fibronectin was mediated by gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface molecule implicated in parasite internalization. When exogenous fibronectin was present at concentrations higher than cruzipain can properly digest, or fibronectin expression was stimulated by treatment of epithelial HeLa cells with transforming growth factor beta, the parasite invasion was reduced. Treatment of HeLa cells with purified recombinant cruzipain increased parasite internalization, whereas the treatment of parasites with cysteine proteinase inhibitor had the opposite effect. Metacyclic trypomastigote entry into HeLa cells was not affected by anti-β1 integrin antibody but was inhibited by anti-fibronectin antibody. Overall, our results have indicated that the cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi metacyclic forms, through its fibronectin-degrading activity, is implicated in host cell invasion. PMID:25267835

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Biological Effects of Novel Arylimidamide Derivatives against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Bruno Lisboa; da Silva, Patrícia Bernadino; Batista, Marcos Meuser; da Silva, Francisca Hildemagna Guedes; da Silva, Cristiane França; Tidwell, Richard R.; Patrick, Donald A.; Jones, Susan Kilgore; Bakunov, Stanislav A.; Bakunova, Svetlana M.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health problem in several Latin American countries. The available chemotherapies for CD have limited efficacy and exhibit undesirable side effects. Aromatic diamidines and arylimidamides (AIAs) have shown broad-spectrum activity against intracellular parasites, including T. cruzi. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the biological activity of eight novel AIAs (16DAP002, 16SAB079, 18SAB075, 23SMB022, 23SMB026, 23SMB054, 26SMB070, and 27SMB009) against experimental models of T. cruzi infection in vitro and in vivo. Our data show that none of the compounds induced a loss of cellular viability up to 32 μM. Two AIAs, 18SAB075 and 16DAP002, exhibited good in vitro activity against different parasite strains (Y and Tulahuen) and against the two relevant forms of the parasite for mammalian hosts. Due to the excellent selective indexes of 18SAB075, this AIA was moved to in vivo tests for acute toxicity and parasite efficacy; nontoxic doses (no-observed-adverse-effect level [NOAEL], 50 mg/kg) were employed in the tests for parasite efficacy. In experimental models of acute T. cruzi infection, 18SAB075 reduced parasitemia levels only up to 50% and led to 40% protection against mortality (at 5 mg/kg of body weight), being less effective than the reference drug, benznidazole. PMID:24752263

  13. Natural populations of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, have a complex multiclonal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tibayrenc, M.; Ward, P.; Moya, A.; Ayala, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied 15 gene loci coding for enzymes in 121 Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from a wide geographic range - from the US and Mexico to Chile and southern Brazil. T.cruzi is diploid but reproduction is basically clonal, with very little if any sexuality remaining at present. They have identified 43 different clones by their genetic composition; the same genetic clone is often found in very distant places and in diverse hosts. There is much genetic heterogeneity among the different clones, and they cannot be readily classified into a few discrete groups that might represent natural taxa. These findings imply that the biological and medical characteristics need to be ascertained separately for each natural clone. The evidence indicates that clonal evolution is very ancient in T.cruzi. The authors propose two alternative hypotheses concerning the relationship between the biochemical diversity and the heterogeneity in other biological and medical characteristics of T. cruzi. One hypothesis is that the degree of diversity between strains simply reflects the time elapsed since their last common ancestor. The second hypothesis is that biological and medical heterogeneity is recent and reflects adaptation to different transmission cycles. A decision between the two hypotheses can be reached with appropriate studies, with important medical consequences.

  14. Cloning and expression analysis of two novel paraflagellar rod domain genes found in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Clark, April K; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Kandlikar, Sachin; Lal, Shailesh; Stryker, Gabrielle A

    2005-07-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum is one of the most complex macromolecular structures found in cells, containing more than 250 proteins. One unique structure in the flagella of trypanomastids is the paraflagellar rod (PFR). The PFR constitutes a lattice of cytoskeletal filaments that lies alongside the axoneme in the flagella. This unique and complex structure is critical for cell motility, though little is known about its molecular assembly or its role in the lifecycle of trypanosomatids. These proteins are of particular importance in Trypanosoma cruzi, as purified or recombinant PFR proteins have been demonstrated to be immunogenic, protecting mice from a lethal challenge with the parasite. We have searched the T. cruzi databases and discovered two novel genes containing PFR domains. Both these genes are transcribed in vivo and are significantly larger than the previously described PFR genes identified in T. cruzi (>2 Kb). Real-time PCR was used to examine the relative expression levels of six PFR genes, including the two we describe here, in all three stages of T. cruzi's lifecycle. Database searches have further provided EST and genomic sequence support for the presence of these genes in two other pathogenic trypanosomatids, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp. One of these genes, designated PFR5 contains a carboxy terminal SH3 domain not previously seen in PFR family genes. We propose that this proline-binding SH3 domain may play an important role in the assembly of the PFR. PMID:15918067

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi burden, genotypes, and clinical evaluation of Chilean patients with chronic Chagas cardiopathy.

    PubMed

    Apt, Werner; Arribada, Arturo; Zulantay, Inés; Saavedra, Miguel; Araya, Eduardo; Solari, Aldo; Ortiz, Sylvia; Arriagada, Katherine; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    There are currently no biomarkers to assess which patients with chronic indeterminate Chagas disease will develop heart disease and which will spend their entire life in this state. We hypothetize that the parasite burden and Trypanosoma cruzi genotypes are related to the presence of heart disease in patients with Chagas disease. This study is aimed to investigate the parasite burden and T. cruzi genotypes in chagasic cardiopaths versus chagasic individuals without cardiac involvement according to the New York Heart Association. Patients with chronic Chagas disease, 50 with and 50 without cardiopathy (controls), groups A and B, respectively, were submitted to anamnesis, physical examination, and electrocardiogram. Echo-Doppler was performed for group A; all important known causes of cardiopathy were discarded. Xenodiagnosis, conventional PCR, and quantitative PCR were performed on patients of both groups. T. cruzi genotyping was done for 25 patients of group A and 20 of group B. The 50 cardiopaths had 80 electrocardiographic alterations, most of them in grade II of the New York Heart Association classification; 49 were classified in grade I by Echo-Doppler, and only one patient was in grade III. The difference in average parasitemia in patients of groups A and B was not significant. The most frequent T. cruzi DTU found was TcV. The parasite burden and genotype of the groups with and without cardiopathy were similar. Graphical abstract Imagen 1 Chronic chagas cardiopathy chest X-ray heart enlargement Figure 2 Chronic Chagas cardiopathy microaneurism of left ventricle. Cineangiography.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids.

  17. Th17 Cells Are More Protective Than Th1 Cells Against the Intracellular Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuli; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Th17 cells are a subset of CD4+ T cells known to play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases, as well as in the defense against some extracellular bacteria and fungi. However, Th17 cells are not believed to have a significant function against intracellular infections. In contrast to this paradigm, we have discovered that Th17 cells provide robust protection against Trypanosoma cruzi, the intracellular protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. Th17 cells confer significantly stronger protection against T. cruzi-related mortality than even Th1 cells, traditionally thought to be the CD4+ T cell subset most important for immunity to T. cruzi and other intracellular microorganisms. Mechanistically, Th17 cells can directly protect infected cells through the IL-17A-dependent induction of NADPH oxidase, involved in the phagocyte respiratory burst response, and provide indirect help through IL-21-dependent activation of CD8+ T cells. The discovery of these novel Th17 cell-mediated direct protective and indirect helper effects important for intracellular immunity highlights the diversity of Th17 cell roles, and increases understanding of protective T. cruzi immunity, aiding the development of therapeutics and vaccines for Chagas disease. PMID:27695083

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin inhibits the complement lectin pathway activation by direct interaction with L-Ficolin.

    PubMed

    Sosoniuk, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; Kenawy, Hany; Gaboriaud, Christine; Thielens, Nicole; Fujita, Teizo; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Ferreira, Arturo; Valck, Carolina

    2014-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, the sixth neglected tropical disease worldwide, infects 10-12 million people in Latin America. Differently from T. cruzi epimastigotes, trypomastigotes are complement-resistant and infective. CRPs, T-DAF, sialic acid and lipases explain at least part of this resistance. In vitro, T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a chaperone molecule that translocates from the ER to the parasite surface: (a) Inhibits the human classical complement activation, by interacting with C1, (b) As a consequence, an increase in infectivity is evident and, (c) It inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. We report here that TcCRT also binds to the L-Ficolin collagenous portion, thus inhibiting approximately between 35 and 64% of the human complement lectin pathway activation, initiated by L-Ficolin, a property not shared by H-Ficolin. While L-Ficolin binds to 60% of trypomastigotes and to 24% of epimastigotes, 50% of the former and 4% of the latter display TcCRT on their surfaces. Altogether, these data indicate that TcCRT is a parasite inhibitory receptor for Ficolins. The resulting evasive activities, together with the TcCRT capacity to inhibit C1, with a concomitant increase in infectivity, may represent T. cruzi strategies to inhibit important arms of the innate immune response.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Elche (Spain): comparison of the seroprevalence in immigrants from Paraguay and Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, José M; Ponce, Yamileth; Gallegos, Ingrid; Flóres-Chávez, María; Cañavate, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is a global public health problem due to the recent emigration of people from Latin America to other regions, including Europe. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among Paraguayans and Bolivians living in Elche (Spain), a city located in the Mediterranean Coast of Spain. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Capillary blood samples were obtained through a finger prick, and collected on filter paper. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect immunofluorescence tests were performed to search for anti-T. cruzi IgG antibodies in the filter papers. Thirteen out of 201 participants were infected with T. cruzi in this study, seven out of 73 Bolivians and six out of 128 Paraguayans, corresponding to seroprevalences of 9.59% (95%CI, 4.72–18.5%) and 4.69% (95%CI, 2.17–9.85%), respectively. Palpitation, chest pain, and migration from rural endemic areas were the most common clinical and epidemiological risk factors associated with T. cruzi infection detected in the Paraguayan group. This study highlights that Chagas disease is no longer limited to the Bolivian population living in Spain. It is important to note this wider prevalence and, therefore, not discount Paraguayans in the screening for Chagas disease in Spain. Indeed, this should be considered for all immigrants from Latin America. PMID:22943545

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids. PMID:26983938

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Elche (Spain): comparison of the seroprevalence in immigrants from Paraguay and Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Ramos, José M; Ponce, Yamileth; Gallegos, Ingrid; Flóres-Chávez, María; Cañavate, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2012-05-01

    Chagas disease is a global public health problem due to the recent emigration of people from Latin America to other regions, including Europe. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among Paraguayans and Bolivians living in Elche (Spain), a city located in the Mediterranean Coast of Spain. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Capillary blood samples were obtained through a finger prick, and collected on filter paper. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect immunofluorescence tests were performed to search for anti-T. cruzi IgG antibodies in the filter papers. Thirteen out of 201 participants were infected with T. cruzi in this study, seven out of 73 Bolivians and six out of 128 Paraguayans, corresponding to seroprevalences of 9·59% (95%CI, 4·72-18·5%) and 4·69% (95%CI, 2·17-9·85%), respectively. Palpitation, chest pain, and migration from rural endemic areas were the most common clinical and epidemiological risk factors associated with T. cruzi infection detected in the Paraguayan group. This study highlights that Chagas disease is no longer limited to the Bolivian population living in Spain. It is important to note this wider prevalence and, therefore, not discount Paraguayans in the screening for Chagas disease in Spain. Indeed, this should be considered for all immigrants from Latin America.

  2. Nitrofuran drugs as common subversive substrates of Trypanosoma cruzi lipoamide dehydrogenase and trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed

    Blumenstiel, K; Schöneck, R; Yardley, V; Croft, S L; Krauth-Siegel, R L

    1999-12-01

    Lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH), trypanothione reductase (TR), and glutathione reductase (GR) catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of disulfide substrates. TR occurs exclusively in trypanosomatids which lack a GR. Besides their physiological reactions, the flavoenzymes catalyze the single-electron reduction of nitrofurans with the concomitant generation of superoxide anions. Here, we report on the interaction of clinically used antimicrobial nitrofurans with LipDH and TR from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease (South American trypanosomiasis), in comparison to mammalian LipDH and GR. The compounds were studied as inhibitors and as subversive substrates of the enzymes. None of the nitrofurans inhibited LipDH, although they did interfere with the disulfide reduction of TR and GR. When the compounds were studied as substrates, T. cruzi LipDH showed a high rate of nitrofuran reduction and was even more efficient than its mammalian counterpart. Several derivatives were also effective subversive substrates of TR, but the respective reaction with human GR was negligible. Nifuroxazide, nifuroxime, and nifurprazine proved to be the most promising derivatives since they were redox-cycled by both T. cruzi LipDH and TR and had pronounced antiparasitic effects in cultures of T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. The results suggest that those nitrofuran derivatives which interact with both parasite flavoenzymes should be revisited as trypanocidal drugs. PMID:10571254

  3. Effects of habitat fragmentation on wild mammal infection by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Vaz, V C; D'Andrea, P S; Jansen, A M

    2007-11-01

    Expansion of human activities frequently results in habitat fragmentation, a phenomenon that has been widely recognized in the last decades as one of the major threats to world's biodiversity. The transformation of a continuous forest into a fragmented area results in a hyper-dynamic landscape with unpredictable consequences to overall ecosystem health. The effect of the fragmentation process on Trypanosoma cruzi infection among small wild mammals was studied in an Atlantic Rain Forest landscape. Comparing continous forest to fragmented habitat, marsupials were less abundant than rodents in the continuous landscape. An overall decrease in small wild mammal richness was observed in the smaller fragments. An anti-T. cruzi seroprevalence of 18% (82/440) was deteced by immunofluorescence assay. Moreover, this seroprevalence was higher in the fragmented habitat than in the continuous forest. According to the collected data, 3 main factors seem to modulate infection by T. cruzi in small wild mammals: (i) habitat fragmentation; (ii) biodiversity loss; (iii) increase of marsupial abundance in mammal communities. Furthermore, an extremely mild controlled infection by T. cruzi was detected since no patent parasitaemia could be detected in fresh blood samples, and no parasites were isolated by haemoculture.

  4. The seroprevalence of cysticercosis, malaria, and Trypanosoma cruzi among North Carolina migrant farmworkers.

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, S; Seed, J R; Estrada, J; Wrenn, E

    1993-01-01

    A seroprevalence study of cysticercosis, Trypanosoma cruzi, and plasmodia species and screening for active malaria was conducted among a randomly selected group of 138 Hispanic and Haitian migrant farmworkers. A random sample of labor camps in eastern North Carolina was selected. Blood samples were tested by Indirect Fluorescent Antibody techniques for plasmodial antibody and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cysticerci and T. cruzi antibodies. Questionnaires collected demographic data and medical history of the workers and family. Blood films stained with Leukostat stain were examined for plasmodia species. The seroprevalence of cysticercosis was 10 percent, T. cruzi 2 percent, and plasmodia species 4.4 percent. One case of active malaria (Plasmodium vivax) was demonstrated. The clinical significance of seropositivity was not determined, but these results suggest that a small but significant number of farmworkers are infected with cysticercosis, T. cruzi, and malaria. Migrant health clinicians should be aware of the possible presence of these infections. Greater observance and enforcement of sanitation regulations in farmwork is needed to prevent transmission of cysticercosis. PMID:8265758

  5. Caspase inhibition reduces lymphocyte apoptosis and improves host immune responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elisabeth M; Guillermo, Landi V C; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; De Meis, Juliana; Nunes, Marise P; Senra, Juliana F V; Soares, Milena B P; DosReis, George A; Lopes, Marcela F

    2007-03-01

    In experimental Chagas' disease, lymphocytes from mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi show increased apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with a pan-caspase blocker peptide inhibited expression of the active form of effector caspase-3 in vitro and rescued both B and T cells from cell death. Injection of the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethyl ketone, but not a control peptide, reduced parasitemia and lymphocyte apoptosis in T. cruzi-infected mice. Moreover, treatment with caspase inhibitor throughout acute infection increased the absolute numbers of B and T cells in the spleen and lymph nodes, without affecting cell infiltrates in the heart. Following treatment, we found increased accumulation of memory/activated CD4 and CD8 T cells, and secretion of IFN-gamma by splenocytes stimulated with T. cruzi antigens. Caspase inhibition in the course of infection reduced the intracellular load of parasites in peritoneal macrophages, and increased the production of TNF-alpha and nitric oxide upon activation in vitro. Our results indicate that inhibition of caspases with a pan-caspase blocker peptide improves protective type-1 immune responses to T. cruzi infection. We suggest that mechanisms of apoptosis are potential therapeutic targets in Chagas' disease.

  6. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Bin; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  7. Importation of Hybrid Human-Associated Trypanosoma cruzi Strains of Southern South American Origin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Louisa A; Ramirez, Juan David; Llewellyn, Martin S; Guhl, Felipe; Miles, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    We report the characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi of southern South American origin among humans, domestic vectors, and peridomestic hosts in Colombia using high-resolution nuclear and mitochondrial genotyping. Expanding our understanding of the geographic range of lineage TcVI, which is associated with severe Chagas disease, will help clarify risk of human infection for improved disease control. PMID:27434772

  8. Importation of Hybrid Human-Associated Trypanosoma cruzi Strains of Southern South American Origin, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juan David; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Guhl, Felipe; Miles, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi of southern South American origin among humans, domestic vectors, and peridomestic hosts in Colombia using high-resolution nuclear and mitochondrial genotyping. Expanding our understanding of the geographic range of lineage TcVI, which is associated with severe Chagas disease, will help clarify risk of human infection for improved disease control. PMID:27434772

  9. Mitochondrial Gene Expression Is Responsive to Starvation Stress and Developmental Transition in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Aubie K; Kalem, Murat C; Zimmer, Sara L

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi parasites causing Chagas disease are passed between mammals by the triatomine bug vector. Within the insect, T. cruzi epimastigote-stage cells replicate and progress through the increasingly nutrient-restricted digestive tract, differentiating into infectious, nonreplicative metacyclic trypomastigotes. Thus, we evaluated how nutrient perturbations or metacyclogenesis affects mitochondrial gene expression in different insect life cycle stages. We compared mitochondrial RNA abundances in cultures containing fed, replicating epimastigotes, differentiating cultures containing both starved epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes and epimastigote starvation cultures. We observed increases in mitochondrial rRNAs and some mRNAs in differentiating cultures. These increases predominated only for the edited CYb mRNA in cultures enriched for metacyclic trypomastigotes. For the other transcripts, abundance increases were linked to starvation and were strongest in culture fractions with a high population of starved epimastigotes. We show that loss of both glucose and amino acids results in rapid increases in RNA abundances that are quickly reduced when these nutrients are returned. Furthermore, the individual RNAs exhibit distinct temporal abundance patterns, suggestive of multiple mechanisms regulating individual transcript abundance. Finally, increases in mitochondrial respiratory complex subunit mRNA abundances were not matched by increases in abundances of nucleus-encoded subunit mRNAs, nor were there statistically significant increases in protein levels of three nucleus-encoded subunits tested. These results show that, similarly to that in T. brucei, the mitochondrial genome in T. cruzi has the potential to alter gene expression in response to environmental or developmental stimuli but for an as-yet-unknown purpose. IMPORTANCE Chagas disease is caused by insect-transmitted Trypanosoma cruzi. Halting T. cruzi's life cycle in one of its various

  10. Interaction with host factors exacerbates Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion capacity upon oral infection.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Charles; Cortez, Mauro; Ferreira, Daniele; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2007-12-01

    Outbreaks of severe acute Chagas' disease acquired by oral infection, leading to death in some cases, have occurred in recent years. Using the mouse model, we investigated the basis of such virulence by analyzing a Trypanosoma cruzi isolate, SC, from a patient with severe acute clinical symptoms, who was infected by oral route. It has previously been shown that, upon oral inoculation into mice, T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes invade the gastric mucosal epithelium by engaging the stage-specific surface glycoprotein gp82, whereas the surface molecule gp90 functions as a down-modulator of cell invasion. We found that, when orally inoculated into mice, metacyclic forms of the SC isolate, which express high levels of gp90, produced high parasitemias and high mortality, in sharp contrast with the reduced infectivity in vitro. Upon recovery from the mouse stomach 1h after oral inoculation, the gp90 molecule of the parasites was completely degraded, and their entry into HeLa cells, as well as into Caco-2 cells, was increased. The gp82 molecule was more resistant to digestive action of the gastric juice. Host cell invasion of SC isolate metacyclic trypomastigotes was augmented in the presence of gastric mucin. No alteration in infectivity was observed in T. cruzi strains CL and G which were used as references and which express gp90 molecules resistant to degradation by gastric juice. Taken together, our findings suggest that the exacerbation of T. cruzi infectivity, such as observed upon interaction of the SC isolate with the mouse stomach components, may be responsible for the severity of acute Chagas' disease that has been reported in outbreaks of oral T. cruzi infection.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi infection by oral route: how the interplay between parasite and host components modulates infectivity.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Nobuko

    2008-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection by oral route constitutes the most important mode of transmission in some geographical regions, as illustrated by reports on microepidemics and outbreaks of acute Chagas' disease acquired by ingestion of food contaminated with parasites from triatomine insects. In the mouse model, T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes invade the gastric mucosal epithelium, a unique portal of entry for systemic infection. High efficiency of metacyclic forms in establishing infection by oral route is associated with expression of gp82, a stage-specific surface molecule that binds to gastric mucin and to epithelial cells. Gp82 promotes parasite entry by triggering the signaling cascades leading to intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. T. cruzi strains deficient in gp82 can effectively invade cells in vitro, by engaging the Ca(2+) signal-inducing surface glycoprotein gp30. However, they are poorly infective in mice by oral route because gp30 has low affinity for gastric mucin. Metacyclic forms also express gp90, a stage-specific surface glycoprotein that binds to host cells and acts as a negative regulator of invasion. T. cruzi strains expressing gp90 at high levels, in addition to gp82 and gp30, are all poor cell invaders in vitro. Notwithstanding, their infectivity by oral route may vary because, unlike gp82 and gp30, which resist degradation by pepsin in the gastric milieu, the gp90 isoforms of different strains have varying susceptibility to peptic digestion. For instance, in a T. cruzi isolate, derived from an acute case of Chagas' disease acquired by oral route, gp90 is extensively degraded by gastric juice in the mouse stomach and this renders the parasite highly invasive towards target cells. If such an exacerbation of infectivity occurs in humans, it may be responsible for the severity of the disease reported in outbreaks of oral infection.

  12. Association of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with risk factors and electrocardiographic abnormalities in northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background American trypanosomiasis is a major disease and public health issue, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The prevalence of T. cruzi has not been fully documented, and there are few reports of this issue in Nuevo Leon. The aim of this study was to update the seroprevalence rate of T. cruzi infection, including an epidemiological analysis of the risk factors associated with this infection and an electrocardiographic (ECG) evaluation of those infected. Methods Sera from 2,688 individuals from 10 municipalities in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, were evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect hemagglutination assay. An ECG case–control study was performed in subjects seropositive for T. cruzi and the results were matched by sex and age to seronegative residents of the same localities. A univariate analysis with χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests was used to determine the association between seropositivity and age (years), sex, and ECG changes. A multivariate analysis was then performed to calculate the odd ratios between T. cruzi seropositivity and the risk factors. Results The seropositive rate was 1.93% (52/2,688). In the ECG study, 22.85% (8/35) of the infected individuals exhibited ECG abnormalities. Triatoma gerstaeckeri was the only vector reported. The main risk factors were ceiling construction material (P ≤ 0.0024), domestic animals (P ≤ 0.0001), and living in rural municipalities (P ≤ 0.0025). Conclusions These findings demonstrate a 10-fold higher prevalence of Chagas disease than previously reported (0.2%), which implies a serious public health threat in northeastern Mexico. The epidemiological profile established in this study differs from that found in the rest of Mexico, where human populations live in close proximity to domiciliary triatomines. PMID:24580840

  13. Metabolic signatures of triatomine vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi unveiled by metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Han, Jun; Pan, Jingxi; Moreira, Carlos J C; Azambuja, Patrícia; Borchers, Christoph H; Carels, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a trypanosomiasis whose causative agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by hematophagous insects known as triatomines and affects a large proportion of South America. The digestive tract of the insect vectors in which T. cruzi develops constitutes a dynamic environment that affects the development of the parasite. Thus, we set out to investigate the chemical composition of the triatomine intestinal tract through a metabolomics approach. We performed Direct Infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry on fecal samples of three triatomine species (Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus) fed with rabbit blood. We then identified groups of metabolites whose frequencies were either uniform in all species or enriched in each of them. By querying the Human Metabolome Database, we obtained putative identities of the metabolites of interest. We found that a core group of metabolites with uniform frequencies in all species represented approximately 80% of the molecules detected, whereas the other 20% varied among triatomine species. The uniform core was composed of metabolites of various categories, including fatty acids, steroids, glycerolipids, nucleotides, sugars, and others. Nevertheless, the metabolic fingerprint of triatomine feces differs depending on the species considered. The variable core was mainly composed of prenol lipids, amino acids, glycerolipids, steroids, phenols, fatty acids and derivatives, benzoic acid and derivatives, flavonoids, glycerophospholipids, benzopyrans, and quinolines. Triatomine feces constitute a rich and varied chemical medium whose constituents are likely to affect T. cruzi development and infectivity. The complexity of the fecal metabolome of triatomines suggests that it may affect triatomine vector competence for specific T. cruzi strains. Knowledge of the chemical environment of T. cruzi in its invertebrate host is likely to

  14. Metabolic Signatures of Triatomine Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Unveiled by Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Luis Caetano M.; Han, Jun; Pan, Jingxi; Moreira, Carlos J. C.; Azambuja, Patrícia; Borchers, Christoph H.; Carels, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a trypanosomiasis whose causative agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by hematophagous insects known as triatomines and affects a large proportion of South America. The digestive tract of the insect vectors in which T. cruzi develops constitutes a dynamic environment that affects the development of the parasite. Thus, we set out to investigate the chemical composition of the triatomine intestinal tract through a metabolomics approach. We performed Direct Infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry on fecal samples of three triatomine species (Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus) fed with rabbit blood. We then identified groups of metabolites whose frequencies were either uniform in all species or enriched in each of them. By querying the Human Metabolome Database, we obtained putative identities of the metabolites of interest. We found that a core group of metabolites with uniform frequencies in all species represented approximately 80% of the molecules detected, whereas the other 20% varied among triatomine species. The uniform core was composed of metabolites of various categories, including fatty acids, steroids, glycerolipids, nucleotides, sugars, and others. Nevertheless, the metabolic fingerprint of triatomine feces differs depending on the species considered. The variable core was mainly composed of prenol lipids, amino acids, glycerolipids, steroids, phenols, fatty acids and derivatives, benzoic acid and derivatives, flavonoids, glycerophospholipids, benzopyrans, and quinolines. Triatomine feces constitute a rich and varied chemical medium whose constituents are likely to affect T. cruzi development and infectivity. The complexity of the fecal metabolome of triatomines suggests that it may affect triatomine vector competence for specific T. cruzi strains. Knowledge of the chemical environment of T. cruzi in its invertebrate host is likely to

  15. Concomitant Benznidazole and Suramin Chemotherapy in Mice Infected with a Virulent Strain of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Eliziária C.; Cupertino, Marli C.; Bastos, Daniel S. S.; Klein, Raphael C.; Silva, Eduardo A. M.; Fietto, Juliana L. R.; Talvani, André; Bahia, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Although suramin (Sur) is suggested as a potential drug candidate in the management of Chagas disease, this issue has not been objectively tested. In this study, we examined the applicability of concomitant treatment with benznidazole (Bz) and suramin in mice infected with a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Eighty 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were equally randomized in eight groups: (i) noninfected mice (negative control) and mice infected with T. cruzi Y strain receiving (ii) no treatment (positive control), (iii) Bz, 100 mg/kg of body weight per day, (iv) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, and (v to viii) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, combined with Bz, 100, 50, 25, or 5 mg/kg/day. Bz was administered by gavage, and Sur was administered intraperitoneally. Sur dramatically increased the parasitemia, cardiac content of parasite DNA, inflammation, oxidative tissue damage, and mortality. In response to high parasitic load in cardiac tissue, Sur stimulated the immune system in a manner typical of the acute phase of Chagas disease, increasing tissue levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducing a preferential IgG2a anti-T. cruzi serum pattern. When Sur and Bz were combined, the infection severity was attenuated, showing a dose-dependent Bz response. Sur therapy had a more harmful effect on the host than on the parasite and reduced the efficacy of Bz against T. cruzi infection. Considering that Sur drastically reinforced the infection evolution, potentiating the inflammatory process and the severity of cardiac lesions, the in vivo findings contradicted the in vitro anti-T. cruzi potential described for this drug. PMID:26169419

  16. The Prevalence of Chagas Heart Disease in a Central Bolivian Community Endemic for Trypanosoma Cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Yager, Jessica E.; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F.; Torrico, Faustino; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Though the incidence of new Trypanosoma cruzi infections has decreased significantly in endemic regions in the Americas, medical professionals continue to encounter a high burden of resulting Chagas disease among infected adults. The current prevalence of Chagas heart disease in a community setting is not known; nor is it known how recent insecticide vector control measures may have impacted the progression of cardiac disease in an infected population. Objectives and Methods Nested within a community serosurvey in rural and periurban communities in central Bolivia, we performed a cross-sectional cardiac substudy to evaluate adults for historical, clinical, and electrocardiographic evidence of cardiac disease. All adults between the ages of 20 and 60 years old with T. cruzi infection and those with a clinical history, physical exam, or ECG consistent with cardiac abnormalities were also scheduled for echocardiography. Results and conclusions Of the 604 cardiac substudy participants with definitive serology results, 183 were seropositive for infection with T. cruzi (30.3%). Participants who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were more likely to have conduction system defects (1.6% versus 0 for complete right bundle branch block and 10.4% versus 1.9% for any bundle branch block; p=0.008 and p<0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of bradycardia among seropositive versus seronegative participants. Echocardiogram findings were not consistent with a high burden of Chagas cardiomyopathy: valvulopathies were the most common abnormality, and few participants were found to have low ejection fraction or left ventricular dilatation. No participants had significant heart failure. Though almost one third of adults in the community were seropositive for T. cruzi infection, few had evidence of Chagas heart disease. PMID:26407509

  17. High Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence associated with minimal cardiac pathology among wild carnivores in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Lewis, Barbara C; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-08-01

    Infection with the zoonotic vector-borne protozoal parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease in humans and dogs throughout the Americas. Despite the recognized importance of various wildlife species for perpetuating Trypanosoma cruzi in nature, relatively little is known about the development of cardiac disease in infected wildlife. Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected cardiac tissue and blood from hunter-donated wildlife carcasses- including raccoon (Procyon lotor), coyote (Canis latrans), gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) - from central Texas, a region with established populations of infected triatomine vectors and increasing diagnoses of Chagas disease in domestic dogs. Based on PCR analysis, we found that 2 bobcats (14.3%), 12 coyotes (14.3%), 8 foxes (13.8%), and 49 raccoons (70.0%) were positive for T. cruzi in at least one sample (right ventricle, apex, and/or blood clot). Although a histologic survey of right ventricles showed that 21.1% of 19 PCR-positive hearts were characterized by mild lymphoplasmocytic infiltration, no other lesions and no amastigotes were observed in any histologic section. DNA sequencing of the TcSC5D gene revealed that raccoons were infected with T. cruzi strain TcIV, and a single racoon harbored a TcI/TcIV mixed infection. Relative to other wildlife species tested here, our data suggest that raccoons may be important reservoirs of TcIV in Texas and a source of infection for indigenous triatomine bugs. The overall high level of infection in this wildlife community likely reflects high levels of vector contact, including ingestion of bugs. Although the relationship between the sylvatic cycle of T. cruzi transmission and human disease risk in the United States has yet to be defined, our data suggest that hunters and wildlife professionals should take precautions to avoid direct contact with potentially infected wildlife tissues. PMID:27330982

  18. Concomitant Benznidazole and Suramin Chemotherapy in Mice Infected with a Virulent Strain of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eliziária C; Novaes, Rômulo D; Cupertino, Marli C; Bastos, Daniel S S; Klein, Raphael C; Silva, Eduardo A M; Fietto, Juliana L R; Talvani, André; Bahia, Maria T; Oliveira, Leandro L

    2015-10-01

    Although suramin (Sur) is suggested as a potential drug candidate in the management of Chagas disease, this issue has not been objectively tested. In this study, we examined the applicability of concomitant treatment with benznidazole (Bz) and suramin in mice infected with a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Eighty 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were equally randomized in eight groups: (i) noninfected mice (negative control) and mice infected with T. cruzi Y strain receiving (ii) no treatment (positive control), (iii) Bz, 100 mg/kg of body weight per day, (iv) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, and (v to viii) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, combined with Bz, 100, 50, 25, or 5 mg/kg/day. Bz was administered by gavage, and Sur was administered intraperitoneally. Sur dramatically increased the parasitemia, cardiac content of parasite DNA, inflammation, oxidative tissue damage, and mortality. In response to high parasitic load in cardiac tissue, Sur stimulated the immune system in a manner typical of the acute phase of Chagas disease, increasing tissue levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducing a preferential IgG2a anti-T. cruzi serum pattern. When Sur and Bz were combined, the infection severity was attenuated, showing a dose-dependent Bz response. Sur therapy had a more harmful effect on the host than on the parasite and reduced the efficacy of Bz against T. cruzi infection. Considering that Sur drastically reinforced the infection evolution, potentiating the inflammatory process and the severity of cardiac lesions, the in vivo findings contradicted the in vitro anti-T. cruzi potential described for this drug.

  19. High Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence associated with minimal cardiac pathology among wild carnivores in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Lewis, Barbara C; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-08-01

    Infection with the zoonotic vector-borne protozoal parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease in humans and dogs throughout the Americas. Despite the recognized importance of various wildlife species for perpetuating Trypanosoma cruzi in nature, relatively little is known about the development of cardiac disease in infected wildlife. Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected cardiac tissue and blood from hunter-donated wildlife carcasses- including raccoon (Procyon lotor), coyote (Canis latrans), gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) - from central Texas, a region with established populations of infected triatomine vectors and increasing diagnoses of Chagas disease in domestic dogs. Based on PCR analysis, we found that 2 bobcats (14.3%), 12 coyotes (14.3%), 8 foxes (13.8%), and 49 raccoons (70.0%) were positive for T. cruzi in at least one sample (right ventricle, apex, and/or blood clot). Although a histologic survey of right ventricles showed that 21.1% of 19 PCR-positive hearts were characterized by mild lymphoplasmocytic infiltration, no other lesions and no amastigotes were observed in any histologic section. DNA sequencing of the TcSC5D gene revealed that raccoons were infected with T. cruzi strain TcIV, and a single racoon harbored a TcI/TcIV mixed infection. Relative to other wildlife species tested here, our data suggest that raccoons may be important reservoirs of TcIV in Texas and a source of infection for indigenous triatomine bugs. The overall high level of infection in this wildlife community likely reflects high levels of vector contact, including ingestion of bugs. Although the relationship between the sylvatic cycle of T. cruzi transmission and human disease risk in the United States has yet to be defined, our data suggest that hunters and wildlife professionals should take precautions to avoid direct contact with potentially infected wildlife tissues.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor p55-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castaños-Velez, Esmeralda; Maerlan, Stephanie; Osorio, Lyda M.; Åberg, Frederik; Biberfeld, Peter; Örn, Anders; Rottenberg, Martín E.

    1998-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (TNFRp55) mediates host resistance to several pathogens by allowing microbicidal activities of phagocytes. In the studies reported here, TNFRp55−/− mice infected with the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi showed clearly higher parasitemia and cumulative mortality than wild-type (WT) controls did. However, gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-activated macrophages from TNFRp55−/− mice produced control levels of nitric oxide and killed the parasite efficiently in vitro. Trypanocidal mechanisms of nonphagocytic cells (myocardial fibroblasts) from both TNFRp55−/− and WT mice were also activated by IFN-γ in a dose-dependent way. However, IFN-γ-activated TNFRp55−/− nonphagocytes showed less effective killing of T. cruzi than WT control nonphagocytes, even when interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was added as a costimulator. In vivo, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice and WT mice released similar levels of NO and showed similar levels of IFN-γ mRNA and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in their tissues. Instead, increased susceptibility to T. cruzi of TNFRp55−/− mice was associated with reduced levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) (but not IgM) antibodies during infection, which is probably linked to abnormal B-cell differentiation in secondary lymphoid tissues of the mutant mice. Surprisingly, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice showed increased inflammatory and necrotic lesions in several tissues, especially in skeletal muscles, indicating that TNFRp55 plays an important role in controlling the inflammatory process. Accordingly, levels of Mn2+ superoxide dismutase mRNA, a TNF-induced enzyme which protects the cell from the toxic effects of superoxide, were lower in mutant than in WT infected mice. PMID:9596773

  1. Correlation between Presence of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in Heart Tissue of Baboons and Cynomolgus Monkeys, and Lymphocytic Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Mubiru, James N.; Yang, Alice; Dick, Edward J.; Owston, Michael; Sharp, R. Mark; VandeBerg, Jane F.; Shade, Robert E.; VandeBerg, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, preferentially infects cardiac and digestive tissues. Baboons living in Texas (Papio hamadryas) and cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) have been reported to be infected naturally with T. cruzi. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed cases of animals that were diagnosed with lymphocytic myocarditis and used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method (S36/S35 primer set) to amplify T. cruzi DNA from archived frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cardiac tissues. We show that the PCR method is applicable in archived frozen and FFPE tissues and the sensitivity is in the femtogram range. A positive correlation between PCR positivity and lymphocytic myocarditis in both baboons and cynomolgus monkeys is shown. We also show epicarditis as a common finding in animals infected with T. cruzi. PMID:24567317

  2. Vaccination of dogs with Trypanosoma rangeli induces antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area of Córdoba, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Beatriz; Marini, Vanina; Gauna, Diego; Frias, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Dogs play a major role in the domestic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, acting as reservoirs. In a previous work we have developed a model of vaccination of dogs in captivity with nonpathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes, resulting in the production of protective antibodies against T. cruzi, with dramatic decrease of parasitaemia upon challenge with 100,000 virulent forms of this parasite. The aim of this work was to evaluate the immunogenicity of this vaccine in dogs living in a rural area. Domestic dogs, free from T. cruziinfection, received three immunisations with fixed T. rangeliepimastigotes. Dogs were not challenged with T. cruzi, but they were left in their environment. This immunisation induced antibodies againstT. cruzi for more than three years in dogs in their natural habitat, while control dogs remained serologically negative. PMID:27074257

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi induces tissue disorganization and destruction of chorionic villi in an ex vivo infection model of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Duaso, J; Rojo, G; Cabrera, G; Galanti, N; Bosco, C; Maya, J D; Morello, A; Kemmerling, U

    2010-08-01

    Congenital Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America and also present with lower frequency in other countries, is associated with premature labor, miscarriage, and placentitis. The mechanism of tissue invasion and infection of human placenta by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) remains unclear. In order to explore some morphological aspects of this infection in the placenta, we incubated chorionic villous explants from normal human placentae ex vivo with the parasite and studied the resulting effects by immunohistochemical and histochemical methods. Infection of the chorionic villi with the parasite was confirmed by immunofluoresence and PCR. T. cruzi induces syncytiotrophoblast destruction and detachment, selective disorganization of basal lamina and disorganization of collagen I in the connective tissue of villous stroma. These effects are a function of the number of parasites used for the infection. Our results suggest a participation of the proteolytic activity of the parasite on the placental basal lamina and connective tissue in the mechanism of infection of the fetus by T. cruzi.

  4. Short communication: Genetic variants of Sarcocystis cruzi in infected Malaysian cattle based on 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yit Han; Fong, Mun Yik; Subramaniam, Vellayan; Shahari, Shahhaziq; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are pathogenic parasites that infect a wide range of animals, including cattle. A high prevalence of cattle sarcocystosis has been reported worldwide, but its status is unknown in Malaysia. This study focused on utilizing 18S rDNA to identify Sarcocystis species in Malaysian cattle and to determine their genetic variants. In this study, only Sarcocystis cruzi was detected in Malaysian cattle. The intra-species S. cruzi phylogenetic tree analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), respectively displayed two minor groups among the parasite isolates. This finding was supported by high Wright FST value (FST=0.647). The definitive hosts (dogs) may play a fundamental role in the development of S. cruzi genetic variants. Additionally, the existence of microheterogeneity within the S. cruzi merozoites and/or distinct genetic variants arisen from independent merozoites in mature sarcocysts, possibly contributed to the existence of intra-species variations within the population. PMID:26679818

  5. Short communication: Genetic variants of Sarcocystis cruzi in infected Malaysian cattle based on 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yit Han; Fong, Mun Yik; Subramaniam, Vellayan; Shahari, Shahhaziq; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are pathogenic parasites that infect a wide range of animals, including cattle. A high prevalence of cattle sarcocystosis has been reported worldwide, but its status is unknown in Malaysia. This study focused on utilizing 18S rDNA to identify Sarcocystis species in Malaysian cattle and to determine their genetic variants. In this study, only Sarcocystis cruzi was detected in Malaysian cattle. The intra-species S. cruzi phylogenetic tree analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), respectively displayed two minor groups among the parasite isolates. This finding was supported by high Wright FST value (FST=0.647). The definitive hosts (dogs) may play a fundamental role in the development of S. cruzi genetic variants. Additionally, the existence of microheterogeneity within the S. cruzi merozoites and/or distinct genetic variants arisen from independent merozoites in mature sarcocysts, possibly contributed to the existence of intra-species variations within the population.

  6. Effect of elevated environmental temperature on the antibody response of mice to Trypanosoma cruzi during the acute phase of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Dimock, K A; Davis, C D; Kuhn, R E

    1991-01-01

    When held at 36 degrees C, Trypanosoma cruzi-infected C3H mice survive an otherwise lethal infection with significantly decreased parasitemia levels and enhanced immune responsiveness. Treatment of T. cruzi-infected mice with the immunosuppressive agent cyclophosphamide indicated that the positive effects of increased environmental temperature were primarily due to enhancement of immunity. A parasite-specific, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis were used to examine the effect of elevated environmental temperature on the production of anti-T. cruzi antibodies. Both the reactivity and diversity of anti-T. cruzi antibodies were found to be lower in infected mice held at 36 degrees C than in infected mice held at room temperature. However, reactivity and diversity could be enhanced by vaccination with culture forms of the parasite. Images PMID:1937796

  7. Prevalence and Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in People of Rural Communities of the High Jungle of Northern Peru

    PubMed Central

    Alroy, Karen A.; Huang, Christine; Gilman, Robert H.; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R.; Marks, Morgan A.; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Hillyard, Miranda; Verastegui, Manuela; Sanchez, Gerardo; Cabrera, Lilia; Vidal, Elisa; Billig, Erica M. W.; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Náquira, César; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi is seen exclusively in the Americas where an estimated 8 million people are infected with the parasite. Significant research in southern Peru has been conducted to understand T. cruzi infection and vector control, however, much less is known about the burden of infection and epidemiology in northern Peru. Methodology A cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in humans (n=611) and domestic animals [dogs (n=106) and guinea pigs (n=206)] in communities of Cutervo Province, Peru. Sampling and diagnostic strategies differed according to species. An entomological household study (n=208) was conducted to identify the triatomine burden and species composition, as well as the prevalence of T. cruzi in vectors. Electrocardiograms (EKG) were performed on a subset of participants (n=90 T. cruzi infected participants and 170 age and sex-matched controls). The seroprevalence of T. cruzi among humans, dogs, and guinea pigs was 14.9% (95% CI: 12.2 – 18.0%), 19.8% (95% CI: 12.7- 28.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.4 – 6.9%) respectively. In one community, the prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 17.2% (95% CI: 9.6 - 24.7%) among participants < 15 years, suggesting recent transmission. Increasing age, positive triatomines in a participant's house, and ownership of a T. cruzi positive guinea pig were independent correlates of T. cruzi infection. Only one species of triatomine was found, Panstrongylus lignarius, formerly P. herreri. Approximately forty percent (39.9%, 95% CI: 33.2 - 46.9%) of surveyed households were infested with this vector and 14.9% (95% CI: 10.4 - 20.5%) had at least one triatomine positive for T. cruzi. The cardiac abnormality of right bundle branch block was rare, but only identified in seropositive individuals. Conclusions Our research documents a substantial prevalence of T. cruzi infection in Cutervo and highlights a need for greater attention and vector

  8. An improved general approach for cloning and characterizing telomeres: the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi as model organism.

    PubMed

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Santos, Marcia R M; Franco Da Silveira, Jose; Ramírez, Jose Luis

    2002-07-10

    We here describe a general strategy for cloning and characterizing telomeric and sub-telomeric regions of the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The use of a bacterial artificial chromosome vector and a telomeric adaptor produced stable telomeric recombinant clones with inserts ranging from 5 to 25 kb. Analysis of these recombinants provided unique landmarks for chromosomal mapping and sequencing and enabled us to derive a more accurate picture of T. cruzi telomeric organization.

  9. Importance of the CCR5-CCL5 axis for mucosal Trypanosoma cruzi protection and B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Nicole L; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Zhang, Xiuli; Giddings, Olivia K; Lane, Thomas E; Hoft, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite and the causative agent of Chagas disease. Previous work has shown that the chemokine receptor CCR5 plays a role in systemic T. cruzi protection. We evaluated the importance of CCR5 and CCL5 for mucosal protection against natural oral and conjunctival T. cruzi challenges. T. cruzi-immune CCR5(-/-) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were generated by repeated infectious challenges with T. cruzi. CCR5(-/-) and wild-type mice developed equivalent levels of cellular, humoral, and protective mucosal responses. However, CCR5(-/-)-immune mice produced increased levels of CCL5 in protected gastric tissues, suggesting compensatory signaling through additional receptors. Neutralization of CCL5 in CCR5(-/-)-immune mice resulted in decreased mucosal inflammatory responses, reduced T. cruzi-specific Ab-secreting cells, and significantly less mucosal T. cruzi protection, confirming an important role for CCL5 in optimal immune control of T. cruzi replication at the point of initial mucosal invasion. To investigate further the mechanism responsible for mucosal protection mediated by CCL5-CCR5 signaling, we evaluated the effects of CCL5 on B cells. CCL5 enhanced proliferation and IgM secretion in highly purified B cells triggered by suboptimal doses of LPS. In addition, neutralization of endogenous CCL5 inhibited B cell proliferation and IgM secretion during stimulation of highly purified B cells, indicating that B cell production of CCL5 has important autocrine effects. These findings demonstrate direct effects of CCL5 on B cells, with significant implications for the development of mucosal adjuvants, and further suggest that CCL5 may be important as a general B cell coactivator.

  10. Lysosomal phospholipase A1 in Trypanosoma cruzi: an enzyme with a possible role in the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wainszelbaum, M; Isola, E; Wilkowsky, S; Cannata, J J; Florin-Christensen, J; Florin-Christensen, M

    2001-01-01

    We found that, as in African trypanosomes, endogenous phospholipase A(1) (Plase A(1)) activity can catalyse extensive deacylation of phospholipids upon cell death in all life stages of Trypanosoma cruzi. A major lysosomal Plase A(1) was purified and characterized. The enzyme products can explain the lesions surrounding degenerating T. cruzi cells in host tissues. Thus Plase A(1) emerges as a target to block pathogenesis in trypanosomal infections. PMID:11311140

  11. Trypanosoma Cruzi Cyp51 Inhibitor Derived from a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Screen Hit

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Doyle, Patricia S.; Yermalitskaya, Liudmila V.; Mackey, Zachary B.; Ang, Kenny K.H.; McKerrow, James H.; Podust, Larissa M.

    2009-02-18

    The two front-line drugs for chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections are limited by adverse side-effects and declining efficacy. One potential new target for Chagas disease chemotherapy is sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in biosynthesis of membrane sterols. In a screening effort targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51 (CYP51{sub Mt}), we previously identified the N-[4-pyridyl]-formamide moiety as a building block capable of delivering a variety of chemotypes into the CYP51 active site. In that work, the binding modes of several second generation compounds carrying this scaffold were determined by high-resolution co-crystal structures with CYP51{sub Mt}. Subsequent assays against the CYP51 orthologue in T. cruzi, CYP51{sub Tc}, demonstrated that two of the compounds tested in the earlier effort bound tightly to this enzyme. Both were tested in vitro for inhibitory effects against T. cruzi and the related protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. One of the compounds had potent, selective anti-T. cruzi activity in infected mouse macrophages. Cure of treated host cells was confirmed by prolonged incubation in the absence of the inhibiting compound. Discrimination between T. cruzi and T. brucei CYP51 by the inhibitor was largely based on the variability (phenylalanine versus isoleucine) of a single residue at a critical position in the active site. CYP51{sub Mt}-based crystal structure analysis revealed that the functional groups of the two tightly bound compounds are likely to occupy different spaces in the CYP51 active site, suggesting the possibility of combining the beneficial features of both inhibitors in a third generation of compounds to achieve more potent and selective inhibition of CYP51{sub Tc}. Enzyme sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) is a well-established target for anti-fungal therapy and is a prospective target for Chagas disease therapy. We previously identified a

  12. Gene expression changes induced by Trypanosoma cruzi shed microvesicles in mammalian host cells: relevance of tRNA-derived halves.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Silva, Maria R; Cabrera-Cabrera, Florencia; das Neves, Roberta Ferreira Cura; Souto-Padrón, Thaís; de Souza, Wanderley; Cayota, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    At present, noncoding small RNAs are recognized as key players in novel forms of posttranscriptional gene regulation in most eukaryotes. However, canonical small RNA pathways seem to be lost or excessively simplified in some unicellular organisms including Trypanosoma cruzi which lack functional RNAi pathways. Recently, we reported the presence of alternate small RNA pathways in T. cruzi mainly represented by homogeneous populations of tRNA- and rRNA-derived small RNAs, which are secreted to the extracellular medium included in extracellular vesicles. Extracellular vesicle cargo could be delivered to other parasites and to mammalian susceptible cells promoting metacyclogenesis and conferring susceptibility to infection, respectively. Here we analyzed the changes in gene expression of host HeLa cells induced by extracellular vesicles from T. cruzi. As assessed by microarray assays a large set of genes in HeLa cells were differentially expressed upon incorporation of T. cruzi-derived extracellular vesicles. The elicited response modified mainly host cell cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, and immune responses pathways. Some genes were also modified by the most abundant tRNA-derived small RNAs included in extracellular vesicles. These data suggest that microvesicles secreted by T. cruzi could be relevant players in early events of the T. cruzi host cell interplay.

  13. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  14. Phlebotomine fauna, natural infection rate and feeding habits of Lutzomyia cruzi in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, Veruska Nogueira de; Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira de; Nakazato, Luciano; Duarte, Rosemere; Souza, Cladson de Oliveira; Sousa, Valéria Régia Franco

    2014-11-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is transmitted by the phlebotomine Lutzomyia longipalpis and in some midwestern regions by Lutzomyia cruzi. Studies of the phlebotomine fauna, feeding habits and natural infection rate by Leishmania contribute to increased understanding of the epidemiological chain of leishmaniases and their vectorial capacity. Collections were performed in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso from 2010-2013, during which time 2,011 phlebotomines (23 species) were captured (68.70% Lu. cruzi and 20.52% Lutzomyia whitmani). Lu. cruzi females were identified by observing the shapes of the cibarium (a portion of the mouthpart) and spermatheca, from which samples were obtained for polymerase chain reaction to determine the rates of natural infection. Engorged phlebotomines were assessed to identify the blood-meal host by ELISA. A moderate correlation was discovered between the number of Lu. cruzi and the temperature and the minimum rate of infection was 6.10%. Twenty-two females were reactive to the antisera of bird (28%), dog (3.30%) and skunk (1.60%). We conclude that Lu. cruzi and Lu. whitmani have adapted to the urban environment in this region and that Lu. cruzi is the most likely vector of VL in Jaciara. Moreover, maintenance of Leishmania in the environment is likely aided by the presence of birds and domestic and synanthropic animals.

  15. Phlebotomine fauna, natural infection rate and feeding habits of Lutzomyia cruzi in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, Veruska Nogueira de; Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira de; Nakazato, Luciano; Duarte, Rosemere; Souza, Cladson de Oliveira; Sousa, Valéria Régia Franco

    2014-10-14

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is transmitted by the phlebotomine Lutzomyia longipalpis and in some midwestern regions by Lutzomyia cruzi. Studies of the phlebotomine fauna, feeding habits and natural infection rate by Leishmania contribute to increased understanding of the epidemiological chain of leishmaniases and their vectorial capacity. Collections were performed in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso from 2010-2013, during which time 2,011 phlebotomines (23 species) were captured (68.70% Lu. cruzi and 20.52% Lutzomyia whitmani). Lu. cruzi females were identified by observing the shapes of the cibarium (a portion of the mouthpart) and spermatheca, from which samples were obtained for polymerase chain reaction to determine the rates of natural infection. Engorged phlebotomines were assessed to identify the blood-meal host by ELISA. A moderate correlation was discovered between the number of Lu. cruzi and the temperature and the minimum rate of infection was 6.10%. Twenty-two females were reactive to the antisera of bird (28%), dog (3.30%) and skunk (1.60%). We conclude that Lu. cruzi and Lu. whitmani have adapted to the urban environment in this region and that Lu. cruzi is the most likely vector of VL in Jaciara. Moreover, maintenance of Leishmania in the environment is likely aided by the presence of birds and domestic and synanthropic animals. PMID:25338156

  16. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  17. Phlebotomine fauna, natural infection rate and feeding habits of Lutzomyia cruzi in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, Veruska Nogueira de; Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira de; Nakazato, Luciano; Duarte, Rosemere; Souza, Cladson de Oliveira; Sousa, Valéria Régia Franco

    2014-10-14

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is transmitted by the phlebotomine Lutzomyia longipalpis and in some midwestern regions by Lutzomyia cruzi. Studies of the phlebotomine fauna, feeding habits and natural infection rate by Leishmania contribute to increased understanding of the epidemiological chain of leishmaniases and their vectorial capacity. Collections were performed in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso from 2010-2013, during which time 2,011 phlebotomines (23 species) were captured (68.70% Lu. cruzi and 20.52% Lutzomyia whitmani). Lu. cruzi females were identified by observing the shapes of the cibarium (a portion of the mouthpart) and spermatheca, from which samples were obtained for polymerase chain reaction to determine the rates of natural infection. Engorged phlebotomines were assessed to identify the blood-meal host by ELISA. A moderate correlation was discovered between the number of Lu. cruzi and the temperature and the minimum rate of infection was 6.10%. Twenty-two females were reactive to the antisera of bird (28%), dog (3.30%) and skunk (1.60%). We conclude that Lu. cruzi and Lu. whitmani have adapted to the urban environment in this region and that Lu. cruzi is the most likely vector of VL in Jaciara. Moreover, maintenance of Leishmania in the environment is likely aided by the presence of birds and domestic and synanthropic animals.

  18. Geographical structuring of Trypanosoma cruzi populations from Chilean Triatoma infestans triatomines and their genetic relationship with other Latino American counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Venegas, J; Rojas, T; DÍaz, F; Miranda, S; Jercic, M I; González, C; Coñoepán, W; Pichuantes, S; RodrÍguez, J; Gajardo, M; Sánchez, G

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain more information about the population structure of Chilean Trypanosoma cruzi, and their genetic relationship with other Latino American counterparts, we performed the study of T. cruzi samples detected in the midgut content of Triatoma infestans insects from three endemic regions of Chile. The genetic characteristics of these samples were analysed using microsatellite markers and PCR conditions that allow the detection of predominant T. cruzi clones directly in triatomine midgut content. Population genetic analyses using the Fisher’s exact method, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and the determination of FST showed that the northern T. cruzi population sample was genetically differentiated from the two southern population counterparts. Further analysis showed that the cause of this genetic differentiation was the asymmetrical distribution of TcIII T. cruzi predominant clones. Considering all triatomines from the three regions, the most frequent predominant lineages were TcIII (38%), followed by TcI (34%) and hybrid (8%). No TcII lineage was observed along the predominant T. cruzi clones. The best phylogenetic reconstruction using the shared allelic genetic distance was concordant with the population genetic analysis and tree topology previously described studying foreign samples. The correlation studies showed that the lineage TcIII from the III region was genetically differentiated from the other two, and this differentiation was correlated with geographical distance including Chilean and mainly Brazilian samples. It will be interesting to investigate whether this geographical structure may be related with different clinical manifestation of Chagas disease. PMID:22325822

  19. Ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Amazon basin. The main scenaries in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Coura, J R; Junqueira, A C V

    2015-11-01

    The ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region is directly interlinked with the parasite's extensive reservoir, composed of 33 species of wild mammals within the following orders: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Xenarthra, Carnivora and Primates; and of 16 species of wild triatomines, of which ten may be infected with T. cruzi. Four scenarios for the diversity of T. cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region are evident: (i) T. cruzi transmission between vectors and wild mammals, which is characterized as a wild enzooty encompassing the entire Amazon basin; (ii) accidental T. cruzi transmission from vectors and wild mammals to humans, when they invade the wild ecotope or when these vectors and wild mammals invade human homes; (iii) occupational Chagas disease among piassava (Leopoldinia piassaba) palm fiber gatherers, transmitted by the vector Rhodnius brethesi, for which these palm trees are the specific ecotope; (IV) oral T. cruzi transmission to humans through food contamination, particularly in juices from plants such as assai, which today is considered to be endemic in the Brazilian Amazon region, with more than 1500 cases notified.

  20. Genetically different isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi elicit different infection dynamics in raccoons (Procyon lotor) and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana).

    PubMed

    Roellig, Dawn M; Ellis, Angela E; Yabsley, Michael J

    2009-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a genetically and biologically diverse species. In the current study we determined T. cruzi infection dynamics in two common North American reservoirs, Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and raccoons (Procyon lotor). Based on previous molecular and culture data from naturally-exposed animals, we hypothesised that raccoons would have a longer patent period than opossums, and raccoons would be competent reservoirs for both genotypes T. cruzi I (TcI) and TcIIa, while opossums would only serve as hosts for TcI. Individuals (n=2 or 3) of each species were inoculated with 1x10(6) culture-derived T. cruzi trypomastigotes of TcIIa (North American (NA) - raccoon), TcI (NA - opossum), TcIIb (South American - human), or both TcI and TcIIa. Parasitemias in opossums gradually increased and declined rapidly, whereas parasitemias peaked sooner in raccoons and they maintained relatively high parasitemia for 5weeks. Raccoons became infected with all three T. cruzi strains, while opossums only became infected with TcI and TcIIb. Although opossums were susceptible to TcIIb, infection dynamics were dramatically different compared with TcI. Opossums inoculated with TcIIb seroconverted, but parasitemia duration was short and only detectable by PCR. In addition, raccoons seroconverted sooner (3-7days post inoculation) than opossums (10days post inoculation). These data suggest that infection dynamics of various T. cruzi strains can differ considerably in different wildlife hosts.

  1. Phlebotomine fauna, natural infection rate and feeding habits of Lutzomyia cruzi in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, Veruska Nogueira de; Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira de; Nakazato, Luciano; Duarte, Rosemere; Souza, Cladson de Oliveira; Sousa, Valéria Régia Franco

    2014-11-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is transmitted by the phlebotomine Lutzomyia longipalpis and in some midwestern regions by Lutzomyia cruzi. Studies of the phlebotomine fauna, feeding habits and natural infection rate by Leishmania contribute to increased understanding of the epidemiological chain of leishmaniases and their vectorial capacity. Collections were performed in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso from 2010-2013, during which time 2,011 phlebotomines (23 species) were captured (68.70% Lu. cruzi and 20.52% Lutzomyia whitmani). Lu. cruzi females were identified by observing the shapes of the cibarium (a portion of the mouthpart) and spermatheca, from which samples were obtained for polymerase chain reaction to determine the rates of natural infection. Engorged phlebotomines were assessed to identify the blood-meal host by ELISA. A moderate correlation was discovered between the number of Lu. cruzi and the temperature and the minimum rate of infection was 6.10%. Twenty-two females were reactive to the antisera of bird (28%), dog (3.30%) and skunk (1.60%). We conclude that Lu. cruzi and Lu. whitmani have adapted to the urban environment in this region and that Lu. cruzi is the most likely vector of VL in Jaciara. Moreover, maintenance of Leishmania in the environment is likely aided by the presence of birds and domestic and synanthropic animals. PMID:25410993

  2. Ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Amazon basin. The main scenaries in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Coura, J R; Junqueira, A C V

    2015-11-01

    The ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region is directly interlinked with the parasite's extensive reservoir, composed of 33 species of wild mammals within the following orders: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Xenarthra, Carnivora and Primates; and of 16 species of wild triatomines, of which ten may be infected with T. cruzi. Four scenarios for the diversity of T. cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region are evident: (i) T. cruzi transmission between vectors and wild mammals, which is characterized as a wild enzooty encompassing the entire Amazon basin; (ii) accidental T. cruzi transmission from vectors and wild mammals to humans, when they invade the wild ecotope or when these vectors and wild mammals invade human homes; (iii) occupational Chagas disease among piassava (Leopoldinia piassaba) palm fiber gatherers, transmitted by the vector Rhodnius brethesi, for which these palm trees are the specific ecotope; (IV) oral T. cruzi transmission to humans through food contamination, particularly in juices from plants such as assai, which today is considered to be endemic in the Brazilian Amazon region, with more than 1500 cases notified. PMID:26254002

  3. Survey of Feral Swine ( Sus scrofa ) Infection with the Agent of Chagas Disease ( Trypanosoma cruzi ) in Texas, 2013-14.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Juliette M; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Lewis, Barbara C; Cummings, Kevin J; Mesenbrink, Brian T; Leland, Bruce R; Bodenchuk, Michael J; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    : Feral swine ( Sus scrofa ) are an invasive species and reservoir of numerous zoonotic pathogens in the US, and Texas leads the nation in the estimated population size of feral hogs. Texas also harbors enzootic transmission cycles of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , agent of Chagas disease. Given previous evidence that swine can serve as reservoirs of T. cruzi in Latin America and new evidence of triatomines (kissing bugs) feeding on swine in Texas, we measured the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in feral swine in Texas. From 2013 to 2014, we sampled blood and/or cardiac tissue from 78 feral swine across 14 Texas counties (seven with and seven without prior documentation of kissing bug occurrence) and used PCR and histopathology to detect T. cruzi infection. We determined an overall infection prevalence of 6% (3 of 54) based on PCR evaluation of cardiac tissue, and no blood samples were positive (n=72). All three positive pigs were from counties where kissing bugs are documented. No T. cruzi amastigotes were noted on histopathology (n=54). Sarcocysts were observed in 10 (18%) of the samples, five of which also had mild focal areas of degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Eco-epidemiologic investigations can provide an assessment of contributions of feral hogs to maintenance of T. cruzi across a landscape to help protect human and animal health. PMID:27224214

  4. Survey of Feral Swine ( Sus scrofa ) Infection with the Agent of Chagas Disease ( Trypanosoma cruzi ) in Texas, 2013-14.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Juliette M; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Lewis, Barbara C; Cummings, Kevin J; Mesenbrink, Brian T; Leland, Bruce R; Bodenchuk, Michael J; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    : Feral swine ( Sus scrofa ) are an invasive species and reservoir of numerous zoonotic pathogens in the US, and Texas leads the nation in the estimated population size of feral hogs. Texas also harbors enzootic transmission cycles of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , agent of Chagas disease. Given previous evidence that swine can serve as reservoirs of T. cruzi in Latin America and new evidence of triatomines (kissing bugs) feeding on swine in Texas, we measured the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in feral swine in Texas. From 2013 to 2014, we sampled blood and/or cardiac tissue from 78 feral swine across 14 Texas counties (seven with and seven without prior documentation of kissing bug occurrence) and used PCR and histopathology to detect T. cruzi infection. We determined an overall infection prevalence of 6% (3 of 54) based on PCR evaluation of cardiac tissue, and no blood samples were positive (n=72). All three positive pigs were from counties where kissing bugs are documented. No T. cruzi amastigotes were noted on histopathology (n=54). Sarcocysts were observed in 10 (18%) of the samples, five of which also had mild focal areas of degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Eco-epidemiologic investigations can provide an assessment of contributions of feral hogs to maintenance of T. cruzi across a landscape to help protect human and animal health.

  5. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase interferes with Trypanosoma cruzi infection and proliferation of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C; Haikarainen, Teemu; Narwal, Mohit; Schlesinger, Mariana; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Villamil, Silvia H Fernández; Lehtiö, Lari

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosylation) is a post-translational covalent modification of proteins catalyzed by a family of enzymes termed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). In the human genome, 17 different genes have been identified that encode members of the PARP superfamily. Poly (ADP-ribose) metabolism plays a role in a wide range of biological processes. In Trypanosoma cruzi, PARP enzyme appears to play a role in DNA repair mechanisms and may also be involved in controlling the different phases of cell growth. Here we describe the identification of potent inhibitors for T. cruzi PARP with a fluorescence-based activity assay. The inhibitors were also tested on T. cruzi epimastigotes, showing that they reduced ADP-ribose polymer formation in vivo. Notably, the identified inhibitors are able to reduce the growth rate of T. cruzi epimastigotes. The best inhibitor, Olaparib, is effective at nanomolar concentrations, making it an efficient chemical tool for chacterization of ADP-ribose metabolism in T. cruzi. PARP inhibition also decreases drastically the amount of amastigotes but interestingly has no effect on the amount of trypomastigotes in the cell culture. Knocking down human PARP-1 decreases both the amount of amastigotes and trypomastigotes in cell culture, indicating that the effect would be mainly due to inhibition of human PARP-1. The result suggests that the inhibition of PARP could be a potential way to interfere with T. cruzi infection. PMID:23049934

  6. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Interferes with Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Proliferation of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Haikarainen, Teemu; Narwal, Mohit; Schlesinger, Mariana; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Villamil, Silvia H. Fernández; Lehtiö, Lari

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosylation) is a post-translational covalent modification of proteins catalyzed by a family of enzymes termed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). In the human genome, 17 different genes have been identified that encode members of the PARP superfamily. Poly (ADP-ribose) metabolism plays a role in a wide range of biological processes. In Trypanosoma cruzi, PARP enzyme appears to play a role in DNA repair mechanisms and may also be involved in controlling the different phases of cell growth. Here we describe the identification of potent inhibitors for T. cruzi PARP with a fluorescence-based activity assay. The inhibitors were also tested on T. cruzi epimastigotes, showing that they reduced ADP-ribose polymer formation in vivo. Notably, the identified inhibitors are able to reduce the growth rate of T. cruzi epimastigotes. The best inhibitor, Olaparib, is effective at nanomolar concentrations, making it an efficient chemical tool for chacterization of ADP-ribose metabolism in T. cruzi. PARP inhibition also decreases drastically the amount of amastigotes but interestingly has no effect on the amount of trypomastigotes in the cell culture. Knocking down human PARP-1 decreases both the amount of amastigotes and trypomastigotes in cell culture, indicating that the effect would be mainly due to inhibition of human PARP-1. The result suggests that the inhibition of PARP could be a potential way to interfere with T. cruzi infection. PMID:23049934

  7. Phlebotomine fauna, natural infection rate and feeding habits of Lutzomyia cruzi in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Brito, Veruska Nogueira; de Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira; Nakazato, Luciano; Duarte, Rosemere; Souza, Cladson de Oliveira; Sousa, Valéria Régia Franco

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is transmitted by the phlebotomine Lutzomyia longipalpis and in some midwestern regions by Lutzomyia cruzi. Studies of the phlebotomine fauna, feeding habits and natural infection rate by Leishmania contribute to increased understanding of the epidemiological chain of leishmaniases and their vectorial capacity. Collections were performed in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso from 2010-2013, during which time 2,011 phlebotomines (23 species) were captured (68.70% Lu. cruzi and 20.52% Lutzomyia whitmani). Lu. cruzi females were identified by observing the shapes of the cibarium (a portion of the mouthpart) and spermatheca, from which samples were obtained for polymerase chain reaction to determine the rates of natural infection. Engorged phlebotomines were assessed to identify the blood-meal host by ELISA. A moderate correlation was discovered between the number of Lu. cruzi and the temperature and the minimum rate of infection was 6.10%. Twenty-two females were reactive to the antisera of bird (28%), dog (3.30%) and skunk (1.60%). We conclude that Lu. cruzi and Lu. whitmani have adapted to the urban environment in this region and that Lu. cruzi is the most likely vector of VL in Jaciara. Moreover, maintenance of Leishmania in the environment is likely aided by the presence of birds and domestic and synanthropic animals. PMID:25410993

  8. Infection Rate by Trypanosoma cruzi and Biased Vertebrate Host Selection in the Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduvidae) Species Complex.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Sierra, M J; Dumonteil, E

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a vector-borne disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by hematophagous insects. Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduvidae (Latreille 1811)) is one of the main vectors, and recent molecular studies indicate that it is a species complex, with potentially different vectorial competences. We investigated the differences in natural T. cruzi infection rate within T. dimidiata complex in Yucatan, Mexico. ITS-2 hybrid bugs had a twofold higher infection rate than ITS-2 Groups 2 and 3 bugs, and this pattern was consistent over time and in several villages. To test if T. dimidiata ITS-2 hybrid bugs could feed more frequently on T. cruzi-infected hosts, we evaluated their host-seeking behavior in a dual-choice chamber. Group 2 and 3 bugs were equally attracted to T. cruzi-infected or uninfected mice. On the contrary, ITS-2 hybrid bugs reached three times more frequently the T. cruzi-infected mouse, compared to the uninfected one, indicating a significant bias toward an infected host. This behavior may explain in part their higher natural infection rate. Further studies should explore the complex and unique interactions among T. cruzi, triatomines vectors, and mammalian hosts, as this may led to new strategies to interfere with transmission cycles and improve Chagas disease control.

  9. Treatment Success in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Predicted by Early Changes in Serially Monitored Parasite-Specific T and B Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Gretchen; Albareda, María C.; Viotti, Rodolfo; Perez-Mazliah, Damián E.; Lococo, Bruno; Castro Eiro, Melisa; Laucella, Susana A.; Tarleton, Rick L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is the highest impact parasitic disease in Latin America. We have proposed that changes in Trypanosoma cruzi-specific immune responses might serve as surrogate indicators of treatment success. Herein, we addressed in a long-term follow-up study whether cure achieved after treatment can be predicted by changes in non-conventional indexes of anti-parasite serological and T cell activities. Methodology/Principal Findings T. cruzi-specific T cell responses, as measured by interferon-γ ELISPOT and T. cruzi-specific antibodies assessed by ELISA, hemagglutination and immunofluorescence tests as well as by a multiplex assay incorporating 14 recombinant T. cruzi proteins were measured in 33 patients at 48–150 months post-benznidazole treatment. Cure — as assessed by conventional serological tests — was associated with an early decline in T. cruzi-specific IFN-γ-producing T cells and in antibody titers measured by the multiplex serological assay. Changes in the functional status and potential of T. cruzi-specific T cells, indicative of reduced antigen stimulation, provided further evidence of parasitological cure following benznidazole treatment. Patients showing a significant reduction in T. cruzi-specific antibodies had higher pre-therapy levels of T. cruzi-specific IFN-γ- producing T cells compared to those with unaltered humoral responses post-treatment. Conclusions/Significance Monitoring of appropriate immunological responses can provide earlier and robust measures of treatment success in T. cruzi infection. PMID:27128444

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M

    2016-03-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico's mandated

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico’s national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase: enhancement of virulence in a murine model of Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, expresses a trans-sialidase at highest levels in infective trypomastigotes, where it attaches to the plasma membrane by a glycophosphoinositol linkage. Bound enzyme sheds into the extracellular milieu in a soluble form. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that the trans-sialidase participates in several parameters of T. cruzi-host interactions, like cell adhesion and complement resistance. However, the role that membrane-bound and soluble trans-sialidase plays in the infection of mammals is not understood. To begin to study the role the enzyme may play in vivo, T. cruzi trypomastigotes were inoculated subcutaneously into mice that had been sensitized for various times with the purified protein. A single dose of either endogenous or recombinant trans- sialidase injected into the connective tissues of BALB/c mice greatly enhanced parasitemia and mortality. Maximum enhancement was achieved with 1-2-h priming. Injection of the enzyme after the parasites had been established in the inoculation site had little, if any, consequence in modifying virulence. The enhancement did not seem to be through a direct effect of the enzyme on trypomastigote-host cell interactions because it occurred when the sites of trans-sialidase sensitization and parasite inoculation were physically separate. Rather, virulence enhancement seemed to depend on inflammatory cells, since priming with trans-sialidase had no significant effect in severe combined immunodeficiency mice, which lack functional T and B lymphocytes. However, antibody response to T. cruzi in the trans- sialidase-primed BALB/c mice was the same as in the control animals. Virulence enhancement was specific for the trans-sialidase because it did not occur in mice primed with Newcastle virus sialidase, which has the same substrate specificity as the T. cruzi enzyme, or with the sialidase from the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, whose substrate specificity is broader than

  13. Mitochondrial Gene Expression Is Responsive to Starvation Stress and Developmental Transition in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Aubie K.; Kalem, Murat C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trypanosoma cruzi parasites causing Chagas disease are passed between mammals by the triatomine bug vector. Within the insect, T. cruzi epimastigote-stage cells replicate and progress through the increasingly nutrient-restricted digestive tract, differentiating into infectious, nonreplicative metacyclic trypomastigotes. Thus, we evaluated how nutrient perturbations or metacyclogenesis affects mitochondrial gene expression in different insect life cycle stages. We compared mitochondrial RNA abundances in cultures containing fed, replicating epimastigotes, differentiating cultures containing both starved epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes and epimastigote starvation cultures. We observed increases in mitochondrial rRNAs and some mRNAs in differentiating cultures. These increases predominated only for the edited CYb mRNA in cultures enriched for metacyclic trypomastigotes. For the other transcripts, abundance increases were linked to starvation and were strongest in culture fractions with a high population of starved epimastigotes. We show that loss of both glucose and amino acids results in rapid increases in RNA abundances that are quickly reduced when these nutrients are returned. Furthermore, the individual RNAs exhibit distinct temporal abundance patterns, suggestive of multiple mechanisms regulating individual transcript abundance. Finally, increases in mitochondrial respiratory complex subunit mRNA abundances were not matched by increases in abundances of nucleus-encoded subunit mRNAs, nor were there statistically significant increases in protein levels of three nucleus-encoded subunits tested. These results show that, similarly to that in T. brucei, the mitochondrial genome in T. cruzi has the potential to alter gene expression in response to environmental or developmental stimuli but for an as-yet-unknown purpose. IMPORTANCE Chagas disease is caused by insect-transmitted Trypanosoma cruzi. Halting T. cruzi’s life cycle in one of its

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M

    2016-03-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico's mandated

  15. Proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi developmental stages using isotope-coded affinity tag reagents.

    PubMed

    Paba, Jaime; Ricart, Carlos A O; Fontes, Wagner; Santana, Jaime M; Teixeira, Antonio R L; Marchese, Jason; Williamson, Brian; Hunt, Tony; Karger, Barry L; Sousa, Marcelo V

    2004-01-01

    Comparative proteome analysis of developmental stages of the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi was carried out by isotope-coded affinity tag technology (ICAT) associated with liquid cromatography-mass spectrometry peptide sequencing (LC-MS/MS). Protein extracts of the protozoan trypomastigote and amastigote stages were labeled with heavy (D8) and light (D0) ICAT reagents and subjected to cation exchange and avidin affinity chromatographies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. High confidence sequence information and expression levels for 41 T. cruzi polypeptides, including metabolic enzymes, paraflagellar rod components, tubulins, and heat-shock proteins were reported. Twenty-nine proteins displayed similar levels of expression in both forms of the parasite, nine proteins presented higher levels in trypomastigotes, whereas three were more expressed in amastigotes.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi: circulating polysaccharide factors excreted in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martín, U O; Afchain, D; Loyens, M; Maidana, C; Caprón, A

    1989-01-01

    An antigen factor (EF), thermostable and soluble in trichloroacetic acid was detected in the supernatant fluid of epimastigote cultures of Trypanosoma cruzi and in the sera of patients with acute Chagas disease. An hyperimmune antiserum to this antigenic factor was obtained in rabbits. The EF was revealed on the fibroblast surface membranes of rats infected with trypomastigotes, using the indirect immunofluorescence technique. The presence of EF in the sera of patients with acute Chagas disease as well as in the supernatant of epimastigotes culture at logarithmic phase, leads to its association with a process of parasite proliferation. Being EF a component of the parasite, its origin both in vitro and in vivo could be the result of an excretion-secretion of parasite or simply a result of the parasite's death. It can be postulated that the same as in other protozoic infection, EF could be used by T. cruzi in the process of cell penetration. PMID:2517138

  17. A Recombinant Protein Based on Trypanosoma cruzi P21 Enhances Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Heline Hellen T.; Cruz, Mário C.; Brígido, Paula C.; dos Santos, Paulo C. F.; Martins, Flávia A.; Bahia, Diana; Maricato, Juliana T.; Janini, Luiz M. R.; Reboredo, Eduardo H.; Mortara, Renato A.; da Silva, Claudio V.

    2012-01-01

    Background P21 is a secreted protein expressed in all developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the recombinant protein based on P21 (P21-His6) on inflammatory macrophages during phagocytosis. Findings Our results showed that P21-His6 acts as a phagocytosis inducer by binding to CXCR4 chemokine receptor and activating actin polymerization in a way dependent onthe PI3-kinase signaling pathway. Conclusions Thus, our results shed light on the notion that native P21 is a component related to T. cruzi evasion from the immune response and that CXCR4 may be involved in phagocytosis. P21-His6 represents an important experimental control tool to study phagocytosis signaling pathways of different intracellular parasites and particles. PMID:23251513

  18. Nutritional Status Driving Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi: Lessons from Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Malafaia, Guilherme; Talvani, André

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific knowledge about protein-energy and micronutrient malnutrition in the context of Chagas disease, especially in experimental models. The search of articles was conducted using the electronic databases of SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online), PubMed and MEDLINE published between 1960 and March 2010. It was possible to verify that nutritional deficiencies (protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrient malnutrition) exert a direct effect on the infection by T. cruzi. However, little is known about the immunological mechanisms involved in the relationship “nutritional deficiencies and infection by T. cruzi”. A hundred years after the discovery of Chagas disease many aspects of this illness still require clarification, including the effects of nutritional deficiencies on immune and pathological mechanisms of T. cruzi infection. PMID:21577255

  19. Experimental and Mathematical-Modeling Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigote Motility.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Hernández, Eduardo; Ballesteros-Rodea, Gilberto; Arias-Del-Angel, Jorge A; Dévora-Canales, Diego; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Santillán, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at characterizing the motility of parasite T. cruzi in its epimastigote form. To that end, we recorded the trajectories of two strains of this parasite (a wild-type strain and a stable transfected strain, which contains an ectopic copy of LYT1 gene and whose motility is known to be affected). We further extracted parasite trajectories from the recorded videos, and statistically analysed the following trajectory-step features: step length, angular change of direction, longitudinal and transverse displacements with respect to the previous step, and mean square displacement. Based on the resulting observations, we developed a mathematical model to simulate parasite trajectories. The fact that the model predictions closely match most of the experimentally observed parasite-trajectory characteristics, allows us to conclude that the model is an accurate description of T. cruzi motility. PMID:26544863

  20. Attenuated Salmonella sp. as a DNA Delivery System for Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens.

    PubMed

    Bivona, Augusto E; Cerny, Natacha; Alberti, Andrés Sánchez; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is an important neglected disease affecting thousands of people in the Americas. Novel strategies for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against the etiological agent, the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, are urgently needed. Vaccines based on attenuated virus and bacteria as a foreign DNA delivery system represent a strong advantage over naked DNA-based vaccines. Here we describe the use of attenuated Salmonella carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding a T. cruzi antigen. The main advantages of the methodology are the oral administration of the Salmonella-based vaccine and the induction of a strong humoral and cell-mediated immune response at both mucosal and systemic level, favored by the adjuvant effect elicited by the bacteria pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PMID:27076330

  1. Experimental and Mathematical-Modeling Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigote Motility

    PubMed Central

    Arias-del-Angel, Jorge A.; Dévora-Canales, Diego; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G.; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Santillán, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at characterizing the motility of parasite T. cruzi in its epimastigote form. To that end, we recorded the trajectories of two strains of this parasite (a wild-type strain and a stable transfected strain, which contains an ectopic copy of LYT1 gene and whose motility is known to be affected). We further extracted parasite trajectories from the recorded videos, and statistically analysed the following trajectory-step features: step length, angular change of direction, longitudinal and transverse displacements with respect to the previous step, and mean square displacement. Based on the resulting observations, we developed a mathematical model to simulate parasite trajectories. The fact that the model predictions closely match most of the experimentally observed parasite-trajectory characteristics, allows us to conclude that the model is an accurate description of T. cruzi motility. PMID:26544863

  2. A simple immunometric assay to assess the feeding habits of Meprai spinolai, a Trypanosoma cruzi vector.

    PubMed

    Molina, María C; Cattán, Pedro; Canals, Mauricio; Cruzat, Loreto; Aguillón, Juan C; Ferreira, Arturo

    2004-03-01

    We propose a simple assay to assess the importance of seven vertebrate species as food sources for Mepria spinolai, a wild arthropod vector of Trypanosoma cruzi (the agent of Chagas' disease). Rabbits were immunized with serum proteins from one of each of the seven species. After titration, a consensus 1/100,000 dilution of the immune sera detected vertebrate serum proteins in the intestinal contents of 48.9% of 131 insects tested. The high proportion of negative samples is consistent with previous information indicating that these insects can withstand prolonged fasting periods. Alternatively, they may have fed on a different animal species than those used to produce the antisera. In about 70% of the positive samples, only one species of serum protein was detected. All pre-immune sera were negative. In 67% of the positive vectors, rabbit immunoglobulins were detected directly by means of a specific goat antibody. Thus, rabbits may play a role in T. cruzi transmission.

  3. Field application of polymerase chain reaction diagnosis and strain typing of Trypanosoma cruzi in Bolivian triatomines.

    PubMed

    Breniere, S F; Bosseno, M F; Telleria, J; Carrasco, R; Vargas, F; Yaksic, N; Noireau, F

    1995-08-01

    A new approach for direct identification and characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks in biological samples was tested for field applicability on an extensive sample of feces collected from triatomine vectors from four different species found in Bolivia. The first step of the technique is polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the hypervariable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi parasites. In this report, 345 fecal samples were analyzed and the PCR results were compared with microscopic examination. For Triatoma infestans, the principal Bolivian vector, both techniques were in concordance 85.3% of the time. For the three other species, Rhodnius pictipes, Eratyrus mucronatus, and Triatoma sordida, the fecal samples were all negative by microscopic examination whereas PCR results showed several T. cruzi-infected insects in each species. The second step of the procedure is the characterization of the T. cruzi clones by means of hybridization of the PCR products with clone-specific probes generated by the PCR. We used two probes corresponding to major clones circulating in high frequency in Bolivia (as shown by previous population genetic studies using isoenzyme characterization). We obtained four primary results: 1) we confirm the importance of two major clones in Bolivia in two distinct regions; 2) we report high rates of mixed infections (multiple clones in a single vector) in Triatoma infestans, up to 22% and 35% in Cochabamba and La Paz departments, respectively; 3) the results favor the absence of interaction between different clones; and 4) we find, for the first time, evidence of the major clones circulating in three species of triatomines that are known as mainly sylvatic species.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7677221

  4. The Effectiveness of Natural Diarylheptanoids against Trypanosoma cruzi: Cytotoxicity, Ultrastructural Alterations and Molecular Modeling Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sueth-Santiago, Vitor; Moraes, Julliane de B. B.; Sobral Alves, Eliomara Sousa; Vannier-Santos, Marcos André; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Castro, Rosane N.; Mendes-Silva, Gustavo Peron; Del Cistia, Catarina de Nigris; Magalhães, Luma Godoy; Andricopulo, Adriano Defini; Sant´Anna, Carlos Mauricio R.; Decoté-Ricardo, Debora; Freire de Lima, Marco Edilson

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is the major constituent of the rhizomes of Curcuma longa and has been widely investigated for its chemotherapeutic properties. The well-known activity of CUR against Leishmania sp., Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum led us to investigate its activity against Trypanosoma cruzi. In this work, we tested the cytotoxic effects of CUR and other natural curcuminoids on different forms of T. cruzi, as well as the ultrastructural changes induced in epimastigote form of the parasite. CUR was verified as the curcuminoid with more significant trypanocidal properties (IC50 10.13 μM on epimastigotes). Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) was equipotent to CUR (IC50 11.07 μM), but bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) was less active (IC50 45.33 μM) and cyclocurcumin (CC) was inactive. In the experiment with infected murine peritoneal macrophages all diarylheptanoids were more active than the control in the inhibition of the trypomastigotes release. The electron microscopy images showed ultrastructural changes associated with the cytoskeleton of the parasite, indicating tubulin as possible target of CUR in T. cruzi. The results obtained by flow cytometry analysis of DNA content of the parasites treated with natural curcuminoids suggested a mechanism of action on microtubules related to the paclitaxel`s mode of action. To better understand the mechanism of action highlighted by electron microscopy and flow cytometry experiments we performed the molecular docking of natural curcuminoids on tubulin of T. cruzi in a homology model and the results obtained showed that the observed interactions are in accordance with the IC50 values found, since there CUR and DMC perform similar interactions at the binding site on tubulin while BDMC do not realize a hydrogen bond with Lys163 residue due to the absence of methoxyl groups. These results indicate that trypanocidal properties of CUR may be related to the cytoskeletal alterations. PMID:27658305

  5. Influence of Parasite Load on Renal Function in Mice Acutely Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Ricardo Cambraia; Miguel, Renata Botelho; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite the vast number of studies evaluating the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, the influence of parasite burden on kidney lesions remains unclear. Thus, the main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of T. cruzi infection on renal function and determine whether there was a correlation between parasite load and renal injury using an acute experimental model of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Low, medium and high parasite loads were generated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 300 (low), 3,000 (medium) or 30,000 (high) numbers of “Y” strain trypomastigotes. We found that mice infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes show increased renal injury. The infection resulted in reduced urinary excretion and creatinine clearance. We also observed a marked elevation in the ratio of urine volume to kidney and body weight, blood urea nitrogen, chloride ion, nitric oxide, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the number of leukocytes in the blood and/or renal tissues of infected mice. Additionally, we observed the presence of the parasite in the cortical/medullary and peri-renal region, an increase of inflammatory infiltrate and of vascular permeability of the kidney. Overall, most renal changes occurred mainly in animals infected with high parasitic loads. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that T. cruzi impairs kidney function, and this impairment is more evident in mice infected with high parasitic loads. Moreover, these data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied cardiovascular effects, renal injury should be regarded as an important indicator for better understanding the pan-infectivity of the parasite and consequently for understanding the disease in experimental models. PMID:23951243

  6. Crystal structure of Trypanosoma cruzi tyrosine aminotransferase: substrate specificity is influenced by cofactor binding mode.

    PubMed Central

    Blankenfeldt, W.; Nowicki, C.; Montemartini-Kalisz, M.; Kalisz, H. M.; Hecht, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) from the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, which belongs to the aminotransferase subfamily Igamma, has been determined at 2.5 A resolution with the R-value R = 15.1%. T. cruzi TAT shares less than 15% sequence identity with aminotransferases of subfamily Ialpha but shows only two larger topological differences to the aspartate aminotransferases (AspATs). First, TAT contains a loop protruding from the enzyme surface in the larger cofactor-binding domain, where the AspATs have a kinked alpha-helix. Second, in the smaller substrate-binding domain, TAT has a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet instead of the two-stranded beta-sheet in the AspATs. The position of the aromatic ring of the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor is very similar to the AspATs but the phosphate group, in contrast, is closer to the substrate-binding site with one of its oxygen atoms pointing toward the substrate. Differences in substrate specificities of T. cruzi TAT and subfamily Ialpha aminotransferases can be attributed by modeling of substrate complexes mainly to this different position of the cofactor-phosphate group. Absence of the arginine, which in the AspATs fixes the substrate side-chain carboxylate group by a salt bridge, contributes to the inability of T. cruzi TAT to transaminate acidic amino acids. The preference of TAT for tyrosine is probably related to the ability of Asn17 in TAT to form a hydrogen bond to the tyrosine side-chain hydroxyl group. PMID:10595543

  7. Binding Mode and Selectivity of Steroids towards Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase from the Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Cecilia; Moraca, Francesca; Medeiros, Andrea; Botta, Maurizio; Hamilton, Niall; Comini, Marcelo A

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) plays a housekeeping role in cell metabolism by generating reducing power (NADPH) and fueling the production of nucleotide precursors (ribose-5-phosphate). Based on its indispensability for pathogenic parasites from the genus Trypanosoma, G6PDH is considered a drug target candidate. Several steroid-like scaffolds were previously reported to target the activity of G6PDH. Epiandrosterone (EA) is an uncompetitive inhibitor of trypanosomal G6PDH for which its binding site to the enzyme remains unknown. Molecular simulation studies with the structure of Trypanosoma cruzi G6PDH revealed that EA binds in a pocket close to the G6P binding-site and protrudes into the active site blocking the interaction between substrates and hence catalysis. Site directed mutagenesis revealed the important steroid-stabilizing effect of residues (L80, K83 and K84) located on helix α-1 of T. cruzi G6PDH. The higher affinity and potency of 16α-Br EA by T. cruzi G6PDH is explained by the formation of a halogen bond with the hydrogen from the terminal amide of the NADP+-nicotinamide. At variance with the human enzyme, the inclusion of a 21-hydroxypregnane-20-one moiety to a 3β-substituted steroid is detrimental for T. cruzi G6PDH inhibition. The species-specificity of certain steroid derivatives towards the parasite G6PDH and the corresponding biochemically validated binding models disclosed in this work may prove valuable for the development of selective inhibitors against the pathogen's enzyme. PMID:26999093

  8. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Sülsen, Valeria P; Puente, Vanesa; Papademetrio, Daniela; Batlle, Alcira; Martino, Virginia S; Frank, Fernanda M; Lombardo, María E

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin accomplished its antiparasitic

  9. Combined Treatment of Heterocyclic Analogues and Benznidazole upon Trypanosoma cruzi In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Denise da Gama Jaén; Batista, Marcos Meuser; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo; Britto, Constança Carvalho; Rodrigues, Ana Carolina Mondaine; Stephens, Chad E.; Boykin, David W.; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré Correia

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in Latin America but no vaccines or safe chemotherapeutic agents are available. Combined therapy is envisioned as an ideal approach since it may enhance efficacy by acting upon different cellular targets, may reduce toxicity and minimize the risk of drug resistance. Therefore, we investigated the activity of benznidazole (Bz) in combination with the diamidine prodrug DB289 and in combination with the arylimidamide DB766 upon T. cruzi infection in vivo. The oral treatment of T.cruzi-infected mice with DB289 and Benznidazole (Bz) alone reduced the number of circulating parasites compared with untreated mice by about 70% and 90%, respectively. However, the combination of these two compounds decreased the parasitemia by 99% and protected against animal mortality by 100%, but without providing a parasitological cure. When Bz (p.o) was combined with DB766 (via ip route), at least a 99.5% decrease in parasitemia levels was observed. DB766+Bz also provided 100% protection against mice mortality while Bz alone provided about 87% protection. This combined therapy also reduced the tissular lesions induced by T. cruzi infection: Bz alone reduced GPT and CK plasma levels by about 12% and 78% compared to untreated mice group, the combination of Bz with DB766 resulted in a reduction of GPT and CK plasma levels of 56% and 91%. Cure assessment through hemocultive and PCR approaches showed that Bz did not provide a parasitological cure, however, DB766 alone or associated with Bz cured ≥13% of surviving animals. PMID:21814568

  10. Longitudinal studies of the immune response of Colombian patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli.

    PubMed

    Hudson, L; Guhl, F; de Sanchez, N; Bridge, D; Jaramillo, C A; Young, A

    1988-06-01

    Two groups of patients were examined for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies by immunofluorescence and ELISA (i) inhabitants of the village and surrounding rural area of Tibu, Norte de Santander, Columbia (n = 327) and (ii) employees of the Empresa Colombiana de Petroleos (ECOPETROL, n = 849). The latter group had a lower rate of positive serology (12 as compared to 29%) but the distributions of antibody titres were very similar in the two groups. A total of 119 serum samples (37 village and 82 ECOPETROL, including 25 seronegative controls) were analysed for their ability to immunoprecipitate the 7 major polypeptides of T. cruzi trypomastigotes of Mr greater than 72 kDa. Although 10 sera from positive patients showed no immunoprecipitation, all of the remaining positive sera contained antibodies which reacted with the 150, 90 and 85 kDa polypeptides. When the T. cruzi immunofluorescence positive, immunoprecipitation negative sera were retested by ELISA using GP90, all were negative thus suggesting that the patients had had a misdiagnosed T. rangeli infection. The new diagnosis was confirmed by immunofluorescence and ELISA with T. rangeli epimastigotes. Longitudinal studies were carried out on 19 patients from the ECOPETROL group for up to 3.5 years. Five seropositive patients showed a change in their anti-trypomastigote immunoprecipitation profiles over this period; one by loss of a previously recognized high molecular weight band and four others by conversion from a negative to a positive immunoprecipitation profile. These latter patients presented initially with uncomplicated T. rangeli infection but then acquired a T. cruzi superinfection. These patients represent the nucleus of a group in which prospective studies will identify the effect of T. rangeli infection on the course of subsequent South American trypanosomiasis and Chagas' disease.

  11. Frequency of the Congenital Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Elizabeth J.; Xiong, Xu; Carlier, Yves; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Buekens, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and endemic in much of Latin America. With increased globalization and immigration, it is a risk in any country due in part to congenital transmission. The frequency of congenital transmission is unclear. Objective To assess the frequency of congenital transmission of T. cruzi. Search Strategy PubMed, Journals@Ovid Full Text, EMBASE, CINAHL, Fuente Academica and BIREME databases were searched using seven search terms related to Chagas disease or Trypanosoma cruzi and congenital transmission. Selection Criteria The inclusion criteria were the following: Dutch, English, French, Portuguese or Spanish language; case report, case series or observational study; original data on congenital T. cruzi infection in humans; congenital infection rate reported or it could be derived. This systematic review included 13 case reports/series and 51 observational studies. Data Collection and Analysis Two investigators independently collected data on study characteristics, diagnosis and congenital infection rate. The principal summary measure – the congenital transmission rate – is defined as the number of congenitally infected infants divided by the number of infants born to infected mothers. A random effects model was utilized. Main Results The pooled congenital transmission rate was 4.7% (95% confidence interval: 3.9–5.6%). Endemic countries had a higher rate of congenital transmission compared to non-endemic (5.0% vs. 2.7%). Conclusions Congenital transmission of Chagas disease is a global problem. Overall risk of congenital infection in infants born to infected mothers is about 5%. The congenital mode of transmission requires targeted screening to prevent future cases of Chagas disease. PMID:23924273

  12. Expression and the Peculiar Enzymatic Behavior of the Trypanosoma cruzi NTH1 DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Ormeño, Fernando; Barrientos, Camila; Ramirez, Santiago; Ponce, Iván; Valenzuela, Lucía; Sepúlveda, Sofía; Bitar, Mainá; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Carlos Renato; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, presents three cellular forms (trypomastigotes, epimastigotes and amastigotes), all of which are submitted to oxidative species in its hosts. However, T. cruzi is able to resist oxidative stress suggesting a high efficiency of its DNA repair machinery.The Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway is one of the main DNA repair mechanisms in other eukaryotes and in T. cruzi as well. DNA glycosylases are enzymes involved in the recognition of oxidative DNA damage and in the removal of oxidized bases, constituting the first step of the BER pathway. Here, we describe the presence and activity of TcNTH1, a nuclear T. cruzi DNA glycosylase. Surprisingly, purified recombinant TcNTH1 does not remove the thymine glycol base, but catalyzes the cleavage of a probe showing an AP site. The same activity was found in epimastigote and trypomastigote homogenates suggesting that the BER pathway is not involved in thymine glycol DNA repair. TcNTH1 DNA-binding properties assayed in silico are in agreement with the absence of a thymine glycol removing function of that parasite enzyme. Over expression of TcNTH1 decrease parasite viability when transfected epimastigotes are submitted to a sustained production of H2O2.Therefore, TcNTH1 is the only known NTH1 orthologous unable to eliminate thymine glycol derivatives but that recognizes and cuts an AP site, most probably by a beta-elimination mechanism. We cannot discard that TcNTH1 presents DNA glycosylase activity on other DNA base lesions. Accordingly, a different DNA repair mechanism should be expected leading to eliminate thymine glycol from oxidized parasite DNA. Furthermore, TcNTH1 may play a role in the AP site recognition and processing. PMID:27284968

  13. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  14. Kinetoplast DNA signatures of Trypanosoma cruzi strains obtained directly from infected tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Vago, A. R.; Macedo, A. M.; Oliveira, R. P.; Andrade, L. O.; Chiari, E.; Galvão, L. M.; Reis, D.; Pereira, M. E.; Simpson, A. J.; Tostes, S.; Pena, S. D.

    1996-01-01

    We report here a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based DNA profiling technique that permits Trypanosoma cruzi strain characterization by direct study of infected tissues. This is based on application of a recently developed method of DNA fragment identification, called low-stringency single specific primer PCR (LSSP-PCR), to the study of the variable region of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircles from T. cruzi Thus, we can translate the intraspecific polymorphism in the nucleotide sequence of kDNA minicircles into a specific and highly reproducible kDNA signature. Comparison with the phenogram obtained by DNA fingerprinting analysis of a set of T. cruzi strains showed good qualitative correlation between the degree of divergence of the LSSP-PCR profiles and the genetic distance between the strains. kDNA signatures of heart tissue from acutely or chronically infected animals revealed perfect concordance with the patterns obtained from cultured parasites for the CL and Colombiana strains but not for the Y strain, which is known to be multiclonal. However, the match was perfect for studies with two clones of the Y strain. We take this as evidence that in some multiclonal strains there is heterogeneity among the clones in the degree of tropism for the heart tissue. Finally, we showed that it is possible to obtain a T. cruzi kDNA signature from the heart of a human patient with chronic Chagasic myocardiopathy. kDNA signatures obtained by LSSP-PCR of sequences amplified from infected tissues constitute a new tool to study the molecular epidemiology of Chagas' disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8952547

  15. Synergy Testing of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Potent Drug Combinations against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Don, Robert; Buckner, Frederick S.

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 8 million persons, mainly in Latin America, are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas disease have significant toxicities and suboptimal effectiveness, hence new therapeutic strategies need to be devised to address this neglected tropical disease. Due to the high research and development costs of bringing new chemical entities to the clinic, we and others have investigated the strategy of repurposing existing drugs for Chagas disease. Screens of FDA-approved drugs (described in this paper) have revealed a variety of chemical classes that have growth inhibitory activity against mammalian stage Trypanosoma cruzi parasites. Aside from azole antifungal drugs that have low or sub-nanomolar activity, most of the active compounds revealed in these screens have effective concentrations causing 50% inhibition (EC50's) in the low micromolar or high nanomolar range. For example, we have identified an antihistamine (clemastine, EC50 of 0.4 µM), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, EC50 of 4.4 µM), and an antifolate drug (pyrimethamine, EC50 of 3.8 µM) and others. When tested alone in the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, most compounds had insufficient efficacy to lower parasitemia thus we investigated using combinations of compounds for additive or synergistic activity. Twenty-four active compounds were screened in vitro in all possible combinations. Follow up isobologram studies showed at least 8 drug pairs to have synergistic activity on T. cruzi growth. The combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, plus the antifungal drug, posaconazole, was found to be more effective at lowering parasitemia in mice than either drug alone, as was the combination of clemastine and posaconazole. Using combinations of FDA-approved drugs is a promising strategy for developing new treatments for Chagas disease. PMID:25033456

  16. Aspirin Treatment of Mice Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and Implications for the Pathogenesis of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shankar; Machado, Fabiana S.; Huang, Huang; Oz, Helieh S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Prado, Cibele M.; Koba, Wade; Fine, Eugene J.; Zhao, Dazhi; Factor, Stephen M.; Collado, J. Elias; Weiss, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiovascular disease. It is increasingly clear that parasite-derived prostaglandins potently modulate host response and disease progression. Here, we report that treatment of experimental T. cruzi infection (Brazil strain) beginning 5 days post infection (dpi) with aspirin (ASA) increased mortality (2-fold) and parasitemia (12-fold). However, there were no differences regarding histopathology or cardiac structure or function. Delayed treatment with ASA (20 mg/kg) beginning 60 dpi did not increase parasitemia or mortality but improved ejection fraction. ASA treatment diminished the profile of parasite- and host-derived circulating prostaglandins in infected mice. To distinguish the effects of ASA on the parasite and host bio-synthetic pathways we infected cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) null mice with the Brazil-strain of T. cruzi. Infected COX-1 null mice displayed a reduction in circulating levels of thromboxane (TX)A2 and prostaglandin (PG)F2α. Parasitemia was increased in COX-1 null mice compared with parasitemia and mortality in ASA-treated infected mice indicating the effects of ASA on mortality potentially had little to do with inhibition of prostaglandin metabolism. Expression of SOCS-2 was enhanced, and TRAF6 and TNFα reduced, in the spleens of infected ASA-treated mice. Ablation of the initial innate response to infection may cause the increased mortality in ASA-treated mice as the host likely succumbs more quickly without the initiation of the “cytokine storm” during acute infection. We conclude that ASA, through both COX inhibition and other “off-target” effects, modulates the progression of acute and chronic Chagas disease. Thus, eicosanoids present during acute infection may act as immunomodulators aiding the transition to and maintenance of the chronic phase of the disease. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of ASA action may provide clues to the differences

  17. Vectorial transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: an experimental field study with susceptible and immunized hosts.

    PubMed

    Catala, S S; Gorla, D E; Basombrio, M A

    1992-07-01

    The dynamics of vectorial transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi and the level of host (guinea pigs) protection after immunization with attenuated parasites (TCC strain) was studied under natural climatic conditions in an endemic region of northern Argentina. The experimental design included two guinea pig corrals isolated by mosquito netting. One (controls) had 17 healthy and susceptible adult guinea pigs. The other had 19 guinea pigs immunized with attenuated T. cruzi TCC strain. Each corral was colonized in April 1988 with equal-sized populations of Triatoma infestans naturally infected by T. cruzi. To evaluate relevant variables in the natural transmission of Chagas' disease, corrals were sampled in both winter and late spring to assess vector populations, and to carry out parasitologic studies on both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In both corrals, vector density decreased in winter and reached a maximum in the hot season. The vector infection rate was very high (greater than 50%) throughout the experiment. Vector infectivity increased with temperature and vector age, but did not differ between the experimental and control corrals. The vector-host contact rate showed a close relationship with temperature, although a very high vector density decreased this rate, even with high ambient temperatures. Initial infections by T. cruzi occurred among guinea pigs only during the hot season. Vectorial transmission risk was estimated from the total number of bug bites per day, the proportion of infected bugs, and the daily incidence in the guinea pig population. During the hot season, this risk was 6.84 x 10(-4) in the control group and 1.82 x 10(-4) in the immunized group. PMID:1636879

  18. Cruzipain Activates Latent TGF-β from Host Cells during T. cruzi Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ferrão, Patrícia Mello; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Araujo-Jorge, Tania Cremonini; Degrave, Wim Maurits; Gonçalves, Antônio da Silva; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Lima, Ana Paula; Feige, Jean Jacques; Bailly, Sabine; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas

    2015-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the activity of cruzipain, the main lysosomal cysteine peptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi, contributes to parasite infectivity. In addition, the parasitic invasion process of mammalian host cells is described to be dependent on the activation of the host TGF-β signaling pathway by T. cruzi. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cruzipain could be an important activator of latent TGF-β and thereby trigger TGF-β-mediated events crucial for the development of Chagas disease. We found that live epimastigotes of T. cruzi, parasite lysates and purified cruzipain were able to activate latent TGF-β in vitro. This activation could be inhibited by the cysteine peptidase inhibitor Z-Phe-Ala-FMK. Moreover, transfected parasites overexpressing chagasin, a potent endogenous cruzipain inhibitor, prevented latent TGF-β activation. We also observed that T. cruzi invasion, as well as parasite intracellular growth, were inhibited by the administration of Z-Phe-Ala-FMK or anti-TGF-β neutralizing antibody to Vero cell cultures. We further demonstrated that addition of purified cruzipain enhanced the invasive activity of trypomastigotes and that this effect could be completely inhibited by addition of a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the activities of cruzipain and TGF-β in the process of cell invasion are functionally linked. Our data suggest that cruzipain inhibition is an interesting chemotherapeutic approach for Chagas disease not only because of its trypanocidal activity, but also due to the inhibitory effect on TGF-β activation. PMID:25938232

  19. Frequent House Invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Triatomines in a Suburban Area of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Jr., Gilmar; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Reis, Renato Barbosa; dos Santos, Carlos Gustavo Silva; Amorim, Alekhine; Andrade, Sônia Gumes; Reis, Mitermayer G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The demographic transition of populations from rural areas to large urban centers often results in a disordered occupation of forest remnants and increased economic pressure to develop high-income buildings in these areas. Ecological and socioeconomic factors associated with these urban transitions create conditions for the potential transmission of infectious diseases, which was demonstrated for Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed 930 triatomines, mainly Triatoma tibiamaculata, collected in artificial and sylvatic environments (forests near houses) of a suburban area of the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil between 2007 and 2011. Most triatomines were captured at peridomiciles. Adult bugs predominated in all studied environments, and nymphs were scarce inside houses. Molecular analyses of a randomly selected sub-sample (n=212) of triatomines showed Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates of 65%, 50% and 56% in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments, respectively. We detected the T. cruzi lineages I and II and mixed infections. We also showed that T. tibiamaculata fed on blood from birds (50%), marsupials (38%), ruminants (7%) and rodents (5%). The probability of T. cruzi infection was higher in triatomines that fed on marsupial blood (odds ratio (OR) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-3.11). Moreover, we observed a protective effect against infection in bugs that fed on bird blood (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.30-0.73). Conclusions/Significance The frequent invasion of houses by infected triatomines indicates a potential risk of T. cruzi transmission to inhabitants in this area. Our results reinforce that continuous epidemiological surveillance should be performed in areas where domestic transmission is controlled but enzootic transmission persists. PMID:25909509

  20. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Papademetrio, Daniela; Batlle, Alcira; Martino, Virginia S.; Frank, Fernanda M.; Lombardo, María E.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas’ disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin accomplished its

  1. Host Cell Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Is Crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. PMID:23776710

  2. Host cell poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase is crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi infection cycle.

    PubMed

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Alonso, Guillermo D; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas' disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas' disease. PMID:23776710

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation.

    PubMed

    Barrias, Emile Santos; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; De Souza, Wanderley

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T. cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T. cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane (PM) protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the PV release from the host cell PM. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T. cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete PV formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, and endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss others mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair. PMID:23914186

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Barrias, Emile Santos; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; De Souza, Wanderley

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T. cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T. cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane (PM) protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the PV release from the host cell PM. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T. cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete PV formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, and endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss others mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair. PMID:23914186

  5. Expression and the Peculiar Enzymatic Behavior of the Trypanosoma cruzi NTH1 DNA Glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Ormeño, Fernando; Barrientos, Camila; Ramirez, Santiago; Ponce, Iván; Valenzuela, Lucía; Sepúlveda, Sofía; Bitar, Mainá; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Carlos Renato; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents three cellular forms (trypomastigotes, epimastigotes and amastigotes), all of which are submitted to oxidative species in its hosts. However, T. cruzi is able to resist oxidative stress suggesting a high efficiency of its DNA repair machinery.The Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway is one of the main DNA repair mechanisms in other eukaryotes and in T. cruzi as well. DNA glycosylases are enzymes involved in the recognition of oxidative DNA damage and in the removal of oxidized bases, constituting the first step of the BER pathway. Here, we describe the presence and activity of TcNTH1, a nuclear T. cruzi DNA glycosylase. Surprisingly, purified recombinant TcNTH1 does not remove the thymine glycol base, but catalyzes the cleavage of a probe showing an AP site. The same activity was found in epimastigote and trypomastigote homogenates suggesting that the BER pathway is not involved in thymine glycol DNA repair. TcNTH1 DNA-binding properties assayed in silico are in agreement with the absence of a thymine glycol removing function of that parasite enzyme. Over expression of TcNTH1 decrease parasite viability when transfected epimastigotes are submitted to a sustained production of H2O2.Therefore, TcNTH1 is the only known NTH1 orthologous unable to eliminate thymine glycol derivatives but that recognizes and cuts an AP site, most probably by a beta-elimination mechanism. We cannot discard that TcNTH1 presents DNA glycosylase activity on other DNA base lesions. Accordingly, a different DNA repair mechanism should be expected leading to eliminate thymine glycol from oxidized parasite DNA. Furthermore, TcNTH1 may play a role in the AP site recognition and processing. PMID:27284968

  6. The sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area in the humid Chaco of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Otegui, J A; Ceballos, L A; Orozco, M M; Enriquez, G F; Cardinal, M V; Cura, C; Schijman, A G; Kitron, U; Gürtler, R E

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about the sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Gran Chaco ecoregion. We conducted surveys to identify the main sylvatic hosts of T. cruzi, parasite discrete typing units and vector species involved in Pampa del Indio, a rural area in the humid Argentinean Chaco. A total of 44 mammals from 14 species were captured and examined for infection by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR). Ten (22.7%) mammals were positive by xenodiagnosis or kDNA-PCR. Four of 11 (36%) Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossums) and six of nine (67%) Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillos) were positive by xenodiagnosis and or kDNA-PCR. Rodents, other armadillo species, felids, crab-eating raccoons, hares and rabbits were not infected. Positive animals were highly infectious to the bugs that fed upon them as determined by xenodiagnosis. All positive opossums were infected with T. cruzi I and all positive nine-banded armadillos with T. cruzi III. Extensive searches in sylvatic habitats using 718 Noireau trap-nights only yielded Triatoma sordida whereas no bug was collected in 26 light-trap nights. Four armadillos or opossums fitted with a spool-and-line device were successfully tracked to their refuges; only one Panstrongylus geniculatus was found in an armadillo burrow. No sylvatic triatomine was infected with T. cruzi by microscopical examination or kDNA-PCR. Our results indicate that two independent sylvatic transmission cycles of T. cruzi occur in the humid Chaco. The putative vectors of both cycles need to be identified conclusively. PMID:22771688

  7. The sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area in the humid Chaco of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Otegui, J.A.; Ceballos, L.A.; Orozco, M.M.; Enriquez, G.F.; Cardinal, M.V.; Cura, C.; Schijman, A.G.; Kitron, U.; Gürtler, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Gran Chaco ecoregion. We conducted surveys to identify the main sylvatic hosts of T. cruzi, parasite discrete typing units and vector species involved in Pampa del Indio, a rural area in the humid Argentinean Chaco. A total of 44 mammals from 14 species was captured and examined for infection by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR). Ten (22.7%) mammals were positive by xenodiagnosis or kDNA-PCR. Four of 11 (36%) Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossums) and six of nine (67%) Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillos) were positive by xenodiagnosis and or kDNA-PCR. Rodents, other armadillo species, felids, crab-eating raccoons, hares and rabbits were not infected. Positive animals were highly infectious to the bugs that fed upon them as determined by xenodiagnosis. All positive opossums were infected with T. cruzi I and all positive nine-banded armadillos with T. cruzi III. Extensive searches in sylvatic habitats using 718 Noireau trap-nights only yielded Triatoma sordida whereas no bug was collected in 26 light-trap nights. Four armadillos or opossums fitted with a spool-and-line device were successfully tracked to their refuges; only one Panstrongylus geniculatus was found in an armadillo burrow. No sylvatic triatomine was infected with T. cruzi by microscopical examination or kDNA-PCR. Our results indicate that two independent sylvatic transmission cycles of T. cruzi occur in the humid Chaco. The putative vectors of both cycles need to be identified conclusively. PMID:22771688

  8. Unequivocal Identification of Subpopulations in Putative Multiclonal Trypanosoma cruzi Strains by FACs Single Cell Sorting and Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Helder Magno Silva; Pimenta, Juliana Ramos; Segatto, Marcela; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Chiari, Egler; Gollob, Kenneth John; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; de Lana, Marta; Franco, Glória Regina; Machado, Carlos Renato; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Macedo, Andréa Mara

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is a polymorphic species. Evidence suggests that the majority of the T. cruzi populations isolated from afflicted humans, reservoir animals, or vectors are multiclonal. However, the extent and the complexity of multiclonality remain to be established, since aneuploidy cannot be excluded and current conventional cloning methods cannot identify all the representative clones in an infection. To answer this question, we adapted a methodology originally described for analyzing single spermatozoids, to isolate and study single T. cruzi parasites. Accordingly, the cloning apparatus of a Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS) was used to sort single T. cruzi cells directly into 96-wells microplates. Cells were then genotyped using two polymorphic genomic markers and four microsatellite loci. We validated this methodology by testing four T. cruzi populations: one control artificial mixture composed of two monoclonal populations – Silvio X10 cl1 (TcI) and Esmeraldo cl3 (TcII) – and three naturally occurring strains, one isolated from a vector (A316A R7) and two others derived from the first reported human case of Chagas disease. Using this innovative approach, we were able to successfully describe the whole complexity of these natural strains, revealing their multiclonal status. In addition, our results demonstrate that these T. cruzi populations are formed of more clones than originally expected. The method also permitted estimating of the proportion of each subpopulation of the tested strains. The single-cell genotyping approach allowed analysis of intrapopulation diversity at a level of detail not achieved previously, and may thus improve our comprehension of population structure and dynamics of T. cruzi. Finally, this methodology is capable to settle once and for all controversies on the issue of multiclonality. PMID:22802979

  9. Ecological Connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi Reservoirs and Triatoma pallidipennis Hosts in an Anthropogenic Landscape with Endemic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Janine M.; Gutiérrez-Cabrera, Ana E.; Salgado-Ramírez, Liliana; Peterson, A. Townsend; Sánchez-Cordero, Victor; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for Chagas disease prevention are targeted at domestic vector reduction, as well as control of transfusion and maternal-fetal transmission. Population connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected vectors and hosts, among sylvatic, ecotone and domestic habitats could jeopardize targeted efforts to reduce human exposure. This connectivity was evaluated in a Mexican community with reports of high vector infestation, human infection, and Chagas disease, surrounded by agricultural and natural areas. We surveyed bats, rodents, and triatomines in dry and rainy seasons in three adjacent habitats (domestic, ecotone, sylvatic), and measured T. cruzi prevalence, and host feeding sources of triatomines. Of 12 bat and 7 rodent species, no bat tested positive for T. cruzi, but all rodent species tested positive in at least one season or habitat. Highest T. cruzi infection prevalence was found in the rodents, Baiomys musculus and Neotoma mexicana. In general, parasite prevalence was not related to habitat or season, although the sylvatic habitat had higher infection prevalence than by chance, during the dry season. Wild and domestic mammals were identified as bloodmeals of T. pallidipennis, with 9% of individuals having mixed human (4.8% single human) and other mammal species in bloodmeals, especially in the dry season; these vectors tested >50% positive for T. cruzi. Overall, ecological connectivity is broad across this matrix, based on high rodent community similarity, vector and T. cruzi presence. Cost-effective T. cruzi, vector control strategies and Chagas disease transmission prevention will need to consider continuous potential for parasite movement over the entire landscape. This study provides clear evidence that these strategies will need to include reservoir/host species in at least ecotones, in addition to domestic habitats. PMID:23049923

  10. The sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area in the humid Chaco of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Otegui, J A; Ceballos, L A; Orozco, M M; Enriquez, G F; Cardinal, M V; Cura, C; Schijman, A G; Kitron, U; Gürtler, R E

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about the sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Gran Chaco ecoregion. We conducted surveys to identify the main sylvatic hosts of T. cruzi, parasite discrete typing units and vector species involved in Pampa del Indio, a rural area in the humid Argentinean Chaco. A total of 44 mammals from 14 species were captured and examined for infection by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR). Ten (22.7%) mammals were positive by xenodiagnosis or kDNA-PCR. Four of 11 (36%) Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossums) and six of nine (67%) Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillos) were positive by xenodiagnosis and or kDNA-PCR. Rodents, other armadillo species, felids, crab-eating raccoons, hares and rabbits were not infected. Positive animals were highly infectious to the bugs that fed upon them as determined by xenodiagnosis. All positive opossums were infected with T. cruzi I and all positive nine-banded armadillos with T. cruzi III. Extensive searches in sylvatic habitats using 718 Noireau trap-nights only yielded Triatoma sordida whereas no bug was collected in 26 light-trap nights. Four armadillos or opossums fitted with a spool-and-line device were successfully tracked to their refuges; only one Panstrongylus geniculatus was found in an armadillo burrow. No sylvatic triatomine was infected with T. cruzi by microscopical examination or kDNA-PCR. Our results indicate that two independent sylvatic transmission cycles of T. cruzi occur in the humid Chaco. The putative vectors of both cycles need to be identified conclusively.

  11. Automated High-Content Assay for Compounds Selectively Toxic to Trypanosoma cruzi in a Myoblastic Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Cotillo, Ignacio; Presa, Jesús L.; Cantizani, Juan; Peña, Imanol; Bardera, Ana I.; Martín, Jose J.; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a very important public health problem in Latin America where it is endemic. Although mostly asymptomatic at its initial stage, after the disease becomes chronic, about a third of the infected patients progress to a potentially fatal outcome due to severe damage of heart and gut tissues. There is an urgent need for new drugs against Chagas disease since there are only two drugs available, benznidazole and nifurtimox, and both show toxic side effects and variable efficacy against the chronic stage of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Genetically engineered parasitic strains are used for high throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical collections in the search for new anti-parasitic compounds. These assays, although successful, are limited to reporter transgenic parasites and do not cover the wide T. cruzi genetic background. With the aim to contribute to the early drug discovery process against Chagas disease we have developed an automated image-based 384-well plate HTS assay for T. cruzi amastigote replication in a rat myoblast host cell line. An image analysis script was designed to inform on three outputs: total number of host cells, ratio of T. cruzi amastigotes per cell and percentage of infected cells, which respectively provides one host cell toxicity and two T. cruzi toxicity readouts. The assay was statistically robust (Z´ values >0.6) and was validated against a series of known anti-trypanosomatid drugs. Conclusions/Significance We have established a highly reproducible, high content HTS assay for screening of chemical compounds against T. cruzi infection of myoblasts that is amenable for use with any T. cruzi strain capable of in vitro infection. Our visual assay informs on both anti-parasitic and host cell toxicity readouts in a single experiment, allowing the direct identification of compounds selectively targeted to the parasite. PMID:25615687

  12. A Kazal-type inhibitor is modulated by Trypanosoma cruzi to control microbiota inside the anterior midgut of Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Tatiane S; Buarque, Diego S; Queiroz, Bruna R; Gomes, Cícera M; Braz, Glória R C; Araújo, Ricardo N; Pereira, Marcos H; Guarneri, Alessandra A; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2015-05-01

    The triatomine insect, Rhodnius prolixus, is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. The parasite must overcome immune response and microbiota to develop inside the midgut of triatomines. In this study, we expressed, purified and characterized a Kazal-type inhibitor from the midgut of R. prolixus, named RpTI, which may be involved in microbiota - T. cruzi interactions. The qPCR showed that the RpTI transcript was primarily expressed in tissues from the intestinal tract and that it was upregulated in the anterior midgut after T. cruzi infection. A 315-bp cDNA fragment encoding the mature protein was cloned into the pPIC9 vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris system. Recombinant RpTI (rRpTI) was purified on a trypsin-Sepharose column and had a molecular mass of 11.5 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. This protein inhibited trypsin (Ki = 0.42 nM), whereas serine proteases from the coagulation cascade were not inhibited. Moreover, trypanocidal assays revealed that rRpTI did not interfere in the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. The RpTI transcript was also knocked down by RNA interference prior to infection of R. prolixus with T. cruzi. The amount of T. cruzi in the anterior midgut was significantly lower in RpTI knockdown insects compared to the non-silenced groups. We also verified that the bacterial load is higher in the anterior midgut of silenced and infected R. prolixus compared to non-silenced and infected insects. Our results suggest that T. cruzi infection increases the expression of RpTI to mediate microbiota modulation and is important for parasite immediately after infection with R. prolixus.

  13. Long-Term Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi in the Absence of Immunodominant trans-Sialidase-Specific CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Charles S; Zhang, Weibo; Bustamante, Juan M; Tarleton, Rick L

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection drives the expansion of remarkably focused CD8(+) T cell responses targeting epitopes encoded by variant trans-sialidase (TS) genes. Infection of C57BL/6 mice with T. cruzi results in up to 40% of all CD8(+) T cells committed to recognition of the dominant TSKB20 and subdominant TSKB18 TS epitopes. However, despite this enormous response, these mice fail to clear T. cruzi infection and subsequently develop chronic disease. One possible reason for the failure to cure T. cruzi infection is that immunodomination by these TS-specific T cells may interfere with alternative CD8(+) T cell responses more capable of complete parasite elimination. To address this possibility, we created transgenic mice that are centrally tolerant to these immunodominant epitopes. Mice expressing TSKB20, TSKB18, or both epitopes controlled T. cruzi infection and developed effector CD8(+) T cells that maintained an activated phenotype. Memory CD8(+) T cells from drug-cured TSKB-transgenic mice rapidly responded to secondary T. cruzi infection. In the absence of the response to TSKB20 and TSKB18, immunodominance did not shift to other known subdominant epitopes despite the capacity of these mice to expand epitope-specific T cells specific for the model antigen ovalbumin expressed by engineered parasites. Thus, CD8(+) T cell responses tightly and robustly focused on a few epitopes within variant TS antigens appear to neither contribute to, nor detract from, the ability to control T. cruzi infection. These data also indicate that the relative position of an epitope within a CD8(+) immunodominance hierarchy does not predict its importance in pathogen control.

  14. A Key Role for Old Yellow Enzyme in the Metabolism of Drugs by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Kabututu, Zakayi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Munday, Craig J.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lazarus, Michael; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Martin, Samuel K.; Duszenko, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. So far, first choice anti-chagasic drugs in use have been shown to have undesirable side effects in addition to the emergence of parasite resistance and the lack of prospect for vaccine against T. cruzi infection. Thus, the isolation and characterization of molecules essential in parasite metabolism of the anti-chagasic drugs are fundamental for the development of new strategies for rational drug design and/or the improvement of the current chemotherapy. While searching for a prostaglandin (PG) F2α synthase homologue, we have identified a novel “old yellow enzyme” from T. cruzi (TcOYE), cloned its cDNA, and overexpressed the recombinant enzyme. Here, we show that TcOYE reduced 9,11-endoperoxide PGH2 to PGF2α as well as a variety of trypanocidal drugs. By electron spin resonance experiments, we found that TcOYE specifically catalyzed one-electron reduction of menadione and β-lapachone to semiquinone-free radicals with concomitant generation of superoxide radical anions, while catalyzing solely the two-electron reduction of nifurtimox and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide drugs without free radical production. Interestingly, immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that anti-TcOYE polyclonal antibody abolished major reductase activities of the lysates toward these drugs, identifying TcOYE as a key drug-metabolizing enzyme by which quinone drugs have their mechanism of action. PMID:12417633

  15. A human astrocytoma cell line is highly susceptible to infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Zambrano, Juan Camilo; Lasso, Paola; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción Judith; González, John Mario

    2013-04-01

    Astrocytes play a vital role in neuronal protection, homeostasis, vascular interchange and the local immune response. Some viruses and parasites can cross the blood-brain barrier and infect glia. Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, can seriously compromise the central nervous system, mainly in immune-suppressed individuals, but also during the acute phase of the infection. In this report, the infective capacity of T. cruzi in a human astrocyte tumour-derived cell line was studied. Astrocytes exposed to trypomastigotes (1:10 ratio) produced intracellular amastigotes and new trypomastigotes emerged by day 4 post-infection (p.i.). At day 6 p.i., 93% of the cells were infected. Using flow cytometry, changes were observed in both the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and II molecules and the chemokine secretion pattern of astrocytes exposed to the parasite. Blocking the low-density lipoprotein receptor on astrocytes did not reduce parasite intracellular infection. Thus, T. cruzi can infect astrocytes and modulate the immune response during central nervous system infection.

  16. Vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli induces resistance of guinea pigs to virulent Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Basso, B; Moretti, E; Fretes, R

    2014-01-15

    Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America, is spread in natural environments through animal reservoirs, including marsupials, mice and guinea pigs. Farms breeding guinea pigs for food are located in some Latin-American countries with consequent risk of digestive infection. The aim of this work was to study the effect of vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli in guinea pigs challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi. Animals were vaccinated with fixated epimastigotes of T. rangeli, emulsified with saponin. Controls received only PBS. Before being challenged with T. cruzi, parasitemia, survival rates and histological studies were performed. The vaccinated guinea pigs revealed significantly lower parasitemia than controls (p<0.0001-0.01) and a discrete lymphomonocytic infiltrate in cardiac and skeletal muscles was present. In the chronic phase, the histological view was normal. In contrast, control group revealed amastigote nests and typical histopathological alterations compatible with chagasic myocarditis, endocarditis and pericarditis. These results, together with previous works in our laboratory, show that T. rangeli induces immunoprotection in three species of animals: mice, guinea pigs and dogs. The development of vaccines for use in animals, like domestic dogs and guinea pigs in captivity, opens up new opportunities for preventive tools, and could reduce the risk of infection with T. cruzi in the community.

  17. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  18. Dibenzylideneacetones Are Potent Trypanocidal Compounds That Affect the Trypanosoma cruzi Redox System.

    PubMed

    Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Martins, Solange Cardoso; Ribeiro, Fabianne Martins; Ud Din, Zia; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2016-02-01

    Despite ongoing efforts, the available treatments for Chagas' disease are still unsatisfactory, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. Our previous study reported the strong trypanocidal activity of the dibenzylideneacetones A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 against Trypanosoma cruzi (Z. Ud Din, T. P. Fill, F. F. de Assis, D. Lazarin-Bidóia, V. Kaplum, F. P. Garcia, C. V. Nakamura, K. T. de Oliveira, and E. Rodrigues-Filho, Bioorg Med Chem 22:1121-1127, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2013.12.020). In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of action of these compounds that are involved in parasite death. We showed that A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 induced oxidative stress in the three parasitic forms, especially trypomastigotes, reflected by an increase in oxidant species production and depletion of the endogenous antioxidant system. This oxidative imbalance culminated in damage in essential cell structures of T. cruzi, reflected by lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. Consequently, A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 induced vital alterations in T. cruzi, leading to parasite death through the three pathways, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. PMID:26596953

  19. Synthesis, physicochemical properties of allopurinol derivatives and their biological activity against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Raviolo, M A; Solana, M E; Novoa, M M; Gualdesi, M S; Alba-Soto, C D; Briñón, M C

    2013-11-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) leading to a huge number of infections and deaths per year, because in addition to many sufferers only having limited access to health services only an inefficient chemotherapy is available using drugs such as benznidazole and nifurtimox. Here, C6-alkyl (2a-c) and N1-acyl (3a-c) derivatives of Allopurinol (Allop, compound with activity against T. cruzi) were synthesized in good yields and their structures were unambiguously characterized. Only 2a, 2b and 3c showed inhibitory activity against the proliferative stages of the parasite when tested at 1 μg mL(-1) with the 3c derivative exhibiting an IC50 value similar to that of Allop and not being toxic for mammalian cells. Relevant pharmaceutical physicochemical properties (pKa, stability, solubility, lipophilicity) were also determined as well by using Lipinski's rule, polar surface area and molecular rigidity. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the studied derivatives had optimal properties for bioavailability and oral absorption. For the stability studies, Micellar Liquid Chromatography was used as the analytical method which was fully validated according to the FDA guidelines and shown to be a suitable, sensitive and simple method for routine analysis of these Allop derivatives.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi ubiquitin as an antigen in the differential diagnosis of Chagas disease and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Telles, Senobia; Abate, Teresa; Slezynger, Thelma; Henriquez, Diana A

    2003-06-10

    In the present report we describe Trypanosoma cruzi ubiquitin as an antigen to be utilized in the differential diagnosis of Chagas disease and leishmaniasis. Initially, recombinant T. cruzi ubiquitin was evaluated against a panel of sera by phage dot immunoassay, showing a good performance against chagasic sera. However, the presence of a carboxy-terminal tail region encoding a ribosomal protein homologous to a related protein present in the genome of Leishmania sp. gave significant cross-reactivity with leishmanial sera. Therefore, ubiquitin was purified by a simple biochemical protocol and its immunoreactivity was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Analysis of 104 sera indicates that the response to ubiquitin is very sensitive towards chronic chagasic sera (98%) and, more important, highly species-specific, presenting better performance compared to the use of the recombinant protein or the total epimastigote extracts when tested against a panel of leishmanial sera, where out of a total of 70 sera tested, only five sera from the mucocutaneous form of the disease reacted with T. cruzi ubiquitin. On the other hand, Leishmania ubiquitin was not recognized by chagasic sera, but was recognized by sera from different forms of leishmaniasis. These results make ubiquitin an excellent candidate to be used in the differential diagnosis of these two parasitic diseases. The molecular basis for this highly species-specific response is discussed.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi: an in vitro cycle of cell differentiation in axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Rondinelli, E; Silva, R; Carvalho, J F; de Almeida Soares, C M; de Carvalho, E F; de Castro, F T

    1988-08-01

    The operation of an in vitro cycle of cell differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi in axenic culture was obtained. When epimastigote forms, grown in LIT medium, were transferred to a modified LIT medium (E. Chiari, 1981, "Diferenciação do Trypanosoma cruzi em cultura." Ph.D. dissertation, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil), metacyclic trypomastigotes were generated. The latter, upon treatment with fresh human serum, and subsequent incubation in LIT medium gave origin to clusters of spheromastigote cells. The spheromastigotes were resistent to lysis mediated by the complement system and possess a morphology shown by optical and electron microscopy to be very similar to spheromastigotes derived from tissues of infected vertebrates. Blood-like trypomastigotes, or epimastigotes, could be obtained from spheromastigotes depending on the incubation conditions: at high serum concentration (55%) at 37 C, blood-like trypomastigotes were generated; by aging or heating (37 C), at low serum concentration (10%), epimastigotes were formed, closing the whole sequence of cell differentiation of T. cruzi. The molecular characterization of the different cell forms by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of metabolic pulse labeled proteins showed that the in vitro differentiated cells were distinct, not only by morphological criteria, but by differential gene expression as well. All the forms described could be obtained in large amounts (6 x 10(7) to 1 x 10(8)/ml), making it possible to perform preparative biochemical, molecular biological, and immunological experiments.

  2. The C-terminal region of Trypanosoma cruzi MASPs is antigenic and secreted via exovesicles

    PubMed Central

    De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Díaz Lozano, Isabel María; Jercic, Maria Isabel; Quinzada, Markela; Giménez, Maria José; Calabuig, Eva; Espino, Ana Margarita; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Osuna, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a neglected and emerging tropical disease, endemic to South America and present in non-endemic regions due to human migration. The MASP multigene family is specific to T. cruzi, accounting for 6% of the parasite’s genome and plays a key role in immune evasion. A common feature of MASPs is the presence of two conserved regions: an N-terminal region codifying for signal peptide and a C-terminal (C-term) region, which potentially acts as GPI-addition signal peptide. Our aim was the analysis of the presence of an immune response against the MASP C-term region. We found that this region is highly conserved, released via exovesicles (EVs) and has an associated immune response as revealed by epitope affinity mapping, IFA and inhibition of the complement lysis assays. We also demonstrate the presence of a fast IgM response in Balb/c mice infected with T. cruzi. Our results reveal the presence of non-canonical secreted peptides in EVs, which can subsequently be exposed to the immune system with a potential role in evading immune system targets in the parasite. PMID:27270330

  3. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  4. The Trypanosoma cruzi Diamine Transporter Is Essential for Robust Infection of Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasne, Marie-Pierre; Soysa, Radika; Ullman, Buddy

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is incapable of synthesizing putrescine or cadaverine de novo, and, therefore, salvage of polyamines from the host milieu is an obligatory nutritional function for the parasite. A high-affinity diamine transporter (TcPOT1) from T. cruzi has been identified previously that recognizes both putrescine and cadaverine as ligands. In order to assess the functional role of TcPOT1 in intact parasites, a Δtcpot1 null mutant was constructed by targeted gene replacement and characterized. The Δtcpot1 mutant lacked high-affinity putrescine-cadaverine transport capability but retained the capacity to transport diamines via a non-saturable, low-affinity mechanism. Transport of spermidine and arginine was not impacted by the Δtcpot1 lesion. The Δtcpot1 cell line exhibited a significant but not total defect in its ability to subsist in Vero cells, although initial infection rates were not affected by the lesion. These findings reveal that TcPOT1 is the sole high-affinity diamine permease in T. cruzi, that genetic obliteration of TcPOT1 impairs the ability of the parasite to maintain a robust infection in mammalian cells, and that a secondary low-affinity uptake mechanism for this key parasite nutrient is operative but insufficient for optimal infection. PMID:27050410

  5. Dibenzylideneacetones Are Potent Trypanocidal Compounds That Affect the Trypanosoma cruzi Redox System

    PubMed Central

    Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Martins, Solange Cardoso; Ribeiro, Fabianne Martins; Ud Din, Zia; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2015-01-01

    Despite ongoing efforts, the available treatments for Chagas' disease are still unsatisfactory, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. Our previous study reported the strong trypanocidal activity of the dibenzylideneacetones A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 against Trypanosoma cruzi (Z. Ud Din, T. P. Fill, F. F. de Assis, D. Lazarin-Bidóia, V. Kaplum, F. P. Garcia, C. V. Nakamura, K. T. de Oliveira, and E. Rodrigues-Filho, Bioorg Med Chem 22:1121–1127, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2013.12.020). In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of action of these compounds that are involved in parasite death. We showed that A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 induced oxidative stress in the three parasitic forms, especially trypomastigotes, reflected by an increase in oxidant species production and depletion of the endogenous antioxidant system. This oxidative imbalance culminated in damage in essential cell structures of T. cruzi, reflected by lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. Consequently, A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 induced vital alterations in T. cruzi, leading to parasite death through the three pathways, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. PMID:26596953

  6. Structural and immunological characterization of sulphatides: relevance of sulphate moieties in Trypanosoma cruzi glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D M; Soprano, L L; Ferrero, M R; Esteva, M I; Riarte, A; Couto, A S; Duschak, V G

    2012-11-01

    Sulphoglycosphingolipids, present on the surface of diverse cells, participate in the regulation of various cellular events. However, little is known about the structure and the role of sulphoglycosphingolipids in trypanosomatids. Herein, sulphated dihexosylceramide structures - composed mainly of sphingosine as the long chain base acylated with stearic acid - have been determined for the first time in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes by UV-MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Interestingly, inhibition ELISA assays using cruzipain as antigen and polyclonal rabbit antibodies specific for cruzipain, the major cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi, or for its C-terminal domain, have demonstrated (i) that sulphate epitopes are shared between cruzipain and sulphatides of T. cruzi, (ii) that cross-reactivity maps to the C-terminal domain and (iii) the existence of other antigenic determinants in the glycolipidic structures. These features provide evidence that sulphate groups are antigenic in sulphate-containing parasite glycoconjugates. Furthermore, IgG2 antibody levels inversely correlate with disease severity in chronic Chagas disease patients, suggesting that IgG2 antibodies specific for sulphated epitopes might be associated with protective immunity and might be considered as potential surrogates of the course of chronic Chagas disease. PMID:22738032

  7. The endless race between Trypanosoma cruzi and host immunity: lessons for and beyond Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Caetano, Braulia; Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Melo, Mariane B; Ropert, Catherine; Rodrigues, Maurício M; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2010-09-15

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is characterised by a variable clinical course - from symptomless cases to severe chronic disease with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal involvement. The variability in disease outcome has been attributed to host responses as well as parasite heterogeneity. In this article, we review studies indicating the importance of immune responses as key determinants of host resistance to T. cruzi infection and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. Particular attention is given to recent studies defining the role of cognate innate immune receptors and immunodominant CD8+ T cells that recognise parasite components - both crucial for host-parasite interaction and disease outcome. In light of these studies we speculate about parasite strategies that induce a strong and long-lasting T-cell-mediated immunity but at the same time allow persistence of the parasite in the vertebrate host. We also discuss what we have learned from these studies for increasing our understanding of Chagas pathogenesis and for the design of new strategies to prevent the development of Chagas disease. Finally, we highlight recent studies employing a genetically engineered attenuated T. cruzi strain as a vaccine shuttle that elicits potent T cell responses specific to a tumour antigen and protective immunity against a syngeneic melanoma cell line.

  8. Domestic dogs and cats as sources of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    GÜRTLER, R. E.; CECERE, M. C.; LAURICELLA, M. A.; CARDINAL, M. V.; KITRON, U.; COHEN, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The reservoir capacity of domestic cats and dogs for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and the host-feeding patterns of domestic Triatoma infestans were assessed longitudinally in 2 infested rural villages in north-western Argentina. A total of 86 dogs and 38 cats was repeatedly examined for T. cruzi infection by serology and/or xenodiagnosis. The composite prevalence of infection in dogs (60%), but not in cats, increased significantly with age and with the domiciliary density of infected T. infestans. Dogs and cats had similarly high forces of infection, prevalence of infectious hosts (41–42%), and infectiousness to bugs at a wide range of infected bug densities. The infectiousness to bugs of seropositive dogs declined significantly with increasing dog age and was highly aggregated. Individual dog infectiousness to bugs was significantly autocorrelated over time. Domestic T. infestans fed on dogs showed higher infection prevalence (49%) than those fed on cats (39%), humans (38%) or chickens (29%) among 1085 bugs examined. The basic reproduction number of T. cruzi in dogs was at least 8·2. Both cats and dogs are epidemiologically important sources of infection for bugs and householders, dogs nearly 3 times more than cats. PMID:17032467

  9. Optical detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood samples for diagnosis purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanis, Elvio; Romero, Graciela; Alvarez, Liliana; Martinez, Carlos C.; Basombrio, Miguel A.

    2004-10-01

    An optical method for detection of Trypanosoma Cruzi (T. cruzi) parasites in blood samples of mice infected with Chagas disease is presented. The method is intended for use in human blood, for diagnosis purposes. A thin layer of blood infected by T. cruzi parasites, in small concentrations, is examined in an interferometric microscope in which the images of the vision field are taken by a CCD camera and temporarily stored in the memory of a host computer. The whole sample is scanned displacing the microscope plate by means of step motors driven by the computer. Several consecutive images of the same field are taken and digitally processed by means of image temporal differentiation in order to detect if a parasite is eventually present in the field. Each field of view is processed in the same fashion, until the full area of the sample is covered or until a parasite is detected, in which case an acoustical warning is activated and the corresponding image is displayed permitting the technician to corroborate the result visually. A discussion of the reliability of the method as well as a comparison with other well established techniques are presented.

  10. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-05-19

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence.

  11. Multi-epitope proteins for improved serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Guderian, Jeffery A; Vallur, Aarthy C; Misquith, Ayesha; Liang, Hong; Mohamath, Raodoh; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Carter, Darrick; Tavares, Suelene N B; Reed, Steven G

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported that tandem repeat (TR) proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi could serve as targets of the antibody response and be useful as diagnostic indicators. To optimize reagents for detecting T. cruzi infection we evaluated individual TR proteins and identified several that were recognized by the majority of Chagas patient's sera collected from individuals form Brazil. We then produced novel, recombinant fusion proteins to combine the reactive TR proteins into a single diagnostic product. Direct comparison of the antibody response of serum samples that were readily detected by the established fusion antigen used in commercial detection of Chagas disease, TcF, revealed strong responses to TcF43 and TcF26 proteins. While the TcF43 and TcF26 antigens enhanced detection and strength of signal, they did not compromise the specificity of detection compared to that obtained with TcF. Finally, it was apparent by testing against a panel of 84 serum samples assembled on the basis of moderate or weak reactivity against TcF (mostly signal:noise <5) that TcF43 and TcF26 could more strongly detected by many of the sera that had low TcF antibody levels. Taken together, these data indicate that TcF43 and TcF26 could be used to enhance the detection of T. cruzi infection as well as supporting a diagnosis of Chagas disease.

  12. The Dialogue of the Host-Parasite Relationship: Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Carlos Gustavo Vieira; Castro Lima, Ana Karina; Terra, Rodrigo; dos Santos, Rosiane Freire; Da-Silva, Silvia Amaral Gonçalves; Dutra, Patrícia Maria Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular protozoa Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi and the causative agents of Leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, belong to the Trypanosomatidae family. Together, these two neglected tropical diseases affect approximately 25 million people worldwide. Whether the host can control the infection or develops disease depends on the complex interaction between parasite and host. Parasite surface and secreted molecules are involved in triggering specific signaling pathways essential for parasite entry and intracellular survival. The recognition of the parasite antigens by host immune cells generates a specific immune response. Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have a multifaceted repertoire of strategies to evade or subvert the immune system by interfering with a range of signal transduction pathways in host cells, which causes the inhibition of the protective response and contributes to their persistence in the host. The current therapeutic strategies in leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are very limited. Efficacy is variable, toxicity is high, and the emergence of resistance is increasingly common. In this review, we discuss the molecular basis of the host-parasite interaction of Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi infection and their mechanisms of subverting the immune response and how this knowledge can be used as a tool for the development of new drugs.

  13. Eco-epidemiological aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli and their vector (Rhodnius pallescens) in Panama.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Ana Maria de; Samudio, Franklyn E; Saldaña, Azael; Paz, Hector M; Calzada, José E

    2004-01-01

    The eco-epidemiology of T. cruzi infection was investigated in the Eastern border of the Panama Canal in Central Panama. Between 1999 and 2000, 1110 triatomines were collected: 1050 triatomines (94.6%) from palm trees, 27 (2.4%) from periurban habitats and 33 (3.0%) inside houses. All specimens were identified as R. pallescens. There was no evidence of vector domiciliation. Salivary glands from 380 R. pallescens revealed a trypanosome natural infection rate of 7.6%, while rectal ampoule content from 373 triatomines was 45%. Isoenzyme profiles on isolated trypanosomes demonstrated that 85.4% (n = 88) were T. cruzi and 14.6% (n = 15) were T. rangeli. Blood meal analysis from 829 R. pallescens demonstrated a zoophilic vector behavior, with opossums as the preferential blood source. Seroprevalence in human samples from both study sites was less than 2%. Our results demonstrate that T. cruzi survives in the area in balanced association with R. pallescens, and with several different species of mammals in their natural niches. However, the area is an imminent risk of infection for its population, consequently it is important to implement a community educational program regarding disease knowledge and control measures. PMID:15361974

  14. The Dialogue of the Host-Parasite Relationship: Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Carlos Gustavo Vieira; Castro Lima, Ana Karina; dos Santos, Rosiane Freire; Da-Silva, Silvia Amaral Gonçalves; Dutra, Patrícia Maria Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular protozoa Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi and the causative agents of Leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, belong to the Trypanosomatidae family. Together, these two neglected tropical diseases affect approximately 25 million people worldwide. Whether the host can control the infection or develops disease depends on the complex interaction between parasite and host. Parasite surface and secreted molecules are involved in triggering specific signaling pathways essential for parasite entry and intracellular survival. The recognition of the parasite antigens by host immune cells generates a specific immune response. Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have a multifaceted repertoire of strategies to evade or subvert the immune system by interfering with a range of signal transduction pathways in host cells, which causes the inhibition of the protective response and contributes to their persistence in the host. The current therapeutic strategies in leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are very limited. Efficacy is variable, toxicity is high, and the emergence of resistance is increasingly common. In this review, we discuss the molecular basis of the host-parasite interaction of Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi infection and their mechanisms of subverting the immune response and how this knowledge can be used as a tool for the development of new drugs. PMID:26090399

  15. Molecular diversity of the Trypanosoma cruzi TcSMUG family of mucin genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Urban, Ivana; Santurio, Lucía Boiani; Chidichimo, Agustina; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Mucci, Juan; Agüero, Fernán; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2011-09-01

    The surface of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is covered by a dense coat of mucin-type glycoconjugates, which make a pivotal contribution to parasite protection and host immune evasion. Their importance is further underscored by the presence of >1000 mucin-like genes in the parasite genome. In the present study we demonstrate that one such group of genes, termed TcSMUG L, codes for previously unrecognized mucin-type glycoconjugates anchored to and secreted from the surface of insect-dwelling epimastigotes. These features are supported by the in vivo tracing and characterization of endogenous TcSMUG L products and recombinant tagged molecules expressed by transfected parasites. Besides displaying substantial homology to TcSMUG S products, which provide the scaffold for the major Gp35/50 mucins also present in insect-dwelling stages of the T. cruzi lifecycle, TcSMUG L products display unique structural and functional features, including being completely refractory to sialylation by parasite trans-sialidases. Although quantitative real time-PCR and gene sequencing analyses indicate a high degree of genomic conservation across the T. cruzi species, TcSMUG L product expression and processing is quite variable among different parasite isolates. PMID:21651499

  16. New scenarios of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Orinoco region of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rendón, Lina María; Guhl, Felipe; Cordovez, Juan Manuel; Erazo, Diana

    2015-05-01

    Rhodnius prolixus, a blood-sucking triatomine with domiciliary anthropophilic habits, is the main vector of Chagas disease. The current paradigm of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in Columbia includes a sylvatic and domiciliary cycle co-existing with domestic and sylvatic populations of reservoirs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the population densities and relative abundance of triatomines and mammals that may be involved in the sylvatic cycle of Chagas disease to clarify the epidemiological scenario in an endemic area in the province of Casanare. Insect vectors on Attalea butyracea palms were captured using both manual searches and bait traps. The capture of mammals was performed using Sherman and Tomahawk traps. We report an infestation index of 88.5% in 148 palms and an index of T. cruzi natural infection of 60.2% in 269 dissected insects and 11.9% in 160 captured mammals. High population densities of triatomines were observed in the sylvatic environment and there was a high relative abundance of reservoirs in the area, suggesting a stable enzootic cycle. We found no evidence of insect domiciliation. Taken together, these observations suggest that eco-epidemiological factors shape the transmission dynamics of T. cruzi, creating diverse scenarios of disease transmission.

  17. New scenarios of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Orinoco region of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rendón, Lina María; Guhl, Felipe; Cordovez, Juan Manuel; Erazo, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Rhodnius prolixus, a blood-sucking triatomine with domiciliary anthropophilic habits, is the main vector of Chagas disease. The current paradigm of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in Columbia includes a sylvatic and domiciliary cycle co-existing with domestic and sylvatic populations of reservoirs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the population densities and relative abundance of triatomines and mammals that may be involved in the sylvatic cycle of Chagas disease to clarify the epidemiological scenario in an endemic area in the province of Casanare. Insect vectors on Attalea butyracea palms were captured using both manual searches and bait traps. The capture of mammals was performed using Sherman and Tomahawk traps. We report an infestation index of 88.5% in 148 palms and an index of T. cruzi natural infection of 60.2% in 269 dissected insects and 11.9% in 160 captured mammals. High population densities of triatomines were observed in the sylvatic environment and there was a high relative abundance of reservoirs in the area, suggesting a stable enzootic cycle. We found no evidence of insect domiciliation. Taken together, these observations suggest that eco-epidemiological factors shape the transmission dynamics of T. cruzi, creating diverse scenarios of disease transmission. PMID:25830543

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase characterization and cloning. A novel energetic pathway in protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C A; Alonso, G D; Paveto, M C; Iribarren, A; Cabanas, M L; Torres, H N; Flawiá, M M

    2000-01-14

    This work contains the first description of a guanidino kinase in a flagellar unicellular parasite. The enzyme phosphorylates L-arginine and was characterized in preparations from Trypanosoma cruzi, the ethiological agent of Chagas' disease. The activity requires ATP and a divalent cation. Under standard assay conditions (1 mM L-arginine), the presence of 5-fold higher concentrations of canavanine or histidine produced a greater than 50% enzyme inhibition. The base sequence of this enzyme revealed an open reading frame of 357 amino acids and a molecular weight of 40,201. The amino acid sequence shows all of the characteristic consensus blocks of the ATP:guanidino phosphotransferase family and a putative "actinin-type" actin-binding domain. The highest amino acid identities of the T. cruzi sequence, about 70%, were with arginine kinases from Arthropoda. Southern and chromosome blots revealed that the kinase is encoded by a single-copy gene. Moreover, Northern blot analysis showed an mRNA subpopulation of about 2.0 kilobases, and Western blotting of T. cruzi-soluble polypeptides revealed a 40-kDa band. The finding in the parasite of a phosphagen and its biosynthetic pathway, which are totally different from those in mammalian host tissues, points out this arginine kinase as a possible chemotherapy target for Chagas' disease. PMID:10625703

  19. How Trypanosoma cruzi handles cell cycle arrest promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zuma, Aline Araujo; Mendes, Isabela Cecília; Reignault, Lissa Catherine; Elias, Maria Carolina; de Souza, Wanderley; Machado, Carlos Renato; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2014-02-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately 8 million people in Latin America. This parasite contains a single nucleus and a kinetoplast, which harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). DNA topoisomerases act during replication, transcription and repair and modulate DNA topology by reverting supercoiling in the DNA double-strand. In this work, we evaluated the effects promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that promotes protozoan proliferation impairment, cell cycle arrest, ultrastructure alterations and DNA lesions in epimastigotes of T. cruzi. The results showed that inhibition of cell proliferation was reversible only at the lowest drug concentration (1μM) used. The unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin and mitochondrion swelling were the main ultrastructural modifications observed. Inhibition of parasite proliferation also led to cell cycle arrest, which was most likely caused by nuclear DNA lesions. Following camptothecin treatment, some of the cells restored their DNA, whereas others entered early apoptosis but did not progress to late apoptosis, indicating that the protozoa stay alive in a "senescence-like" state. This programmed cell death may be associated with a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these results indicate that the inhibition of T. cruzi proliferation is related to events capable of affecting cell cycle, DNA organization and mitochondrial activity. PMID:24530483

  20. Effects of camptothecin derivatives and topoisomerase dual inhibitors on Trypanosoma cruzi growth and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease that is an endemic disease in Latin America and affects about 8 million people. This parasite belongs to the Trypanosomatidae family which contains a single mitochondrion with an enlarged region, named kinetoplast that harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). The kinetoplast and the nucleus present a great variety of essential enzymes involved in DNA replication and topology, including DNA topoisomerases. Such enzymes are considered to be promising molecular targets for cancer treatment and for antiparasitic chemotherapy. In this work, the proliferation and ultrastructure of T. cruzi epimastigotes were evaluated after treatment with eukaryotic topoisomerase I inhibitors, such as topotecan and irinotecan, as well as with dual inhibitors (compounds that block eukaryotic topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II activities), such as baicalein, luteolin and evodiamine. Previous studies have shown that such inhibitors were able to block the growth of tumor cells, however most of them have never been tested on trypanosomatids. Results Considering the effects of topoisomerase I inhibitors, our results showed that topotecan decreased cell proliferation and caused unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin, however none of these alterations were observed after treatment with irinotecan. The dual inhibitors baicalein and evodiamine decreased cell growth; however the nuclear and kinetoplast ultrastructures were not affected. Conclusions Taken together, our data showed that camptothecin is more efficient than its derivatives in decreasing T. cruzi proliferation. Furthermore, we conclude that drugs pertaining to a certain class of topoisomerase inhibitors may present different efficiencies as chemotherapeutical agents. PMID:24917086

  1. Eco-epidemiological aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli and their vector (Rhodnius pallescens) in Panama.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Ana Maria de; Samudio, Franklyn E; Saldaña, Azael; Paz, Hector M; Calzada, José E

    2004-01-01

    The eco-epidemiology of T. cruzi infection was investigated in the Eastern border of the Panama Canal in Central Panama. Between 1999 and 2000, 1110 triatomines were collected: 1050 triatomines (94.6%) from palm trees, 27 (2.4%) from periurban habitats and 33 (3.0%) inside houses. All specimens were identified as R. pallescens. There was no evidence of vector domiciliation. Salivary glands from 380 R. pallescens revealed a trypanosome natural infection rate of 7.6%, while rectal ampoule content from 373 triatomines was 45%. Isoenzyme profiles on isolated trypanosomes demonstrated that 85.4% (n = 88) were T. cruzi and 14.6% (n = 15) were T. rangeli. Blood meal analysis from 829 R. pallescens demonstrated a zoophilic vector behavior, with opossums as the preferential blood source. Seroprevalence in human samples from both study sites was less than 2%. Our results demonstrate that T. cruzi survives in the area in balanced association with R. pallescens, and with several different species of mammals in their natural niches. However, the area is an imminent risk of infection for its population, consequently it is important to implement a community educational program regarding disease knowledge and control measures.

  2. The Trypanosoma cruzi Diamine Transporter Is Essential for Robust Infection of Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Hasne, Marie-Pierre; Soysa, Radika; Ullman, Buddy

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is incapable of synthesizing putrescine or cadaverine de novo, and, therefore, salvage of polyamines from the host milieu is an obligatory nutritional function for the parasite. A high-affinity diamine transporter (TcPOT1) from T. cruzi has been identified previously that recognizes both putrescine and cadaverine as ligands. In order to assess the functional role of TcPOT1 in intact parasites, a Δtcpot1 null mutant was constructed by targeted gene replacement and characterized. The Δtcpot1 mutant lacked high-affinity putrescine-cadaverine transport capability but retained the capacity to transport diamines via a non-saturable, low-affinity mechanism. Transport of spermidine and arginine was not impacted by the Δtcpot1 lesion. The Δtcpot1 cell line exhibited a significant but not total defect in its ability to subsist in Vero cells, although initial infection rates were not affected by the lesion. These findings reveal that TcPOT1 is the sole high-affinity diamine permease in T. cruzi, that genetic obliteration of TcPOT1 impairs the ability of the parasite to maintain a robust infection in mammalian cells, and that a secondary low-affinity uptake mechanism for this key parasite nutrient is operative but insufficient for optimal infection.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi strains isolated from human, vector, and animal reservoir in the same endemic region in Mexico and typed as T. cruzi I, discrete typing unit 1 exhibit considerable biological diversity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guillén, María del Carmen; Bernabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Zavala-Castro, Jorge; Totolhua, José-Luis; Méndez-López, Julio; González-Mejía, Martha-Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2006-09-01

    In this study, three strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were isolated at the same time and in the same endemic region in Mexico from a human patient with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (RyC-H); vector (Triatoma barberi) (RyC-V); and rodent reservoir (Peromyscus peromyscus) (RyC-R). The three strains were characterized by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, random amplified polymorphic DNA, and by pathological profiles in experimental animals (biodemes). Based on the analysis of genetic markers the three parasite strains were typed as belonging to T. cruzi I major group, discrete typing unit 1. The pathological profile of RyC-H and RyC-V strains indicated medium virulence and low mortality and, accordingly, the strains should be considered as belonging to biodeme Type III. On the other hand, the parasites from RyC-R strain induced more severe inflammatory processes and high mortality (> 40%) and were considered as belonging to biodeme Type II. The relationship between genotypes and biological characteristics in T. cruzi strains is still debated and not clearly understood. An expert committee recommended in 1999 that Biodeme Type III would correspond to T. cruzi I group, whereas Biodeme Type II, to T. cruzi II group. Our findings suggest that, at least for Mexican isolates, this correlation does not stand and that biological characteristics such as pathogenicity and virulence could be determined by factors different from those identified in the genotypic characterization.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' disease agent) reduces HIV-1 replication in human placenta

    PubMed Central

    Dolcini, Guillermina Laura; Solana, María Elisa; Andreani, Guadalupe; Celentano, Ana María; Parodi, Laura María; Donato, Ana María; Elissondo, Natalia; Cappa, Stella Maris González; Giavedoni, Luis David; Peralta, Liliana Martínez

    2008-01-01

    Background Several factors determine the risk of HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), such as coinfections in placentas from HIV-1 positive mothers with other pathogens. Chagas' disease is one of the most endemic zoonoses in Latin America, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The purpose of the study was to determine whether T. cruzi modifies HIV infection of the placenta at the tissue or cellular level. Results Simple and double infections were carried out on a placental histoculture system (chorionic villi isolated from term placentas from HIV and Chagas negative mothers) and on the choriocarcinoma BeWo cell line. Trypomastigotes of T. cruzi (VD lethal strain), either purified from mouse blood or from Vero cell cultures, 24 h-supernatants of blood and cellular trypomastigotes, and the VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 reporter virus were used for the coinfections. Viral transduction was evaluated by quantification of luciferase activity. Coinfection with whole trypomastigotes, either from mouse blood or from cell cultures, decreased viral pseudotype luciferase activity in placental histocultures. Similar results were obtained from BeWo cells. Supernatants of stimulated histocultures were used for the simultaneous determination of 29 cytokines and chemokines with the Luminex technology. In histocultures infected with trypomastigotes, as well as in coinfected tissues, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10 and MCP-1 production was significantly lower than in controls or HIV-1 transducted tissue. A similar decrease was observed in histocultures treated with 24 h-supernatants of blood trypomastigotes, but not in coinfected tissues. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that the presence of an intracellular pathogen, such as T. cruzi, is able to impair HIV-1 transduction in an in vitro system of human placental histoculture. Direct effects of the parasite on cellular structures as well as on cellular/viral proteins essential for HIV-1 replication might influence viral transduction in this

  5. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi's Discrete Typing Units in a cohort of Latin American migrants in Spain.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, Angela; Poveda, Cristina; Ramírez, Juan David; Norman, Francesca; Gironés, Núria; Guhl, Felipe; Monge-Maillo, Begoña; Fresno, Manuel; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. This is an endemic disease in the Americas, but increased migration to Europe has made it emerge in countries where it was previously unknown, being Spain the second non endemic country in number of patients. T. cruzi is a parasite with a wide genetic diversity, which has been grouped by consensus into 6 Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) affecting humans. Some authors have linked these DTUs either to a specific epidemiological context or to the different clinical presentations. Our main objective was to describe the T. cruzi DTUs identified from a population of chronically infected Latin American migrants attending a reference clinic in Madrid. 149 patients meeting this condition were selected for the study. Molecular characterization was performed by an algorithm that combines PCR of the intergenic region of the mini exon-gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of the satellite DNA. A descriptive analysis was performed and associations between geographical/clinical data and the different DTUs were tested. DTUs could be determined in 105 out of 149 patients, 93.3% were from Bolivia, 67.7% were women and median age was 35 years (IQR 29-44). The most common DTU found was TcV (58; 55.2%), followed by TcIV (17; 16.2%), TcII (10; 9.5%) and TcI (4; 3.8%). TcIII and TcVI were not identified from any patient, and 15.2% patients presented mixed infections. In addition, we determined DTUs after treatment in a subset of patients. In 57% patients had different DTUs before and after treatment. DTUs distribution from this study indicates active transmission of T. cruzi is occurring in Bolivia, in both domestic and sylvatic cycles. TcIV was confirmed as a cause of chronic human disease. The current results indicate no correlation between DTU and any specific clinical presentation associated with Chagas disease, nor with geographical origin. Treatment with benznidazole does not always clear T. cruzi

  6. Antibody and lymphoblastogenic responses of dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi isolates from North American mammals.

    PubMed

    Barr, S C; Dennis, V A; Klei, T R; Norcross, N L

    1991-09-01

    The humoral and cellular immune responses of dogs infected with either a non-pathogenic Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from a North American dog (Tc-D) or a pathogenic T. cruzi isolate from an opossum (Tc-O) were studied over a 240 day period. Antibody to T. cruzi epimastigote antigens prepared from Tc-O or Tc-D isolates were first detected by ELISA by Day 26 post infection (PI), peaked by day 175 PI and remained elevated throughout the experimental period in both Tc-O and Tc-D infected dogs. Differences in antibody levels between infected groups were not detected. Western blot analyses were performed using Tc-O and Tc-D epimastigote antigens probed with pooled sera and sera from individual Tc-O and Tc-D infected dogs prior to infection (Day 0), and during the acute (Day 16-35 PI), indeterminate (Day 50-135 PI) and chronic (Day 235 PI) stages of infection. Generally, the patterns, number of protein bands, and temporal appearance of the protein bands identified by pooled sera and sera from individual dogs within each antigen preparation were similar. However, similarities and differences were present in antibody responses between sera from Tc-O and Tc-D infected dogs. Blastogenic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from Tc-O and Tc-D infected dogs to mitogens (concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed) were not significantly different from controls at any time during the experimental period. The PBMC from both groups of dogs were unresponsive to epimastigote antigens during the acute stage of infection. Statistically significant differences (P less than 0.05) in PBMC responsiveness from controls were observed on Days 70 and 175 PI. Responses decreased to pre-infection levels by Day 240 PI. These studies demonstrate that although two North American T. cruzi isolates have markedly different virulence for dogs, some aspects of their cellular and humoral immune responses are similar while other responses, such as antibody recognition of specific T

  7. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi's Discrete Typing Units in a cohort of Latin American migrants in Spain.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, Angela; Poveda, Cristina; Ramírez, Juan David; Norman, Francesca; Gironés, Núria; Guhl, Felipe; Monge-Maillo, Begoña; Fresno, Manuel; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. This is an endemic disease in the Americas, but increased migration to Europe has made it emerge in countries where it was previously unknown, being Spain the second non endemic country in number of patients. T. cruzi is a parasite with a wide genetic diversity, which has been grouped by consensus into 6 Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) affecting humans. Some authors have linked these DTUs either to a specific epidemiological context or to the different clinical presentations. Our main objective was to describe the T. cruzi DTUs identified from a population of chronically infected Latin American migrants attending a reference clinic in Madrid. 149 patients meeting this condition were selected for the study. Molecular characterization was performed by an algorithm that combines PCR of the intergenic region of the mini exon-gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of the satellite DNA. A descriptive analysis was performed and associations between geographical/clinical data and the different DTUs were tested. DTUs could be determined in 105 out of 149 patients, 93.3% were from Bolivia, 67.7% were women and median age was 35 years (IQR 29-44). The most common DTU found was TcV (58; 55.2%), followed by TcIV (17; 16.2%), TcII (10; 9.5%) and TcI (4; 3.8%). TcIII and TcVI were not identified from any patient, and 15.2% patients presented mixed infections. In addition, we determined DTUs after treatment in a subset of patients. In 57% patients had different DTUs before and after treatment. DTUs distribution from this study indicates active transmission of T. cruzi is occurring in Bolivia, in both domestic and sylvatic cycles. TcIV was confirmed as a cause of chronic human disease. The current results indicate no correlation between DTU and any specific clinical presentation associated with Chagas disease, nor with geographical origin. Treatment with benznidazole does not always clear T. cruzi

  8. Decoding the Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Action of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors Using Epimastigotes as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Sangenito, Leandro S.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; d′Avila-Levy, Claudia M.; Branquinha, Marta H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspartic peptidase inhibitors have shown antimicrobial action against distinct microorganisms. Due to an increase in the occurrence of Chagas' disease/AIDS co-infection, we decided to explore the effects of HIV aspartic peptidase inhibitors (HIV-PIs) on Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Methodology and Principal Findings HIV-PIs presented an anti-proliferative action on epimastigotes of T. cruzi clone Dm28c, with IC50 values ranging from 0.6 to 14 µM. The most effective inhibitors, ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir, also had an anti-proliferative effect against different phylogenetic T. cruzi strains. The HIV-PIs induced some morphological alterations in clone Dm28c epimastigotes, as reduced cell size and swollen of the cellular body. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar membrane, mitochondrion and reservosomes are the main targets of HIV-PIs in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Curiously, an increase in the epimastigote-into-trypomastigote differentiation process of clone Dm28c was observed, with many of these parasites presenting morphological alterations including the detachment of flagellum from the cell body. The pre-treatment with the most effective HIV-PIs drastically reduced the interaction process between epimastigotes and the invertebrate vector Rhodnius prolixus. It was also noted that HIV-PIs induced an increase in the expression of gp63-like and calpain-related molecules, and decreased the cruzipain expression in epimastigotes as judged by flow cytometry and immunoblotting assays. The hydrolysis of a cathepsin D fluorogenic substrate was inhibited by all HIV-PIs in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the aspartic peptidase could be a possible target to these drugs. Additionally, we verified that ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir reduced drastically the viability of clone Dm28c trypomastigotes, causing many morphological damages. Conclusions and Significance The results contribute to understand

  9. Trypanocide Treatment of Women Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and Its Effect on Preventing Congenital Chagas

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, Diana L.; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 “chronically infected mother-biological child” pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2±6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3±5.8, 17.5±9.2 and 18.6±8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up. PMID:25411847

  10. Chagas Cardiomyopathy Manifestations and Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes Circulating in Chronic Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Juan David; Guhl, Felipe; Rendón, Lina María; Rosas, Fernando; Marin-Neto, Jose A.; Morillo, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a complex disease that is endemic and an important problem in public health in Latin America. The T. cruzi parasite is classified into six discrete taxonomic units (DTUs) based on the recently proposed nomenclature (TcI, TcII, TcIII, TcIV, TcV and TcVI). The discovery of genetic variability within TcI showed the presence of five genotypes (Ia, Ib, Ic, Id and Ie) related to the transmission cycle of Chagas disease. In Colombia, TcI is more prevalent but TcII has also been reported, as has mixed infection by both TcI and TcII in the same Chagasic patient. The objectives of this study were to determine the T. cruzi DTUs that are circulating in Colombian chronic Chagasic patients and to obtain more information about the molecular epidemiology of Chagas disease in Colombia. We also assessed the presence of electrocardiographic, radiologic and echocardiographic abnormalities with the purpose of correlating T. cruzi genetic variability and cardiac disease. Molecular characterization was performed in Colombian adult chronic Chagasic patients based on the intergenic region of the mini-exon gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of satellite DNA, whereby the presence of T.cruzi I, II, III and IV was detected. In our population, mixed infections also occurred, with TcI-TcII, TcI-TcIII and TcI-TcIV, as well as the existence of the TcI genotypes showing the presence of genotypes Ia and Id. Patients infected with TcI demonstrated a higher prevalence of cardiac alterations than those infected with TcII. These results corroborate the predominance of TcI in Colombia and show the first report of TcIII and TcIV in Colombian Chagasic patients. Findings also indicate that Chagas cardiomyopathy manifestations are more correlated with TcI than with TcII in Colombia. PMID:21152056

  11. A PCR-based RFLP analysis of Sarcocystis cruzi (Protozoa: Sarcocystidae) in Yunnan Province, PR China, reveals the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) as a natural intermediate host.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Qing; Yang, Zha-Qing; Zuo, Yang-Xian; Attwood, S W; Chen, Xin-Wen; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2002-12-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) approach is used to examine Sarcocystis cruzi-like taxa from the atypical intermediate host, water buffalo, in Yunnan, People's Republic of China. The loci examined lie within the 18S rRNA gene. A total of 15 water buffalo isolates are compared with those of 10 S. cruzi from cattle. RFLP patterns for the S. cruzi isolates from cattle and the S. cruzi-like taxon from water buffalo are found to be identical with all the 12 restriction enzymes used. Interpopulation variation between samples from Kunming and Gengma (Yunnan) is found to be undetectable at these loci for both S. cruzi and the S. cruzi-like taxon. But RFLPs are found between the S. cruzi taxa and S. suihominis from pigs at the same study sites. These findings support the hypothesis that S. cruzi is able to use the water buffalo as an intermediate host and is not restricted to cattle as was previously supposed.

  12. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in central Brazil. A study of 1,211 individuals born to infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Luquetti, Alejandro O; Tavares, Suelene Brito do Nascimento; Siriano, Liliane da Rocha; Oliveira, Rozângela Amaral de; Campos, Dayse Elizabeth; de Morais, Cicilio Alves; de Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2015-05-01

    Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi during pregnancy is estimated to occur in less than 20% of infected mothers; however, the etiopathogenesis is not completely understood. The Centre for Studies on Chagas Disease provides confirmation of T. cruzi infection for individuals living in central Brazil. In this retrospective hospital-based study, all requests for diagnosis of T. cruzi infection in individuals less than 21 years old from 1994-2014 were searched. We end with 1,211 individuals and their respective infected mothers. Congenital transmission of infection was confirmed in 24 individuals (2%) in central Brazil, an area where the main T. cruzi lineage circulating in humans is TcII. This low prevalence of congenital Chagas disease is discussed in relation to recent findings in the south region of Brazil, where TcV is the main lineage and congenital transmission has a higher prevalence (approximately 5%), similar to frequencies reported in Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia. This is the first report to show geographical differences in the rates of congenital transmission of T. cruzi and the relationship between the prevalence of congenital transmission and the type of Tc prevalent in each region.

  13. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E; Lobos, Simón E; Zurita, Alejandra P; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M G; Grijalva, Mario J; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats-Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite.

  14. Bottlenecks in domestic animal populations can facilitate the emergence of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Tustin, Aaron; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Mabud, Tarub S; Levy, Katelyn; Barbu, Corentin M; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2015-07-01

    Faeces-mediated transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi (the aetiological agent of Chagas disease) by triatomine insects is extremely inefficient. Still, the parasite emerges frequently, and has infected millions of people and domestic animals. We synthesize here the results of field and laboratory studies of T. cruzi transmission conducted in and around Arequipa, Peru. We document the repeated occurrence of large colonies of triatomine bugs (more than 1000) with very high infection prevalence (more than 85%). By inoculating guinea pigs, an important reservoir of T. cruzi in Peru, and feeding triatomine bugs on them weekly, we demonstrate that, while most animals quickly control parasitaemia, a subset of animals remains highly infectious to vectors for many months. However, we argue that the presence of these persistently infectious hosts is insufficient to explain the observed prevalence of T. cruzi in vector colonies. We posit that seasonal rains, leading to a fluctuation in the price of guinea pig food (alfalfa), leading to annual guinea pig roasts, leading to a concentration of vectors on a small subpopulation of animals maintained for reproduction, can propel T. cruzi through vector colonies and create a considerable force of infection for a pathogen whose transmission might otherwise fizzle out.

  15. Mode of action of natural and synthetic drugs against Trypanosoma cruzi and their interaction with the mammalian host.

    PubMed

    Maya, Juan Diego; Cassels, Bruce K; Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Ferreira, Jorge; Faúndez, Mario; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo; Morello, Antonio

    2007-04-01

    Current knowledge of the biochemistry of Trypanosoma cruzi has led to the development of new drugs and the understanding of their mode of action. Some trypanocidal drugs such as nifurtimox and benznidazole act through free radical generation during their metabolism. T. cruzi is very susceptible to the cell damage induced by these metabolites because enzymes scavenging free radicals are absent or have very low activities in the parasite. Another potential target is the biosynthetic pathway of glutathione and trypanothione, the low molecular weight thiol found exclusively in trypanosomatids. These thiols scavenge free radicals and participate in the conjugation and detoxication of numerous drugs. Inhibition of this key pathway could render the parasite much more susceptible to the toxic action of drugs such as nifurtimox and benznidazole without affecting the host significantly. Other drugs such as allopurinol and purine analogs inhibit purine transport in T. cruzi, which cannot synthesize purines de novo. Nitroimidazole derivatives such as itraconazole inhibit sterol metabolism. The parasite's respiratory chain is another potential therapeutic target because of its many differences with the host enzyme complexes. The pharmacological modulation of the host's immune response against T. cruzi infection as a possible chemotherapeutic target is discussed. A large set of chemicals of plant origin and a few animal metabolites active against T. cruzi are enumerated and their likely modes of action are briefly discussed.

  16. Effects of Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli on the Reproductive Performance of the Vector Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Fellet, Maria Raquel; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo; Elliot, Simon Luke; Carrasco, David; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The insect Rhodnius prolixus is responsible for the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the etiological agent of Chagas disease in areas of Central and South America. Besides this, it can be infected by other trypanosomes such as Trypanosoma rangeli. The effects of these parasites on vectors are poorly understood and are often controversial so here we focussed on possible negative effects of these parasites on the reproductive performance of R. prolixus, specifically comparing infected and uninfected couples. While T. cruzi infection did not delay pre-oviposition time of infected couples at either temperature tested (25 and 30°C) it did, at 25°C, increase the e-value in the second reproductive cycle, as well as hatching rates. Meanwhile, at 30°C, T. cruzi infection decreased the e-value of insects during the first cycle and also the fertility of older insects. When couples were instead infected with T. rangeli, pre-oviposition time was delayed, while reductions in the e-value and hatching rate were observed in the second and third cycles. We conclude that both T. cruzi and T. rangeli can impair reproductive performance of R. prolixus, although for T. cruzi, this is dependent on rearing temperature and insect age. We discuss these reproductive costs in terms of potential consequences on triatomine behavior and survival. PMID:25136800

  17. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in central Brazil. A study of 1,211 individuals born to infected mothers

    PubMed Central

    Luquetti, Alejandro O; Tavares, Suelene Brito do Nascimento; Siriano, Liliane da Rocha; de Oliveira, Rozângela Amaral; Campos, Dayse Elizabeth; de Morais, Cicilio Alves; de Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi during pregnancy is estimated to occur in less than 20% of infected mothers; however, the etiopathogenesis is not completely understood. The Centre for Studies on Chagas Disease provides confirmation of T. cruzi infection for individuals living in central Brazil. In this retrospective hospital-based study, all requests for diagnosis of T. cruzi infection in individuals less than 21 years old from 1994-2014 were searched. We end with 1,211 individuals and their respective infected mothers. Congenital transmission of infection was confirmed in 24 individuals (2%) in central Brazil, an area where the main T. cruzi lineage circulating in humans is TcII. This low prevalence of congenital Chagas disease is discussed in relation to recent findings in the south region of Brazil, where TcV is the main lineage and congenital transmission has a higher prevalence (approximately 5%), similar to frequencies reported in Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia. This is the first report to show geographical differences in the rates of congenital transmission of T. cruzi and the relationship between the prevalence of congenital transmission and the type of Tc prevalent in each region. PMID:25993506

  18. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, C. Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E.; Lobos, Simón E.; Zurita, Alejandra P.; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G.; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M. G.; Grijalva, Mario J.; Perkins, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats—Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite. PMID:26465748

  19. Cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression protects cardiac noradrenergic nerve terminals from damage by Trypanosoma cruzi infection in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Guerra, L B; Andrade, L O; Galvão, L M; Macedo, A M; Machado, C R

    2001-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi-infected juvenile rats develop severe cardiac sympathetic denervation in parallel with acute myocarditis. This aspect has not been studied in adult rats, thought to be resistant to this infection. The mechanism involved in T. cruzi-induced neuronal damage remains to be completely elucidated. In juvenile rats, the mortality during the acute phase depends on T. cruzi populations, ranging from 30% to 100%. Therefore, studies of mechanisms through hazardous procedures such as immunosuppression are restricted. The current paper shows that adult rats infected with T. cruzi (Y strain) develop severe acute myocarditis and cardiac sympathetic denervation, despite null mortality and virtual absence of patent parasitaemia followed by negative haemoculture. Recovery from the myocarditis and denervation occurred but PCR studies showed persistence of parasite DNA at least until day 111 post inoculation. Immunosuppression by cyclophosphamide treatment increased the parasitaemia, prevented the acute myocarditis and the sympathetic denervation without significant alteration of the myocardial parasitism. These results argue against a direct role for parasite-derived products and implicate the inflammatory cells in the denervation process. As previous studies in juvenile animals have discarded an essential role for radiosensitive cells, the macrophages remain as the possible effectors for the T. cruzi-induced neuronal damage.

  20. CCR5 plays a critical role in the development of myocarditis and host protection in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fabiana S; Koyama, Natalia S; Carregaro, Vanessa; Ferreira, Beatriz R; Milanezi, Cristiane M; Teixeira, Mauro M; Rossi, Marcos A; Silva, João S

    2005-02-15

    The pathogenesis of myocarditis during Trypanosoma cruzi infection is poorly understood. We investigated the role played by chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) in the influx of T cells to the cardiac tissue of T. cruzi-infected mice. mRNA and protein for the CCR5 ligands CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 were detected in the hearts of infected mice in association with CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. There was a high level of CCR5 expression on CD8+ T cells in the hearts of infected mice. Moreover, CCR5 expression on CD8+ T cells was positively modulated by T. cruzi infection. CCR5-deficient mice infected with T. cruzi experienced a dramatically inhibited migration of T cells to the heart and were also more susceptible to infection. These results suggest that CCR5 and its ligands play a central role in the control of T cell influx in T. cruzi-infected mice. Knowledge of the mechanisms that trigger and control the migration of cells to the heart in patients with Chagas disease may help in the design of drugs that prevent myocarditis and protect against the development of severe disease.

  1. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as Potential Chemotherapeutic Target in Mammal-Dwelling Stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Linda J.; Brand, Stephen; Santos, Andres; Nohara, Lilian L.; Harrison, Justin; Norcross, Neil R.; Thompson, Stephen; Smith, Victoria; Lema, Carolina; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Gilbert, Ian H.; Almeida, Igor C.; Maldonado, Rosa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, an endemic and debilitating illness in Latin America. Lately, owing to extensive population movements, this neglected tropical disease has become a global health concern. The two clinically available drugs for the chemotherapy of Chagas disease have rather high toxicity and limited efficacy in the chronic phase of the disease, and may induce parasite resistance. The development of new anti-T. cruzi agents is therefore imperative. The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) has recently been biochemically characterized, shown to be essential in Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and T. cruzi¸ and proposed as promising chemotherapeutic target in these trypanosomatids. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, using high-content imaging we assayed eight known trypanosomatid NMT inhibitors, against mammal-dwelling intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote stages and demonstrated that three of them (compounds 1, 5, and 8) have potent anti-proliferative effect at submicromolar concentrations against T. cruzi, with very low toxicity against human epithelial cells. Moreover, metabolic labeling using myristic acid, azide showed a considerable decrease in the myristoylation of proteins in parasites treated with NMT inhibitors, providing evidence of the on-target activity of the inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our data point out to the potential use of NMT inhibitors as anti-T. cruzi chemotherapy. PMID:27128971

  2. Host microtubule plus-end binding protein CLASP1 influences sequential steps in the Trypanosoma cruzi infection process

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Kumar, Praveen; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Galjart, Niels; Teygong, Crystal; Blader, Ira; Wittmann, Torsten; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian cell invasion by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi involves host cell microtubule dynamics. Microtubules support kinesin-dependent anterograde trafficking of host lysosomes to the cell periphery where targeted lysosome exocytosis elicits remodeling of the plasma membrane and parasite invasion. Here, a novel role for microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) in the coordination of T. cruzi trypomastigote internalization and post-entry events is reported. Acute silencing of CLASP1, a +TIP that participates in microtubule stabilization at the cell periphery, impairs trypomastigote internalization without diminishing the capacity for calcium-regulated lysosome exocytosis. Subsequent fusion of the T. cruzi vacuole with host lysosomes and its juxtanuclear positioning are also delayed in CLASP1-depleted cells. These post-entry phenotypes correlate with a generalized impairment of minus-end directed transport of lysosomes in CLASP1 knockdown cells and mimic the effects of dynactin disruption. Consistent with GSK3β acting as a negative regulator of CLASP function, inhibition of GSK3β activity enhances T. cruzi entry in a CLASP1-dependent manner and expression of constitutively active GSK3β dampens infection. This study provides novel molecular insights into the T. cruzi infection process, emphasizing functional links between parasite-elicited signaling, host microtubule plus-end tracking proteins and dynein-based retrograde transport. Highlighted in this work is a previously unrecognized role for CLASPs in dynamic lysosome positioning, an important aspect of the nutrient sensing response in mammalian cells. PMID:23107073

  3. Host microtubule plus-end binding protein CLASP1 influences sequential steps in the Trypanosoma cruzi infection process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Kumar, Praveen; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Caradonna, Kacey L; Galjart, Niels; Teygong, Crystal; Blader, Ira; Wittmann, Torsten; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian cell invasion by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi involves host cell microtubule dynamics. Microtubules support kinesin-dependent anterograde trafficking of host lysosomes to the cell periphery where targeted lysosome exocytosis elicits remodelling of the plasma membrane and parasite invasion. Here, a novel role for microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) in the co-ordination of T. cruzi trypomastigote internalization and post-entry events is reported. Acute silencing of CLASP1, a +TIP that participates in microtubule stabilization at the cell periphery, impairs trypomastigote internalization without diminishing the capacity for calcium-regulated lysosome exocytosis. Subsequent fusion of the T. cruzi vacuole with host lysosomes and its juxtanuclear positioning are also delayed in CLASP1-depleted cells. These post-entry phenotypes correlate with a generalized impairment of minus-end directed transport of lysosomes in CLASP1 knock-down cells and mimic the effects of dynactin disruption. Consistent with GSK3β acting as a negative regulator of CLASP function, inhibition of GSK3β activity enhances T. cruzi entry in a CLASP1-dependent manner and expression of constitutively active GSK3β dampens infection. This study provides novel molecular insights into the T. cruzi infection process, emphasizing functional links between parasite-elicited signalling, host microtubule plus-end tracking proteins and dynein-based retrograde transport. Highlighted in this work is a previously unrecognized role for CLASPs in dynamic lysosome positioning, an important aspect of the nutrient sensing response in mammalian cells. PMID:23107073

  4. Reaching for the Holy Grail: insights from infection/cure models on the prospects for vaccines for Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juan; Tarleton, Rick

    2015-05-01

    Prevention of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mammals likely depends on either prevention of the invading trypomastigotes from infecting host cells or the rapid recognition and killing of the newly infected cells by T. cruzi-specific T cells. We show here that multiple rounds of infection and cure (by drug therapy) fails to protect mice from reinfection, despite the generation of potent T cell responses. This disappointing result is similar to that obtained with many other vaccine protocols used in attempts to protect animals from T. cruzi infection. We have previously shown that immune recognition of T. cruzi infection is significantly delayed both at the systemic level and at the level of the infected host cell. The systemic delay appears to be the result of a stealth infection process that fails to trigger substantial innate recognition mechanisms while the delay at the cellular level is related to the immunodominance of highly variable gene family proteins, in particular those of the trans-sialidase family. Here we discuss how these previous studies and the new findings herein impact our thoughts on the potential of prophylactic vaccination to serve a productive role in the prevention of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease.

  5. Microcavia australis (Caviidae, Rodentia), a new highly competent host of Trypanosoma cruzi I in rural communities of northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cecere, M Carla; Cardinal, Marta V; Arrabal, Juan P; Moreno, Claudio; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2015-02-01

    Rodents are well-known hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi but little is known on the role of some caviomorph rodents. We assessed the occurrence and prevalence of T. cruzi infection in Microcavia australis ("southern mountain, desert or small cavy") and its infectiousness to the vector Triatoma infestans in four rural communities of Tafí del Valle department, northwestern Argentina. Parasite detection was performed by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR) from blood samples. A total of 51 cavies was captured in traps set up along cavy paths in peridomestic dry-shrub fences located between 25 and 85 m from the nearest domicile. We document the first record of M. australis naturally infected by T. cruzi. Cavies presented a very high prevalence of infection (46.3%; 95% confidence interval, CI=33.0-59.6%). Only one (4%) of 23 cavies negative by xenodiagnosis was found infected by kDNA-PCR. TcI was the only discrete typing unit identified in 12 cavies with a positive xenodiagnosis. The infectiousness to T. infestans of cavies positive by xenodiagnosis or kDNA-PCR was very high (mean, 55.8%; CI=48.4-63.1%) and exceeded 80% in 44% of the hosts. Cavies are highly-competent hosts of T. cruzi in peridomestic habitats near human dwellings in rural communities of Tucumán province in northwestern Argentina.

  6. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E; Lobos, Simón E; Zurita, Alejandra P; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M G; Grijalva, Mario J; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats-Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite. PMID:26465748

  7. Impairment in natural killer cells editing of immature dendritic cells by infection with a virulent Trypanosoma cruzi population.

    PubMed

    Batalla, Estela I; Pino Martínez, Agustina M; Poncini, Carolina V; Duffy, Tomás; Schijman, Alejandro G; González Cappa, Stella M; Alba Soto, Catalina D

    2013-01-01

    Early interactions between natural killer (NK) and dendritic cells (DC) shape the immune response at the frontier of innate and adaptive immunity. Activated NK cells participate in maturation or deletion of DCs that remain immature. We previously demonstrated that infection with a high virulence (HV) population of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi downmodulates DC maturation and T-cell activation capacity. Here, we evaluated the role of NK cells in regulating the maturation level of DCs. Shortly after infection with HV T. cruzi, DCs in poor maturation status begin to accumulate in mouse spleen. Although infection induces NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production, NK cells from mice infected with HV T. cruzi exhibit reduced ability to lyse and fail to induce maturation of bone marrow-derived immature DCs (iDCs). NK-mediated lysis of iDCs is restored by in vitro blockade of the IL-10 receptor during NK-DC interaction or when NK cells are obtained from T. cruzi-infected IL-10 knockout mice. These results suggest that infection with a virulent T. cruzi strain alters NK cell-mediated regulation of the adaptive immune response induced by DCs. This regulatory circuit where IL-10 appears to participate might lead to parasite persistence but can also limit the induction of a vigorous tissue-damaging T-cell response.

  8. Bottlenecks in domestic animal populations can facilitate the emergence of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Tustin, Aaron; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Mabud, Tarub S.; Levy, Katelyn; Barbu, Corentin M.; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Faeces-mediated transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi (the aetiological agent of Chagas disease) by triatomine insects is extremely inefficient. Still, the parasite emerges frequently, and has infected millions of people and domestic animals. We synthesize here the results of field and laboratory studies of T. cruzi transmission conducted in and around Arequipa, Peru. We document the repeated occurrence of large colonies of triatomine bugs (more than 1000) with very high infection prevalence (more than 85%). By inoculating guinea pigs, an important reservoir of T. cruzi in Peru, and feeding triatomine bugs on them weekly, we demonstrate that, while most animals quickly control parasitaemia, a subset of animals remains highly infectious to vectors for many months. However, we argue that the presence of these persistently infectious hosts is insufficient to explain the observed prevalence of T. cruzi in vector colonies. We posit that seasonal rains, leading to a fluctuation in the price of guinea pig food (alfalfa), leading to annual guinea pig roasts, leading to a concentration of vectors on a small subpopulation of animals maintained for reproduction, can propel T. cruzi through vector colonies and create a considerable force of infection for a pathogen whose transmission might otherwise fizzle out. PMID:26085582

  9. Pre-Columbian Chagas disease in Brazil: Trypanosoma cruzi I in the archaeological remains of a human in Peruaçu Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Alexandre; Iñiguez, Alena M; Lima, Valdirene S; Souza, Sheila M F Mendonça de; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Jansen, Ana M

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated the presence and distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in a mummy presenting with megacolon that was dated as approximately 560 +/- 40 years old. The mummy was from the Peruaçu Valley in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. All samples were positive for T. cruzi minicircle DNA, demonstrating the presence and broad dissemination of the parasite in this body. From one sample, a mini-exon gene fragment was recovered and characterized by sequencing and was found to belong to the T. cruzi I genotype. This finding suggests that T. cruzi I infected humans during the pre-Columbian times and that, in addition to T. cruzi infection, Chagas disease in Brazil most likely preceded European colonization.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi: in vivo evaluation of iron in skin employing X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in mouse strains that differ in their susceptibility to infection.

    PubMed

    Estevam, Marcelo; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia Hideko; Panis, Carolina; Cecchini, Rubens; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2012-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease (CD), is a substantial public health concern in Latin America. Laboratory mice inoculated with T. cruzi have served as important animal models of acute CD. Host hypoferremic responses occur during T. cruzi infection; therefore, it has been hypothesized that T. cruzi requires iron for optimal growth in host cells and, unlike extracellular pathogens, may benefit from host hypoferremic responses. Recent technological improvements of X-ray fluorescence are useful for diagnostics or monitoring in biomedical applications. The goal of our study was to determine whether the iron availabilities in Swiss and C57BL/6 mice differ during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection and whether the availability correlates with oxidative stress in the susceptible and resistant phenotypes identified in these mice. Our results showed that the decrease in iron levels in the skin of resistant infected mice correlated with the increase in oxidative stress associated with anemia and the reduction in parasite burden.

  11. A high throughput analysis of cytokines and chemokines expression during the course of Trypanosoma cruzi experimental oral infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Adele A; Notário, Ana Flávia O; Teixeira, Thaise L; e Silva, Rebecca T; Quintal, Amanda P N; Alves, Rosiane N; Brígido, Paula C; Siqueira, Carla S; Martins, Flávia A; Machado, Fabrício C; Clemente, Tatiana M; da Silva, Aline A; Borges, Bruna C; Teixeira, Samuel C; dos Santos, Marlus A; da Silva, Claudio V

    2016-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has high biological and biochemical diversity and variable tissue tropism. Here we aimed to verify the kinetics of cytokine and chemokine in situ secretion in animals infected with two distinct T. cruzi strains after oral inoculation. Also, we investigated parasite migration, residence and pathological damage in stomach, heart and spleen. Our results showed that host immune response against T. cruzi infection is an intricate phenomenon that depends on the parasite strain, on the infected organ and on the time point of the infection. We believe that a wide comprehension of host immune response will potentially provide basis for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies in order to clear parasitism and minimize tissue injury. In this context, we find that KC poses as a possible tool to be used.

  12. Between a bug and a hard place: Trypanosoma cruzi genetic diversity and the clinical outcomes of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Louisa A; Miles, Michael A; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, concomitant with successful transnational disease control programs across Latin America, Chagas disease has expanded from a neglected, endemic parasitic infection of the rural poor to an urbanized chronic disease, and now a potentially emergent global health problem. Trypanosoma cruzi infection has a highly variable clinical course, ranging from complete absence of symptoms to severe and often fatal cardiovascular and/or gastrointestinal manifestations. To date, few correlates of clinical disease progression have been identified. Elucidating a putative role for T. cruzi strain diversity in Chagas disease pathogenesis is complicated by the scarcity of parasites in clinical specimens and the limitations of our contemporary genotyping techniques. This article systematically reviews the historical literature, given our current understanding of parasite genetic diversity, to evaluate the evidence for any association between T. cruzi genotype and chronic clinical outcome, risk of congenital transmission or reactivation and orally transmitted outbreaks. PMID:26162928

  13. Early Diagnosis of Congenital Trypanosoma cruzi Infection, Using Shed Acute Phase Antigen, in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Mallimaci, María Cristina; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Russomando, Graciela; Sanchez, Zunilda; Sijvarger, Carina; Alvarez, Isabel Marcela; Barrionuevo, Lola; Lopez, Carlos; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanasoma cruzi. It is estimated that 15,000 new cases of congenital T. cruzi transmission occur in the Americas each year. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of congenital T. cruzi infection in infants born to infected women living in Ushuaia, Argentina, as well to assess a serologic test using Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) for a timely diagnosis of congenital infection. The rate of congenital infection among children in the study was 4.4% (3/68). Our results show that for infants younger than 30 days of age, matched blood samples from mother and infant were capable of identifying congenital transmission of infection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with SAPA. For infants older than 3 months, congenital infection could be ruled out using the same procedure. PMID:20064996

  14. 3-H-[1,2]Dithiole as a New Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Chemotype: Biological and Mechanism of Action Studies.

    PubMed

    Couto, Marcos; Sánchez, Carina; Dávila, Belén; Machín, Valentina; Varela, Javier; Álvarez, Guzmán; Cabrera, Mauricio; Celano, Laura; Aguirre-López, Beatriz; Cabrera, Nallely; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The current pharmacological Chagas disease treatments, using Nifurtimox or Benznidazole, show limited therapeutic results and are associated with potential side effects, like mutagenicity. Using random screening we have identified new chemotypes that were able to inhibit relevant targets of the Trypanosoma cruzi. We found 3H-[1,2]dithioles with the ability to inhibit Trypanosoma cruzi triosephosphate isomerase (TcTIM). Herein, we studied the structural modifications of this chemotype to analyze the influence of volume, lipophilicity and electronic properties in the anti-T. cruzi activity. Their selectivity to parasites vs. mammalian cells was also examined. To get insights into a possible mechanism of action, the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of TcTIM and cruzipain, using the isolated enzymes, and the inhibition of membrane sterol biosynthesis and excreted metabolites, using the whole parasite, were achieved. We found that this structural framework is interesting for the generation of innovative drugs for the treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:26274947

  15. Phthalimido-thiazoles as building blocks and their effects on the growth and morphology of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Paulo André Teixeira de Moraes; Oliveira, Arsênio Rodrigues; Cardoso, Marcos Veríssimo de Oliveira; Santiago, Edna de Farias; Barbosa, Miria de Oliveira; de Siqueira, Lucianna Rabelo Pessoa; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Bastos, Tanira Matutino; Brayner, Fábio André; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Mendes, Andresa Pereira de Oliveira; de Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly Brelaz; Pereira, Valéria Rego Alves; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima

    2016-03-23

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection caused by protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi that affects approximately 6-7 million people worldwide. Benznidazole is the only drug approved for treatment during the acute and asymptomatic chronic phases; however, its efficacy during the symptomatic chronic phase is controversial. The present work reports the synthesis and anti-T. cruzi activities of a novel series of phthalimido-thiazoles. Some of these compounds showed potent inhibition of the trypomastigote form of the parasite at low cytotoxicity concentrations in spleen cells, and the resulting structure-activity relationships are discussed. We also showed that phthalimido-thiazoles induced ultrastructural alterations on morphology, flagellum shortening, chromatin condensation, mitochondria swelling, reservosomes alterations and endoplasmic reticulum dilation. Together, these data revealed, for the first time, a novel series of phthalimido-thiazoles-structure-based compounds with potential effects against T. cruzi and lead-like characteristics against Chagas disease. PMID:26854377

  16. Between a bug and a hard place: Trypanosoma cruzi genetic diversity and the clinical outcomes of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Louisa A; Miles, Michael A; Bern, Caryn

    2015-08-01

    Over the last 30 years, concomitant with successful transnational disease control programs across Latin America, Chagas disease has expanded from a neglected, endemic parasitic infection of the rural poor to an urbanized chronic disease, and now a potentially emergent global health problem. Trypanosoma cruzi infection has a highly variable clinical course, ranging from complete absence of symptoms to severe and often fatal cardiovascular and/or gastrointestinal manifestations. To date, few correlates of clinical disease progression have been identified. Elucidating a putative role for T. cruzi strain diversity in Chagas disease pathogenesis is complicated by the scarcity of parasites in clinical specimens and the limitations of our contemporary genotyping techniques. This article systematically reviews the historical literature, given our current understanding of parasite genetic diversity, to evaluate the evidence for any association between T. cruzi genotype and chronic clinical outcome, risk of congenital transmission or reactivation and orally transmitted outbreaks.

  17. Wild ecotopes and food habits of Triatoma longipennis infected by Trypanosoma cruzi lineages I and II in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bosseno, Marie-France; Barnabé, Christian; Sierra, Maria Jesus Ramirez; Kengne, Pierre; Guerrero, Sergio; Lozano, Felipe; Ezequiel, Kasten; Gastélum, Magallón; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2009-06-01

    The control of wild triatomine populations that can invade dwellings is a major challenge for Chagas disease control in Mexico, but a better knowledge of the biology of these populations is required to develop appropriate control methods. We describe a new terrestrial ecotope of Triatoma longipennis, a principal vector in the occidental part of Mexico, in addition to its previously identified niche in rock pile boundary walls. Analysis of feeding hosts in the two ecotopes showed that this species is able to diversify its food sources outside of the principal hosts, Dasypus novemcinctus and Procyon lotor, and to disperse in search of new meals. Moreover, T. longipennis are strongly infected not only by the Trypanosoma cruzi I lineage found in the domestic cycle, but also by T. cruzi lineage II. The impact of T. cruzi II on human infection remains to be determined.

  18. Early diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection, using shed acute phase antigen, in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mallimaci, María Cristina; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Russomando, Graciela; Sanchez, Zunilda; Sijvarger, Carina; Alvarez, Isabel Marcela; Barrionuevo, Lola; Lopez, Carlos; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanasoma cruzi. It is estimated that 15,000 new cases of congenital T. cruzi transmission occur in the Americas each year. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of congenital T. cruzi infection in infants born to infected women living in Ushuaia, Argentina, as well to assess a serologic test using Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) for a timely diagnosis of congenital infection. The rate of congenital infection among children in the study was 4.4% (3/68). Our results show that for infants younger than 30 days of age, matched blood samples from mother and infant were capable of identifying congenital transmission of infection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with SAPA. For infants older than 3 months, congenital infection could be ruled out using the same procedure.

  19. Impact of benznidazole on infection course in mice experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi I, II, and IV.

    PubMed

    Gruendling, Ana Paula; Massago, Miyoko; Teston, Ana Paula M; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Kaneshima, Edilson N; Araújo, Silvana M; Gomes, Mônica L; Barbosa, Maria das Graças V; Toledo, Max Jean O

    2015-06-01

    American trypanosomiasis is an emerging zoonosis in the Brazilian Amazon. Studies on benznidazole (BZ) chemotherapy with Trypanosoma cruzi from this region have great relevance, given the different discrete typing units (DTUs) that infect humans in the Amazon and other regions of Brazil. We performed a parasitological, histopathological, and molecular analysis of mice inoculated with strains of T. cruzi I, II, and IV that were BZ-treated during the acute phase of infection. Groups of Swiss mice were inoculated; 13 received oral BZ, whereas the other 13 comprised the untreated controls. Unlike parasitemia, the infectivity and mortality did not vary among the DTUs. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected in all tissues analyzed and the proportion of organs parasitized varied with the parasite DTU. The BZ treatment reduced the most parasitological parameters, tissue parasitism and the inflammatory processes at all infection stages and for all DTUs. However, the number of significant reductions varied according to the DTU and infection phase.

  20. Simple methodology to directly genotype Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units in single and mixed infections from human blood samples.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Iván A; Bizai, María L; Ortiz, Sylvia; Manattini, Silvia; Fabbro, Diana; Solari, Aldo; Diez, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Different DNA markers to genotype Trypanosoma cruzi are now available. However, due to the low quantity of parasites present in biological samples, DNA markers with high copy number like kinetoplast minicircles are needed. The aim of this study was to complete a DNA assay called minicircle lineage specific-PCR (MLS-PCR) previously developed to genotype the T. cruzi DTUs TcV and TcVI, in order to genotype DTUs TcI and TcII and to improve TcVI detection. We screened kinetoplast minicircle hypervariable sequences from cloned PCR products from reference strains belonging to the mentioned DTUs using specific kDNA probes. With the four highly specific sequences selected, we designed primers to be used in the MLS-PCR to directly genotype T. cruzi from biological samples. High specificity and sensitivity were obtained when we evaluated the new approach for TcI, TcII, TcV and TcVI genotyping in twenty two T. cruzi reference strains. Afterward, we compared it with hybridization tests using specific kDNA probes in 32 blood samples from chronic chagasic patients from North Eastern Argentina. With both tests we were able to genotype 94% of the samples and the concordance between them was very good (kappa=0.855). The most frequent T. cruzi DTUs detected were TcV and TcVI, followed by TcII and much lower TcI. A unique T. cruzi DTU was detected in 18 samples meantime more than one in the remaining; being TcV and TcVI the most frequent association. A high percentage of mixed detections were obtained with both assays and its impact was discussed.

  1. Dried Blood as an Alternative to Plasma or Serum for Trypanosoma cruzi IgG Detection in Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    Holguín, Africa; Norman, Francesca; Martín, Leticia; Mateos, María Luisa; Chacón, Jesús; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi serological screening is recommended for people potentially exposed to this parasite in countries where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic and those where it is not endemic. Blood samples on filter paper may be a practical alternative to plasma/serum for antibody detection. Using the Architect Chagas assay, we detected the presence of IgG against T. cruzi in matched serum and dried blood spots (DBS) collected from 147 patients residing in Madrid, Spain, who had potential previous exposure to T. cruzi. The κ statistic for the DBS/serum proportion of agreement for the detection of antibodies against T. cruzi was 0.803, considering an S/CO (assay result unit; chemiluminescent signal from the sample [S] divided by the mean chemiluminescent signal for the three calibrators used in the test [CO]) cutoff value of ≥1.00. The relative sensitivity of the Architect test using DBS increased from 95.2% to 98.8% when the cutoff was lowered from ≥1.00 to ≥0.88, while the relative specificity decreased from 84.1% to 71.6%. Overall, the median S/CO values for DBS were significantly lower than those for serum (2.6 versus 6.5; P < 0.001). Discrepancies that occurred with the use of DBS included 10 false positives (with low S/CO values in 9 cases [median, 2.13]) and 4 false negatives, with mean S/CO values of 0.905 (gray zone). Using DBS plus a highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) may be a simple and reliable method for detecting IgG against T. cruzi when blood sampling by venipuncture is not feasible. This method may also reduce the false-negative rates observed with some rapid diagnostic tests. The lower relative sensitivity compared to the reference method may be increased by lowering the optical density threshold. PMID:23740927

  2. Identification and subcellular localization of TcHIP, a putative Golgi zDHHC palmitoyl transferase of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Batista, Cassiano Martin; Kalb, Ligia Cristina; Moreira, Claudia Maria do Nascimento; Batista, Guilherme Tadashi Hono; Eger, Iriane; Soares, Maurilio José

    2013-05-01

    Protein palmitoylation is a post-translational modification that contributes to determining protein localization and function. Palmitoylation has been described in trypanosomatid protozoa, but no zDHHC palmitoyl transferase has been identified in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In this study we identify and show the subcellular localization of TcHIP (Tc00.1047053508199.50), a putative T. cruzi zDHHC palmitoyl transferase. Analysis of the deduced protein sequence indicates that it contains ankyrin repeats (Ank and Ank2) and the zDHHC conserved domain, typical of zDHHC palmitoyl transferases. A TcHIP polyclonal antiserum obtained from mice immunized with the purified recombinant protein was used to study the presence and subcellular localization of the native enzyme. In western blots this antiserum recognized a protein of about 95 kDa, consistent with the predicted molecular mass of TcHIP (95.4 kDa), in whole extracts of T. cruzi epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. Immunolocalization by confocal microscopy showed TcHIP labeling at the Golgi complex, co-localizing with the T. cruzi Golgi marker TcRab7-GFP. Transfectant T. cruzi epimastigotes containing a construct encoding TcHIP fused to proteins A and C (TcHIP/AC) were obtained. In western blotting experiments, the TcHIP polyclonal antiserum recognized both native and TcHIP/AC proteins in extracts of the transfectants. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of native TcHIP with TcHIP/AC. These findings demonstrate the presence of a putative zDHHC palmitoyl transferase (TcHIP) containing ankyrin and zDHHC domains in different developmental forms of T. cruzi, and its association with the Golgi complex. PMID:23428831

  3. A Trypanosoma cruzi-secreted 80 kDa proteinase with specificity for human collagen types I and IV.

    PubMed Central

    Santana, J M; Grellier, P; Schrével, J; Teixeira, A R

    1997-01-01

    Specific interactions between parasites and extracellular matrix components are an important mechanism in the dissemination of Chagas' disease. Binding of the extracellular matrix proteins to Trypanosoma cruzi receptors has been described as a significant step in this phenomenon. In this study, a specific proteinase activity was identified in cell-free extracts of amastigote, trypomastigote and epimastigote forms of T. cruzi using the collagenase fluorogenic substrate N-Suc-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin. Isolation of this activity was achieved by a four-step FPLC procedure. Optimal enzyme activity was found to occur at pH 8.0 and was associated with a single T. cruzi 80 kDa protein (Tc 80 proteinase) on SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions. An internal peptide sequence of Tc 80 proteinase was obtained (AGDNYTPPE), and no similarity was found to previously described proteinases of T. cruzi. This enzyme activity is strongly inhibited by HgCl2, tosyl-lysylchloromethane ('TLCK') p-chloromercuribenzoate and benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Ala-diazomethane. The purified enzyme was able to hydrolyse purified human [14C]collagen types I and IV at neutral pH, but not 14C-labelled BSA, rat laminin, rabbit IgG or small proteins such as insulin or cytochrome c. In addition, Tc 80 proteinase activity was found to be secreted by T. cruzi forms infective to mammalian cells. Furthermore we demonstrated that purified Tc 80 proteinase mediates native collagen type I hydrolysis in rat mesentery. This feature is compared with that of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. These findings suggest that Tc 80 proteinase may facilitate T. cruzi host-cell infection by degrading the collagens of the extracellular matrix and could represent a good target for Chagas' disease chemotherapy. PMID:9224638

  4. A novel protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is involved in the transformation of human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    González, Jorge; Cornejo, Alberto; Santos, Marcia R M; Cordero, Esteban M; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Porcile, Patricio; Mortara, Renato A; Sagua, Hernán; Da Silveira, José Franco; Araya, Jorge E

    2003-01-01

    Here we provide evidence for a critical role of PP2As (protein phosphatase 2As) in the transformation of Trypanosoma cruzi. In axenic medium at pH 5.0, trypomastigotes rapidly transform into amastigotes, a process blocked by okadaic acid, a potent PP2A inhibitor, at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM. 1-Norokadaone, an inactive okadaic acid analogue, did not affect the transformation. Electron microscopy studies indicated that okadaic acid-treated trypomastigotes had not undergone ultrastructural modifications, reinforcing the idea that PP2A inhibits transformation. Using a microcystin-Sepharose affinity column we purified the native T. cruzi PP2A. The enzyme displayed activity against 32P-labelled phosphorylase a that was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by okadaic acid. The protein was also submitted to MS and, from the peptides obtained, degenerate primers were used to clone a novel T. cruzi PP2A enzyme by PCR. The isolated gene encodes a protein of 303 amino acids, termed TcPP2A, which displayed a high degree of homology (86%) with the catalytic subunit of Trypanosoma brucei PP2A. Northern-blot analysis revealed the presence of a major 2.1-kb mRNA hybridizing in all T. cruzi developmental stages. Southern-blot analysis suggested that the TcPP2A gene is present in low copy number in the T. cruzi genome. These results are consistent with the mapping of PP2A genes in two chromosomal bands by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and chromoblot hybridization. Our studies suggest that in T. cruzi PP2A is important for the complete transformation of trypomastigotes into amastigotes during the life cycle of this protozoan parasite. PMID:12737627

  5. High-Resolution Molecular Typing of Trypanosoma cruzi in 2 Large Outbreaks of Acute Chagas Disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carolina; Vera, Mauricio Javier; Cucunubá, Zulma; Flórez, Carolina; Cantillo, Omar; Buitrago, Luz Stella; González, Marina Stella; Ardila, Susanne; Dueñas, Liliana Zuleta; Tovar, Rubén; Forero, Luis Fernando; Ramírez, Juan David

    2016-10-15

    Oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi has gained relevance because of its association with high morbidity and lethality rates. This transmission route is responsible for maintaining the infection of the parasite in sylvatic cycles, and human cases have been associated mainly with the consumption of food contaminated with triatomine feces or didelphid secretions. Several ecological changes allow the intrusion of sylvatic reservoirs and triatomines to the domestic environments with subsequent food contamination. Here, high-resolution molecular tools were used to detect and genotype T. cruzi across humans, reservoirs, and insect vectors in 2 acute outbreaks of presumptive oral transmission in eastern Colombia.

  6. The Immune Response to Trypanosoma cruzi: Role of Toll-Like Receptors and Perspectives for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Mauricio M.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Bellio, Maria

    2012-01-01

    In the past ten years, studies have shown the recognition of Trypanosoma cruzi-associated molecular patterns by members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and demonstrated the crucial participation of different TLRs during the experimental infection with this parasite. In the present review, we will focus on the role of TLR-activated pathways in the modulation of both innate and acquired immune responses to T. cruzi infection, as well as discuss the state of the art of vaccine research and development against the causative agent of Chagas disease (or American trypanosomiasis). PMID:22496959

  7. High-Resolution Molecular Typing of Trypanosoma cruzi in 2 Large Outbreaks of Acute Chagas Disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carolina; Vera, Mauricio Javier; Cucunubá, Zulma; Flórez, Carolina; Cantillo, Omar; Buitrago, Luz Stella; González, Marina Stella; Ardila, Susanne; Dueñas, Liliana Zuleta; Tovar, Rubén; Forero, Luis Fernando; Ramírez, Juan David

    2016-10-15

    Oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi has gained relevance because of its association with high morbidity and lethality rates. This transmission route is responsible for maintaining the infection of the parasite in sylvatic cycles, and human cases have been associated mainly with the consumption of food contaminated with triatomine feces or didelphid secretions. Several ecological changes allow the intrusion of sylvatic reservoirs and triatomines to the domestic environments with subsequent food contamination. Here, high-resolution molecular tools were used to detect and genotype T. cruzi across humans, reservoirs, and insect vectors in 2 acute outbreaks of presumptive oral transmission in eastern Colombia. PMID:27511897

  8. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi among Teenek Amerindian residents of the Huasteca region in San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Tobias, Soledad; Vaughan, Gilberto; Torres-Montoya, Aida; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2009-08-01

    Scarce information on the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi among Amerindians is available, and the distribution of this disease in Mexican Indian populations is unknown. In this study, the presence of specific antibodies against T. cruzi among Teenek Amerindians in nine different communities located in San Luis Potosi State was analyzed. An average seroprevalence of 6.5% was found in these populations, suggesting that active transmission of disease occurs in this relatively isolated population in Mexico, and therefore, further studies should be conducted to identify risk factor associated to Chagas disease in other isolated populations across the country to determine the prevalence of Chagas disease in Mexican Amerindians.

  9. A new cruzipain-mediated pathway of human cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi requires trypomastigote membranes.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Isabela M; Scharfstein, Julio; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2004-10-01

    The intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas' disease, a chronic illness associated with cardiomyopathy and digestive disorders. This pathogen invades mammalian cells by signaling them through multiple transduction pathways. We previously showed that cruzipain, the main cysteine protease of T. cruzi, promotes host cell invasion by activating kinin receptors. Here, we report a cruzipain-mediated invasion route that is not blocked by kinin receptor antagonists. By testing different strains of T. cruzi, we observed a correlation between the level of cruzipain secreted by trypomastigotes and the capacity of the pathogen to invade host cells. Consistent with a role for cruzipain, the cysteine protease inhibitor N-methylpiperazine-urea-Phe-homophenylalanine-vinylsulfone-benzene impaired the invasion of human smooth muscle cells by strains Dm28c and X10/6 but not by the G isolate. Cruzipain-rich supernatants of Dm28c trypomastigotes enhanced the infectivity of isolate G parasites twofold, an effect which was abolished by the cysteine protease inhibitor l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane and by thapsigargin, a drug that induces depletion of the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. The enhancement due to Dm28 supernatants was abolished upon cruzipain immunodepletion, and the activity was restored by purified cruzipain. In contrast, supernatants from isolate G trypomastigotes (with low levels of cruzipain) or supernatants from Dm28c epimastigotes or purified cruzipain alone did not enhance parasite invasion, indicating that the protease is required but not sufficient to engage this invasion pathway. We provide evidence that activation of this pathway requires cruzipain-mediated processing of a trypomastigote molecule associated with parasite-shed membranes. Our results couple cruzipain to host cell invasion through a kinin-independent route and further suggest that high-level cruzipain expression may contribute to parasite infectivity.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi in the Chicken Model: Chagas-Like Heart Disease in the Absence of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Gomes, Clever; Nitz, Nadjar; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Alves, Rozeneide M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Cordeiro, Ciro; Bernal, Francisco M.; Rosa, Ana C.; Hejnar, Jiri; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Hecht, Mariana M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The administration of anti-trypanosome nitroderivatives curtails Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Chagas disease patients, but does not prevent destructive lesions in the heart. This observation suggests that an effective treatment for the disease requires understanding its pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the origin of clinical manifestations of the heart disease we used a chicken model system in which infection can be initiated in the egg, but parasite persistence is precluded. T. cruzi inoculation into the air chamber of embryonated chicken eggs generated chicks that retained only the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA minicircle in their genome after eight days of gestation. Crossbreeding showed that minicircles were transferred vertically via the germ line to chicken progeny. Minicircle integration in coding regions was shown by targeted-primer thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and detected by direct genomic analysis. The kDNA-mutated chickens died with arrhythmias, shortness of breath, cyanosis and heart failure. These chickens with cardiomyopathy had rupture of the dystrophin and other genes that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Tissue pathology revealed inflammatory dilated cardiomegaly whereby immune system mononuclear cells lyse parasite-free target heart fibers. The heart cell destruction implicated a thymus-dependent, autoimmune; self-tissue rejection carried out by CD45+, CD8γδ+, and CD8α lymphocytes. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that genetic alterations resulting from kDNA integration in the host genome lead to autoimmune-mediated destruction of heart tissue in the absence of T. cruzi parasites. PMID:21468314

  11. Temporizin and Temporizin-1 Peptides as Novel Candidates for Eliminating Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Kátia S.; Hardoim, Daiane J.; Taniwaki, Noemi; Alves, Luiz A.; De Simone, Salvatore G.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical diseases caused by parasitic infections continue to cause socioeconomic distress worldwide. Among these, Chagas disease has become a great concern because of globalization. Caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, there is an increasing need to discover new, more effective methods to manage infections that minimize disease onset. Antimicrobial peptides represent a possible solution to this challenge. As effector molecules of the innate immune response against pathogens, they are the first line of defense found in all multi-cellular organisms. In amphibians, temporins are a large family of antimicrobial peptides found in skin secretions. Their functional roles and modes of action present unique properties that indicate possible candidates for therapeutic applications. Here, we investigated the trypanocide activity of temporizin and temporizin-1. Temporizin is an artificial, hybrid peptide containing the N-terminal region of temporin A, the pore-forming region of gramicidin and a C-terminus consisting of alternating leucine and lysine. Temporizin-1 is a modification of temporizin with a reduction in the region responsible for insertion into membranes. Their activities were evaluated in a cell permeabilization assay by flow cytometry, an LDH release assay, electron microscopy, an MTT assay and patch clamp experiments. Both temporizin and temporizin-1 demonstrated toxicity against T. cruzi with temporizin displaying slightly more potency. At concentrations up to 100 μg/ ml, both peptides exhibited low toxicity in J774 cells, a macrophage lineage cell line, and no toxicity was observed in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. In contrast, the peptides showed some toxicity in rat adenoma GH3 cells and Jurkat human lymphoma cells with temporizin-1 displaying lower toxicity. In summary, a shortened form of the hybrid temporizin peptide, temporizin-1, was efficient at killing T. cruzi and it has low toxicity in wild-type mammalian cells. These data suggest that temporizin-1

  12. Altered Distribution of Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Humans Chronically Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Esteban R.; Olivera, Gabriela C.; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P.; González, Mariela N.; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L.; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S.; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans. PMID:25111833

  13. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  14. Alternative Method for the Mass Rearing of Lutzomyia (Lutzomyia) cruzi (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a Laboratory Setting.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E F; Fernandes, W S; Oshiro, E T; Oliveira, A G; Galati, E A B

    2015-09-01

    The understanding of the transmission dynamics of Leishmania spp. Ross as well as the epidemiology and spread of leishmaniasis is related to parasite-vector-host interactions. These interactions can be studied using specimens of a sand fly population reared in the laboratory, exposing individuals to experimental infection for the investigation of vector competence and parameters of the vectorial capacity of the species. The present study sought to describe an alternative method for the implantation of a Lutzomyia (Lutzomyia) cruzi colony with wild specimens captured in the municipality of Corumbá, Brazil. With Method 1, engorged females were individualized for oviposition. The eggs were transferred to an acrylic petri dish with a layer of plaster on the bottom, on which food was placed after hatching of the first larvae. With Method 2, females were kept in groups for oviposition in containers, in which soil and food were placed on their bottom for the larvae. In addition, the exposure time of the larvae to light was reduced in comparison with Method 1. With Method 2, a significantly greater number of specimens of Lu. cruzi was obtained. The ratio between the number of emerged adults and the females followed for oviposition was 0.42 with Method 1 and 2.75 with Method 2. The optimization of the rearing conditions for Lu. cruzi will enable the establishment of a colony providing a sufficient number of specimens to develop experimental infection by Leishmania as well as vectorial competence and some parameters of the vectorial capacity of this sand fly.

  15. Molecular and functional characterization of the ceramide synthase from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Juliana M.; Rodrigues, Deivid C.; Silva, Rafael C.M.C.; Koeller, Carolina M.; Jiang, James C.; Jazwinski, S. Michal; Previato, José O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Ürményi, Turán P.; Heise, Norton

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we characterized ceramide synthase (CerS) of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi at the molecular and functional levels. TcCerS activity was detected initially in a cell-free system using the microsomal fraction of epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, [3H]dihydrosphingosine or [3H]sphingosine, and fatty acids or acyl-CoA derivatives as acceptor or donor substrates, respectively. TcCerS utilizes both sphingoid long-chain bases, and its activity is exclusively dependent on acyl-CoAs, with palmitoyl-CoA being preferred. In addition, Fumonisin B1, a broad and well-known acyl-CoA-dependent CerS inhibitor, blocked the parasite’s CerS activity. However, unlike observations in fungi, the CerS inhibitors Australifungin and Fumonisin B1 did not affect the proliferation of epimastigotes in culture, even after exposure to high concentrations or after extended periods of treatment. A search of the parasite genome with the conserved Lag1 motif from Lag1p, the yeast acyl-CoA-dependent CerS, identified a T. cruzi candidate gene (TcCERS1) that putatively encodes the parasite’s CerS activity. The TcCERS1 gene was able to functionally complement the lethality of a lag1Δlac1Δ double deletion yeast mutant in which the acyl-CoA-dependent CerS is not detectable. The complemented strain was capable of synthesizing normal inositol-containing sphingolipids and is 10 times more sensitive to Fumonisin B1 than the parental strain. PMID:22226824

  16. Molecular and functional characterization of the ceramide synthase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Juliana M; Rodrigues, Deivid C; Silva, Rafael C M C; Koeller, Carolina M; Jiang, James C; Jazwinski, S Michal; Previato, José O; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Urményi, Turán P; Heise, Norton

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we characterized ceramide synthase (CerS) of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi at the molecular and functional levels. TcCerS activity was detected initially in a cell-free system using the microsomal fraction of epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, [(3)H]dihydrosphingosine or [(3)H]sphingosine, and fatty acids or acyl-CoA derivatives as acceptor or donor substrates, respectively. TcCerS utilizes both sphingoid long-chain bases, and its activity is exclusively dependent on acyl-CoAs, with palmitoyl-CoA being preferred. In addition, Fumonisin B(1), a broad and well-known acyl-CoA-dependent CerS inhibitor, blocked the parasite's CerS activity. However, unlike observations in fungi, the CerS inhibitors Australifungin and Fumonisin B(1) did not affect the proliferation of epimastigotes in culture, even after exposure to high concentrations or after extended periods of treatment. A search of the parasite genome with the conserved Lag1 motif from Lag1p, the yeast acyl-CoA-dependent CerS, identified a T. cruzi candidate gene (TcCERS1) that putatively encodes the parasite's CerS activity. The TcCERS1 gene was able to functionally complement the lethality of a lag1Δ lac1Δ double deletion yeast mutant in which the acyl-CoA-dependent CerS is not detectable. The complemented strain was capable of synthesizing normal inositol-containing sphingolipids and is 10 times more sensitive to Fumonisin B(1) than the parental strain.

  17. Predictive role of polymerase chain reaction in the early diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Elsa B; Rivero, Rocío; De Rissio, Ana María; Malagrino, Nora; Esteva, Mónica I; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Ruiz, Andrés Mariano

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of specific chemotherapy in congenital Chagas disease before the first year of life ranges between 90 and 100%. Between this age and 15 years of age, the efficacy decreases to around 60%. Therefore, early infection detection is a priority in vertical transmission. The aim of this work was to assess whether polymerase chain reaction (PCR) plays a predictive role in the diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease as compared to conventional parasitological and serological methods. To this end, we studied a total of 468 children born to Trypanosoma cruzi seroreactive mothers came from Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay, who lived in the city of Buenos Aires and suburban areas (Argentina), a non-endemic area of this country. These children were assessed by PCR from 2004 to 2009 with the specific primers Tcz1 and Tcz2, and 121 and 122. PCR allowed detecting 49 T. cruzi-positive children. Eight of these 49 children were excluded from the analysis: six because they did not complete follow-up and two because the first control was performed after 12 months of age. Parasitological methods allowed detecting 25 positive children, 7 of whom had been earlier diagnosed by PCR (1.53±2.00 vs. 6.71±1.46 months; p=0.0002). Serological methods allowed detecting 16 positive children, 12 of whom had been earlier diagnosed by PCR (1.46±1.48 vs. 11.77±4.40 months; p<0.0001). None of the children negative by PCR was positive by serological or parasitological methods. This study shows that PCR allows early diagnosis in congenital Chagas disease. At present, an early positive PCR is not indicative for treatment. However, a positive PCR would alert the health system to search only those infected infants diagnosed by early PCR and thus generate greater efficiency in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital T. cruzi infection.

  18. Experimental Evidence of Biological Interactions among Different Isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi from the Chaco Region

    PubMed Central

    Ragone, Paula G.; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Monje Rumi, Mercedes; Tomasini, Nicolás; Lauthier, Juan J.; Cimino, Rubén O.; Uncos, Alejandro; Ramos, Federico; Alberti D´Amato, Anahí M.; Basombrío, Miguel A.; Diosque, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Many infectious diseases arise from co-infections or re-infections with more than one genotype of the same pathogen. These mixed infections could alter host fitness, the severity of symptoms, success in pathogen transmission and the epidemiology of the disease. Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, exhibits a high biological variability often correlated with its genetic diversity. Here, we developed an experimental approach in order to evaluate biological interaction between three T. cruzi isolates belonging to different Discrete Typing Units (DTUs TcIII, TcV and TcVI). These isolates were obtained from a restricted geographical area in the Chaco Region. Different mixed infections involving combinations of two isolates (TcIII + TcV, TcIII + TcVI and TcV + TcVI) were studied in a mouse model. The parameters evaluated were number of parasites circulating in peripheral blood, histopathology and genetic characterization of each DTU in different tissues by DNA hybridization probes. We found a predominance of TcVI isolate in blood and tissues respect to TcIII and TcV; and a decrease of the inflammatory response in heart when the damage of mice infected with TcVI and TcIII + TcVI mixture were compared. In addition, simultaneous presence of two isolates in the same tissue was not detected. Our results show that biological interactions between isolates with different biological behaviors lead to changes in their biological properties. The occurrence of interactions among different genotypes of T. cruzi observed in our mouse model suggests that these phenomena could also occur in natural cycles in the Chaco Region. PMID:25789617

  19. Proliferation and Differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi inside Its Vector Have a New Trigger: Redox Status

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Natália P.; Saraiva, Francis M. S.; Sultano, Pedro E.; Cunha, Paula R. B. B.; Laranja, Gustavo A. T.; Justo, Graça A.; Sabino, Kátia C. C.; Coelho, Marsen G. P.; Rossini, Ana; Atella, Georgia C.; Paes, Marcia C.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi proliferate and differentiate inside different compartments of triatomines gut that is the first environment encountered by T. cruzi. Due to its complex life cycle, the parasite is constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS). We tested the influence of the pro-oxidant molecules H2O2 and the superoxide generator, Paraquat, as well as, metabolism products of the vector, with distinct redox status, in the proliferation and metacyclogenesis. These molecules are heme, hemozoin and urate. We also tested the antioxidants NAC and GSH. Heme induced the proliferation of epimastigotes and impaired the metacyclogenesis. β-hematin, did not affect epimastigote proliferation but decreased parasite differentiation. Conversely, we show that urate, GSH and NAC dramatically impaired epimastigote proliferation and during metacyclogenesis, NAC and urate induced a significant increment of trypomastigotes and decreased the percentage of epimastigotes. We also quantified the parasite loads in the anterior and posterior midguts and in the rectum of the vector by qPCR. The treatment with the antioxidants increased the parasite loads in all midgut sections analyzed. In vivo, the group of vectors fed with reduced molecules showed an increment of trypomastigotes and decreased epimastigotes when analyzed by differential counting. Heme stimulated proliferation by increasing the cell number in the S and G2/M phases, whereas NAC arrested epimastigotes in G1 phase. NAC greatly increased the percentage of trypomastigotes. Taken together, these data show a shift in the triatomine gut microenvironment caused by the redox status may also influence T. cruzi biology inside the vector. In this scenario, oxidants act to turn on epimastigote proliferation while antioxidants seem to switch the cycle towards metacyclogenesis. This is a new insight that defines a key role for redox metabolism in governing the parasitic life cycle. PMID:25671543

  20. Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Sirtuins as Possible Drug Targets for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; da Silva Augusto, Leonardo; Clemente, Tatiana Mordente; Antunes, Raysa Paes Pinto; Yoshida, Nobuko; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine is a major posttranslational modification of proteins and is catalyzed by lysine acetyltransferases, while lysine deacetylases remove acetyl groups. Among the deacetylases, the sirtuins are NAD+-dependent enzymes, which modulate gene silencing, DNA damage repair, and several metabolic processes. As sirtuin-specific inhibitors have been proposed as drugs for inhibiting the proliferation of tumor cells, in this study, we investigated the role of these inhibitors in the growth and differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease. We found that the use of salermide during parasite infection prevented growth and initial multiplication after mammalian cell invasion by T. cruzi at concentrations that did not affect host cell viability. In addition, in vivo infection was partially controlled upon administration of salermide. There are two sirtuins in T. cruzi, TcSir2rp1 and TcSir2rp3. By using specific antibodies and cell lines overexpressing the tagged versions of these enzymes, we found that TcSir2rp1 is localized in the cytosol and TcSir2rp3 in the mitochondrion. TcSir2rp1 overexpression acts to impair parasite growth and differentiation, whereas the wild-type version of TcSir2rp3 and not an enzyme mutated in the active site improves both. The effects observed with TcSir2rp3 were fully reverted by adding salermide, which inhibited TcSir2rp3 expressed in Escherichia coli with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) ± standard error of 1 ± 0.5 μM. We concluded that sirtuin inhibitors targeting TcSir2rp3 could be used in Chagas disease chemotherapy. PMID:26014945

  1. Temporizin and Temporizin-1 Peptides as Novel Candidates for Eliminating Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Souza, André L A; Faria, Robson X; Calabrese, Kátia S; Hardoim, Daiane J; Taniwaki, Noemi; Alves, Luiz A; De Simone, Salvatore G

    2016-01-01

    Tropical diseases caused by parasitic infections continue to cause socioeconomic distress worldwide. Among these, Chagas disease has become a great concern because of globalization. Caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, there is an increasing need to discover new, more effective methods to manage infections that minimize disease onset. Antimicrobial peptides represent a possible solution to this challenge. As effector molecules of the innate immune response against pathogens, they are the first line of defense found in all multi-cellular organisms. In amphibians, temporins are a large family of antimicrobial peptides found in skin secretions. Their functional roles and modes of action present unique properties that indicate possible candidates for therapeutic applications. Here, we investigated the trypanocide activity of temporizin and temporizin-1. Temporizin is an artificial, hybrid peptide containing the N-terminal region of temporin A, the pore-forming region of gramicidin and a C-terminus consisting of alternating leucine and lysine. Temporizin-1 is a modification of temporizin with a reduction in the region responsible for insertion into membranes. Their activities were evaluated in a cell permeabilization assay by flow cytometry, an LDH release assay, electron microscopy, an MTT assay and patch clamp experiments. Both temporizin and temporizin-1 demonstrated toxicity against T. cruzi with temporizin displaying slightly more potency. At concentrations up to 100 μg/ ml, both peptides exhibited low toxicity in J774 cells, a macrophage lineage cell line, and no toxicity was observed in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. In contrast, the peptides showed some toxicity in rat adenoma GH3 cells and Jurkat human lymphoma cells with temporizin-1 displaying lower toxicity. In summary, a shortened form of the hybrid temporizin peptide, temporizin-1, was efficient at killing T. cruzi and it has low toxicity in wild-type mammalian cells. These data suggest that temporizin-1

  2. Experimental infection of two South American reservoirs with four distinct strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Roellig, Dawn M.; McMillan, Katherine; Ellis, Angela E.; Vandeberg, John L.; Champagne, Donald E.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc), the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a diverse species with 2 primary genotypes, TcI and TcII, with TcII further subdivided into 5 subtypes (IIa–e). This study evaluated infection dynamics of 4 genetically and geographically diverse T. cruzi strains in 2 South American reservoirs, degus (Octodon degus) and grey short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica). Based on prior suggestions of a genotype-host association, we hypothesized that degus (placental) would more readily become infected with TcII strains while short-tailed opossums (marsupial) would be a more competent reservoir for a TcI strain. Individuals (n = 3) of each species were intraperitoneally inoculated with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of TcIIa [North America (NA)-raccoon (Procyon lotor) origin], TcI [NA-Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana)], TcIIb [South America (SA)-human], TcIIe (SA-Triatoma infestans), or both TcI and TcIIa. Parasitaemias in experimentally infected degus peaked earlier (7–14 days post-inoculation (p.i.)) compared with short-tailed opossums (21–84 days p.i.). Additionally, peak parasitaemias were higher in degus; however, the duration of detectable parasitaemias for all strains, except TcIIa, was greater in short-tailed opossums. Infections established in both host species with all genotypes, except for TcIIa, which did not establish a detectable infection in short-tailed opossums. These results indicate that both South American reservoirs support infections with these isolates from North and South America; however, infection dynamics differed with host and parasite strain. PMID:20128943

  3. Global Metabolomic Profiling of Acute Myocarditis Caused by Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gironès, Núria; Carbajosa, Sofía; Guerrero, Néstor A.; Poveda, Cristina; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Fresno, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, being cardiomyopathy the more frequent manifestation. New chemotherapeutic drugs are needed but there are no good biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. There is growing evidence linking immune response and metabolism in inflammatory processes and specifically in Chagas disease. Thus, some metabolites are able to enhance and/or inhibit the immune response. Metabolite levels found in the host during an ongoing infection could provide valuable information on the pathogenesis and/or identify deregulated metabolic pathway that can be potential candidates for treatment and being potential specific biomarkers of the disease. To gain more insight into those aspects in Chagas disease, we performed an unprecedented metabolomic analysis in heart and plasma of mice infected with T. cruzi. Many metabolic pathways were profoundly affected by T. cruzi infection, such as glucose uptake, sorbitol pathway, fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis that were increased in heart tissue but decreased in plasma. Tricarboxylic acid cycle was decreased in heart tissue and plasma whereas reactive oxygen species production and uric acid formation were also deeply increased in infected hearts suggesting a stressful condition in the heart. While specific metabolites allantoin, kynurenine and p-cresol sulfate, resulting from nucleotide, tryptophan and phenylalanine/tyrosine metabolism, respectively, were increased in heart tissue and also in plasma. These results provide new valuable information on the pathogenesis of acute Chagas disease, unravel several new metabolic pathways susceptible of clinical management and identify metabolites useful as potential specific biomarkers for monitoring treatment and clinical severity in patients. PMID:25412247

  4. Characterization of TcCYC6 from Trypanosoma cruzi, a gene with homology to mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, María Agostina; Laverrière, Marc; Schenkman, Sergio; Wehrendt, Diana Patricia; Tellez-Iñón, María Teresa; Potenza, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite with a life cycle that alternates between replicative and non-replicative forms, but the components and mechanisms that regulate its cell cycle are poorly described. In higher eukaryotes, cyclins are proteins that activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), by associating with them along the different stages of the cell cycle. These cyclin-CDK complexes exert their role as major modulators of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates. For the correct progression of the cell cycle, the mechanisms that regulate the activity of cyclins and their associated CDKs are diverse and must be controlled precisely. Different types of cyclins are involved in specific phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle, preferentially activating certain CDKs. In this work, we characterized TcCYC6, a putative coding sequence of T. cruzi which encodes a protein with homology to mitotic cyclins. The overexpression of this sequence, fused to a tag of nine amino acids from influenza virus hemagglutinin (TcCYC6-HA), showed to be detrimental for the proliferation of epimastigotes in axenic culture and affected the cell cycle progression. In silico analysis revealed an N-terminal segment similar to the consensus sequence of the destruction box, a hallmark for the degradation of several mitotic cyclins. We experimentally determined that the TcCYC6-HA turnover decreased in the presence of proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that TcCYC6 degradation occurs via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The results obtained in this study provide first evidence that TcCYC6 expression and degradation are finely regulated in T. cruzi.

  5. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans. PMID:25111833

  6. Oxidative Stress and DNA Lesions: The Role of 8-Oxoguanine Lesions in Trypanosoma cruzi Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Pedro H. N.; Furtado, Carolina; Repolês, Bruno M.; Ribeiro, Grazielle A.; Mendes, Isabela C.; Peloso, Eduardo F.; Gadelha, Fernanda R.; Macedo, Andrea M.; Franco, Glória R.; Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.; Vieira, Leda Q.; Guarneri, Alessandra A.; Andrade, Luciana O.; Machado, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    The main consequence of oxidative stress is the formation of DNA lesions, which can result in genomic instability and lead to cell death. Guanine is the base that is most susceptible to oxidation, due to its low redox potential, and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is the most common lesion. These characteristics make 8-oxoG a good cellular biomarker to indicate the extent of oxidative stress. If not repaired, 8-oxoG can pair with adenine and cause a G:C to T:A transversion. When 8-oxoG is inserted during DNA replication, it could generate double-strand breaks, which makes this lesion particularly deleterious. Trypanosoma cruzi needs to address various oxidative stress situations, such as the mammalian intracellular environment and the triatomine insect gut where it replicates. We focused on the MutT enzyme, which is responsible for removing 8-oxoG from the nucleotide pool. To investigate the importance of 8-oxoG during parasite infection of mammalian cells, we characterized the MutT gene in T. cruzi (TcMTH) and generated T. cruzi parasites heterologously expressing Escherichia coli MutT or overexpressing the TcMTH enzyme. In the epimastigote form, the recombinant and wild-type parasites displayed similar growth in normal conditions, but the MutT-expressing cells were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide treatment. The recombinant parasite also displayed significantly increased growth after 48 hours of infection in fibroblasts and macrophages when compared to wild-type cells, as well as increased parasitemia in Swiss mice. In addition, we demonstrated, using western blotting experiments, that MutT heterologous expression can influence the parasite antioxidant enzyme protein levels. These results indicate the importance of the 8-oxoG repair system for cell viability. PMID:23785540

  7. Vesicles from different Trypanosoma cruzi strains trigger differential innate and chronic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Paula M; Ribeiro, Kleber; Silveira, Amanda C O; Campos, João H; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Bela, Samantha R; Campos, Marco A; Pessoa, Natalia L; Colli, Walter; Alves, Maria J M; Soares, Rodrigo P; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas Disease, shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) enriched with glycoproteins of the gp85/trans-sialidase (TS) superfamily and other α-galactosyl (α-Gal)-containing glycoconjugates, such as mucins. Here, purified vesicles from T. cruzi strains (Y, Colombiana, CL-14 and YuYu) were quantified according to size, intensity and concentration. Qualitative analysis revealed differences in their protein and α-galactosyl contents. Later, those polymorphisms were evaluated in the modulation of immune responses (innate and in the chronic phase) in C57BL/6 mice. EVs isolated from YuYu and CL-14 strains induced in macrophages higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and nitric oxide via TLR2. In general, no differences were observed in MAPKs activation (p38, JNK and ERK 1/2) after EVs stimulation. In splenic cells derived from chronically infected mice, a different modulation pattern was observed, where Colombiana (followed by Y strain) EVs were more proinflammatory. This modulation was independent of the T. cruzi strain used in the mice infection. To test the functional importance of this modulation, the expression of intracellular cytokines after in vitro exposure was evaluated using EVs from YuYu and Colombiana strains. Both EVs induced cytokine production with the appearance of IL-10 in the chronically infected mice. A high frequency of IL-10 in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was observed. A mixed profile of cytokine induction was observed in B cells with the production of TNF-α and IL-10. Finally, dendritic cells produced TNF-α after stimulation with EVs. Polymorphisms in the vesicles surface may be determinant in the immunopathologic events not only in the early steps of infection but also in the chronic phase.

  8. Vesicles from different Trypanosoma cruzi strains trigger differential innate and chronic immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Paula M.; Ribeiro, Kleber; Silveira, Amanda C. O.; Campos, João H.; Martins-Filho, Olindo A.; Bela, Samantha R.; Campos, Marco A.; Pessoa, Natalia L.; Colli, Walter; Alves, Maria J. M.; Soares, Rodrigo P.; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas Disease, shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) enriched with glycoproteins of the gp85/trans-sialidase (TS) superfamily and other α-galactosyl (α-Gal)-containing glycoconjugates, such as mucins. Here, purified vesicles from T. cruzi strains (Y, Colombiana, CL-14 and YuYu) were quantified according to size, intensity and concentration. Qualitative analysis revealed differences in their protein and α-galactosyl contents. Later, those polymorphisms were evaluated in the modulation of immune responses (innate and in the chronic phase) in C57BL/6 mice. EVs isolated from YuYu and CL-14 strains induced in macrophages higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and nitric oxide via TLR2. In general, no differences were observed in MAPKs activation (p38, JNK and ERK 1/2) after EVs stimulation. In splenic cells derived from chronically infected mice, a different modulation pattern was observed, where Colombiana (followed by Y strain) EVs were more proinflammatory. This modulation was independent of the T. cruzi strain used in the mice infection. To test the functional importance of this modulation, the expression of intracellular cytokines after in vitro exposure was evaluated using EVs from YuYu and Colombiana strains. Both EVs induced cytokine production with the appearance of IL-10 in the chronically infected mice. A high frequency of IL-10 in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was observed. A mixed profile of cytokine induction was observed in B cells with the production of TNF-α and IL-10. Finally, dendritic cells produced TNF-α after stimulation with EVs. Polymorphisms in the vesicles surface may be determinant in the immunopathologic events not only in the early steps of infection but also in the chronic phase. PMID:26613751

  9. NADPH oxidase inhibition ameliorates Trypanosoma cruzi-induced myocarditis during Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, invades nucleated mammalian cells including macrophages. In this study, we investigated the crosstalk between T. cruzi-induced immune activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory responses, and their role in myocardial pathology. Splenocytes of infected mice (C3H/HeN) responded to Tc-antigenic stimulus by more than a two-fold increase in NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity, ROS generation, cytokine production (IFN-γ > IL-4 > TNFα > IL1-β ≈ IL6), and predominant expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Inhibition of NOX, but not of myeloperoxidase and xanthine oxidase, controlled the ROS (>98%) and cytokine (70–89%) release by Tc-stimulated splenocytes of infected mice. Treatment of infected mice with apocynin (NOX inhibitor) in drinking water resulted in a 50–90% decline in endogenous NOX/ROS and cytokine levels, and splenic phagocytes’ proliferation. The splenic percentage of T cells was maintained, though more than a 40% decline in splenic index (spleen weight/body weight) indicated decreased T-cell proliferation in apocynin-treated/infected mice. The blood and tissue parasite burden were significantly increased in apocynin-treated/infected mice, yet acute myocarditis, ie inflammatory infiltrate consisting of macrophages, neutrophils, and CD8+ T cells, and tissue oxidative adducts (eg 8-isoprostanes, 3-nitrotyrosine, and 4-hydroxynonenal) were diminished in apocynin-treated/infected mice. Consequently, hypertrophy (increased cardiomyocytes’ size and β-MHC, BNP, and ANP mRNA levels) and fibrosis (increased collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and lipid contents) of the heart during the chronic phase were controlled in apocynin-treated mice. We conclude that NOX/ROS is a critical regulator of the splenic response (phagocytes, T cells, and cytokines) to T. cruzi infection, and bystander effects of heart-infiltrating phagocytes and CD8+ T cells resulting in cardiac remodelling in chagasic

  10. Host Life History Strategy, Species Diversity, and Habitat Influence Trypanosoma cruzi Vector Infection in Changing Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Calzada, José E.; Saldaña, Azael; Carroll, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama. Methodology/Principal Findings R. pallescens vectors (N = 643) were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3%) vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3%) dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas) were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as rmax, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase), and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites) were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of rmax were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site. Conclusions/Significance In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially

  11. Ecological, Social and Biological Risk Factors for Continued Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission by Triatoma dimidiata in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Dulce M.; De Urioste-Stone, Sandra M.; Juárez, José G.; Pennington, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease transmission by Triatoma dimidiata persists in Guatemala and elsewhere in Central America under undefined ecological, biological and social (eco-bio-social) conditions. Methodology Eco-bio-social risk factors associated with persistent domiciliary infestation were identified by a cross-sectional survey and qualitative participatory methods. Quantitative and qualitative data were generated regarding Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs and triatomine hosts. Blood meal analysis and infection of insects, dogs and rodents were determined. Based on these data, multimodel inference was used to identify risk factors for domestic infestation with the greatest relative importance (>0.75). Principal Findings Blood meal analysis showed that 64% of 36 bugs fed on chickens, 50% on humans, 17% on dogs; 24% of 34 bugs fed on Rattus rattus and 21% on Mus musculus. Seroprevalence among 80 dogs was 37%. Eight (17%) of 46 M. musculus and three (43%) of seven R. rattus from households with infected triatomines were infected with T. cruzi Distinct Typing Unit I. Results from interviews and participatory meetings indicated that vector control personnel and some householders perceived chickens roosting and laying eggs in the house as bug infestation risk factors. House construction practices were seen as a risk factor for bug and rodent infestation, with rodents being perceived as a pest by study participants. Multimodel inference showed that house infestation risk factors of high relative importance are dog density, mouse presence, interior wall plaster condition, dirt floor, tile roofing and coffee tree presence. Conclusions/Significance Persistent house infestation is closely related to eco-bio-social factors that maintain productive T. dimidiata habitats associated with dogs, chickens and rodents. Triatomine, dog and rodent infections indicate active T. cruzi transmission. Integrated vector control methods should include actions that consider the role of

  12. Perturbation of the Dimer Interface of Triosephosphate Isomerase and its Effect on Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-Illana, Vanesa; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; Becker, Ingeborg; Berzunza, Miriam; García, Juventino; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; López-Calahorra, Francisco; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Gómez-Puyou, Armando

    2007-01-01

    Background Chagas disease affects around 18 million people in the American continent. Unfortunately, there is no satisfactory treatment for the disease. The drugs currently used are not specific and exert serious toxic effects. Thus, there is an urgent need for drugs that are effective. Looking for molecules to eliminate the parasite, we have targeted a central enzyme of the glycolytic pathway: triosephosphate isomerase (TIM). The homodimeric enzyme is catalytically active only as a dimer. Because there are significant differences in the interface of the enzymes from the parasite and humans, we searched for small molecules that specifically disrupt contact between the two subunits of the enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi but not those of TIM from Homo sapiens (HTIM), and tested if they kill the parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings Dithiodianiline (DTDA) at nanomolar concentrations completely inactivates recombinant TIM of T. cruzi (TcTIM). It also inactivated HTIM, but at concentrations around 400 times higher. DTDA was also tested on four TcTIM mutants with each of its four cysteines replaced with either valine or alanine. The sensitivity of the mutants to DTDA was markedly similar to that of the wild type. The crystal structure of the TcTIM soaked in DTDA at 2.15 Å resolution, and the data on the mutants showed that inactivation resulted from alterations of the dimer interface. DTDA also prevented the growth of Escherichia coli cells transformed with TcTIM, had no effect on normal E. coli, and also killed T. cruzi epimastigotes in culture. Conclusions/Significance By targeting on the dimer interface of oligomeric enzymes from parasites, it is possible to discover small molecules that selectively thwart the life of the parasite. Also, the conformational changes that DTDA induces in the dimer interface of the trypanosomal enzyme are unique and identify a region of the interface that could be targeted for drug discovery. PMID:17989778

  13. Coinfection with Different Trypanosoma cruzi Strains Interferes with the Host Immune Response to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Claudiney Melquíades; Valadares, Helder Magno Silva; Francisco, Amanda Fortes; Arantes, Jerusa Marilda; Campos, Camila França; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Araujo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Chiari, Egler; Franco, Glória Regina; Machado, Carlos Renato; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Macedo, Andréa Mara

    2010-01-01

    A century after the discovery of Trypanosoma cruzi in a child living in Lassance, Minas Gerais, Brazil in 1909, many uncertainties remain with respect to factors determining the pathogenesis of Chagas disease (CD). Herein, we simultaneously investigate the contribution of both host and parasite factors during acute phase of infection in BALB/c mice infected with the JG and/or CL Brener T. cruzi strains. JG single infected mice presented reduced parasitemia and heart parasitism, no mortality, levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, CCL2, IL-6 and IFN-γ) similar to those found among naïve animals and no clinical manifestations of disease. On the other hand, CL Brener single infected mice presented higher parasitemia and heart parasitism, as well as an increased systemic release of pro-inflammatory mediators and higher mortality probably due to a toxic shock-like systemic inflammatory response. Interestingly, coinfection with JG and CL Brener strains resulted in intermediate parasitemia, heart parasitism and mortality. This was accompanied by an increase in the systemic release of IL-10 with a parallel increase in the number of MAC-3+ and CD4+ T spleen cells expressing IL-10. Therefore, the endogenous production of IL-10 elicited by coinfection seems to be crucial to counterregulate the potentially lethal effects triggered by systemic release of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by CL Brener single infection. In conclusion, our results suggest that the composition of the infecting parasite population plays a role in the host response to T. cruzi in determining the severity of the disease in experimentally infected BALB/c mice. The combination of JG and CL Brener was able to trigger both protective inflammatory immunity and regulatory immune mechanisms that attenuate damage caused by inflammation and disease severity in BALB/c mice. PMID:20967289

  14. Putative Role of the Aldo-Keto Reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Benznidazole Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Patricia Andrea; Laverrière, Marc; Cannata, Joaquín J B; García, Gabriela Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz), the drug used for treatment of Chagas' disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi), is activated by a parasitic NADH-dependent type I nitroreductase (NTR I). However, several studies have shown that other enzymes are involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the aldo-keto reductase from T. cruzi (TcAKR), a NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase previously described by our group, uses Bz as the substrate. We demonstrated that both recombinant and native TcAKR enzymes reduce Bz by using NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor. TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes showed higher NADPH-dependent Bz reductase activity and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for Bz 1.8-fold higher than that of the controls, suggesting that TcAKR is involved in Bz detoxification instead of activation. To understand the role of TcAKR in Bz metabolism, we studied TcAKR expression and NADPH/NADH-dependent Bz reductase activities in two T. cruzi strains with differential susceptibility to Bz: CL Brener and Nicaragua. Taking into account the results obtained with TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes, we expected the more resistant strain, Nicaragua, to have higher TcAKR levels than CL Brener. However, the results were the opposite. CL Brener showed 2-fold higher TcAKR expression and 5.7-fold higher NADPH-Bz reduction than the Nicaragua strain. In addition, NADH-dependent Bz reductase activity, characteristic of NTR I, was also higher in CL Brener than in Nicaragua. We conclude that although TcAKR uses Bz as the substrate, TcAKR activity is not a determinant of Bz resistance in wild-type strains and may be overcome by other enzymes involved in Bz activation, such as NADPH- and NADH-dependent reductases. PMID:26856844

  15. Immune Protection against Trypanosoma cruzi Induced by TcVac4 in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio-Burgos, José E.; Zepeda-Escobar, José A.; de Oca-Jimenez, Roberto Montes; Estrada-Franco, José G.; Barbabosa-Pliego, Alberto; Ochoa-García, Laucel; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rivas, Nancy; Peñuelas-Rivas, Giovanna; Val-Arreola, Margarita; Gupta, Shivali; Salazar-García, Felix; Garg, Nisha J.; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in southern parts of the American continent. Herein, we have tested the protective efficacy of a DNA-prime/T. rangeli-boost (TcVac4) vaccine in a dog (Canis familiaris) model. Dogs were immunized with two-doses of DNA vaccine (pcDNA3.1 encoding TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 antigens plus IL-12- and GM-CSF-encoding plasmids) followed by two doses of glutaraldehyde-inactivated T. rangeli epimastigotes (TrIE); and challenged with highly pathogenic T. cruzi (SylvioX10/4) isolate. Dogs given TrIE or empty pcDNA3.1 were used as controls. We monitored post-vaccination and post-challenge infection antibody response by an ELISA, parasitemia by blood analysis and xenodiagnosis, and heart function by electrocardiography. Post-mortem anatomic and pathologic evaluation of the heart was conducted. TcVac4 induced a strong IgG response (IgG2>IgG1) that was significantly expanded post-infection, and moved to a nearly balanced IgG2/IgG1 response in chronic phase. In comparison, dogs given TrIE or empty plasmid DNA only developed high IgG titers with IgG2 predominance in response to T. cruzi infection. Blood parasitemia, tissue parasite foci, parasite transmission to triatomines, electrocardiographic abnormalities were significantly lower in TcVac4-vaccinated dogs than was observed in dogs given TrIE or empty plasmid DNA only. Macroscopic and microscopic alterations, the hallmarks of chronic Chagas disease, were significantly decreased in the myocardium of TcVac4-vaccinated dogs. We conclude that TcVac4 induced immunity was beneficial in providing resistance to T. cruzi infection, evidenced by control of chronic pathology of the heart and preservation of cardiac function in dogs. Additionally, TcVac4 vaccination decreased the transmission of parasites from vaccinated/infected animals to triatomines. PMID:25853654

  16. Assay for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in human sera based on reaction with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, U; Lorca, M; Veloso, C; Gonzalez, A; Engstrom, A; Aslund, L; Pettersson, U; Frasch, A C

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic peptides modelled according to the amino acid sequences derived from the repeated domains of five Trypanosoma cruzi antigens were used in an immunoradiometric assay to detect antibodies appearing after natural human infections. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed with a complex antigenic mixture from parasites were used as controls. The results indicate that the synthetic peptides were recognized by a large proportion of serum samples collected from 34 patients with Chagas' disease in Chile and point to their possible use in diagnosis. PMID:1774331

  17. Isolation of the peptide inhibitor of H+-ATP synthase from Crithidia fasciculata and Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Rilo, M C; Cataldi de Flombaum, M A; Stoppani, A O

    1989-02-01

    An inhibitor of Crithidia fasciculata and Trypanosoma cruzi H+ -ATP synthase (ATPase) was isolated from these organims mitochondrial particles, either by (a) ammonium sulfate-cholate extraction followed by heat treatment and ethanol precipitation, or (b) gel-filtration on Sephadex G-50, followed by a similar purification procedure. Inactivation by trypsin supported the inhibitor peptide structure. Removal of the peptide inhibitor increased about three-fold the specific activity of the protozoan ATPases. The isolated peptides and a highly purified bovine heart ATPase inhibitor inhibited C. fasciculata ATPase as a function of the peptide concentration.

  18. A cytoplasmic new catalytic subunit of calcineurin in Trypanosoma cruzi and its molecular and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Orrego, Patricio R; Olivares, Héctor; Cordero, Esteban M; Bressan, Albert; Cortez, Mauro; Sagua, Hernán; Neira, Ivan; González, Jorge; da Silveira, José Franco; Yoshida, Nobuko; Araya, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    Parasitological cure for Chagas disease is considered extremely difficult to achieve because of the lack of effective chemotherapeutic agents against Trypanosoma cruzi at different stages of infection. There are currently only two drugs available. These have several limitations and can produce serious side effects. Thus, new chemotherapeutic targets are much sought after. Among T. cruzi components involved in key processes such as parasite proliferation and host cell invasion, Ca(2+)-dependent molecules play an important role. Calcineurin (CaN) is one such molecule. In this study, we cloned a new isoform of the gene coding for CL strain catalytic subunit CaNA (TcCaNA2) and characterized it molecularly and functionally. There is one copy of the TcCaNA2 gene per haploid genome. It is constitutively transcribed in all T. cruzi developmental forms and is localized predominantly in the cytosol. In the parasite, TcCaNA2 is associated with CaNB. The recombinant protein TcCaNA2 has phosphatase activity that is enhanced by Mn(2+)/Ni(2+). The participation of TcCaNA2 in target cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigotes was also demonstrated. Metacyclic forms with reduced TcCaNA2 expression following treatment with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeted to TcCaNA2 invaded HeLa cells at a lower rate than control parasites treated with morpholino sense oligonucleotides. Similarly, the decreased expression of TcCaNA2 following treatment with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides partially affected the replication of epimastigotes, although to a lesser extent than the decrease in expression following treatment with calcineurin inhibitors. Our findings suggest that the calcineurin activities of TcCaNA2/CaNB and TcCaNA/CaNB, which have distinct cellular localizations (the cytoplasm and the nucleus, respectively), may play a critical role at different stages of T. cruzi development, the former in host cell invasion and the latter in parasite multiplication. PMID:24498455

  19. Active penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into host cells: historical considerations and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; de Carvalho, Tecia M. Ulisses

    2013-01-01

    In the present short review, we analyze past experiments that addressed the interactions of intracellular pathogenic protozoa (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Plasmodium) with host cells and the initial use of the term active penetration to indicate that a protozoan “crossed the host cell membrane, penetrating into the cytoplasm.” However, the subsequent use of transmission electron microscopy showed that, for all of the protozoans and cell types examined, endocytosis, classically defined as involving the formation of a membrane-bound vacuole, took place during the interaction process. As a consequence, the recently penetrated parasites are always within a vacuole, designated the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). PMID:23355838

  20. Distantiae Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: A New Epidemiological Feature of Acute Chagas Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Bilac, Daniele; de Araújo, Vitor Antônio Louzada; Neto, Sócrates Fraga da Costa; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; da Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho Ferreira; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The new epidemiological scenario of orally transmitted Chagas disease that has emerged in Brazil, and mainly in the Amazon region, needs to be addressed with a new and systematic focus. Belém, the capital of Pará state, reports the highest number of acute Chagas disease (ACD) cases associated with the consumption of açaí juice. Methodology/Principal Findings The wild and domestic enzootic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in the two locations (Jurunas and Val-de Cães) that report the majority of the autochthonous cases of ACD in Belém city. Moreover, we evaluated the enzootic cycle on the three islands that provide most of the açaí fruit that is consumed in these localities. We employed parasitological and serological tests throughout to evaluate infectivity competence and exposure to T. cruzi. In Val-de-Cães, no wild mammal presented positive parasitological tests, and 56% seroprevalence was observed, with low serological titers. Three of 14 triatomines were found to be infected (TcI). This unexpected epidemiological picture does not explain the high number of autochthonous ACD cases. In Jurunas, the cases of ACD could not be autochthonous because of the absence of any enzootic cycle of T. cruzi. In contrast, in the 3 island areas from which the açaí fruit originates, 66.7% of wild mammals and two dogs displayed positive hemocultures, and 15.6% of triatomines were found to be infected by T. cruzi. Genotyping by mini-exon gene and PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) targeting revealed that the mammals and triatomines from the islands harbored TcI and Trypanosoma rangeli in single and mixed infections. Conclusion/Significance These findings show that cases of Chagas disease in the urban area of Belém may be derived from infected triatomines coming together with the açaí fruits from distant islands. We term this new epidemiological feature of Chagas disease as “Distantiae transmission”. PMID:24854494

  1. Expression, purification and kinetic characterization of His-tagged glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cheleski, Juliana; Freitas, Renato F; Wiggers, Helton José; Rocha, Josmar R; de Araújo, Ana Paula Ulian; Montanari, Carlos A

    2011-04-01

    Trypanosomes are flagellated protozoa responsible for serious parasitic diseases that have been classified by the World Health Organization as tropical sicknesses of major importance. One important drug target receiving considerable attention is the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (T. cruzi Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TcGAPDH); EC 1.2.1.12). TcGAPDH is a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway of T. cruzi and catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG) coupled to the reduction of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, (NAD(+)) to NADH, the reduced form. Herein, we describe the cloning of the T. cruzi gene for TcGAPDH into the pET-28a(+) vector, its expression as a tagged protein in Escherichia coli, purification and kinetic characterization. The His(6)-tagged TcGAPDH was purified by affinity chromatography. Enzyme activity assays for the recombinant His(6)-TcGAPDH were carried out spectrophotometrically to determine the kinetic parameters. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)(app)) determined for D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and NAD(+) were 352±21 and 272±25 μM, respectively, which were consistent with the values for the untagged enzyme reported in the literature. We have demonstrated by the use of Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) that this vector modification resulted in activity preserved for a higher period. We also report here the use of response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the region of optimal conditions for enzyme activity. A quadratic model was developed by RSM to describe the enzyme activity in terms of pH and temperature as independent variables. According to the RMS contour plots and variance analysis, the maxi