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Sample records for cruzi histopathological lesions

  1. Effects of specific treatment on parasitological and histopathological parameters in mice infected with different Trypanosoma cruzi clonal genotypes.

    PubMed

    Toledo, M J O; Bahia, M T; Veloso, V M; Carneiro, C M; Machado-Coelho, G L L; Alves, C F; Martins, H R; Cruz, R E; Tafuri, W L; Lana, M

    2004-06-01

    The goal of this study was to verify the effect of specific treatment on parasitological and histopathological parameters in mice experimentally infected with different Trypanosoma cruzi clonal genotypes. Twenty cloned stocks were selected, representative of the whole phylogenetic diversity of the protozoan and belonging to the clonal genotypes 19 and 20 (T. cruzi I) and 39 and 32 (T. cruzi II). The stocks were inoculated in 40 BALB/c mice divided into four groups: (i) treated with benznidazole, (ii) treated with itraconazole and (iii and iv) untreated control groups (NT) for each drug, respectively. Seven parameters related to parasitaemia curves and histopathological lesions were analysed. Four during the acute phase (AP) and three during both the AP and chronic phase (CP) of infection. Statistical comparison between benznidazole-treated and NT groups for the biological parameters showed significant differences for all genotypes. Benznidazole treatment led to lower patent period, maximum of parasitaemia, day of maximum parasitaemia and area under the parasitaemia curve for all genotypes analysed. Percentage of positive haemoculture during AP and CP was lower for genotypes 19 and 32. Tissue parasitism (TP) and inflammatory process (IP) during AP were lower for genotypes 19 and 32, respectively. In general, itraconazole treatment induced a smaller reduction in these same parameters between treated and NT animals in relation to benznidazole treatment. Our results indicate that phylogenetic divergence among T. cruzi clonal genotypes must be taken in account in chemotherapy and studies dealing with all aspects of the parasite and the disease.

  2. Histopathological lesions associated with equine periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Cox, Alistair; Dixon, Padraic; Smith, Sionagh

    2012-12-01

    Equine periodontal disease (EPD) is a common and painful condition, the aetiology and pathology of which are poorly understood. To characterise the histopathological lesions associated with EPD, the skulls of 22 horses were assessed grossly for the presence of periodontal disease, and a standard set of interdental tissues taken from each for histopathological examination. Histological features of EPD included ulceration and neutrophilic inflammation of the gingival epithelium. Mononuclear and eosinophilic inflammation of the gingival lamina propria and submucosa was commonly present irrespective of the presence or degree of periodontal disease. Gingival hyperplasia was present to some degree in all horses, and was only weakly associated with the degree of periodontal disease. In all horses dental plaque was present at the majority of sites examined and was often associated with histological evidence of peripheral cemental erosion. Bacteria (including spirochaetes in four horses) were identified in gingival samples by Gram and silver impregnation techniques and were significantly associated with the presence of periodontal disease. This is the first study to describe histological features of EPD, and the first to identify associated spirochaetes in some cases. Histological features were variable, and there was considerable overlap of some features between the normal and diseased gingiva. Further investigation into the potential role of bacteria in the pathogenesis and progression of EPD is warranted.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi: histopathology of endocrine system in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, K. S.; Lagrange, P. H.; da Costa, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally immunocompromised athymic mice, neonatal mice and adult outbred OFI mice treated with the immunosuppressive agents cyclophosphamide (CY), dexamethasone (DM) and indomethacin (IM) were infected with trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi Y and CL strains. 10(4) parasites were used, except in the case of IM treatment, where mice received 10(3) trypomastigotes in one group and 10(5) in another. The course of parasitaemia, tissue distribution of amastigotes and time of mortality were compared with an infected thymus intact control group. Neonate and indomethacin treated mice presented the same pattern of parasitaemia. Death occurred as early as 9-10 days after infection. A single dose of CY 200 mg/kg given 5 days after infection enhanced the parasitaemia and increased the number of parasites in the tissues. All groups were similar in terms of colonization of the endocrine system by parasites and the adrenals showed the highest density of amastigotes nests. The thyroid gland (analysed only in neonates) showed intense amastigote accumulation. Colonization of the ovary was observed with amastigotes in both the theca interna and in the stroma. The testes (also examined only in the neonate) showed that the interstitial cells, the tunica albuginea of the seminiferous tubules and the loose connective tissue were infected. Athymic nude mice showed the most intense parasite colonization of the islets of Langerhans. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7734334

  4. Histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemic and diabetic women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the incidence of histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemia, gestational diabetes and overt diabetes at term and preterm gestation. Research design and methods One-hundred-and-thirty-one placental samples were collected from Diabetes mellitus (DM) positive screened patients. Two diagnostic tests, glycemic profile and 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in parallel identified 4 groups normoglycemic, mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH), gestational DM (GDM) or overt DM (DM). Placental tissue specimens and sections from 4 groups were obtained by uniform random sampling and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results Placentas from MGH group presented 17 types of histopathological change and higher rates of syncytial nodes and endarteritis. GDM placentas presented only nine types of histopathological change, high rates of dysmaturity, low rates of calcification and no syncytial nodes. Overt DM placentas showed 22 types of histopathological change, 21 of which were present in the preterm period. There were histopathological similarities between MGH and DM placentas, but the former exhibited a higher incidence of endarteritis, which has been described as a "post-mortem" phenomenon. Conclusion Our results confirmed that the distinct placental changes associated with DM and MGH depend on gestational period during which the diabetic insult occurs. It may reasonably be inferred that subclinical maternal hyperglycemia during pregnancy, as showed in MGH group, is responsible for increased placental endarteritis, a postmortem lesion in the live fetus. PMID:21831283

  5. Histopathologic lesions in sea otters exposed to crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, T.P.; Harris, R.K.; Moeller, R.B.; Pletcher, J.M.; Haebler, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    On 24 March 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska. In the months following the spill, over 1,000 sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from oil spill-affected areas are known to have died. The purpose of the study is to identify and describe histopathologic lesions associated with crude oil exposure in sea otters and to discuss possible pathogeneses of the lesions. Materials available included tissues from oil-contaminated and uncontaminated otters that died in rehabilitation centers following the oil spill and tissues from otters that were found dead in the oil spill-affected area with external oil present. Tissues from apparently normal sea otters from an area not contaminated by crude oil, were also examined.

  6. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia: unique histopathological findings in skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Leithauser, Laurel A; Mutasim, Diya F

    2012-04-01

    Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD) is a rare, autosomal dominantly inherited, multisystem disease thought to be caused by abnormalities in desmosomes and gap junctions. HMD affects the skin, mucosae, hair, eyes and lungs. Nearly all patients clinically display the triad of non-scarring alopecia, well-demarcated mucosal erythema and erythematous intertriginous plaques. Although histopathological findings of mucous membrane epithelium have been well characterized, only three reports have described histopathologic findings in the skin. We report a case with unique histopathological findings not previously reported in HMD.

  7. [Incidence of radicular cysts in a series of 125 chronic periapical lesions. Histopathologic study].

    PubMed

    Sanchis, J M; Peñarrocha, M; Bagan, J V; Guarinos, J; Vera, F

    1998-02-01

    The incidence of radicular cysts in 125 chronic periapical lesions was studied in 36 cases of periapical surgery (28.8%), and to 89 tooth extractions (71.2%). Histopathology revealed 18 radicular cysts (14.4%) and 107 lesions corresponding to chronic apical periodontitis (C.A.P.) or granulomas (85.6%). Cholesterol clefts, a fibrous capsule and presence of a cavity were more common in the cysts, significant differences being observed with respect to chronic apical periodontitis.

  8. Histopathologic lesions in sea otters exposed to crude oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipscomb, T.P.; Harris, R.K.; Moeller, R.B.; Pletcher, J.M.; Haebler, R.J.; Ballachey, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, sea otters (Enhydra lutris) that appeared to be contaminated with oil, that were in danger of becoming contaminated, or that were behaving abnormally were captured and taken to rehabilitation centers. Exposure to oil was assessed by visual examination when otters arrived at the centers. Degree of oil exposure was graded according to the following criteria: oil covering greater than 60% of the body - heavily contaminated; oil covering 30–60% of the body - moderately contaminated; oil covering less than 30% of the body or light sheen on fur - lightly contaminated. If there was no oil visible, otters were considered uncontaminated. Tissues from 51 oil-contaminated sea otters (14 males, 37 females) and from six uncontaminated sea otters (three males, three females) that died in rehabilitation centers were examined histologically. Among oil-contaminated sea otters, 19/46 had interstitial pulmonary emphysema, 13/40 had gastric erosion and hemorrhage, 11/47 had centrilobular hepatic necrosis, 14/47 had periportal to diffuse hepatic lipidosis, and 10/42 had renal tubular lipidosis. Of the uncontaminated sea otters, 1/6 had gastric erosion and hemorrhage and 1/6 had diffuse hepatic lipidosis. Histologic examinations were performed on tissues from five sea otters (three males, two females) found dead with external oil present 15 to 16 days after the spill. Periportal hepatic lipidosis and renal tubular lipidosis were found in 3/5, and interstitial pulmonary emphysema was found in 1/5. Tissues from six apparently normal sea otters (four males, two females) collected from an area not affected by an oil spill were examined histologically, and none of these lesions were found. We conclude that interstitial pulmonary emphysema, centrilobular hepatic necrosis, and hepatic and renal lipidosis of sea otters were associated with exposure to crude oil. Gastric erosion and hemorrhage may have been associated with

  9. Clinical and Histopathologic Investigation of Periapical Actinomycosis with Cutaneous Lesion: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Davood; Moazami, Fariborz; Sobhnamayan, Fereshteh; Taheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Management of an extra-radicular infection is a challenging procedure that requires surgical intervention. This report describes a patient with discharging cutaneous lesion that required apical surgery. A 40-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Endodontics, Shiraz Dental School with chief complaint of a cutaneous sinus tract. She had been treated by a dermatologist and an otolaryngologist. The patient had also received orthograde root canal treatment of tooth #16. Yet, the lesion was still discharging and the patient was scheduled for surgery. Histopathologic analysis of the lesion showed actinomycosis infection. A 36-month follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic healing. PMID:26535411

  10. Oxidative stress enzyme and histopathological lesions in Colossoma macropomum (pisces, ariidae) for environmental impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Ticianne de Sousa de Oliveira Mota; Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro; Dantas, Janaina Gomes; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    This study used oxidative stress enzyme (Glutathione S-Transferase and Catalase), histopathological lesions (Branchial lesions) and biometric data in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in an Environmental Protection Area at São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations (A1 = contaminated area and A2 = reference site) within the protected area on four occasions. The activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in C. macropomum was compared with biometric data and histopathological lesions. Results have shown that biometric data decreased significantly in fish (p<0.05) at the contaminated site. The activity of CAT was higher in fish specifically caught in A1. A significant difference was observed in the GST activity in the liver of C. macropomum when comparing fish from the contaminated site and those from the reference site (p<0.05).

  11. Fish biomarkers for environmental monitoring: An integrated model supporting enzyme activity and histopathological lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho; Torres Junior, Audalio Rebelo

    2014-10-01

    We present a mathematical model describing the association between glutathione-S-transferase activity and brachial lesions in the catfish, Sciades herzbergii (Ariidae) from a polluted port. The catfish were sampled from a port known to be contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds and from a natural reserve in São Marcos Bay, Brazil. Two biomarkers, hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and histopathological lesions, in gills tissue were measured. The values for GST activity were modeled with the occurrence of branchial lesions by fitting a third order polynomial. Results from the mathematical model indicate that GST activity has a strong polynomial relationship with the occurrence of branchial lesions in both the wet and the dry seasons, but only at the polluted port site. The model developed in this study indicates that branchial and hepatic lesions are initiated when GST activity reaches 2.15 μmol min-1 mg protein-1. Beyond this limit, GST activity decreased to very low levels and irreversible histopathological lesions occurred. This mathematical model provides a realistic approach to analyze predictive biomarkers of environmental health status.

  12. Feline sporotrichosis: histopathological profile of cutaneous lesions and their correlation with clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Luisa H M; Conceição-Silva, Fátima; Quintella, Leonardo P; Kuraiem, Bianca P; Pereira, Sandro A; Schubach, Tânia M P

    2013-07-01

    Cutaneous lesions of feline sporotrichosis show high fungal load and are associated with severe disease and elevated zoonotic potential. The present study describes the histopathology and fungal load of the lesions in different clinical presentations of feline sporotrichosis. Cats with sporotrichosis were separated into groups L1, L2 and L3 (lesions in one, two and three or more locations, respectively) and subjected to skin biopsies for histopathology. Eighty-six cats were included in the study. Lesions were suppurative granulomatous in 84 cases and poorly formed granulomas were predominant. The well-formed granulomas were associated with group L1. The high fungal load was predominant in group L3 and in poorly formed granuloma cases and did not occur in well-formed granulomas cases. The good general condition was associated with low fungal load. These findings suggest that the fungal load control in animals with more localized lesions and well-organized response is linked with the improvement in the outcome of infected cats.

  13. Radiological and histopathological examination of apparent lytic lesions in allograft long bones—No cause for concern

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Mike; Brooker, Greg; Fisher, Ryan; Goh, Geraldine; Aguiar, Ranieri Falcao; Papadimitriou, John; Wong, Daniel; Carey-Smith, Richard; Cowie, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identify the nature of apparent lytic lesions within human allograft specimens from patients with no known malignancy, using radiological and histopathological analysis Methods 123 Post-retrieval radiographs from 23 donors were examined. Sixty-seven radiographs were noted to show apparent lytic lesions. The number, size, character and position of the apparent lesions were recorded. Results CT scanning of 9 specimens confirmed the lesions to be of air pockets causing artefact. Histopathological analysis showed no malignant or pathological process. Conclusions Apparent lesions were not pathological. Practice implications Specimens with similar appearances, in donors with no malignancy, can be safely used in donation. PMID:27047215

  14. A 5 year retrospective study of biopsied jaw lesions with the assessment of concordance between clinical and histopathological diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Peker, Elif; Öğütlü, Faruk; Karaca, İnci Rana; Gültekin, Elif Sibel; Çakır, Merve

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The jaw can be affected by several lesions that manifest in the oral cavity, but little is known about their distribution patterns in various populations. Aims and Objectives: This study presents the frequency and distribution of biopsied jaw lesions recorded in Faculty of Dentistry and gathers the information including provisional and final diagnosis of the lesions. Material and Methods: Biopsy of 1938 lesions (2008–2013) was reviewed and 1473 lesions were included in this study. The provisional diagnosis and histopathological validations of lesions were compared. Data on the location of the lesion, as well as patient demographics, were also evaluated. The lesions were divided into three major groups as 1 - developmental/reactive and inflammatory lesions of the jaw, 2 - cystic lesion and 3 - tumor and tumor-like lesions. Statistical Analysis: The variables were recorded and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results and Observations: Three hundred and ninety-six lesions were in Group 1 and periapical granuloma was the most frequent diagnosis. Seven hundred and eighty-nine lesions were in Group 2 and the radicular cyst was the most frequent diagnosis. Two hundred and eighty-eight lesions were in Group 3 and the keratocystic odontogenic tumor was the most frequent. Two hundred and ninety-one biopsied lesions were in disagreement with respect to the diagnoses on clinical and histopathological examination. Conclusion: Consequently, a provisional diagnosis of some of the malignant lesions was reactive, inflammatory, cystic or benign lesions, therefore the importance of evaluation of the specimen is emphasized. PMID:27194866

  15. Histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations of hepatic lesions associated with congenital portosystemic shunt in dogs.

    PubMed

    Baade, S; Aupperle, H; Grevel, V; Schoon, H-A

    2006-01-01

    Canine livers with congenital portosystemic shunt were investigated histopathologically and immunohistochemically before and 8-272 days after partial ligation of the shunt. Lesions included hypoplasia of portal veins, arteriolar and ductular proliferation, lymphangiectasis, mild to moderate fibrosis, fatty cysts, and mostly mild hepatocellular damage with frequent atrophy and steatosis, regardless of the location of the shunting vessel. Perisinusoidal hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in normal canine liver expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), but no desmin. In altered livers, however, raised expression of alpha-SMA was detected, together with expression of desmin, in varying numbers of HSCs. This was interpreted as a sign of cellular proliferation and transformation to myofibroblast-like cells. Additionally, there was an obvious perisinusoidal increase of several extracellular matrix components. Postoperative biopsy samples showed basically the same lesions as those of pre-operative samples, except that signs of resolution of hepatic changes were apparent.

  16. Imaging and Histopathologic Features of BI-RADS 3 Lesions Upgraded during Imaging Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Aya; Chung, Chris SungWon; Birdwell, Robyn L; Frost, Elisabeth P; Giess, Catherine S

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate imaging and histopathologic differences between screen-detected benign and malignant upgraded lesions initially assessed as BI-RADS 3 at diagnostic evaluation. An IRB approved retrospective review of the mammography data base from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2008 identified 1,188 (1.07%) of 110,776 screening examinations assessed as BI-RADS 3 following diagnostic evaluation at our academic center (staffed by breast specialists) or our outpatient center (staffed by general radiologists), 1,017 with at least 24 months follow-up or biopsy. Sixty (5.9%) BI-RADS 3 lesions were upgraded to BI-RADS 4 or 5 during imaging surveillance (study population). Prospective reports, patient demographics, and clinical outcomes were abstracted from the longitudinal medical record. Mean patient age was 54.1 years (range 35-85). Lesions consisted of 7 masses, 12 focal asymmetries and 41 calcifications. Fifteen (25%) of 60 lesions upgraded from initial BI-RADS 3 assessment were malignant (1.47% of total; 15/1,017 BI-RADS 3 studies). Malignancy rates by upgraded lesion type showed no significant difference: Thirty-three (73.3%) of 45 benign upgraded lesions were calcifications compared to 8 (53.3%) of 15 malignant upgraded lesions (p = 0.202). Twelve (26.7%) of 45 benign upgraded lesions were masses or focal asymmetries, compared to 7 (46.7%) of 15 upgraded malignant lesions (p = 0.202). Six (85.7%) of 7 malignant upgraded masses/focal asymmetries had no US correlate at initial BI-RADS 3 assessment compared to 7 (58.3%) of 12 benign upgraded masses/focal asymmetries (p = 0.33). Breast-imaging specialists interpreted 21 studies, 3 (14.3%) malignant; general radiologists interpreted 39 studies, 12 (30.8%) malignant (p = 0.218). There was no significant difference in malignancy rate among different types of upgraded mammographic lesions, nor depending on subspecialty interpretation versus nonsubspecialist interpretation. Although calcifications made up a majority of upgraded

  17. Actinic lesions in fishermen’s lower lip: clinical, cytopathological and histopathologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Piñera-Marques, Karine; Lorenço, Silvia Vanessa; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Carneiro, Paulo Campos

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Actinic cheilitis (AC) is considered to be a pre-malignant lesion or an incipient and superficial form of lip squamous cell carcinoma. It is commonly found in individuals whose occupational activities are related to chronic sun exposure and the definitive diagnosis is performed with biopsy. Althoug Exfoliative cytology has been used as a screening procedure to evaluate cancer of the oral cavity no studies have proposed the use of exfoliative cytologic analysis to evaluate and diagnose AC. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate lower lip lesions on fishermen related to chronic solar exposure using clinical, cytologic and histopathologic analyses. PATIENTS AND METHODS Smears taken from the vermilion of the lower lips of 125 fishermen and 30 control individuals were subjected to cytologic analysis. RESULTS The harvested cells were sufficient for cytologic analysis in 83.2% of the samples. Sixteen fishermen exhibited prominent lower lip lesions that justified biopsy and histological studies. In total, 4 specimens were malignant (3.2%), and 12 displayed epithelial dysplasia, demonstrating that the prevalence of epithelial dysplasia and malignant lesions was high among the fishermen population. These conditions were strongly associated with infiltration and blurring of the vermilion margin of the lower lip. CONCLUSION The cytologic analysis was not useful for detecting epithelial dysplasia or malignant alterations. PMID:20454492

  18. Reduced severity of histopathological lesions in mink selected for tolerance to Aleutian mink disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Farid, A Hossain; Ferns, Linda E

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the effect of selection for tolerance on the severity of the Aleutian disease (AD) lesions in mink. Sensitivity and specificity of antibody detection in the blood by counter-immunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) relative to the presence of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) in the spleen by PCR in naturally infected farmed mink were also estimated. Carcasses of 680 sero-positive (CIEP-P) black mink from 28 farms in Nova Scotia, Canada, and from 132 sero-negative (CIEP-N) mink from 14 of these farms were collected at pelting time. A total of 116 of the CIEP-P mink were from three farms where animals have been selected for tolerating AD for almost 20years. The severity of the AD lesions was assessed by histopathological examination of kidneys, lungs, heart, brain and liver on a scale of 0 to 4. Sensitivity and specificity of CIEP relative to PCR were 0.97 and 0.85, respectively, and 16.5% of CIEP-N mink were PCR positive, which could be one of the reasons for the failure of virus eradication by CIEP in Canada. The CIEP-N and tolerant CIEP-P animals had 9.39 and 6.23 greater odds of showing lower lesion severity, respectively, than the CIEP-P animals (P<0.01). The CIEP-N mink had a slightly higher chance (P=0.07) of showing lower lesion severity (odds ratio 1.51) compared with tolerant CIEP-P mink. The results suggested that tolerant mink had significantly reduced severity of AD lesions despite having anti-viral antibodies and carrying the virus.

  19. Giant Cell Lesions of Lungs: A Histopathological and Morphometric Study of Seven Autopsy Cases

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, M.; Biligi, Dayananda S; Raghupathi, A.R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages undergo fusion to form multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in several pathologic conditions. The exact mechanism of their generation is still unclear. MGC are a common feature of granulomas that develop during various inflammatory reactions. Aim To study the histopathological features of giant cell lesions in lungs and correlate the characteristics of giant cells with other histopathological findings. Also, to determine the utility of morphometry to differentiate foreign body and Langhans MGC. Materials and Methods Seven cases were analysed. Specimen of lungs was grossed, sectioned and processed. Routinely, tissue sections were stained by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain. Polarizing microscopy and special stains were employed in selected cases. Granulomas and MGC were counted and measured. Several other parameters like location, distribution, type and number of MGC, associated predominant inflammatory component and nature of granulomas were analysed. Results Five patterns of lesions were observed in seven cases. Aspiration pneumonia was seen in three cases (42.85%) and constituted the most common pattern. However, aspiration pneumonia as the only cause of MGC was seen in only one case (14.28%). Pulmonary tuberculosis and asteroid bodies constituted two cases (28.57%) each. Cryptococcal pneumonia and cholesterol clefts constituted one case (14.28%) each. Crypococci were demonstrated to be positively birefringent by polarized microscopy on Ziehl-Neelsen stained sections. Based on statistical analysis of morphometric data, a new index (NP index) was proposed to statistically categorize MGC into foreign body type and Langhans type. NP index value of ≤0.016 was found to be statistically significant (p<0.005) in foreign body MGC. It had high sensitivity and efficacy. Conclusion MGC may not be always associated with granulomas. The mechanisms that lead to the occurrence of MGC, independent of granuloma needs to be elucidated. Morphometry may

  20. Is there any Correlation between Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Breast Lesions of BIRADS Category 4 with Histopathologic Results?

    PubMed Central

    Farghadani, Maryam; Soofi, Ghazale Jamalipoor; Sarrami, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of breast lesions of Breast Imaging Reporting and Database System (BI-RADS) category 4 with histopathologic results. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study between December 2013 and April 2015, patients with suspicious mammographic and/or ultrasound findings referred for Breast MRI were evaluated. Patients with lesions of BI-RADS category 4 were enrolled with a written informed consent. In each patient, mass lesion (ML) or nonmass lesion (NML) was determined, and different characteristics of the lesions were recorded. A follow-up program was taken with mean 3–12 months. Patients who underwent core needle biopsy or open biopsy were summoned. Results: Seventy-eight females aged 24–67 years (mean 43.1 ± 8.8) met the inclusion criteria and had adequate samples for histopathologic study. Twenty-nine (37.2%) patients had ML and 49 (62.8%) patients had NML. Tissue sampling in 63 (80.7%) patients was through core needle biopsy and in 15 (19.2%) patients through surgery. A wide spectrum of benign and malignant pathologic diagnoses was seen. In statistical analysis, none of the MRI features has a significant correlation with any specific histopathologic diagnosis (P = 0.185). However, the relation between the MRI category (ML or NML) and pathology results was significant at level of 0.1 (P = 0.06). Conclusion: This study showed that a wide spectrum of histopathologic results is seen in BI-RADS category 4. However, in this sample volume, none of the MRI features in this BI-RADS category has a significant correlation with any specific histopathologic diagnosis. PMID:28217652

  1. Histopathology of a benign bile duct lesion in the liver: Morphologic mimicker or precursor of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    A bile duct lesion originating from intrahepatic bile ducts is generally regarded as an incidental pathologic finding in liver specimens. However, a recent study on the molecular classification of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has focused on the heterogeneity of this carcinoma and has suggested that the cells of different origins present in the biliary tree may have a major role in the mechanism of oncogenesis. In this review, benign intrahepatic bile duct lesions—regarded in the past as reactive changes or remnant developmental anomalies and now noted to have potential for developing precursor lesions of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma—are discussed by focusing on the histopathologic features and its implications in clinical practice. PMID:27729636

  2. Revised terminology for cervical histopathology and its implications for management of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Alan G; Chelmow, David; Darragh, Teresa M; Lawson, Herschel; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2012-12-01

    In March 2012, the College of American Pathologists and American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, in collaboration with 35 stakeholder organizations, convened a consensus conference called the Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) Project. The recommendations of this project include using a uniform, two-tiered terminology to describe the histology of human papillomavirus-associated squamous disease across all anogenital tract tissues: vulva, vagina, cervix, penis, perianus, and anus. The recommended terminology is "low-grade" or "high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL)." This terminology is familiar to clinicians, because it parallels the terminology of the Bethesda System cytologic reports. Biopsy results using SIL terminology may be further qualified using "intraepithelial neoplasia" (IN) terminology in parentheses. Laboratory p16 tissue immunostaining is recommended to better classify histopathology lesions that morphologically would earlier have been diagnosed as IN 2. p16 is also recommended for differentiating between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign mimics. The LAST Project recommendations potentially affect the application of current guidelines for managing cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions. The authors offer interim guidance for managing cervical lesions diagnosed using this new terminology with special attention paid to managing young women with cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions on biopsy. Clinicians should be aware of the LAST Project recommendations, which include important changes from prior terminology.

  3. Histopathological Analogies in Chronic Pulmonary Lesions between Cattle and Humans: Basis for an Alternative Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M.; Rodríguez-Tovar, Luis E.; Wong-González, Alfredo; Ledezma-Torres, Rogelio A.; Hernández-Vidal, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Most of the natural cases of pneumonia in feedlot cattle are characterized by a longer clinical course due to chronic lung lesions. Microscopically, these lesions include interstitial fibroplasia, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and epithelial metaplasia of the airways. Herein, the aim was to review, under a medical perspective, the pathologic mechanisms operating in these chronic pneumonic lesions in calves. Based on the similarities of these changes to those reported in bronchiolitis obliterans/organising pneumonia (BO/OP) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in human beings, calves are proposed as an alternative animal model. PMID:22629176

  4. Assessment of the histopathological lesions and chemical analysis of feral cats to the smoke from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, R.B. Jr.; Dick, E.J.; Pletcher, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    Twenty-six adult or subadult feral cats were collected from Kuwait approximately 8 months after the ignition of the Kuwait oil wells. These animals were obtained from two sources: 12 animals from Kuwait City, a relatively smoke-free area, and 14 from the city of Ahmadi, an area with heavy smoke. Animals were euthanized and a complete set of tissues consisting of all major organs was taken for histopathology. Samples of lung, liver, kidney, urine, and blood were also taken for toxicology. Histopathological lesions observed in the lung were mild accumulations of anthracotic pigment in the lungs of 17 cats. Hyperplasia of the bronchial and bronchiolar gland in 8 cats, and smooth muscle hyperplasia of bronchioles in 14 cats. Tracheal gland hyperplasia was observed in 7 cats, and minimal squamous metaplasia of the tracheal mucosa in 17 cats, Laryngeal lesions consisted of submucosal gland hyperplasia in 2 cats and squamous metaplasia of the mucosa in 5 cats. Hyperplasia of the nasal submucosal glands was observed in 6 animals. The pharyngeal mucosa as well as other organs and organ systems were normal in all cats. Atomic absorption analysis for 11 metals was performed; vanadium and nickel levels (two metals that were present in the smoke from the oil fires) are not indicative of substantial exposure to the oil fires. Based on the histopathological findings and toxicological analysis, it is felt that inhalation of air contaminated with smoke from the oil fires had little or no long-term effect on the animals examined. 36 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Assessment of the histopathological lesions and chemical analysis of feral cats to the smoke from Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, R.B.; Kalasinsky, V.F.; Razzaque, M.; Centeno, J.A.; Dick, E.J.

    1994-12-31

    Twenty-six adult or subadult feral cats were collected from Kuwait approximately 8 months after the ignition of the Kuwait oil wells. These animals were obtained from two sources: 12 animals from Kuwait City, a relatively Co smoke-free area, and 14 from the city of Alimadi, an area with heavy smoke. Animals were euthanized and a complete set of tissues consisting of all 0 major organs was taken for histopathology. Samples of lung, liver, kidney, urine, and blood were also taken for toxicology. Histopathological lesions observed in the lung were mild accumulations of anthracotic pigment in the lungs of 17 cats. Hyperplasia of the bronchial and bronchiolar gland in 8 cats, and smooth muscle hyperplasia of bronchioles in 14 cats. Iracheal gland hyperplasia was observed in 7 cats, and minimal squamous metaplasia of the tracheal mucosa in 17 cats, Laryngeal lesions consisted of submucosal gland hyperplasia in 2 cats and squamous metaplasia of the mucosa in 5 cats. Hyperplasia of the nasal submucosal glands was observed in 6 animals. The pharyngeal mucosa as well as other organs and organ systems (a) were normal in all cats. Atomic absorption analysis for 11 metals was performed; vanadium and nickel levels (two metals that were present in the smoke from the oil fires) are not indicative of substantial exposure to the oil fires. Based on the histopathological findings and toxicological analysis, it is felt that inhalation of air contaminated with smoke from the oil fires had little or no long-term effect on the animals examined.

  6. Histopathological and immunohistochemical study of air sac lesions induced by two strains of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, A; Mondal, S P; Buckles, E L

    2011-11-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a highly contagious respiratory coronavirus of domestic chickens. Although mortality is low, infection with IBV results in substantial losses for the egg and meat chicken industries. Despite the economic importance of IBV and decades of research into the pathogenesis of infection, significant gaps in our knowledge exist. The aim of this study was to compare the early progression of air sac lesions in birds receiving a vaccine strain of the virus or a more virulent field strain. The air sacs are lined by different types of epithelia and are relatively isolated from the environment, so they represent a unique tissue in which to study virus-induced lesions. Both the pathogenic and vaccine strains of the virus produced significant lesions; however, the lesions progressed more rapidly in the birds receiving the pathogenic strain. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that in birds infected with the pathogenic strain of virus, IBV spike protein is detected first in the ciliated cells lining the air sac. These preliminary data provide important clues regarding potential mechanisms for IBV tissue tropism and spread and show that the nature of the virus isolate influences the early progression of IBV infection.

  7. The Revisited Classification of GN in SLE at 10 Years: Time to Re-Evaluate Histopathologic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmus, Suzanne; Alpers, Charles E; Cook, H Terence; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Haas, Mark; Joh, Kensuke; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Seshan, Surya V; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M

    2015-12-01

    Over 10 years have passed since the latest revision of the histopathologic classification of lupus nephritis. This revision was a significant improvement compared with the previous version, mainly because of clearer and more concise definitions and the elimination of mixed subclasses. Despite these improvements, there are still some difficulties in the classification for lupus nephritis, many of which are in the definitions provided. In this review, we focus on the difficulties surrounding the evaluation of classes III and IV lesions, particularly the definitions of endocapillary and extracapillary proliferation, the use of the terms endocapillary proliferation and hypercellularity, the clinical relevance of segmental and global subdivision in class IV, and the value of distinguishing lesions that indicate activity and chronicity. Vascular and tubulointerstitial lesions are also discussed. Furthermore, we give an overview of the history of the classification to provide background on the origin and development of the definitions in lupus nephritis. The issues raised in this review as well as the suggestions for improvements may assist with a revision of the lupus nephritis classification in the near future.

  8. PARP Inhibition Attenuates Histopathological Lesion in Ischemia/Reperfusion Renal Mouse Model after Cold Prolonged Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    del Moral, Raimundo M. G.; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; Aguilar, David; Caballero, Trinidad; Aneiros-Fernández, Jose; Caba-Molina, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Martínez, Mª  Dolores; Peralta, Andreina; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Osuna, Antonio; Oliver, F. Javier

    2013-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that PARP inhibition can decrease acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and other renal lesions related to prolonged cold ischemia/reperfusion (IR) in kidneys preserved at 4°C in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution. Material and Methods. We used 30 male Parp1+/+ wild-type and 15 male Parp10/0 knockout C57BL/6 mice. Fifteen of these wild-type mice were pretreated with 3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)butoxyl]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone (DPQ) at a concentration of 15 mg/kg body weight, used as PARP inhibitor. Subgroups of mice were established (A: IR 45 min/6 h; B: IR + 48 h in UW solution; and C: IR + 48 h in UW solution plus DPQ). We processed samples for morphological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and western-blotting studies. Results. Prolonged cold ischemia time in UW solution increased PARP-1 expression and kidney injury. Preconditioning with PARP inhibitor DPQ plus DPQ supplementation in UW solution decreased PARP-1 nuclear expression in renal tubules and renal damage. Parp10/0 knockout mice were more resistant to IR-induced renal lesion. In conclusion, PARP inhibition attenuates ATN and other IR-related renal lesions in mouse kidneys under prolonged cold storage in UW solution. If confirmed, these data suggest that pharmacological manipulation of PARP activity may have salutary effects in cold-stored organs at transplantation. PMID:24319370

  9. Histopathologic features and frequency of gall bladder lesions in consecutive 540 cholecystectomies.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of gall bladder lesions in cholecystectomies is not clear. The purpose of the present study is to report the morphologies and frequency of gall bladder diseases and lesions of 540 cholecystectomies in the last 10 years in our pathology laboratory. The age of patients ranged from 18 years to 93 years with a mean of 64.75 ±14.43 years. Male to female ratio was 213:327. Of these, 518 cases (96%) had gall stones. Eight (1.5%) were acute cholecystitis, 508 (94.1%) were chronic cholecystitis, 12 (2.2%) were adenocarcinomas, 1 (0.2%) was cystadenocarcinoma, and 11 (2.0%) were normal gall bladders. The frequency of histological lesions were as follows: acute gangrenous inflammation (8 cases, 1.5%), Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses (RAS) (351 cases, 65%), microliths or inspissated bile in RAS (108 cases, 20%), adenomyomatous changes (16 cases, 3.0 %), focal abscess formations (12 cases, 2.2%), focal xanthogranulomatous changes (15 cases, 2.8%), mucosal ulcers (61 cases, 11.3%), cholesterosis (62 cases, 11%), cholesterol polyp (32 cases, 6%), pyloric gland metaplasia (292 cases, 54%), adenoma (7 cases, 1.3%), xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (5 cases, 1%), invasive adenocarcinoma (12 cases, 2.2%), and cystadenocarcinoma (1 cases, 0.2%). In adenomyomatous changes, the epithelial proliferation was florid in a few cases, and no perineural invasions were seen. In pyloric gland metaplasia, no perineural invasions were recognized. All the 7 cases of adenoma were of intestinal type. In the 12 adenocarcinoma cases, one case arose in RAS without mucosal involvement, and 9 were tubular adenocarcinomas and 3 were papillary adenocarcinomas and 1 was mucinous adenocarcinoma. In the present series, there were no cases of heterotipc tissue, intestinal metaplasia, intraepithelial neoplasm, and other malignancies. These data may provide basic knowledge of the gall bladder pathologies.

  10. Histopathologic lesions in cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) exposed chronically to the insecticide endrin.

    PubMed

    Eller, L L

    1971-08-01

    Pathologic conditions associated with exposure to endrin were found in the gill, liver, pancreas, brain and gonad of cutthroat trout. Edema, hemorrhage and possibly intracapillary congestion characterized gill damage after exposure to the highest level of endrin in bath. Hepatic lesions in young trout were of a type frequently described as preceding the development of hepatomas in nutritionally deficient fish. The increased incidence and severity of hepatic degenerative changes observed in fish exposed to high levels of endrin suggested nutritional deficiency enhanced by exposure to endrin. Marked hyperplasia of pancreatic islets and irregular, atypical oocytes were observed after exposure to high endrin levels.

  11. Detection and Classification of Thyroid Follicular Lesions Based on Nuclear Structure from Histopathology Images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Ozolek, John A.; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2010-01-01

    Follicular lesions of the thyroid are traditionally difficult and tedious challenges in diagnostic surgical pathology in part due to lack of obvious discriminatory cytological and microarchitectural features. We describe a computerized method to detect and classify follicular adenoma of the thyroid, follicular carcinoma of the thyroid, and normal thyroid based on the nuclear chromatin distribution from digital images of tissue obtained by routine histological methods. Our method is based on determining whether a set of nuclei, obtained from histological images using automated image segmentation, is most similar to sets of nuclei obtained from normal or diseased tissues. This comparison is performed utilizing numerical features, a support vector machine, and a simple voting strategy. We also describe novel methods to identify unique and defining chromatin patterns pertaining to each class. Unlike previous attempts in detecting and classifying these thyroid lesions using computational imaging, our results show that our method can automatically classify the data pertaining to 10 different human cases with 100% accuracy after blind cross validation using at most 43 nuclei randomly selected from each patient. We conclude that nuclear structure alone contains enough information to automatically classify the normal thyroid, follicular carcinoma, and follicular adenoma, as long as groups of nuclei (instead of individual ones) are used. We also conclude that the distribution of nuclear size and chromatin concentration (how tightly packed it is) seem to be discriminating features between nuclei of follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and normal thyroid. PMID:20099247

  12. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse)

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence. PMID:27446562

  13. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence.

  14. Histopathological and immunohistochemical study of the hepatic lesions experimentally induced by Entamoeba dispar

    PubMed Central

    Costa, C.A.X.; Brito, K.N.O.; Gomes, M.A.; Caliari, M.V.

    2010-01-01

    The sequence of hepatic necrotic-inflammatory events produced by Entamoeba dispar are originally described in this work. For the first time the experimental lesions produced by E. dispar were described in details, as well as the distribution of the trophozoites detected by the immunohistochemistry. Animals experimentally infected with E. dispar presented necrosis, thrombosis and chronic granulomatous inflammation. Immunoreactive products derived from trofozoites were observed close or associated with trophozoites, epithelioid cells, leucocytes and hepatocytes. Few are the articles on the literature about virulence of E. dispar, which is approximately 9 times more frequent than to Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica). Variation in the virulence is therefore expected and signalizing the need of the continuity of studies with E. dispar strains from different places in the world. Taking into account that E. dispar is a closely related species to E. histolytica, these studies could determine new elements involved with E. histolytica pathogenesis, helping us to better understand the disease. PMID:20819776

  15. Histopathology of neoplastic and nonneoplastic hepatic lesions in mice fed diets containing tetrachlorvinphos.

    PubMed

    Ward, J M; Bernal, E; Buratto, B; Goodman, D G; Strandberg, J D; Schueler, R

    1979-07-01

    Tetrachlorvinphos was fed at 8,000 or 16,000 ppm in diets to male and female (C57BL/6N X C3H/HeN)F1 mice for 80 weeks. Surviving mice were killed at 92 weeks, and all mice were completely necropsied. A high incidence of unusual nonneoplastic hepatic lesions in treated mice was present and characterized by pericellular fibrosis, hepatocyte nuclear pleomorphism, and intrasinusoidal foci of macrophages with intracytoplasmic crystalline structures. From 84 to 94% of the treated male mice and from 21 to 23% of the treated females had hepatocellular neoplasms. Only 17% of the control males and 7% of the control females had liver tumors. The induced tumors were frequently multiple in the liver, whereas the tumors in the controls were usually singular. The morphology of 241 liver tumors in 110 treated mice was different from that of tumors in controls. Liver tumors in control mice were generally composed of small basophillic hepatocytes. In treated mice, tumors were hepatocellular carcinomas composed of solid sheets of large basophilic or eosinophilic hepatocytes. Foci of prominent trabecular formation were seen in 51 tumors. Fifteen tumors were composed of small basophilic hepatocytes with oval cells interposed among them. Foci of capillary formation were noted in 3 of these tumors. In addition, 7 more typical hemangiosarcomas forming sinusoids and with thrombosis were observed.

  16. The Morphometrical and Histopathological Changes which were Observed after Topical Ozone Therapy on an Exophytic Fibrous Gingival Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Punit Vaibhav; Gujjari, Sheela Kumar

    2013-01-01

    We are presenting 2 cases where ozone therapy was used in the form of ozonated oil on an exophytic fibrous gingival lesion. A 42-years female patient was selected, who presented with a mild to moderately painful, exophytic, fibrous lesion on the upper anterior gingiva. This gingival lesion was treated with 2ml of ozonated oil, thrice daily for one week. After the ozone therapy, the postoperative outcomes were measured and analyzed. Finally, the lesion was subjected to an excisional biopsy and a histopathological evaluation. After the ozone therapy, the patient revealed that there was less pain. On examination of the lesion, an improvement was observed in the clinical sign of the inflammation and also a reduction in the surface ulceration. During the final biopsy, less bleeding was observed. The morphometrical analysis showed a reduction in the size of the lesion. The histopathological analysis showed a reduction in the collagen fibres and in the inflammatory cells in the connective tissue stroma. Topical ozone therapy provides potential benefits for the treatment of exophytic gingival lesions. The observed benefits in present case report needs to be verified in future with well-controlled clinical trials. PMID:23905150

  17. A new species of philometrid parasite (Nematoda, Philometridae) and histopathological lesions in juvenile whitemouth croakers, Micropogonias furnieri (Desmarest).

    PubMed

    Montes, M M; Plaul, S E; Martorelli, S R

    2016-09-01

    A new species of nematode parasite, Philometroides tahieli sp. nov. is described. The juvenile whitemouth croaker, Micropogonias furnieri Desmarest, was collected during the spring and summer of the years 2008-2010 from estuarial environments of Argentina. During investigations of the parasite fauna a nematode encapsulated in the musculature of the operculum was found. The nematodes were removed from the host's muscle tissue and slide-mounted in lactophenol solution to clarify the specimens. Opercular muscle with the parasite was processed for histopathological examination. Philometroides tahieli sp. nov. can be identified by the location of gravid females in the host, presence of anterior oesophageal bulb, bosses on the surface of the body, presence of transversal mounds and 14 cephalic papillae in two circular rows. The pathogenicity of the parasite is low in the natural environment, but lesions are consistent with a chronic process. The appearance of caseous necrosis suggests the presence of a locally acting substance. Philometroides tahieli sp. nov. is the second species of this genera described from brackish waters, and since the discovery of Philometroides maplestoni in 1928, is the first species of this genus recorded for South America.

  18. Histopathology of Incontinence-Associated Skin Lesions: Inner Tissue Damage Due to Invasion of Proteolytic Enzymes and Bacteria in Macerated Rat Skin

    PubMed Central

    Mugita, Yuko; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Nakagami, Gojiro; Kishi, Chihiro; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Nagase, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Mori, Taketoshi; Abe, Masatoshi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A common complication in patients with incontinence is perineal skin lesions, which are recognized as a form of dermatitis. In these patients, perineal skin is exposed to digestive enzymes and intestinal bacterial flora, as well as excessive water. The relative contributions of digestive enzymes and intestinal bacterial flora to skin lesion formation have not been fully shown. This study was conducted to reveal the process of histopathological changes caused by proteases and bacterial inoculation in skin maceration. For skin maceration, agarose gel containing proteases was applied to the dorsal skin of male Sprague-Dawley rats for 4 h, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculation for 30 min. Macroscopic changes, histological changes, bacterial distribution, inflammatory response, and keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation were examined. Proteases induced digestion in the prickle cell layer of the epidermis, and slight bleeding in the papillary dermis and around hair follicles in the macerated skin without macroscopic evidence of erosion. Bacterial inoculation of the skin macerated by proteolytic solution resulted in the formation of bacteria-rich clusters comprising numerous microorganisms and inflammatory cells within the papillary dermis, with remarkable tissue damage around the clusters. Tissue damage expanded by day 2. On day 3, the proliferative keratinocyte layer was elongated from the bulge region of the hair follicles. Application of proteases and P. aeruginosa induced skin lesion formation internally without macroscopic erosion of the overhydrated area, suggesting that the histopathology might be different from regular dermatitis. The healing process of this lesion is similar to transepidermal elimination. PMID:26407180

  19. Histopathologic extent of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 lesions in the atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion triage study: implications for subject safety and lead-time bias.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Mark E; Wang, Sophia S; Tarone, Robert; Rich, Laurie; Schiffman, Mark

    2003-04-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) is the precursor of mostsquamous carcinomas and serves as a surrogate end point. However, small CIN3 lesions are rarely associated with concurrent invasion. We hypothesized that aggressive follow-up for cytology of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) leads predominantly to detection of smaller CIN3 lesions than those usually associated with cancer. We assessed this hypothesis in a masked histopathologic review of 330 CIN3 lesions in the ASCUS LSILTriage Study, focusing on ASCUS referrals. ASCUS referrals underwent randomized management [colposcopy for repeat cytology of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), colposcopy for oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) detection or repeat HSIL, or immediate colposcopy]; then all were followed with repeat cytology for 2 years, followed by colposcopy and aggressive treatment. We assessed all CIN3 lesions qualitatively and measured 39 of them. CIN3 lesions were overwhelmingly small. Compared with enrollment, lesions found at follow-up or exit involved fewer tissue fragments (P < 0.01) and showed less diffuse gland involvement (P = 0.03). CIN3 lesions found postenrollment after HPV testing involved the fewest tissue fragments [versus immediate colposcopy (P = 0.04) or repeat cytology of HSIL (P = 0.02)], and none showed diffuse gland involvement. The median distal-proximal length was 6.5 mm (median replacement of total epithelium = 5%) in the 39 measured cases. We conclude that CIN3 lesions underlying ASCUS or LSIL generally lack features associated with invasion, particularly if managed using HPV testing, suggesting that aggressive management leads to early detection of CIN3 but probably prevents relatively few cancers in screened populations.

  20. Biological characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from domestic and sylvatic vectors in Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Téllez-Meneses, Jair; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana María; Triana-Chávez, Omar

    2008-10-01

    Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta is one of the most endemic regions of Chagas disease in Colombia. In this study, we compared the biological behavior and genetic features of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks that were isolated from domestic and sylvatic insects in this area. Rhodnius prolixus (from domestic environments) and Triatoma dimidiata (from sylvatic, peridomestic and domestic environments) are the most important vectors in this region. Genetic characterization showed that all stocks corresponded to T. cruzi I, but LSSP-PCR analyses indicated that some genotypes were present in both environments. Biological characterization in vitro showed a low growth rate in sylvatic T. cruzi stocks and in some domestic T. cruzi stocks, possibly indicating the presence of stocks with similar behavior in both transmission cycles. In parallel, in vivo behavioral analysis also indicated that T. cruzi stocks are variable and this species did not show a correlation between the environments where they were isolated. In addition, all stocks demonstrated a low mortality rate and histopathological lesions in heart, skeletal muscle and colon tissue. Moreover, our data indicated that experimentally infected chagasic mice displayed a relation between their myocardial inflammation intensity, parasitism tissue and parasite load using the qPCR. In conclusion, our results indicate that the T. cruzi stocks present in SNSM have similar biological behavior and do not show a correlation with the different transmission cycles. This could be explained by the complex transmission dynamics of T. cruzi in Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, where hosts, vectors (e.g., T. dimidiata) and reservoirs circulate in both environments due to the close contact between the two transmission cycles, favoring environment overlapping. This knowledge is an important key to understanding the epidemiology and pathology of Chagas disease in this Colombian region. Furthermore, our findings could be of significant use in the design of

  1. Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Methyl Eugenol-induced Nonneoplastic and Neoplastic Neuroendocrine Cell Lesions in Glandular Stomach of Rats.

    PubMed

    Janardhan, Kyathanahalli S; Rebolloso, Yvette; Hurlburt, Geoffrey; Olson, David; Lyght, Otis; Clayton, Natasha P; Gruebbel, Margarita; Picut, Catherine; Shackelford, Cynthia; Herbert, Ronald A

    2015-07-01

    Methyl eugenol induces neuroendocrine (NE) cell hyperplasia and tumors in F344/N rat stomach. Detailed histopathological and immunohistochemical (IHC) characterization of these tumors has not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to fill that data gap. Archived slides and paraffin blocks were retrieved from the National Toxicology Program Archives. NE hyperplasias and tumors were stained with chromogranin A, synaptophysin, amylase, gastrin, H(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), pepsinogen, somatostatin, and cytokeratin 18 (CK18) antibodies. Many of the rats had gastric mucosal atrophy, due to loss of chief and parietal cells. The hyperplasias and tumors were confined to fundic stomach, and females were more affected than the males. Hyperplasia of NE cells was not observed in the pyloric region. Approximately one-third of the females with malignant NE tumors had areas of pancreatic acinar differentiation. The rate of metastasis was 21%, with liver being the most common site of metastasis. Immunohistochemically, the hyperplasias and tumors stained consistently with chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Neoplastic cells were also positive for amylase and CK18 and negative for gastrin, somatostatin, H(+)/K(+) ATPase, and pepsinogen. Metastatic neoplasms histologically similar to the primary neoplasm stained positively for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Based on the histopathological and IHC features, the neoplasms appear to arise from enterochromaffin-like cells.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Venezuelan HIV+-AIDS Patient: Pathological Diagnosis Confirmed by PCR Using Formalin-Fixed- and Paraffin-Embedded-Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Céspedes, Ghislaine; Romero, Sandra; Fuentes, Isabel; Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A.; Cañavate, Carmen; Flores-Chávez, María

    2014-01-01

    Coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and infectious agents have been recognized since the early 90s. In the central nervous system (CNS) of HIV+ patients, parasitic protozoans like Toxoplasma gondii have been described as responsible for the space occupying lesions (SOL) developed. However, the involvement of Trypanosoma cruzi is also described but appears to be less frequent in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and transplant recipients, associated with necrotizing myocarditis and neurological symptoms related to the occurrence of necrotizing pseudotumoral encephalitis (NPE) and meningoencephalitis (NME). The present work aims to present a Venezuelan case of NME associated with the coinfection of HIV and a T. cruzi-like trypanosomatid as well as its evolution and diagnosis by histopathological techniques, electron microscopy, and PCR methods using formalin-fixed- (FF-) and paraffin-embedded- (PE-) tissues. Postmortem cytological studies of leptomeninges imprints reveal the presence of trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma sp. Histopathological and electron microscopy studies allowed us to identify an amastigote stage and to reject the involvement of other opportunistic microorganisms as the etiological agent of the SOL. The definitive confirmation of T. cruzi as the etiological agent was achieved by PCR suggesting that the NME by T. cruzi was due to a reactivation of Chagas' disease. PMID:25763312

  3. Histopathological lesions and DNA adducts in the liver of European flounder (Platichthys flesus) collected in the Seine estuary versus two reference estuarine systems on the French Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Cachot, Jérôme; Cherel, Yan; Larcher, Thibaut; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Laroche, Jean; Quiniou, Louis; Morin, Jocelyne; Schmitz, Julien; Burgeot, Thierry; Pottier, Didier

    2013-02-01

    An epidemiological survey was conducted in the Seine estuary and in two smaller and relatively preserved estuaries on the French Atlantic coast in order to estimate the occurrence of liver lesions in European flounder, Platichthys flesus, and also to seek putative risk factors for the recorded pathologies. Four hundred and seventy-eight fish of both sexes and of different size ranges were sampled in the three studied areas, 338 of which in the Seine estuary. All fish were examined for histopathological liver lesions, while DNA adducts and otoliths were analyzed on a subsample. Five categories of hepatic lesions were recorded with the following prevalence for the Seine estuary: 36.7 % inflammations, 8 % parasites (mainly encysted nematodes), 6.5 % foci of cellular alteration (FCA), 5.3 % foci of necrosis or regeneration (FNR), and 1.5 % tumors. Inflammation occurrence increased according to age, contrary to parasitic infestations and FCA which were more prevalent in young fish, notably those of <1 year old (group 0). Tumors were only observed in females of more than two winters. Females exhibited a higher prevalence of tumors (3.0 %) and FCA (6.5 %) than males (0 and 2.6 %, respectively). Parasitic and infectious lesions and FNR were equally distributed in males and females. The prevalence of FNR was also shown to vary according to sampling season, with significantly more occurrences of liver necrosis in the fish collected in summer than in spring. Spatial differences were observed with a higher occurrence of encysted parasites in flounders from the upper Seine estuary, while inflammations predominated in flounders living downstream. Temporal trends were also noted, with an increased prevalence of parasitic infestations, inflammations, and FCA in the 2002-2003 period in comparison to the 1996-1997 one. The three flounder populations from the Seine estuary (Normandy), Ster estuary (Brittany), and Bay of Veys (Normandy) showed different spectra of hepatic lesions

  4. Myenteric plexus is differentially affected by infection with distinct Trypanosoma cruzi strains in Beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Paiva, Nívia Carolina; Fonseca, Kátia da Silva; Vieira, Paula Melo de Abreu; Diniz, Lívia Figueiredo; Caldas, Ivo Santana; de Moura, Sandra Aparecida Lima; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Matta; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2013-01-01

    Chagasic megaoesophagus and megacolon are characterised by motor abnormalities related to enteric nervous system lesions and their development seems to be related to geographic distribution of distinct Trypanosoma cruzi subpopulations. Beagle dogs were infected with Y or Berenice-78 (Be-78) T. cruzi strains and necropsied during the acute or chronic phase of experimental disease for post mortem histopathological evaluation of the oesophagus and colon. Both strains infected the oesophagus and colon and caused an inflammatory response during the acute phase. In the chronic phase, inflammatory process was observed exclusively in the Be-78 infected animals, possibly due to a parasitism persistent only in this group. Myenteric denervation occurred during the acute phase of infection for both strains, but persisted chronically only in Be-78 infected animals. Glial cell involvement occurred earlier in animals infected with the Y strain, while animals infected with the Be-78 strain showed reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive area of enteric glial cells in the chronic phase. These results suggest that although both strains cause lesions in the digestive tract, the Y strain is associated with early control of the lesion, while the Be-78 strain results in progressive gut lesions in this model. PMID:24271001

  5. Histopathological study of the treatment of melasma lesions using a low-fluence Q-switched 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, J E; Chang, S E; Yeo, U C; Haw, S; Kim, I-H

    2013-03-01

    The low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (QSNY) laser is a widely used treatment for melasma in East Asia, although its mechanism of action is unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of action of the QSNY laser. We performed a histopathological study on eight Korean women who had considerable improvement in their melasma lesions after a series of low-fluence QSNY laser treatments. Compared with nonlesional skin, samples from melasma lesions showed increased reactivity in melanin (Fontana-Masson staining) and in melanogenesis-associated proteins, including α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2, nerve growth factor and stem cell factor. After laser treatment, the melasma skin showed a decrease in the number of melanosomes and reduced expression of melanogenesis-associated proteins. Expression levels of the melanogenic proteins were reduced after laser treatment, although the number of melanocytes was unchanged even in hypopigmented areas. Based on these results, we believe that repeated application of low thermal energy via QSNY laser may result in damage to melanocytes and long-lasting hypopigmentation.

  6. A case of primary aldosteronism caused by unilateral multiple adrenocortical micronodules presenting as muscle cramps at rest: The importance of functional histopathology for identifying a culprit lesion.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Yuto; Sasano, Hironobu; Matsubara, Daisuke; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Tamba, Mio; Tabata, Kenichi; Ashizawa, Kentaro; Takei, Akihito; Koizumi, Masaru; Sakuma, Yasunaru; Sata, Naohiro; Oshiro, Hisashi

    2017-04-01

    Unilateral multiple adrenocortical micronodules (UMNs) constitute a rare subset of primary aldosteronism (PA) characterized by the hypersecretion of aldosterone derived from multiple small nodules in the zona glomerulosa of the unilateral adrenal grand. This case study describes a 49-year-old man with PA and UMNs who presented with muscle cramps at rest due to hypokalemia. The patient had a 6-year history of hypertension treated with antihypertensive drugs. Imaging studies revealed bilateral adrenal nodules as large as 5 mm. Adrenal venous sampling confirmed unilateral PA; therefore, the patient underwent the removal of the affected adrenal gland. Macroscopically, the removed adrenal gland exhibited irregular adrenocortical thickening accompanied by ill-defined, adrenocortical macronodules as large as 6 mm. The zona glomerulosa was histologically hyperplastic. However, an immunohistochemistry test of the steroidogenic enzymes revealed that these macronodules and the hyperplastic glomerular layer tested negative for CYB11B2. Moreover, we observed adrenocortical micronodules as large as 0.5 mm that tested immunohistochemically positive for CYP11B2 and HSD3B2 but negative for CYP17A1 and CYP11B1. Thus, UMNs were diagnosed. This case instructively indicates that a grossly or histologically detectable nodular lesion is not necessarily a culprit lesion for PA. Therefore, functional histopathology is indispensable for the correct subclassification of PA.

  7. Protective role of sodium selenite on histopathological lesions, decreased T-cell subsets and increased apoptosis of thymus in broilers intoxicated with aflatoxin B₁.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejie; Shu, Gang; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Cui, Hengmin; Chen, Jin; Wang, Fengyuan; Chen, Zhengli; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Geng, Yi; Lai, Weimin

    2013-09-01

    For evaluating the ability of selenium (Se) in counteracting the adverse effects of aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁), two hundred 1-day-old male Avian broilers, divided into five groups, were fed with basal diet (control group), 0.3 mg/kg AFB₁ (AFB₁ group), 0.3 mg/kg AFB₁+0.2 mg/kg Se (+Se group I), 0.3mg/kg AFB₁+0.4 mg/kg Se (+Se group II) and 0.3mg/kg AFB₁+0.6 mg/kg Se (+Se group III), respectively. Compared with control group, the decreased relative weight of thymus and percentages of mature thymocytes, congestion in medulla and much debris in cortex of thymus, and the increased apoptotic thymocytes were observed in AFB1 group. However, supplied dietary sodium selenite could increase the relative weight of thymus and percentages of mature thymocytes, and alleviate histopathological lesions. Compared with AFB1 group, the percentages of apoptotic thymocytes detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method and flow cytometry method in three +Se groups were decreased, the expression of Caspase-3 and Bax, through quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemical method, in three +Se groups were decreased, while the expression of Bcl-2 was increased. The results indicate that sodium selenite supplied in the diet, through a mechanism of apoptosis regulation, may ameliorated AFB₁-induced lesions of thymus and accordingly improve the impaired cellular immune function.

  8. Pathogen translocation and histopathological lesions in an experimental model of Salmonella Dublin infection in calves receiving lactic acid bacteria and lactose supplements

    PubMed Central

    Zbrun, María V.; Soto, Lorena P.; Bertozzi, Ezequiel; Sequeira, Gabriel J.; Marti, Luis E.; Signorini, Marcelo L.; Armesto, Roberto Rodríguez; Rosmini, Marcelo R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of a lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculum to protect calves with or without lactose supplements against Salmonella Dublin infection by evaluating histopathological lesions and pathogen translocation. Fifteen calves were divided into three groups [control group (C-G), a group inoculated with LAB (LAB-G), and a group inoculated with LAB and given lactose supplements (L-LAB-G)] with five, six, and four animals, respectively. The inoculum, composed of Lactobacillus (L.) casei DSPV 318T, L. salivarius DSPV 315T, and Pediococcus acidilactici DSPV 006T, was administered with milk replacer. The LAB-G and L-LAB-G received a daily dose of 109 CFU/kg body weight of each strain throughout the experiment. Lactose was provided to the L-LAB-G in doses of 100 g/day. Salmonella Dublin (2 × 1010 CFU) was orally administered to all animals on day 11 of the experiment. The microscopic lesion index values in target organs were 83%, 70%, and 64.3% (p < 0.05) for the C-G, LAB-G, and L-LAB-G, respectively. Administration of the probiotic inoculum was not fully effective against infection caused by Salmonella. Although probiotic treatment was unable to delay the arrival of pathogen to target organs, it was evident that the inoculum altered the response of animals against pathogen infection. PMID:23000583

  9. Use of computed tomography and histopathologic review for lung lesions produced by the interaction between Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and fumonisin mycotoxins in pigs.

    PubMed

    Pósa, R; Magyar, T; Stoev, S D; Glávits, R; Donkó, T; Repa, I; Kovács, M

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has a primary role in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). The objective of this study was to determine whether fumonisin mycotoxins influence the character and/or the severity of pathological processes induced in the lungs of pigs by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Four groups of pigs (n = 7/group) were used, one fed 20 ppm fumonisin B1 (FB1) from 16 days of age (group F), one only infected with M. hyopneumoniae on study day 30 (group M), and a group fed FB1 and infected with M. hyopneumoniae (group MF), along with an untreated control group (group C). Computed tomography (CT) scans of infected pigs (M and MF) on study day 44 demonstrated lesions extending to the cranial and middle or in the cranial third of the caudal lobe of the lungs. The CT images obtained on study day 58 showed similar but milder lesions in 5 animals from group M, whereas lungs from 2 pigs in group MF appeared progressively worse. The evolution of average pulmonary density calculated from combined pixel frequency values, as measured by quantitative CT, was significantly influenced by the treatment and the age of the animals. The most characteristic histopathologic lesion in FB1-treated pigs was pulmonary edema, whereas the pathomorphological changes in Mycoplasma-infected pigs were consistent with catarrhal bronchointerstitial pneumonia. FB1 aggravated the progression of infection, as demonstrated by severe illness requiring euthanasia observed in 1 pig and evidence of progressive pathology in 2 pigs (group MF) between study days 44 and 58.

  10. National benthic surveillance project: Pacific coast. Fish histopathology and relationships between toxicopathic lesions and exposure to chemical contaminants for cycles 1 to 5 (1984-88). Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, M.S.; Stehr, C.M.; Olson, O.P.; Johnson, L.L.; McCain, B.B.

    1993-02-01

    The report presents and interprets the results of histopathology studies conducted on 17 species of bottomfish captured at 45 sites between 1984 and 1988 as part of the Pacific Coast portion of the National Benthic Surveillance Program (NBSP) in conjunction with NOAA's National Status and Trends Program (NS T). The location of sampling sites ranged from Prudhoe Bay in Alaska to San Diego Bay in California, and incorporated sites. Twenty-three were located in or near urban embayments, and the 22 remaining sites were in nonurban embayments, five of which served as comparison or reference sites on the basis of minimal levels of sediment contaminants detected (Kamishak Bay, AK; Nisqually Reach, WA; and Bodega Bay, Dana Point, and outer Mission Bay, CA). These comparison sites were selected so that the same fish species could be collected from minimally contaminated environments as opposed to those obtained at urban or more contaminated sites. Six primary target species were identified for statistical analyses that examined the relationships between occurrence of particular toxicopathic diseases or lesions in the liver and kidney and levels of potential or actual exposure to contaminants. These species were selected because they were broadly distributed geographically and were abundant among the sampling sites, they had previously documented significant prevalences of contaminant-associated diseases, or the geographic distribution of similar diseases among the sites suggested an association with contaminant exposure. These primary target species were flathead sole, English sole, starry flounder, hornyhead turbot, white croaker, and black croaker. All specimens were examined for the presence of necrotic, sclerotic and proliferative lesions in the kidney, as well as lesions.

  11. Melan-a-positive "pseudomelanocytic nests": a pitfall in the histopathologic and immunohistochemical diagnosis of pigmented lesions on sun-damaged skin.

    PubMed

    Beltraminelli, Helmut; Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila El; Kerl, Helmut; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2009-05-01

    We encountered recently 3 cases with a histopathologic diagnosis of melanoma in situ on sun-damaged skin (male = 2, female = 1; median age: 59 years; range: 52-60 years). The diagnosis was based mainly on the finding of actinic elastosis in the dermis and increased number of melanocytes in the epidermis and was confirmed by strong positivity for Melan-A in single cells and in small nests ("pseudomelanocytic nests"), located at the dermoepidermal junction. Indeed, examination of slides stained with hematoxylin and eosin revealed the presence of marked hyperpigmentation and small nests of partially pigmented cells at the dermoepidermal junction, positive for Melan-A. The histologic and especially the immunohistochemical features were indistinguishable from those of melanoma in situ on chronic sun-damaged skin. In addition, a variably dense lichenoid inflammation was present. Clinicopathologic correlation, however, showed, in all patients, the presence of a lichenoid dermatitis (phototoxic reaction, 1 case; lichen planus pigmentosus, 1 case; and pigmented lichenoid keratosis, 1 case). Our cases clearly show the histopathologic pitfalls represented by lichenoid reactions on chronic sun-damaged skin. Immunohistochemical investigations, especially if performed with Melan-A alone, may lead to confusing and potentially disastrous results. The unexpected staining pattern of Melan-A in cases like ours raises concern about the utility of this antibody in the setting of a lichenoid tissue reaction on chronic sun-damaged skin. It should be underlined that pigmented lesions represent a paradigmatic example of how immunohistochemical results should be interpreted carefully and always in conjunction with histologic and clinical features.

  12. Effects of Selenium-Enriched Probiotics on Lipid Metabolism, Antioxidative Status, Histopathological Lesions, and Related Gene Expression in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Nido, Sonia Agostinho; Shituleni, Shituleni Andreas; Mengistu, Berhe Mekonnen; Liu, Yunhuan; Khan, Alam Zeb; Gan, Fang; Kumbhar, Shahnawaz; Huang, Kehe

    2016-06-01

    A total of 80 female albino mice were randomly allotted into five groups (n = 16) as follows: (A) normal control, (B) high-fat diet (HFD),; (C) HFD + probiotics (P), (D) HFD + sodium selenite (SS), and (E) HFD + selenium-enriched probiotics (SP). The selenium content of diets in groups A, B, C, D, and E was 0.05, 0.05, 0.05, 0.3, and 0.3 μg/g, respectively. The amount of probiotics contained in groups C and E was similar (Lactobacillus acidophilus 0.25 × 10(11)/mL and Saccharomyces cerevisiae 0.25 × 10(9)/mL colony-forming units (CFU)). The high-fat diet was composed of 15 % lard, 1 % cholesterol, 0.3 % cholic acid, and 83.7 % basal diet. At the end of the 4-week experiment, blood and liver samples were collected for the measurements of lipid metabolism, antioxidative status, histopathological lesions, and related gene expressions. The result shows that HFD significantly increased the body weights and liver damages compared to control, while P, SS, or SP supplementation attenuated the body weights and liver damages in mice. P, SS, or SP supplementation also significantly reversed the changes of alanine aminotransferase (AST), aspartate aminotransferase (ALT), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total protein (TP), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalasa (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels induced by HFD. Generally, adding P, SS, or SP up-regulated mRNA expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I (CPT1), carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT2), acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase II (ACAT2), acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (ACOX2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and down-regulated mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1) involved in lipid metabolism. Among the group

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Patel, Shital M; Flash, Charlene A; Stager, Charles E; Goodman, Jerry C; Woc-Colburn, Laila

    2014-07-01

    As a result of global migration, a significant number of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection now live in the United States, Canada, many countries in Europe, and other non-endemic countries. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis is a rare cause of ring-enhancing lesions in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that can closely mimic central nervous system (CNS) toxoplasmosis. We report a case of CNS Chagas reactivation in an AIDS patient successfully treated with benznidazole and antiretroviral therapy in the United States.

  14. Non-lesions, Misdiagnoses, Missed Diagnoses, and Other Interpretive Challenges in Fish Histopathology Studies: A Guide for Investigators, Authors, Reviewers, and Readers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differentiating salient histopathologic changes from normal anatomic features or tissue artifacts can be decidedly challenging, especially for the novice fish pathologist. As a consequence, findings of questionable accuracy may be reported inadvertently, and the potential negativ...

  15. National status and trends program for National Benthic Surveillance Project: Pacific coast. Fish histopathology and relationships between toxicopathic lesions and exposure to chemical contaminants for cycles I to V (1984-88). Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, M.S.; Stehr, C.M.; Olson, O.P.; Johnson, L.L.; McCain, B.B.

    1993-02-01

    The report presents and interprets the results of histopathology studies conducted on 17 species of bottomfish captured at 45 sites between 1984 and 1988 as part of the Pacific Coast portion of the National Benthic Surveillance Program (NBSP) in conjunction with NOAA's National Status and Trends Program (NS T). The species examined histopathologically for potentially contaminant-induced (toxicopathic) lesions in the liver and kidney were fourhorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus quadricornis), Arctic flounder (Pleuronectes glacialis), flathead sole (Hippoglossoides elassodon), yellowfin sole (Pleuronectes asper), Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus), English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus), starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus), white croaker (Genyonemus lineatus), hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis), barred sand bass (Paralabrax nebulifer), spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus), spotted turbot (Pleuronichthys ritteri), diamond turbot (Hysopsetta guttulata), California tonguefish (Symphurus atricauda), black croaker (Cheilotrema saturnum), and California halibut (Paralichthys californicus). In all, over 5,250 individual fish among these species were examined.

  16. Side effects of immunization with liver attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Basombrío, M A; Besuschio, S; Cossio, P M

    1982-01-01

    Immunity against lethal, bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was achieved in mice by preinoculation of approximately equal to 10(5) culture epimastigotes of an attenuated T. cruzi strain (TCC). The risks of TCC inoculation in terms of pathogenicity or eventual increase in virulence of TCC progeny were evaluated. No pathogenic parasites could be selected from TCC progeny by either mouse, triatome, or culture passages. Immunizing doses of live TCC did not induce in adult mice alterations resembling chronic Chagas' disease, as judged by patterns of mortality, tissue damage, autoantibodies, or parasite recovery. On the basis of the same criteria, However, a remarkable similarity could be established between the disease caused in mice by inoculation of low numbers (10(2)) of pathogenic trypomastigotes and human chronic Chagas' disease. Although patent parasitemias were never revealed in fresh blood mounts obtained from TCC-inoculated mice, a few hemocultures and xenodiagnoses gave positive results, particularly soon after inoculations at birth. The parasites recovered by either method remained in the attenuated, epimastigote stage. In rabbits, no local lesions, fever, weight loss, or histopathological alterations were detected after subcutaneous inoculation of 10(7) TCC organisms, although one fifth of the animals yielded positive hemocultures of epimastigotes. The contrasting host response to cultured epimastigotes as compared with blood trypomastigotes indicates that, in experimental Chagas' disease, immunoprotection is not necessarily associated with immunopathology. Images PMID:6804389

  17. Histopathology of chromoblastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F; Zuluaga, A I; Leon, W; Restrepo, A

    1989-01-01

    A study aimed at determining the histopathologic appearance of chromoblastomycotic lesions was undertaken. Biopsies from 26 patients with the disease were examined. It was found that 23 cases (88.46%) exhibited the organized mixed mycotic granuloma - OMMA -, a granuloma modified by the presence polymorphonuclear neutrophils - PMN's. An equal proportion of cases exhibited pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, with the epithelium playing an important role in the transepidermic elimination of the fungus. Healing of the lesions took place by fibrosis which was observed in 21 (80.77%) patients; this type of reaction was more common in the deeper areas of the dermis.

  18. Monoaminergic PET imaging and histopathological correlation in unilateral and bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal in-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Gago, Belén; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Juri, Carlos; Collantes, María; Delgado, Mercedes; Prieto, Elena; Ecay, Margarita; Iglesias, Elena; Marín, Concepció; Peñuelas, Iván; Obeso, José A

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-11 labeled dihydrotetrabenazine ((11)C-DTBZ) binds to the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and has been used to assess nigro-striatal integrity in animal models and patients with Parkinson's disease. Here, we applied (11)C-DTBZ positron emission tomography (PET) to obtain longitudinally in-vivo assessment of striatal dopaminergic loss in the classic unilateral and in a novel bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model. Forty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 sub-groups: 1. 6-OHDA-induced unilateral lesion in the medial forebrain bundle, 2. bilateral lesion by injection of 6-OHDA in the third ventricle, and 3. vehicle injection in either site. (11)C-DTBZ PET studies were investigated in the same animals successively at baseline, 1, 3 and 6weeks after lesion using an anatomically standardized volumes-of-interest approach. Additionally, 12 rats had PET and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to construct a new (11)C-DTBZ PET template. Behavior was characterized by rotational, catalepsy and limb-use asymmetry tests and dopaminergic striatal denervation was validated post-mortem by immunostaining of the dopamine transporter (DAT). (11)C-DTBZ PET showed a significant decrease of striatal binding (SB) values one week after the unilateral lesion. At this point, there was a 60% reduction in SB in the affected hemisphere compared with baseline values in 6-OHDA unilaterally lesioned animals. A 46% symmetric reduction over baseline SB values was found in bilaterally lesioned rats at the first week after lesion. SB values remained constant in unilaterally lesioned rats whereas animals with bilateral lesions showed a modest (22%) increase in binding values at the 3rd and 6th weeks post-lesion. The degree of striatal dopaminergic denervation was corroborated histologically by DAT immunostaining. Statistical analysis revealed a high correlation between (11)C-DTBZ PET SB and striatal DAT immunostaining values (r=0.95, p<0.001). The data presented here indicate

  19. CagA and VacA Polymorphisms Do Not Correlate with Severity of Histopathological Lesions in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Greek Children▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Panayotopoulou, Effrosini G.; Papadakos, Konstantinos; Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Roumbani, Aikaterini; Panayiotou, Joanna; vanVliet-Constantinidou, Cathy; Mentis, Andreas F.; Roma-Giannikou, Eleftheria

    2009-01-01

    The presence of various numbers of EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs in the CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to contribute to pathogenesis in adults. In this prospective study, we characterized H. pylori isolates from symptomatic children, with reference to the diversity of functional EPIYA motifs in the CagA protein and vacA isotypes, and assessed the potential correlation with the histopathological manifestations of the infection. We analyzed 105 H. pylori isolates from 98 children and determined the diversity of EPIYA motifs in CagA by amplification and sequencing of the 3′ variable region of the cagA gene as well as vacA isotypes for the signal, middle, and intermediate regions. CagA phosphorylation and levels of secreted IL-8 were determined following in vitro infection of AGS gastric epithelial cells. Histopathological evaluation of H. pylori colonization, activity, and severity of the associated gastritis was performed according to the updated Sydney criteria. EPIYA A (GLKN[ST]EPIYAKVNKKK), EPIYA B (Q[V/A]ASPEPIY[A/T]QVAKKVNAKI), and EPIYA C (RS[V/A]SPEPIYATIDDLG) motifs were detected in the ABC (46.6%) and ABCC (17.1%) combinations. No isolates harboring more than two EPIYA C motifs in CagA were found. The presence of isogenic strains with variable numbers of CagA EPIYA C motifs within the same patient was detected in seven cases. Occurrence of increasing numbers of EPIYA C motifs correlated strongly with presence of a high-vacuolation (s1 or s2/i1/m1) phenotype and age. A weak positive correlation was observed between vacuolating vacA genotypes and presence of nodular gastritis. However, CagA- and VacA-dependent pathogenicities were not found to contribute to severity of histopathology manifestations in H. pylori-infected children. PMID:19535517

  20. Morphological, biological and molecular characterization of three strains of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae) isolated from Triatoma sordida (Stal) 1859 (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) and a domestic cat

    PubMed Central

    RIMOLDI, ALINE; TOMÉ ALVES, RENATA; AMBRÓSIO, DANIELA LUZ; FERNANDES, MARIA ZENAIDE TITA; MARTINEZ, ISABEL; DE ARAÚJO, RENATO FREITAS; CICARELLI, REGINA MARIA BARRETO; DA ROSA, JOÃO ARISTEU

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A study was conducted of the biological, morphological and molecular characters of 3 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi (SI5, SI8 and SIGR3) isolated from specimens of Triatoma sordida collected in Santo Inácio and a domestic cat. In order to carry out the study, the following parameters were evaluated: pre-patent period, parasitaemia curves, morphology of the parasites, mortality rates, histopathological lesions and molecular typing. The strains presented variable pre-patent periods, low parasitaemia and no animal mortality. The morphological study of trypomastigotes showed a predominance of intermediate-width and short-length forms, as well as low nuclear index. Epimastigotes presented a low nuclear index, intermediate-width forms in strains SI5 and SI8, and large-width forms in SIGR3. A shorter length could be noted in strains SI8 and SIGR3, whereas SI5 displayed an intermediate length. The histopathological study did not detect amastigote nests in tissues. The amplification of the divergent domain of 24Sα rRNA, HSP60 and GPI genes of strains SI5, SI8 and SIGR3 classified the 3 strains into Group II. Biological parameters made it possible to classify the strains isolated in Santo Inácio (BA) into Biodeme III, Zymodeme 1 and Group II of T. cruzi. PMID:22217619

  1. Histopathologic findings and diagnostic difficulties posed with use of escharotic agents for treatment of skin lesions: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anna M; Helm, Klaus F

    2008-04-01

    Escharotic agents have been used as alternative therapy for treatment of skin cancer and skin problems for centuries. Internet web sites such as online health product stores and eBay have made them widely available to the general public. The use of these agents carries risk of incomplete removal of tumor, damage of surrounding healthy tissues and marked scarring with poor cosmetic outcome. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with history of moles and self-treatment with an escharotic agent containing bloodroot in order to document the histopathologic findings of topical bloodroot treatment and to show the clinical consequences that may occur in the unsuspecting public. To the best of our knowledge, the histological features following use of bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) have not yet been documented.

  2. Granulomatous and lymphocytic interstitial lung disease: a spectrum of pulmonary histopathologic lesions in common variable immunodeficiency--histologic and immunohistochemical analyses of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nagarjun; Mackinnon, A Craig; Routes, John M

    2015-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is a primary immunodeficiency of unknown etiology characterized by low serum immunoglobulin G, a decreased ability to make specific antibodies, and variable T-cell defects. Approximately 10-30% of patients with common variable immunodeficiency develop clinical evidence of a diffuse parenchymal lung disease with a constellation of histopathologic findings termed granulomatous and lymphocytic interstitial lung disease. In this study, we characterized the histologic and immunohistochemical features in a series of 16 cases diagnosed by open lung biopsy. Peribronchiolar and interstitial lymphocytic infiltration, granulomatous inflammation, and organizing pneumonia were consistent features; interstitial fibrosis with architectural remodeling was also found in a subgroup of patients. By immunohistochemistry, a predominance of CD4+ T lymphocytes with variable numbers of CD8+ T cells and B cells was present, with a striking absence of FOXP3-positive T-regulatory cells. This heretofore unrecognized immunohistochemical finding needs further investigation for a potential role in the pathogenesis of the condition. The presence of interstitial fibrosis with or without architectural remodeling in a subset of patients also needs additional study, for effect on prognosis.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi and myoid cells from seminiferous tubules: interaction and relation with fibrous components of extracellular matrix in experimental Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luiz Otávio Pereira; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lucia; Hardoim, Daiana de Jesús; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Mendes, Verônica Gonçalves; da Costa, Sylvio Celso Gonçalves; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva

    2009-01-01

    The main transmission route of Trypanosoma cruzi is by triatomine bugs. However, T. cruzi is also transmitted through blood transfusion, organ transplantation, ingestion of contaminated food or fluids, or is congenital. Sexual transmission, although suggested since the discovery of Chagas’ disease, has remained unproven. Sexual transmission would require T. cruzi to be located at the testes and ovaries. Here we investigated whether T. cruzi is present in the gonads of mice infected with 104 T. cruzi trypomastigotes from the CL strain. Fourteen days after experimental infection, histopathological examination showed alterations in the extracellular matrix of the lamina propria of the seminiferous tubules. Furthermore, amastigotes were present in seminiferous tubules, within myoid cells, and in the adjacencies of the basal compartment. These results indicate that T. cruzi is able to reach seminiferous tubule lumen, thus suggesting that Chagas’ disease could potentially be transmitted through sexual intercourse. Complementary studies are required to demonstrate that Chagas’ disease can be transmitted by coitus. PMID:19200251

  4. Nail histopathology.

    PubMed

    Martin, B

    2013-09-01

    The structure of the nail unit is complex and many dermatologists and dermatopathologists have an incomplete understanding of it. Familiarity with the anatomy and histology of this unit, however, is a key factor in improving the diagnostic yield of nail biopsy. Inflammatory or infectious conditions that affect the nail can have a marked impact on a patient's quality of life. A wide-ranging variety of tumors can also develop in this region and they may be life-threatening or require surgery that will result in functional defects. The author reviews the anatomy and histology of the nail unit as well as the basic histopathologic findings in the most common conditions affecting the nails.

  5. Histopathology of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlageter, Manuel; Terracciano, Luigi Maria; D’Angelo, Salvatore; Sorrentino, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the sixth most common type of cancer with a high mortality rate and an increasing incidence worldwide. Its etiology is usually linked to environmental, dietary or life-style factors. HCC most commonly arises in a cirrhotic liver but interestingly an increasing proportion of HCCs develop in the non-fibrotic or minimal fibrotic liver and a shift in the underlying etiology can be observed. Although this process is yet to be completely understood, this changing scenario also has impact on the material seen by pathologists, presenting them with new diagnostic dilemmas. Histopathologic criteria for diagnosing classical, progressed HCC are well established and known, but with an increase in detection of small and early HCCs due to routine screening programs, the diagnosis of these small lesions in core needle biopsies poses a difficult challenge. These lesions can be far more difficult to distinguish from one another than progressed HCC, which is usually a clear cut hematoxylin and eosin diagnosis. Furthermore lesions thought to derive from progenitor cells have recently been reclassified in the WHO. This review summarizes recent developments and tries to put new HCC biomarkers in context with the WHOs reclassification. Furthermore it also addresses the group of tumors known as combined hepatocellular-cholangiocellular carcinomas. PMID:25473149

  6. Survey of Feral Swine ( Sus scrofa ) Infection with the Agent of Chagas Disease ( Trypanosoma cruzi ) in Texas, 2013-14.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Juliette M; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Lewis, Barbara C; Cummings, Kevin J; Mesenbrink, Brian T; Leland, Bruce R; Bodenchuk, Michael J; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    : Feral swine ( Sus scrofa ) are an invasive species and reservoir of numerous zoonotic pathogens in the US, and Texas leads the nation in the estimated population size of feral hogs. Texas also harbors enzootic transmission cycles of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , agent of Chagas disease. Given previous evidence that swine can serve as reservoirs of T. cruzi in Latin America and new evidence of triatomines (kissing bugs) feeding on swine in Texas, we measured the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in feral swine in Texas. From 2013 to 2014, we sampled blood and/or cardiac tissue from 78 feral swine across 14 Texas counties (seven with and seven without prior documentation of kissing bug occurrence) and used PCR and histopathology to detect T. cruzi infection. We determined an overall infection prevalence of 6% (3 of 54) based on PCR evaluation of cardiac tissue, and no blood samples were positive (n=72). All three positive pigs were from counties where kissing bugs are documented. No T. cruzi amastigotes were noted on histopathology (n=54). Sarcocysts were observed in 10 (18%) of the samples, five of which also had mild focal areas of degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Eco-epidemiologic investigations can provide an assessment of contributions of feral hogs to maintenance of T. cruzi across a landscape to help protect human and animal health.

  7. Distribution and pathogenicity of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans and Triatoma guasayana from rural western Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Lauricella, Marta A; Stariolo, Raúl L; Riarte, Adelina R; Segura, Elsa L; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in peridomestic triatomines collected manually at a district-wide scale in rural villages around Olta, western Argentina, and typed the isolated strains according to their pathogenicity to laboratory mice. Of 1623 triatomines examined, only 14 (0.9%) were infected with T. cruzi based on microscopical examination of feces. The prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 0.8% in Triatoma infestans, 2.3% in T. guasayana, and nil in T. garciabesi, T. platensis, and T. eratyrusiformis. Local transmission occurred in kitchens, store-rooms and goat corrals or nearby, though at very low levels. T. cruzi was detected by at least one parasitological method in 11 (79%) of 14 microscope-positive bugs. Hemoculture was the most sensitive method (67%) followed by culture of organ homogenates, histopathology or xenodiagnosis of inoculated suckling mice (55-58%), and culture of microscope-positive bug feces (46%). The evidence suggests that most of the isolated T. cruzi strains would be myotropic type III. Our study establishes for the first time that peridomestic, microscope-positive T. guasayana nymphs were actually infected with T. cruzi, and may be implicated as a putative secondary vector of T. cruzi in domestic or peridomestic sites. PMID:16021298

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi: characterization of reinfection and search for tissue tropism in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Cabrine-Santos, M; Lages Silva, E; Chapadeiro, E; Ramírez, L E

    2001-11-01

    Tissue tropism, the role of reinfection in the development of Chagas' disease, and the selection of subpopulations of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in hamsters inoculated with the VIC strain of T. cruzi. Adult allogeneic male hamsters were inoculated once or reinoculated by the intraperitoneal route up to four times with 2000 blood trypomastigotes. Animals were studied by blood culture, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular techniques (PCR and low-stringency single specific primer-PCR). Homogeneity of the T. cruzi population observed in different tissues suggests that selective tropism of the VIC strain extends only to various muscle tissues in hamsters and that reinfection is not a factor in the development of the inflammatory processes, although it may aggravate it, possibly due to an increase in tissue parasitism, which might induce autoimmune mechanisms. Reinfection did not induce selection of subpopulations in the tissue or in the blood.

  9. Activities of Psilostachyin A and Cynaropicrin against Trypanosoma cruzi In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cristiane França; Batista, Denise da Gama Jaen; De Araújo, Julianna Siciliano; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Lionel, Jessica; de Souza, Elen Mello; Hammer, Erica Ripoll; da Silva, Patricia Bernardino; De Mieri, Maria; Adams, Michael; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Hamburger, Matthias; Brun, Reto; Schühly, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo activities against Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated for two sesquiterpene lactones: psilostachyin A and cynaropicrin. Cynaropicrin had previously been shown to potently inhibit African trypanosomes in vivo, and psilostachyin A had been reported to show in vivo effects against T. cruzi, albeit in another test design. In vitro data showed that cynaropicrin was more effective than psilostachyin A. Ultrastructural alterations induced by cynaropicrin included shedding events, detachment of large portions of the plasma membrane, and vesicular bodies and large vacuoles containing membranous structures, suggestive of parasite autophagy. Acute toxicity studies showed that one of two mice died at a cynaropicrin dose of 400 mg/kg of body weight given intraperitoneally (i.p.). Although no major plasma biochemical alterations could be detected, histopathology demonstrated that the liver was the most affected organ in cynaropicrin-treated animals. Although cynaropicrin was as effective as benznidazole against trypomastigotes in vitro, the treatment (once or twice a day) of T. cruzi-infected mice (up to 50 mg/kg/day cynaropicrin) did not suppress parasitemia or protect against mortality induced by the Y and Colombiana strains. Psilostachyin A (0.5 to 50 mg/kg/day given once a day) was not effective in the acute model of T. cruzi infection (Y strain), reaching 100% animal mortality. Our data demonstrate that although it is very promising against African trypanosomes, cynaropicrin does not show efficacy compared to benznidazole in acute mouse models of T. cruzi infection. PMID:23939901

  10. Growth hormones therapy in immune response against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Frare, Eduardo Osório; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Caetano, Leony Cristina; Caldeira, Jerri C; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; Prado, José Clóvis do

    2010-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is an important hypophyseal hormone that is primarily involved in body growth and metabolism. In mammals, control of Trypanosoma cruzi parasitism during the acute phase of infection is considered to be critically dependent on direct macrophage activation by cytokines. To explore the possibility that GH might be effective in the treatment of Chagas' disease, we investigated its effects on the course of T. cruzi infection in rats, focusing our analyses on its influences on parasitemia, NO, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma concentration and on histopathological alterations and parasite burden in heart tissue. T. cruzi-infected male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally treated with 5 ng/10 g body weight/day of GH. Animals treated with GH showed a significant reduction in the number of blood trypomastigotes during the acute phase of infection compared with untreated animals (P<0.05). For all experimental days (7, 14 and 21 post infection) of the acute phase, infected and GH treated animals reached higher concentrations of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and nitric oxide as compared to untreated and infected counterparts (P<0.05) Histopathological observations of heart tissue revealed that GH administration also resulted in fewer and smaller amastigote burdens, and less inflammatory infiltrate and tissue disorganization, indicating a reduced parasitism of this tissue. These results show that GH can be considered as an immunomodulator substance for controlling parasite replication and combined with the current drug used may represent in the future a new therapeutic tool to reduce the harmful effects of Chagas' disease.

  11. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL BIOMARKERS AS INTEGRATORS OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANT EXPOSURE AND EFFECTS IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Histopathology can be an extremely useful tool for assessing effects of chemical exposure in fish at the level of the individual. Although somewhat qualitative, the histopathological approach is especially valuable because observed lesions represent an integration of cumulative e...

  12. Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi telomerase.

    PubMed

    Campelo, Riward; Galindo, Maria Mercedes; Ramirez, Jose Luis

    2011-12-01

    High telomerase activity is always associated with actively dividing cells, however the detection of this activity in dividing Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi cells has always been disappointingly low. Recently, we have found that Leishmania major telomerase activity can be activated by heat, which combined with dilutions of the nuclear extracts produced an increase in activity comparable to cancer cells. Here we examined whether T. cruzi telomerase shares the same physicochemical properties of primer specificity and overall features of the L. major. Our studies revealed that no telomerase inhibitory factors were present in the nuclear lysates of T. cruzi however the enzyme was activated by heat and was very resilient to heat denaturation. We also showed the extension primer specificity, susceptibility to RNase-A and RNase-H digestion, and the effect of telomerase inhibitors.

  13. [Histopathological meniscus diagnostic].

    PubMed

    Fisseler-Eckhoff, A; Müller, K-M

    2009-06-01

    Menisci fulfill many functions within the complex biomechanics of the knee joint. In the case of meniscus lesions, sparing arthroscopic resections and operative refixation are the treatments of choice. With regard to diagnostics, this means that in general terms, the histopathologic diagnostics are carried out on detached meniscus fragments of between 5 mm and 2 cm in size. An experienced pathologist's knowledge of physiologically possible cellular and fibrous histological meniscus damage, as opposed to nonphysiological change regarded as normal with respect to age, is essential during a diagnostic meniscus evaluation. The clinician expects clear statements from the pathologist regarding the severity of previous or secondary degenerative meniscus damage, the age and type of traumatic tears, and appraisal of the relationship between trauma and meniscus damage from an insurance point of view. Close cooperation between the clinician and the pathologist allows for fast and unambiguous correlation of anamnesis, the clinical picture, and morphological reporting so that cases involving insurance problems - which are numerous, often long-term, and often unsatisfactory - can be clarified quickly.

  14. Immunological response to re-infections with clones of the Colombian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi with different degrees of virulence: influence on pathological features during chronic infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Marcos Lazaro da Silva; Morais, Isa Rita Brito; Andrade, Sonia Gumes

    2015-01-01

    Re-infections with Trypanosoma cruzi are an aggravating factor for Chagas disease morbidity. The Colombian strain of T. cruzi represents multiclonal populations formed by clonally propagating organisms with different tropisms and degrees of virulence. In the present study, the influence of successive inoculations with clones of the Colombian strain, exhibiting different degrees of virulence, on chronic myocarditis and the humoral and cellular immune responses (Col-C1 high virulence, Col-C8 medium virulence and Col-C5 low virulence) were demonstrated. Mice from three groups with a single infection were evaluated during the acute (14th-30th day) and chronic phases for 175 days. An immunofluorescence assay, ELISA and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) cutaneous test were also performed. Mice with a triple infection were studied on the 115th-175th days following first inoculation. The levels of IgM and IgG2a were higher in the animals with a triple infection. DTH showed a higher intensity in the inflammatory infiltrate based on the morphometric analysis during a 48 h period of the triple infection and at 24 h with a single infection. The histopathology of the heart demonstrated significant exacerbation of cardiac inflammatory lesions confirmed by the morphometric test. The humoral responses indicate a reaction to the triple infection, even with clones of the same strain. PMID:25946153

  15. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL BIOMARKERS AS INTEGRATORS OF ANTHROPOGENIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Histopathology is an extremely useful tool for assessing effects of exposure to stressors at the level of the individual. Even though the histopathological approach is somewhat qualitative, it is very valuable because the observed lesions represent an integration of cumulative e...

  16. Blood viscosity changes in experimentally Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rats.

    PubMed

    Berra, H H; Piaggio, E; Revelli, S S; Luquita, A

    2005-01-01

    Microcirculatory alterations would explain focal lesions found in Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection induces host blood properties modifications and defensive responses capable of producing blood hyperviscosity, an ischemic risk factor able to affect microvascular blood flow. We studied whole blood viscosity (eta(b)) and plasmatic and cellular factors influencing it in rats, 7 and 14 days after experimental infection with T. cruzi. Increased plasma viscosity (eta(p)) was found in infected versus control rats and it was correlated with high blood parasite levels at 7 days and enhanced gamma-globulin fraction concentration at 14 days. The hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and eta(b) were higher in 14 days infected rats vs. 7 days and control animals. Also, electron microscopy observation showed morphological changes in red blood cells (RBC) at 7 and 14 days post-infection, with increased proportion of echinocyte and stomatocyte shapes transformation. In our rat model of Chagas' disease, BPL, increased plasmatic protein concentration, enhanced MCV and RBC shapes transformation would determine blood hyperviscosity, cause of microvascular blood flow abnormalities.

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a review with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Hemmige, Vagish; Tanowitz, Herbert; Sethi, Aisha

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease, an infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by the Reduuvid insect vector, remains a major cause of morbidity in Central and South America over a century after its discovery in 1909. Though major advances in preventing the spread of this disease have been made in recent decades, millions of individuals remain chronically infected due to prior exposure to T. cruzi and are at risk for future complications from the disease. Dermatologic manifestations of acute infection may include localized swelling at the site of inoculation (chagoma), conjunctivitis (Romaña’s sign), and a generalized morbilliform eruption (schizotrypanides). Reactivation of quiescent infection in immunocompromised hosts due to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or organ transplantation can present with fever and skin lesions including panniculitis. The wide-spread emigration of chronic carriers of T. cruzi to North America, Europe, and Australia makes it imperative that dermatologists worldwide be familiar with this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22515575

  18. Vitiligo - Part 2 - classification, histopathology and treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Reichert Faria, Adriane; Tarlé, Roberto Gomes; Dellatorre, Gerson; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Silva de Castro, Caio Cesar

    2014-01-01

    In an unprecedented effort in the field of vitiligo, a global consensus resulted on a suggested new classification protocol for the disease. The main histopathological finding in vitiligo is the total absence of functioning melanocytes in the lesions, while the inflammatory cells most commonly found on the edges of the lesions are CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Physical and pharmacological treatment strategies aim to control the autoimmune damage and stimulate melanocyte migration from the unaffected edges of lesions and the outer hair follicle root sheath to the affected skin; moreover, surgical treatments can be combined with topical and physical treatments. PMID:25184918

  19. Histopathology of laser skin resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Sharon L.; Baldwin, Bonnie; Chi, Eric; Ellard, Jeff; Schwartz, Jon A.

    1997-05-01

    Pulsed carbon-dioxide laser skin resurfacing is a purportedly 'non-thermal' procedure enjoying wide application as a cosmetic treatment for skin wrinkles. Treatment success has been based on clinical assessments of skin smoothness. Skin lesions (1 cm2) created by one, two or three superimposed carbon-dioxide laser passes were placed on the backs of 28 'fuzzy' Harlan Sprague Dawley rats. The variable laser irradiation parameters included measured energies ranging from 112 to 387/pulse with pulse widths of 65 and 125 microseconds and a repetition rate of 8 Hz. The square, flat laser beam measured 3 mm2 at the focal point. The lesions were collected from 0 to 10 days after treatment for qualitative and quantitative histopathology. Thermal damage and treatment effect tended to increase in severity and, to a lesser extent, depth with increased delivery parameters. In acute lesions, the vacuolated and fragmented, desiccated and thermally coagulated epidermis was partially removed exposing the underlying thermally coagulated dermal collagen and cells. Epidermal and dermal necrosis and slough occurred between 24 to 72 hours after treatment. Epithelial regeneration originated from the adnexa and the lesion edges. Dermal fibrous scar formation began at 5 days below the regenerated epidermis and became more prominent at 7 and 10 days.

  20. Epidemiology of American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos, Carlos L.; Cajal, Silvana P.; Juarez, Marisa; Marco, Jorge D.; Alberti D'Amato, Anahí M.; Cayo, Melina; Torrejón, Irma; Cimino, Rubén O.; Diosque, Patricio; Nasser, Julio R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endemic areas of tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) in Salta, Argentina, present some overlap zones with the geographical distribution of Chagas disease, with mixed infection cases being often detected. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude of Leishmania sp. infection and potential associated risk factors, the serologic prevalence of T. cruzi, and the presence of T. cruzi-Leishmania sp. mixed infection in a region of the northwest of Argentina. Methods. Cross-sectional studies were conducted to detect TL prevalence and T. cruzi seroprevalence. A case-control study was conducted to examine leishmaniasis risk factors. Results. Prevalence of TL was 0.17%, seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection was 9.73%, and mixed infection proportion—within the leishmaniasic patients group—was 16.67%. The risk factors associated with TL transmission were sex, age, exposure to bites at work, staying outdoors more than 10 hours/day, bathing in the river, and living with people who had lesions or were infected during the study. Discussion. The endemic pattern of TL seems to involve exposure of patients to vectors in wild as well as peridomestic environment. Cases of T. cruzi infection are apparently due to migration. Therefore, a careful epidemiological surveillance is necessary due to the contraindication of antimonial administration to chagasic patients. PMID:27777950

  1. Morphea Simulating Paucibacillary Leprosy Clinically and Histopathologically

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, José Saulo Torres; Cavalcanti, Marília Lopes; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Pires, Claudia Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Clinically and histopathologically paucibacillary leprosy shows similar features with initial morphea. In this case we report a 24 yr-old male patient who presented to our dermatology department with diagnosed paucibacillary leprosy by his local dermatologist, and confirmed by perineurovascular lymphocytic infiltrate in the histopathological exam. On physical examination we found new plaque lesions that were suggestive of morphea with alteration of sensitivity. A new biopsy was performed showing sclerotic superficial dermis with thickening of the collagen bundles in deep dermis and linear arrays lymphocytic infiltrate between the collagen bundles that confirm the diagnosis of morphea. PMID:23372229

  2. Flat warts undergoing involution: histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Berman, A; Winkelmann, R K

    1977-09-01

    Patients with multiple flat warts were observed during the period of involution, shortly before regression of the warts. The histopathological process was characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration around subpapillary blood vessels, exocytosis of mononuclear cells into the epidermis, and a spectrum of degenerative epidermal changes that culminated in focal areas of necrosis within the epidermis. Lesions near the end stage of involution did not show the histopathologic features of flat warts. The mononuclear cell-associated injury to the epidermis resembles that seen in delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity responses and suggests that regression of flat warts may be due to a cell-mediated rejection reaction.

  3. Protein geranylgeranyltransferase-I of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kohei; Gillespie, John R.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (PGGT-I) and protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) occur in many eukaryotic cells. Both consist of two subunits, the common αsubunit and a distinct β subunit. In the gene database of protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a putative protein that consists of 401 amino acids with ∼20% amino acid sequence identity to the PGGT-I β of other species was identified, cloned, and characterized. Multiple sequence alignments show that the T. cruzi ortholog contains all three of the zinc-binding residues and several residues uniquely conserved in the β subunit of PGGT-I. Co-expression of this protein and the α subunit of T. cruzi PFT in Sf9 insect cells yielded a dimeric protein that forms a tight complex selectively with [3H]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, indicating a key characteristic of a functional PGGT-I. Recombinant T. cruzi PGGT-I ortholog showed geranylgeranyltransferase activity with distinct specificity toward the C-terminal CaaX motif of protein substrates compared to that of the mammalian PGGT-I and T. cruzi PFT. Most of the CaaX-containing proteins with X=Leu are good substrates of T. cruzi PGGT-I, and those with X=Met are substrates for both T. cruzi PFT and PGGT-I, whereas unlike mammalian PGGT-I, those with X=Phe are poor substrates for T. cruzi PGGT-I. Several candidates for T. cruzi PGGT-I or PFT substrates containing the C-terminal CaaX motif are found in the T. cruzi gene database. Among five C-terminal peptides of those tested, a peptide of a Ras-like protein ending with CVLL was selectively geranylgeranylated by T. cruzi PGGT-I. Other peptides with CTQQ (Tcj2 DNAJ protein), CAVM (TcPRL-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase), CHFM (a small GTPase like protein), and CQLF (TcRho1 GTPase) were specific substrates for T. cruzi PFT but not for PGGT-I. The mRNA and protein of the T. cruzi PGGT-I β ortholog were detected in three life-cycle stages of T. cruzi. Cytosol fractions from

  4. Nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Schenkman, Sergio; Pascoalino, Bruno dos Santos; Nardelli, Sheila C

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nucleus in living organisms characterizes the Eukaryote domain. The nucleus compartmentalizes the genetic material surrounded by a double membrane called nuclear envelope. The nucleus has been observed since the advent of the light microscope, and sub-compartments such as nucleoli, diverse nuclear bodies and condensed chromosomes have been later recognized, being part of highly organized and dynamic structure. The significance and function of such organization has increased with the understanding of transcription, replication, DNA repair, recombination processes. It is now recognized as consequence of adding complexity and regulation in more complex eukaryotic cells. Here we provide a description of the actual stage of knowledge of the nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi. As an early divergent eukaryote, it presents unique and/or reduced events of DNA replication, transcription and repair as well as RNA processing and transport to the cytosol. Nevertheless, it shows peculiar structure changes accordingly to the cell cycle and stage of differentiation. T. cruzi proliferates only as epimastigote and amastigote stages, and when these forms differentiate in trypomastigote forms, their cell cycle is arrested. This arrested stage is capable of invading mammalian cells and of surviving harsh conditions, such as the gut of the insect vector and mammalian macrophages. Transcription and replication decrease during transformation in trypomastigotes implicating large alterations in the nuclear structure. Recent evidences also suggest that T. cruzi nucleus respond to oxidative and nutritional stresses. Due to the phylogenetic proximity with other well-known trypanosomes, such as Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, they are expected to have similar nuclear organization, although differences are noticed due to distinct life cycles, cellular organizations and the specific adaptations for surviving in different host environments. Therefore, the general

  5. [Histopathological evaluation of the meniscus].

    PubMed

    Fisseler-Eckhoff, A; Müller, K-M

    2011-05-01

    Menisci fulfill many functions within the complex biomechanics of the knee joint. In the case of meniscus lesions, sparing arthroscopic resection and surgical refixation are the treatments of choice. In terms of diagnosis, this means in general that histopathologic diagnostics are carried out on detached meniscus fragments of between 5 mm and 2 cm in size. A good knowledge of physiologically possible cellular and fibrous histological meniscus damage, as opposed to nonphysiological change regarded as normal with respect to age, is essential for diagnostic meniscus evaluation. The clinician expects clear statements from the pathologist regarding the severity of previous or secondary degenerative meniscus damage, the age and type of traumatic tears, and an appraisal of the relationship between trauma and meniscus damage from an insurance point of view. Close cooperation between the clinician and the pathologist allows for a fast and unambiguous correlation of anamnesis, the clinical picture, and morphological reporting such that problematic insurance cases can be clarified quickly.

  6. [Histopathological differential diagnosis in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Fociani, P; Carsana, L; Zerbi, P; Ferri, A; Sampietro, G M; Vago, G

    2003-01-01

    In front of the suspicious diagnosis of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the pathologist must have adequate and complete clinical, anamnestic, instrumental informations and, if possible, the previous histopathologic examinations. This is necessary because: the diagnosis of IBD is made with exclusion criteria, different pathologic entities may have similar macroscopic and microscopic findings and the characteristic lesions are often present in little number. The authors consider in this paper the problem of the differential diagnosis of IBD.

  7. Cutaneous histopathology of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kao, G F; Evancho, C D; Ioffe, O; Lowitt, M H; Dumler, J S

    1997-11-01

    The dermatologic diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is often presumptive; the clinical presentation includes skin rash and febrile illness with or without a clear history of tick bite. The characteristic cutaneous manifestations include a generalized skin eruption with purpuric, blanching or non-blanching macules and papules usually involving the extremities. Although skin biopsies are often performed to confirm the diagnosis, the spectrum of cutaneous histopathology in RMSF has not been well described. We studied a series of 26 cases of RMSF, of which 10 were surgical specimens and 16 were autopsies. The microscopic changes were correlated with the duration of illness. The main histopathologic feature was lymphohistiocytic capillaritis and venulitis with extravasation of erythrocytes, edema, predominantly perivascular and some interstitial infiltrate. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) with neutrophilic infiltrate and nuclear dust was seen in 11 of 15 (73%) specimens from involved skin. These lesions with LCV also showed notable epidermal change including basal layer vacuolar degeneration with mild dermoepidermal interface lymphocytic exocytosis. Six lesions with LCV displayed focal fibrin thrombi and capillary wall necrosis. Apoptotic keratinocytes were noted in 3 lesions with LCV. Subepidermal blister was observed in the skin lesion of an autopsied patient with LCV changes. Another lesion of a fatal case with LCV also contained features of acute neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis. Focal small nerve twig inflammation was noted in a third autopsy case with LCV. Plasma cells were seen in 6 of 34 specimens (18%); and eosinophils were observed in 3 (9%). The subcutaneous fat contained a mild perivascular inflammation and one case revealed focal lobular neutrophilic inflammation. Immunohistologic (IH) staining using polyclonal rabbit anti-Rickettsia rickettsii demonstrated positive staining of the organisms in the affected endothelial cells in all 12 cases

  8. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define the histopathologic features of eyes in which a pathologic diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy had been made in the years 1951 through 1998. METHODS: The following data were documented: age of patient, race, sex, source of tissue, cause of death, clinical history, interval from loss of vision to death, enucleation, exenteration, and biopsy. The histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy were the presence of localized ischemic edema, cavernous degeneration, or an area of atrophy located superior or inferior in the optic nerve. Cases with history of abrupt loss of vision were combined with reports from the literature to construct a time table of histopathologic features and associated conditions. RESULTS: Ischemic optic neuropathy was present in 193 eyes. There were 88 females and 65 males. The average age was 71.6 years. Ischemic edema without (early) and with (later) gitter macrophages was present in 26 (13.5%). Cavernous degeneration was present in 69 nerves (36%). Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) was present in 37 cavernous lesions 1 month or longer after loss of vision. Cavernous lesions were seen in 3 eyes in which peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer hemorrhage had been observed prior to death. Atrophic lesions, the most common pattern, were observed in 133 optic nerves (66.8%). More than 1 ischemic lesion was seen in 38 optic nerves (19.7%). Bilateral ischemic lesions were seen in 50 (35.2%) of 142 paired eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic optic nerve lesions are initially acellular and later show macrophage infiltration. Cavernous lesions with MPS are present 4 weeks or longer after vision loss. The location of MPS posteriorly and along the internal margin suggests that MPS is produced at the edges of lesions. Progressive vision loss in ischemic optic neuropathy may be secondary to compression of intact nerve from ischemic edema and cavernous swelling, or a second ischemic lesion. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5

  9. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infections.

    PubMed

    Chamond, N; Coatnoan, N; Minoprio, P

    2002-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas' disease, is transmitted to man and other mammals by triatominae insects, or 'kissing bugs'. Since its discovery in 1909, by Carlos Chagas, this parasite has been the object of several publications in the domains of immunology, cellular biology and of control gene organization, regulation and expression. Although much progress has been made concerning prophylaxis of Chagas' disease, particularly vector eradication, additional cases of infection and disease development still occur every day throughout the world. Whilst infection was largely limited in the past to vector transmission in endemic areas of Latin America, its impact has increased in terms of congenital and blood transmission, transplants and recrudescence following immunosuppressive states. Reports on new insect vectors adapted to the parasite and domestic animals infected in more developed countries, emphasize the continuing worldwide public health issue. Therapy against this parasite is limited and cure is subjected to several criteria, such as susceptibility of the parasite strain, age of the host and stage of the disease. The ability of Trypanosoma cruzi to induce important and various host immune system dysfunctions makes the development of effective vaccines a laborious and complex task. These considerations strengthen the latent significance of Chagas' disease and encourage the search for new preventive procedures and the research on rational vaccines.

  10. Effect of treatment with cyclophosphamide in low doses upon the onset of delayed type hypersensitivity in mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi: involvement of heart interstitial dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Thé, Torriceli Souza; Portella, Renata Siqueira; Guerreiro, Marcos Lázaro; Andrade, Sonia Gumes

    2013-09-01

    Acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi results in intense myocarditis, which progresses to a chronic, asymptomatic indeterminate form. The evolution toward this chronic cardiac form occurs in approximately 30% of all cases of T. cruzi infection. Suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) has been proposed as a potential explanation of the indeterminate form. We investigated the effect of cyclophosphamide (CYCL) treatment on the regulatory mechanism of DTH and the participation of heart interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs) in this process using BALB/c mice chronically infected with T. cruzi. One group was treated with CYCL (20 mg/kg body weight) for one month. A DTH skin test was performed by intradermal injection of T. cruzi antigen (3 mg/mL) in the hind-footpad and measured the skin thickness after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The skin test revealed increased thickness in antigen-injected footpads, which was more evident in the mice treated with CYCL than in those mice that did not receive treatment. The thickened regions were characterised by perivascular infiltrates and areas of necrosis. Intense lesions of the myocardium were present in three/16 cases and included large areas of necrosis. Morphometric evaluation of lymphocytes showed a predominance of TCD8 cells. Heart IDCs were immunolabelled with specific antibodies (CD11b and CD11c) and T. cruzi antigens were detected using a specific anti-T. cruzi antibody. Identification of T. cruzi antigens, sequestered in these cells using specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies was done, showing a significant increase in the number of these cells in treated mice. These results indicate that IDCs participate in the regulatory mechanisms of DTH response to T. cruzi infection.

  11. First finding of Trypanosoma cruzi II in vampire bats from a district free of domestic vector-borne transmission in Northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Argibay, Hernán D; Orozco, M Marcela; Cardinal, M Victoria; Rinas, Miguel A; Arnaiz, María; Mena Segura, Carlos; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2016-09-01

    Establishing the putative links between sylvatic and domestic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is of public health relevance. We conducted three surveys to assess T. cruzi infection in wild mammals from a rural and a preserved area in Misiones Province, Northeastern Argentina, which had recently been declared free of vector- and blood-borne transmission of human T. cruzi infection. A total of 200 wild mammals were examined by xenodiagnosis (XD) and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR). The overall prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 8%. Nine (16%) of 57 Didelphis albiventris opossums and two (7%) of 29 Desmodus rotundus vampire bats were positive by both XD and kDNA-PCR. Additionally, one D. rotundus positive for T. cruzi by kDNA-PCR tested positive by satellite-DNA-PCR (SAT-DNA-PCR). The T. cruzi-infected bats were captured indoors and in the yard of a vacant dwelling. All D. albiventris were infected with TcI and both XD-positive D. rotundus by TcII. Fifty-five opossum cubs within the marsupium were negative by XD. The mean infectiousness to the vector was 62% in D. albiventris and 50% in D. rotundus. Mice experimentally infected with a parasite isolate from a vampire bat displayed lesions typically caused by T. cruzi. Our study documents the presence of the genotype TcII in a sylvatic host for the first time in Argentina, and the occurrence of two transmission cycles of T. cruzi in a district free of domestic vector-borne transmission.

  12. Clinical and Histopathological Investigation of Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Nam Kyung; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common epidermal tumors of the skin. However, only a few large-scale clinicohistopathological investigations have been conducted on SK or on the possible correlation between histopathological SK subtype and location. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and histopathological features of a relatively large number of cases of diagnosed SK. Methods Two hundred and seventy-one pathology slides of skin tissue from patients with clinically diagnosed SK and 206 cases of biopsy-proven SK were analyzed. The biopsy-proven cases of SK were assessed for histopathological subclassification. The demographic, clinical, and histopathological data of the patients were collected for analysis of associated factors. Results The most frequent histopathological subtype was the acanthotic type, followed by mixed, hyperkeratotic, melanoacanthoma, clonal, irritated, and adenoid types; an unexpectedly high percentage (9.2%) of the melanoacanthoma variant was observed. The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites than in sun-protected sites (p=0.028). Premalignant and malignant entities together represented almost one-quarter (24.2%) of the clinicopathological mismatch cases (i.e., mismatch between the clinical and histopathological diagnoses). Regarding the location of SK development, the frequency of mismatch for the sun-exposed areas was significantly higher than that for sun-protected areas (p=0.043). Conclusion The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites. Biopsy sampling should be performed for lesions situated in sun-exposed areas to exclude other premalignant or malignant diseases. PMID:27081260

  13. Bilateral lacrimal caruncle lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuta; Takai, Yoshiko; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of a lesion on the medial lacrimal canthus of both eyes. He had a history of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, i.e., pANCA-positive interstitial pneumonia. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging excluded space occupying lesions, and laboratory testing excluded thyroid-related diseases. The masses were excised, and histopathological examinations showed sebaceous gland hyperplasia and inflammatory changes around the gland. In addition, the specimen from the left eye showed a retention cyst possibly caused by an infection. It was also possible that the use of steroid was involved in the development of the lesions. A relationship between the ANCA and the lesions was not completely eliminated. PMID:28303065

  14. Histopathologic lesions associated with crude oil exposure in sea otters. Marine mammal study 6-10. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resources damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, T.P.; Harris, R.K.; Moeller, R.B.; Pletcher, J.M.; Haebler, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, sea otters (Enhydra lutris) that appeared oiled, were in danger of becoming oiled, or were behaving abnormally were captured and taken to rehabilitation centers. Oil exposure was assessed by visual examination on arrival at the centers. Tissues from 51 oiled sea otters and from 6 unoiled sea otters that died in rehabilitation centers were examined histologically. Histologic examinations were performed on tissues from 5 sea otters found dead with external oil present shortly after the spill. Necropsies were performed on 214 sea otters that had been collected and frozen in the period following the oil spill. Tissues from 6 apparently normal sea otters collected from an area not affected by the oil spill were examined histologically, and none of these lesions were found. We conclude that pulmonary interstitial emphysema, gastric erosion and hemorrhage, centrilobular hepatic necrosis, and hepatic and renal lipidosis were associated with exposure to crude oil in sea otters.

  15. Overview of DNA Repair in Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Rajão, Matheus Andrade; Nascimento de Aguiar, Pedro Henrique; Vieira-da-Rocha, João Pedro; Machado, Carlos Renato; Furtado, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of DNA lesions arise due to environmental agents, normal cellular metabolism, or intrinsic weaknesses in the chemical bonds of DNA. Diverse cellular mechanisms have evolved to maintain genome stability, including mechanisms to repair damaged DNA, to avoid the incorporation of modified nucleotides, and to tolerate lesions (translesion synthesis). Studies of the mechanisms related to DNA metabolism in trypanosomatids have been very limited. Together with recent experimental studies, the genome sequencing of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania major, three related pathogens with different life cycles and disease pathology, has revealed interesting features of the DNA repair mechanism in these protozoan parasites, which will be reviewed here. PMID:20976268

  16. Potential Role of Carvedilol in the Cardiac Immune Response Induced by Experimental Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Horta, Aline Luciano; Leite, Ana Luisa Junqueira; Paula Costa, G.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes a cardiac infection characterized by an inflammatory imbalance that could become the inciting factor of the illness. To this end, we evaluated the role of carvedilol, a beta-blocker with potential immunomodulatory properties, on the immune response in C57BL/6 mice infected with VL-10 strain of T. cruzi in the acute phase. Animals (n = 40) were grouped: (i) not infected, (ii) infected, (iii) infected + carvedilol, and (iv) not infected + carvedilol. We analyzed parameters related to parasitemia, plasma levels of TNF, IL-10, and CCL2, and cardiac histopathology after the administration of carvedilol for 30 days. We did not observe differences in the maximum peaks of parasitemia in the day of their detection among the groups. The plasma TNF was elevated at 60 days of infection in mice treated or not with carvedilol. However, we observed a decreased CCL2 level and increased IL-10 levels in those infected animals treated with carvedilol, which impacted the reduction of the inflammatory infiltration in cardiac tissue. For this experimental model, carvedilol therapy was not able to alter the levels of circulating parasites but modulates the pattern of CCL2 and IL-10 mediators when the VL10 strain of T. cruzi was used in C57BL6 mice. PMID:28377930

  17. Vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli induces resistance of guinea pigs to virulent Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Basso, B; Moretti, E; Fretes, R

    2014-01-15

    Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America, is spread in natural environments through animal reservoirs, including marsupials, mice and guinea pigs. Farms breeding guinea pigs for food are located in some Latin-American countries with consequent risk of digestive infection. The aim of this work was to study the effect of vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli in guinea pigs challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi. Animals were vaccinated with fixated epimastigotes of T. rangeli, emulsified with saponin. Controls received only PBS. Before being challenged with T. cruzi, parasitemia, survival rates and histological studies were performed. The vaccinated guinea pigs revealed significantly lower parasitemia than controls (p<0.0001-0.01) and a discrete lymphomonocytic infiltrate in cardiac and skeletal muscles was present. In the chronic phase, the histological view was normal. In contrast, control group revealed amastigote nests and typical histopathological alterations compatible with chagasic myocarditis, endocarditis and pericarditis. These results, together with previous works in our laboratory, show that T. rangeli induces immunoprotection in three species of animals: mice, guinea pigs and dogs. The development of vaccines for use in animals, like domestic dogs and guinea pigs in captivity, opens up new opportunities for preventive tools, and could reduce the risk of infection with T. cruzi in the community.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection through the Oral Route Promotes a Severe Infection in Mice: New Disease Form from an Old Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-de-Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva-dos-Santos, Danielle; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; de Santana-van-Vliet, Eliane; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Roggero, Eduardo; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carla Eponina; Jurberg, José; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; de Meis, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Oral transmission of Chagas disease has been documented in Latin American countries. Nevertheless, significant studies on the pathophysiology of this form of infection are largely lacking. The few studies investigating oral route infection disregard that inoculation in the oral cavity (Oral infection, OI) or by gavage (Gastrointestinal infection, GI) represent different infection routes, yet both show clear-cut parasitemia and heart parasitism during the acute infection. Herein, BALB/c mice were subjected to acute OI or GI infection using 5x104 culture-derived Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. OI mice displayed higher parasitemia and mortality rates than their GI counterparts. Heart histopathology showed larger areas of infiltration in the GI mice, whereas liver lesions were more severe in the OI animals, accompanied by higher Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase serum contents. A differential cytokine pattern was also observed because OI mice presented higher pro-inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF) serum levels than GI animals. Real-time PCR confirmed a higher TNF, IFN-γ, as well as IL-10 expression in the cardiac tissue from the OI group compared with GI. Conversely, TGF-β and IL-17 serum levels were greater in the GI animals. Immunolabeling revealed macrophages as the main tissue source of TNF in infected mice. The high mortality rate observed in the OI mice paralleled the TNF serum rise, with its inhibition by an anti-TNF treatment. Moreover, differences in susceptibility between GI versus OI mice were more clearly related to the host response than to the effect of gastric pH on parasites, since infection in magnesium hydroxide-treated mice showed similar results. Overall, the present study provides conclusive evidence that the initial site of parasite entrance critically affects host immune response and disease outcome. In light of the occurrence of oral Chagas disease outbreaks, our results raise important implications in terms of the current

  19. Bestatin Induces Specific Changes in Trypanosoma cruzi Dipeptide Pool

    PubMed Central

    Creek, Darren J.; Faral-Tello, Paula; Barrett, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases and peptidases in Trypanosoma cruzi are considered potential targets for antichagasic chemotherapy. We monitored changes in low-mass metabolites in T. cruzi epimastigotes treated with bestatin, a dipeptide metalloaminopeptidase inhibitor. After treatment, multiple dipeptides were shown to be increased, confirming in situ inhibition of the leucine aminopeptidase of T. cruzi (LAPTc) and probably other peptidases. PMID:25712359

  20. Concomitant Benznidazole and Suramin Chemotherapy in Mice Infected with a Virulent Strain of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eliziária C; Novaes, Rômulo D; Cupertino, Marli C; Bastos, Daniel S S; Klein, Raphael C; Silva, Eduardo A M; Fietto, Juliana L R; Talvani, André; Bahia, Maria T; Oliveira, Leandro L

    2015-10-01

    Although suramin (Sur) is suggested as a potential drug candidate in the management of Chagas disease, this issue has not been objectively tested. In this study, we examined the applicability of concomitant treatment with benznidazole (Bz) and suramin in mice infected with a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Eighty 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were equally randomized in eight groups: (i) noninfected mice (negative control) and mice infected with T. cruzi Y strain receiving (ii) no treatment (positive control), (iii) Bz, 100 mg/kg of body weight per day, (iv) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, and (v to viii) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, combined with Bz, 100, 50, 25, or 5 mg/kg/day. Bz was administered by gavage, and Sur was administered intraperitoneally. Sur dramatically increased the parasitemia, cardiac content of parasite DNA, inflammation, oxidative tissue damage, and mortality. In response to high parasitic load in cardiac tissue, Sur stimulated the immune system in a manner typical of the acute phase of Chagas disease, increasing tissue levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducing a preferential IgG2a anti-T. cruzi serum pattern. When Sur and Bz were combined, the infection severity was attenuated, showing a dose-dependent Bz response. Sur therapy had a more harmful effect on the host than on the parasite and reduced the efficacy of Bz against T. cruzi infection. Considering that Sur drastically reinforced the infection evolution, potentiating the inflammatory process and the severity of cardiac lesions, the in vivo findings contradicted the in vitro anti-T. cruzi potential described for this drug.

  1. How Trypanosoma cruzi handles cell cycle arrest promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zuma, Aline Araujo; Mendes, Isabela Cecília; Reignault, Lissa Catherine; Elias, Maria Carolina; de Souza, Wanderley; Machado, Carlos Renato; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2014-02-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately 8 million people in Latin America. This parasite contains a single nucleus and a kinetoplast, which harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). DNA topoisomerases act during replication, transcription and repair and modulate DNA topology by reverting supercoiling in the DNA double-strand. In this work, we evaluated the effects promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that promotes protozoan proliferation impairment, cell cycle arrest, ultrastructure alterations and DNA lesions in epimastigotes of T. cruzi. The results showed that inhibition of cell proliferation was reversible only at the lowest drug concentration (1μM) used. The unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin and mitochondrion swelling were the main ultrastructural modifications observed. Inhibition of parasite proliferation also led to cell cycle arrest, which was most likely caused by nuclear DNA lesions. Following camptothecin treatment, some of the cells restored their DNA, whereas others entered early apoptosis but did not progress to late apoptosis, indicating that the protozoa stay alive in a "senescence-like" state. This programmed cell death may be associated with a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these results indicate that the inhibition of T. cruzi proliferation is related to events capable of affecting cell cycle, DNA organization and mitochondrial activity.

  2. Detection of soluble antigen and DNA of Trypanosoma cruzi in urine is independent of renal injury in the guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E; Gilman, Robert H; Yauri, Verónica; Cok, Jaime; Angulo, Noelia; Escalante, Hermes; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Chagas disease in humans is generally limited to the detection of specific antibodies. Detection of T. cruzi antigens in urine has been reported previously, but is not used in the diagnosis. In this study, soluble T. cruzi antigens and DNA were detected in urine samples and were associated with kidney injury and systemic detection of the parasite. We used 72 guinea pigs infected with T. cruzi Y strain and 18 non-infected guinea pigs. Blood, kidney, heart and urine samples were collected during the acute phase and chronic phase. Urine samples were concentrated by ultrafiltration. Antigens were detected by Western Blot using a polyclonal antibody against trypomastigote excretory-secretory antigen (TESA). T. cruzi DNA was detected by PCR using primers 121/122 and TcZ1/TcZ2. Levels of T. cruzi DNA in blood, heart and kidney were determined by quantitative PCR. T. cruzi antigens (75 kDa, 80 kDa, 120 kDa, 150 kDa) were detected in the acute phase (67.5%) and the chronic phase (45%). Parasite DNA in urine was detected only in the acute phase (45%). Kidney injury was characterized by high levels of proteinuria, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and urea, and some histopathological changes such as inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis and scarce parasites. The detection of antigens and DNA in urine was associated with the presence of parasite DNA in blood and heart and with high levels of parasite DNA in blood, but not with the presence of parasite in kidney or kidney injury. These results suggest that the detection of T. cruzi in urine could be improved to be a valuable method for the diagnosis of Chagas disease, particularly in congenital Chagas disease and in immunocompromised patients.

  3. Perforin-expressing cytotoxic cells contribute to chronic cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Silverio, Jaline Coutinho; de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; da Silva, Andréa Alice; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dual participation of the immune response in controlling the invader and at the same time causing tissue damage might contribute to the design of effective new vaccines and therapies for Chagas disease. Perforin, a cytolytic protein product of killer cells, is involved in resistance to acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection. However, the contribution of perforin in parasite control and chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is unclear. Perforin-positive cells were detected in the heart tissue during the acute and chronic phases of infection of C57BL/6 mice inoculated with low dose (102 parasites) of the Colombian T. cruzi strain. This protocol led to acute phase survival in both wild-type and perforin null (pfp−/−) mice lineages. During the chronic infection, parasitism and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as interleukin (IL)-4+ and, mainly, interferon (IFN)-γ+ cells were more elevated in the heart tissue of pfp−/− mice. Higher levels of circulating NO and anti-parasite immunoglobulin (Ig)G2c and IgG3, paralleled by a prominent frequency of IFN-γ+ and IL-10+ splenocytes, were present in pfp−/−-infected mice. Therefore, although the perforin-dependent pathway plays a role, it is not crucial for anti-T. cruzi immunity and acute phase survival of mice infected with a low inoculum. Further, perforin deficiency resulted in lower activity of creatine kinase-muscle brain isoform (CK-MB) isoenzyme in serum and a more restricted connexin 43 loss, both of which are markers of the cardiomyocyte lesion. Moreover, perforin deficiency hampered the development of severe electrocardiographic abnormalities. Hence, our results corroborate that perforin-bearing cytotoxic cells might contribute to cardiomyocyte lesion and heart dysfunction during chronic T. cruzi infection, shedding light on immunopathogenesis of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:19878357

  4. Deceptive Lesions of Periodontium: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Pandiar, Deepak; Pattamparambath, Manjusha; Kalathingal, Pranav Vijayan; Maliyekkal, Shameena Pallikandi; Vijay, Amol Nagrale

    2015-09-01

    Basic pathology of the common appearing diseases of the periodontium are not always common inflammatory reactions. The root cause may be malignant and metastatic lesions. Here, we present unusual causes of these common periodontal lesions. This article also stress upon the importance of histopathological examination of the surgically excised localized gingival swellings which fail to regress after conservative therapy.

  5. CD8+ T-Cells Expressing Interferon Gamma or Perforin Play Antagonistic Roles in Heart Injury in Experimental Trypanosoma Cruzi-Elicited Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cipitelli, Márcio da Costa; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    In Chagas disease, CD8+ T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8+ T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Here we explored the role of CD8+ T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8+ T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8+ T-cells segregated into IFNγ+ perforin (Pfn)neg or IFNγnegPfn+ cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8+Pfn+ cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8−/− recipients showed that the CD8+ cells from infected ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8+ cells from ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8−/− mice with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ+ cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn+ cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8+Pfn+ and CD8+IFNγ+ cells during CCC. CD8+IFNγ+ cells may exert a beneficial role, whereas CD8+Pfn+ may play a detrimental role

  6. Enlightening the Pink: Use of Confocal Microscopy in Pink Lesions.

    PubMed

    Gill, Melissa; González, Salvador

    2016-10-01

    Solitary pink lesions can pose a particular challenge to dermatologists because they may be almost or completely featureless clinically and dermoscopically, previously requiring biopsy to exclude malignancy. However, these lesions usually are not particularly challenging histopathologically. Thus, the incorporation of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy into the clinical practice, which allows for noninvasive examination of the skin at the cellular level revealing features previously seen only on histopathology, is particularly useful for this subset of clinically difficult lesions.

  7. Encephalitozoon cuniculi in rabbits: Serological screening and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Maestrini, Giovanni; Ricci, Emanuele; Cantile, Carlo; Mannella, Riccardo; Mancianti, Francesca; Paci, Gisella; D'Ascenzi, Carlo; Perrucci, Stefania

    2017-02-01

    Serological prevalence of E. cuniculi infection was assessed in 183 rabbits from central Italy. In seropositive deceased rabbits, histopathological lesions were also evaluated. Sera from 118 rabbits from 6 intensive farms, 10 rabbits from 6 family farms, 16 rabbits from a zoo, 30 rabbits from 5 research laboratories and 9 pet rabbits from 9 different owners, were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were statistically analysed. Tissue samples from brain and kidney of 10 deceased rabbits were formalin-fixed and subsequently analysed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Anti-E. cuniculi antibodies were found in 129/183 (70.5%) analysed sera. At statistical analysis, E. cuniculi seropositivity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in industrial and zoo rabbits. At histology, different degrees of pathological lesions were found in serological positive (9) deceased animals. In three rabbits deceased after showing neurological signs, the severity of the lesions was interpreted as a likely cause for their death.

  8. Murine models susceptibility to distinct Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes infection.

    PubMed

    León, Cielo M; Montilla, Marleny; Vanegas, Ricardo; Castillo, Maria; Parra, Edgar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2017-04-01

    Chagas disease is a complex zoonosis that affects around 8 million people worldwide. This pathology is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a kinetoplastid parasite that shows tremendous genetic diversity evinced in six distinct Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI) including a recent genotype named as TcBat and associated with anthropogenic bats. TcI presents a broad geographical distribution and has been associated with chronic cardiomyopathy. Recent phylogenetic studies suggest the existence of two genotypes (Domestic (TcIDom) and sylvatic TcI) within TcI. The understanding of the course of the infection in different mouse models by these two genotypes is not yet known. Therefore, we infected 126 animals (ICR-CD1, National Institute of Health (NIH) and Balb/c) with two TcIDom strains and one sylvatic strain for a follow-up period of 60 days. We quantified the parasitaemia, immune response and histopathology observing that the maximum day of parasitaemia was achieved at day 21 post-infection. Domestic strains showed higher parasitaemia than the sylvatic strain in the three mouse models; however in the survival curves Balb/c mice were less susceptible to infection compared with NIH and ICR-CD1. Our results suggest that the genetic background plays a fundamental role in the natural history of the infection and the sympatric TcI genotypes have relevant implications in disease pathogenesis.

  9. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions.

    PubMed

    González, Joaquín V; Gutiérrez, Rafael A; Keszler, Alicia; Colacino, Maria del Carmen; Alonio, Lidia V; Teyssie, Angelica R; Picconi, Maria Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Neotropical Wild Carnivores (Mammalia: Carnivora): At the Top of the T. cruzi Transmission Chain

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Fabiana Lopes; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; de Lima, Juliane Saab; Cheida, Carolina Carvalho; Lemos, Frederico Gemesio; de Azevedo, Fernanda Cavalcanti; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa; Bilac, Daniele; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Mourão, Guilherme; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Little is known on the role played by Neotropical wild carnivores in the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles. We investigated T. cruzi infection in wild carnivores from three sites in Brazil through parasitological and serological tests. The seven carnivore species examined were infected by T. cruzi, but high parasitemias detectable by hemoculture were found only in two Procyonidae species. Genotyping by Mini-exon gene, PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) and kDNA genomic targets revealed that the raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus) harbored TcI and the coatis (Nasua nasua) harbored TcI, TcII, TcIII-IV and Trypanosoma rangeli, in single and mixed infections, besides four T. cruzi isolates that displayed odd band patterns in the Mini-exon assay. These findings corroborate the coati can be a bioaccumulator of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTU) and may act as a transmission hub, a connection point joining sylvatic transmission cycles within terrestrial and arboreal mammals and vectors. Also, the odd band patterns observed in coatis’ isolates reinforce that T. cruzi diversity might be much higher than currently acknowledged. Additionally, we assembled our data with T. cruzi infection on Neotropical carnivores’ literature records to provide a comprehensive analysis of the infection patterns among distinct carnivore species, especially considering their ecological traits and phylogeny. Altogether, fifteen Neotropical carnivore species were found naturally infected by T. cruzi. Species diet was associated with T. cruzi infection rates, supporting the hypothesis that predator-prey links are important mechanisms for T. cruzi maintenance and dispersion in the wild. Distinct T. cruzi infection patterns across carnivore species and study sites were notable. Musteloidea species consistently exhibit high parasitemias in different studies which indicate their high infectivity potential. Mesocarnivores that feed on both invertebrates and mammals, including the coati, a host that can be

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in neotropical wild carnivores (Mammalia: Carnivora): at the top of the T. cruzi transmission chain.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Fabiana Lopes; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; de Lima, Juliane Saab; Cheida, Carolina Carvalho; Lemos, Frederico Gemesio; de Azevedo, Fernanda Cavalcanti; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa; Bilac, Daniele; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Mourão, Guilherme; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Little is known on the role played by Neotropical wild carnivores in the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles. We investigated T. cruzi infection in wild carnivores from three sites in Brazil through parasitological and serological tests. The seven carnivore species examined were infected by T. cruzi, but high parasitemias detectable by hemoculture were found only in two Procyonidae species. Genotyping by Mini-exon gene, PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) and kDNA genomic targets revealed that the raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus) harbored TcI and the coatis (Nasua nasua) harbored TcI, TcII, TcIII-IV and Trypanosoma rangeli, in single and mixed infections, besides four T. cruzi isolates that displayed odd band patterns in the Mini-exon assay. These findings corroborate the coati can be a bioaccumulator of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTU) and may act as a transmission hub, a connection point joining sylvatic transmission cycles within terrestrial and arboreal mammals and vectors. Also, the odd band patterns observed in coatis' isolates reinforce that T. cruzi diversity might be much higher than currently acknowledged. Additionally, we assembled our data with T. cruzi infection on Neotropical carnivores' literature records to provide a comprehensive analysis of the infection patterns among distinct carnivore species, especially considering their ecological traits and phylogeny. Altogether, fifteen Neotropical carnivore species were found naturally infected by T. cruzi. Species diet was associated with T. cruzi infection rates, supporting the hypothesis that predator-prey links are important mechanisms for T. cruzi maintenance and dispersion in the wild. Distinct T. cruzi infection patterns across carnivore species and study sites were notable. Musteloidea species consistently exhibit high parasitemias in different studies which indicate their high infectivity potential. Mesocarnivores that feed on both invertebrates and mammals, including the coati, a host that can be

  12. Pigmented lesions of the nail unit: clinical and histopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Beth S

    2010-09-01

    Probably the most common reason to perform biopsy of the nail unit is for the evaluation of irregular pigmentation, especially longitudinal melanonychia or pigmented bands. When narrow and solitary, these are usually the product of melanocytic activation/hypermelanosis, lentigines, or melanocytic nevi. Multiple pigmented bands are generally a benign finding, the result of melanocytic activation, as seen in racial pigmentation in darker-skinned patients, for example. In the context of an irregular, broad, heterogeneous or "streaky" band, the chief concern is the exclusion of subungual melanoma. Before assessing the histologic features of any such entities, it is important to understand the normal nail anatomy and melanocytic density of nail unit epithelium, as well as the type of specimen submitted, and whether it is adequate to undertake a proper histologic evaluation. The criteria for diagnosis and prognosis of melanoma of the nail unit are still evolving, and a variety of factors must be weighed in the balance to make a correct diagnosis. The importance of the clinical context cannot be overemphasized. There are also nonmelanocytic conditions to be considered that may produce worrisome nail discoloration, such as subungual hemorrhage, squamous cell carcinoma, and pigmented onychomycosis.

  13. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  14. Predominance of Trypanosoma cruzi I among Panamanian sylvatic isolates.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Franklyn; Ortega-Barría, Eduardo; Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, Jose

    2007-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is throughout Panama, which is in agreement with the widespread of the sylvatic vectors implicated in the transmission. Eco-epidemiological changes in some regions of the country have led to a successful dissemination of the palm-tree Attalea butyracea and a possible adaptation of the primary vector of Chagas' disease to human settlements. These facts might increase both vector-human contact and human infection with different potentials T. cruzi genotypes and make therefore necessary a study to disclose Panamanian T. cruzi make-up. In this study, 71 T. cruzi isolates from Rhodnius pallescens were analyzed using mini-exon gene and sequence-characterized amplified region markers. The analyzed strains were T. cruzi lineage I. This finding along with prior results indicates that T. cruzi I is the principal genotype circulating in both sylvatic and domestic/peridomestic cycles and consequently responsible for the disease in the country.

  15. Combined Treatment of Heterocyclic Analogues and Benznidazole upon Trypanosoma cruzi In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Denise da Gama Jaén; Batista, Marcos Meuser; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo; Britto, Constança Carvalho; Rodrigues, Ana Carolina Mondaine; Stephens, Chad E.; Boykin, David W.; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré Correia

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in Latin America but no vaccines or safe chemotherapeutic agents are available. Combined therapy is envisioned as an ideal approach since it may enhance efficacy by acting upon different cellular targets, may reduce toxicity and minimize the risk of drug resistance. Therefore, we investigated the activity of benznidazole (Bz) in combination with the diamidine prodrug DB289 and in combination with the arylimidamide DB766 upon T. cruzi infection in vivo. The oral treatment of T.cruzi-infected mice with DB289 and Benznidazole (Bz) alone reduced the number of circulating parasites compared with untreated mice by about 70% and 90%, respectively. However, the combination of these two compounds decreased the parasitemia by 99% and protected against animal mortality by 100%, but without providing a parasitological cure. When Bz (p.o) was combined with DB766 (via ip route), at least a 99.5% decrease in parasitemia levels was observed. DB766+Bz also provided 100% protection against mice mortality while Bz alone provided about 87% protection. This combined therapy also reduced the tissular lesions induced by T. cruzi infection: Bz alone reduced GPT and CK plasma levels by about 12% and 78% compared to untreated mice group, the combination of Bz with DB766 resulted in a reduction of GPT and CK plasma levels of 56% and 91%. Cure assessment through hemocultive and PCR approaches showed that Bz did not provide a parasitological cure, however, DB766 alone or associated with Bz cured ≥13% of surviving animals. PMID:21814568

  16. Influence of Parasite Load on Renal Function in Mice Acutely Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Ricardo Cambraia; Miguel, Renata Botelho; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite the vast number of studies evaluating the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, the influence of parasite burden on kidney lesions remains unclear. Thus, the main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of T. cruzi infection on renal function and determine whether there was a correlation between parasite load and renal injury using an acute experimental model of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Low, medium and high parasite loads were generated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 300 (low), 3,000 (medium) or 30,000 (high) numbers of “Y” strain trypomastigotes. We found that mice infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes show increased renal injury. The infection resulted in reduced urinary excretion and creatinine clearance. We also observed a marked elevation in the ratio of urine volume to kidney and body weight, blood urea nitrogen, chloride ion, nitric oxide, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the number of leukocytes in the blood and/or renal tissues of infected mice. Additionally, we observed the presence of the parasite in the cortical/medullary and peri-renal region, an increase of inflammatory infiltrate and of vascular permeability of the kidney. Overall, most renal changes occurred mainly in animals infected with high parasitic loads. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that T. cruzi impairs kidney function, and this impairment is more evident in mice infected with high parasitic loads. Moreover, these data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied cardiovascular effects, renal injury should be regarded as an important indicator for better understanding the pan-infectivity of the parasite and consequently for understanding the disease in experimental models. PMID:23951243

  17. Expression and the Peculiar Enzymatic Behavior of the Trypanosoma cruzi NTH1 DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Ormeño, Fernando; Barrientos, Camila; Ramirez, Santiago; Ponce, Iván; Valenzuela, Lucía; Sepúlveda, Sofía; Bitar, Mainá; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Carlos Renato; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, presents three cellular forms (trypomastigotes, epimastigotes and amastigotes), all of which are submitted to oxidative species in its hosts. However, T. cruzi is able to resist oxidative stress suggesting a high efficiency of its DNA repair machinery.The Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway is one of the main DNA repair mechanisms in other eukaryotes and in T. cruzi as well. DNA glycosylases are enzymes involved in the recognition of oxidative DNA damage and in the removal of oxidized bases, constituting the first step of the BER pathway. Here, we describe the presence and activity of TcNTH1, a nuclear T. cruzi DNA glycosylase. Surprisingly, purified recombinant TcNTH1 does not remove the thymine glycol base, but catalyzes the cleavage of a probe showing an AP site. The same activity was found in epimastigote and trypomastigote homogenates suggesting that the BER pathway is not involved in thymine glycol DNA repair. TcNTH1 DNA-binding properties assayed in silico are in agreement with the absence of a thymine glycol removing function of that parasite enzyme. Over expression of TcNTH1 decrease parasite viability when transfected epimastigotes are submitted to a sustained production of H2O2.Therefore, TcNTH1 is the only known NTH1 orthologous unable to eliminate thymine glycol derivatives but that recognizes and cuts an AP site, most probably by a beta-elimination mechanism. We cannot discard that TcNTH1 presents DNA glycosylase activity on other DNA base lesions. Accordingly, a different DNA repair mechanism should be expected leading to eliminate thymine glycol from oxidized parasite DNA. Furthermore, TcNTH1 may play a role in the AP site recognition and processing. PMID:27284968

  18. Histopathology of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Giannakakis, Konstantinos; Faraggiana, Tullio

    2011-06-01

    The spectrum of morphologic changes in lupus nephritis, either microscopic, ultrastructural, or immunohistological, closely reflects the great variety of immune complexes that are produced in the course of the disease. Every tissue component of the kidney can be affected, but glomeruli are the target structure in most patients. Several attempts have been made to correlate the clinical severity and the outcome of the nephritis with the pathologic features; the current classification and the six classes that resulted from an international study group are entirely based on glomerular changes. Major criteria of classification include the focal or diffuse involvement of the glomerulus, the site of hypercellularity, the site of immune complex deposition and the presence of active and/or sclerotic lesions. Even if less thoroughly investigated than the glomerulus, the interstitial compartment has revealed many interesting features as are vascular lesions, a common and often underestimated feature. Typing of subpopulation of lymphoid infiltrates supports the emerging evidence indicating that B cells are promoting autoimmunity in mechanisms other than autoAb secretion. Many aspects are still debated and/or poorly understood, such as the interpretation of the so-called "full house nephropathy" that closely mimic lupus nephritis in seronegative patients.

  19. Comparison of contact endoscopy and frozen section histopathology in the intra-operative diagnosis of laryngeal pathology.

    PubMed

    Cikojević, D; Gluncić, I; Pesutić-Pisac, V

    2008-08-01

    Andrea et al. were the first to use contact endoscopy in the diagnosis of laryngeal disease, in 1995. This method enables in vivo microscopy of laryngeal mucosa. In the present study, comparison of contact endoscopy with frozen section histopathology was performed in 142 patients with various diseases of the larynx. Paraffin section histopathology diagnosed 70 benign lesions, 23 precancerous lesions and 49 malignant lesions. Frozen section histopathology showed a sensitivity of 89.8 per cent, a specificity of 98.9 per cent and an accuracy of 95.7 per cent (chi2 = 1.5; p = 0.18). Frozen histopathology diagnosed 45 malignant lesions, including one false positive and five false negative results. Contact endoscopy yielded a sensitivity of 79.59 per cent, a specificity of 100 per cent and an accuracy of 92.95 per cent (chi2 = 8.1; p = 0.002). All malignant lesions diagnosed by contact endoscopy were confirmed by histopathology; contact endoscopy failed to recognise malignant lesions in 10 patients. Contact endoscopy is preferable to frozen section histopathology as it is noninvasive, provides information on microscopic diagnosis and laryngeal lesion margins, and enables visualisation of the laryngeal mucosa microvasculature. The use of contact endoscopy along with frozen section histopathology improves diagnostic accuracy and allows for operative (or other) therapy to continue according to the results obtained.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi screening in Texas blood donors, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M N; Woc-Colburn, L; Rossmann, S N; Townsend, R L; Stramer, S L; Bravo, M; Kamel, H; Beddard, R; Townsend, M; Oldham, R; Bottazzi, M E; Hotez, P J; Murray, K O

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease is an important emerging disease in Texas that results in cardiomyopathy in about 30% of those infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Between the years 2008 and 2012, about 1/6500 blood donors were T. cruzi antibody-confirmed positive. We found older persons and minority populations, particularly Hispanic, at highest risk for screening positive for T. cruzi antibodies during routine blood donation. Zip code analysis determined that T. cruzi is associated with poverty. Chagas disease has a significant disease burden and is a cause of substantial economic losses in Texas.

  1. Evaluating IPMN and pancreatic carcinoma utilizing quantitative histopathology.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Evan S; Zhang, Hao Helen; Hill, Kimberly A; Patel, Charmi; Kha, Stephanie T; Yozwiak, Michael L; Bartels, Hubert; Nafissi, Nellie N; Watkins, Joseph C; Alberts, David S; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-10-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are pancreatic lesions with uncertain biologic behavior. This study sought objective, accurate prediction tools, through the use of quantitative histopathological signatures of nuclear images, for classifying lesions as chronic pancreatitis (CP), IPMN, or pancreatic carcinoma (PC). Forty-four pancreatic resection patients were retrospectively identified for this study (12 CP; 16 IPMN; 16 PC). Regularized multinomial regression quantitatively classified each specimen as CP, IPMN, or PC in an automated, blinded fashion. Classification certainty was determined by subtracting the smallest classification probability from the largest probability (of the three groups). The certainty function varied from 1.0 (perfectly classified) to 0.0 (random). From each lesion, 180 ± 22 nuclei were imaged. Overall classification accuracy was 89.6% with six unique nuclear features. No CP cases were misclassified, 1/16 IPMN cases were misclassified, and 4/16 PC cases were misclassified. Certainty function was 0.75 ± 0.16 for correctly classified lesions and 0.47 ± 0.10 for incorrectly classified lesions (P = 0.0005). Uncertainty was identified in four of the five misclassified lesions. Quantitative histopathology provides a robust, novel method to distinguish among CP, IPMN, and PC with a quantitative measure of uncertainty. This may be useful when there is uncertainty in diagnosis.

  2. The immunology of experimental Chagas' disease. IV. Production of lesions in rabbits similar to those of chronic Chagas' disease in man.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, A. R.; Teixeira, M. L.; Santos-Buch, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Eight rabbits that received a single inoculation of trypomastigotes of a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi first developed a transient acute illness associated with parasitemia; later, 4 of these rabbits died with chronic myocarditis and/or with megacolon in the absence of demonstrable parasitemia or encysted parasites in tissues. Two of these rabbits with chronic myocarditis died unexpectedly. Three of the inoculated rabbits that survived the infection were sacrificed 18 months later and showed similar but less severe microscopic lesions. The remaining rabbit is alive and well at the time of writing (26 months) with negative blood cultures but high hemagglutinating antibody titers to T. cruzi antigens. The natural course of T. cruzi infection in rabbits and the lesions observed postmortem are similar to those recorded for humans with chronic Chagas' disease. Multiple injections of particulate subcellular antigens of T. cruzi in rabbits resulted in microscopic lesions similar to those observed in rabbits that survived protozoan infection. Sera of rabbits inoculated with T. cruzi have antibodies to striated and smooth muscle structures. However, evidence provided in this and in other experiments strongly suggest that the lesions of chronic Chagas' disease are produced by delayed hypersensitivity to T. cruzi antigens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 3-4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:808136

  3. Histopathological Image Analysis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gurcan, Metin N.; Boucheron, Laura; Can, Ali; Madabhushi, Anant; Rajpoot, Nasir; Yener, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, dramatic increases in computational power and improvement in image analysis algorithms have allowed the development of powerful computer-assisted analytical approaches to radiological data. With the recent advent of whole slide digital scanners, tissue histopathology slides can now be digitized and stored in digital image form. Consequently, digitized tissue histopathology has now become amenable to the application of computerized image analysis and machine learning techniques. Analogous to the role of computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) algorithms in medical imaging to complement the opinion of a radiologist, CAD algorithms have begun to be developed for disease detection, diagnosis, and prognosis prediction to complement to the opinion of the pathologist. In this paper, we review the recent state of the art CAD technology for digitized histopathology. This paper also briefly describes the development and application of novel image analysis technology for a few specific histopathology related problems being pursued in the United States and Europe. PMID:20671804

  4. In vitro drug susceptibility of two strains of the wildlife trypanosome, Trypanosoma copemani: A comparison with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Botero, Adriana; Keatley, Sarah; Peacock, Christopher; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomes are blood protozoan parasites that are capable of producing illness in the vertebrate host. Within Australia, several native Trypanosoma species have been described infecting wildlife. However, only Trypanosoma copemani has been associated with pathological lesions in wildlife hosts and more recently has been associated with the drastic decline of the critically endangered woylie (Bettongia penicillata). The impact that some trypanosomes have on the health of the vertebrate host has led to the development of numerous drug compounds that could inhibit the growth or kill the parasite. This study investigated and compared the in vitro susceptibility of two strains of T. copemani (G1 and G2) and one strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (10R26) against drugs that are known to show trypanocidal activity (benznidazole, posaconazole, miltefosine and melarsoprol) and against four lead compounds, two fenarimols and two pyridine derivatives (EPL-BS1937, EPL-BS2391, EPL-BS0967, and EPL-BS1246), that have been developed primarily against T.cruzi. The in vitro cytotoxicity of all drugs against L6 rat myoblast cells was also assessed. Results showed that both strains of T. copemani were more susceptible to all drugs and lead compounds than T. cruzi, with all IC50 values in the low and sub-μM range for both species. Melarsoprol and miltefosine exhibited the highest drug activity against both T. copemani and T. cruzi, but they also showed the highest toxicity in L6 cells. Interestingly, both fenarimol and pyridine derivative compounds were more active against T. copemani and T. cruzi than the reference drugs benznidazole and posaconazole. T. copemani strains exhibited differences in susceptibility to all drugs demonstrating once again considerable differences in their biological behaviour.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi expresses diverse repetitive protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, D F; Kim, K S; Otsu, K; Moser, D R; Yost, W J; Blumin, J H; Donelson, J E; Kirchhoff, L V

    1989-01-01

    We screened a Trypanosoma cruzi cDNA expression library with human and rabbit anti-T. cruzi sera and identified cDNA clones that encode polypeptides containing tandemly arranged repeats which are 6 to 34 amino acids in length. The peptide repeats encoded by these cDNAs varied markedly in sequence, copy number, and location relative to the polyadenylation site of the mRNAs from which they were derived. The repeats were specific for T. cruzi, but in each case the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs and the total number of repeat copies encoded varied considerably among different isolates of the parasite. Expression of the peptide repeats was not stage specific. One of the peptide repeats occurred in a protein with an Mr of greater than 200,000 and one was in a protein of Mr 75,000 to 105,000. The frequent occurrence and diversity of these peptide repeats suggested that they may play a role in the ability of the parasite to evade immune destruction in its invertebrate and mammalian hosts, but the primary roles of these macromolecules may be unrelated to the host-parasite relationship. Images PMID:2659529

  6. Histopathology of marine vibrio wound infections.

    PubMed

    Beckman, E N; Leonard, G L; Castillo, L E; Genre, C F; Pankey, G A

    1981-12-01

    Although marine vibrio wound infections and septicemia are being reported with increasing frequency, description of the histopathologic changes has been scanty. The histologic alterations in three patients with primary marine vibrio wound infections are presented. The lesions are characterized by intense acute cellulitis of the subcutis with much tissue destruction and extension into the adjacent dermis. The superficial dermis is devitalized and lacks an inflammatory cellular infiltrate. Subepidermal noninflammatory bullae are formed. Many organisms are seen both within the areas of intense acute inflammation and in devitalized areas. Organisms and inflammation are especially oriented around vessels, with associated acute vasculitis. It is concluded that the morphologic picture in marine vibrio wound infections is nonspecific yet characteristic.

  7. Histopathological study of feline eosinophilic dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Fondati, A; Fondevila, D; Ferrer, L

    2001-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on skin specimens from 24 cats with eosinophilic granuloma complex. The specimens were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and Gallego's trichrome stain. In all specimens, flame figures and/or large foci of so-called "collagen degeneration" were detected and histopathological features were not predictive of the clinical picture. Use of the term eosinophilic dermatosis was advocated in diagnostic dermatopathology. On trichrome-stained sections, normally stained collagen fibres were identified in the middle of both flame figures and large foci of "collagen degeneration" and the debris surrounding collagen bundles showed the same tinctorial properties as eosinophil granules. Eosinophil degranulation around collagen bundles seemed to represent the major pathogenetic event in these lesions, analogous with human flame figures. The term flame figures might therefore be more accurately used to designate those foci of eosinophilic to partly basophilic debris commonly referred to as "collagen degeneration".

  8. Phyllodes tumor: diagnostic imaging and histopathology findings.

    PubMed

    Venter, Alina Cristiana; Roşca, Elena; Daina, Lucia Georgeta; Muţiu, Gabriela; Pirte, Adriana Nicoleta; Rahotă, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all primary tumors of the breast. Histologically, phyllodes tumors can be divided into benign (60%), borderline (20%) and malignant (20%). The mammography examination was performed by means of a digital mammography system Giotto 3D Images; the ultrasound examination was performed through a GE Logiq P6 device and histological confirmation was possible after surgery or following the histological biopsy. We grouped the nine patients who presented clinically palpable nodules into two groups, namely: the six patients presenting histological benign results into Group I, and Group II where we included those with borderline and malignant histological results. Mammography performed in 77.7% revealed a well-circumscribed round or oval opacity or with contour lobules. Ultrasound examination was performed in all patients. Mammography and ultrasound have limitation in differentiating between benign lesion and phyllodes tumor. In the nine analyzed cases, mammographic and ultrasound examinations did not allow the differentiation into the three groups of phyllodes tumor. Histopathological examination is considered the golden standard for their diagnosis. Correlations between mammographic and microscopic aspects were inconclusive for determining the degree of differentiation, ultrasound changes could be correlated with the histopathological aspects.

  9. Paederus fuscipes dermatitis. A histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Borroni, G; Brazzelli, V; Rosso, R; Pavan, M

    1991-10-01

    Paederus fuscipes (PF) dermatitis is a self-healing blistering disorder of the skin caused by a small insect belonging to genus Paederus, family Staphylinidae, order Coleoptera. Crushing PF on the skin causes acute dermatitis within 24 hours, corresponding in shape and dimensions to the area affected by the substance released (pederin). The acute vesicular lesions become crusted and scaly within a few days and heal completely in 10-12 days, with a transitory postinflammatory hypercromic patch. Twenty consecutive cases of PF dermatitis at different stages were studied histologically by routine light microscopy. The pederin causes a spectrum of histopathologic changes ranging from acute epidermal necrosis and blistering in acute stages, to marked acanthosis with mitotic figures in the late stages. PF dermatitis is an entomological model of irritant contact dermatitis, having histopathologic features of intraepidermal and subepidermal blistering, epidermal necrosis and acantholysis. The presence of some acantholytic foci, relatively far from the foci of clinically involved skin, in four of the cases considered suggests a possible role of pederin in inducing acantholysis indirectly. Acantholysis is probably caused by the release of epidermal proteases.

  10. Margins of oral leukoplakia: autofluorescence and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Elvers, D; Braunschweig, T; Hilgers, R-D; Ghassemi, A; Möhlhenrich, S C; Hölzle, F; Gerressen, M; Modabber, A

    2015-02-01

    Autofluorescence devices are widely used to examine oral lesions. The aim of this study was to see whether there were any signs of dysplasia, parakeratosis, or mucosal inflammation in the borders of homogeneous oral leukoplakia using autofluorescence, and we also compared clinically visible extensions with those detected by autofluorescence. Twenty patients with 26 homogeneous areas of oral leukoplakia were included in the study. After the clinically visible extensions of the lesion had been marked, we took a photograph through the autofluorescence device, which showed both borders in one picture. We then used photo-editing software to measure the size of the area of leukoplakia together with the area with loss of autofluorescence. We took 3 punch biopsy specimens: one from the leukoplakia, one 2.5mm from its marked borders, and one from healthy mucosa. Seventy-eight biopsy specimens were examined by an experienced pathologist, and 95% CI calculated to assess the amount of parakeratosis. Spearman's rank correlation was used to assess the association with mucosal inflammation. Ten areas of leukoplakia were surrounded by normal green autofluorescence, and 16 were consistent with loss of autofluorescence with a mean size of 66%, which exceeded the clinically visible size of the area of leukoplakia. We calculated that there was a strong association between these entities and their surrounding areas, with loss of autofluorescence for parakeratosis. Some leukoplakias showed clinically invisible extensions during histopathological examination and autofluorescence. The technique described enables clinicians to measure the extent of these lesions beyond their visible margins. We found no dysplasia, which emphasises that autofluorescence detects non-dysplastic lesions caused by mucosal inflammation and parakeratosis.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi: distinct patterns of infection in the sibling caviomorph rodent species Thrichomys apereoides laurentius and Thrichomys pachyurus (Rodentia, Echimyidae).

    PubMed

    Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; D'Andrea, Paulo Sérgio; de Andrade, Gisele Braziliano; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2005-09-01

    Thrichomys apereoides, a caviomorph rodent species common in a highly endemic area for Chagas disease in Brazil, may act as reservoir of the parasite. However, no information is available concerning its sibling species Thrichomys pachyurus, found in the Pantanal region, where Trypanosoma cruzi is found only in the enzootic cycle. We followed up the cross infection of these cryptic species with two isolates derived from naturally infected T. pachyurus and Thrichomys apereoides laurentius. No regional co-adaptation between Thrichomys species and the regional isolates were noticed. However, significant differences in the outcome of the infection were observed. T. a. laurentius was more resistant than T. pachyurus, as expressed by lower parasitemia and less histopathological damage. The routine biochemical markers used for laboratory rodents were unsuitable for follow up of infection in Thrichomys spp, since they did not correlate with the histopathological findings or allowed the kinetic follow-up of tissue colonization by the parasite.

  12. Polypoidal Lesions in the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; K.C., Mahadeva

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nasal polyps are polypoidal masses arising from mucous membranes of nose and paranasal sinuses. They are overgrowths of the mucosa that frequently accompany allergic rhinitis. They are freely movable and nontender. Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to study the histopathologic spectrum of polypoidal lesions of the nasal cavity. Materials and Methods: The study comprised of 100 consecutive cases of polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity, received in the department of pathology. The age and sex of the patients were recorded. The tissues were routinely processed for histopathologic sections and stained with haematoxylin and eosin stains. Special stains like Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) was done wherever applicable. The cases were classified into neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions. The neoplastic lesions were further classified according to WHO classification on histopathologic examination. Results: Analysis of 100 polypoidal lesions in the nose and paranasal sinuses with clinical diagnosis of nasal polyps, revealed 66 cases were nonneoplastic and 34 were neoplastic;17 (50%)were benign and 17(50%) were malignant. True nasal polyps both inflammatory and allergic together comprised 44 cases of the 100 polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity. Angiofibroma and inverted papilloma were the most frequent benign tumour accounting for 12/17(0.7%). The most common malignant tumour was anaplastic carcinoma 7/17(0.4%). Nonneoplastic and benign tumours were common in younger age groups whereas malignant tumours were most common in older males. Conclusion: The majority of polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity are nonneoplastic. PMID:23905098

  13. Human Trypanosoma cruzi infection and seropositivity in dogs, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Franco, Jose G; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Diaz-Albiter, Hector; Ochoa-Garcia, Laucel; Barbabosa, Alberto; Vazquez-Chagoyan, Juan C; Martinez-Perez, Miguel A; Guzman-Bracho, Carmen; Garg, Nisha

    2006-04-01

    We used 5 diagnostic tests in a cross-sectional investigation of the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Tejupilco municipality, State of Mexico, Mexico. Our findings showed a substantial prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies to T. cruzi in human (n = 293, IgG 2.05%, IgM 5.5%, both 7.1%) and dog (n = 114, IgG 15.8%, IgM 11.4%, both 21%) populations. We also found antibodies to T. cruzi (n = 80, IgG 10%, IgM 15%, both 17.5%) in dogs from Toluca, an area previously considered free of T. cruzi. Our data demonstrate the need for active epidemiologic surveillance programs in these regions. A direct correlation (r2 = 0.955) of seropositivity between humans and dogs suggests that seroanalysis in dogs may help identify the human prevalence of T. cruzi infection in these areas.

  14. Human Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Seropositivity in Dogs, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Diaz-Albiter, Hector; Ochoa-Garcia, Laucel; Barbabosa, Alberto; Vazquez-Chagoyan, Juan C.; Martinez-Perez, Miguel A.; Guzman-Bracho, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    We used 5 diagnostic tests in a cross-sectional investigation of the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Tejupilco municipality, State of Mexico, Mexico. Our findings showed a substantial prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies to T. cruzi in human (n = 293, IgG 2.05%, IgM 5.5%, both 7.1%) and dog (n = 114, IgG 15.8%, IgM 11.4%, both 21%) populations. We also found antibodies to T. cruzi (n = 80, IgG 10%, IgM 15%, both 17.5%) in dogs from Toluca, an area previously considered free of T. cruzi. Our data demonstrate the need for active epidemiologic surveillance programs in these regions. A direct correlation (r2 = 0.955) of seropositivity between humans and dogs suggests that seroanalysis in dogs may help identify the human prevalence of T. cruzi infection in these areas. PMID:16704811

  15. The Japanese Viewpoint on the Histopathology of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shigeki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Jansen, Marnix; Kushima, Ryoji

    Japanese histopathologists have traditionally had greater opportunity to study the histology and clinical course of early gastric cancer because of technological developments including double contrast radiography and endoscopy systems, combined with the higher incidence of gastric cancer in the general population in Japan. Endoscopic resection is now considered best practice for treatment of early gastric cancers with a negligible risk of lymph node metastasis. Histopathologic evaluation plays a critical role in assessing the likelihood of lymph node metastasis on endoscopically resected specimens. There remains disparity between Western and Japanese histopathologists in the conceptual approach to the histopathologic evaluation of neoplastic lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract, in particular regarding lesions straddling the borderline between noninvasive and invasive disease. Although in routine practice, the clinical impact of these conceptual differences is small, this disparity does complicate international exchange of datasets and the development of globally applicable formal definitions. Here we review the current practice in histological diagnosis of early gastric cancer in Japan and discuss some of the conceptual differences between Japanese and Western histopathological assessment of lesions in the neoplastic stomach.

  16. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  17. Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans: histopathologic findings and clinical correlations in 111 cases.

    PubMed

    Brehmer-Andersson, E; Hovmark, A; Asbrink, E

    1998-05-01

    We studied 111 consecutive, untreated and serologically confirmed patients with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Emphasis was on the histopathologic patterns of erythematous and fibrous lesions, and on an assay used to correlate histopathologic findings with such clinical features as fibrous nodules, ulnar bands and the pain reaction allodynia. There was a significant correlation between allodynia and signs of marked inflammation, but not between allodynia and neural and perineural cell infiltrates or fibrosis. Moreover, there was no significant correlation between serum IgG titers to Borrelia and the density of inflammatory cell infiltrates or the proportion of plasma cells in tissue. Histopathologic examination did not reveal any important differences between fibrous nodules, ulnar bands and sclerodermatous lesions. The histopathologic pattern is not diagnostic per se, but characteristic enough to alert the experienced pathologist.

  18. Oral mucocele: A clinical and histopathological study

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B; Bhavsar, Khushbu; Varma, Saurabh; Tailor, Mansi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral mucocele is the most common benign minor (accessory) salivary gland lesion, caused due to mechanical trauma to the excretory duct of the gland. Clinically they are characterized by single or multiple, soft, fluctuant nodule, ranging from the normal color of the oral mucosa to deep blue. It affects at any age and is equally present in both sexes with highest incidence in second decade of life. They are classified as extravasation or retention type. Objectives: To analyze the data between 2010 and 2011 of, clinically and histopathologically diagnosed 58 oral mucoceles for age, gender, type, site, color, cause, symptoms and dimension. Results: Oral mucoceles were highly prevalent in the age group of 15-24 years, were seen in 51.72% of males and 48.28% of females, with a ratio of 1.07:1. The extravasation type (84.48%) was more common than the retention type (15.52%). The most common affected site was lower lip (36.20%) followed by ventral surface of the tongue (25.86%). The lowest frequency was observed in floor of mouth, upper lip and palate. The maximum numbers of mucoceles were asymptomatic (58.62%), and the color of the overlying mucosa had color of adjacent normal mucosa (48.28%). It was also observed that most of the mucoceles had diameter ranging from 5 to 14 mm. The causative factors of the lesion were lip biting (22.41%), trauma (5.18%) and numerous lesions (72.41%). Conclusion: Oral Mucoceles are frequently seen in an oral medicine service, mainly affecting young people and lower lip, measuring around 5 to 14 mm and the extravasation type being the most common. PMID:25364184

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  20. Interferon-Gamma Promotes Infection of Astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M.; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  1. [Histopathologic study of chronic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Wayoff, M; Parache, R M; Bodelet, B; Gazel, P

    1983-01-01

    The conventional histopathology of the sinus is a criterium for the therapeutic indication, since it is possible to distinguish between granulomatous chronic sinusitis, chronic sinusitis with oedema and nasal polyposis. Each one of these clinical pictures has his own etiology and requires a specific therapeutic approach.

  2. Interstitial Mycosis Fungoides With Lichen Sclerosus-Like Clinical and Histopathological Features.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Burak; Kempf, Werner; Seckin, Dilek; Ergun, Tulin; Yucelten, Deniz; Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2016-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) simulates a variety of dermatologic disorders histopathologically and clinically, well deserving the designation of a great mimicker. Interstitial MF is a rare, but well-recognized histopathological variant resembling the interstitial form of granuloma annulare or the inflammatory phase of morphea. From a clinical standpoint, MF can have a wide array of manifestations, including an anecdotal presentation with lesions clinically suggestive of lichen sclerosus (LS). We herein report a 25-year-old man with a history of patch-stage MF who later developed widespread LS-like lesions histopathologically consistent with interstitial MF. In some biopsies, additional features resembling LS were discerned. We think that our case might represent a unique variant of interstitial MF presenting with LS-like lesions. The diagnostic challenge arising from this uncommon presentation is discussed together with review of the literature.

  3. Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia in Oral Lesions: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Vaidhehi Narayan; Uma, K; Girish, H C; Murgod, Sanjay; Shyamala, K; Naik, Ranajit B

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia (PEH) is a histopathological reaction pattern to various stimuli, which includes trauma, infection, inflammation, neoplasia. It is seen as tongue like epithelial proliferation invading the connective tissue and should not be mistaken for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This review enlists oral lesions which exhibit PEH with a note on how to differentiate SCC from PEH. PMID:26435636

  4. Virulence factors of Trypanosoma cruzi: who is who?

    PubMed

    Osorio, Luis; Ríos, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Bessy; González, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this review is to gather the current knowledge of Trypanosoma cruzi's virulence factors described to date in an integrative way, relating these with the parasite's life cycle and trying to elucidate their importance in each process. Several aspects relevant for the parasite's survival, such as invasion, resistance to oxidative damage, escape from the phagolysosomal vacuole and differentiation, among others, will be discussed. However, there is still a lot to learn about what virulence really means in T. cruzi and which parasite molecules are absolutely required to make T. cruzi one of the most successful pathogens to invade, survive and persist in a mammalian host.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi in the Chicken Model: Chagas-Like Heart Disease in the Absence of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Gomes, Clever; Nitz, Nadjar; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Alves, Rozeneide M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Cordeiro, Ciro; Bernal, Francisco M.; Rosa, Ana C.; Hejnar, Jiri; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Hecht, Mariana M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The administration of anti-trypanosome nitroderivatives curtails Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Chagas disease patients, but does not prevent destructive lesions in the heart. This observation suggests that an effective treatment for the disease requires understanding its pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the origin of clinical manifestations of the heart disease we used a chicken model system in which infection can be initiated in the egg, but parasite persistence is precluded. T. cruzi inoculation into the air chamber of embryonated chicken eggs generated chicks that retained only the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA minicircle in their genome after eight days of gestation. Crossbreeding showed that minicircles were transferred vertically via the germ line to chicken progeny. Minicircle integration in coding regions was shown by targeted-primer thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and detected by direct genomic analysis. The kDNA-mutated chickens died with arrhythmias, shortness of breath, cyanosis and heart failure. These chickens with cardiomyopathy had rupture of the dystrophin and other genes that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Tissue pathology revealed inflammatory dilated cardiomegaly whereby immune system mononuclear cells lyse parasite-free target heart fibers. The heart cell destruction implicated a thymus-dependent, autoimmune; self-tissue rejection carried out by CD45+, CD8γδ+, and CD8α lymphocytes. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that genetic alterations resulting from kDNA integration in the host genome lead to autoimmune-mediated destruction of heart tissue in the absence of T. cruzi parasites. PMID:21468314

  6. Oral Mucocutaneous Lesions – A Comparative Clinicopathological and Immunofluorescence Study

    PubMed Central

    Rameshkumar, Annasamy; Varghese, Alex Kumaranthara; Dineshkumar, Thayalan; Ahmed, Shaheen; Venkatramani, Janaki; Sugirtharaj, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral mucosa is often affected by many diseases including mucocutaneous disorders. The diagnoses of these disorders are primarily based on history, clinical features, and histopathology. For the past few years’ immunofluorescence techniques emerged as an important tool to study the pathogenesis and in the diagnosis of oral mucocutaneous and vesiculobullous disorders. The present study was designed to carry out retrospective and prospective analysis of oral mucocutaneous lesions to elucidate the clinicopathologic features and its immunofluorescence findings. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 subjects with oral mucocutaneous lesions were retrieved from the oral pathology files of Tamil Nadu Govt. Dental College and their clinical features were evaluated, and the histopathology was also evaluated with the help of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. For the prospective study, biopsy from 12 subjects with oral mucocutaneous lesions was subjected to routine histopathological examination and DIF to evaluate the consistency of the methods. Results: In the retrospective analysis of 70 subjects with oral mucocutaneous lesions in relation to clinical features and histopathology, most of the findings were similar to the previous studies except for few criteria like male predilection in lichen planus and mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) and more prevalence of pemphigus vulgaris than MMP (2:1). In the prospective analysis of 12 subjects, the histopathological diagnosis was consistent with DIF study in 66% of cases. Conclusion: The diagnostic efficiency of oral mucocutaneous lesions can be improved by modern tools like DIF studies in addition to traditional methods like clinical and histopathology. PMID:25878481

  7. Subcellular proteomics of Trypanosoma cruzi reservosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Celso; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Pereira, Miria G.; Lourenço, Daniela; de Souza, Wanderley; Almeida, Igor C.; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa L.

    2009-01-01

    Reservosomes are the endpoint of the endocytic pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. These organelles have the particular ability to concentrate proteins and lipids obtained from medium together with the main proteolytic enzymes originated from the secretory pathway, being at the same time a storage organelle and the main site of protein degradation. Subcellular proteomics have been extensively used for profiling organelles in different cell types. Here, we combine cell fractionation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify reservosome-resident proteins. Starting from a purified reservosome fraction, we established a protocol to isolate reservosome membranes. Transmission electron microscopy was applied to confirm the purity of the fractions. To achieve a better coverage of identified proteins we analyzed the fractions separately and combined the results. LC-MS/MS analysis identified in total 709 T. cruzi-specific proteins; of these, 456 had predicted function and 253 were classified as hypothetical proteins. We could confirm the presence of most of the proteins validated by previous work and identify new proteins from different classes such as enzymes, proton pumps, transport proteins and others. The definition of the reservosome protein profile is a good tool to assess their molecular signature, identify molecular markers, and understand their relationship with different organelles. PMID:19288526

  8. Phosphatidylinositol kinase activities in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Alba Marina; Gesumaría, María Celeste; Schoijet, Alejandra C; Alonso, Guillermo D; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Racagni, Graciela E; Machado, Estela E

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) metabolism through phosphatidylinositol kinase (PIKs) activities plays a central role in different signaling pathways. In Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, PIKs have been proposed as target for drug design in order to combat this pathogen. In this work, we studied the classes of PI4K, PIPK and PI3K that could participate in signaling pathways in T. cruzi epimastigote forms. For this reason, we analyzed their enzymatic parameters and detailed responses to avowed kinase inhibitors (adenosine, sodium deoxycholate, wortmannin and LY294002) and activators (Ca(2+), phosphatidic acid, spermine and heparin). Our results suggest the presence and activity of a class III PI4K, a class I PIPK, a class III PI3K previously described (TcVps34) and a class I PI3K. Class I PI3K enzyme, here named TcPI3K, was cloned and expressed in a bacterial system, and their product was tested for kinase activity. The possible participation of TcPI3K in central cellular events of the parasite is also discussed.

  9. Immune Evasion Strategies of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Flávia Nardy, Ana; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Morrot, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Microbes have evolved a diverse range of strategies to subvert the host immune system. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, provides a good example of such adaptations. This parasite targets a broad spectrum of host tissues including both peripheral and central lymphoid tissues. Rapid colonization of the host gives rise to a systemic acute response which the parasite must overcome. The parasite in fact undermines both innate and adaptive immunity. It interferes with the antigen presenting function of dendritic cells via an action on host sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin receptors. These receptors also induce suppression of CD4+ T cells responses, and we presented evidence that the sialylation of parasite-derived mucins is required for the inhibitory effects on CD4 T cells. In this review we highlight the major mechanisms used by Trypanosoma cruzi to overcome host immunity and discuss the role of parasite colonization of the central thymic lymphoid tissue in chronic disease. PMID:26240832

  10. Enalapril in Combination with Benznidazole Reduces Cardiac Inflammation and Creatine Kinases in Mice Chronically Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Penitente, Arlete Rita; Leite, Ana Luísa Junqueira; de Paula Costa, Guilherme; Shrestha, Deena; Horta, Aline Luciano; Natali, Antônio J.; Neves, Clóvis A.; Talvani, Andre

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi triggers an inflammatory process in mammalian heart causing events such as fibrosis, changes in the architecture and functionality in this organ. Enalapril, an angiotensin II-converting enzyme inhibitor, is a drug prescribed to ameliorate this heart dysfunction, and appears to exert a potential role in immune system regulation. Our aim was to evaluate the chronic cardiac inflammatory parameters after therapeutic treatment with enalapril and benznidazole in C57BL/6 mice infected with the VL-10 strain of T. cruzi. After infection, animals were treated with oral doses of enalapril (25 mg/kg), benznidazole (100 mg/kg), or both during 30 days. Morphometric parameters and levels of chemokines (CCL2, CCL5), IL-10, creatine kinases (CKs), and C-reactive protein were evaluated in the heart and serum at the 120th day of infection. Enalapril alone or in combination with benznidazole did not change the number of circulating parasites, but reduced cardiac leukocyte recruitment and total collagen in the cardiac tissue. Interestingly, the combination therapy (enalapril/benznidazole) also reduced the levels of chemokines, CK and CK-MB, and C-reactive proteins in chronic phase. In conclusion, during the chronic experimental T. cruzi infection, the combination therapy using enalapril plus benznidazole potentiated their immunomodulatory effects, resulting in a low production of biomarkers of cardiac lesions. PMID:26350447

  11. The Interaction of Classical Complement Component C1 with Parasite and Host Calreticulin Mediates Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Christian; Ramírez, Galia; Valck, Carolina; Aguilar, Lorena; Maldonado, Ismael; Rosas, Carlos; Galanti, Norbel; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Ferreira, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Background 9 million people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi in Latin America, plus more than 300,000 in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and Japan. Approximately 30% of infected individuals develop circulatory or digestive pathology. While in underdeveloped countries transmission is mainly through hematophagous arthropods, transplacental infection prevails in developed ones. Methodology/Principal Findings During infection, T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT) translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, TcCRT acts as virulence factor since it binds maternal classical complement component C1q that recognizes human calreticulin (HuCRT) in placenta, with increased parasite infectivity. As measured ex vivo by quantitative PCR in human placenta chorionic villi explants (HPCVE) (the closest available correlate of human congenital T. cruzi infection), C1q mediated up to a 3–5-fold increase in parasite load. Because anti-TcCRT and anti-HuCRT F(ab′)2 antibody fragments are devoid of their Fc-dependent capacity to recruit C1q, they reverted the C1q-mediated increase in parasite load by respectively preventing its interaction with cell-bound CRTs from both parasite and HPCVE origins. The use of competing fluid-phase recombinant HuCRT and F(ab′)2 antibody fragments anti-TcCRT corroborated this. These results are consistent with a high expression of fetal CRT on placental free chorionic villi. Increased C1q-mediated infection is paralleled by placental tissue damage, as evidenced by histopathology, a damage that is ameliorated by anti-TcCRT F(ab′)2 antibody fragments or fluid-phase HuCRT. Conclusions/Significance T. cruzi infection of HPCVE is importantly mediated by human and parasite CRTs and C1q. Most likely, C1q bridges CRT on the parasite surface with its receptor orthologue on human placental cells, thus facilitating the first encounter between the parasite and the fetal derived placental tissue. The results

  12. Bone marrow cells migrate to the heart and skeletal muscle and participate in tissue repair after Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Bruno S d F; Azevedo, Carine M; Lima, Ricardo S d; Kaneto, Carla M; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Guimarães, Elisalva T; dos Santos, Ricardo R; Soares, Milena B P

    2014-01-01

    Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, causes an intense inflammatory reaction in several tissues, including the myocardium. We have previously shown that transplantation of bone marrow cells (BMC) ameliorates the myocarditis in a mouse model of chronic Chagas disease. We investigated the participation of BMC in lesion repair in the heart and skeletal muscle, caused by T. cruzi infection in mice. Infection with a myotropic T. cruzi strain induced an increase in the percentage of stem cells and monocytes in the peripheral blood, as well as in gene expression of chemokines SDF-1, MCP1, 2, and 3 in the heart and skeletal muscle. To investigate the fate of BMC within the damaged tissue, chimeric mice were generated by syngeneic transplantation of green fluorescent protein (GFP+) BMC into lethally irradiated mice and infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Migration of GFP+ BMC to the heart and skeletal muscle was observed during and after the acute phase of infection. GFP+ cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells were present in heart sections of chimeric chagasic mice. GFP+ myofibres were observed in the skeletal muscle of chimeric mice at different time points following infection. In conclusion, BMC migrate and contribute to the formation of new resident cells in the heart and skeletal muscle, which can be detected both during the acute and the chronic phase of infection. These findings reinforce the role of BMC in tissue regeneration. PMID:24976301

  13. Oral lichenoid lesions: clinico-pathological mimicry and its diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Santhosh Kumar S; Kale, Alka D; Charantimath, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Oral cavity is commonly affected by number of lichenoid lesions, whose clinical and histopathologic features overlap due to the presence of inflammatory cells in connective tissue. Segregation of these lichenoid lesions is mandatory as each may embody a distinct disease entity in terms of cause, diagnosis and prognosis. The literature discussed in the article is an attempt to segregate individual lichenoid lesions by defining clinical and histopathologic variations among each other, which avoids the diagnostic problem.

  14. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  15. [Trypanosoma cruzi: transport of essential metabolites acquired from the host].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Claudio A; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Bouvier, León A; Cánepa, Gaspar E

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a disease endemic not only in Argentina but also in all of Latin America. T. cruzi presents several metabolic characteristics which are completely absent in its insect vectors and in mammalian hosts. Some of these differences were acquired after millions of years of adaptation to parasitism, during which this protozoan replaced many biosynthetic routes for transport systems. In the present review, we describe the advances in the knowledge of T. cruzi transport processes and the molecules involved. In particular, we focus on amino acid and polyamine transporters from the AAAP family (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases), because they seem to be exclusive transporters from trypanosomatids. Taking into account that these permeases are completely absent in mammals, they could be considered as a potential target against Trypanosoma cruzi.

  16. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Renzo; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Tustin, Aaron W; Borrini-Mayorí, Katty; Náquira, César; Levy, Michael Z

    2015-02-01

    Populations of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, have recently undergone explosive growth. Bed bugs share many important traits with triatomine insects, but it remains unclear whether these similarities include the ability to transmit Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Here, we show efficient and bidirectional transmission of T. cruzi between hosts and bed bugs in a laboratory environment. Most bed bugs that fed on experimentally infected mice acquired the parasite. A majority of previously uninfected mice became infected after a period of cohabitation with exposed bed bugs. T. cruzi was also transmitted to mice after the feces of infected bed bugs were applied directly to broken host skin. Quantitative bed bug defecation measures were similar to those of important triatomine vectors. Our findings suggest that the common bed bug may be a competent vector of T. cruzi and could pose a risk for vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease.

  17. Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius) as Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Renzo; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Tustin, Aaron W.; Borrini-Mayorí, Katty; Náquira, César; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, have recently undergone explosive growth. Bed bugs share many important traits with triatomine insects, but it remains unclear whether these similarities include the ability to transmit Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Here, we show efficient and bidirectional transmission of T. cruzi between hosts and bed bugs in a laboratory environment. Most bed bugs that fed on experimentally infected mice acquired the parasite. A majority of previously uninfected mice became infected after a period of cohabitation with exposed bed bugs. T. cruzi was also transmitted to mice after the feces of infected bed bugs were applied directly to broken host skin. Quantitative bed bug defecation measures were similar to those of important triatomine vectors. Our findings suggest that the common bed bug may be a competent vector of T. cruzi and could pose a risk for vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease. PMID:25404068

  18. Sarcocystis cruzi infection in wood bison (Bison bison athabascae).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Verma, Shiv K; Seaton, C Tom; Sinnett, David; Ball, Erin; Dunams, Detiger; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-05-30

    Endangered wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) is the largest terrestrial mammal in the American continent. Animal health is an important issue in their conservation, and Sarcocystis cruzi may be a cause of clinical disease in Bovidae. Hearts of eight wood bison from Alaska, USA were examined for sarcocysts by histology, transmission electron microscopy, pepsin digestion, and molecularly. Sarcocystis bradyzoites were found in pepsin digests of all eight and sarcocysts were found in histologic sections of myocardium of four bison. Sarcocysts were thin-walled and ultrastructurally consistent with S. cruzi. Characterization of DNA obtained from lysis of pepsin liberated bradyzoites by PCR-RFLP and subsequent phylogenetic analyses matched with that previously reported for S. cruzi infecting cattle in the USA. Collectively, data indicate that wood bison is a natural intermediate host for S. cruzi.

  19. Pink lesions.

    PubMed

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  20. Ultrastructural and transmission evidence of Sarcocystis cruzi associated with eosinophilic myositis in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Gajadhar, A A; Marquardt, W C

    1992-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, diaphragm, tongue, esophagus and heart of beef carcasses that were condemned for eosinophilic myositis and those that were unaffected were collected at an abattoir in Colorado and studied to determine the involvement of Sarcocystis spp. All affected carcasses contained similar granulomatous lesions with adjacent infiltrations of leukocytes. Intact or fragments of sarcocysts were found within 32 of 363 granulomas, and whole sarcocysts were present in nearby unaffected muscle cells. Light and electron microscopic examinations revealed that sarcocysts, affected or unaffected by cellular response in condemned carcasses, as well as those found in unaffected carcasses, were consistent with those of S. cruzi. Transmission experiments confirmed that S. cruzi were present in all carcasses, and that dogs, but not cats, were the definitive hosts. The results of pepsin-HCl digestion assays showed that unaffected carcasses that were approved for human consumption generally contained more infective parasites than carcasses that were condemned for eosinophilic myositis. This study provides evidence to support the suggestion that dogs, rather than cats, and unaffected rather than eosinophilic myositis-affected carcasses, have greater potential for contributing to the perpetuation of eosinophilic myositis in the cattle industry. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1586892

  1. Ultrastructural and transmission evidence of Sarcocystis cruzi associated with eosinophilic myositis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Gajadhar, A A; Marquardt, W C

    1992-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, diaphragm, tongue, esophagus and heart of beef carcasses that were condemned for eosinophilic myositis and those that were unaffected were collected at an abattoir in Colorado and studied to determine the involvement of Sarcocystis spp. All affected carcasses contained similar granulomatous lesions with adjacent infiltrations of leukocytes. Intact or fragments of sarcocysts were found within 32 of 363 granulomas, and whole sarcocysts were present in nearby unaffected muscle cells. Light and electron microscopic examinations revealed that sarcocysts, affected or unaffected by cellular response in condemned carcasses, as well as those found in unaffected carcasses, were consistent with those of S. cruzi. Transmission experiments confirmed that S. cruzi were present in all carcasses, and that dogs, but not cats, were the definitive hosts. The results of pepsin-HCl digestion assays showed that unaffected carcasses that were approved for human consumption generally contained more infective parasites than carcasses that were condemned for eosinophilic myositis. This study provides evidence to support the suggestion that dogs, rather than cats, and unaffected rather than eosinophilic myositis-affected carcasses, have greater potential for contributing to the perpetuation of eosinophilic myositis in the cattle industry.

  2. Inositolphosphoceramide Metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi as Compared to other Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    DE LEDERKREMER, ROSA M.; AGUSTI, ROSALÍA; DOCAMPO, ROBERTO

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and is endemic to North, Central and South American countries. Current therapy against this disease is only partially effective and produces adverse side effects. Studies on the metabolic pathways of T. cruzi, in particular those with no equivalent in mammalian cells, might identify targets for the development of new drugs. Ceramide is metabolized to inositolphosphoceramide (IPC) in T. cruzi and other kinetoplastid protists whereas in mammals it is mainly incorporated into sphingomyelin. In T. cruzi, in contrast to Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp., IPC functions as lipid anchor constituent of glycoproteins and free glycosylinositolphospholipids (GIPLs). Inhibition of IPC and GIPLs biosynthesis impairs differentiation of trypomastigotes into the intracellular amastigote forms. The gene encoding IPC synthase in T. cruzi has been identified and the enzyme has been expressed in a cell-free system. The enzyme involved in IPC degradation and the remodelases responsible for the incorporation of ceramide into free GIPLs or into the glycosylphosphatidyl inositols (GPIs) anchoring glycoproteins, and in fatty acid modifications of these molecules of T. cruzi have been understudied. IPC metabolism and remodeling could be exploited as targets for Chagas disease chemotherapy. PMID:21332877

  3. The gingival Stillman’s clefts: histopathology and cellular characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cassini, Maria Antonietta; Cerroni, Loredana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Orlandi, Augusto; Pilloni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study Stillman’s cleft is a mucogingival triangular-shaped defect on the buccal surface of a root with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to examine the Stillman’s cleft obtained from excision during root coverage surgical procedures at an histopathological level. Materials and method Harvesting of cleft was obtained from two periodontally healthy patients with a scalpel and a bevel incision and then placed in a test tube with buffered solution to be processed for light microscopy. Results Microscopic analysis has shown that Stillman’s cleft presented a lichenoid hand-like inflammatory infiltration, while in the periodontal patient an inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia was identified. Conclusion Stillman’s cleft remains to be investigated as for the possible causes of such lesion of the gingival margin, although an inflammatory response seems to be evident and active from a strictly histopathological standpoint. PMID:26941897

  4. Peripheral desmoplastic ameloblastoma: histopathological and immunohistochemical profile of a case.

    PubMed

    Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; de Almeida-Oslei, Paes; Toral-Rizo, Victor; Martínez-Mata, Guillermo

    2010-11-01

    In this study we present a rare case of peripheral desmoplastic ameloblastoma and discuss its clinical features, histopathology, and immunohistochemical profile. This article reports a new case of this unusual neoplasm in a 66 year-old woman in which the main complaint was an asymptomatic swelling located in the right body of mandible. Histopathological findings were similar to the two previously reported cases of this tumor. Positive immunohistochemical stain for laminin V and type IV collagen suggests an inductive effect of the epithelium over the stroma while the low index of p53 protein and Ki-67 expression in epithelium and stromal cells, as well as CD138 uniform positive-stain in epithelial cells, support the benign biological behavior of this lesion. Including this new case, currently there are only three reports of this rare neoplasm. Reports of new cases of peripheral desmoplastic ameloblastoma are necessary for a better understanding of the origin and behavior of this particular subtype of ameloblastoma.

  5. 42 CFR 493.1219 - Condition: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Histopathology. 493.1219 Section 493....1219 Condition: Histopathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Histopathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1219 - Condition: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Histopathology. 493.1219 Section 493....1219 Condition: Histopathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Histopathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1219 - Condition: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Histopathology. 493.1219 Section 493....1219 Condition: Histopathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Histopathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1219 - Condition: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Histopathology. 493.1219 Section 493....1219 Condition: Histopathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Histopathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1219 - Condition: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Histopathology. 493.1219 Section 493....1219 Condition: Histopathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Histopathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, §...

  10. Diagnosing pyogenic, brucella and tuberculous spondylitis using histopathology and MRI: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Liu, Tao; Jiang, Zhensong; Cui, Xingang; Sun, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the histopathological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of pyogenic, brucella and tuberculous spondylitis (PS, BS and TS, respectively). A total of 22 PS, 20 BS and 20 TS patients were included in the study. Histopathological examination was used to assess the lesion structure and composition, and the MRI observation identified the lesion location and signal features. The following histopathological and MRI features were identified significantly more in patients with PS than in patients with BS and TS: Predominant neutrophil infiltration, abnormal intervertebral disk signal, lesions on the ventral and lateral sides of the vertebral bodies, and thick and irregular abscess walls. The following histopathological and MRI features were identified significantly more in patients with BS than in patients with PS and TS: Predominant lymphocyte infiltration, new bone formation, epithelioid granuloma, lesions on the ventral sides of the vertebral bodies, no, or very mild, vertebral body deformation, no abnormal paraspinal soft tissue signal, no intraosseous or paraspinal abscesses, and thin and irregular abscess walls. The following histopathological and MRI features were identified significantly more in patients with TS than in patients with BS and PS: Sequestrum, Langerhans giant cells, caseous necrosis, lesions primarily in the thoracic region and on the lateral sides of the vertebral bodies, no obvious intervertebral disk damage, obvious vertebral body deformation, abnormal paraspinal soft tissue signal, intraosseous or paraspinal abscesses, and thin and smooth abscess walls. In conclusion, it can be suggested that these significant differences in histopathological and MRI features between the three different types of spondylitis may contribute towards the differential diagnosis of the diseases. PMID:27698694

  11. Histopathology of human laser thermal angioplasty recanalization.

    PubMed

    White, R A; White, G H; Vlasak, J; Fujitani, R; Kopchok, G E

    1988-01-01

    Laserprobe thermal-assisted balloon, angioplasty (LTBA) has demonstrated promising initial clinical results in recanalizing stenotic or occluded superficial femoral and popliteal arteries. Over the past year we have obtained six specimens of laserprobe thermal (LT) and LTBA treated total occlusions (avg. length 12 cm) for histopathologic examination from patients who were treated for limb salvage. Three tissue specimens were obtained acutely, and one was obtained at 6, 8, and 13 days, respectively, after laser angioplasty at the time of revision for complications or failed procedures. Serial histologic sections of the treated LT segments demonstrated recanalization of atherosclerotic lesions to approximately 60-70% of the probe diameter. The LT channels were lined by a thin layer of carbonized or coagulated tissue and several layers of cell necrosis. The histology of the thermal injury was similar regardless of whether it was produced by the heated metal cap or by free argon laser energy. Stellate balloon angioplasty fractures were frequently filled with thrombus. Analysis of these human LT and LTBA specimens revealed that the thermal device produces a confined injury through the path of least resistance. Balloon dilatation produces fragmented cracks in the vessel wall, which appear to be more thrombogenic than the carbonized LT surface. With improved guidance methods, LTBA shows potential for continuing development.

  12. [Pyogenic granuloma vs. lobular capillary hemangioma. Histopathological analysis and epidemiology (Venezuela)].

    PubMed

    Tinoco, P J; Sanalzar, N

    1989-01-01

    A review of the literature is done concerning Pyogenic Granuloma. From two hundred and thirty eight cases of our files. Twenty four cases are separated which are considered histopathologically different and to which the term Lobular Capillary Hemangioma is more applicable. Epidemiologic studies are analyzed and conclusions are established. Pyogenic Granuloma is more a reactive type of lesion of inflammatory nature, while Lobular Capillary Hemangioma separated as an entity is considered a lesion of benign neoplastic nature and vascular origin.

  13. Sclerosing adenosis: Ultrasonographic and mammographic findings and correlation with histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Ling; Chen, Jia-Jian; Chang, Cai; Gao, Yi; Wu, Jiong; Yang, Wen-Tao; Gu, Ya-Jia

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the radiological findings, particularly the ultrasonographic (US) characteristics of sclerosing adenosis (SA), and their correlation with histopathological results. A retrospective review identified 191 patients with a total of 200 lesions histopathologically confirmed as SA following breast surgery between July 2009 and December 2012. Of the 191 patients, 145 (151 lesions) with SA as the major component were included for US and mammographic (MG) analysis. All 145 patients analyzed were female, with a mean age ± standard deviation of 46.8±7.8 years (range, 25–71 years). All 145 patients underwent US examination and the imaging findings included heterogeneously echogenic areas in 9.3% (14/151), masses in 51.7% (78/151), masses with calcifications in 13.9% (21/151), focal acoustic shadowing in 4.0% (6/151) and were negative in 21.2% (32/151) patients. Among the 119 lesions with visible abnormalities, 87.4% (104/119) were hypoechoic, 58.0% (69/119) were irregular in shape, 52.1% (62/119) had an ill-defined margin, calcifications were found in 17.6% (21/119) and 7.6% (9/119) were hypervascular, while none of the characteristics mentioned above were significantly correlated with histopathology. A total of 136 patients underwent MG at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, and the imaging findings included microcalcifications in 31.6% (43/136), masses in 23.5% (32/136), asymmetric focal density in 14.7% (20/136), focal architectural distortion in 22.8% (31/136), and were negative in 7.4% (10/136). The mass lesions were fewer on MG compared with US (23.5 vs. 65.6%, respectively). The area under the curve of US distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions was significantly larger compared with that of MG (0.547 vs. 0.497, respectively; P=0.036). In the 60 lesions that were overestimated by Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System US category, one or more characteristics of malignancy were found on US imaging. The

  14. Histopathology in diagnosis of broiler chicken and layer diseases--review of cases 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Dolka, I; Sapierzyński, R; Bielecki, W; Malicka, E; Zbikowski, A; Szeleszczuk, P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of histopathological lesions in the different organs in relation to the commercial-type and the age of birds (i.e. broiler chickens and layers). During the period 1999-2010 a total of 189 cases was submitted to the Division of Animal Pathomorphology, Department of Pathology and Veterinary Diagnostics at WULS. Most cases were found in broiler chickens (66.7%). The majority of the histopathological lesions were detected in the liver and lymphoid organs. In of 29% cases of hepatic injury pathognomonic lesions associated with inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) were found. The mean age of birds was 23 days. Among IBH cases proventriculitis (58%) was more often found than gizzard lesions (25.8%). Interestingly, we noted some intranuclear inclusions in the epithelial cells within the proventriculus. A low percentage of histopathological evidence of infectious bursal disease (IBD) was reported in chickens. The gastrointestinal tract was the second most frequent predilection site for histopathological lesions. Histopathological findings within the heart and lungs were less common and were more often seen in the upper respiratory tract. Cases of infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) were registered in broiler chickens (3.2%, mean age 37 days) and in layers (4.8%; mean age 196 days). Lesions associated with Marek's disease, avian leukosis and fowl pox were recognized only in layers, respectively in 3.2% (mean age 176 days), 1.6% (mean age 205 days) and 1.1% (mean age 196 days) of all cases. Avian encephalomyelitis (AE) was noted only in 0.5% of all cases.

  15. Enzymatic and histopathologic biomarkers in the flatfish Euryglossa orientalis from the northwestern Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Chupani, Latifeh; Savari, Ahmad; Zolgharnein, Hossein; Rezaie, Anahita; Zeinali, Majid

    2016-05-01

    Most of the chemicals in the petrochemical sewages cause oxidative stress in marine organisms. Antioxidant enzymes (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) as biomarkers of oxidative stress and liver histopathological alterations were investigated in the current study to evaluate the toxic effects of petrochemical pollutions in flatfish, Euryglossa orientalis The enzymatic and histopathological changes were assessed in the liver of E. orientalis from Khowr-e Jafari (one of the creeks from Khowr-e Musa estuary) and Sajafi harbor as polluted and clean areas, respectively. A significant increase in the antioxidant enzyme activities was observed in response to aquatic pollutions of Khowr-e Jafari. Liver lesions were diagnosed and categorized using standard methods. The results of histopathological examinations showed more lesion scores in the fish from Khowr-e Jafari. Various histopathological changes including hepatocyte degeneration, inflammatory lesions, peliosis hepatis and pancreatic acinar cell adenoma, and increase in the number of pigmented macrophage aggregates were observed in the fish from polluted site. It is suggested that activities of CAT and SOD along with semi-quantitative histopathologic analysis of E. orientalis can be used for biomonitoring programs in Persian Gulf.

  16. The important role of interdisciplinary collaboration in the management of a melanocytic skin lesion

    PubMed Central

    Balato, Anna; Raimondo, Annunziata; Cantelli, Mariateresa; Siano, Maria; Lembo, Serena; Scalvenzi, Massimiliano; Balato, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    One of the most confounding characteristics, commonly seen in malignant, but even in benign melanocytic nevi, is represented by the regression phenomenon. The identification of regression, through dermoscopical observation, can be predictive of a tricky histopathological examination. Therefore, this feature should be an alert to a meticulous clinical, dermoscopical and histopathological correlation for correct analysis of melanocytic skin lesions. A 26-year-old man was referred to our department for a pigmented skin lesion localized on his trunk. It was clinically and dermoscopically diagnosed as atypical melanocytic nevus with central regression. After 1 year the lesion underwent considerable changes, leading to a nearly complete regression. The lesion was excised and, on the basis of clinical, dermoscopical and histopathological correlation, was interpreted as a junctional melanocytic nevus with regression. In our case the association of clinical, dermoscopical and histopathological experience, resulted an important and useful method, in order to proper interpret and correctly diagnose an atypical melanocytic skin lesion. PMID:25386254

  17. Elastoma: clinical and histopathological aspects of a rare disease*

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Marina Gagheggi; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Seize, Maria Bandeira de Melo Paiva; Marcassi, Aline Pantano; Piazza, Christiane Affonso De Donato; Cestari, Silmara da Costa Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Elastoma is a connective tissue nevus characterized by changes in elastic fibers. It can be congenital or acquired, and is usually diagnosed before puberty. Associated with osteopoikilosis, it is known as Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome. Histopathology with specific staining for elastic fibers is critical for a diagnostic conclusion. This report describes the case of a 7-year-old male patient with lesions diagnosed as elastoma, with absence of bone changes in the radiological imaging. This study aims to report the clinical presentation and histological examination of such unusual disease.

  18. Histopathology of mallards dosed with lead and selected substitute shot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Irby, H.D.; Bagley, George E.

    1967-01-01

    The histopathological response of male game farm mallards fed lead, three types of plastic-coated lead, two lead-magnesium alloys, iron, copper, zinc-coated iron, and molybdenum-coated iron shot was studied. Mallards fed lead, plastic-coated lead, or lead-magnesium alloy shot developed a similar pathological response, including the formation of acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in the kidneys. Birds fed iron or molybdenum-coated iron shot developed hemosiderosis of the liver. Two of four mallards fed zinc-coated iron shot also developed hemosiderosis of the liver. No lesions were found in mallards fed copper shot.

  19. Histopathologic diagnosis of multifactorial alopecia.

    PubMed

    Wohltmann, Wendi E; Sperling, Leonard

    2016-06-01

    Establishing a definitive diagnosis for any form of alopecia can be challenging. Adding to the diagnostic complexity is the fact that many patients have more than one form of alopecia contributing to their hair loss. We conducted a review of 1360 consecutive scalp biopsy specimens submitted for the evaluation of scalp hair loss over a 16-month period, demonstrating that 12.5% of cases had a combination of diagnoses (multifactorial alopecia) accounting for their hair loss. An approach to the histopathologic diagnosis of multifactorial alopecia, particularly multiple forms of alopecia found in a single biopsy, is here presented.

  20. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in raccoons from Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Jenny; Newsome, Anthony; Huang, Junjun; Kirby, Jordona; Kranz, Melissa; Wateska, Angela; Dunlap, Brett; Yabsley, Michael J; Dunn, John R; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

    2010-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Autochthonous human and canine transmission of T. cruzi has been documented in Tennessee, but little is known about its ecology, including the prevalence of T. cruzi among wildlife in Tennessee. Serum samples from 706 raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 10 counties in the Ridge and Valley and Blue Ridge Mountains ecoregions of eastern Tennessee were tested for antibodies reactive with T. cruzi using the indirect fluorescent antibody assay. Two hundred six (29.2%) samples were seropositive, with 9 counties yielding positive samples (range 14.6-63.6%). Significantly more raccoons from rural habitats (35.1%) were found positive for T. cruzi exposure than were those from suburban habitats (23.1%, P < 0.001). Land cover class was not associated with seropositivity status (P = 0.441), even though deciduous forest was the most common site from where raccoons were trapped and the most common site of positive raccoons in rural areas (42%). Interestingly, age was positively associated with seropositivity. Raccoons older than 1 yr (adults) were 40.1% seropositive compared to 12.2% of those less than 1 yr (juveniles; P < 0.001). Female adults were significantly more likely to be exposed to T. cruzi than were male adult raccoons (P < 0.001). No significant seroprevalence difference was seen among male and female juveniles. This study contributes to understanding the dynamics of T. cruzi exposure within raccoon populations in Tennessee. The importance of habitat (rural vs. suburban) and microhabitat (dens) in risk of exposure to these populations is also discussed.

  1. Potentially malignant oral lesions: clinicopathological correlations

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Haline Cunha de Medeiros; Pinto, Najara Alcântara Sampaio; Pereira, Joabe dos Santos; de Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the incidence of potentially malignant oral lesions, and evaluate and correlate their clinical and pathological aspects. Methods The sample consisted of cases clinically diagnosed as oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, erythroleukoplakia, actinic cheilitis, and oral lichen planus treated at a diagnostic center, between May 2012 and July 2013. Statistical tests were conducted adopting a significance level of 5% (p≤0.05). Results Out of 340 patients, 106 (31.2%) had potentially malignant oral lesions; and 61 of these (17.9%) were submitted to biopsy. Actinic cheilitis was the most frequent lesion (37.5%) and the lower lip was the most affected site (49.6%). Among 106 patients in the sample, 48 (45.3%) reported nicotine consumption, 35 (33%) reported alcohol intake and 34 (32.1%) sun exposure while working. When clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compared, oral erythroplakia and atypical ulcer were the lesions that exhibited greater compatibility (100% each). Conclusion In most cases, clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compatible. An association between the occurrence of erythroplakia, leukoplakia and erythroleukoplakia with smoking was observed. Similarly, an association between actinic cheilitis and sun exposure was noted. Erythroleukoplakia presented the highest malignancy grade in this study. Finally, dental surgeons should draw special attention to diagnosis of potentially malignant oral lesions, choose the best management, and control the lesions to avoid their malignant transformation. PMID:27074232

  2. Atypical feline sporotrichosis resembling vaccine-induced sarcoma: clinical and histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Isabele Barbieri; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; de Miranda, Luisa Helena Monteiro; de Sousa Trotte, Marcele Nogueira; Schubach, Tânia Maria Pacheco; Tortelly, Rogerio

    2013-06-01

    A 7-year-old Siamese cat presenting with three ulcerated cutaneous nodules in the lumbosacral region was seen at the Laboratory for Clinical Research on Dermatozoonoses in Domestic Animals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Histopathological analysis showed that the lesions consisted of polyhedral and spindle-shaped voluminous mononuclear cells with loose chromatin and clearly visible nucleoli, few giant cells, and foci of coagulative and caseous necrosis -- findings suggestive of a vaccine-induced sarcoma. No significant mitotic rate, cytological atypias or asteroid bodies were observed. Special histopathological staining with periodic acid-Schiff and Grocott's silver stain demonstrated the presence of small yeast cells characterized by simple and narrow-base budding compatible with Sporothrix schenckii. Mycological culture grew S schenckii. Cytopathology was negative for yeast cells. These atypical clinical and histopathological signs support the importance of histopathological analysis with special staining techniques, in addition to mycological culture in the diagnosis of feline sporotrichosis.

  3. Toxic and therapeutic effects of Nifurtimox and Benznidazol on Trypanosoma cruzi ex vivo infection of human placental chorionic villi explants.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Gemma; Castillo, Christian; Duaso, Juan; Liempi, Ana; Droguett, Daniel; Galanti, Norbel; Maya, Juan Diego; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2014-04-01

    Nifurtimox (Nfx) and Benznidazole (Bnz) are the only available drugs in use for the treatment of Chagas disease. These drugs are recommended but not fully validated in evidence-based medicine and reports about the differential toxicity of both drugs are controversial. Here, we evaluated the toxic and therapeutic effects of Nfx and Bnz on human placental chorionic villi explants (HPCVE) during ex vivo infection of Trypanosoma cruzi, performing histopathological, histochemical, immunohistochemical as well as immunofluorescence analysis of the tissue. Additionally, we determined the effect of both drugs on parasite load by real time PCR. Bnz prevents the parasite induced tissue damage in ex vivo infected HPCVE compared to Nfx, which is toxic per se. The presence of T. cruzi antigens and DNA in infected explants suggests that these drugs do not impair parasite invasion into the HPCVE. Additionally, our results confirm reports suggesting that Bnz is less toxic than Nfx and support the need for the development of more effective and better-tolerated drugs.

  4. Transcriptional and phenotypical heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Seco-Hidalgo, Víctor; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Osuna, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex life cycle comprising pools of cell populations which circulate among humans, vectors, sylvatic reservoirs and domestic animals. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated the importance of clonal variations for parasite population dynamics, survival and evolution. By limiting dilution assays, we have isolated seven isogenic clonal cell lines derived from the Pan4 strain of T. cruzi. Applying different molecular techniques, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the expression heterogeneity in the mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) gene family, where all the clonal isogenic populations were transcriptionally different. Hierarchical cluster analysis and sequence comparison among different MASP cDNA libraries showed that, despite the great variability in MASP expression, some members of the transcriptome (including MASP pseudogenes) are conserved, not only in the life-cycle stages but also among different strains of T. cruzi. Finally, other important aspects for the parasite, such as growth, spontaneous metacyclogenesis or excretion of different catabolites, were also compared among the clones, demonstrating that T. cruzi populations of cells are also phenotypically heterogeneous. Although the evolutionary strategy that sustains the MASP expression polymorphism remains unknown, we suggest that MASP clonal variability and phenotypic heterogeneities found in this study might provide an advantage, allowing a rapid response to environmental pressure or changes during the life cycle of T. cruzi. PMID:26674416

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi: modification of macrophage function during infection

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent intraperitoneal challenge with heat-killed trypanosomes elicits peritoneal macrophages which display in vitro microbicidal activity against trypomastigotes of T. cruzi. These cells also display other activated properties including rapid spreading, intense membrane activity, secretion of high levels of plasminogen activator, and ingestion mediated by the C3 receptor. An intravenous infection with BCG, followed by an intraperitoneal challenge with mycobacterial antigens brings about macrophages with similar properties. These criteria of macrophage activation were compared in normal and BCG- or T. cruzi-immune mice, with or without an intraperitoneal challenge with specific or unrelated antigens. Trypanocidal activity is displayed by both BCG- and T. cruzi-immune macrophages after intraperitoneal challenge with either antigen. Resident-immune macrophages from both T. cruzi- and BCG-infected mice show a trypanostatic, rather than trypanocidal activity. Macrophages from noninfected mice, challenged with the same antigens, show neither trypanostatic nor trypanocidal activity. Increased secretion of plasminogen activator shows a definite immunological specificity. Challenge with the specific antigen induces the appearance of macrophages secreting high levels of plasminogen activator, while unrelated antigens induce much smaller levels. Noninfected mice challenged with the same antigens do not display any enchancement in secretion. In contrast, increased spreading and phagocytosis mediated by the complement receptor are also displayed by cells from noninfected mice challenged with any of the agents tested. PMID:327012

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi culture used as vaccine to prevent chronic Chagas' disease in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Basombrío, M A; Besuschio, S

    1982-01-01

    The development of chronic pathology in mice at 2 to 10 months after inoculation of 10(2) T. cruzi trypomastigotes can be prevented by preimmunization with live, attenuated culture parasites (strain TCC). Swiss mice received one or three immunizing inoculations of 10(6) TCC organisms and were challenged with 10(2) Tulahuén blood trypomastigotes. Control groups received only the immunizing or the challenge inoculations. Immunized groups as compared with nonimmunized controls had lower mortality rates at 2 months postchallenge (9% versus 23%; P = 0.059), lower early peaks of parasitemia, lower percentages of positive xenodiagnoses at 5.5 months (40 versus 80%; P = 0.061), and lower incidences of tissue lesions in the skeletal muscle (P less than 0.005) at 2,6, and 10 months postchallenge. Tissue lesions in the heart and smooth muscle were also reduced, reaching statistical significance after 10 months (P less than 0.02). Chronic pathology parameters were never enhanced in preimmunized groups. In spite of the putative role that autoimmunity may play in the development of chronic chagasic lesions, the preventive effect of vaccination is readily exerted upon the chronic murine model of Chagas' disease. Images PMID:6804390

  7. Diverse imaging characteristics of a mandibular intraosseous vascular lesion.

    PubMed

    Handa, Hina; Naidu, Giridhar S; Dara, Balaji Gandhi Babu; Deshpande, Ashwini; Raghavendra, Raju

    2014-03-01

    Intraosseous vascular lesions of the maxillofacial region are rare, and the differential diagnosis of intraosseous vascular malformations from other jaw lesions can be challenging. In the present case, magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was used for diagnosis, and the lesion was treated wih surgical excision. Diverse characteristics such as the "honeycomb" and "sunburst" radiographic appearances and the absence of major peripheral feeder vessels in the CTA were noted. Intraosseous vascular malformations have a varied radiographic appearance, and the nomenclature of these lesions is equally diverse, with several overlapping terms. Pathologists do not generally differentiate among intraosseous vascular lesions on the basis of histopathology, although these lesions may present with contrasting immunohistochemical and clinical behaviors requiring varied treatment strategies. This case report highlights the need for multiple imaging modalities to differentiate among vascular lesions, as well as to better understand the behaviors of these unique lesions.

  8. Histopathological Image Classification using Discriminative Feature-oriented Dictionary Learning

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Tiep Huu; Mousavi, Hojjat Seyed; Monga, Vishal; Rao, Ganesh; Rao, UK Arvind

    2016-01-01

    In histopathological image analysis, feature extraction for classification is a challenging task due to the diversity of histology features suitable for each problem as well as presence of rich geometrical structures. In this paper, we propose an automatic feature discovery framework via learning class-specific dictionaries and present a low-complexity method for classification and disease grading in histopathology. Essentially, our Discriminative Feature-oriented Dictionary Learning (DFDL) method learns class-specific dictionaries such that under a sparsity constraint, the learned dictionaries allow representing a new image sample parsimoniously via the dictionary corresponding to the class identity of the sample. At the same time, the dictionary is designed to be poorly capable of representing samples from other classes. Experiments on three challenging real-world image databases: 1) histopathological images of intraductal breast lesions, 2) mammalian kidney, lung and spleen images provided by the Animal Diagnostics Lab (ADL) at Pennsylvania State University, and 3) brain tumor images from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, reveal the merits of our proposal over state-of-the-art alternatives. Moreover, we demonstrate that DFDL exhibits a more graceful decay in classification accuracy against the number of training images which is highly desirable in practice where generous training is often not available. PMID:26513781

  9. Comparison of optical coherence tomography imaging of cataracts with histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Roach, William P.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Cox, Ann B.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) captured cataract images to subsequent histopathological examination of the lenticular opacities. OCT imaging was performed on anesthetized Rhesus monkeys, known as the delayed effects colony (DEC), with documented cataracts. These monkeys were exposed to several types of radiation during the mid and late 1960s. The radiation and age related cataracts in these animals were closely monitored using a unique grading system developed specifically for the DEC. In addition to this system, a modified version of a common cataract grading scheme for use in humans was applied. Of the original 18 monkeys imaged, lenses were collected at necropsy from seven of these animals, processed, and compared to OCT images. Results showed a direct correlation between the vertical OCT images and the cataractous lesions seen on corresponding histopathological sections of the lenses. Based on the images obtained and their corresponding documented comparison to histopathology, OCT showed tremendous potential to aid identification and characterization of cataracts. There can be artifactual problems with the images related to movement and shadows produced by opacities. However, with the advent of increased speed in imaging and multiplanar imaging, these disadvantages may easily be overcome.

  10. Histopathological Image Classification Using Discriminative Feature-Oriented Dictionary Learning.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tiep Huu; Mousavi, Hojjat Seyed; Monga, Vishal; Rao, Ganesh; Rao, U K Arvind

    2016-03-01

    In histopathological image analysis, feature extraction for classification is a challenging task due to the diversity of histology features suitable for each problem as well as presence of rich geometrical structures. In this paper, we propose an automatic feature discovery framework via learning class-specific dictionaries and present a low-complexity method for classification and disease grading in histopathology. Essentially, our Discriminative Feature-oriented Dictionary Learning (DFDL) method learns class-specific dictionaries such that under a sparsity constraint, the learned dictionaries allow representing a new image sample parsimoniously via the dictionary corresponding to the class identity of the sample. At the same time, the dictionary is designed to be poorly capable of representing samples from other classes. Experiments on three challenging real-world image databases: 1) histopathological images of intraductal breast lesions, 2) mammalian kidney, lung and spleen images provided by the Animal Diagnostics Lab (ADL) at Pennsylvania State University, and 3) brain tumor images from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, reveal the merits of our proposal over state-of-the-art alternatives. Moreover, we demonstrate that DFDL exhibits a more graceful decay in classification accuracy against the number of training images which is highly desirable in practice where generous training is often not available.

  11. Simultaneous sparsity model for histopathological image representation and classification.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Umamahesh; Mousavi, Hojjat Seyed; Monga, Vishal; Hattel, Arthur; Jayarao, Bhushan

    2014-05-01

    The multi-channel nature of digital histopathological images presents an opportunity to exploit the correlated color channel information for better image modeling. Inspired by recent work in sparsity for single channel image classification, we propose a new simultaneous sparsity model for multi-channel histopathological image representation and classification (SHIRC). Essentially, we represent a histopathological image as a sparse linear combination of training examples under suitable channel-wise constraints. Classification is performed by solving a newly formulated simultaneous sparsity-based optimization problem. A practical challenge is the correspondence of image objects (cellular and nuclear structures) at different spatial locations in the image. We propose a robust locally adaptive variant of SHIRC (LA-SHIRC) to tackle this issue. Experiments on two challenging real-world image data sets: 1) mammalian tissue images acquired by pathologists of the animal diagnostics lab (ADL) at Pennsylvania State University, and 2) human intraductal breast lesions, reveal the merits of our proposal over state-of-the-art alternatives. Further, we demonstrate that LA-SHIRC exhibits a more graceful decay in classification accuracy against the number of training images which is highly desirable in practice where generous training per class is often not available.

  12. Development of histopathological indices in a commercial marine bivalve (Ruditapes decussatus) to determine environmental quality.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro M; Carreira, Sara; Costa, Maria H; Caeiro, Sandra

    2013-01-15

    Bivalve histopathology is an acknowledged tool in environmental toxicology studies, however geographically restricted, limited to a few species and still lacking the degree of detail needed to develop effective (semi)quantitative approaches. A first-time detailed histopathological screening was performed on grooved carpet shell clams collected from commercial shellfish beds in distinct coastal ecosystems of the Southern Portuguese coast: two parted sites within an impacted estuary (S(1) and S(2)), an inlet channel of a fish farm at a considered pristine estuary (site M) and a site allocated in a clean coastal lagoon (A). A total of thirty histopathological lesions and alterations were analysed in the gills and digestive glands following a weighted condition indices approach, including inflammation-related responses, necrosis, neoplastic diseases and parasites. Digestive glands were consistently more damaged than gills, except for animals collected from site M, where the most severe lesions were found in both organs, immediately followed by S(2). Clams from sites S(1) and A were overall the least damaged. Neoplastic diseases were infrequent in all cases. Inflammation-related traits were some of the most common alterations progressing in animals enduring severe lesions such as digestive tubule (diverticula) and intertubular tissue necrosis. Some alterations, such as lipofuscin aggregates within digestive tubule cells, did not relate to histological lesions. Granulocytomas only occurred in heavily infected tissues. Animals from M and A presented the highest infections in the digestive gland, especially by protozoa. Gill infections were more similar between sites. Still, the level of infection does not account for all histopathological lesions in either organ. Overall, the results are in accordance with environmental parameters, such as distance to pollution sources, sediment type and hydrodynamics, and show that the combination of multiple histopathological features

  13. Histopathologic Findings in Autopsies with Emphasis on Interesting and Incidental Findings-A Pathologist’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, B.R.; Manjunath, G.V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autopsy aids to the knowledge of pathology by unveiling the rare lesions which are a source of learning from a pathologist’s perspective Some of them are only diagnosed at autopsy as they do not cause any functional derangement. This study emphasizes the various incidental lesions which otherwise would have been unnoticed during a person’s life. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the spectrum of histopathological findings including neoplastic lesions related or unrelated to the cause of death. It was also aimed to highlight various incidental and interesting lesions in autopsies. Materials and Methods A retrospective study of medicolegal autopsies for six years was undertaken in a tertiary care centre to determine the spectrum of histopathological findings including neoplastic lesions related or unrelated to the cause of death and to highlight various incidental and interesting lesions in autopsies. Statistical Analysis: Individual lesions were described in numbers and incidence in percentage. Results The study consisted of a series of 269 autopsy cases and histopathological findings were studied only in 202 cases. The commonest cause of death was pulmonary oedema. The most common incidental histopathological finding noted was atherosclerosis in 55 (27.2%) cases followed by fatty liver in 40 (19.8%) cases. Neoplastic lesions accounted for 2.47% of cases. Conclusion This study has contributed a handful of findings to the pool of rare lesions in pathology. Some of these lesions encountered which served as feast to a pathologist are tumour to tumour metastasis, a case with coexistent triple lesions, Dubin Johnson syndrome, von Meyenburg complex, Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma (MCRCC), Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD), liver carcinod and an undiagnosed vaso-occlusive sickle cell crisis. Autopsy studies help in the detection of unexpected findings significant enough to have changed patient management had they been

  14. Histopathology of a wavy medaka

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Kota; Kuroda, Yusuke; Mimori, Norihiko; Hayashi, Seigo; Abe, Masayoshi; Tsuji, Naho; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Furukawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wavy medakas are medakas that exhibit spinal curvature characterized by dorsoventrally curved vertebrae. We found a spontaneous wavy medaka in our experimental stock and subjected it to a histopathological examination. Macroscopically, the wavy medaka’s spine formed an M shape, and its vertebrae displayed a dorsoventral curvature that started at the third vertebral bone. Microscopically, the vertebral cavities were filled with fibrous tissue, which was similar to that seen in the central parts of the intervertebral discs of a normal medaka. The vertebral joints were composed of vacuolated notochord cells without intervertebral disc formation. These changes were also observed in the caudal region, which exhibited less curvature. In the normal medaka, the intervertebral discs form via the regression of the notochord that plays a key role in the development of vertebrae and disc formation. We concluded that notochordal subinvolution had induced intervertebral disc dysplasia, leading to lordokyphosis, in the wavy medaka. PMID:27182116

  15. Pulmonary ground-glass opacity: computed tomography features, histopathology and molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Wei; Rizzo, Stefania; Ma, Li-Hong; Qiu, Xiang-Yu; Warth, Arne; Seki, Nobuhiko; Hasegawa, Mizue; Zou, Jia-Wei; Li, Qian; Femia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) lesions is increasing as a result of the widespread use of multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) and the low-dose CT screening for lung cancer detection. Besides benign lesions, GGOs can be a specific type of lung adenocarcinomas or their preinvasive lesions. Evaluation of pulmonary GGO and investigation of the correlation between CT imaging features and lung adenocarcinoma subtypes or driver genes can be helpful in confirming the diagnosis and in guiding the clinical management. Our review focuses on the pathologic characteristics of GGO detected at CT, involving histopathology and molecular pathology.

  16. Statistical analysis of histopathological endpoints.

    PubMed

    Green, John W; Springer, Timothy A; Saulnier, Amy N; Swintek, Joe

    2014-05-01

    Histopathological assessments of fish from aquatic ecotoxicology studies are being performed with increasing frequency. Aquatic ecotoxicology studies performed for submission to regulatory agencies are usually conducted with multiple subjects (e.g., fish) in each of multiple vessels (replicates) within a water control and within each of several concentrations of a test substance. A number of histopathological endpoints are evaluated in each fish, and a severity score is generally recorded for each endpoint. The severity scores are often recorded using a nonquantitative scale of 0 to 4, with 0 indicating no effect, 1 indicating minimal effect, through 4 for severe effect. Statistical methods often used to analyze these scores suffer from several shortcomings: computing average scores as though scores were quantitative values, considering only the frequency of abnormality while ignoring severity, ignoring any concentration-response trend, and ignoring the possible correlation between responses of individuals within test vessels. A new test, the Rao-Scott Cochran-Armitage by Slices (RSCABS), is proposed that incorporates the replicate vessel experimental design and the biological expectation that the severity of the effect tends to increase with increasing doses or concentrations, while retaining the individual subject scores and taking into account the severity as well as frequency of scores. A power simulation and examples demonstrate the performance of the test. R-based software has been developed to carry out this test and is available free of charge at www.epa.gov/med/Prods_Pubs/rscabs.htm. The SAS-based RSCABS software is available from the first and third authors.

  17. Editing the Trypanosoma cruzi genome with zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Burle-Caldas, Gabriela Assis; Grazielle-Silva, Viviane; Soares-Simões, Melissa; Schumann Burkard, Gabriela; Roditi, Isabel; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte; Teixeira, Santuza M

    2017-03-01

    Gene function studies in Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, have been hindered by the lack of efficient genetic manipulation protocols. In most organisms, insertion and deletion of DNA fragments in the genome are dependent on the generation of double-stranded DNA break (DSB) and repair. By inducing a site-specific DSB, zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have proven to be useful to enhance gene editing in many cell types. Using a pair of ZFNs targeted to the T. cruzi gp72 gene, we were able to generate gp72 knockout parasites with improved efficiency compared to the conventional gene knockout protocol. We also provide evidence that, in T. cruzi, repair of DSBs generated by ZFNs occurs primarily by the homologous recombination pathway.

  18. [Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Argentina has being increasing its relative importance with control of vectorial and transfusional transmission growth. It is for this reason that vertical transmission is seen, in the future, as a continuous source of infected newborns, even with vectorial and transfusional transmission completely controlled. Preventing vertical transmission of T.cruzi is not possible, but it can be precociously detected, permitting mother and child to be incorporated into the medical attention system, and so allowing the newbornś treatment with practically 100% efficacy. It is estimated that between 800 and 1700 children infected with T. cruzi by congenital transmission are born in Argentina, per year. The implementation of an early strategy of detection for an effective and opportune treatment acquires great relevance as a Public Health measure.

  19. Liver biopsy histopathology for diagnosis of Johne's disease in sheep.

    PubMed

    Smith, S L; Wilson, P R; Collett, M G; Heuer, C; West, D M; Stevenson, M; Chambers, J P

    2014-09-01

    Sheep with Johne's disease develop epithelioid macrophage microgranulomas, specific to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection, in the terminal ileum, mesenteric lymph nodes, and organs distant to the alimentary tract such as the liver. The objectives of this study were to determine whether liver pathology was present in ewes affected by Map and whether liver cores provide adequate tissue for this potential diagnostic marker. One hundred and twenty-six adult, low body condition ewes were euthanized, necropsied, and underwent simulated liver biopsy. Ileal lesions typical of Map were found in 60 ewes. Hepatic epithelioid microgranulomas were observed in all ewes with Type 3b (n = 40) and 82% (n = 11) with Type 3c ileal lesions. None were found in ewes unaffected by Map or with Type 1, 2, or 3a ileal lesions. Liver biopsy core samples provided adequate tissue for histopathology with a sensitivity and specificity of 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-0.99) and 100% (95% CI, 0.95-1), respectively for detection of types 3b and 3c ileal lesions.

  20. Nitrogen and sulphur mustard induced histopathological observations in mouse visceral organs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Pant, S C; Pant, J C; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2010-11-01

    Nitrogen mustards (HN) and sulphur mustard (SM) are potent alkylating blister inducing chemical warfare agents. Single 1.0 LD50 dose produced a progressive fall in body weight from second day onwards in all groups of mustard agents exposed animals. Histological examination of spleen, liver skin and kidney revealed significant histopathological lesions in nitrogen mustards and sulphur mustard. These lesions include granulovascular degeneration with perinuclear clumping of the cytoplasm of hepatocytes and renal parenchymal cells. Renal lesions were characterized by congestion and hemorrhage. The maximum toxic manifestation were noted in spleen and skin of HN-3 exposed mice while sulphur mustard reported maximum toxicity in liver and kidneys. The study suggests both nitrogen mustards and sulphur mustard to be extremely toxic by percutaneous route based on histopathological observation and can contributed to earlier reported free radical generation by these toxicants.

  1. Microbiological and histopathological features of canine acral lick dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Shumaker, A K; Angus, J C; Coyner, K S; Loeffler, D G; Rankin, S C; Lewis, T P

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate microbiological and histopathological features of canine acral lick dermatitis (ALD). Microbial characteristics of ALD are poorly described in current literature. If infection is recognized, antimicrobial selection is usually empirical, based on appearance, cytology or surface culture, rather than deep tissue culture. It was hypothesized that cultures obtained from deep tissue would yield different results than predicted by surface culture and cytology, and that isolates from ALD have unpredictable susceptibility patterns showing resistance to antibiotics routinely administered for canine pyoderma. Biopsies were obtained from 31 lesions and submitted for aerobic, anaerobic and fungal culture, and histopathological evaluation. Surface aerobic culture and susceptibility and cytology were obtained for comparison in 22 dogs. Skin scrapings and dermatophyte culture were performed. Bacteria were isolated in 30 of 31 cases. Staphylococcus intermedius was isolated in 58% of deep cultures. Twenty per cent of deep isolates were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species. Forty-eight per cent of cases yielded organisms defined as multidrug resistant on deep culture. Only 57% and 55% of bacteria isolated from tissue culture were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and cefazolin, respectively. Cytology and superficial cultures did not correlate well with deep cultures. Surface culture predicted deep tissue isolates in eight of 22 cases. Microsporum gypseum was isolated from one dog. Histopathological features included acanthosis, follicular elongation, lymphoplasmacytic dermal inflammation, folliculitis, furunculosis, perihidradenitis, hidradenitis and vertical streaking fibrosis. Lesions associated with ALD warrant tissue bacterial cultures as the majority of cases yielded positive growth of bacteria differing from superficial culture and often resistant to empirical drugs.

  2. Aspirin treatment exacerbates oral infections by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cossentini, Luana Aparecida; Da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; De Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2016-05-01

    Oral transmission of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been documented in Latin American countries. The reported cases of infection were due to the ingestion of contaminated fresh fruit, juices, or sugar cane juice. There have been few studies on the physiopathology of the disease in oral transmission cases. Gastritis is a common ailment that can be caused by poor dietary habits, intake of alcohol or other gastric irritants, bacterial infection, or by the widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This study investigated in a mouse model whether gastric mucosal injury, induced by aspirin, would affect the course of disease in animals infected with T. cruzi by the oral route. The CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi, both of low infectivity, were used. To this end, groups of BALB/c mice were treated during 5 days with aspirin (100 mg kg(-1)) before oral infection with T. cruzi metacyclic forms (4 × 10(5) or 5 × 10(7) parasites/mouse). Histological analysis and determination of nitric oxide and TNF-α were performed in gastric samples obtained 5 days after infection. Parasitemia was monitored from the thirteenth day after infection. The results indicate that aspirin treatment of mice injured their gastric mucosa and facilitated invasion by both CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi. Strain CL14 caused more severe infection compared to the G strain, as larger numbers of amastigote nests were found in the stomach and parasitemia levels were higher. Our study is novel in that it shows that gastric mucosal damage caused by aspirin, a commonly used NSAID, facilitates T. cruzi infection by the oral route.

  3. Autoimmune hepatitis. Definition--classification--histopathology--immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Dienes, H P

    1996-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a distinct form of acute and chronic inflammatory liver disease in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. If left untreated it carries an unfavourable prognosis, and the diagnosis should be made as soon as possible. The diagnostic approach has been greatly facilitated by the establishment of a panel of marker autoantibodies, which do not define distinct therapeutic groups of AIH, but do allow a subgrouping based on differences in patient populations, some clinical features and prognosis. The characterization of organ-specific components of the liver cell surface as targets of cellular and humoral autoimmune reactions give new insights into the pathogenesis of the disease, even though the primary event triggering the disease remains to be defined. The most important disease-promoting factor seems to be a genetically determined background for autoimmunity. Without this different environmental factors, including viruses, toxins, cytokines and drugs, are only able to induce transient autoimmune phenomena and not autoimmune disease. The histopathology of AIH is in keeping with the present pathogenetic concept. Although there is no pathognomonic feature distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus-induced forms, some distinct morphological lesions are regarded as characteristic. Clinical research on AIH has benefited greatly from observations of experimental AIH in mice. Recognition of the critical role of autoreactive T-lymphocytes in the pathogenesis and the observation of spontaneous recovery from AIH in the animal model associated with antigen-specific and antigen-non-specific T-cell suppression have made basic contributions to our improved understanding of the natural course of AIH in humans.

  4. A comparison of gross pathology, histopathology, and mycobacterial culture for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in elk (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed Central

    Rohonczy, E B; Balachandran, A V; Dukes, T W; Payeur, J B; Rhyan, J C; Saari, D A; Whiting, T L; Wilson, S H; Jarnagin, J L

    1996-01-01

    Using the isolation of Mycobacterium bovis as the reference standard, this study evaluated the sensitivity, specificity and kappa statistic of gross pathology (abattoir postmortem inspection), histopathology, and parallel or series combinations of the two for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in 430 elk and red deer. Two histopathology interpretations were evaluated: histopathology I, where the presence of lesions compatible with tuberculosis was considered positive, and histopathology II, where lesions compatible with tuberculosis or a select group of additional possible diagnoses were considered positive. In the 73 animals from which M. bovis was isolated, gross lesions of tuberculosis were most often in the lung (48), the retropharyngeal lymph nodes (36), the mesenteric lymph node (35), and the mediastinal lymph nodes (16). Other mycobacterial isolates included: 11 M. paratuberculosis, 11 M. avium, and 28 rapidly growing species or M. terrae complex. The sensitivity estimates of gross pathology and histopathology I were 93% (95% confidence limits [CL] 84.97%) and 88% [CL 77.94%], respectively, and the specificity of both was 89% [CL 85.92%]). The sensitivity and specificity of histopathology II were 89% (CL 79.95%) and 77% (CL 72.81%), respectively. The highest sensitivity estimates (93-95% [CL 84.98%]) were obtained by interpreting gross pathology and histopathology in parallel (where an animal had to be positive on at least one of the two, to be classified as combination positive). The highest specificity estimates (94-95% [CL 91-97%] were generated when the two tests were interpreted in series (an animal had to be positive on both tests to be classified as combination positive). The presence of gross or microscopic lesions showed moderate to good agreement with the isolation of M. bovis (Kappa = 65-69%). The results showed that post-mortem inspection, histopathology and culture do not necessarily recognize the same infected animals and that the spectra of animals

  5. Value of Strain Elastography Ultrasound in Differentiation of Breast Masses and Histopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Atabey, Aysun Okar; Arıbal, Erkin; Ergelen, Rabia; Kaya, Handan

    2014-01-01

    Objective US elastography is an emerging technique that can be used during breast US examination. The increasing awareness of breast cancer led to an increase in mammography and breast US examinations. The specificity of these techniques is not high enough to prevent unnecessary biopsies. There is still a need for a more specific technique that can overcome this problem. This study aimed to evaluate the value of strain elastography in breast lesions. Materials and Methods In this study, 110 lesions of 96 patients were evaluated with strain elastography. Five score system was used for lesion scoring. The histopathologic results of lesions were obtained and were accepted as gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the technique were calculated. Histopathologic and strain elastography results were correlated. Results The sensitivity of US strain elastography was calculated as 83%, the specificity as 89%, the positive predictive value as 79% and the negative predictive value as 91%. There were no score 1 lesions. All score 2 lesions were benign. Score 5 had the highest true positivity rate. Conclusion We believe that ultrasound elastography is an effective imaging technique that can be used as an adjunct for differential diagnosis, prior to the decision to biopsy a lesion in certain cases.

  6. Clinical and histopathologic study of benign lichenoid keratosis on the face.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Su; Park, Eun Joo; Kwon, In Ho; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kim, Kwang Joong

    2013-10-01

    Benign lichenoid keratosis is a cutaneous entity that consists of a nonpruritic papule or slightly indurated plaque that is histologically characterized by a band-like inflammatory infiltrate with interface involvement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and histopathologic features of benign lichenoid keratosis localized on the face. Fourteen benign lichenoid keratosis patients diagnosed clinically and histopathologically in our clinic during the 10-year period from 2002 to 2012 were studied. Thirteen female and 1 male patients were included. The mean age at diagnosis was 46.5 years. The color of most of the lesions was brown (10 cases, 71%). The cheek was the most commonly involved area (10 cases, 71%). All of the lesions were single. There were 9 (64%) flat lesion cases and 5 (36%) raised lesion cases. Most patients denied having any symptoms; 3 had mild pruritus. The histopathological findings indicated that all the cases exhibited lichenoid inflammatory infiltrate obscuring the dermal-epidermal junction and vacuolar alteration of basal cell layer. The lesions showed focal parakeratosis (79%), melanophages (79%), hyperkeratosis (71%), and necrotic keratinocytes (71%). Solar elastosis (50%) and acanthosis (43%) were also seen frequently. Diagnosis of benign lichenoid keratosis should be made by a combination of clinical manifestations and histopathological findings. In particular, benign lichenoid keratosis should be considered if a middle-aged patient presents a solitary asymptomatic brown lesion on the face. We think benign lichenoid keratosis may be a specific disorder rather than the inflammatory stage of regressing solar lentigines, large cell acanthoma or reticulated seborrheic keratosis.

  7. [Current perspectives on endodontic treatment of teeth with chronic periapical lesions].

    PubMed

    Canalda Sahli, C

    1990-01-01

    The author study in this article histopathological aspects of periapical lesions, intra-granulomatous epithelial proliferation phenomenon as pathogenic mechanism of microscopic cystic cavities formation, diagnostic problems of them all, as well as the most actual therapeutic perspectives.

  8. Diode Laser Excision of Oral Benign Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ena; Sareen, Mohit; Dhaka, Payal; Baghla, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lasers have made tremendous progress in the field of dentistry and have turned out to be crucial in oral surgery as collateral approach for soft tissue surgery. This rapid progress can be attributed to the fact that lasers allow efficient execution of soft tissue procedures with excellent hemostasis and field visibility. When matched to scalpel, electrocautery or high frequency devices, lasers offer maximum postoperative patient comfort. Methods: Four patients agreed to undergo surgical removal of benign lesions of the oral cavity. 810 nm diode lasers were used in continuous wave mode for excisional biopsy. The specimens were sent for histopathological examination and patients were assessed on intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results: Diode laser surgery was rapid, bloodless and well accepted by patients and led to complete resolution of the lesions. The excised specimen proved adequate for histopathological examination. Hemostasis was achieved immediately after the procedure with minimal postoperative problems, discomfort and scarring. Conclusion: We conclude that diode lasers are rapidly becoming the standard of care in contemporary dental practice and can be employed in procedures requiring excisional biopsy of oral soft tissue lesions with minimal problems in histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26464781

  9. 42 CFR 493.1273 - Standard: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Histopathology. 493.1273 Section 493.1273 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1273 Standard: Histopathology. (a) As specified in § 493.1256(e)(3), fluorescent...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1273 - Standard: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard: Histopathology. 493.1273 Section 493.1273 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1273 Standard: Histopathology. (a) As specified in § 493.1256(e)(3), fluorescent...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1273 - Standard: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard: Histopathology. 493.1273 Section 493.1273 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1273 Standard: Histopathology. (a) As specified in § 493.1256(e)(3), fluorescent...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1273 - Standard: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Histopathology. 493.1273 Section 493.1273 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1273 Standard: Histopathology. (a) As specified in § 493.1256(e)(3), fluorescent...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1273 - Standard: Histopathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard: Histopathology. 493.1273 Section 493.1273 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1273 Standard: Histopathology. (a) As specified in § 493.1256(e)(3), fluorescent...

  14. Proliferative Lesions of Parathyroid Glands: An Update for Practicing Pathologists.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Shaheera; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    Pathological lesions of parathyroid glands encompass a wide range of lesions ranging from developmental anomalies to inflammatory disorders to neoplastic processes. Proliferative lesions of parathyroid glands represent the commonest causes of hyperparathyroidism in clinical practice. However, the parathyroid specimens represent only a tiny fraction of the workload received in a non-specialist histopathology laboratory. As a result, the familiarity of the pathologists with the spectrum of parathyroid lesions is generally limited. An accurate diagnosis of the parathyroid lesions is challenging and a daunting task for both the clinicians and the pathologists. The traditional morphological approaches have limitations. Ancillary techniques of immunohistochemistry and molecular biology are being increasingly employed to resolve the diagnostic dilemmas. This review briefly describes the proliferative pathological lesions affecting the parathyroid glands and provides some useful tips on accurately diagnosing these lesions.

  15. Mandibular destructive radiolucent lesion: The first sign of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fregnani, Eduardo-Rodrigues; Leite, Amanda-Almeida; Parahyba, Claudia-Joffily; Nesrallah, Ana-Cristina-Alo; Ramos-Perez, Flávia-Maria-de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a mandibular lesion as the first sign of multiple myeloma (MM) is uncommon. This report describes a case of MM diagnosed because of a mandibular lesion. A 62-year-old woman presented a destructive radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular ramus. The lesion caused rupture of the anterior cortical bone and extended from the retromolar area to the coronoid process. An incisional biopsy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed numerous pleomorphic plasma cells, some with binucleated nuclei. The tumor cells showed kappa light-chain restriction. Bone marrow biopsy showed findings of massive infiltration of neoplastic plasma cells, besides lesions in the vertebrae. The diagnosis of MM was established. The patient underwent autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Currently, the patient is under regular follow up after 40 months of initial treatment. In conclusion, MM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of destructive mandibular lesions. Key words:Mandible, multiple myeloma, radiolucent lesion. PMID:27703618

  16. Histopathological study of stomatitis nicotina.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C R; Kameswari, V R; Ramulu, C; Reddy, P G

    1971-09-01

    One hundred and thirteen biopsies of the palate in people accustomed to smoking cigars, most of them with the burning end of the cigar inside the mouth, have been studied.Thirty-eight of these showed mild to severe atypical changes in the epithelium. There were 19 lesions showing orthokeratosis and 53 showing hyperorthokeratosis.The earliest atypical change is seen in the mouths of the ducts of the glands.There were 3 cases showing microinvasive carcinomas.Pigmentation is a prominent feature in these cases.The papules with umbilication could be due to hyperplasia of the mucous glands.It is suggested that stomatitis nicotina occurring in men and women with the habit of reverse smoking is probably precancerous because of the presence of atypical changes in the epithelium and also the finding of 3 microinvasive carcinomas without any macroscopic evidence.There is no acceptable explanation why the soft palate escapes getting either stomatitis nicotina lesion or carcinoma in reverse smokers.

  17. Histopathology of the Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    Lymph nodes function as filters of tissues and tissue fluids and are sites of origin and production of lymphocytes for normal physiological functions. As part of this normal function, they react to both endogenous and exogenous substances with a variety of specific morphological and functional responses. Lesions can be both proliferative and nonproliferative, and can be treatment-related or not. The histological evaluation of lymph nodes is necessary in order to understand the immunotoxic effects of chemicals with the resulting data providing an important component of human risk assessment. It is the challenge of the toxicologic pathologist to interpret the pathology data within the complete clinical evaluation of the entire animal. Daily insults, ageing and toxins can alter the normal histology and primary function of lymph nodes. Therefore it is important to distinguish and differentiate lesions that occur naturally during normal development and ageing from those that are induced by xenobiotics. To achieve this goal, comparison with strain- age- and sex-matched controls is crucial. PMID:17067938

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda

    2016-01-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol. PMID:26975994

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Real, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol.

  20. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen.

    PubMed

    Adissu, Hibret A; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hooks, Yvette; Carragher, Damian M; Clarke, Kay; Karp, Natasha A; Newbigging, Susan; Jones, Nora; Morikawa, Lily; White, Jacqueline K; McKerlie, Colin

    2014-05-01

    The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD) we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30) or without (n=20) clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3%) in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14%) presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice.

  1. Potent Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activities of Oxidosqualene Cyclase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Griffin, John H.; Wilson, Aaron J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2001-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan agent that causes Chagas' disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Better drugs are needed to treat infected individuals. The sterol biosynthesis pathway is a potentially excellent target for drug therapy against T. cruzi. In this study, we investigated the antitrypanosomal activities of a series of compounds designed to inhibit a key enzyme in sterol biosynthesis, oxidosqualene cyclase. This enzyme converts 2,3-oxidosqualene to the tetracyclic product, lanosterol. The lead compound, N-(4E,8E)-5,9, 13-trimethyl-4,8, 12-tetradecatrien-1-ylpyridinium, is an electron-poor aromatic mimic of a monocyclized transition state or high-energy intermediate formed from oxidosqualene. This compound and 27 related compounds were tested against mammalian-stage T. cruzi, and 12 inhibited growth by 50% at concentrations below 25 nM. The lead compound was shown to cause an accumulation of oxidosqualene and decreased production of lanosterol and ergosterol, consistent with specific inhibition of the oxidosqualene cyclase. The data demonstrate potent anti-T. cruzi activity associated with inhibition of oxidosqualene cyclase. PMID:11257036

  2. Distinct phosphatase activity profiles in two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Morales-Neto, R; Hulshof, L; Ferreira, C V; Gadelha, F R

    2009-12-01

    Phosphorylation of parasite proteins plays a key role in the process of cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. In this sense, characterization of parasite kinases and phosphatases could open new possibilities for the rational design of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of Chagas' disease. In this work, we analyzed phosphatase activities in T. cruzi homogenates from 2 strains belonging to different lineages and with different resistance to oxidative stress. Tulahuen 2 cells (Lineage I) showed higher phosphatase activities and specificity constants when compared to the Y strain (Lineage II). Tulahuen 2 had an optimum phosphatase activity at pH 4.0 and the Y strain at pH 7.0. In both cases, neutral–basic, but not acid, phosphatase activities were increased in the presence of Mg2+. Although calcium had an inhibitory effect at a pH of 7.0 and 8.0 in the Y strain, this inhibition was restricted to pH 8.0 in the other strain. Different substrates and acid phosphotyrosine and alkaline phosphatase inhibitors exhibited distinct effects on the phosphatase activity of both strains. Our results provide a better understanding of T. cruzi phosphatases and reinforce the notion of heterogeneity among T. cruzi populations.

  3. Autochthonous Transmission of Trypanosoma Cruzi in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Salvador; Flores, Carmen A.; Viana, Gracia M.; Sanchez, Daniel R.; Traina, Mahmoud I.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi usually infects humans via triatomine insects in Latin America. Vector-borne transmission in the United States is exceedingly rare. We describe (1) the first case of probable autochthonous transmission reported in California in more than 30 years and (2) the first ever reported case in the greater Los Angeles area. PMID:28018928

  4. Comparative studies confirm natural infections of buffaloes by Sarcocystis cruzi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controversy exists concerning whether cattle and water buffalo sustain infections with cysts distinct arrays species in the genus Sarcocystis. In particular, morphologically similar parasites have been alternately ascribed to S. cruzi or to S. levinei, depending on their occurrence in cattle and wa...

  5. Histopathological indices in sole (Solea solea) and hake (Merluccius merluccius) for implementation of the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive along the Basque continental shelf (SE Bay of Biscay).

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Nagore; Zorita, Izaskun; Costa, Pedro M; Quincoces, Iñaki; Larreta, Joana; Franco, Javier

    2015-05-15

    Sole and hake, together with sediments, were collected during two campaigns along the Basque continental shelf to study the utility of two existing histopathological indices for assessing the biological effects of contaminants to implement the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive. Hepatic and gonadal histopathology were measured, and metal and/or organic contaminants were determined in both liver and sediments. Sediments from the Basque continental shelf were found to be moderately impacted by metals but non-impacted by organic compounds. Metal bioaccumulation and histopathological lesions in liver were higher in sole than in hake, although non-specific and early non-neoplastic toxicopathic lesions were observed in both species. No gross alterations were recorded in gonad. The two histopathological indices applied were highly correlated in both organs but the lack of correlation between sediment contamination levels, bioaccumulation and histopathological indices suggests that other factors, rather than pollution alone, are responsible for the biological effects observed.

  6. Nitric oxide-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabra, A. B.; Kitice, N. A.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Lancheros, C. A. C.; Yamauchi, L. M.; Pinge-Filho, P.; Yamada-Ogatta, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), and the disease remains a major health problem in many Latin American countries. Several papers report that the killing of the parasite is dependent on the production of nitric oxide (NO). The endogenous free radical NO is an important cellular signalling molecule that plays a key role in the defense against pathogens, including T. cruzi. As T. cruzi is able to compromise host macrophages decreasing endogenous NO production, the administration of exogenous NO donors represents an interesting strategy to combat Chagas disease. Thus, the aims of this study were to prepare and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of NO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against T. cruzi. Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles composed of chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate(TPP) were prepared and used to encapsulate mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which is a thiol-containing molecule. Nitrosation of free thiols (SH) groups of MSA were performed by the addition of equimolar amount of sodium nitrite (NaNO2), leading to the formation of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles. These polymeric nanoparticles act as spontaneous NO donors, with free NO release. The results show the formation of nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 270 to 500 nm, average of polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency in the range of 99%. The NO release kinetics from the S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. The microbicidal activity of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles was evaluated by incubating NO-releasing nanoparticles (200 - 600 μg/mL) with replicative and non-infective epimastigote, and non-replicative and infective trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. In addition, a significant decrease in the percentage of macrophage-infected (with amastigotes) and

  7. Prevention of transfusional Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Schmunis, G A

    1999-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan infection widely spread in Latin America, from Mexico in the north to Argentina and Chile in the south. The second most important way of acquiring the infection is by blood transfusion. Even if most countries of Latin America have law/decree/norms, that make mandatory the screening of blood donors for infectious diseases, including T. cruzi (El Salvador and Nicaragua do not have laws on the subject), there is usually no enforcement or it is very lax. Analysis of published serologic surveys of T. cruzi antibodies in blood donors done in 1993, indicating the number of donors and screening coverage for T. cruzi in ten countries of Central and South America indicated that the probability of receiving a potentially infected transfusion unit in each country varied from 1,096 per 10,000 transfusions in Bolivia, the highest, to 13.02 or 13.86 per 10,000 transfusions in Honduras and Venezuela respectively, where screening coverage was 100%. On the other hand the probability of transmitting a T. cruzi infected unit was 219/10,000 in Bolivia, 24/10,000 in Colombia, 17/10,000 in El Salvador, and around 2-12/10,000 for the seven other countries. Infectivity risks defined as the likelihood of being infected when receiving an infected transfusion unit were assumed to be 20% for T. cruzi. Based on this, estimates of the absolute number of infections induced by transfusion indicated that they were 832, 236, and 875 in Bolivia, Chile and Colombia respectively. In all the other countries varied from seven in Honduras to 85 in El Salvador. Since 1993, the situation has improved. At that time only Honduras and Venezuela screened 100% of donors, while seven countries, Argentina, Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela, did the same in 1996. In Central America, without information from Guatemala, the screening of donors for T. cruzi prevented the transfusion of 1,481 infected units and the potential infection of 300 individuals in

  8. Landscape ecology of Trypanosoma cruzi in the southern Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    López-Cancino, Sury Antonio; Tun-Ku, Ezequiel; De la Cruz-Felix, Himmler Keynes; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos Napoleón; Izeta-Alberdi, Amaia; Pech-May, Angélica; Mazariegos-Hidalgo, Carlos Jesús; Valdez-Tah, Alba; Ramsey, Janine M

    2015-11-01

    Landscape interactions of Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) with Triatoma dimidiata (Td) depend on the presence and relative abundance of mammal hosts. This study analyzed a landscape adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, composed of conserved areas, crop and farming areas, and the human community of Zoh Laguna with reported Chagas disease cases. Sylvatic mammals of the Chiroptera, Rodentia, and Marsupialia orders were captured, and livestock and pets were sampled along with T. dimidiata in all habitats. Infection by T. cruzi was analyzed using mtDNA markers, while lineage and DTU was analyzed using the mini-exon. 303 sylvatic specimens were collected, corresponding to 19 species during the rainy season and 114 specimens of 18 species during dry season. Five bats Artibeus jamaicensis, Artibeus lituratus, Sturnira lilium, Sturnira ludovici, Dermanura phaeotis (Dp) and one rodent Heteromys gaumeri were collected in the three habitats. All but Dp, and including Carollia brevicauda and Myotis keaysi, were infected with predominately TcI in the sylvatic habitat and TcII in the ecotone. Sigmodon hispidus was the rodent with the highest prevalence of infection by T. cruzi I and II in ecotone and domestic habitats. Didelphis viginiana was infected only with TcI in both domestic and sylvatic habitats; the only two genotyped human cases were TcII. Two main clades of T. cruzi, lineages I (DTU Ia) and II (DTU VI), were found to be sympatric (all habitats and seasons) in the Zoh-Laguna landscape, suggesting that no species-specific interactions occur between the parasite and any mammal host, in any habitat. We have also found mixed infections of the two principal T. cruzi clades in individuals across modified habitats, particularly in livestock and pets, and in both haplogroups of T. dimidiata. Results are contradictory to the dilution hypothesis, although we did find that most resilient species had an important role as T. cruzi hosts. Our study detected some complex trends in

  9. The potential of canine sentinels for reemerging Trypanosoma cruzi transmission

    PubMed Central

    Neyra, Ricardo Castillo; Chu, Lily Chou; Quispe-Machaca, Victor; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Malaga Chavez, Fernando S.; Mazuelos, Milagros Bastos; Naquira, Cesar; Bern, Caryn; Gilman, Robert H.; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, a vector-borne disease transmitted by triatomine bugs and caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, affects millions of people in the Americas. In Arequipa, Peru, indoor residual insecticide spraying campaigns are routinely conducted to eliminate Triatoma infestans, the only vector in this area. Following insecticide spraying, there is risk of vector return and reinitiation of parasite transmission. Dogs are important reservoirs of T. cruzi and may play a role in reinitiating transmission in previously sprayed areas. Dogs may also serve as indicators of reemerging transmission. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional serological screening to detect T. cruzi antibodies in dogs, in conjunction with an entomological vector collection survey at the household level, in a disease endemic area that had been treated with insecticide 13 years prior. Spatial clustering of infected animals and vectors was assessed using Ripley’s K statistic, and the odds of being seropositive for dogs proximate to infected colonies was estimated with multivariate logistic regression. Results There were 106 triatomine-infested houses (41.1%), and 45 houses infested with T. cruzi-infected triatomine insects (17.4%). Canine seroprevalence in the area was 12.3% (n=154); all seropositive dogs were 9 months old or older. We observed clustering of vectors carrying the parasite, but no clustering of seropositive dogs. The age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio between seropositivity to T. cruzi and proximity to an infected triatomine (≤50m) was 5.67 (95% CI: 1.12 – 28.74; p=0.036). Conclusions Targeted control of reemerging transmission can be achieved by improved understanding of T. cruzi in canine populations. Our results suggest that dogs may be useful sentinels to detect re-initiation of transmission following insecticide treatment. Integration of canine T. cruzi blood sampling into existing interventions for zoonotic disease control (e.g. rabies vaccination programs

  10. Breast papillary lesions: an analysis of 70 cases

    PubMed Central

    Boin, Dahiana Pulgar; Baez, Jaime Jans; Guajardo, Militza Petric; Benavides, David Oddo; Ortega, Maria Elena Navarro; Valdés, Dravna Razmilic; Apphun, Mauricio Camus

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Papillary breast lesions are rare and constitute less than 10% of benign breast lesions and less than 1% of breast carcinomas. Objective To analyse the clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, and surgical and anatomopathological characteristics of the patients operated on for papillary breast lesions. Material and Methods Retrospective descriptive and analytical study. We analysed the database of patients with definitive histopathological diagnosis of papillary breast lesions operated on at our institution from January 2004 to May 2013. Results During the period described, 70 patients with histopathological diagnosis of papillary breast lesions were operated upon. The median age was 50 years (19–86 years). Thirty-seven patients (52.8%) were symptomatic at diagnosis. Preoperative ultrasound was reported to be altered in all patients. A mammography showed pathologic findings in only 50% of cases. All patients underwent partial mastectomy, after needle localisation under ultrasound, if the lesion was not palpable on physical examination. The final pathological diagnosis was: benign papillary lesion in 55 patients (78.6%) and malignant in 15 patients (21.4%). Adjuvant treatment was performed in all malignant cases. Median follow-up was 46 months (3–115 months). Conclusions Patients with papillary breast lesions presented with symptoms in half of all cases. There was a high frequency of malignancy (21.4%), therefore surgical resection was recommended for papillary breast lesions. PMID:25228917

  11. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide by Trypanosoma cruzi in renal cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel M; Yoshida, Nobuko; Higa, Elisa M S; Shenkman, Sérgio; Alves, Monique; Staquicini, Daniela; Cascabulho, Cynthia; Schor, Nestor

    2011-08-01

    Chagas disease is typically associated with cardiac involvement. During the acute phase of murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, severe acute myocarditis can develop. Prior to cardiac alteration, however, infected mice present with renal inflammatory infiltration causing acute kidney injury due to an ischemia/reperfusion lesion. Thus, the present study was undertaken in order to evaluate whether the parasites or some of their components would directly affect renal cells. As such, this study employed kidney cell lines (mesangial, epithelial, and proximal tubular) that mimic different regions of the renal system. Mesangial cells are more resistant to infection, showing reduced parasite internalization relative to epithelial and proximal tubular cells. Upon infection, mesangial cells produced more nitric oxide, tumor factor necrosis-α, and interferon-γ and showed decreased viability when compared to the other cell lines. These results indicate that the resistance of mesangial cells to infection may be related to the increased expression of nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines. Conversely, the high levels of nitric oxide produced by these cells caused impairment of cell integrity and viability. Higher nitric oxide concentrations promote cellular injury and can be involved in the genesis of ischemia/reperfusion lesions in acute kidney injury.

  12. Radiological and histopathological examination of early tissue reactions to absorbable hemostatic agents in the rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Kaymaz, Memduh; Tokgoz, Nil; Kardes, Ozgür; Ozköse, Zerrin; Ozogul, Candan; Orbay, Toygun

    2005-05-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are widely and safely used in neurosurgery. The purpose of this study was to compare and analyse the early tissue reactions to two hemostatic agents, oxidized regenerated cellulose and gelatin sponge, in rabbit brain by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic sections. Bilateral identical parenchymal lesions were made in the frontal regions of each hemisphere in 13 rabbits. Hemostasis was achieved using oxidized regenerated cellulose or gelatin sponge, one agent being used on each side. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was performed 24 h postoperatively and there was no statistical difference in edema formation at the site of the lesions. Histopathologic examinations indicated that pericapillary edema and endothelial distortion were common in both groups but that there was additional tissue degeneration evident in the regions where gelatin sponge had been used. Oxidized regenerated cellulose seemed to cause greater tissue distortion in magnetic resonance images than gelatin sponge but in contrast, histological examination of lesions in which oxidized regenerated cellulose had been used revealed less tissue degeneration than histopathologic examinations of lesions in which gelatin sponge had been used.

  13. Histopathological gill changes in wild leaping grey mullet (Liza saliens) from the Esmoriz-Paramos coastal lagoon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Conceição; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, António; Monteiro, Sandra Mariza; Salgado, Maria Antónia

    2007-08-01

    The histopathological changes are among the most recognized responses to environmental stressors, namely heavy metals. Liza saliens were sampled, in the Portuguese Esmoriz-Paramos coastal lagoon to assess their gill histopathological response to Cu and Zn contaminated sediments. A lesion prevalence index, severity, and extension scores of each lesion, as well as an assessment value (severity x extension), were determined to evaluate the effect of environmental heavy metal exposure. The main histopathological changes observed were aneurisms, hyperplasia, lifting, and vasodilation. A high prevalence for each lesion (65-85%) was found, in addition to a high number of simultaneous lesions. Vasodilation and hyperplasia were the lesions that showed higher prevalence indexes. Lifting, followed by hyperplasia, were the lesions with highest assessment value. The prevalence of the number of the lesions found in L. saliens collected from the Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon was high when compared with mullet caught in the sea. A previous work revealed that fish collected in the lagoon showed elevated Cu and Zn levels in their gills, in a positive correlation with age. However, no positive correlation was observed between assessment value and gill metal levels.

  14. Comparative analysis of colorectal carcinoma staging using operative, histopathology and computed tomography findings

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Subhash Chander; Kaushal, Dhawal; Sagoo, Harinder Singh; Calton, Nalini

    2017-01-01

    Background: The staging of colorectal carcinoma using 3 modalities viz operative, histopathology and CT scan has been subject of interest in accurately defining the extent of disease. This retrospective as well as prospective study was carried out at CMC, Ludhiana, Punjab from November 2011 to May 2014. Aim: The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness and accuracy of CT scan findings to state the extent and spread of colorectal malignancy and to correlate these findings with histopathological diagnosis. Method: A total of 31 biopsy proven patients showing variable bowel wall thickening involving the colon /rectum on CECT (Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography) were included in the study. The tumours were staged based on the CT scan findings and were compared with the operative and histopathological findings. Observations: Rectum was the most common site of involvement followed by the recto-sigmoid involvement. Metastasis was observed in 5 cases out of the 31 malignant cases. Five of the 7 cases were correctly staged as T1 & T2 lesions on CT having a sensitivity of 83.3%, specificity of 92%, and positive predictive value of 71.4% and a negative predictive value of 95.8% in the diagnosis of T1 and T2 lesions. 15 of the 16 cases were correctly staged as T3 lesions. CT had a sensitivity of 88.2%, specificity of 93.8%, and positive predictive value of 93.8% and a negative predictive value of 86.7% in the diagnosis of T3 lesions. All the 8 cases were correctly staged as T4 lesions. CT had a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 100%, and positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 100% in the diagnosis of T4 lesions. Conclusion: We conclude that CT scan is an excellent modality in diagnosing malignant lesions of the colon and rectum. PMID:28251101

  15. Pre-exposure to faeces or saliva of Triatoma dimidiata decreases parasitemia in mice challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi: a description of the inflammatory reaction at the inoculation site

    PubMed

    Monteon, Victor; Quen-Rámirez, Enrique; Macedo-Reyes, Veronica; Lopez, Ruth; Acosta-Viana, Karla; Pennigton, Pamela; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel

    2016-10-01

    Under natural conditions, Trypanosoma cruzi infection is transmitted to mammals when faeces contaminated with metacyclic trypomastigotes gain access through skin lesions, mucosa or bite wounds. Natural infection of bugs with T. cruzi can vary greatly from less than 1% up to 70%, depending on triatomine species: in the case of Triatoma dimidiata, the percentage of infection is around 30%. In this work uses biological fluids (saliva and faeces) from Triatoma dimidiata to inoculate experimental animals once or multiple times, before inoculation with faeces contaminated with metacyclic trypomastigotes discrete type unit Ia (TcI). The site of infection was analyzed for histological changes based on hematoxile-eosine technique and toluide blue stain for mast cells. Inoculation with saliva led to the recruitment of eosinophils and mononuclear cells at the inoculation site, whereas inoculation with faeces led to the recruitment of neutrophils. Mice inoculated multiple times exhibited a strong inflammatory reaction from the first hour. Mono- or multi-exposure to T. dimidiata fluids before inoculation with metacyclic trypomastigotes helped to control the level of parasitemia. Previous contact with saliva or faeces of T. dimidiata reduces parasitemia in T. cruzi I -infected mice.

  16. Liver histopathology in Baltic flounder (Platichthys flesus) as indicator of biological effects of contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lang, Thomas; Wosniok, Werner; Barsiene, Janina; Broeg, Katja; Kopecka, Justyna; Parkkonen, Jari

    2006-01-01

    Results are presented of a study on liver histopathology in Baltic flounder (Platichthys flesus) carried out in 2001 and 2002 in four coastal sampling areas of the Baltic Sea: Kvädöfjärden (Swedish east coast, reference area), Klaipeda-Butinge (Lithuanian coast), Gulf of Gdansk (Polish coast), and Wismar Bay (German coast) within the framework of the EU-funded BEEP project. Liver lesions were diagnosed and categorised using standardised methodologies and, for a spatial and temporal assessment of the prevalence and types of lesions detected, a scoring system was applied, involving the calculation of mean histopathology lesion scores. 83.0% of the 436 female flounder examined (size range: 20-43 cm total length, age range: 2-8 years) were affected by liver lesions, out of which 74.3% were assigned to the category of non-specific, 3.4% to the category of early toxicopathic non-neoplastic, 4.6% to the category of pre-neoplastic and 0.7% to the category of neoplastic lesions. Mean lesions scores were highest in the areas at the Lithuanian and Swedish coast and there is indication of an impact of the age structure of the flounder populations studied, the sampling season as well as of contaminant effects.

  17. Differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi I (TcI) and T. cruzi II (TcII) genotypes using genes encoding serine carboxypeptidases.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Catarina Andréa Chaves; Mayer, Christoph; Waniek, Peter Josef; Azambuja, Patricia; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2016-11-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae) can be classified based on biochemical and molecular markers, into six lineages or discrete typing units (DTUs), T. cruzi I-VI (TcI-VI), from which TcI and TcII are the parental genotypes. Trying to understand the dispersion of the subpopulations of T. cruzi in nature and its complex transmission cycles, the serine carboxypeptidase genes of T. cruzi were used as a molecular marker in the present study. DTUs of 25 T. cruzi isolates derived from different hosts and from different regions of Brazil were classified. Using specific primers, the complete serine carboxypeptidase open reading frame of 1401 bp was sequenced. The obtained data shows significant differences in the sequences of TcI and TcII. The analysis of the T. cruzi significantly different serine carboxypeptidase genes allowed distinguishing between the parental DTUs TcI to TcII and the hybrid DTU TcVI which grouped within the latter branch. The sequence diversity within the T. cruzi subpopulations was rather low. The analysis using the genes encoding proteases seems to be an interesting approach for the reconstruction of the origin and genotype evolution of T. cruzi.

  18. Colon Preneoplastic Lesions in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Suzui, Masumi; Morioka, Takamitsu; Yoshimi, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    The animal model is a powerful and fundamental tool in the field of biochemical research including toxicology, carcinogenesis, cancer therapeutics and prevention. In the carcinogenesis animal model system, numerous examples of preneoplastic lesions have been isolated and investigated from various perspectives. This may indicate that several options of endpoints to evaluate carcinogenesis effect or therapeutic outcome are presently available; however, classification of preneoplastic lesions has become complicated. For instance, these lesions include aberrant crypt foci (ACF), dysplastic ACF, flat ACF, β-catenin accumulated crypts, and mucin-depleted foci. These lesions have been induced by commonly used chemical carcinogens such as azoxymethane (AOM), 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), methylnitrosourea (MUN), or 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). Investigators can choose any procedures or methods to examine colonic preneoplastic lesions according to their interests and the objectives of their experiments. Based on topographical, histopathological, and biological features of colon cancer preneoplastic lesions in the animal model, we summarize and discuss the character and implications of these lesions. PMID:24526805

  19. Induction of Resistance to Azole Drugs in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Wilson, Aaron J.; White, Theodore C.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    1998-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas’ disease, a frequently fatal illness affecting the heart and gastrointestinal systems. An estimated 16 million to 18 million people in Latin America and 50,000 to 100,000 people in the United States are infected with this pathogen. Treatment options for T. cruzi infections are suboptimal due to the toxicities and limited effectiveness of the available drugs. Azole antimicrobial agents have been discovered to have antitrypanosomal activity by inhibition of ergosterol synthesis. The triazole itraconazole was recently shown to produce a parasitologic cure rate of 53% in chronically infected patients (W. Apt et al., Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 59:133–138, 1998), a result which may lead to more use of this family of drugs for the treatment of T. cruzi infections. In the experiments reported on here, resistance to azoles was induced in vitro by serial passage of mammalian-stage parasites in the presence of fluconazole for 4 months. These parasites were cross resistant to the other azoles, ketoconazole, miconazole, and itraconazole. They remained susceptible to benznidazole and amphotericin B. The azole-resistant phenotype was stable for more than 2 months of in vitro serial passage without fluconazole. In addition, the parasites resisted treatment in mice receiving ketoconazole. The rapid development of azole resistance in T. cruzi in vitro suggests that resistance to azole drugs has the potential to occur in patients and may pose an impediment to the progress being made in the treatment of T. cruzi infection. PMID:9835521

  20. Role of iron in Trypanosoma cruzi infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, R G; Holbein, B E

    1984-01-01

    The role of iron in experimental infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi was investigated. B6 mice had a transient parasitemia and a transient anemia, both of maximal intensity 28 d after the inoculation of T. cruzi. There was a biphasic hypoferremic host response to infection with T. cruzi with the peak hypoferremia also occurring 28 d after inoculation of the parasite. The mortality rate from infection was increased from 23% in phosphate-buffered saline-treated B6 mice to 50% in a group of B6 mice receiving iron-dextran (P less than or equal to 0.025), whereas depletion of iron stores with the iron chelator desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet provided complete protection of B6 mice (P less than or equal to 0.05). The mortality rate in the highly susceptible C3H strain was reduced from 100% in the control group to 45% (P less than or equal to 0.025) in the iron-depleted group. The tissue iron stores were altered in mice receiving either iron-dextran or desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet. In vitro, T. cruzi was shown to require both a heme and a nonheme iron source for an optimal growth rate. The effects of iron excess or depletion on the outcome of infection with T. cruzi correlated both with the growth requirements of the parasite for iron and with the availability of intracellular iron. Thus, it was suggested that the hypoferremic response, by sequestering iron within intracellular stores, potentially enhanced the pathogenicity of the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, the in vivo effects of iron excess and depletion correlated with an effect of iron on the growth rate and pathogenicity of the parasite. PMID:6421877

  1. Targeted Screening Strategies to Detect Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Kawai, Vivian; Bowman, Natalie M.; Waller, Lance A.; Cabrera, Lilia; Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana V.; Seitz, Amy E.; Steurer, Frank J.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G.; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; Maguire, James H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2007-01-01

    Background Millions of people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Anti-trypanosomal drug therapy can cure infected individuals, but treatment efficacy is highest early in infection. Vector control campaigns disrupt transmission of T. cruzi, but without timely diagnosis, children infected prior to vector control often miss the window of opportunity for effective chemotherapy. Methods and Findings We performed a serological survey in children 2–18 years old living in a peri-urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and linked the results to entomologic, spatial and census data gathered during a vector control campaign. 23 of 433 (5.3% [95% CI 3.4–7.9]) children were confirmed seropositive for T. cruzi infection by two methods. Spatial analysis revealed that households with infected children were very tightly clustered within looser clusters of households with parasite-infected vectors. Bayesian hierarchical mixed models, which controlled for clustering of infection, showed that a child's risk of being seropositive increased by 20% per year of age and 4% per vector captured within the child's house. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) plots of best-fit models suggest that more than 83% of infected children could be identified while testing only 22% of eligible children. Conclusions We found evidence of spatially-focal vector-borne T. cruzi transmission in peri-urban Arequipa. Ongoing vector control campaigns, in addition to preventing further parasite transmission, facilitate the collection of data essential to identifying children at high risk of T. cruzi infection. Targeted screening strategies could make integration of diagnosis and treatment of children into Chagas disease control programs feasible in lower-resource settings. PMID:18160979

  2. Biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Livore, Verónica I; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi showed similar fatty acid (FA) compositions, having a high proportion of unsaturated FAs, mainly 18:2Δ9,12 (23-39%) and 18:1Δ9 (11-17%). C22 polyunsaturated FAs are in significant amounts only in T. brucei (12-20%) but represent a mere 2% of total FAs in T. cruzi. Both species have also similar profiles of medium- and long-chain saturated FAs, from 14:0 to 20:0. Interestingly, procyclic and bloodstream forms of T. brucei lack very long chain FAs (VLCFAs), whereas epimastigotes and trypomastigotes of T. cruzi contain 22:0 (0.1-0.2%), 24:0 (1.5-2%), and 26:0 (0.1-0.2%). This is in agreement with the presence of an additional FA elongase gene (TcELO4) in T. cruzi. TcELO4 was expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking the endogenous ScELO3, rescuing the synthesis of saturated and hydroxylated C26 FAs in the yeast. Expression of TcELO4 also rescued the synthetic lethality of a ScELO2, ScELO3 double mutation, and the VLCFA profile of the transformed yeast was similar to that found in T. cruzi. By identifying TcELO4 as the enzyme responsible for the elongation of FA from 16:0 and 18:0 up to 26:0, with 24:0 being the preferred product, this work completed the characterization of FA elongases in Trypanosoma spp.

  3. Stray dogs as reservoirs of the zoonotic agents Leptospira interrogans, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Aspergillus spp. in an urban area of Chiapas in southern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Coello, Matilde; Ortega-Pacheco, Antonio; Guzman-Marin, Eugenia; Guiris-Andrade, Dario M; Martinez-Figueroa, Laura; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y

    2010-03-01

    This investigation determined the presence and prevalence of the zoonotic agents Leptospira interrogans, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Aspergillus spp. in the stray dog population (a total of 224 stray dogs) in an urban area of Southern Mexico. Blood serum samples were taken from all dogs, and root hair samples were taken from dogs with skin lesions and partial alopecia. IgG antibodies for L. interrogans from 10 serovars were detected using the microscopic agglutination test. Immunofluorescence antibody test and Western blot assay were used for serologic diagnosis of T. cruzi. The Sabouraud medium was used to isolate Aspergillus spp. Prevalence of L. interrogans was 4.9%, which was determined by identifying only serovars Pyrogenes, which accounted for 3.6%, and Tarassovi, which constituted 1.3%, with titers from 1:100 to 1:800. Additionally, T. cruzi antibodies were detected in 4.5% of the dogs. Skin lesions were found in 43% of the dogs (98/224), and 35 cultures were positive for Aspergillus spp. (35.7%, p < 0.05, 95% confidence interval 2.45-3.67), identified as A. niger (82.8%), A. flavus (14.3%), and A. terreus (2.9%). This study demonstrates the presence of certain zoonotic agents (bacteria, protozoa, and fungi) in stray dogs living within the studied area. Dogs play an important role in the transmission of diseases that are potentially harmful to humans. Although the prevalence of canine leptospirosis and trypanosomiasis is not high in Southern Mexico compared with other tropical regions of Mexico, the presence of these zoonotic agents in the stray dog population demonstrates that the stray dog population in this region is a significant reservoir and potential source of infection in humans. Special care should be taken when handling stray dogs that exhibit skin lesions with partial alopecia, since a pathological Aspergillus sp. fungus may be present.

  4. TNF-α is expressed at sites of parasite and tissue destruction in the spleen of mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    LIMA, ELIANITA SUZART; ANDRADE, ZILTON A; ANDRADE, SONIA G

    2001-01-01

    Mice infected with a macrophagotropic strain of Trypanosoma cruzi develop progressive splenomegaly due to reactive hyperplasia with increased number of lymphocytes and macrophages, culminating in parasite disintegration and necrosis of parasitized cells. Necrotic changes have been attributed to the liberation of toxic cytokines, including TNF-α, from parasitized macrophages. In the present study, the presence of TNF‐α was investigated in situ. In addition the participation of destroyed parasites in inducing the liberation of TNF-α was examined in two highly susceptible mice strains (C3H and Swiss) and a more resistant strain (DBA). Swiss (90) C3H/He (83) and DBA (30) mice were infected with the Peruvian strain of T. cruzi. Nineteen infected Swiss mice, and 22 infected C3H/He were treated with Benznidazole (one or two doses, 100 mg/kg bw/day), on the 8th and 9th days after infection. Necrotic splenic lesions occurred in both susceptible and resistant strains of mice. Although differing in degree, lesions were more intense in C3H and Swiss than in DBA mice. Comparing untreated and treated susceptible mice, necrotic lesions were significantly less intense in the latter. By specific monoclonal antibody immunolabelling, TNF-α was demonstrated in the cytoplasm of macrophages and within necrotic areas, from Swiss, C3H/He and DBA mouse spleens. In conclusion, TNF-α, probably synthesized by macrophages, was strongly expressed at the sites of parasite and cell destruction, thus appearing to play a pivotal role in splenic necrotic changes associated with severe experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:11846839

  5. The characterization of anti-T. cruzi activity relationships between ferrocenyl, cyrhetrenyl complexes and ROS release.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Romero, Valentina; Arancibia, Rodrigo; Klahn, Hugo; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisen, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Simon, Felipe; Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Nifurtimox is the most used drug against the T. cruzi, this drug increases intermediaries nitro group, being mainly responsible for the high toxicity component, for this reason it is important to study new organic compounds and thus improve therapeutic strategies against Chagas disease. The electronic effects of ferrocenyl and cyrhetrenyl fragments were investigated by DFT calculation. A close correlation was found between HOMO-LUMO gap of nitro radical NO 2 (-) with the experimental reduction potential found for nitro group and IC50 of two forms the T. cruzi (epimastigote and trypomastigote). The IC50 on human hepatoma cells is higher for both compounds compared to IC50 demonstrated in the two forms the T. cruzi, and additionally show reactive oxygen species release. The information obtained in this paper could generate two new drugs with anti-T. cruzi activity, but additional studies are needed.

  6. Molecular diagnosis and typing of Trypanosoma cruzi populations and lineages in cerebral Chagas disease in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Juan M; Begher, Sandra B; Freitas, Jorge M; Bisio, Margarita; Duffy, Tomas; Altcheh, Jaime; Teijeiro, Ricardo; Lopez Alcoba, Horacio; Deccarlini, Florencia; Freilij, Hector; Levin, Mariano J; Levalle, Jorge; Macedo, Andrea M; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2005-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was amplified from an intracranial biopsy and peripheral blood of an HIV patient with encephalitis; this episode was indicative of AIDS and congenital Chagas disease. The analysis of a micro-satellite locus revealed a multiclonal parasite population at the brain lesion with a more complex minicircle signature than that profiled in blood using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-PCR and low stringency single primer (LSSP) PCR. Interestingly, different sublineages of T. cruzi II were detected in blood and brain by means of spliced-leader and 24salpha ribosomal-DNA amplifications. Quantitative-competitive PCR monitored the decrease of parasitic load during treatment and secondary prophylaxis with benznidazole. The synergy between parasiticidal plus anti-retroviral treatments probably allowed the patient a longer survival than usually achieved in similar episodes. This is the first case report demonstrating a differential distribution of natural parasite populations and sublineages in Chagas disease reactivation, showing the proliferation of cerebral variants not detectable in peripheral blood.

  7. Comparison of histological features, and description of histopathological lesions in thyroid glands from three species of free-ranging sharks from the northwestern Atlantic, the blue shark, Prionace glauca (L.), the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrhinchus Rafinesque, and the thresher, Alopias vulpinus (Bonnaterre).

    PubMed

    Borucinska, J D; Tafur, M

    2009-09-01

    Abstract Histomorphological features of piscine thyroids are widely accepted and frequently used as bioindicators of environmental pollution. This despite the fact that there is marked variation in thyroid morphology resulting from numerous pathological and physiological conditions. Our hypothesis was that there will be variations in histological features in thyroids collected from different shark species during the summer season in the northwestern Atlantic. To test our hypothesis, we examined histological features encountered in grossly normal thyroids from three species of sharks, the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrhinchus, thresher, Alopias vulpinus and blue sharks, Prionace glauca. In addition, microscopic lesions from these thyroids were described. Ninety-four sharks were collected in summer 2001, 2002 and 2004. Routine, haematoxylin and eosin-stained paraffin-embedded sections were studied by light microscopy. We found inter-species but not intra-species variation in histological patterns of thyroids, which were distinct enough to allow 'blind' assignment of a thyroid to the specific species. The most common lesions encountered were lymphofollicular hyperplasia and chronic thyroiditis. In addition, one case each of intravascular larval nematodes and a myxosporean infection was found. Our results provide the first data on species-specific morphology of thyroids collected during summer months from sharks. The results indicate that familiarity with normal thyroid morphology is crucial before using shark thyroids in biomonitoring of environmental contamination or interpreting data from this gland in shark-health studies.

  8. Palmoplantar hyperkeratotic lesions: a rare presentation of lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Almodovar-Real, Ana; Aneiros-Fernández, Jose; Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Fernandez-Pugnaire, Ma Antonia

    2015-03-15

    Palmoplantar lichen planus is a localized and rare subtype of lichen planus (LP) often underdiagnosed. Several morphological types of palmoplantar lesions have been defined in LP. We present an unusual case of the palmoplantar kyperkeratotic variant of LP. Histopathology examination confirmed our diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of this rare entity in the differential diagnosis of palmoplantar dermatoses.

  9. Canalicular adenoma: a case report of an unusual parotid lesion

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Colin; Kulendra, Kevin N; Menon, Gopind; D’Souza, Alwyn R

    2009-01-01

    The present report describes a case of an 85-year-old woman who underwent an excisional biopsy of a preauricular lesion centred over the zygoma and subsequently developed an immediate iatrogenic facial palsy. Histopathological diagnosis revealed a canalicular adenoma of the parotid gland. PMID:21686469

  10. Rare lesions of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cem; Altinors, Nur; Sonmez, Erkin; Gulsen, Salih; Caner, Hakan

    2010-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas, meningiomas and epidermoids account for a vast majority of the lesions occurring in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA). Neoplastic and non-neoplastic pathologies other than these tumors constitute 1% of all lesions located in the CPA. The aim of this study was to reveal our experience in the treatment of the rare lesions of the CPA. We have retrospectively reviewed the medical files and radiological data of all patients who underwent surgery involving any kind of pathology in the CPA. We have excluded those patients with a histopathological diagnosis of meningioma, schwannoma and epidermoids. Our research revealed a case of craniopharyngioma, a case of chloroma, a case of solitary fibrous tumor, a case of pinealoblastoma, a case of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor, a case of an aneurysm, a case of hemorrhage and a case of abscess.

  11. Oral Lesions in Elderly Patients in Referral Centers for Oral Lesions of Bahia

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Sarah; Alves, Técia; Santos, Jean; Oliveira, Márcio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aging population phenomenon is occurring on a global scale; aging affects all of the structures of organisms, including the oral cavity. Objective To estimate the frequency of oral lesions, according to the clinical and histopathologic diagnoses, and to describe the sociodemographic profile of the elderly treated at the referral centers of oral lesions of public universities in Bahia, Brazil. Methods A descriptive epidemiologic study with transverse characteristics was conducted with elderly patients between August 2010 and January 2012. A form was used to collect data. The descriptive analysis consisted of calculating the simple and relative frequencies of sociodemographic variables and oral lesions. Results The population was predominantly black women, and the minority of elderly people were retired. Fibroid (13%) and squamous cell carcinoma (145%) were more prevalent clinical diagnoses, with squamous cell carcinoma (30.7%) and fibrous hyperplasia more prevalent histopathologic diagnoses. Conclusion A prevention policy needs to be implemented to reduce new cases of oral lesions in Bahia, Brazil and to aid in early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of oral lesions. PMID:26491471

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi: variability of stocks from Colombia determined by molecular karyotype and minicircle Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Triana, Omar; Ortiz, Sylvia; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Solari, Aldo

    2006-05-01

    Nineteen Trypanosoma cruzi stocks, most of them of wild origin, and four Trypanosoma rangeli stocks from Colombia were analysed by molecular karyotype analysis with cloned DNA cruzipain as the probe. Another 27 cloned stocks of T. cruzi from different geographic areas of South America were used as reference for T. cruzi lineages. Phenetic analysis of chromosome size polymorphism demonstrated a great variability of Colombian T. cruzi stocks, suggesting that most belong to lineage I, although two of them belong to lineage II. The 2 lineage II T. cruzi, 17 T. cruzi lineage I, and 3 T. rangeli stocks from Colombia were studied further by Southern blot analysis with a panel of kinetoplast DNA minicircle probes. Hybridisation results indicate that the two T. cruzi II stocks are genetically distant from each other and from T. cruzi lineages IIb, IId, and IIe from Chile. Finally, T. cruzi minicircle probes do not cross-hybridise in any stringency condition tested with T. rangeli minicircles, a clear indication that these parasites can be easily distinguished by this method.

  13. In vivo MR guided boiling histotripsy in a mouse tumor model evaluated by MRI and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan; den Brok, Martijn H; Veltien, Andor; Wassink, Melissa; Wesseling, Pieter; Dumont, Erik; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-06-01

    Boiling histotripsy (BH) is a new high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation technique to mechanically fragmentize soft tissue into submicrometer fragments. So far, ultrasound has been used for BH treatment guidance and evaluation. The in vivo histopathological effects of this treatment are largely unknown. Here, we report on an MR guided BH method to treat subcutaneous tumors in a mouse model. The treatment effects of BH were evaluated one hour and four days later with MRI and histopathology, and compared with the effects of thermal HIFU (T-HIFU). The lesions caused by BH were easily detected with T2 w imaging as a hyper-intense signal area with a hypo-intense rim. Histopathological evaluation showed that the targeted tissue was completely disintegrated and that a narrow transition zone (<200 µm) containing many apoptotic cells was present between disintegrated and vital tumor tissue. A high level of agreement was found between T2 w imaging and H&E stained sections, making T2 w imaging a suitable method for treatment evaluation during or directly after BH. After T-HIFU, contrast enhanced imaging was required for adequate detection of the ablation zone. On histopathology, an ablation zone with concentric layers was seen after T-HIFU. In line with histopathology, contrast enhanced MRI revealed that after BH or T-HIFU perfusion within the lesion was absent, while after BH in the transition zone some micro-hemorrhaging appeared. Four days after BH, the transition zone with apoptotic cells was histologically no longer detectable, corresponding to the absence of a hypo-intense rim around the lesion in T2 w images. This study demonstrates the first results of in vivo BH on mouse tumor using MRI for treatment guidance and evaluation and opens the way for more detailed investigation of the in vivo effects of BH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Histopathology and contaminant concentrations in fish from Kuwait's marine environment.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaidan, A S; Al-Sarawi, H A; Massoud, M S; Al-Enezi, M; Smith, A J; Bignell, J P; Green, M J; Askem, C; Bolam, T P C; Barber, J L; Bersuder, P; Lyons, B P

    2015-11-30

    Kuwait has witnessed major socioeconomic and industrial development in recent decades. Consequently, a variety of contaminants related to these activities have been discharged directly into the marine environment. This paper describes the application of a histopathology baseline survey in two potential sentinel species, the Giant sea catfish (Arius thalassinus) and the Fourlined terapon (Pelates quadrilineatus) to assess the health of biota inhabiting Kuwait's marine environment. Histological analysis revealed several lesion types in both species, although the prevalence was generally considered low with no discernible differences between sampling locations. The analysis of contaminant burdens (metals, PCBs, PBDEs, HBCDD) in A. thalassinus, along with the analysis of bile for PAH metabolites in both species, indicated that levels of contaminant exposure was low. Overall the data show that both species appear to be susceptible to pathologies associated with environmental contaminants and therefore suitable for further investigation as sentinel organisms for biological effects monitoring.

  15. In vivo imaging of mice infected with bioluminescent Trypanosoma cruzi unveils novel sites of infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of techniques that allow the imaging of animals infected with parasites expressing luciferase opens up new possibilities for following the fate of parasites in infected mammals. Methods D-luciferin potassium salt stock solution was prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 15 mg/ml. To produce bioluminescence, infected and control mice received an intraperitoneal injection of luciferin stock solution (150 mg/kg). All mice were immediately anesthetized with 2% isofluorane, and after 10 minutes were imaged. Ex vivo evaluation of infected tissues and organs was evaluated in a 24-well plate in 150 μg/ml D-luciferin diluted in PBS. Images were captured using the IVIS Lumina image system (Xenogen). Dissected organs were also evaluated by microscopy of hematoxylin-eosin stained sections. Results Here we describe the results obtained using a genetically modified Dm28c strain of T. cruzi expressing the firefly luciferase to keep track of infection by bioluminescence imaging. Progression of infection was observed in vivo in BALB/c mice at various intervals after infection with transgenic Dm28c-luc. The bioluminescent signal was immediately observed at the site of T. cruzi inoculation, and one day post infection (dpi) it was disseminated in the peritoneal cavity. A similar pattern in the cavity was observed on 7 dpi, but the bioluminescence was more intense in the terminal region of the large intestine, rectum, and gonads. On 14 and 21 dpi, bioluminescent parasites were also observed in the heart, snout, paws, hind limbs, and forelimbs. From 28 dpi to 180 dpi in chronically infected mice, bioluminescence declined in regions of the body but was concentrated in the gonad region. Ex vivo evaluation of dissected organs and tissues by bioluminescent imaging confirmed the in vivo bioluminescent foci. Histopathological analysis of dissected organs demonstrated parasite nests at the rectum and snout, in muscle fibers of mice infected with Dm28c

  16. Recent, independent and anthropogenic origins of Trypanosoma cruzi hybrids.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael D; Llewellyn, Martin S; Yeo, Matthew; Acosta, Nidia; Gaunt, Michael W; Miles, Michael A

    2011-10-01

    The single celled eukaryote Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite transmitted by numerous species of triatomine bug in the Americas, causes Chagas disease in humans. T. cruzi generally reproduces asexually and appears to have a clonal population structure. However, two of the six major circulating genetic lineages, TcV and TcVI, are TcII-TcIII inter-lineage hybrids that are frequently isolated from humans in regions where chronic Chagas disease is particularly severe. Nevertheless, a prevalent view is that hybridisation events in T. cruzi were evolutionarily ancient and that active recombination is of little epidemiological importance. We analysed genotypes of hybrid and non-hybrid T. cruzi strains for markers representing three distinct evolutionary rates: nuclear GPI sequences (n = 88), mitochondrial COII-ND1 sequences (n = 107) and 28 polymorphic microsatellite loci (n = 35). Using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches we dated key evolutionary events in the T. cruzi clade including the emergence of hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI, which we estimated to have occurred within the last 60,000 years. We also found evidence for recent genetic exchange between TcIII and TcIV and between TcI and TcIV. These findings show that evolution of novel recombinants remains a potential epidemiological risk. The clearly distinguishable microsatellite genotypes of TcV and TcVI were highly heterozygous and displayed minimal intra-lineage diversity indicative of even earlier origins than sequence-based estimates. Natural hybrid genotypes resembled typical meiotic F1 progeny, however, evidence for mitochondrial introgression, absence of haploid forms and previous experimental crosses indicate that sexual reproduction in T. cruzi may involve alternatives to canonical meiosis. Overall, the data support two independent hybridisation events between TcII and TcIII and a recent, rapid spread of the hybrid progeny in domestic transmission cycles concomitant with, or as a

  17. Correlation of environmental attributes with histopathology of native Yellowstone cutthroat trout naturally infected with Myxobolus cerebralis.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Silvia; Kerans, Billie L; MacConnell, Elizabeth; Koel, Todd M

    2011-02-22

    Infection by the invasive parasite Myxobolus cerebralis (causing whirling disease in salmonids) is strongly influenced by a stream's physico-chemical characteristics, which might affect host pathology. We examined whether environmental variables of a M. cerebralis-positive tributary to Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., correlated with the histopathology of naturally infected native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri. Host inflammatory response and cranial cartilage lesions were the main correlates with whirling behavior. Canonical correlation analyses showed that the prevalence of trout with severe lesions in the cranial and jaw cartilages was highest in stream sites with a combination of high temperature and low specific conductivity. Our results reveal that environmental components can affect when and where a pathogen resides within the host, and manifestation of disease. Recognition of the synergism among environmental and histopathology factors most conducive to whirling disease will increase our prediction and detection abilities for M. cerebralis in salmonid hosts.

  18. Larvicidal and Histopathological Effects of Cassia siamea Leaf Extract against Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Jiraungkoorskul, Kanitta; Jiraungkoorskul, Wannee

    2015-01-01

    A traditional Thai medicinal extract from Cassia siamea was evaluated with respect to its larvicidal properties by determining the median lethal concentration (LC50) at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h against the fourth instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, which is a carrier of mosquito-borne diseases, by studying the histopathological alterations. The 24, 48, 72 and 96 h LC50 values were 394.29, 350.24, 319.17 and 272.42 ppm, respectively. The histopathological lesions after exposure to 25% of the 24-h LC50 were observed primarily in the midgut of the larva. Lesions with edema, swelling, and deformation or elongation of the epithelial cells were observed. Moreover, cells protruding into the lumen and absent microvilli were also found in some areas. The present study reveals that aqueous C. siamea leaf extracts have natural biopesticide properties. PMID:26868707

  19. Videomicroscopic and histopathological investigation of intense pulsed light therapy for solar lentigines.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Akira; Asai, Mutsuyo; Kameyama, Hiroko; Sangen, Yoshiko; Aragane, Yoshinori; Tezuka, Tadashi; Iwakiri, Kouji

    2002-08-01

    A noncoherent, broadband, intense pulsed light source has been effective for symptoms of photoaging skin as a nonablative method. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of efficacy of intense pulsed light for solar lentigines, a symptom of photoaging skin, with videomicroscopy and histopathology. Skin lesions of patients with solar lentigines who received one treatment of intense pulsed light were examined. Sixteen of 20 patients showed tiny crusts clinically. These tiny crusts were confirmed to be micro-crust formation after epidermal injury with sequential observation using videomicroscope and histopathology. Drop-off of micro-crusts with ample melanin pigments lead to clinical improvement of skin lesions. Intense pulsed light with absorption spectrum for melanin induced injury of melanin-containing epidermal cells via photothermal effects, suggesting that intense pulsed light may be a new modality for solar lentigines.

  20. Renal lesions in cetaceans from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Viera, O; Ruoppolo, V; Marigo, J; Carvalho, V L; Groch, K R; Bertozzi, C P; Takakura, C; Namiyama, G; Vanstreels, R E T; Catão-Dias, J L

    2015-05-01

    This study reports the occurrence of renal lesions in cetaceans from the coast of Brazil subjected to necropsy examination between 1996 and 2011. The animals (n = 192) were by-caught in fishing nets, were found dead on beaches or died despite attempted rehabilitation. Kidney samples were evaluated grossly and microscopically and, depending on the histopathological findings, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analyses were conducted. Due to autolysis, a diagnosis was reached in only 128 animals, of which 82 (64.1%) had kidney lesions. Cystic renal disease was the most common lesion observed in 34 cases (26.6%) and these were classified as simple cysts in eight cases (6.3%), polycystic kidney disease in one rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis), secondary glomerulocystic disease in 16 cases (12.5%) and primary glomerulocystic disease in nine cases (7%). Other lesions included membranous glomerulonephritis (28 cases; 21.9%), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (20 cases; 15.6%), lymphoplasmacytic interstitial nephritis (21 cases; 16.4%), lipidosis (19 cases; 14.8%), glomerulosclerosis (8 cases; 6.3%) and pyogranulomatous nephritis(five cases; 3.9%); two of the later were associated with the migration of nematode larvae. Additionally, tubular adenoma was identified in a Franciscana (Pontoporia blainvillei). The pathological implications of these lesions are discussed according the cause of death, age or sex of the animals. Furthermore, the lesions were compared with those of other marine and terrestrial mammals, including man.

  1. Alveolar hydatid disease of the liver: computed tomography and transabdominal ultrasound with histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Choji, K; Fujita, N; Chen, M; Spiers, A S; Morita, Y; Shinohara, M; Nojima, T; Irie, G

    1992-08-01

    The appearances of alveolar hydatid disease of the liver (AHDL) on computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) were retrospectively compared with histopathological appearances in 67 patients with 100 separate lesions. The radiological features were correlated directly with the pathological specimens obtained from each patient. We conclude that the CT appearances are more specific, but that US has a role to play in mass screening in endemic areas, and intraoperatively.

  2. Evolution of infection in mice inoculated by the oral route with different developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi I and II.

    PubMed

    Dias, Greicy Brisa Malaquias; Gruendling, Ana Paula; Araújo, Silvana Marques; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas

    2013-11-01

    Oral infection has become the most important transmission mechanism of Chagas disease in Brazil. For this study, the development of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice, induced by the oral and intraperitoneal (IP) routes, was compared. Four groups of Swiss mice were used to evaluate the influence of parasite genetics, number of parasites, inoculation volume and developmental stages on the development of the orally induced infection: 1 - blood trypomastigotes (BT) via oral; 2 - BT via IP; 3 - culture metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT) via oral; and 4 - culture MT via IP. Animals inoculated orally showed levels of parasitemia, as well as infectivity and mortality rates, lower than animals inoculated via IP, regardless of DTU (discrete typing unit) and inoculum. Animals infected with TcII showed higher levels of these parameters than did animals infected with TcI. The larger volume of inoculum showed a greater capacity to cause an infection when administered via the oral route. BT infection was more virulent than culture MT infection for both routes (oral and IP). However, mice inoculated orally with BT showed lower levels than via IP, while mice inoculated orally with culture MT showed similar levels of infection to those inoculated via IP. Mice inoculated with culture MT showed more histopathological changes than those inoculated with BT, regardless of the inoculation route. These results indicate that this alternative experimental model is useful for evaluating infection by T. cruzi isolates with subpatent parasitemia and low virulence, such as those belonging to the TcI and TcIV DTUs, which are prevalent in outbreaks of orally transmitted Chagas disease.

  3. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi in Persons without Serologic Evidence of Disease, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Basquiera, Ana L.; Sembaj, Adela; Aguerri, Ana M.; Reyes, María E.; Omelianuk, Mirtha; Fernández, Ruth A.; Enders, Julio; Palma, Atilio; Barral, José Moreno; Madoery, Roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    Current diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease relies on serologic detection of specific immunoglobulin G against Trypanosoma cruzi. However, the presence of parasites detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients without positive conventional serologic testing has been observed. We determined the prevalence and clinical characteristics of persons with seronegative results for T. cruzi DNA detected by PCR in a population at high risk for chronic American trypanosomiasis. We studied a total of 194 persons from two different populations: 110 patients were recruited from an urban cardiology clinic, and 84 persons were nonselected citizens from a highly disease-endemic area. Eighty (41%) of persons had negative serologic findings; 12 (15%) had a positive PCR. Three patients with negative serologic findings and positive PCR results had clinical signs and symptoms that suggested Chagas cardiomyopathy. This finding challenges the current recommendations for Chagas disease diagnosis, therapy, and blood transfusion policies. PMID:14720396

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi: susceptibility in mice carrying mutant gene lpr (lymphoproliferation).

    PubMed

    Boyer, M H; Hoff, R; Kipnis, T L; Murphy, E D; Roths, J B

    1983-03-01

    There is evidence that autoimmune aberrations may contribute to the immunopathological consequences of Chagas' disease and because of this we sought to determine whether four inbred strains of mice bearing the single autosomal recessive gene, lpr (lymphoproliferation), which controls certain autoimmune manifestations, are particularly susceptible to acute infection with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. MRL/MpJ-lpr/lpr, C57Bl/6J-lpr/lpr, AKR/J-lpr/lpr, C3H/HeJ-lpr/lpr showed parasitaemias 2-10 times higher when compared to their congenic partners. Mortality was significantly higher in three of the four lpr strains. The results indicate that a single autosomal recessive gene which is associated with autoimmunity can influence susceptibility to acute T. cruzi infection in mice.

  6. The inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol signalling pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Docampo, R; Pignataro, O P

    1991-01-01

    Using [32P]Pi and [3H]inositol as precursors, we have detected the presence of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and their derivatives inositol phosphate, inositol 1,4-bisphosphate and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate respectively, in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. Using digitonin-permeabilized cells it was possible to detect a stimulation in the formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and inositol 1,4-bisphosphate as well as an increased generation of diacylglycerol in the presence of 1 mM-CaCl2. These results are consistent with the operation of a functional inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol pathway in T. cruzi, and constitute the first demonstration of the presence and activation of this pathway in a parasitic protozoan. These results also indicate that this pathway is conserved during evolution from lower to higher eukaryotic organisms. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2025225

  7. Lysophosphatidylcholine: A Novel Modulator of Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Neto, Mário A. C.; Carneiro, Alan B.; Silva-Cardoso, Livia; Atella, Georgia C.

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine is a bioactive lipid that regulates a large number of cellular processes and is especially present during the deposition and infiltration of inflammatory cells and deposition of atheromatous plaque. Such molecule is also present in saliva and feces of the hematophagous organism Rhodnius prolixus, a triatominae bug vector of Chagas disease. We have recently demonstrated that LPC is a modulator of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission. It acts as a powerful chemoattractant for inflammatory cells at the site of the insect bite, which will provide a concentrated population of cells available for parasite infection. Also, LPC increases macrophage intracellular calcium concentrations that ultimately enhance parasite invasion. Finally, LPC inhibits NO production by macrophages stimulated by live T. cruzi, and thus interferes with the immune system of the vertebrate host. In the present paper, we discuss the main signaling mechanisms that are likely used by such molecule and their eventual use as targets to block parasite transmission and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. PMID:22132309

  8. Periurban Trypanosoma cruzi-infected Triatoma infestans, Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Zachary; Bowman, Natalie M; Kawai, Vivian; Waller, Lance A; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Cordova Benzaquen, Eleazar; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2006-09-01

    In Arequipa, Peru, vectorborne transmission of Chagas disease by Triatoma infestans has become an urban problem. We conducted an entomologic survey in a periurban community of Arequipa to identify risk factors for triatomine infestation and determinants of vector population densities. Of 374 households surveyed, triatomines were collected from 194 (52%), and Trypanosoma cruzi-carrying triatomines were collected from 72 (19.3%). Guinea pig pens were more likely than other animal enclosures to be infested and harbored 2.38x as many triatomines. Stacked brick and adobe enclosures were more likely to have triatomines, while wire mesh enclosures were protected against infestation. In human dwellings, only fully stuccoed rooms were protected against infestation. Spatially, households with triatomines were scattered, while households with T. cruzi-infected triatomines were clustered. Keeping small animals in wire mesh cages could facilitate control of T. infestans in this densely populated urban environment.

  9. Use of histopathology services by general practitioners: recent changes in referral practice.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrock, K

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To determine the nature and magnitude of the histopathological workload generated by specimens received from general practitioners and to assess the trends in referral practice. METHODS--All material submitted by general practitioners to the Leicester district histopathology service from 1989 to January 1993 was identified from departmental records. All GP referrals from October to December 1992 were also analysed. Total numbers of referrals from all sources were used for comparison. Specimens were also analysed according to diagnostic categories. RESULTS--There has been a progressive rise, both in the absolute number and the proportion of specimens relative to other surgical specimens submitted by GPs. Most are skin biopsy specimens. There were clear changes over the study period in the relative proportion of different types of lesions received, with a substantial increase in samples of benign naevi and papillomas. There was some evidence of a corresponding decrease in the number of these lesions submitted by hospital practitioners. The number of malignant skin tumours from GPs was small and the proportion had not increased over the study period. CONCLUSIONS--Histopathological workload generated by GPs is increasing but it still represents a small proportion of the total. The major increase is in benign skin lesions. PMID:8254104

  10. Multiparametric and semiquantitative scoring systems for the evaluation of mouse model histopathology - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Histopathology has initially been and is still used to diagnose infectious, degenerative or neoplastic diseases in humans or animals. In addition to qualitative diagnoses semiquantitative scoring of a lesion`s magnitude on an ordinal scale is a commonly demanded task for histopathologists. Multiparametric, semiquantitative scoring systems for mouse models histopathology are a common approach to handle these questions and to include histopathologic information in biomedical research. Results Inclusion criteria for scoring systems were a first description of a multiparametric, semiquantiative scoring systems which comprehensibly describe an approach to evaluate morphologic lesion. A comprehensive literature search using these criteria identified 153 originally designed semiquantitative scoring systems for the analysis of morphologic changes in mouse models covering almost all organs systems and a wide variety of disease models. Of these, colitis, experimental autoimmune encephalitis, lupus nephritis and collagen induced osteoarthritis colitis were the disease models with the largest number of different scoring systems. Closer analysis of the identified scoring systems revealed a lack of a rationale for the selection of the scoring parameters or a correlation between scoring parameter value and the magnitude of the clinical symptoms in most studies. Conclusion Although a decision for a particular scoring system is clearly dependent on the respective scientific question this review gives an overview on currently available systems and may therefore allow for a better choice for the respective project. PMID:23800279

  11. Repertoire, Genealogy and Genomic Organization of Cruzipain and Homologous Genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-Like and Other Trypanosome Species

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A.; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Cortez, Alane P.; Alfieri, Silvia C.; Buck, Gregory A.; Teixeira, Marta M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  12. Repertoire, genealogy and genomic organization of cruzipain and homologous genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-like and other trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P; Serrano, Myrna G; Cortez, Alane P; Alfieri, Silvia C; Buck, Gregory A; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  13. Interactions Between Trypanosoma cruzi the Chagas Disease Parasite and Naturally Infected Wild Mepraia Vectors of Chile.

    PubMed

    Campos-Soto, Ricardo; Ortiz, Sylvia; Cordova, Ivan; Bruneau, Nicole; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Solari, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease, which ranks among the world's most neglected diseases, is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Mepraia species are the wild vectors of this parasite in Chile. Host-parasite interactions can occur at several levels, such as co-speciation and ecological host fitting, among others. Thus, we are exploring the interactions between T. cruzi circulating in naturally infected Mepraia species in all areas endemic of Chile. We evaluated T. cruzi infection rates of 27 different haplotypes of the wild Mepraia species and identified their parasite genotypes using minicircle PCR amplification and hybridization tests with genotype-specific DNA probes. Infection rates were lower in northern Chile where Mepraia gajardoi circulates (10-35%); in central Chile, Mepraia spinolai is most abundant, and infection rates varied in space and time (0-55%). T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII, TcV, and Tc VI were detected. Mixed infections with two or more DTUs are frequently found in highly infected insects. T. cruzi DTUs have distinct, but not exclusive, ecological and epidemiological associations with their hosts. T. cruzi infection rates of M. spinolai were higher than in M. gajardoi, but the presence of mixed infection with more than one T. cruzi DTU was the same. The same T. cruzi DTUs (TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI) were found circulating in both vector species, even though TcI was not equally distributed. These results suggest that T. cruzi DTUs are not associated with any of the two genetically related vector species nor with the geographic area. The T. cruzi vectors interactions are discussed in terms of old and recent events. By exploring T. cruzi DTUs present in Mepraia haplotypes and species from northern to central Chile, we open the analysis on these invertebrate host-parasite interactions.

  14. The detection of phosphonolipids in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Allen, Anthony K.; Snary, David

    1982-01-01

    2-Aminoethylphosphonate was detected in the acid hydrolysates of the phosphonolipids and the lipopeptidophosphoglycan of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. This finding represents the first evidence of phosphonolipids in a zooflagellate. By comparison, no phosphonolipids were detected in Trypanosama brucei, indicating that phosphonolipids are not a ubiquitous feature of the Order Kinetoplastidia. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:6758765

  15. Histopathological analysis of the therapeutic response to cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen in patients with multiple actinic keratosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marina Câmara; Trevisan, Flávia; Pinto, Clovis Antônio Lopes; Xavier, Célia Antônia; Pinto, Jaqueline Campoi Calvo Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Actinic keratoses are premalignant lesions of the skin caused by excessive sun exposure. Lesions may become mainly squamous cell carcinoma. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen is one of the main treatments. In order to evaluate the response of actinic keratosis to cryotherapy by histopathology, two lesions were selected in each of 14 patients with multiple actinic keratoses. In one lesion a biopsy was performed and in the other lesion a biopsy was performed after cryotherapy. Subsequently, both biopsies were compared histologically. Of the thirteen patients who completed the study, the best results were obtained in lesions undergoing cryotherapy concerning the atypia of keratinocytes, epithelial thickness and corneal layer and lymphocytic infiltrate. Despite the small number of patients, it was concluded that, if performed correctly, cryotherapy has high efficacy in the treatment of actinic keratoses. PMID:26131870

  16. Histopathological analysis of the therapeutic response to cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen in patients with multiple actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Câmara de; Trevisan, Flávia; Pinto, Clovis Antônio Lopes; Xavier, Célia Antônia; Pinto, Jaqueline Campoi Calvo Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Actinic keratoses are premalignant lesions of the skin caused by excessive sun exposure. Lesions may become mainly squamous cell carcinoma. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen is one of the main treatments. In order to evaluate the response of actinic keratosis to cryotherapy by histopathology, two lesions were selected in each of 14 patients with multiple actinic keratoses. In one lesion a biopsy was performed and in the other lesion a biopsy was performed after cryotherapy. Subsequently, both biopsies were compared histologically. Of the thirteen patients who completed the study, the best results were obtained in lesions undergoing cryotherapy concerning the atypia of keratinocytes, epithelial thickness and corneal layer and lymphocytic infiltrate. Despite the small number of patients, it was concluded that, if performed correctly, cryotherapy has high efficacy in the treatment of actinic keratoses.

  17. Characterisation of the fumarate hydratase repertoire in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Kia, Ali Martin; Filho, Antonio José Costa; Wilkinson, Shane R; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-03-27

    Nifurtimox and benznidazole represent the only treatments options available targeting Chagas disease, the most important parasitic infection in the Americas. However, use of these is problematic as they are toxic and ineffective against the more severe stages of the disease. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach to characterise the fumarases from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas Disease. We showed this trypanosome expresses cytosolic and mitochondrial fumarases that via an iron-sulfur cluster mediate the reversible conversion of fumarate to S-malate. Based on sequence, biochemical properties and co-factor binding, both T. cruzi proteins share characteristics with class I fumarases, enzymes found in bacteria and some other protozoa but absent from humans, that possess class II isoforms instead. Gene disruption suggested that although the cytosolic or mitochondrial fumarase activities are individually dispensable their combined activity is essential for parasite viability. Finally, based on the mechanistic differences with the human (host) fumarase, we designed and validated a selective inhibitor targeting the parasite enzyme. This study showed that T. cruzi fumarases should be exploited as targets for the development of new chemotherapeutic interventions against Chagas disease.

  18. Imidazolium compounds are active against all stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Liang, Mary; Mahler, Graciela; Wipf, Peter; Robello, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Imidazolium salts are best known for their applications in organic synthesis as room-temperature ionic liquids, or as precursors of stable carbenes, but they also show important biological properties such as anti-oxidative effects, induction of mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation and inhibition of the infection cycle of Plasmodium falciparum. For these reasons, and since chemotherapy for Chagas disease is inefficient, the aim of this study was to test the use of imidazolium compounds against the kinetoplastid haemoflagellate aetiological agent for this disease, namely Trypanosoma cruzi. The results show that five of the tested compounds are more effective than the reference drug benznidazole against the epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. Moreover, intracellular amastigotes were also affected by the compounds, which showed lower toxicity in host cells. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the tested agents induced alterations of the kinetoplast and particularly of the mitochondria, leading to extraordinary swelling of the organelle. These results further demonstrate that the test agents with the best profile are those bearing symmetrical bulky substituents at N(1) and N(3), displaying promising activity against all forms of T. cruzi, interesting selectivity indexes and exceptional activity at low doses. Accordingly, these agents represent promising candidates for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  19. Characterization of a RAB5 homologue in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Araripe, Júlia Rolão; Ramos, Fabiane Pereira; Cunha e Silva, Narcisa Leal; Urményi, Turán Péter; Silva, Rosane; Leite Fontes, Carlos Frederico; da Silveira, José Franco; Rondinelli, Edson

    2005-04-08

    RAB proteins are small GTPases involved in exocytic and endocytic pathways of eukaryotic cells, controlling vesicle docking and fusion. RABs show a remarkable specificity in subcellular localization, so they can be used as molecular markers for studying protein trafficking in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease. RAB5 is a component of early endosomes. It has been identified in kinetoplastids such as Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani. In this work, we describe the characterization of the complete coding sequence of a RAB5 gene homologue in T. cruzi (TcRAB5, GenBank Accession No. AY730667). It is present as a single copy gene, located at chromosomal bands XIII and XIV. TcRAB5 shares the highest degrees of similarity (71%) and identity (63%) with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense RAB5a and contains all five characteristic RAB motifs. TcRAB5 is transcribed as a single 1.5kb mRNA in epimastigotes. Its transcript was also detected in the other two forms of the parasite, metacyclic trypomastigotes and spheromastigotes. The recombinant TcRAB5 protein was able to bind and hydrolyze GTP. The identification of proteins involved in T. cruzi endo- and exocytic pathways may generate cellular compartment markers, an invaluable tool to better understand the vesicular transport in this parasite.

  20. Geographical distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi genotypes in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Hernán J; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A; Feliciangeli, M Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI - TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi infection by oral route.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Nobuko

    2009-07-01

    Frequent reports on outbreaks of acute Chagas' disease by ingestion of food contaminated with parasites from triatomine insects illustrate the importance of this mode of transmission. Studies on oral Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice have indicated that metacyclic trypomastigotes invade the gastric mucosal epithelium. A key molecule in this process is gp82, a stage-specific surface glycoprotein that binds to both gastric mucin and to target epithelial cells. By triggering Ca2+ signalling, gp82 promotes parasite internalisation. Gp82 is relatively resistant to peptic digestion at acidic pH, thus preserving the properties critical for oral infection. The infection process is also influenced by gp90, a metacyclic stage-specific molecule that negatively regulates the invasion process. T. cruzi strains expressing high gp90 levels invade cells poorly in vitro. However, their infectivity by oral route varies considerably due to varying susceptibilities of different gp90 isoforms to peptic digestion. Parasites expressing pepsin-susceptible gp90 become highly invasive against target cells upon contact with gastric juice. Such is the case of a T. cruzi isolate from an acute case of orally acquired Chagas' disease; the gp90 from this strain is extensively degraded upon short period of parasite permanence in the gastric milieu. If such an exacerbation of infectivity occurs in humans, it may be responsible for the severity of Chagas' disease reported in outbreaks of oral infection.

  2. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Rodríguez, Ana

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS) as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of synthetic bornyl benzoates against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, P R C; Miranda, R R S; Duarte, L P; Silva, G D F; Filho, S A Vieira; Okuma, A A; Carazza, F; Morgado-Díaz, J A; Pinge-Filho, P; Yamauchi, L M; Nakamura, C V; Yamada-Ogatta, S F

    2012-01-01

    We report here for the first time the in vitro effects of (1S,2R,4S)-1,7,7-trimethyl-bicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl-3′,4′,5′-trimethoxy benzoate (1) and (1S,2R,4S)-1,7,7-trimethyl-bicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl benzoate (2) on the growth and ultrastructure of Trypanosoma cruzi. These two synthetic compounds exerted an antiproliferative effect on the epimastigote forms of the parasite. The ICs50/72h of two synthetic L-bornyl benzoates, 1 and 2, was 10.1 and 12.8 μg/ml, respectively. Both compounds were more selective against epimastigotes than HEp-2 cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed intense cytoplasmic vacuolization and the appearance of cytoplasmic materials surrounded by membranes. The treatment of peritoneal macrophages with compounds 1 and 2 caused a significant decrease in the number of T. cruzi-infected cells. L-Bornyl benzoate derivatives may serve as a potential source for the development of more effective and safer chemotherapeutic agents against T. cruzi infections. PMID:22943546

  4. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread.

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone increases resistance to experimental infection by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla Domingues; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; Santello, Fabrícia Helena; Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Brazão, Vânia; do Prado Júnior, José Clóvis

    2008-05-31

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) enhances immune responses against a wide range of viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. In a previous study, we reported that administration of DHEA significantly decreased the numbers of blood parasites in Trypanosoma cruzi experimental infection. The present study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of DHEA in reducing the severity of acute phase T. cruzi infection of male and female Wistar rats. Animals were treated subcutaneously with 40 mg/kg body weight/day of DHEA. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) was determined in spleen peritoneal cavity. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were determined in the sera of uninfected and infected animals. DHEA treatment augments NO production for both sexes after in vitro LPS treatment for uninfected animals. Infection triggered enhanced NO levels although not significant. IL-2 and IFN-gamma were detectable in higher concentrations in treated and infected rats of both genders when compared to untreated controls. These data suggest that DHEA may have a potent immunoregulatory function that can affect the course of T. cruzi infection.

  6. Conservation and divergence within the clathrin interactome of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Ligia Cristina; Frederico, Yohana Camila A.; Boehm, Cordula; Moreira, Claudia Maria do Nascimento; Soares, Maurilio José; Field, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protozoa with a significant burden on human health. African and American trypanosomes are causative agents of Nagana and Chagas disease respectively, and speciated about 300 million years ago. These parasites have highly distinct life cycles, pathologies, transmission strategies and surface proteomes, being dominated by the variant surface glycoprotein (African) or mucins (American) respectively. In African trypanosomes clathrin-mediated trafficking is responsible for endocytosis and post-Golgi transport, with several mechanistic aspects distinct from higher organisms. Using clathrin light chain (TcCLC) and EpsinR (TcEpsinR) as affinity handles, we identified candidate clathrin-associated proteins (CAPs) in Trypanosoma cruzi; the cohort includes orthologs of many proteins known to mediate vesicle trafficking, but significantly not the AP-2 adaptor complex. Several trypanosome-specific proteins common with African trypanosomes, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy revealed localisations for TcEpsinR, TcCLC and TcCHC at the posterior region of trypomastigote cells, coincident with the flagellar pocket and Golgi apparatus. These data provide the first systematic analysis of clathrin-mediated trafficking in T. cruzi, allowing comparison between protein cohorts and other trypanosomes and also suggest that clathrin trafficking in at least some life stages of T. cruzi may be AP-2-independent. PMID:27502971

  7. Geographical Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Hernán J.; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E.; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A.; Feliciangeli, M. Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI – TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela. PMID:22745843

  8. Gene Discovery through Expressed Sequence Tag Sequencing in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Verdun, Ramiro E.; Di Paolo, Nelson; Urmenyi, Turan P.; Rondinelli, Edson; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Sanchez, Daniel O.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) constitutes a useful approach for gene identification that, in the case of human pathogens, might result in the identification of new targets for chemotherapy and vaccine development. As part of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, we have partially sequenced the 5′ ends of 1,949 clones to generate ESTs. The clones were randomly selected from a normalized CL Brener epimastigote cDNA library. A total of 14.6% of the clones were homologous to previously identified T. cruzi genes, while 18.4% had significant matches to genes from other organisms in the database. A total of 67% of the ESTs had no matches in the database, and thus, some of them might be T. cruzi-specific genes. Functional groups of those sequences with matches in the database were constructed according to their putative biological functions. The two largest categories were protein synthesis (23.3%) and cell surface molecules (10.8%). The information reported in this paper should be useful for researchers in the field to analyze genes and proteins of their own interest. PMID:9784549

  9. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-09-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety.

  10. Tumefactive Fibroinflammatory Lesion: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Promil; Sen, Rajeev; Sharma, Nisha; Bhargava, Shilpi; Singh, Virender

    2017-01-01

    Tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesions (TFLs) are rare idiopathic benign fibrosclerosing lesions that clinically simulate a malignancy. TFLs are seen more frequently in males between 10 and 74 years of age. The usual site of involvement is the head and neck region, but rarely the extremities may be involved. Coexisting fibrosclerotic processes have been reported including retroperitoneal fibrosis, sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing mediastinal fibrosis, and orbital pseudotumors. The etiology of this poorly understood entity remains unknown. Possible suggestions include exaggerated responses or autoimmune reactions to any chronic infection. The clinical and radiological appearance of TFLs is that of malignancy, but histopathology reveals them to be a benign process broadly classified under non-neoplastic, fibroinflammatory proliferations. The treatment strategies for these lesions are not well defined and variable and include steroids, surgery, and radiotherapy either alone or in combination. TFLs, albeit not fatal, have a high recurrence rate; patients should, therefore, be kept on long-term follow-up. We describe a young female patient presenting with a rapidly developing cheek swelling, which was diagnosed histopathologically as a TFLs. PMID:28360448

  11. Oncocytic metaplasia in inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia: Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Ana Lúcia Carrinho Ayrosa; León, Jorge Esquiche; Jorge, Jacks; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; Vargas, Pablo Agustín

    2008-03-01

    Oncocytic metaplasia (OM) is not a well-known feature in inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia (IFH) lesions, although it may be common, as proposed in our previous study about this lesion. In the present paper, we assessed the histopathological and immunohistochemical features of 18 cases of IFH containing OM areas. All the samples were examined on haematoxylin and eosin stained sections and cytokeratins (AE1/AE3, 34betaE12, CK5, CK7, CK8, CK13, CK14 and CK19), CD15, CD20, CD68, CD45Ro, and LCA primary antibodies were used. The vast majority of IFH occurred in women (n=14) and the most common site of presentation was the buccal vestibule. Oncocytic and salivary duct cells showed uniform immunoreactivity for AE1/AE3, CK7, CK8 and CK19. CD45Ro+ T-lymphocytes were the most common inflammatory cells surrounding the OM areas followed by CD20+ B-lymphocytes. These findings suggest that oncocytic cells present in IFH might develop from salivary duct epithelium, and T-lymphocytes might play an important role in its etiopathogenesis.

  12. Likely Autochthonous Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to Humans, South Central Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Sarah M.; Murray, Kristy O.; Gorchakov, Rodion; Beddard, Rachel; Rossmann, Susan N.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Rivera, Hilda; Brown, Eric L.; Aguilar, David; Widman, Lawrence E.

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major neglected tropical disease affecting the Americas. The epidemiology of this disease in the United States is incomplete. We report evidence of likely autochthonous vectorborne transmission of T. cruzi and health outcomes in T. cruzi–seropositive blood donors in south central Texas, USA. PMID:28221110

  13. Surgery on the Trabecular Meshwork: Histopathological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Bhartiya, Shibal; Ichhpujani, Parul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Juxtacanalicular (JXT) trabecular meshwork and endothelial lining of Schlemm’s canal have been cited as the loci of aqueous outflow resistance, both in a normal as well as a glaucomatous eye. In this review, we attempt to understand the currently available surgical modalities in light of the available histopathological evidence, regarding localization of outflow resistance. How to cite this article: Bhartiya S, Ichhpujani P, Shaarawy T. Surgery on the Trabecular Meshwork: Histopathological Evidence. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(2):51-61. PMID:26997835

  14. Correlation of Histopathologic Features with Demographic, Gross and Radiographic Findings in Giant Cell Granulomas of the Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Aghbali, Amirala; Sina, Mahmood; Vahid Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi; Emamverdizadeh, Parya; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Mahmoudi, Seyyed Mostafa; Janani, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. The correlation between morphology of giant cells in peripheral granulomas of the jaws and the aggressive behavior of the lesion is unknown. This study investigated the correlation between the histopathologic features with demographic, gross and radiographic findings in giant cell granulomas. Materials and methods. In this analytical study, data from 23 cases of central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) and 42 cases of peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) were analyzed, focusing on age, gender, location, and gross and radiographic features. For each patient, microscopic slides were assessed in terms of histologic features of giant cells and stroma. Results. No significant differences were found in the mean number of nuclei or the size of nuclei and giant cell distribution patterns between the jaws and genders in both lesions (P >0.05). Correlation between the mean number of nuclei and age was positively significant and correlation between the size of nuclei and age was negatively significant (P < 0.05). In addition, correlation between the mean number and size of nuclei and the size of the lesion was significant (P < 0.05). Correlation between stroma and aggressiveness of CGCGs was not statistically significant. Correlation between histopathologic features and radiographic findings was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion. There were correlations between the mean number of nuclei per giant cell and the size of the lesion and age, and between the size of nuclei and size of the lesion. No relation was observed between histopathologic and radiographic features. PMID:24578821

  15. Tc45, a dimorphic Trypanosoma cruzi immunogen with variable chromosomal localization, is calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Aguillón, J C; Ferreira, L; Pérez, C; Colombo, A; Molina, M C; Wallace, A; Solari, A; Carvallo, P; Galindo, M; Galanti, N; Orn, A; Billetta, R; Ferreira, A

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that Tc45, a polypeptide described as an immunogenetically restricted Trypanosoma cruzi antigen in mice, is calreticulin, a dimorphic molecule encoded by genes with variable chromosomal distribution. Previously we showed that IgG from A.SW (H2s) mice immunized with T. cruzi trypomastigotes or epimastigotes and sera from infected humans recognize Tc45, a 45 kD parasite polypeptide. Herein we describe the cloning, sequencing, and expression of the Tc45 gene. A 98% homology in the deduced amino acid sequence was found with a T. cruzi calreticulin-like molecule and 41% with Leishmania donovani and human calreticulin. In the T. cruzi CL Brener clone and in the Tulahuén strain, the gene is located in two and four chromosomes, respectively. Calreticulin was detected in several T. cruzi clones, in the Tulahuén strain, and in T. rangeli, displaying alternative 43 and 46 kD forms.

  16. Molecular phylogeny of Trypanosoma cruzi from Central America (Guatemala) and a comparison with South American strains.

    PubMed

    Iwagami, M; Higo, H; Miura, S; Yanagi, T; Tada, I; Kano, S; Agatsuma, T

    2007-12-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis was carried out for 21 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi, nine of which were obtained from Guatemala and 12 from South America. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using the nucleotide sequences of two nuclear gene regions, dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) and trypanothione reductase (TR), and contiguous portions of two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1). Possible genetic exchange between the rather divergent lineages of T. cruzi II from South America was suggested in the trees of the two nuclear genes. T. cruzi I strains obtained from Guatemala and Colombia were identical in all the genes examined, but other T. cruzi I isolates from South America were rather polymorphic in the DHFR-TS and mitochondrial genes. No genetic exchange was identified between T. cruzi I populations from Central and South America in the present study.

  17. Gastric invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and induction of protective mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, D F; Farrar, P L; Kratz-Owens, K; Shaffer, D

    1996-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite transmitted from a reduviid insect vector to humans by exposure of mucosal surfaces to infected insect excreta. We have used an oral challenge murine model that mimics vector-borne transmission to study T. cruzi mucosal infection. Although gastric secretions have microbicidal activity against most infectious pathogens, we demonstrate that T. cruzi can invade and replicate in the gastric mucosal epithelium. In addition, gastric mucosal invasion appears to be the unique portal of entry for systemic T. cruzi infection after oral challenge. The mucosal immune responses stimulated by T. cruzi gastric infection are protective against a secondary mucosal parasite challenge. This protective mucosal immunity is associated with increased numbers of lymphocytes that secrete parasite-specific immunoglobulin A. Our results document the first example of systemic microbial invasion through gastric mucosa and suggest the feasibility of a mucosal vaccine designed to prevent infection with this important human pathogen. PMID:8751932

  18. Prevalence of antibodies to Leishmania infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi in wild canids from South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Tidwell, Richard R; Lindsay, David S

    2007-08-01

    Wild canids are reservoir hosts for Leishmania infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi. The present study examined the prevalence of antibodies to these zoonotic parasites in a population of wild canids from a nonagricultural setting in South Carolina. Sera from 26 gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and 2 coyotes (Canis latrans) were examined for antibodies to L. infantum and T. cruzi using the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test and commercially available parasite-specific immunochromatigraphic strip assays. Antibodies to L. infantum were not detected by either assay in gray foxes or coyotes. Two (8%) of 26 gray foxes were positive in both the T. cruzi immunofluorescent antibody and strip assays. Antibodies to T. cruzi were not detected in coyotes. Results from this study indicate that wild canids are exposed to T. cruzi, but not L. infantum. in this geographic region.

  19. Infectious Granulomatous Dermatitis at a Tertiary Care Centre in North Maharashtra: A Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Dravid, Nandkumar; Nagappa, Karibasappa Gundabaktha; Rokade, Chakor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infectious granulomatous dermatitis is a distinctive entity of chronic inflammation. Recognizing the aetiology of granulomatous lesion is challenging to the dermatopathologist. The definitive diagnosis of the granulomatous lesions of skin with identification of aetiological agent is very essential for specific treatment and an appropriate desirable outcome. Aim To study the histomorphology of various granulomatous lesions of skin and classify them, accordingly into different categories. Materials and Methods A retrospective study of skin biopsies received in the Department of Pathology over a period of five years (June 2009-June 2014) was objectively reviewed. The skin biopsies diagnosed histopathologically as granulomatous dermatitis on H&E stained sections were selected. Complete clinical and relevant history were recorded. Special stains were employed whenever required. Results A total of 137 cases exhibited granulomatous reaction pattern. Among the granulomatous lesions of skin, tuberculoid granulomas were seen in 109 cases (79.56%), foreign body type in 12 cases (8.75%), suppurative and necrobiotic granulomas each in 7 cases (5.1%) and histiocytic and mixed inflammatory type each in one case (0.7%). Leprosy was the most common granulomatous lesion in 66.4% of the cases (91/137). Conclusion Leprosy was the most common granulomatous lesion with Borderline Tuberculoid Leprosy (BTL) as common sub type followed by tuberculoid leprosy. Hence the combination of clinical data and histomorphological findings are essential for establishing an accurate diagnosis of granulomatous lesion of skin. PMID:28050374

  20. Comparative histopathological study of sporotrichosis and American tegumentary leishmaniasis in dogs from Rio de Janeiro.

    PubMed

    Miranda, L H M; Quintella, L P; Santos, I B; Oliveira, R V C; Menezes, R C; Figueiredo, F B; Schubach, T M P

    2010-07-01

    Pyogranulomatous lesions from 80 dogs with sporotrichosis and 26 dogs with American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) were compared microscopically in order to identify features that would support the diagnostic suspicion and direct the subsequent search for the aetiological agent of either infection. Odds ratios and their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated in order to evaluate the impact of the microscopical findings on the diagnosis of either disease. Lesions with well-formed granulomata were 14 times more likely to be due to sporotrichosis than ATL. Marked neutrophil infiltration into granulomata was 12.26 times more likely to be associated with sporotrichosis when compared with lesions having mild neutrophilic infiltration. Absence of lymphocytes and macrophages in the peripheral infiltrate was associated with a 9.71 and 4.93 higher chance, respectively, of being sporotrichosis rather than ATL compared with lesions where these cells were present. Lesions with a perivascular, perifollicular and interstitial peripheral inflammatory infiltrate were 5.48 times more likely to be due to sporotrichosis than ATL when compared with lesions with a diffuse peripheral infiltrate. Histopathological analysis may therefore contribute to the diagnosis of sporotrichosis or ATL skin lesions in dogs since this method permits the identification of features that direct the diagnostic suspicion, thus facilitating the search for the aetiological agent in histological sections, permitting the precise request of subsequent tests and thereby reducing costs and time taken to achieve a definitive diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate therapy.

  1. Incidental Breast Lesions Detected on Computed Thorax Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Poyraz, Necdet; Emlik, Ganime Dilek; Keskin, Suat; Kalkan, Havva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although mammography is the primary imaging method of the breast, incidental benign and malignant breast lesions are increasingly being detected on computed tomographies (CTs) performed to detect different pathologies. Therefore, the detection and accurate identification of these lesions is important. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency, morphological features, and results of incidental breast lesions on CTs performed for the detection of extramammarian pathologies. Materials and Methods Incidental breast lesions on CTs performed in our department between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated. Patients who had previously diagnosed breast lesions were excluded from the study. The inclusion criteria were histopathologic diagnose and being followed-up for at least 2 years. Results The study population consisted of 33 women whose mean age was 55±1.38 (37–78) years. Of the 33 women, 12 (36%) had malignant and 21 (64%) had benign or normal findings. The most common malignant lesion was invasive ductal carcinoma, and the most common benign lesion was fibroadenoma. Ill-defined contour and lymphadenopathy in malignant lesions and well-defined contour in benign lesions were the most important CT findings. Conclusion Breast must be carefully evaluated if it is included in the scans. An accurate report of breast lesions gives an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Clinical and histopathological review of 229 cases of ranula.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yulin; Zhao, Yifang; Chen, Xinming

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the relationship between the thrombosis and secretory duct dilation, lesion size, clinical types, nature (primary or recurrent) and duration of illness in the development of ranula. A total of 229 cases of sublingual gland cysts were treated with surgical resection from Jan. 1990 to Feb. 2010. The patients' data were investigated on histopathological findings, size of ranula, the clinical types, nature of ranula (primary or recurrent) and duration of illness. Sections from the paraffin-embedded blocks were HE-stained. CK expression was immunohistochemically detected. Among 229 cases the incidence of venous thrombosis was 58.52%. The incidence of venous thrombosis with or without duct dilation was 73.25% and 26.39% respectively, with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.005). The incidence of venous thrombosis of ranulas with diameter larger or less than 3 cm was 72.22% and 46.28% (P<0.005). The incidence of venous thrombosis of oral ranula, plunging ranula and mixed ranula was 49.37%, 77.19% and 85.71% respectively, with a significant difference found between oral and plunging or mixed ranula (P<0.01). The incidence of venous thrombosis in ranula patients with duration of illness longer or less than 3 months was 69.77% and 51.75% (P<0.01). The incidence of venous thrombosis with recurrent and primary ranulas was 51.85% and 64.85%, without a significant difference noted between them (P>0.05). It is concluded that the formation of venous thrombosis was related to the dilation of secretory duct, lesion size, clinical types, duration of lesion but formation of venous thrombosis was not related to the nature (primary or recurrent) of ranulas.

  3. American tegumentary leishmaniasis: correlations among immunological, histopathological and clinical parameters*

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Luiza Grizzo Peres; Barreto, Jaison Antonio; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Martins, Ana Claudia Grizzo Peres

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND American tegumentary leishmaniasis has an annual incidence of 1 to 1.5 million cases. In some cases, the patient's immune response can eliminate the parasite, and the lesion spontaneously resolves. However, when this does not occur, patients develop the disseminated form of the disease. OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between clinical, laboratory and pathological findings in cases of American tegumentary leishmaniasis. METHODS A retrospective study of the medical records of 47 patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis. Clinical, laboratory and epidemiological data were collected, and semi-quantitative histopathological analyses were performed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (p <0.05). RESULTS Mean patient age was 40.5 years. A total of 29.7% individuals were female and 70.2% were male, and 40.4% of the patients were farmers. The ulcerative form was found in 53.2% of patients, of whom 59.6% had lesions in the limbs. The average time to diagnosis was 22.3 months. The following positive correlations were significant: age and duration of the disease, Montenegro reaction, degree of granulomatous transformation and epithelioid cell count; duration of disease, Montenegro reaction and number of lymphocytes; epithelial hyperplasia and edema, hemorrhaging, and epithelial aggression; number of plasmocytes and number of parasites. The main negative correlations found were as follows: age and serology; time and parasite load; epithelial hyperplasia and degree of granulomatous transformation. CONCLUSION The long duration of the disease could be explained by the fact that lesions were relatively asymptomatic, and therefore ignored by patients with low literacy levels. Individuals may have simply waited for spontaneous healing, which proved to be dependent on the activation of hypersensitivity mechanisms. PMID:24626648

  4. Histopathological and immunohistochemical approaches for the diagnosis of Pasteurellosis in swine population of Punjab

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Payal; Singh, Nittin Dev; Leishangthem, Geeta Devi; Kaur, Amninder; Mahajan, Vishal; Banga, Harmanjit Singh; Brar, Rajinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Infectious porcine bronchopneumonia, caused by Pasteurella multocida, is a widespread disease of major economic significance. Thus, the aim of the present study was to diagnose swine Pasteurellosis using gross, histopathological, and immunopathological approaches in the swine population of Punjab and to compare the efficacy of immunohistochemical (IHC) techniques with conventional diagnostic techniques. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 adult swine lung samples showing gross pneumonic changes were collected along with the associated lymph nodes to carry out the study. The collected samples were then processed for histopathological and IHC studies. Results: Out of the total 71 lung samples, 26 samples were found to be suspected for Pasteurellosis as per the microscopic changes observed, and out of these 26 samples, 16 cases were confirmed to be positive for Pasteurellosis by IHC. Varied macroscopic changes noted in lungs were pneumonic patches with consolidation of many lobes, congestion, and focal hemorrhages. Main lesions associated with lymph nodes were its enlargement and hemorrhages. Histologically, the lung showed fibrinous and suppurative bronchopneumonia, multifocal suppuration, thickening of septa with fibrin combined with cellular infiltration and edema. The higher IHC expression of P. multocida was seen in the bronchial epithelium besides in alveolar and bronchial exudate. Moreover, on comparing the histopathological and IHC scores which were calculated on the basis of characteristic microscopic lesions and number of antigen positive cells, respectively, a significant positive correlation (r=0.4234) was found. Conclusion: It was concluded that swine population of Punjab is having P. multocida infection. The gross and histopathological lesions can be helpful in the preliminary diagnosis of Pasteurellosis but needs to be supplemented by other immunodiagnostic tests. Moreover, IHC technique proved to be a specific, reliable, precise, and rapid

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging And Brain Histopathology In Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sibbitt, Wilmer L.; Brooks, William M.; Kornfeld, Mario; Hart, Blaine L.; Bankhurst, Arthur D.; Roldan, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often demonstrates brain lesions in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSL). The present study compared post-mortem histopathology with pre-mortem MRI in NPSL. Methods 200 subjects with NPSLE were studied prospectively with MRI over a 10-year period during which 22 subjects died. In 14 subjects, a brain autopsy with histopathology that permitted direct comparison with pre mortem MRI was successfully obtained. Surface anatomy was used to determine the approximate location of individual lesions. Results Pre mortem MRI findings in fatal NPSLE were small focal white matter lesions (100%), cortical atrophy (64%), ventricular dilation (57%), cerebral edema (50%), diffuse white matter abnormalities (43%), focal atrophy (36%), cerebral infarction (29%), acute leukoencephalopathy (25%), intracranial hemorrhage (21%), and calcifications (7%). Microscopic findings in fatal NPSLE included global ischemic changes (57%), parenchymal edema (50%), microhemorrhages (43%), glial hyperplasia (43%), diffuse neuronal/axonal loss (36%), resolved cerebral infarction (33%), microthomboemboli (29%), blood vessel remodeling (29%), acute cerebral infarction (14%), acute macrohemorrhages (14%), and resolved intracranial hemorrhages (7%). Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilation seen by MRI predicted brain mass at autopsy (r = -0.72, p = 0.01, and r = -0.77, p =0.01, respectively). Cerebral autopsy findings, including infarction, cerebral edema, intracranial hemorrhage, calcifications, cysts, and focal atrophy were also predicted accurately by pre mortem MRI. Conclusion Brain lesions in NPSLE detected by MRI accurately represent serious underlying cerebrovascular and parenchymal brain injury on pathology. PMID:19880162

  6. Histopathology of fish: I. Techniques and principles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, E.M.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1955-01-01

    The techniques of histopathology have been used for many years in the study of human and animal diseases. Until very recent times, however, histology has been applied to fish studies only very infrequently. This brief discussion is intended to acquaint the reader with the techniques and principles involved and to explain how histological studies may help to overcome fish diseases and nutritional problems.

  7. THz imaging of histo-pathological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Pascal; Schmalstieg, K.; Koch, Martin; Rehberg, E.; Vauti, F.; Donhuijsen, K.

    2001-10-01

    We investigate the potential of THz imaging for the examination of histo-pathological samples. Data obtained on a pig larynx and on a human liver containing cancerous tissue are presented. Different types of tissue are clearly resolved due to their distinct spectral absorption characteristics or due to a density dependent THz transmission.

  8. Retrospective study of biopsied head and neck lesions in a cohort of referral Taiwanese patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A study of the whole spectrum of biopsied head and neck (HN) diseases in Taiwan has not yet been performed. Therefore, the current study aimed to provide updated information about HN lesions in a cohort of referral Taiwanese patients for histopathological examination. Methods HN lesions (2000–2011) in patients with records of age, sex, and histological diagnoses were retrieved from the Oral Pathology Department of the institution. These lesions were classified into four main categories: tumor/tumor-like reactive lesions, cystic/pseudocystic lesions, inflammatory/infective lesions, and others/miscellaneous lesions. Results A total of 37,210 HN lesions were included in the current study. Most of these lesions were distributed in the group of tumor/tumor-like reactive lesions, followed by the groups of inflammatory/infective lesions, cystic/pseudocystic lesions, and others/miscellaneous lesions. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common HN lesion, and was also the most frequent malignant lesion among the referral patients. Conclusion It was worthy of note that squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders comprised high percentages of all HN lesions for the present cohort of referral patients. PMID:25047214

  9. The diversity and expansion of the trans-sialidase gene family is a common feature in Trypanosoma cruzi clade members.

    PubMed

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Cortez, Danielle R; Lima, Fábio M; Cortez, Caroline; Ramírez, José Luis; Martins, Andre G; Serrano, Myrna G; Teixeira, Marta M G; da Silveira, José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Trans-sialidase (TS) is a polymorphic protein superfamily described in members of the protozoan genus Trypanosoma. Of the eight TS groups recently described, TS group I proteins (some of which have catalytic activity) are present in the distantly related Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi phylogenetic clades, whereas other TS groups have only been described in some species belonging to the T. cruzi clade. In the present study we analyzed the repertoire, distribution and phylogenetic relationships of TS genes among species of the T. cruzi clade based on sequence similarity, multiple sequence alignment and tree-reconstruction approaches using TS sequences obtained with the aid of PCR-based strategies or retrieved from genome databases. We included the following representative isolates of the T. cruzi clade from South America: T. cruzi, T. cruzi Tcbat, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma conorhini. The cloned sequences encoded conserved TS protein motifs Asp-box and VTVxNVxLYNR but lacked the FRIP motif (conserved in TS group I). The T. conorhini sequences were the most divergent. The hybridization patterns of TS probes with chromosomal bands confirmed the abundance of these sequences in species in the T. cruzi clade. Divergence and relationship analysis placed most of the TS sequences in the groups defined in T. cruzi. Further examination of members of TS group II, which includes T. cruzi surface glycoproteins implicated in host cell attachment and invasion, showed that sequences of T. cruzi Tcbat grouped with those of T. cruzi genotype TcI. Our analysis indicates that different members of the T. cruzi clade, with different vertebrate hosts, vectors and pathogenicity, share the extensive expansion and sequence diversification of the TS gene family. Altogether, our results are congruent with the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade and represent a contribution to the understanding of the molecular

  10. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  11. Scuticociliatid ciliate outbreak in Australian potbellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis (Lesson, 1827): clinical signs, histopathologic findings, and treatment with metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Di Cicco, Emiliano; Paradis, Erika; Stephen, Craig; Turba, Maria Elena; Rossi, Giacomo

    2013-06-01

    A severe outbreak of scuticociliatosis occurred in Australian pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis (Lesson, 1872), kept at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada). Clinical signs included anorexia, lethargy, irregular respiration, and death. Cytology and histopathology revealed a high number of histophagous ciliated protozoa within the tissues. The parasite, identified as Philasterides dicentrarchi, was observed in several internal organs that appeared edematous and hemorrhagic upon postmortem examination. Severe histopathologic lesions were reported in particular in the ovary, the kidney, and the intestine. This infection was successfully treated with metronidazole via bath therapy. No further evidence of this parasite was found in the treated fish.

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I.; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M.; Rodrigues, Flávia G.; DaRocha, Wanderson D.; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8+ T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases. PMID:22114198

  13. Role of placental barrier integrity in infection by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Luján, C; Triquell, M F; Castillo, C; Hardisson, D; Kemmerling, U; Fretes, R E

    2016-12-01

    American trypanosomiasis has long been a neglected disease endemic in LatinAmerica, but congenital transmission has now spread Chagas disease to cause a global health problem. As the early stages of the infection of placental tissue and the vertical transmission by Trypanosoma cruzi are still not well understood, it is important to investigate the relevance of the first structure of the placental barrier in chorionic villi infection by T. cruzi during the initial stage of the infection. Explants of human chorionic villi from healthy pregnant women at term were denuded of their syncytiotrophoblast and co-cultured for 3h, 24h and 96h with 800,000 trypomastigotes (simulating acute infection). T. cruzi infected cells were identified by immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin-7 (+cytotrophoblast) and CD68 (+macrophages), and the infection was quantified. In placental tissue, the parasite load was analyzed by qPCR and microscopy, and the motile trypomastigotes were quantified in culture supernatant. In denuded chorionic villous, the total area occupied by the parasite (451.23μm(2), 1.33%) and parasite load (RQ: 87) was significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the entire villous (control) (5.98μm(2), 0.016%) (RQ:1) and with smaller concentration of nitric oxide. Stromal non-macrophage cells were infected as well as cytotrophoblasts and some macrophages, but with significant differences being observed. The parasite quantity in the culture supernatant was significantly higher (p<0.05) in denuded culture explants from 96h of culture. Although the human complete chorionic villi limited the infection, the detachment of the first structure of the placenta barrier (syncytiotrophoblast) increased both the infection of the villous stroma and the living trypomastigotes in the culture supernatant. Therefore structural and functional alterations to chorionic villi placental barrier reduce placental defenses and may contribute to the vertical transmission of Chagas.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M; Rodrigues, Flávia G; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2011-12-06

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases.

  15. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien; Mandacaru, Samuel C.; Schwämmle, Veit; Lima, Beatriz D.; Roepstorff, Peter; Ricart, Carlos A. O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a tropical neglected disease endemic in Latin America caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite has four major life stages: epimastigote, metacyclic trypomastigote, bloodstream trypomastigote, and amastigote. The differentiation from infective trypomastigotes into replicative amastigotes, called amastigogenesis, takes place in vivo inside mammalian host cells after a period of incubation in an acidic phagolysosome. This differentiation process can be mimicked in vitro by incubating tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes in acidic DMEM. Here we used this well-established differentiation protocol to perform a comprehensive quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of T. cruzi amastigogenesis. Samples from fully differentiated forms and two biologically relevant intermediate time points were Lys-C/trypsin digested, iTRAQ-labeled, and multiplexed. Subsequently, phosphopeptides were enriched using a TiO2 matrix. Non-phosphorylated peptides were fractionated via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics procedures were used for protein and phosphopeptide quantitation, identification, and phosphorylation site assignment. We were able to identify regulated proteins and pathways involved in coordinating amastigogenesis. We also observed that a significant proportion of the regulated proteins were membrane proteins. Modulated phosphorylation events coordinated by protein kinases and phosphatases that are part of the signaling cascade induced by incubation in acidic medium were also evinced. To our knowledge, this work is the most comprehensive quantitative proteomics study of T. cruzi amastigogenesis, and these data will serve as a trustworthy basis for future studies, and possibly for new potential drug targets. PMID:25225356

  16. Polyamine depletion inhibits the autophagic response modulating Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vanrell, María C.; Cueto, Juan A.; Barclay, Jeremías J.; Carrillo, Carolina; Colombo, María I.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Romano, Patricia S.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell process that in normal conditions serves to recycle cytoplasmic components and aged or damaged organelles. The autophagic pathway has been implicated in many physiological and pathological situations, even during the course of infection by intracellular pathogens. Many compounds are currently used to positively or negatively modulate the autophagic response. Recently it was demonstrated that the polyamine spermidine is a physiological inducer of autophagy in eukaryotic cells. We have previously shown that the etiological agent of Chagas disease, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, interacts with autophagic compartments during host cell invasion and that preactivation of autophagy significantly increases host cell colonization by this parasite. In the present report we have analyzed the effect of polyamine depletion on the autophagic response of the host cell and on T. cruzi infectivity. Our data showed that depleting intracellular polyamines by inhibiting the biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) suppressed the induction of autophagy in response to starvation or rapamycin treatment in two cell lines. This effect was associated with a decrease in the levels of LC3 and ATG5, two proteins required for autophagosome formation. As a consequence of inhibiting host cell autophagy, DFMO impaired T. cruzi colonization, indicating that polyamines and autophagy facilitate parasite infection. Thus, our results point to DFMO as a novel autophagy inhibitor. While other autophagy inhibitors such as wortmannin and 3-methyladenine are nonspecific and potentially toxic, DFMO is an FDA-approved drug that may have value in limiting autophagy and the spread of the infection in Chagas disease and possibly other pathological settings. PMID:23697944

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Response to Ionizing Radiation Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; Grynberg, Priscila; Bitar, Mainá; Pires, Simone da Fonseca; Hilário, Heron Oliveira; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, enduring up to 1.5 kGy of gamma rays. Ionizing radiation can damage the DNA molecule both directly, resulting in double-strand breaks, and indirectly, as a consequence of reactive oxygen species production. After a dose of 500 Gy of gamma rays, the parasite genome is fragmented, but the chromosomal bands are restored within 48 hours. Under such conditions, cell growth arrests for up to 120 hours and the parasites resume normal growth after this period. To better understand the parasite response to ionizing radiation, we analyzed the proteome of irradiated (4, 24, and 96 hours after irradiation) and non-irradiated T. cruzi using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. A total of 543 spots were found to be differentially expressed, from which 215 were identified. These identified protein spots represent different isoforms of only 53 proteins. We observed a tendency for overexpression of proteins with molecular weights below predicted, indicating that these may be processed, yielding shorter polypeptides. The presence of shorter protein isoforms after irradiation suggests the occurrence of post-translational modifications and/or processing in response to gamma radiation stress. Our results also indicate that active translation is essential for the recovery of parasites from ionizing radiation damage. This study therefore reveals the peculiar response of T. cruzi to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism can change its protein expression to survive such a harmful stress. PMID:24842666

  18. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: systematic histopathological approach can clinch vital clues.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Prasenjit, Das; Prateek, Kinra; Shasanka, Panda S; Virender, Sekhon; Rajni, Yadav; Gaurav, Jindal; Vijay, Maneesh K; Arun, Kumar V; Mahajan, J K; Sandeep, Agarwala; Ranjan, Dash Nihar; Siddhartha, Datta Gupta

    2014-05-01

    The histopathological approach of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is critical, and the findings are often missed by the histopathologists for lack of awareness and nonavailability of standard criteria. We aimed to describe a detailed histopathological approach for working-up cases of CIP by citing our experience. Eight suspected cases of CIP were included in the study to determine and describe an approach for reaching the histopathological diagnosis collected over a period of the last 1.5 years. The Hirschsprung's disease was put apart from the scope of this study. A detailed light microscopic analysis was performed along with special and immunohistochemical stains. Transmission electron microscopy was carried out on tissue retrieved from paraffin embedded tissue blocks. Among the eight cases, three were neonates, one in the pediatric age group, two adolescent, and two adults. After following the described critical approach, we achieved the histological diagnoses in all the cases. The causes of CIP noted were primary intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) type B (in 4), mesenchymopathy (in 2), lymphocytic myenteric ganglionitis (in 1), and duplication of myenteric plexus with leiomyopathy (in 1). Desmosis was noted in all of them along with other primary pathologies. One of the IND patients also had visceral myopathy, type IV. Histopathologists need to follow a systematic approach comprising of diligent histological examination and use of immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy in CIP workup. Therapy and prognosis vary depending on lesions identified by pathologists. These lesions can be seen in isolation or in combinations.

  19. Role of FNAC in the diagnosis of intraosseous jaw lesions

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Surbhi; Kotru, Mrinalini; Gupta, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Background FNAC of intraosseous jaw lesions has not been widely utilized for diagnosis due to rarity and diversity of these lesions, limited experience and lack of well established cytological features. Aim of the study was to determine the role of FNAC in the diagnosis of intraosseous jaw swellings. Material and Methods 42 patients underwent FNAC over a period of 7 years (2007-2013), of which 37 (88.1%) aspirates were diagnostic. Histopathology correlation was available in 33 cases and diagnostic accuracy of FNAC was calculated. Results Lesions were categorized into inflammatory 3, cysts/hamartomas 15 and neoplasms 19. Mandibular and maxillary involvement was seen in 21 and 16 patients respectively. Of these, benign cysts and malignant lesions were commonest, accounting for 27% lesions (10 cases) each. One case of cystic ameloblastoma was misdiagnosed as odontogenic cyst on cytology. Overall, sensitivity and specificity of FNAC were 94.7% and 100% respectively with a diagnostic accuracy of 97.3%. Definitive categorization of giant cell lesions, fibro-osseous lesions, odontogenic tumors and cystic lesions was not feasible on FNAC. Conclusions FNAC is a simple, safe and minimally invasive first line investigation which can render an accurate preoperative diagnosis of intraosseous jaw lesions, especially the malignant ones in the light of clinic-radiological correlation. Key words: Jaw swellings, intraosseous, FNAC. PMID:25662547

  20. Synergistic Effect of Lupenone and Caryophyllene Oxide against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Polanco-Hernández, Glendy; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Rosado, María E.; Guzmán-Marín, Eugenia; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y.; Giménez-Turba, Alberto; Salamanca, Efraín; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro trypanocidal activity of a 1 : 4 mixture of lupenone and caryophyllene oxide confirmed a synergistic effect of the terpenoids against epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi (IC50 = 10.4 μg/mL, FIC = 0.46). In addition, testing of the terpenoid mixture for its capacity to reduce the number of amastigote nests in cardiac tissue and skeletal muscle of infected mice showed a reduction of more than 80% at a dose level of 20.8 mg·kg−1·day−1. PMID:23762135

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in B-cell-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, A M; Santoro, F; Afchain, D; Bazin, H; Capron, A

    1981-01-01

    The effect of neonatally initiated injections of anti-mu rabbit antiserum on immunity of rats against Trypanosoma cruzi infection was investigated in vivo. Anti-mu treatment resulted in a loss of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG2a synthesis and, subsequently, of antibody production. These rats so treated were shown to be significantly more susceptible to the acute phase of the infection than the control rats treated with normal rabbit serum, as measured by increased parasitemia and mortality. These results indicate the essential role of antibodies, probably in association with complement or effector cells or both, in immunity to acute Chagas' disease. PMID:6783543

  2. Recruitment and endo-lysosomal activation of TLR9 in dendritic cells infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Ropert, Catherine; Melo, Mariane B; Parroche, Peggy; Junqueira, Caroline F; Teixeira, Santuza M R; Sirois, Cherilyn; Kasperkovitz, Pia; Knetter, Cathrine F; Lien, Egil; Latz, Eicke; Golenbock, Douglas T; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2008-07-15

    TLR9 is critical in parasite recognition and host resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, no information is available regarding nucleotide sequences and cellular events involved on T. cruzi recognition by TLR9. In silico wide analysis associated with in vitro screening of synthetic oligonucleotides demonstrates that the retrotransposon VIPER elements and mucin-like glycoprotein (TcMUC) genes in the T. cruzi genome are highly enriched for CpG motifs that are immunostimulatory for mouse and human TLR9, respectively. Importantly, infection with T. cruzi triggers high levels of luciferase activity under NF-kappaB-dependent transcription in HEK cells cotransfected with human TLR9, but not in control (cotransfected with human MD2/TLR4) HEK cells. Further, we observed translocation of TLR9 to the lysosomes during invasion/uptake of T. cruzi parasites by dendritic cells. Consistently, potent proinflammatory activity was observed when highly unmethylated T. cruzi genomic DNA was delivered to the endo-lysosomal compartment of host cells expressing TLR9. Thus, together our results indicate that the unmethylated CpG motifs found in the T. cruzi genome are likely to be main parasite targets and probably become available to TLR9 when parasites are destroyed in the lysosome-fused vacuoles during parasite invasion/uptake by phagocytes.

  3. Is the Antitumor Property of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Mediated by Its Calreticulin?

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Abello, Paula; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eight to 10 million people in 21 endemic countries are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, only 30% of those infected develop symptoms of Chagas’ disease, a chronic, neglected tropical disease worldwide. Similar to other pathogens, T. cruzi has evolved to resist the host immune response. Studies, performed 80 years ago in the Soviet Union, proposed that T. cruzi infects tumor cells with similar capacity to that displayed for target tissues such as cardiac, aortic, or digestive. An antagonistic relationship between T. cruzi infection and cancer development was also proposed, but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained largely unknown. Probably, a variety of T. cruzi molecules is involved. This review focuses on how T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), exteriorized from the endoplasmic reticulum, targets the first classical complement component C1 and negatively regulates the classical complement activation cascade, promoting parasite infectivity. We propose that this C1-dependent TcCRT-mediated virulence is critical to explain, at least an important part, of the parasite capacity to inhibit tumor development. We will discuss how TcCRT, by directly interacting with venous and arterial endothelial cells, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. Thus, these TcCRT functions not only illustrate T. cruzi interactions with the host immune defensive strategies, but also illustrate a possible co-evolutionary adaptation to privilege a prolonged interaction with its host. PMID:27462315

  4. Organ donor screening practices for Trypanosoma cruzi infection among US Organ Procurement Organizations.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, B S; Paster, M; Ison, M G; Chin-Hong, P V

    2011-04-01

    Donor-derived Trypanosoma cruzi infection in solid organ transplant recipients is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Little is known about T. cruzi screening practices among U.S. organ procurement organizations (OPOs). We distributed a questionnaire to all U.S. OPO directors, requesting data on T. cruzi screening strategies, laboratory methods, number of donors screened, disposition of organs from positive donors and attitudes toward screening. Fifty-eight (100%) U.S. OPOs responded to the survey. Donor screening began in 2002 and is presently performed by 11 (19%) OPOs. Among screening OPOs, four screen all donors and seven use a risk-based strategy. Three different T. cruzi serology tests are used for donor screening. During 2008, 9/993 (0.9%) donors screened positive by a T. cruzi screening test, 6/9 (66%) had confirmatory tests performed and 4/6 (66%) had positive confirmatory tests. These results led to the nonuse of five donors and 17 organs. Five organs from three seropositive donors were transplanted in 2008 without recognized disease transmission. Variability of T. cruzi donor screening strategies, laboratory methods and disposition of organs from positive donors currently exists. Further research is needed to identify the risk of donor-derived T. cruzi infections to help inform the best screening strategy.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of domestic and sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Marta V; Lauricella, Marta A; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Lanati, Leonardo; Marcet, Paula L; Levin, Mariano J; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2008-11-01

    Genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi populations and parasite transmission dynamics have been well documented throughout the Americas, but few studies have been conducted in the Gran Chaco ecoregion, one of the most highly endemic areas for Chagas disease, caused by T. cruzi. In this study, we assessed the distribution of T. cruzi lineages (identified by PCR strategies) in Triatoma infestans, domestic dogs, cats, humans and sylvatic mammals from two neighbouring rural areas with different histories of transmission and vector control in northern Argentina. Lineage II predominated amongst the 99 isolates characterised and lineage I amongst the six isolates obtained from sylvatic mammals. T. cruzi lineage IIe predominated in domestic habitats; it was found in 87% of 54 isolates from Tr. infestans, in 82% of 33 isolates from dogs, and in the four cats found infected. Domestic and sylvatic cycles overlapped in the study area in the late 1980s, when intense domestic transmission occurred, and still overlap marginally. The introduction of T. cruzi from sylvatic into domestic habitats is likely to occur very rarely in the current epidemiological context. The household distribution of T. cruzi lineages showed that Tr. infestans, dogs and cats from a given house compound shared the same parasite lineage in most cases. Based on molecular evidence, this result lends further support to the importance of dogs and cats as domestic reservoir hosts of T. cruzi. We believe that in Argentina, this is the first time that lineage IIc has been isolated from naturally infected domestic dogs and Tr. infestans.

  6. Utility of recombinant flagellar calcium-binding protein for serodiagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed Central

    Godsel, L M; Tibbetts, R S; Olson, C L; Chaudoir, B M; Engman, D M

    1995-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a major public health problem in Latin America and of growing concern in the United States as the number of infected immigrants increases. There is currently no testing of U.S. blood products for T. cruzi infection, and the best tests available, although highly sensitive, are not of high enough specificity to be useful for widespread screening of the blood supply in this country. Among the parasite antigens detected by sera of infected humans and mice, those in the range of 24 to 26 kDa are particularly reactive. With an aim of developing a sensitive, specific, recombinant antigen-based serologic test for T. cruzi infection, we used two antibody reagents specific for these 24- to 26-kDa antigens to isolate cDNA clones from a T. cruzi expression library. One clone was found to encode a previously characterized T. cruzi antigen, a 24-kDa flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP). Recombinant FCaBP was found to be a sensitive, specific reagent for distinguishing T. cruzi-infected individuals from uninfected persons, and it therefore could potentially be used for screening purposes, especially if combined with other recombinant T. cruzi antigens that have similarly high degrees of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:7559952

  7. Molecular epidemiology of domestic and sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Marta V.; Lauricella, Marta A.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Lanati, Leonardo; Marcet, Paula L.; Levin, Mariano J.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi populations and parasite transmission dynamics have been well documented throughout the Americas, but few studies have been conducted in the Gran Chaco ecoregion, one of the most highly endemic areas for Chagas disease, caused by T. cruzi. In this study we assessed the distribution of T. cruzi lineages (identified by PCR strategies) in Triatoma infestans, domestic dogs, cats, humans and sylvatic mammals from two neighboring rural areas with different histories of transmission and vector control in northern Argentina. Lineage II predominated among the 99 isolates characterized and lineage I among the six isolates obtained from sylvatic mammals. Trypanosoma cruzi lineage IIe predominated in domestic habitats; it was found in 87% of 54 isolates from Tr. infestans, in 82% of 33 isolates from dogs, and in the four cats found infected. Domestic and sylvatic cycles overlapped in the study area in the late 1980s, when intense domestic transmission occurred, and still overlap marginally. The introduction of T. cruzi from sylvatic into domestic habitats is likely to occur very rarely in the current epidemiological context. The household distribution of T. cruzi lineages showed that Tr. infestans, dogs and cats from a given house compound shared the same parasite lineage in most cases. Based on molecular evidence, this result lends further support to the importance of dogs and cats as domestic reservoir hosts of T. cruzi. We believe that in Argentina, this is the first time that lineage IIc has been isolated from naturally-infected domestic dogs and Tr. infestans. PMID:18585717

  8. Clinical and histopathological features of cutaneous manifestations of adult-onset Still disease.

    PubMed

    Santa, Erin; McFalls, Jeanne M; Sahu, Joya; Lee, Jason B

    2017-03-25

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a rare autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by recurring fevers, arthralgia, and consistent laboratory abnormalities that include leukocytosis and hyperferritinemia. Skin findings accompany the disease in nearly 90% of the cases. Early reports described evanescent, pruritic, salmon-pink or urticarial lesions, referred to as the typical eruption of AOSD. Histopathologic findings consist of superficial perivascular dermatitis with varying number of interstitial neutrophils. Later reports described a more persistent rash that tended to be photodistributed, hyperpigmented, often in a linear configuration, sometimes in a rippled pattern, referred to as the atypical eruption of AOSD. The presence of individual necrotic keratinocytes in the upper spinous layer has been the consistent histopathologic finding. The persistent rash may not represent an atypical presentation of AOSD as recent reports indicate a high prevalence of the rash. Emerging data also suggest that patients with persistent eruption have a worse prognosis. The recognition of the clinical and histopathological findings of skin eruptions of AOSD may facilitate an earlier diagnosis, potentially improving disease outcome. Herein, clinical and histopathological features of cutaneous manifestation of AOSD in two Asian women are highlighted accompanied by relevant review of the disease.

  9. The increase in mannose receptor recycling favors arginase induction and Trypanosoma cruzi survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Vanina V; Dulgerian, Laura R; Stempin, Cinthia C; Cerbán, Fabio M

    2011-01-01

    The macrophage mannose receptor (MR) is a pattern recognition receptor of the innate immune system that binds to microbial structures bearing mannose, fucose and N-acetylglucosamine on their surface. Trypanosoma cruzi antigen cruzipain (Cz) is found in the different developmental forms of the parasite. This glycoprotein has a highly mannosylated C-terminal domain that participates in the host-antigen contact. Our group previously demonstrated that Cz-macrophage (Mo) interaction could modulate the immune response against T. cruzi through the induction of a preferential metabolic pathway. In this work, we have studied in Mo the role of MR in arginase induction and in T. cruzi survival using different MR ligands. We have showed that pre-incubation of T. cruzi infected cells with mannose-Bovine Serum Albumin (Man-BSA, MR specific ligand) biased nitric oxide (NO)/urea balance towards urea production and increased intracellular amastigotes growth. The study of intracellular signals showed that pre-incubation with Man-BSA in T. cruzi J774 infected cells induced down-regulation of JNK and p44/p42 phosphorylation and increased of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These results are coincident with previous data showing that Cz also modifies the MAPK phosphorylation profile induced by the parasite. In addition, we have showed by confocal microscopy that Cz and Man-BSA enhance MR recycling. Furthermore, we studied MR behavior during T. cruzi infection in vivo. MR was up-regulated in F4/80+ cells from T. cruzi infected mice at 13 and 15 days post infection. Besides, we investigated the effect of MR blocking antibody in T. cruzi infected peritoneal Mo. Arginase activity and parasite growth were decreased in infected cells pre-incubated with anti-MR antibody as compared with infected cells treated with control antibody. Therefore, we postulate that during T. cruzi infection, Cz may contact with MR, increasing MR recycling which leads to arginase activity up-regulation and intracellular

  10. Identification and Functional Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Genes That Encode Proteins of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mariana S.; Junqueira, Caroline; Trigueiro, Ricardo C.; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Macedo, Cristiana S.; Araújo, Patrícia R.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Martinelli, Patrícia M.; Kimmel, Jürgen; Stahl, Philipp; Niehus, Sebastian; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Previato, José O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is a protist parasite that causes Chagas disease. Several proteins that are essential for parasite virulence and involved in host immune responses are anchored to the membrane through glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) molecules. In addition, T. cruzi GPI anchors have immunostimulatory activities, including the ability to stimulate the synthesis of cytokines by innate immune cells. Therefore, T. cruzi genes related to GPI anchor biosynthesis constitute potential new targets for the development of better therapies against Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings In silico analysis of the T. cruzi genome resulted in the identification of 18 genes encoding proteins of the GPI biosynthetic pathway as well as the inositolphosphorylceramide (IPC) synthase gene. Expression of GFP fusions of some of these proteins in T. cruzi epimastigotes showed that they localize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Expression analyses of two genes indicated that they are constitutively expressed in all stages of the parasite life cycle. T. cruzi genes TcDPM1, TcGPI10 and TcGPI12 complement conditional yeast mutants in GPI biosynthesis. Attempts to generate T. cruzi knockouts for three genes were unsuccessful, suggesting that GPI may be an essential component of the parasite. Regarding TcGPI8, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the transamidase complex, although we were able to generate single allele knockout mutants, attempts to disrupt both alleles failed, resulting instead in parasites that have undergone genomic recombination and maintained at least one active copy of the gene. Conclusions/Significance Analyses of T. cruzi sequences encoding components of the GPI biosynthetic pathway indicated that they are essential genes involved in key aspects of host-parasite interactions. Complementation assays of yeast mutants with these T. cruzi genes resulted in yeast cell lines that can now be employed in high throughput screenings of drugs against this

  11. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Papulonodular Lesions of Skin: A Study of 50 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevappa, Asha; Manjunath, Gubbanna Vimalambike

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin is one of the frequent site of disease in human body. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) is a safe diagnostic method in these cases. FNAC has some limitation, particularly related to representativity of samples, exact typing of skin adnexal tumours and classifying the nature of metastatic cutaneous nodules. Thus, FNAC alone may not give a confirmative diagnosis regarding few skin lesions. Hence, histopathological study has been the standard technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions. Aim To study the FNAC findings in various papulonodular lesions and to correlate them with histopathological findings wherever possible. Materials and Methods In the present study, 50 cases of clinically diagnosed papulonodular lesions were evaluated by FNAC and correlated with histopathology wherever possible. Results There was 100% correlation in cases of epidermal cyst, leprosy, tuberculosis, actinomycosis, acute and chronic inflammatory lesions and 67% accuracy was seen in adnexal tumours. Aspiration cytology along with radiological studies proved very useful in classifying the nature of metastatic cutaneous nodules and suggesting the possible site of unknown primary. Sensitivity of FNAC for epidermal cyst and inflammatory lesions was 100%. In case of adnexal tumours, sensitivity and specificity was 67% and 50% respectively. Conclusion FNAC is a rapid, efficient, cost effective, relatively painless procedure and produces a speedy result with high diagnostic accuracy. It has high rates of sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing papulonodular lesions of skin and hence, is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and management of patients with papulonodular skin lesions. PMID:28208863

  12. Can galactography-guided stereotactic, 11-gauge, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy of intraductal lesions serve as an alternative to surgical biopsy?

    PubMed

    Reiner, Caecilia S; Helbich, Thomas H; Rudas, Margaretha; Ponhold, Lothar; Riedl, Christopher C; Kropf, Nina; Fuchsjäger, Michael H

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of galactography-guided, stereotactic, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) for the assessment of intraductal breast lesions and its potential as a therapeutic tool that could eliminate the need for surgical excision. Eighteen patients (median age 64 years, range 37-80) with nipple discharge and galactography-verified intraductal lesions underwent galactography-guided, stereotactic, 11-gauge VABB followed by surgery. Histopathology findings from VABB and subsequent surgery were compared. Underestimation and false-negative rates were assessed. After VABB, histopathology revealed invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in three (17%), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in six (33%), high-risk lesions in six (33%) and benign lesions in three (17%) cases. After surgical biopsy, histopathology confirmed the previously established diagnosis in 11 lesions (61%). The underestimation rate for high-risk lesions and DCIS was 50% (6/12). The false-negative rate was 7% (1/14). Histopathology examination after surgery showed that not a single lesion had been completely removed at VABB. Galactography-guided VABB is a feasible diagnostic tool. However, its value as a therapeutic procedure is limited because of the high number of underestimated and missed lesions and because of the histopathological detection of lesions' remnants in every case. Surgical excision should be the therapeutic gold standard in cases of pathological nipple discharge and galactography abnormalities.

  13. Ageing is not associated with an altered immune response during Trypanosoma cruzi infection: Ageing and Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Colato, Rafaela Pravato; Brazão, Vânia; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; do Vale, Gabriel Tavares; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2017-01-25

    The aims of this work were to evaluate the influence of ageing on the magnitude of the immune response in male Wistar rats infected with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Infected young animals displayed enhanced CD4(+) T cells as compared to uninfected counterparts. Ageing also triggered a significant reduction in CD8(+) T cells compared to young and uninfected groups. The percentage of spleen NKT cells was reduced for all groups, regardless of the infection status. Significant decreased B-cells was noted in aged controls and infected animals as compared to young counterparts. A significant decrease in MHC class II (RT1B) expression in all aged animals was observed, whether infected or not. The highest and significant levels of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) were noted in the aged and infected animals as compared to young-infected ones (16day). Consequently superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was reduced for both control and infected aged animals. Significant elevation of 8-isoprostane levels was found in aged control and infected animals. Plasma glutathione (GSH) concentration was reduced in aged control animals, as well as, in the young infected animals. NO production was increased in both infected and uninfected aged animals compared to young infected and uninfected animals. Corticosterone levels were elevated in aged animals, whether infected or not. Thus, our results are inedited since the immune response is not worsened by the simple fact of animals being older. Ageing by itself triggered a damaged immune response as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species, when compared to young counterparts, but it did not contribute to impair the immune response of T. cruzi infected and aged rats.

  14. Molecular histopathology by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-07-01

    A rapid label-free approach for molecular histopathology is presented and reviewed. Broadband vibrational spectra are generated by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging (NIVI), a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)- based technique that uses interferometry and signal processing approaches to acquire Raman-like profiles with suppression of the non-resonant background. This allows for the generation of images that provide contrast based on quantitative chemical composition with high spatial and spectral resolution. Algorithms are demonstrated for reducing the diagnostic spectral information into color-coded composite images for the rapid identification of chemical constituents in skin, as well as differentiating normal from abnormal tissue in a pre-clinical tumor model for human breast cancer. This technology and methodology could result in an alternative method to the traditional histological staining and subjective interpretation procedure currently used in the diagnosis of disease, and has the potential for future in vivo molecular histopathology.

  15. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  16. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity

    PubMed Central

    Zingales, Bianca; Miles, Michael A; Moraes, Carolina B; Luquetti, Alejandro; Guhl, Felipe; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ribeiro, Isabela

    2014-01-01

    This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape. PMID:25317712

  17. 5-Nitro-2-furyl derivative actives against Trypanosoma cruzi: preliminary in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Eliana; Murguiondo, Mariana González; Arias, Marelina González; Arredondo, Carolina; Pintos, Cristina; Aguirre, Gabriela; Fernández, Marcelo; Basmadjián, Yester; Rosa, Raquel; Pacheco, José Pedro; Raymondo, Stella; Di Maio, Rossanna; González, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo

    2009-10-01

    Ten 5-nitro-2-furyl derivatives, with good to excellent in vitro anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity, and nifurtimox were tested oral and intraperitoneally on healthy animals for its acute toxicity on murine models. According to animals' survival percentage, organ histological results, biochemical and haematological findings, three new derivatives, with toxicity like nifurtimox, were selected to test in vivo as antichagasic agents. Clearly, dependences between chemical structure and both acute toxicity and in vivo anti-T. cruzi activity were observed. 4-Hexyl-1-[3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-propenylidene]semicarbazide displayed good profile as anti-T. cruzi agent and better acute toxicity profile than nifurtimox.

  18. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity.

    PubMed

    Zingales, Bianca; Miles, Michael A; Moraes, Carolina B; Luquetti, Alejandro; Guhl, Felipe; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ribeiro, Isabela

    2014-09-01

    This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape.

  19. Histopathology of Conjunctivochalasis Compared to Normal Conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Hesam; Mahbod, Mirgholamreza; Amoli, Fahimeh A.; Kiarudi, Mohammad Y.; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud; Kheirkhah, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the histopathologic changes in the conjunctiva of patients with conjunctivochalasis (CCh) compared to age-matched controls. Methods: This cross-sectional, controlled study included 27 eyes of 27 patients with CCh and 16 eyes of 16 age-matched controls. A biopsy of the bulbar conjunctiva was performed along the temporal lower lid margin before cataract surgery in both groups. Histopathologic evaluation of the specimens was done with light microscopy using staining with hematoxylin/eosin, periodic acid Schiff, and van Gieson elastic stain. Various histopathologic features of the conjunctival epithelium and stroma were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean age of patients was 62.4 ± 6.9 years in the CCh group and 65.1 ± 6.3 years in the control group (P = 0.54). No significant differences were noted between the two groups in terms of conjunctival epithelial changes including papillomatosis, epithelial clefts, epithelial goblet cells, or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Mean thickness of the conjunctival stroma was 0.21 ± 0.08 mm in the CCh group and 0.26 ± 0.21 mm in the control group (P = 0.10). For the conjunctival stroma, there were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of elastosis, fibrosis, lymphangiectasia, or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Conclusion: No noticeable differences were found in the histopathologic features by light microscopy between eyes with CCh and those of age-matched controls. Therefore, the primary pathology of CCh may not be within the conjunctiva itself. Instead, loose attachment of the conjunctiva to the underlying tissue may be the reason for the redundant folds in the bulbar conjunctiva. PMID:27994801

  20. A Review of Sleeve Gastrectomy Specimen Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Kinsinger, Luke A; Garber, James C; Whipple, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing popularity of sleeve gastrectomy, many stomach specimens are being evaluated. Understanding the significance and treatment for unexpected pathology is important. This study examines the incidence of relevant histopathology of sleeve gastrectomy specimens. It evaluates previous data for each histopathology and provides recommendations for treatment. In this study, a retrospective review was performed for 241 patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from 2009 to 2014 at a single institution. Of the specimens, 122 had no significant histopathology, 91 had gastritis, 13 had lymphoid aggregates, 5 had hyperplasia, 3 had intestinal metaplasia, 3 had gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and 3 had gastric polyps. Of the GISTs all had a low mitotic rate and the size of the tumor ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. The findings of metaplasia may be a marker for increased risk of malignancy and may require additional surveillance. The findings of GIST may warrant interval imaging to survey for recurrence, though the likelihood of recurrence for the tumors in this study is less than 2 per cent based on previous studies.

  1. Inflammation and macrophage polarization in cutaneous melanoma: Histopathological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Scali, Elisabetta; Mignogna, Chiara; Di Vito, Anna; Presta, Ivan; Camastra, Caterina; Donato, Giuseppe; Bottoni, Ugo

    2016-12-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are considered to affect tumor growth and progression. Macrophages can be classified into two states of polarized activation, namely classically activated M1 macrophages and alternatively activated M2 macrophages. The dynamic balance between TAMs and tumor cells has an important impact on tumor homeostasis and progression. The aim of this study was to characterize the phenotype of TAMs present in different subtypes of superficial spreading cutaneous melanoma and their relationship with the lymphocytic infiltrate in order to identify new histopathological tools for melanoma prognosis and suitable targets for melanoma therapy. We selected four groups of patients with malignant melanoma in order to analyze the profile of polarized macrophage activation using immunohistochemical methods. Histopathological analysis showed that the macrophage polarization state appears to be more related to the lymphocytic infiltrate than to the thickness of the lesions. Further studies are necessary to increase understanding of the immunopathological dynamic of melanoma that may be modulated by future targeted immunotherapies.

  2. Vulvar nevi, melanosis, and melanoma: an epidemiologic, clinical, and histopathologic review.

    PubMed

    Murzaku, Era Caterina; Penn, Lauren A; Hale, Christopher S; Pomeranz, Miriam Keltz; Polsky, David

    2014-12-01

    Pigmented vulvar lesions are present in approximately 1 in 10 women and include melanocytic and nonmelanocytic proliferations. Vulvar nevi, melanosis, and melanoma are particularly challenging because of the similarity of their clinical and/or histopathological presentation. As a result, they are often difficult to diagnose, may result in patient and physician anxiety, and can lead to unneeded, potentially disfiguring surgical procedures. Because it is often detected late, vulvar melanoma carries a poor prognosis with associated significant morbidity and mortality, underscoring the importance of prompt recognition and treatment. In this review, we analyze the distinct epidemiologic, clinical, and histopathologic characteristics of vulvar nevi, melanosis, and melanoma, discuss treatment options, and propose a practical, systematic approach to facilitate formulation of a differential diagnosis and initiation of appropriate management.

  3. Canine visceral leishmaniosis: a remarkable histopathological picture of one case reported from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tafuri, W L; de Oliveira, M R; Melo, M N; Tafuri, W L

    2001-04-02

    This report describes a remarkable histopathological presentation of a symptomatic dog naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi from Brazil. An intense inflammatory granulomatous reaction was observed in the liver and spleen associated with hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the mononuclear system (the classical histopathological picture of the disease). In addition, a spectrum of vascular lesions was observed in many organs. However, we did not find parasites (amastigotes of Leishmania) in any skin fragments of the ear, nose and or abdominal tissue. In fact, this animal had severe clinical signs, showed parasites in many organs, but no parasites in the skin. It appears that the presence or absence of parasites in the skin is not a good indicator of parasites in other organs or vice versa.

  4. Atypical histopathologic features in a melanocytic nevus after cryotherapy and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wilford, Casey E; Brantley, Julie S; Diwan, A Hafeez

    2014-10-01

    Melanocytic nevi can undergo clinical and histopathologic changes during pregnancy, as well as after various forms of surgical and nonsurgical trauma. We report the case of a 9-month postpartum 29-year-old female who presented to her dermatologist with a clinically worrisome nevus. This nevus had been treated with liquid nitrogen by her primary care physician 6 months prior to presentation. Histopathologic evaluation revealed a crowded proliferation of atypical melanocytes at the dermal-epidermal junction overlying a scar. The dermal component contained scattered mitotic figures. A combined MART-1, tyrosinase and Ki-67 immunohistochemical study showed foci of increased melanocytic proliferation. These atypical features were interpreted as associated with both the prior cryotherapy, as well as her recent pregnancy. Knowledge of the clinical context in evaluating difficult melanocytic lesions is essential.

  5. Phospholipid and glycolipid composition of acidocalcisomes of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Salto, María Laura; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark; de Lederkremer, Rosa M; Docampo, Roberto

    2008-04-01

    Highly purified acidocalcisomes from Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes were obtained by differential centrifugation and iodixanol gradient ultracentrifugation. Lipid analysis of acidocalcisomes revealed the presence of low amounts of 3beta-hydroxysterols and predominance of phospholipids. Alkylacyl phosphatidylinositol (16:0/18:2), diacyl phosphatidylinositol (18:0/18:2), diacyl phosphatidylcholine (16:0/18:2; 16:1/18:2; 16:2/18:2; 18:1/18:2 and 18:2/18:2), and diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine (16:0/18:2 and 16:1/18:2) were the only phospholipids characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Incubation of epimastigotes with [(3)H]-mannose and isolation of acidocalcisomes allowed the detection of a glycoinositolphospholipid (GIPL) in these organelles. The sugar content of the acidocalcisomal GIPL was similar to that of the GIPL present in a microsomal fraction but the amount of galactofuranose and inositol with respect to the other monosaccharides was lower, suggesting a different chemical structure. Taken together, these results indicate that acidocalcisomes of T. cruzi have a distinct lipid and carbohydrate composition.

  6. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease)

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Shirani, Jamshid; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Spray, David C.; Factor, Stephen M.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Weiss, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi it is the most common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10 to 30 percent of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are important modalities in the evaluation and prognosis of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years. PMID:19410685

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi: adaptation to its vectors and its hosts

    PubMed Central

    Noireau, François; Diosque, Patricio; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis is a parasitic zoonosis that occurs throughout Latin America. The etiological agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, is able to infect almost all tissues of its mammalian hosts and spreads in the environment in multifarious transmission cycles that may or not be connected. This biological plasticity, which is probably the result of the considerable heterogeneity of the taxon, exemplifies a successful adaptation of a parasite resulting in distinct outcomes of infection and a complex epidemiological pattern. In the 1990s, most endemic countries strengthened national control programs to interrupt the transmission of this parasite to humans. However, many obstacles remain to the effective control of the disease. Current knowledge of the different components involved in elaborate system that is American trypanosomiasis (the protozoan parasite T. cruzi, vectors Triatominae and the many reservoirs of infection), as well as the interactions existing within the system, is still incomplete. The Triatominae probably evolve from predatory reduvids in response to the availability of vertebrate food source. However, the basic mechanisms of adaptation of some of them to artificial ecotopes remain poorly understood. Nevertheless, these adaptations seem to be associated with a behavioral plasticity, a reduction in the genetic repertoire and increasing developmental instability. PMID:19250627

  8. Structural analysis of inositol phospholipids from Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote forms.

    PubMed Central

    Bertello, L E; Gonçalvez, M F; Colli, W; de Lederkremer, R M

    1995-01-01

    Inositol phospholipids (IPL) from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi have been investigated by metabolic labelling with [3H]palmitic acid and by GLC-MS analysis of the lipids obtained from non-labelled parasites. The IPL fraction was separated into phosphatidylinositol (PI) and inositol-phosphoceramide subfractions, the latter accounting for 80-85% of the total IPL. The neutral lipids released from the IPLs by PI-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis were analysed by silica-gel and reverse-phase TLC for the radioactive lipids and by GLC-MS for the non-radioactive samples. Ceramides containing dihydrosphingosine and sphingosine with C16:0 and C18:0 fatty acids were identified. The main component in the [3H]palmitic acid-labelled ceramides was palmitoyldihydrospingosine, while in the non-labelled sample the ceramides contained mainly sphingosine. This could reflect partial uptake of phospholipid from the medium. The PI contain both alkylacyl- and diacyl-glycerol lipids, with the ether lipid being more abundant. The latter was identified as 1-O-hexadecylglycerol esterified by C18:2 and C18:1 fatty acids. Interestingly, the same lipid had been identified in the anchor of the 1G7 glycoprotein of T. cruzi metacyclic forms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:7646454

  9. Structural characterization of NETNES glycopeptide from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Carla G; Verli, Hugo

    2013-05-24

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan, responsible for Chagas disease, that parasites triatomines and some vertebrates, mainly Homo sapiens. In 2010, nearly 10 million people in whole world, most from Latin America, had Chagas disease, which is an illness of high morbidity, low mortality, and serious problems of quality of life. The available treatment has high toxicity and low efficacy at chronic phase. Some of the protozoan antigenic or virulence factors include complex carbohydrate structures that, due to their uniqueness, may constitute potential selective targets for the development of new treatments. One example of such structures is NETNES, a low abundance T. cruzi glycopeptide, comprising 13 amino acid residues, one or two N-glycosylation chains, a GPI anchor and two P-glycosylations. In this context, the current work aims to obtain an atomic model for NETNES, including its glycan chains and membrane attachment, in order to contribute in the characterization of its structure and dynamics. Based on POPC and GPI models built in agreement with experimental data, our results indicate that, in the first third of the simulation, NETNES peptide is very flexible in solution, bending itself between asparagine residues and lying down on some carbohydrates and membrane, exposing amino acid residues and some other glycans, mainly terminal mannoses, to the extracellular medium, remaining in this position until the end of simulations.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  12. Retrospective distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in Colombia.

    PubMed

    León, Cielo M; Hernández, Carolina; Montilla, Marleny; Ramírez, Juan David

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately eight million people in the Americas. This parasite exhibits genetic variability, with at least six discrete typing units broadly distributed in the American continent. T. cruzi I (TcI) shows remarkable genetic diversity; a genotype linked to human infections and a domestic cycle of transmission have recently been identified, hence, this strain was named TcIDom. The aim of this work was to describe the spatiotemporal distribution of TcI subpopulations across humans, insect vectors and mammalian reservoirs in Colombia by means of molecular typing targeting the spliced leader intergenic region of mini-exon gene. We analysed 101 TcI isolates and observed a distribution of sylvatic TcI in 70% and TcIDom in 30%. In humans, the ratio was sylvatic TcI in 60% and TcIDom in 40%. In mammal reservoirs, the distribution corresponded to sylvatic TcI in 96% and TcIDom in 4%. Among insect vectors, sylvatic TcI was observed in 48% and TcIDom in 52%. In conclusion, the circulation of TcIDom is emerging in Colombia and this genotype is still adapting to the domestic cycle of transmission. The epidemiological and clinical implications of these findings are discussed herein.

  13. An in vivo role for Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin in antiangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Molina, María C; Ferreira, Viviana; Valck, Carolina; Aguilar, Lorena; Orellana, Juana; Rojas, Alvaro; Ramirez, Galia; Billetta, Rosario; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Lemus, David; Ferreira, Arturo

    2005-04-01

    Angiogenesis leads to neovascularization from existing blood vessels. It is associated with tumor growth and metastasis and is regulated by pro- and antiangiogenic molecules, some of them currently under clinical trials for cancer treatment. During the last few years we have cloned, sequenced and expressed a Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin gene (TcCRT). Its product, TcCRT, a 45 kDa protein, is more than 50% identical to human CRT (HuCRT). TcCRT, present on the surface of trypomastigotes, binds both C1q and mannan binding lectin and inhibits the classical activation pathway of human complement. Since TcCRT is highly homologous to a functional antiangiogenic fragment from HuCRT (aa 120-180), recombinant (r) and native (n) TcCRT were tested in their antiangiogenic effects, in the chick embryonic chorioallantoid membrane (CAM) assay. Both proteins mediated highly significant antiangiogenic effects in the in vivo CAM assay. This effect was further substantiated in experiments showing that the plasmid construct pSecTag/TcCRT also displayed significant antiangiogenic properties, as compared to the empty vector. Most likely, the fact that antiangiogenic substances act preferentially on growing neoplasic tissues, but not on already established tumors, is due to their effects on emerging blood vessels. The results shown here indicate that TcCRT, like its human counterpart, has antiangiogenic properties. These properties may explain, at least partly, the reported antineoplasic effect of experimental T. cruzi infection.

  14. Retrospective distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    León, Cielo M; Hernández, Carolina; Montilla, Marleny; Ramírez, Juan David

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately eight million people in the Americas. This parasite exhibits genetic variability, with at least six discrete typing units broadly distributed in the American continent. T. cruzi I (TcI) shows remarkable genetic diversity; a genotype linked to human infections and a domestic cycle of transmission have recently been identified, hence, this strain was named TcIDom. The aim of this work was to describe the spatiotemporal distribution of TcI subpopulations across humans, insect vectors and mammalian reservoirs in Colombia by means of molecular typing targeting the spliced leader intergenic region of mini-exon gene. We analysed 101 TcI isolates and observed a distribution of sylvatic TcI in 70% and TcIDom in 30%. In humans, the ratio was sylvatic TcI in 60% and TcIDom in 40%. In mammal reservoirs, the distribution corresponded to sylvatic TcI in 96% and TcIDom in 4%. Among insect vectors, sylvatic TcI was observed in 48% and TcIDom in 52%. In conclusion, the circulation of TcIDom is emerging in Colombia and this genotype is still adapting to the domestic cycle of transmission. The epidemiological and clinical implications of these findings are discussed herein. PMID:25946157

  15. Clonal population structure of Colombian sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Márquez, E; Arcos-Burgos, M; Triana, O; Moreno, J; Jaramillo, N

    1998-12-01

    Isoenzyme variability and evidence of genetic exchange were evaluated in 75 wild stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi obtained from different hosts from 5 geographical regions within the endemic area in Colombia. Cluster analysis of genetic variability was attempted. Thirty-three multilocus enzyme genotypes (clonets) were identified from 75 stocks, 27 of which clustered with zymodeme Z1 and 6 with zymodeme Z3. Two stocks isolated from human infections showed the potential risk to rural communities in Colombia. The stocks exhibited departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations, including both fixed heterozygote and fixed homozygote demes, where both segregation and recombination were absent. To inspect for population subdivision that might falsely imply clonality in these stocks, Wright's F statistics were calculated. Theta values (Fst) were significantly different from 0 when 33 clonets, 27 Z1-like clonets, and 5 geographical subpopulations were compared; thus, a significant amount of divergence has occurred between and within them. In addition, linkage disequilibrium was detected for most possible pairwise comparisons of loci. In conclusion, the above results all support a scenario of long-term clonal evolution in Colombian sylvatic T. cruzi populations.

  16. MRI and Histopathologic Study of a Novel Cholesterol-Fed Rabbit Model of Xanthogranuloma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanxin; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Parkins, Katie M.; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Rogers, Kem A.; Zeineh, Michael M.; Rutt, Brian K.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a rabbit model of xanthogranuloma based on supplementation of dietary cholesterol. The aim of this study was to analyze the xanthogranulomatous lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological examination. Materials and Methods Rabbits were fed a low-level cholesterol (CH) diet (n = 10) or normal chow (n = 5) for 24 months. In vivo brain imaging was performed on a 3T MR system using fast imaging employing steady state acquisition, susceptibility-weighted imaging, spoiled gradient recalled, T1-weighted inversion recovery imaging and T1 relaxometry, PD-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo imaging and T2 relaxometry, iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation, ultrashort TE MRI (UTE-MRI), and T2∗ relaxometry. MR images were evaluated using a Likert scale for lesion presence and quantitative analysis of lesion size, ventricular volume, and T1, T2, and T2∗ values of lesions was performed. After imaging, brain specimens were examined using histological methods. Results In vivo MRI revealed that 6 of 10 CH-fed rabbits developed lesions in the choroid plexus. Region-of-interest analysis showed that for CH-fed rabbits the mean lesion volume was 8.5 ± 2.6mm3 and the volume of the lateral ventricle was significantly increased compared to controls (P < 0.01). The lesions showed significantly shorter mean T2 values (35 ± 12 msec, P < 0.001), longer mean T1 values (1581 ± 146 msec, P < 0.05), and shorter T2∗ values (22 ± 13 msec, P < 0.001) compared to adjacent brain structures. The ultrashort T2∗ components were visible using UTE-MRI. Histopathologic evaluation of lesions demonstrated features of human xanthogranuloma. Conclusion Rabbits fed a low-level CH diet develop sizable intraventricular masses that have similar histopathological features as human xanthogranuloma. Multiparametric MRI techniques were able to provide information about the complex composition of these lesions. PMID

  17. Oral pigmented lesions: Clinicopathologic features and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Jorge, Rogério; Jorge, Jacks; Lopes, Márcio A.; Vargas, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of pigmented lesions of the oral cavity and perioral tissues is challenging. Even though epidemiology may be of some help in orientating the clinician and even though some lesions may confidently be diagnosed on clinical grounds alone, the definitive diagnosis usually requires histopathologic evaluation. Oral pigmentation can be physiological or pathological, and exogenous or endogenous. Color, location, distribution, and duration as well as drugs use, family history, and change in pattern are important for the differential diagnosis. Dark or black pigmented lesions can be focal, multifocal or diffuse macules, including entities such as racial pigmentation, melanotic macule, melanocytic nevus, blue nevus, smoker’s melanosis, oral melanoacanthoma, pigmentation by foreign bodies or induced by drugs, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Addison´s disease and oral melanoma. The aim of this review is to present the main oral black lesions contributing to better approach of the patients. Key words:Pigmentation, melanin, oral, diagnosis, management. PMID:22549672

  18. Atypical distribution of fowl pox lesions in broilers.

    PubMed

    Sentíes-Cué, C G; Charlton, B R; Woolcock, P; Bickford, A A; Cooper, G; Bland, M

    2010-12-01

    An unusual cutaneous fowl pox outbreak occurred in 8-wk-old broilers in California. Rounded and longitudinal, proliferative scratch-associated lesions were found only in feathered areas of the body. Both sides of the hip, the lower abdomen, pericloacal area, and lateral lower neck area were involved. The head, legs, feet, and toes did not have lesions. Birds in only one section of one of five houses were affected. Fifteen percent condemnations occurred in birds from the affected house due to the skin lesions. A diagnosis of fowl pox was achieved by histopathology, viral isolation, and direct electron microscopy. The unusual distribution of pox lesions was assumed to be associated with skin scratches. There was no evidence that mosquitoes or other types of insects were involved in this outbreak. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first report of this kind of unusual fowl pox in the United States.

  19. [The attitude before subclinical breast lesions on mammography].

    PubMed

    Blidaru, A; Sebeni, M; Bordea, C; Viişoreanu, C; Bălănescu, I

    2000-01-01

    Mammographic screening and improvement of mammography resolution have resulted in the increasingly frequent identification of small-size mammary lesions that have no clinical expression. If in Western countries, approximately one quarter of breast cancers are discovered when clinically occult, in Romania such cases are rare and, most of the times, discovered merely by chance. Infraclinical mammary lesions identified by mammography pose problems concerning the appropriate response. The paper assesses the various diagnosis and therapy choices as well as the localization techniques to be employed in order to establish the best approach. We describe twelve cases of infraclinical mammary lesions identified by mammography. In two of this cases fine needle aspiration biopsy with cytological examination was used, and in one case we performed core biopsy and histological examination. In those cases, lesion localization has been performed using stereotactic X-ray devices. In nine cases, we performed excisional biopsy with histologic assessment. In four of those cases, the lesions proved to be malignant. Preoperative localization was performed with hookwires placed in the proximity of the lesion under mammographic control. In five of those cases, lesion coordinates have been determined by stereotaxy. Using this technique, we removed, in all cases, the clinical lesions identified by mammography. We believe surgical excision to be the best approach in such lesions. Total removal of the lesion enables a thorough histopathological examination resulting in more accurate diagnosis. Curative surgery is also possible within the same surgical procedure. Unless preoperative localization is performed the surgeon is in the position to excise an image that has no clinical expression. Under this circumstances surgical removal is performed blind, as the lesion is hard to be found even intraoperatory. Preoperative localization provides guidance to the surgeon, ensures removal of the lesion

  20. Gross and Microscopic Lesions in Corals from Micronesia.

    PubMed

    Work, T M; Aeby, G S; Hughen, K A

    2016-01-01

    The authors documented gross and microscopic morphology of lesions in corals on 7 islands spanning western, southern, and eastern Micronesia, sampling 76 colonies comprising 30 species of corals among 18 genera, with Acropora, Porites, and Montipora dominating. Tissue loss comprised the majority of gross lesions sampled (41%), followed by discoloration (30%) and growth anomaly (29%). Of 31 cases of tissue loss, most lesions were subacute (48%), followed by acute and chronic (26% each). Of 23 samples with discoloration, most were dark discoloration (40%), with bleaching and other discoloration each constituting 30%. Of 22 growth anomalies, umbonate growth anomalies composed half, with exophytic, nodular, and rugose growth anomalies composing the remainder. On histopathology, for 9 cases of dark discoloration, fungal infections predominated (77%); for 7 bleached corals, depletion of zooxanthellae from the gastrodermis made up a majority of microscopic diagnoses (57%); and for growth anomalies other than umbonate, hyperplasia of the basal body wall was the most common microscopic finding (63%). For the remainder of the gross lesions, no single microscopic finding constituted >50% of the total. Host response varied with the agent present on histology. Fragmentation of tissues was most often associated with algae (60%), whereas necrosis dominated (53%) for fungi. Two newly documented potentially symbiotic tissue-associated metazoans were seen in Porites and Montipora. Findings of multiple potential etiologies for a given gross lesion highlight the importance of incorporating histopathology in coral disease surveys. This study also expands the range of corals infected with cell-associated microbial aggregates.

  1. Gross and microscopic lesions in corals from Micronesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.; Hughen, Konrad A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors documented gross and microscopic morphology of lesions in corals on 7 islands spanning western, southern, and eastern Micronesia, sampling 76 colonies comprising 30 species of corals among 18 genera, with Acropora, Porites, and Montipora dominating. Tissue loss comprised the majority of gross lesions sampled (41%), followed by discoloration (30%) and growth anomaly (29%). Of 31 cases of tissue loss, most lesions were subacute (48%), followed by acute and chronic (26% each). Of 23 samples with discoloration, most were dark discoloration (40%), with bleaching and other discoloration each constituting 30%. Of 22 growth anomalies, umbonate growth anomalies composed half, with exophytic, nodular, and rugose growth anomalies composing the remainder. On histopathology, for 9 cases of dark discoloration, fungal infections predominated (77%); for 7 bleached corals, depletion of zooxanthellae from the gastrodermis made up a majority of microscopic diagnoses (57%); and for growth anomalies other than umbonate, hyperplasia of the basal body wall was the most common microscopic finding (63%). For the remainder of the gross lesions, no single microscopic finding constituted >50% of the total. Host response varied with the agent present on histology. Fragmentation of tissues was most often associated with algae (60%), whereas necrosis dominated (53%) for fungi. Two newly documented potentially symbiotic tissue-associated metazoans were seen in Porites and Montipora. Findings of multiple potential etiologies for a given gross lesion highlight the importance of incorporating histopathology in coral disease surveys. This study also expands the range of corals infected with cell-associated microbial aggregates.

  2. Shearwave Elastography Increases Diagnostic Accuracy in Characterization of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wei Lin; Rahmat, Kartini; Fadzli, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul Izza; Mohd-Shah, Mohammad Nazri; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Westerhout, Caroline Judy; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of shearwave elastography (SWE) in differentiating between benign and malignant breast lesions. One hundred and fifty-nine lesions were assessed using B-mode ultrasound (US) and SWE parameters were recorded (Emax, Emean, Emin, Eratio, SD). SWE measurements were then correlated with histopathological diagnosis. The final sample contained 85 benign and 74 malignant lesions. The maximum stiffness (Emax) with a cutoff point of ≥ 56.0 kPa (based on ROC curves) provided sensitivity of 100.0%, specificity of 97.6%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 97.4%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% in detecting malignant lesions. A cutoff of ≥80 kPa managed to downgrade 95.5% of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4a lesions to BI-RADS 3, negating the need for biopsy. Using a combination of BI-RADS and SWE, the authors managed to improve the PPV from 2.3% to 50% in BI-RADS 4a lesions. SWE of the breast provides highly specific and sensitive quantitative values that are beneficial in the characterization of breast lesions. Our results showed that Emax is the most accurate value for differentiating benign from malignant lesions. PMID:27015196

  3. Aetiology of abfraction lesions.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of abfraction lesions is complex. Most evidence indicates that physical loading forces are a major contributing factor, although they are unlikely to be entirely responsible. Intraoral chemical influences and toothbrush abrasion, combined with the dynamics of inter-occlusal activity such as chewing, swallowing, and parafunction, lead to stress corrosion and may contribute to abfraction lesions. The multifactorial aetiology that operates in the initiation and progression of these lesions has made investigation difficult. Various theories have been proposed and numerous surveys and studies conducted, but the primary causal factor has yet to be definitively determined. This review concludes that occlusal loading is the initiating factor in the development of abfraction lesions.

  4. Histopathological features of Capillaria hepatica infection in laboratory rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mowat, Vasanthi; Turton, John; Stewart, Jacqui; Lui, Kai Chiu; Pilling, Andrew M

    2009-08-01

    Capillaria hepatica is a nematode parasite of wild rodents and other mammals. Adult worms inhabit the liver. Recently, during the necropsy examination of a group of 160 rabbits from a commercial supplier, firm pale or cystic areas (1-5 mm) were noted on the liver in thirteen animals. On further investigation, these animals were found to be infected with C. hepatica. The histopathological features of the infection in the rabbit are described for the first time and diagnostic features recorded. Lesions were identified predominantly in portal tracts consisting of dilated bile ducts with luminal debris, peribiliary inflammatory cell infiltrates, and fibrosis. Large granulomas (macrogranulomas) were evident in portal areas and involved the bile ducts. Macrogranulomas contained collections of characteristic C. hepatica eggs, macrophages, eosinophils, and lymphocytes. Small granulomas (microgranulomas), characterized by epithelioid macrophages surrounded by lymphocytes and eosinophils, were also identified. C. hepatica eggs were also observed in the lumina of the bile ducts and gall bladder. No adult C. hepatica worms were identified. Oocysts of Eimeria stiedae were also evident in the biliary epithelium in some animals. The unique characteristics of the C. hepatica life cycle are described, and the differential diagnosis of hepatic capillariasis is discussed.

  5. [Endoscopic and histopathological studies of experimental esophageal cancer in beagles].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, K; Sunagawa, M; Nakajima, A; Ochi, K; Habu, H; Hoshi, K

    1985-02-01

    In order to obtain a reliable experimental model simulating human esophageal cancer, endoscopic and histopathological studies were undertaken in the esophageal cancer produced in the beagle dog. Thirty-seven dogs had been given a solution of N-Ethyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (ENNG) at a concentration of 150 micrograms/ml for 3-9 months. Follow-up studies included serial endoscopy and biopsy, and almost all animals were eventually sacrificed for histological examination. The results were as follows: Squamous cell carcinoma was observed in 5 out of 22 female dogs, while none in male dogs at all. For the induction of squamous cell carcinoma in the esophagus, administration in the condition of 150 micrograms/ml (75mg/day) for 6-9 months was most suitable. Almost all of esophageal lesions were protruding and well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with invasion of the submucosa. The stages of hyperplasia, dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma in the esophagus were chronologically followed. Carcinoma had been observed in the stomach about 4 months prior to the appearance of esophageal carcinoma. This experimental model was proved to be useful for studies on histogenesis of human esophageal cancer both light and electron microscopically.

  6. Histopathological and clinical traps in lichen sclerosus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brănişteanu, Daciana Elena; Brănişteanu, Daniel Constantin; Stoleriu, Gabriela; Ferariu, Dan; Voicu, Cătălina Maria; Stoica, Loredana Elena; Căruntu, Constantin; Boda, Daniel; Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina Mihaela; Dimitriu, Andreea; Radu, Cezar Doru

    2016-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and limited systemic scleroderma (acrosclerosis) are inflammatory skin diseases that ultimately evolve into two distinct modes of atrophic scar formation, but which can easily be confused clinically. They are very rarely associated. The literature has reported cases in which lichen sclerosus was associated with various forms of scleroderma, but often with localized morphea. The characteristic histopathological picture of lichen sclerosus includes a thin epidermis, with orthohyperkeratosis and vascular degeneration in the basal layer, loss of elastic fibers, and band-like inflammatory infiltrate in the papillary dermis, while systemic sclerosis is characterized by excessive deposition of collagen in the dermis, accompanied by reduction in adnexal structures and their entrapment in collagen, and the presence of perivascular lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate. We present the case of a 40-year-old female patient clinically diagnosed with systemic scleroderma and lichen sclerosus involving the genital mucosa. Physical examination in conjunction with laboratory findings (elevated antinuclear, anti-Scl-70, anti-SSA antibodies and immunogram) induced the supposition of the coexistence of lichen sclerosus and systemic scleroderma, fact confirmed by pathological examination. Systemic therapy with corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and phlebotropic drugs, peripheral vasodilators and other tropic adjuvants and topically potent topical corticosteroids was initiated. The course was favorable under therapy, the hardened skin slightly regaining elasticity, relief of itching and disappearance of lichen sclerosus lesions. Our case reaffirms the uncommon association of these two disorders. The importance of history, physical and laboratory examinations in making a diagnosis of certainty in emphasized.

  7. Ocular Lesions in Red-Tailed Hawks ( Buteo jamaicensis) With Naturally Acquired West Nile Disease.

    PubMed

    Wünschmann, A; Armién, A G; Khatri, M; Martinez, L C; Willette, M; Glaser, A; Alvarez, J; Redig, P

    2017-03-01

    Ocular lesions are common in red-tailed hawks with West Nile (WN) disease. These lesions consist of pectenitis, choroidal or retinal inflammation, or retinal necrosis, but detailed investigation of the ocular lesions is lacking. Postmortem examination of the eyes of 16 red-tailed hawks with naturally acquired WN disease and 3 red-tailed hawks without WN disease was performed using histopathology, immunohistochemistry for West Nile virus (WNV) antigen, glial fibrillary acid protein, cleaved caspase-3, and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. Retinal lesions were classified as type I or type II lesions. Type I lesions were characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in the subjacent choroid with degeneration limited to the outer retina (type Ia lesion) or with degeneration and necrosis of the outer retina or outer and inner retina (type Ib lesion) while retinal collapse, atrophy, and scarring were hallmarks of type II lesions. Type II retinal lesions were associated with a more pronounced choroiditis. Although not statistically significant, WNV antigen tended to be present in larger quantity in type Ib lesions. Type I lesions are considered acute while type II lesions are chronic. The development of retinal lesions was associated with the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate in the choroid. A breakdown of the blood-retina barrier is suspected to be the main route of infection of the retina. Within the retina, virus appeared to spread via both neuronal and Müller cell processes.

  8. Oral exposure to Phytomonas serpens attenuates thrombocytopenia and leukopenia during acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosiane V; Malvezi, Aparecida D; Augusto, Leonardo da Silva; Kian, Danielle; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia H; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; Rizzo, Luiz V; Schenkman, Sergio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2013-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, rapidly develop anemia and thrombocytopenia. These effects are partially promoted by the parasite trans-sialidase (TS), which is shed in the blood and depletes sialic acid from the platelets, inducing accelerated platelet clearance and causing thrombocytopenia during the acute phase of disease. Here, we demonstrate that oral immunization of C57BL/6 mice with Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate parasite that shares common antigens with T. cruzi but has no TS activity, reduces parasite burden and prevents thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Immunization also reduces platelet loss after intraperitoneal injection of TS. In addition, passive transfer of immune sera raised in mice against P. serpens prevented platelet clearance. Thus, oral exposure to P. serpens attenuates the progression of thrombocytopenia induced by TS from T. cruzi. These findings are not only important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection but also for developing novel approaches of intervention in Chagas disease.

  9. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in stray and pet dogs in Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Chikweto, A; Kumthekar, S; Chawla, P; Tiwari, K P; Perea, L M; Paterson, T; Sharma, R N

    2014-06-01

    American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic to parts of South America and the Caribbean. Infected dogs are important in the epidemiology of the parasite as they can play a role in the transmission of the parasite to humans. A total of 399 dog sera (242 stray and 157 pet dogs) were examined for T. cruzi infection; using a qualitative immunochromatographic dipstick test, based on recombinant antigens specific for American trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma detect rapid test; InBios international, Inc., Seattle, Washington). Overall seroprevalence for T. cruzi was estimated at 10.5% (95% confidence interval: 7.5% to 13.5%); with stray dogs being significantly more affected (p<0.05, χ2). Results from this study indicate that dogs in Grenada are moderately exposed to T. cruzi compared to other areas in the region.

  10. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Marcia Cristina; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; de Souza, Cíntia Fernandes; Nogueira, Natália Pereira de Almeida; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology. PMID:22007287

  11. Differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli of Colombia using minicircle hybridization tests.

    PubMed

    Botero, Adriana; Ortiz, Sylvia; Muñoz, Sergio; Triana, Omar; Solari, Aldo

    2010-11-01

    Although Trypanosoma rangeli is harmless for humans, it is a serious problem since it may be confused with diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Both parasites overlap geographically, share antigenic protein, and are able to infect the same Triatominae vector and vertebrate host, including human. Our objective was to differentiate T. cruzi and T. rangeli isolates from Colombia based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the minicircles followed by appropriate hybridization tests with selected DNA probes and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. We worked with highly characterized T. cruzi and T. rangeli isolates from different biologic origins and geographic areas of Colombia, and they were analyzed by RFLP and PCR amplification of variable region of minicircles and Southern blot analysis. Our results and experimental conditions demonstrate the usefulness of PCR amplification of the minicircles followed by Southern blot analysis to differentiate T. cruzi from T. rangeli, which can be highly important to improve diagnosis of Chagas disease.

  12. Familial Analysis of Seropositivity to Trypanosoma cruzi and of Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Grecco, Roseane L.; Balarin, Marly A. S.; Correia, Dalmo; Prata, Aluízio; Rodrigues, Virmondes

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in Água Comprida, MG, Brazil, a region previously endemic to Chagas disease whose vectorial transmission was interrupted around 20 year ago. A total of 998 individuals were examined for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Seropositivity was observed in 255 subjects (25.5%), and 743 subjects were negative. Forty-one families with 5–80 individuals with similar environmental conditions were selected for familial analysis. In 15 families, seropositivity to T. cruzi was observed in > 50% of individuals. The segregation analysis confirmed family aggregation for the seropositivity to the T. cruzi. Heart commitment was the major clinical form observed, and in six families, > 50% of the individuals display cardiopathy that may be attributed to T. cruzi infection. Our results support the hypothesis that there is a family aggregation for the seropositivity but without the effect of one major gene. PMID:20064994

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi parasites fight for control of the JAK-STAT pathway by disarming their host

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Philipp; Schwarz, Ralph T; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The zoonotic Chagas’ disease is caused by infections with the hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) which is endemic in Latin America. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, the underlying molecular processes involved in host-parasite interactions are only poorly understood. In particular, the mechanisms for parasite persistence in host cells remain largely unknown. Cytokine-driven transcription factors from the family of STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins appear to play a central role in the fight against T. cruzi infection. However, amastigotes proliferating in the cytoplasm of infected host cells develop effective strategies to circumvent the attack executed by STAT proteins. This review highlights the interactions between T. cruzi parasites and human host cells in terms of cytokine signaling and, in particular, discusses the impact of STATs on the balance between parasite invasion and clearance. PMID:26413423

  14. Prevalence of antibody to Trypanosoma cruzi in pregnant Hispanic women in Houston.

    PubMed

    Di Pentima, M C; Hwang, L Y; Skeeter, C M; Edwards, M S

    1999-06-01

    We assessed the seroprevalence of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi among pregnant Hispanic women in Houston. Sera from 2,107 Hispanic and 1,658 non-Hispanic subjects were tested by ELISA for the presence of antibodies to T. cruzi. Twenty-two (0.6%) of 3,765 subjects had sera that were reactive. Seroreactivity was confirmed by hemagglutination assay. Eleven subjects had reactive sera, giving a confirmed seroprevalence of 0.3% (95% CI, 0-1%). Nine sera from Hispanic and two from non-Hispanic women were positive by hemagglutination assay, for a prevalence of 0.4% and 0.1%, respectively, during pregnancy. On the basis of these seroreactivity data, transplacental transmission of T. cruzi could occur in the continental United States. Screening for antibodies to T. cruzi during pregnancy would provide the potential for early intervention in congenital Chagas' disease.

  15. Regional variation in the correlation of antibody and T-cell responses to Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diana L; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z; Bern, Caryn

    2014-06-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses.

  16. Regional Variation in the Correlation of Antibody and T-Cell Responses to Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Diana L.; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H.; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z.; Bern, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses. PMID:24710614

  17. Correlation of brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of spontaneously lead poisoned bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) with histological lesions: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Francisco, Olga Nicolas; Feeney, Daniel; Armién, Anibal G; Wuenschmann, Arno; Redig, Patrick T

    2016-04-01

    Six bald eagles with severe, acute lead poisoning based on blood lead values were analyzed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain and histopathology. The aims of the study were to use MRI to locate brain lesions and correlate the changes in MRI signal with the histological character of the lesions at necropsy. All of the bald eagles presented with neurologic and non-neurologic signs suggestive of severe lead poisoning and had blood lead levels in excess of 1.0 ppm. Areas of change in image intensity in the brainstem, midbrain and cerebellum were detected in the MRI scans. Histopathology confirmed the presence of all suspected lesions. The character of the lesions suggested vascular damage as the primary insult. MRI was useful for detecting lesions and defining their three-dimensional distribution and extent. Future studies are needed to evaluate the utility of MRI for detection of lesions in less severely lead poisoned eagles and determining prognosis for treatment.

  18. The TcI and TcII Trypanosoma cruzi experimental infections induce distinct immune responses and cardiac fibrosis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Vieira, Paula Melo de Abreu; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian Oliveira; Cardoso, Jamille Mirelle de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Flávia Carvalho Bitencourt; Reis, Levi Eduardo Soares; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection may be caused by different strains with distinct discrete typing units (DTUs) that can result in variable clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The present study evaluates the immune response and cardiac lesions in dogs experimentally infected with different T. cruzi strains with distinct DTUs, namely, the Colombian (Col) and Y strains of TcI and TcII DTU, respectively. During infection with the Col strain, increased levels of alanine aminotransferase, erythrocytes, haematocrit and haemoglobin were observed. In addition, CD8+ T-lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood produced higher levels of interleukin (IL)-4. The latter suggests that during the acute phase, infection with the Col strain may remain unnoticed by circulating mononuclear cells. In the chronic phase, a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells was detected in the right atrium. Conversely, infection with the Y strain led to leucopoenia, thrombopoenia, inversion of the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T-lymphocytes and alterations in monocyte number. The Y strain stimulated the production of interferon-γ by CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes and IL-4 by CD8+ T-cells. In the chronic phase, significant heart inflammation and fibrosis were observed, demonstrating that strains of different DTUs interact differently with the host. PMID:25591108

  19. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy: Cytology and histopathology of a rare lesion at an uncommon site.

    PubMed

    Batta, Nishant; Narang, Vikram; Kaur, Harpreet; Selhi, Pavneet Kaur; Sood, Neena

    2016-11-07

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy is a rare, pigmented neoplasm generally arising in infants during the first year of life. The cytological features are rarely described in the literature. This case due to its rarity and unusual site emphasising the cytopathological features and the necessity of histology for differentiating it from other round cell tumours has been presented. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Histopathology of Lesions in Swine Exposed to a Hemostatic Bandage Composed of Salmon Thrombin and Fibrinogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    concern that these foreign proteins may induce an immune response in the patients, we investigated the inflammatory response in pigs exposed to...least one report, sperm prepared for artificial insemination using bovine serum albumin induced an anaphylactic reaction (Orta et al. 2003...surgically created on the right and left dorsal skin surface, paramedium to the spinal column in four pigs and monitored for 7 days. A second group of

  1. Histopathological lesions of molluscs in the harbour of Norderney, Lower Saxony, North Sea (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watermann, Burkard; Thomsen, Anja; Kolodzey, Heike; Daehne, Bernd; Meemken, Maike; Pijanowska, Ute; Liebezeit, Gert

    2008-06-01

    During a combined research project at several stations along the Lower Saxony coast (German North Sea) antifouling biocides were analysed in water, sediment and biota. Pathological alterations in blue mussel, Pacific oyster and periwinkle found in the harbour of Norderney and a reference station are presented here and discussed on the background of chemical analyses. The molluscan species from the reference station Borkum East flat did not show any pathological effects in central organs, except those provoked by an infestation in the gastro-intestinal tract by the copepod Mytilicola intestinalis and trematode larvae. In most animals, the metacercaria were found in the interstitial tissue without any inflammatory reaction. In a minor number of specimens, an inflammatory reaction in the mucosa and sub-mucosa of the intestine occurred in association with Mytilicola infestation. These reactions may be evoked through mechanical irritation of the gut epithelium, metabolic products of the parasites or invading bacteria. In contrast to the observed pathological changes of mussels, oysters and periwinkles in Norderney harbour were not found to be associated with parasitic infestation. The most prominent pathological alterations were observed in the digestive system and in the gonad. In the gastro-intestinal tract inflammatory reactions, atrophy and necrosis of tubules in the mid gut gland were most pronounced in spring at the beginning of the pleasure boat season in the Pacific oyster and to a minor degree in the blue mussel and the periwinkle. The latter displayed additional inflammatory and necrotic processes in the gills. Especially in the gonad, an elevated resorption rate of gametes was present in the Pacific oyster and in the periwinkle. In addition, impact of organotin compounds was reflected in an intersex index of up to 1.4 in Littorina littorea in coincidence with masculinization of the reproductive organs.

  2. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required during Trypanosoma cruzi parasitophorous vacuole development.

    PubMed

    Cueto, Juan Agustín; Vanrell, María Cristina; Salassa, Betiana Nebaí; Nola, Sébastien; Galli, Thierry; Colombo, María Isabel; Romano, Patricia Silvia

    2016-12-19

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is an obligate intracellular parasite that exploits different host vesicular pathways to invade the target cells. Vesicular and target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are key proteins of the intracellular membrane fusion machinery. During the early times of T. cruzi infection, several vesicles are attracted to the parasite contact sites in the plasma membrane. Fusion of these vesicles promotes the formation of the parasitic vacuole and parasite entry. In this work, we study the requirement and the nature of SNAREs involved in the fusion events that take place during T. cruzi infection. Our results show that inhibition of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein, a protein required for SNARE complex disassembly, impairs T. cruzi infection. Both TI-VAMP/VAMP7 and cellubrevin/VAMP3, two v-SNAREs of the endocytic and exocytic pathways, are specifically recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane in a synchronized manner but, although VAMP3 is acquired earlier than VAMP7, impairment of VAMP3 by tetanus neurotoxin fails to reduce T. cruzi infection. In contrast, reduction of VAMP7 activity by expression of VAMP7's longin domain, depletion by small interfering RNA or knockout, significantly decreases T. cruzi infection susceptibility as a result of a minor acquisition of lysosomal components to the parasitic vacuole. In addition, overexpression of the VAMP7 partner Vti1b increases the infection, whereas expression of a KIF5 kinesin mutant reduces VAMP7 recruitment to vacuole and, concomitantly, T. cruzi infection. Altogether, these data support a key role of TI-VAMP/VAMP7 in the fusion events that culminate in the T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole development.

  3. First case of natural infection in pigs. Review of Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Schettino, P M; Bucio, M I; Cabrera, M; Bautista, J

    1997-01-01

    An epidemiological research project was performed in the State of Morelos including collection of samples for blood smears and culture, serological tests, and xenodiagnoses from a total of 76 domestic and peridomestic mammals. Two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were isolated by haemocultures; one from a pig (Sus scrofa), the first case of natural infection reported in Mexico, and the other from a dog (Canis familiaris). This study summarizes current information in Mexico concerning confirmed reservoirs of T. cruzi.

  4. Evidence for Trypanosoma cruzi in adipose tissue in human chronic Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adaliene Versiani Matos; Segatto, Marcela; Menezes, Zélia; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Gelape, Cláudio; de Oliveira Andrade, Luciana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Scherer, Philipp E.; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the cause of Chagas disease persists in tissues of infected experimental animals and humans. Here we demonstrate the persistence of the parasite in adipose tissue from of three of 10 elderly seropositive patients with chronic chagasic heart disease. Nine control patients had no parasites in the fat. We also demonstrate that T. cruzi parasitizes primary adipocytes in vitro. Thus, in humans as in mice the parasite may persist in adipose tissue for decades and become a reservoir of infection. PMID:21726660

  5. Evidence for Trypanosoma cruzi in adipose tissue in human chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adaliene Versiani Matos; Segatto, Marcela; Menezes, Zélia; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Gelape, Cláudio; de Oliveira Andrade, Luciana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Scherer, Philipp E; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2011-11-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the cause of Chagas disease persists in tissues of infected experimental animals and humans. Here we demonstrate the persistence of the parasite in adipose tissue from of three of 10 elderly seropositive patients with chronic chagasic heart disease. Nine control patients had no parasites in the fat. We also demonstrate that T. cruzi parasitizes primary adipocytes in vitro. Thus, in humans as in mice the parasite may persist in adipose tissue for decades and become a reservoir of infection.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi: insights into naphthoquinone effects on growth and proteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Saulo C; Cavalcanti, Danielle F B; de Souza, Alessandra M T; Castro, Helena C; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Albuquerque, Magaly G; Santos, Dilvani O; da Silva, Gabriel Gomes; da Silva, Fernando C; Ferreira, Vitor F; de Pinho, Rosa T; Alves, Carlos R

    2011-01-01

    In this study we compared the effects of naphthoquinones (α-lapachone, β-lapachone, nor-β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap) on growth of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes forms, and on viability of VERO cells. In addition we also experimentally analyzed the most active compounds inhibitory profile against T. cruzi serine- and cysteine-proteinases activity and theoretically evaluated them against cruzain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase by using a molecular docking approach. Our results confirmed β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap with a high trypanocidal activity in contrast to α-lapachone and nor-β-lapachone whereas Epoxy-α-lap presented the safest toxicity profile against VERO cells. Interestingly the evaluation of the active compounds effects against T. cruzi cysteine- and serine-proteinases activities revealed different targets for these molecules. β-Lapachone is able to inhibit the cysteine-proteinase activity of T. cruzi proteic whole extract and of cruzain, similar to E-64, a classical cysteine-proteinase inhibitor. Differently, Epoxy-α-lap inhibited the T. cruzi serine-proteinase activity, similar to PMSF, a classical serine-proteinase inhibitor. In agreement to these biological profiles in the enzymatic assays, our theoretical analysis showed that E-64 and β-lapachone interact with the cruzain specific S2 pocket and active site whereas Epoxy-α-lap showed no important interactions. Overall, our results infer that β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap compounds may inhibit T. cruzi epimastigotes growth by affecting T. cruzi different proteinases. Thus the present data shows the potential of these compounds as prototype of protease inhibitors on drug design studies for developing new antichagasic compounds.

  7. Epidemiological survey of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in domestic owned cats from the tropical southeast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Coello, M; Acosta-Viana, K Y; Guzman-Marin, E; Gomez-Rios, A; Ortega-Pacheco, A

    2012-09-01

    American trypanosomiasis is an infectious disease of importance for public health and caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi mainly transmitted by triatomine bugs. The precise role of cats in the peridomestic transmission of T. cruzi and the mechanism by which cats become infected remain uncertain. The objective of this work was to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in domestic cats from an urban area of tropical Mexico by serological and molecular methods and evaluate associated risk factors. A total of 220 domestic cats from Merida Yucatan, Mexico, were studied. Animals older than 3 months were blood sampled. Serum and DNA were obtained. Specific T. cruzi IgG antibodies were detected using a commercial indirect ELISA with an anti-cat antibody HRP labelled. Positive cases were confirmed by Western blot (WB). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also performed using the primers TC1 and TC2. From the 220 cats, 8.6% had antibodies against T. cruzi using ELISA test and later confirmed by WB. In 75 cats (34%), the sequence of ADNk of T. cruzi was amplified. The bad-regular body condition was the only risk factor associated with PCR positive to T.cruzi (P < 0.001). In Mexico, there are no previous epidemiological reports that demonstrate the importance of the cat as a reservoir of T. cruzi. Few individuals were identified with a serological response because they were probably at an early stage of infection or antibodies were not detected because they could be immunocompromised (FIV, FeLV or others). It is necessary to monitor PCR-positive patients and conduct further studies for better understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of Chagas disease in domestic cats.

  8. Functional characterization of enzymes involved in cysteine biosynthesis and H(2)S production in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Daniela; Santana, Marianela; Nowicki, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is expected to synthetize de novo cysteine by different routes, among which the two-step pathway involving serine acetyltransferase and cysteine synthase (CS) is comprised. Also, cystathionine β synthase (CBS) might contribute to the de novo generation of cysteine in addition to catalyze the first step of the reverse transsulfuration route producing cystathionine. However, neither the functionality of CS nor that of cystathionine γ lyase (CGL) has been assessed. Our results show that T. cruzi CS could participate notably more actively than CBS in the de novo synthesis of cysteine. Interestingly, at the protein level T. cruzi CS is more abundant in amastigotes than in epimastigotes. Unlike the mammalian homologues, T. cruzi CGL specifically cleaves cystathionine into cysteine and is unable to produce H(2)S. The expression pattern of T. cruzi CGL parallels that of CBS, which unexpectedly suggests that in addition to the de novo synthesis of cysteine, the reverse transsulfuration pathway could be operative in the mammalian and insect stages. Besides, T. cruzi CBS produces H(2)S by decomposing cysteine or via condensation of cysteine with homocysteine. The latter reaction leads to cystathionine production, and is catalyzed remarkably more efficiently than the breakdown of cysteine. In T. cruzi like in other organisms, H(2)S could exert regulatory effects on varied metabolic processes. Notably, T. cruzi seems to count on stage-specific routes involved in cysteine production, the multiple cysteine-processing alternatives could presumably reflect this parasite's high needs of reducing power for detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

  9. Influence of saccharides and sodium chloride on growth and differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Adroher, F J; Lupiáñez, J A; Osuna, A

    1988-01-01

    The influence of saccharides, especially glucose and fructose, on the metacyclogenesis and growth of Trypanosoma cruzi has been investigated. In the absence of glucose and fructose in the media, both the percentage of metacyclic forms and the growth increased significantly. Furthermore, the addition of NaCl to the medium without monosaccharides strongly increased the formation of metacyclic forms. Presence of NaCl and absence of monosaccharides showed a synergic effect on differentiation of T. cruzi.

  10. Vector Surveillance to Determine Species Composition and Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection at Three Military Installations in San Antonio, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, which was identifi ed by the Brazilian physician Carlos R. J. Chagas in 1909.1 It is a serious disease that mainly...ABSTRACT Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the hemofl agellate protozoan Trypano- soma cruzi which is transmitted by...Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the hemofl agellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi which is transmitted by blood

  11. Studying nanotoxic effects of CdTe quantum dots in Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, C. V.; Almeida, D. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Menna-Barreto, R. F. S.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Cesar, C. L.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.

    2010-02-01

    Many studies have been done in order to verify the possible nanotoxicity of quantum dots in some cellular types. Protozoan pathogens as Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas1 disease is transmitted to humans either by blood-sucking triatomine vectors, blood transfusion, organs transplantation or congenital transmission. The study of the life cycle, biochemical, genetics, morphology and others aspects of the T. cruzi is very important to better understand the interactions with its hosts and the disease evolution on humans. Quantum dot, nanocrystals, highly luminescent has been used as tool for experiments in in vitro and in vivo T. cruzi life cycle development in real time. We are now investigating the quantum dots toxicity on T. cruzi parasite cells using analytical methods. In vitro experiments were been done in order to test the interference of this nanoparticle on parasite development, morphology and viability (live-death). Ours previous results demonstrated that 72 hours after parasite incubation with 200 μM of CdTe altered the development of T. cruzi and induced cell death by necrosis in a rate of 34%. QDs labeling did not effect: (i) on parasite integrity, at least until 7 days; (ii) parasite cell dividing and (iii) parasite motility at a concentration of 2 μM CdTe. This fact confirms the low level of cytotoxicity of these QDs on this parasite cell. In summary our results is showing T. cruzi QDs labeling could be used for in vivo cellular studies in Chagas disease.

  12. Household risk factors for Trypanosoma cruzi seropositivity in two geographic regions of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Black, Carla L; Ocaña, Sofia; Riner, Diana; Costales, Jaime A; Lascano, Mauricio S; Davila, Santiago; Arcos-Teran, Laura; Seed, J Richard; Grijalva, Mario J

    2007-02-01

    Few studies on the relationship between environmental factors and Trypanosoma cruzi transmission have been conducted in Ecuador. We conducted a cross-sectional study of household risk factors for T. cruzi seropositivity in 2 distinct geographical regions of Ecuador. Exposure information was collected via household surveys, and subjects were tested for serological evidence of T. cruzi infection. In total, 3,286 subjects from 997 households were included. In the coastal region, factors associated with seropositivity were living in a house with a palm roof (odds ratio [OR] = 2.63, 95% confidence interval, [1.61. 4.27]), wood walls (OR = 5.75 [2.04, 16.18]), or cane walls (OR = 2.81 11.31, 6.04]), and the presence of firewood in the peridomicile (OR = 2.48 [1.54, 4.01]). Accumulation of trash outside the home was associated with a reduced risk of seropositivity (OR = 0.25 [0.12, 0.51]). In the Andean region, living in a house with adobe walls was the only factor predictive of T. cruzi seropositivity. In conclusion, risk factors for T. cruzi transmission in Ecuador varied by geographic region, probably because of differing behavior of the triatomine vector species in each region. An understanding of the transmission dynamics of T. cruzi in a particular area is necessary for the development of effective Chagas disease control strategies in those areas.

  13. The trans-sialidase, the major Trypanosoma cruzi virulence factor: Three decades of studies.

    PubMed

    Freire-de-Lima, L; Fonseca, L M; Oeltmann, T; Mendonça-Previato, L; Previato, J O

    2015-11-01

    Chagas' disease is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the description of Chagas'disease in 1909 extensive research has identified important events in the disease in order to understand the biochemical mechanism that modulates T. cruzi-host cell interactions and the ability of the parasite to ensure its survival in the infected host. Exactly 30 years ago, we presented evidence for the first time of a trans-sialidase activity in T. cruzi (T. cruzi-TS). This enzyme transfers sialic acid from the host glycoconjugates to the terminal β-galactopyranosyl residues of mucin-like molecules on the parasite's cell surface. Thenceforth, many articles have provided convincing data showing that T. cruzi-TS is able to govern relevant mechanisms involved in the parasite's survival in the mammalian host, such as invasion, escape from the phagolysosomal vacuole, differentiation, down-modulation of host immune responses, among others. The aim of this review is to cover the history of the discovery of T. cruzi-TS, as well as some well-documented biological effects encompassed by this parasite's virulence factor, an enzyme with potential attributes to become a drug target against Chagas disease.

  14. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  15. Do commercial serologic tests for Trypanosoma cruzi infection detect Mexican strains in women and newborns?

    PubMed

    Gamboa-León, Rubi; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Claudia; Padilla-Raygoza, Nicolas; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Caamal-Kantun, Alejandra; Buekens, Pierre; Dumonteil, Eric

    2011-04-01

    We sought to determine the serological test that could be used for Trypanosoma cruzi seroprevalence studies in Mexico, where lineage I predominates. In a previous study among pregnant women and their newborns in the states of Yucatan and Guanajuato, we reported a 0.8-0.9% of prevalence for T. cruzi -specific antibodies by Stat-Pak and Wiener ELISA. We have expanded this study here by performing an additional non-commercial ELISA and confirming the seropositives with Western blot, using whole antigens of a local parasite strain. We found a seroprevalence of 0.6% (3/500) in Merida and 0.4% in Guanajuato (2/488). The 5 seropositive umbilical cord samples reacted to both non-commercial ELISA and Western blot tests, and only 1 of the maternal samples was not reactive to non-commercial ELISA. A follow-up of the newborns at 10 mo was performed in Yucatan to determine the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in children as evidence of congenital infection. None of the children was seropositive. One newborn from an infected mother died at 2 wk of age of cardiac arrest, but T. cruzi infection was not confirmed. The T. cruzi seroprevalence data obtained with both commercial tests (Stat-Pak and ELISA Wiener) are similar to those from non-commercial tests using a local Mexican strain of T. cruzi.

  16. Temporal variation in Trypanosoma cruzi lineages from the native rodent Octodon degus in semiarid Chile.

    PubMed

    Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Rojo, Gemma; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Alejandra; Peña, Fabiola; Ortiz, Sylvia; Solari, Aldo

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by triatomine insects to several mammalian species acting as reservoir hosts. In the present study, we assess T. cruzi-prevalence and DTU composition of the endemic rodent Octodon degus from a hyper-endemic area of Chagas disease in Chile. Parasite detection is performed by PCR assays on blood samples of individuals captured in the austral summers of 2010-2013. The infection level in rodents differed in the summers of these four years between 18% and 70%. Overall, infected O. degus showed similar T. cruzi-DTU composition (TcI, TcII, TcV and TcVI lineages) among years, corresponding to single and mixed infection, but the relative importance of each DTU changed among years. In 2013, we detected that only three out of the four T. cruzi-DTU found in O. degus were present in the endemic triatomine Mepria spinolai. We suggest that O. degus, an abundant long-lived rodent, is an important native reservoir of T. cruzi in the wild transmission cycle of Chagas disease and it is able to maintain all the T. cruzi-DTUs described in semiarid Chile.

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi Survival following Cold Storage: Possible Implications for Tissue Banking

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Diana L.; Goodhew, Brook; Czaicki, Nancy; Foster, Kawanda; Rajbhandary, Srijana; Hunter, Shawn; Brubaker, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    While Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is typically vector-borne, infection can also occur through solid organ transplantation or transfusion of contaminated blood products. The ability of infected human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products (HCT/Ps) to transmit T. cruzi is dependent upon T. cruzi surviving the processing and storage conditions to which HCT/Ps are subjected. In the studies reported here, T. cruzi trypomastigotes remained infective 24 hours after being spiked into blood and stored at room temperature (N = 20); in 2 of 13 parasite-infected cultures stored 28 days at 4°C; and in samples stored 365 days at −80°C without cryoprotectant (N = 28), despite decreased viability compared to cryopreserved parasites. Detection of viable parasites after multiple freeze/thaws depended upon the duration of frozen storage. The ability of T. cruzi to survive long periods of storage at +4 and −80°C suggests that T. cruzi-infected tissues stored under these conditions are potentially infectious. PMID:24759837

  18. [Desmoplastic ameloblastoma. Clinical and histopathological diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Maresi, E; Tortorici, S; Orlando, E; Burruano, F

    2003-03-01

    A rare case of desmoplastic ameloblastoma observed in a 62-year old man presenting a swelling in the anterior mandible area with abnormal mobility of 33, 34, 43, 45, is described. Diagnosis of desmoplastic ameloblastoma was based on: anterior localization, radiopaque appearance, severe desmoplastic stroma and increasing infiltrate pattern of the tumor. The authors suggest to consider the desmoplastic histotype as a different nosological entity defined "desmoplastic ameloblastoma" since these clinical and histopathological features are missing in the other histologic variants of common ameloblastoma. A radical surgical treatment is suggested for this neoplasia.

  19. Subcutaneous sacral ependymoma--a histopathological challenge.

    PubMed

    Helbig, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous myxopapillary or sacral ependymoma are rare tumors mostly developing in children or adolescents. The majority occurs in the sacrococcygeal region. There are numerous clinical and histopathological differential diagnoses. Owing to the fact that there have been rare reported cases that followed an aggressive course and in which the patient succumbed to metastatic disease, long term follow-up is necessary despite complete excision. We describe here a 25-year-old male patient with a histological unusual subcutaneous sacral ependymoma and discuss the differential diagnosis as well as treatment options.

  20. Heme modulates Trypanosoma cruzi bioenergetics inducing mitochondrial ROS production.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Natália P; Saraiva, Francis M S; Oliveira, Matheus P; Mendonça, Ana Paula M; Inacio, Job D F; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo E; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F; Laranja, Gustavo A T; Torres, Eduardo J Lopes; Oliveira, Marcus F; Paes, Marcia C

    2017-03-29

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease and has a single mitochondrion, an organelle responsible for ATP production and the main site for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). T. cruzi is an obligate intracellular parasite with a complex life cycle that alternates between vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, therefore the development of survival strategies and morphogenetic adaptations to deal with the various environments is mandatory. Over the years our group has been studying the vector-parasite interactions using heme as a physiological oxidant molecule that triggered epimastigote proliferation however, the source of ROS induced by heme remained unknown. In the present study we demonstrate the involvement of heme in the parasite mitochondrial metabolism, decreasing oxygen consumption leading to increased mitochondrial ROS and membrane potential. First, we incubated epimastigotes with carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, which led to decreased ROS formation and parasite proliferation, even in the presence of heme, correlating mitochondrial ROS and T. cruzi survival. This hypothesis was confirmed after the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant ((2-(2,2,6,6 Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl-4-ylamino)-2-oxoethyl) triphenylphosphonium chloride (MitoTEMPO) decreased both heme-induced ROS and epimastigote proliferation. Furthermore, heme increased the percentage of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) positive parasites tremendously-indicating the hyperpolarization and increase of potential of the mitochondrial membrane (ΔΨm). Assessing the mitochondrial functional metabolism, we observed that in comparison to untreated parasites, heme-treated epimastigotes decreased their oxygen consumption, and increased the complex II-III activity. These changes allowed the electron flow into the electron transport system, even though the complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) activity decreased

  1. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  2. Italy-Japan agreement and discrepancies in diagnosis of superficial gastric lesions.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Carla; Marini, Mario; Cevenini, Gabriele; Raffaella Ambrosio, Maria; Onorati, Monica; Frosini, Giorgio; Gotoda, Takuji; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Tosi, Piero

    2010-01-01

    The agreement between Italian and Japanese endoscopists and pathologists on endoscopic and histopathological diagnoses of superficial gastric lesions is verified with the use of Paris and Vienna classifications. The correlations between Paris endoscopic types and Vienna histopathological categories is high in both the independent Italian and Japanese evaluations. However, the agreement between Italian and Japanese endoscopists is moderate due to the difficult evaluation of the height of the lesions, in particular when they are mixed. The agreement on the size of the lesions is fairly good. The probability of the same allocation to the Vienna categories of a single case is 87 per cent, disagreements remaining in dysplasia grading, between dysplasia, not only high-grade but also low-grade, and in situ carcinoma, and on cancer invasion of the lamina propria. The results indicate that use of the Paris and Vienna classifications has reduced the discrepancies between Western and Japanese endoscopists and pathologists in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  3. New developments in endocervical glandular lesions.

    PubMed

    McCluggage, W Glenn

    2013-01-01

    McCluggage W G (2012) Histopathology New developments in endocervical glandular lesions There is evidence that the prevalence of premalignant and malignant endocervical glandular lesions is increasing in real as well as in apparent terms. In this review, new developments and selected controversial aspects of endocervical glandular lesions are covered, concentrating mainly on premalignant and malignant lesions. The terminology of premalignant endocervical glandular lesions is discussed with a comparison of the World Health Organization classification and the cervical glandular intraepithelial neoplasia (CGIN) system, which is in widespread use in the United Kingdom. Primary cervical adenocarcinomas comprise a heterogeneous group of different morphological types, and while it is known that the majority of these are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), it has become clear in recent years that most of the more uncommon morphological types are unassociated with HPV, although they may sometimes be p16-positive. A spectrum of benign, premalignant and malignant cervical glandular lesions exhibiting gastric differentiation is now recognized; these include type A tunnel clusters, typical and atypical lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia, adenoma malignum and gastric-type adenocarcinoma. The latter is a recently described variant of primary cervical adenocarcinoma which has a different morphological appearance to the usual endocervical type and which is probably associated with different patterns of spread and a worse prognosis. There is accumulating evidence that 'early invasive' cervical adenocarcinomas have an excellent prognosis and are suitable for conservative management. Immunohistochemical markers of value in the distinction between a primary cervical and endometrial adenocarcinoma are discussed. While it is well known that a panel of markers comprising oestrogen receptor (ER), vimentin, p16 and monoclonal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is

  4. Abnormal bone marrow histopathology in paediatric mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Melody C; Metcalfe, Dean D; Clark, Alicia S; Wayne, Alan S; Maric, Irina

    2015-03-01

    The diagnostic criteria for paediatric mastocytosis are largely based on adult studies and bone marrow findings are not well described in children. We evaluated use of the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of systemic disease in paediatric mastocytosis. In addition, we identified unique clinico-histopathological features within the biopsies. One hundred and thirteen children with paediatric mastocytosis were evaluated at the National Institutes of Health between 1986 and 2013. Complete bone marrow evaluations were performed in 50 cases. Seven children had repeat procedures. Bone marrows were analysed by histopathology, flow cytometry and for KIT D816V. Bone marrow biopsies displayed mild atypical haematopoietic maturation, increased haematogones and hypocellularity in a sub-set of patients with urticaria pigmentosa, diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis and indolent systemic mastocytosis. Hypocellularity was most pronounced in those with urticaria pigmentosa. Haematogones were highest, on average, in patients with diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis or mastocytomas. There was no evidence of peripheral blood cytopenias, myelodysplastic syndrome, myeloproliferative neoplasm or leukaemia within this cohort. The WHO criteria are applicable for the diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis in paediatrics. Although unsuspected bone marrow findings typically seen in myeloproliferative disorders are frequent in paediatric mastocytosis, patients within this study remained clinically stable without progression to a more aggressive variant.

  5. Histopathology of vaccine-preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Isaac H; Milner, Danny A

    2017-01-01

    The widespread use of vaccines has been one of the most important medical advances in the last century, saving trillions of dollars and millions of lives. Despite local eradication of some infections, travellers returning from affected areas may cause outbreaks through reintroduction of pathogens to individuals who are unable to receive vaccines for medical reasons or who have declined vaccination for non-medical reasons. Infections that would otherwise be uncommonly encountered by anatomical pathologists should therefore remain in the differential diagnosis for immunocompromised and unvaccinated patients. We review here the histopathological features and ancillary testing required for diagnosis of all illnesses preventable by vaccines that are currently approved for use by the United States Food and Drug Administration, organized into three sections: viral infections preventable by routine vaccination (measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, rotavirus, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, and human papillomavirus), bacterial infections preventable by routine vaccination (diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae, pneumococcus, and meningococcus), and infections with specific vaccine indications (anthrax, typhoid, tuberculosis, rabies, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, smallpox, and adenovirus). Histopathology for the less common diseases is illustrated in this review. Awareness of a patient's immune and/or vaccine status is a crucial component of the infectious disease work-up, especially for rare diseases that may not otherwise be seen.

  6. Molecular and Histopathological Changes Associated with Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, Mariam Lotfy; Helwa, Inas; Drewry, Michelle; Seremwe, Mutsa; Estes, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a corneal thinning disorder that leads to loss of visual acuity through ectasia, opacity, and irregular astigmatism. It is one of the leading indicators for corneal transplantation in the Western countries. KC usually starts at puberty and progresses until the third or fourth decade; however its progression differs among patients. In the keratoconic cornea, all layers except the endothelium have been shown to have histopathological structural changes. Despite numerous studies in the last several decades, the mechanisms of KC development and progression remain unclear. Both genetic and environmental factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of KC. Many previous articles have reviewed the genetic aspects of KC, but in this review we summarize the histopathological features of different layers of cornea and discuss the differentially expressed proteins in the KC-affected cornea. This summary will help emphasize the major molecular defects in KC and identify additional research areas related to KC, potentially opening up possibilities for novel methods of KC prevention and therapeutic intervention. PMID:28251158

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi: orchiectomy and dehydroepiandrosterone therapy in infected rats.

    PubMed

    Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Brazão, Vânia; Caetano, Leony Cristina; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; Caetano, Luana Naiara; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2008-11-01

    The ability of gonadal hormones to influence and induce diverse immunological functions during the course of a number of parasitic infections has been extensively studied in the latest decades. Dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate are the most abundant steroid hormones secreted by the human adrenal cortex and are considered potent immune-activators. The effects of orchiectomy on the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rats, treated and untreated with DHEA were examined, by comparing blood and cardiac parasitism, macrophage numbers, nitric oxide and IFN-gamma levels. Orchiectomy enhanced resistance against infection with elevated numbers of macrophages, enhanced concentrations of NO and IFN-gamma and reduced amastigote burdens in heart when compared to control animals. DHEA replacement exerted a synergistic effect, up-modulating the immune response. Male sex steroids appear to play fundamental role in determining the outcome of disease, through the regulation and modulation of the activity of the immune response.

  8. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  9. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Andrés B.; Carlevaro, Giannina; Araoz, Beatriz; Ruiz Diaz, Pablo; Camara, María de los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A.; Bossi, Mariano; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Mucci, Juan; Campetella, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS) are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3)Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully soluble form. PMID

  10. Succinate-dependent metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Denicola-Seoane, A; Rubbo, H; Prodanov, E; Turrens, J F

    1992-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes permeabilized with digitonin (65 micrograms (mg protein)-1) to measure mitochondrial respiration were exposed to different substrates. Although none of the NADH-dependent substrates stimulated respiration, succinate supported not only oxygen consumption but also oxidative phosphorylation (respiratory control ratio of 1.9 +/- 0.3) indicating that the mitochondria were coupled. The rate of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption by membrane fractions (9.4 +/- 0.7 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1) was reduced by 50% upon addition of catalase indicating that the electrons from NADH oxidation reduced oxygen to H2O2. NADH-dependent H2O2 production (16 +/- 1 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1) was confirmed using cytochrome c peroxidase. This activity was inhibited by fumarate by 70%, suggesting a competition between fumarate and oxygen for the electrons from NADH, probably at the fumarate reductase level. The respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin blocked both respiration by intact cells and succinate-dependent cytochrome c by isolated membranes. No inhibition by antimycin was observed when NADH replaced succinate as an electron donor, indicating that the electrons from NADH oxidation reduced cytochrome c through a different route. Malonate blocked not only succinate-cytochrome c reductase and fumarate reductase, but also intact cell motility. These results suggest that succinate has a central role in the intermediate metabolism of i. cruzi, as it may be used for respiration or excreted to the extracellular space under anaerobic conditions. In addition, 2 potential sources of H2O2 were tentatively identified as: (a) the enzyme fumarate reductase; and (b) a succinate-dependent site, which may be the semiquinone form of Coenzyme Q9, as in mammalian mitochondria.

  11. Identification of Contractile Vacuole Proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miyoung; Martins, Vicente P.; Atwood, James; Moles, Kristen; Collins, Dalis; Rohloff, Peter; Tarleton, Rick; Moreno, Silvia N. J.; Orlando, Ron; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Contractile vacuole complexes are critical components of cell volume regulation and have been shown to have other functional roles in several free-living protists. However, very little is known about the functions of the contractile vacuole complex of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, other than a role in osmoregulation. Identification of the protein composition of these organelles is important for understanding their physiological roles. We applied a combined proteomic and bioinfomatic approach to identify proteins localized to the contractile vacuole. Proteomic analysis of a T. cruzi fraction enriched for contractile vacuoles and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS resulted in the addition of 109 newly detected proteins to the group of expressed proteins of epimastigotes. We also identified different peptides that map to at least 39 members of the dispersed gene family 1 (DGF-1) providing evidence that many members of this family are simultaneously expressed in epimastigotes. Of the proteins present in the fraction we selected several homologues with known localizations in contractile vacuoles of other organisms and others that we expected to be present in these vacuoles on the basis of their potential roles. We determined the localization of each by expression as GFP-fusion proteins or with specific antibodies. Six of these putative proteins (Rab11, Rab32, AP180, ATPase subunit B, VAMP1, and phosphate transporter) predominantly localized to the vacuole bladder. TcSNARE2.1, TcSNARE2.2, and calmodulin localized to the spongiome. Calmodulin was also cytosolic. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining subcellular fractionation, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatic approaches for localization of organellar proteins that are difficult to detect with whole cell methodologies. The CV localization of the proteins investigated revealed potential novel roles of these organelles in phosphate metabolism

  12. Precursor lesions of invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schreer, Ingrid; Lüttges, Jutta

    2005-04-01

    The increasing application of mammography, mainly in screening programs for the early detection of breast cancer, and the high technical standard of imaging has resulted in the detection of clinically occult breast tumors. Considering that only diagnosis at an early stage will be able to change the prognosis of breast cancer, this diagnostic challenge appears to be the most exciting field in both breast imaging and breast pathology. Especially the precursor lesions need to be diagnosed and defined precisely to understand their prognostic significance. In imaging, the morphologic appearance of precursor lesions is usually neither typical nor pathognomonic. They have to be assessed histologically using percutaneous interventions. Recent molecular studies have demonstrated various genetic alterations in the ductal epithelium, with the earliest onset in atypical ductal hyperplasia. The recent WHO classification, which is based on molecular data and histopathological features, attempts to define in particular the precursor lesions and low grade intraductal carcinomas. The clinical importance of the various grades has to be assessed. Intimate cooperation between diagnostic radiologist and pathologist is essential.

  13. Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Terminology.

    PubMed

    Innes, N P T; Frencken, J E; Bjørndal, L; Maltz, M; Manton, D J; Ricketts, D; Van Landuyt, K; Banerjee, A; Campus, G; Doméjean, S; Fontana, M; Leal, S; Lo, E; Machiulskiene, V; Schulte, A; Splieth, C; Zandona, A; Schwendicke, F

    2016-05-01

    Variation in the terminology used to describe clinical management of carious lesions has contributed to a lack of clarity in the scientific literature and beyond. In this article, the International Caries Consensus Collaboration presents 1) issues around terminology, a scoping review of current words used in the literature for caries removal techniques, and 2) agreed terms and definitions, explaining how these were decided.Dental cariesis the name of the disease, and thecarious lesionis the consequence and manifestation of the disease-the signs or symptoms of the disease. The termdental caries managementshould be limited to situations involving control of the disease through preventive and noninvasive means at a patient level, whereascarious lesion managementcontrols the disease symptoms at the tooth level. While it is not possible to directly relate the visual appearance of carious lesions' clinical manifestations to the histopathology, we have based the terminology around the clinical consequences of disease (soft, leathery, firm, and hard dentine). Approaches to carious tissue removal are defined: 1)selective removal of carious tissue-includingselective removal to soft dentineandselective removal to firm dentine; 2)stepwise removal-including stage 1,selective removal to soft dentine, and stage 2,selective removal to firm dentine6 to 12 mo later; and 3)nonselective removal to hard dentine-formerly known ascomplete caries removal(technique no longer recommended). Adoption of these terms, around managing dental caries and its sequelae, will facilitate improved understanding and communication among researchers and within dental educators and the wider clinical dentistry community.

  14. [Inflammatory aneurysms of the subrenal aorta. Histopathological, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, F; Trimarchi, S; Franch, L; Rampoldi, V; Miani, S

    1994-01-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aneurysms (AIAA) represent a clearly defined clinical entity with an incidence ranging between 1.2% and 15%. In spite of the increasing number of observations reported in recent years, the etiopatholgenesis and natural history have not been defined. The lesion can present in an acute, subacute or chronic manner and the histopathological studies reveal prevalently two components: an inflammatory infiltrate and a diffuse fibrosis, in varying degree. This study aimed to analyze the more recent imaging procedures in order to correctly diagnose this lesion. In our experience the incidence of AIAA is about 2.5%. On the basis of macro microscopic pictures the authors divided patients into two groups: one constituted by the acute or subacute inflammatory forms, the other by chronic clear inflammatory aneurysms. All patients underwent on operative treatment. The surgical adopted techniques and the obtained results are reported.

  15. Inner ear histopathology in "nervous Pointer dogs" with severe hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Angélique G; Gilbert-Gregory, Shana; Steinberg, Sheldon A; Heizmann, Claus; Poncelet, Luc

    2005-02-01

    Ten puppy dogs (82, 131 or 148 days-old) from a Pointer cross-colony, exhibiting a juvenile severe hearing loss transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, were used for histopathological characterization of the inner ear lesion. Immunostaining with calbindin, Na,K-ATPase, cytokeratins, S100, S100A1 and S100A6 antisera were helpful in identifying the different cell types in the degenerated cochleae. Lesions, restricted to the Corti's organ and spiral ganglion, were bilateral but sometimes slightly asymmetrical. Mild to severe lesions of the Corti's organ were unevenly distributed among the different parts of the middle and basal cochlear turns while the apical turn remained unaffected at 148 days. In 82 day-old puppies (n = 2), severe lesions of the Corti's organ, meaning that it was replaced by a layer of unidentifiable cells, involved the lower middle and upper basal turns junction area, extending in the upper basal turn. Mild lesions of the Corti's organ, with both hair and supporting cells abnormalities, involved the lower middle turn and extended from the rest of upper basal turn into the lower basal turn. The outer hair cells (ohc) were more affected than the inner hair cell (ihc). The lesions extended towards the basal end of the cochlea in the 131 (n = 5) and 148 (n = 3) day-old puppies. Additionally, the number of spiral ganglion neurons was reduced in the 131 and 148 day-old puppies; it is earlier than observed in most other canine hereditary deafness. These lesions were interpreted as a degeneration of the neuroepithelial type. This possible animal model might provide information about progressive juvenile hereditary deafness and neuronal retrograde degeneration investigations in human.

  16. Clinico-Pathological Study of Cutaneous Granulomatous Lesions- a 5 yr Experience in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Srabani; Pal, Subrata; Biswas, Biplab Kr; Bose, Kingshuk; Pal, Saswati; Pathak, Swapan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Granulomatous dermatoses are common skin pathology, often need histopathological confirmation for diagnosis. Histologically six sub-types of granulomas found in granulomatous skin diseases- tuberculoid, sarcoidal, necrobiotic, suppurative, foreign body & histoid type. The aims of the present study were clinico-pathological evaluation of granulomatous skin lesions and their etiological classification based on histopathological examination. Methods: It was a five years (Jan 2009- Dec 2013) retrospective study involving all the skin biopsies. Detailed clinical and histopathological features were analyzed and granulomatous skin lesions were categorized according to type of granuloma & etiology. Special stains were used in few cases for diagnostic purpose. Results: Among 1280 skin biopsies, 186 cases (14.53%) were granulomatous skin lesions with a ratio 1:24. In histopathological sub-typing, tuberculoid granuloma was most common type (126 cases, 67.74%). Most common etiology of granuloma in the study was leprosy (107 cases, 57.52%). Other etiologies were cutaneous tuberculosis, foreign body granulomas, fungal lesions, cutaneous leishmaniasis, sarcoidosis and granuloma annulare. Conclusion: Histopathology is established as gold standard investigation for diagnosis, categorization and clinico-pathological correlation of granulomatous skin lesions. PMID:26870144

  17. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  18. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  19. Incidental vertebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-12-01

    Incidental vertebral lesions on imaging of the spine are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Contributing factors include the aging population, the increasing prevalence of back pain, and increased usage of MR imaging. Additionally, refinements in CT and MR imaging have increased the number of demonstrable lesions. The management of incidental findings varies among practitioners and commonly depends more on practice style than on data or guidelines. In this article we review incidental findings within the vertebral column and review management of these lesions, based on available Class III data.

  20. Impression Cytology in a Series of Clinically Diagnosed Ocular Surface Melanocytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaei; Hosseini, Seyed Bagher; Aliakbar-Navahi, Roshanak; Aghaei, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report impression cytology (IC) results of clinically diagnosed ocular surface melanocytic lesions. Methods: Ten patients with a clinical diagnosis of an ocular surface melanocytic lesion underwent IC using cellulose acetate strips and Periodic acid Schiff-Papanicolaou staining. Excisional biopsy of lesions was performed in case of observing atypical cells on IC or at the patient's request, and excised specimens were subjected to histopathological analysis. Agreement between clinical diagnoses and IC results and between IC results and histopathology were evaluated. Results: Clinical diagnoses were nevi in 6, primary acquired melanosis (PAM) with atypia/melanoma in 2, and atypical nevus versus pigmented conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in 2 cases. IC results were suggestive of a benign nevus in 7, PAM with atypia/melanoma in 2 and CIN versus an atypical epithelioid type melanocytic lesion in 1 case. IC results were consistent with the clinical diagnoses in 9 cases (Cohen's kappa index of 0.83) and excluded CIN in 1. Histopathology in 6 cases disclosed benign melanonevus in 3, malignant melanoma in the context of PAM with atypia in 2, and CIN in 1 case. Histologic results were well correlated with the IC features (Cohen's kappa index of 0.74). Conclusion: By demonstrating typical cytomorphological features of ocular superficial layers IC diagnosed the true nature of melanocytic ocular surface lesions in the majority of cases. Although IC does not substitute histopathology, given the high correlation between IC results and histopathology, it can be of great assistance in diagnosis and management of ocular surface melanocytic lesions. PMID:28299002

  1. Histopathological Differential Diagnosis of Psoriasis and Seborrheic Dermatitis of the Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Park, Young Joon; Kim, Sue Kyoung; Kwon, Ji Eun; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Eun-So; Choi, Jee Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The differential diagnosis of psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis can be difficult when both conditions are localized to the scalp without the involvement of other skin sites. Objective We aimed to evaluate the histopathological differences between psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis on the scalp and identify favorable criteria for their differential diagnosis. Methods We evaluated 15 cases of psoriasis and 20 cases of seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp that had been clinicopathologically diagnosed. Skin biopsy sections stained with H&E were examined. Additional immunohistochemistry was performed, including Ki-67, keratin 10, caspase-5, and GLUT-1. Results On histopathological examination, mounds of parakeratosis with neutrophils, spongiform micropustules of Kogoj, and clubbed and evenly elongated rete ridges were significantly more frequently observed in psoriasis. Follicular plugging, shoulder parakeratosis and prominent lymphocytic exocytosis were significantly more common in seborrheic dermatitis. Moreover, significantly higher mitotic figures were observed in psoriatic lesions than in seborrheic dermatitis. Immunohistochemistry did not show any difference between psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis. Conclusion Histopathological features favoring psoriasis include mounds of parakeratosis with neutrophils, spongiform micropustules of Kogoj, clubbed and evenly elongated rete ridges, and increased mitotic figures (≥6/high-powered field). Features indicating seborrheic dermatitis are follicular plugging, shoulder parakeratosis and prominent lymphocytic exocytosis. Immunohistochemistry was not helpful in differentiating psoriasis from seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:27489423

  2. Hematological and biochemical profiles and histopathological evaluation of experimental intoxication by sodium fluoroacetate in cats.

    PubMed

    Collicchio-Zuanaze, R C; Sakate, M; Langrafe, L; Takahira, R K; Burini, C

    2010-11-01

    Sodium fluoroacetate (SFAC) is a potent rodenticide, largely used for rodent and domestic pest control. The toxic effects of SFAC are caused by fluoroacetate, a toxic metabolite, whose toxic action blocks the Krebs cycle and also induces the accumulation of citrate in the body, which is a serum calcium chelator. The most common clinical signs of this intoxication are the cardiac and neurological effects. However, the hematological, biochemical and histopathological findings occurring in intoxication are still unknown in different species. In the present study, 16 domestic cats were experimentally intoxicated with oral doses of fluoroacetate (0.45 mg/kg). The hematological and biochemical profiles and histopathological findings were made to look for auxiliary diagnosis methods in SFAC intoxications. The hematological profile showed transitory leucopenia and thrombocytopenia; in the biochemical profiles were detected hyperglycemia, increase of creatinequinase enzyme (CK) and creatinequinase cardiac isoenzyme (CK-MB), hypokalemia and hypophosfatemia. In the macroscopic and histopathological findings were observed lesions characteristic of degenerative and ischemic processes in heart, kidneys, liver, brain and lungs. These changes may be auxiliary to the diagnosis of intoxication by SFAC in cats, when associated with clinical signs described for the species. Thus, the complete blood count with platelet count, serum glucose, enzymes CK and CK-MB isoenzyme, as well as the electrolytes potassium and phosphorus, can facilitate the laboratory diagnosis during intoxication by SFAC, associated with the pathological findings in the case of death of the intoxicated animal.

  3. Dermoscopic and Clinical Features of Pigmented Skin Lesions of the Genital Area*

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan; Wellenhof, Rainer Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermoscopic features of vulvar melanosis lesions are well known. To our knowledge, there are only a few case reports about dermoscopic features of pigmented genital lesions in male patients. OBJECTIVE To evaluate dermoscopic and clinical characteristics of benign lesions of the genital area in both males and females, and to assess the distinguishing dermoscopic criteria of vulvar melanosis and atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type. METHODS 68 patients with pigmented genital lesions were included in this observational study (28 male and 40 female). A punch biopsy was taken from all pigmented lesions and histopathological examination was performed on all specimens. RESULTS We histopathologically diagnosed: genital melanosis in 40 lesions, atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type in 15 lesions, melanocytic nevi in 9 lesions, seborrheic keratosis in 4 lesions. The most frequent locations were the glans penis (19 patients, 67.9%) in males and the labia minora (19 patients, 47.5%) in females. The mean age of patients with atypical nevi (28,6 ± 11,36) was significantly lower than the mean age of patients with genital melanosis (47,07 ± 15,33). CONCLUSIONS Parallel pattern is prominent in genital melanosis, ring-like pattern is only observed in genital melanosis. Most pigmented lesions on the genital area are solitary. Blue-white veil and irregular dots are only observed in AMNGT. According to these results, we propose that histopathological examination is performed, especially if blue-white veil and irregular dots are found by dermoscopy. PMID:25830986

  4. Incidence of Radiographic Cystic Lesions Associated With Unerupted Teeth in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Sam G; Krakowski Volker, Mary; Luskin, Ira R

    2016-12-01

    Medical records and radiographs were retrospectively reviewed over a 3-year period (2012-2015) from dogs presented to a private dental referral practice. Medical records were evaluated for the diagnosis of impacted or embedded teeth. The identified dogs' radiographs were reviewed for the presence of radiographically significant cystic lesions that were associated with the impacted or embedded teeth. Radiographic criteria were established by the authors for the purposes of identifying cystic lesions in dogs of different breeds and sizes, using established indices from human dental pathology as a basis. When histopathology results were available, they were reviewed and reported. In this study, 136 dogs ranging in age from 3 months to 17 years were diagnosed with 213 unerupted teeth during the study period. There were 62 (29.1%) of the 213 radiographically apparent cystic lesions identified based on the criteria proposed in this study. In this study, 146 (68.5%) of the 213 unerupted teeth were identified as mandibular first premolar teeth. Histopathology was obtained on 28 (45.1%) of the 62 diagnosed cystic lesions. Dentigerous cysts accounted for 20 (71.4%) of the 28 cystic lesions. Brachycephalic breeds were overrepresented in this study. Boxer, pug, Shih Tzu, and Boston terrier dogs were most likely to present with cystic lesions associated with unerupted teeth. Seventeen (85%) of the 20 cases with a histopathologic diagnosis of dentigerous cyst were found within these 4 brachycephalic breeds.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth.

  6. Transcriptome and Functional Genomics Reveal the Participation of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase in Trypanosoma cruzi Resistance to Benznidazole.

    PubMed

    García-Huertas, Paola; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana María; González, Laura; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2017-03-09

    Currently, the only available treatments for Trypanosoma cruzi are benznidazole (Bz) and nifurtimox (Nfx). The mechanisms of action and resistance to these drugs in this parasite are not complete known. In order to identify differentially expressed transcripts between sensitive and resistant parasites, a massive pyrosequencing of the T. cruzi transcriptome was carried out. Additionally, the 2D gel electrophoresis profile of sensitive and resistant parasites was analyzed and the data were supported with functional genomics. The results showed 133 differentially expressed genes in resistant parasites. The transcriptome analysis revealed the regulation of different genes with several functions and metabolic pathways, which could suggest that resistance in T. cruzi is a multigenic process. Additionally, using transcriptomics, one gene, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), was found to be down-regulated in the resistant parasites and its expression profile was confirmed by 2D electrophoresis analysis. The role of this gene in the resistance to Bz was confirmed overexpressing it in sensitive and resistant parasites. Interestingly, both parasites became more sensitive to Bz and H2 O2 . This is the first RNA-seq study to identify regulated genes in T. cruzi associated with Bz resistance and to show the role of APRT in T. cruzi resistance. Although T. cruzi regulation is mainly post-transcriptional, the transcriptome analysis, supported by 2D gel analysis and functional genomic, provides an overall idea of the expression profiles of genes under resistance conditions. These results contribute essential information to further the understanding of the mechanisms of action and resistance to Bz in T. cruzi. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Mammalian cell invasion by closely related Trypanosoma species T. dionisii and T. cruzi.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Alves, Renan Melatto; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2012-02-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Trypanosoma can infect virtually all mammalian species. Within this genus, Trypanosoma dionisii from bats and Trypanosoma cruzi that causes Chagas' disease, belonging to the subgenus Schizotrypanum, can invade mammalian cells. The mechanisms of cell invasion by T. dionisii are poorly understood. To address that question, metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT) and human epithelial HeLa cells were used. Similarly to genetically divergent T. cruzi strains G (TcI) and CL (TcVI), associated, respectively with marsupial and human infections, T. dionisii infectivity increased under nutritional stress, a condition that induces host cell lysosome exocytosis required for parasite internalization. For efficient internalization, T. dionisii depended on MT protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) and Ca(2+) mobilization from acidocalcisomes, whereas T. cruzi strains also relied on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase C (PKC) and Ca(2+) released from thapsigargin-sensitive compartments. T. dionisii-induced signaling in host cells implicated PKC and Ca(2+) mobilized from thapsigargin-sensitive stores, like T. cruzi, but without PI3K involvement. Unlike T. cruzi, T. dionisii metacyclic forms did not use l-proline as source of energy required for internalization. Molecules related to T. cruzi surface glycoproteins involved in MT-host cell interaction were undetectable in T. dionisii. The difference in the surface profile of the two species was also inferred from the susceptibility of T. dionisii metacyclic forms to complement-mediated lysis, as opposed to complete resistance of T. cruzi. In summary, the two Trypanosoma species display distinct surface profiles but invade host cells through a common mechanism involving lysosome mobilization to the site of parasite entry.

  8. The Ly49E Receptor Inhibits the Immune Control of Acute Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Filtjens, Jessica; Coltel, Nicolas; Cencig, Sabrina; Taveirne, Sylvie; Van Ammel, Els; Van Acker, Aline; Kerre, Tessa; Matthys, Patrick; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine; Leclercq, Georges

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi circulates in the blood upon infection and invades various cells. Parasites intensively multiply during the acute phase of infection and persist lifelong at low levels in tissues and blood during the chronic phase. Natural killer (NK) and NKT cells play an important role in the immune control of T. cruzi infection, mainly by releasing the cytokine IFN-γ that activates the microbicidal action of macrophages and other cells and shapes a protective type 1 immune response. The mechanisms by which immune cells are regulated to produce IFN-γ during T. cruzi infection are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is induced early upon T. cruzi infection and remains elevated until day 20 post-infection. We previously demonstrated that the inhibitory receptor Ly49E, which is expressed, among others, on NK and NKT cells, is triggered by uPA. Therefore, we compared wild type (WT) to Ly49E knockout (KO) mice for their control of experimental T. cruzi infection. Our results show that young, i.e., 4- and 6-week-old, Ly49E KO mice control the infection better than WT mice, indicated by a lower parasite load and less cachexia. The beneficial effect of Ly49E depletion is more obvious in 4-week-old male than in female mice and weakens in 8-week-old mice. In young mice, the lower T. cruzi parasitemia in Ly49E KO mice is paralleled by higher IFN-γ production compared to their WT controls. Our data indicate that Ly49E receptor expression inhibits the immune control of T. cruzi infection. This is the first demonstration that the inhibitory Ly49E receptor can interfere with the immune response to a pathogen in vivo. PMID:27891126

  9. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  10. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; ... can remove: Benign or pre-malignant skin lesions Warts Moles Sunspots Hair Small blood vessels in the ...

  11. Fatal methanol poisoning: features of liver histopathology.

    PubMed

    Akhgari, Maryam; Panahianpour, Mohammad Hadi; Bazmi, Elham; Etemadi-Aleagha, Afshar; Mahdavi, Amirhosein; Nazari, Saeed Hashemi

    2013-03-01

    Methanol poisoning has become a considerable problem in Iran. Liver can show some features of poisoning after methanol ingestion. Therefore, our concern was to examine liver tissue histopathology in fatal methanol poisoning cases in Iranian population. In this study, 44 cases of fatal methanol poisoning were identified in a year. The histological changes of the liver were reviewed. The most striking features of liver damage by light microscopy were micro-vesicular steatosis, macro-vesicular steatosis, focal hepatocyte necrosis, mild intra-hepatocyte bile stasis, feathery degeneration and hydropic degeneration. Blood and vitreous humor methanol concentrations were examined to confirm the proposed history of methanol poisoning. The majority of cases were men (86.36%). In conclusion, methanol poisoning can cause histological changes in liver tissues. Most importantly in cases with mean blood and vitreous humor methanol levels greater than 127 ± 38.9 mg/dL more than one pathologic features were detected.

  12. Histopathological evaluation of tissue undergoing thermal insult

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Minal; Bonde, Dushyant; Patil, Swati; Gawande, Madhuri; Hande, Alka; Jain, Deepali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Thermal insult is the major cause of thermal injury or death and in case of death due to thermal injury the body often has to be recovered from the site. Histologically, one can predict whether the victim was alive or dead when the fire was on going. However, determination of probable cause of thermal insult to which victim subjected to be difficult when the victim's body is found somewhere else from the crime scene or accident site or found alone. Hence, histopathological evaluation of the tissue which has undergone thermal insult in such conditions could help to place evidence in front of law officials, regarding probable condition, or scenario at time of burn of victim. Aims: Keeping this as a criteria in this study we aim to evaluate burnt tissue histopathologically, that undergone various degree of thermal insult, which simulates various real life scenario for mortality in burn cases. Settings and Design: We evaluate the changes in hematoxylin and eosin staining pattern of tissue which has undergone thermal insult compared to normal tissue and also the progressive changes in staining pattern, architectural, and cellular details. Materials and Methods: Samples were taken from the patients, in various surgical procedures. Each sample was cut into five parts with close margins so that each burnt tissue is evaluated for same field or region. The tissue that obtained was immediately subjected to varying degree of temperature over a specific period so as to simulate the various real-life condition. Then the tissues were fixed, processed, and stained with routine H and E staining. The processed slides of tissue were examined under the microscope, and the staining, and architectural changes were evaluated and described. Results: Results show that there was a progressive changes in the architectural pattern of the epithelium and connective tissue showing cleft formation and vacuolization, staining pattern also shows mixing of stains progressively as the

  13. Histopathologic Alterations Associated with Global Gene Expression Due to Chronic Dietary TCDD Exposure in Juvenile Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Cariou, Ronan; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Nan; Goetz, Giles; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Tonellato, Peter J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the effects and possible developmental disease implication of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on global gene expression anchored to histopathologic analysis in juvenile zebrafish by functional genomic, histopathologic and analytic chemistry methods. Specifically, juvenile zebrafish were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb, and fish were sampled following 0, 7, 14, 28 and 42 d after initiation of the exposure. TCDD accumulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner and 100 ppb TCDD caused TCDD accumulation in female (15.49 ppb) and male (18.04 ppb) fish at 28 d post exposure. Dietary TCDD caused multiple lesions in liver, kidney, intestine and ovary of zebrafish and functional dysregulation such as depletion of glycogen in liver, retrobulbar edema, degeneration of nasal neurosensory epithelium, underdevelopment of intestine, and diminution in the fraction of ovarian follicles containing vitellogenic oocytes. Importantly, lesions in nasal epithelium and evidence of endocrine disruption based on alternatively spliced vasa transcripts are two novel and significant results of this study. Microarray gene expression analysis comparing vehicle control to dietary TCDD revealed dysregulated genes involved in pathways associated with cardiac necrosis/cell death, cardiac fibrosis, renal necrosis/cell death and liver necrosis/cell death. These baseline toxicological effects provide evidence for the potential mechanisms of developmental dysfunctions induced by TCDD and vasa as a biomarker for ovarian developmental disruption. PMID:24988445

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  15. Histopathological characteristics of endometrosis in thoroughbred mares in Japan: results from 50 necropsy cases.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Michiko; Maeda, Yousuke; Oikawa, Masa-Aki

    2014-01-01

    Uteri from 50 necropsied nonpregnant Japanese Thoroughbred brood mares (1-30 years of age) were investigated to clarify the histopathological characteristics of endometrosis in Japanese Thoroughbred mares and the distribution pattern of endometrosis lesions in the uterus as a whole. Endometrosis was observed in all animals over 6 years of age and in all of the 21 mares aged over 12 years of age. The affected mares showed elastofibrosis of arteries, veins and lymphatic vessels in the uterine wall, atrophy of the uterine smooth muscle layers and hyperplasia of collagen fibers among the smooth muscle fascicles of the myometrium, in addition to pathomorphologic features of endometrosis such as stromal endometrial fibrosis accompanied by endometrial atrophy, periglandular fibrosis and reduction of uterine glands. The severity of the histopathological changes increased with advancing age. Lymphatic vessels with elastofibrosis showed marked lymph congestion, leading to lymphatic edema. With increasing age, the extent of the distribution of these lesions tended to expand from focal to diffuse involvement of the entire uterus. Based on these findings, we speculate that aging plays a role in the pathogenesis of endometrosis; circulatory disturbances due to intrauterine angiosis or angiopathy, particularly reduction of the arterial blood supply and disturbance of venous drainage, resulting in a reduction of lymphatic drainage (lymphatic edema), are closely related to the onset and progression of endometrial fibrosis and myometrial atrophy with fibroplasia may result in myometrial hypofunction during the peri-implantation or puerperal period.

  16. Impact of experimental duel infections with Schistosoma mansoni and Echinoccocus granulosus on hepatic histopathology.

    PubMed

    Elwakil, Hala S; Ali, Nehad M; Talaat, Roba M; Osman, Wesam M

    2007-12-01

    Experimental duel infection with S. mansoni and E. granulosus was induced in mice to determine their effect on serum nitric oxide (NO) level and accordingly on the sequences of histopathological lesions affecting the liver. The results showed that serum NO level was significantly increased (p<0.05) in mice infected with both parasites (GI) in comparison to either S. mansoni (GIV) or E. granulosus (GV). The NO elevation on hepatic pathological lesions of both diseases showed a marked reduction of granuloma size with absence of concentric fibrosis in GI as early as 4 weeks of concomitant infection as compared to GIV. In spite of the significant increase of NO level when E. granulosus infection induced in late stages of schistosomisais (GsII & III), yet granuloma size was not suppressed. Also, there was absence or death of hydatid cyst in mice (GI) compared to E. granulosus (GV). So, the duel infection with the two parasites affected serum NO level and hepatic histopathology, by ameliorative or deteriorative effects, according to duration of infection with either.

  17. Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi T. cruzi I strains with different degrees of virulence induce diverse humoral and cellular immune responses in a murine experimental infection model.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, B; Rico, T; Sosa, S; Oaxaca, E; Vizcaino-Castillo, A; Caballero, M L; Martínez, I

    2010-01-01

    It is has been shown that the majority of T. cruzi strains isolated from Mexico belong to the T. cruzi I (TCI). The immune response produced in response to Mexican T. cruzi I strains has not been well characterized. In this study, two Mexican T. cruzi I strains were used to infect Balb/c mice. The Queretaro (TBAR/MX/0000/Queretaro)(Qro) strain resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, no mortality was observed in mice infected with the Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain. Both strains produced extended lymphocyte infiltrates in cardiac tissue. Ninoa infection induced a diverse humoral response with a higher variety of immunoglobulin isotypes than were found in Qro-infected mice. Also, a stronger inflammatory TH1 response, represented by IL-12p40, IFNgamma, RANTES, MIG, MIP-1beta, and MCP-1 production was observed in Qro-infected mice when compared with Ninoa-infected mice. We propose that an exacerbated TH1 immune response is a likely cause of pathological damage observed in cardiac tissue and the primary cause of death in Qro-infected mice.

  18. Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi T. cruzi I Strains with Different Degrees of Virulence Induce Diverse Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in a Murine Experimental Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, B.; Rico, T.; Sosa, S.; Oaxaca, E.; Vizcaino-Castillo, A.; Caballero, M. L.; Martínez, I.

    2010-01-01

    It is has been shown that the majority of T. cruzi strains isolated from Mexico belong to the T. cruzi I (TCI). The immune response produced in response to Mexican T. cruzi I strains has not been well characterized. In this study, two Mexican T. cruzi I strains were used to infect Balb/c mice. The Queretaro (TBAR/MX/0000/Queretaro)(Qro) strain resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, no mortality was observed in mice infected with the Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain. Both strains produced extended lymphocyte infiltrates in cardiac tissue. Ninoa infection induced a diverse humoral response with a higher variety of immunoglobulin isotypes than were found in Qro-infected mice. Also, a stronger inflammatory TH1 response, represented by IL-12p40, IFNγ, RANTES, MIG, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 production was observed in Qro-infected mice when compared with Ninoa-infected mice. We propose that an exacerbated TH1 immune response is a likely cause of pathological damage observed in cardiac tissue and the primary cause of death in Qro-infected mice. PMID:20396398

  19. Herpetiform genital lesions in a heifer with mucosal disease.

    PubMed

    Fabis, J J; Szkudlarek, L; Risatti, G R; Sura, R; Garmendia, A E; Van Kruiningen, H J

    2008-03-01

    A 14-month-old heifer with a 17-day history of unresponsive bloody diarrhea was necropsied. There were focal, pink-red erosions of the nares and hard palate; ulcers and fissures of the tongue; and multiple ulcerative lesions of the alimentary canal. Interdigital skin of both rear limbs was ulcerated and bleeding; and the margins of the vulva contained punctiform red ulcers. The gross lesions were consistent with mucosal disease. Histopathology and laboratory testing ruled out rinderpest, foot-and-mouth disease, and vesicular stomatitis, and identified bovine virus diarrhea virus to be the cause of this disease. Lesions of the vulva similar to those seen in some stages of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis were negative for bovine herpesvirus-1 and tested positive for bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen by immunohistochemistry.

  20. Polycystic lesions in the liver of the white sturgeon.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter; Smith, Charlie E; Blair, Marilyn J

    2009-03-01

    Polycystic lesions have been reported from the kidney and liver of many different fish species and are attributed to pollution and genetic anomalies. In June 2002, eggs and milt were collected from two female and five male white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. Fertilized eggs were hatched at the Abernathy Fish Technology Center in Longview, Washington, and 20,000 juveniles were raised for approximately 1 year before release into the wild. Just before release, 12,000 juveniles were scute-marked, during which it was noticed that about 30 fish had distended abdomens. Gross necropsy revealed a large, jellylike mass in the peritoneal cavity. Histopathological examination of four fish showed that this growth was a polycystic lesion of liver tissue. This is the first report of this type of lesion in white sturgeon and is presumed to be the product of a genetic anomaly.

  1. Histopathology and Distribution of Viral Antigens in Hamsters Infected with Virulent and Benign Venezuelan Encephalitis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, P. B.; Scherer, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    Lethalities and virulences of Venezuelan encephalitis (VE) viruses for hamsters were found to correlate with severity of histopathologic lesions in hematopoietic and brain tissues. Highly virulent strains (subtype I) destroyed marrow and lymphoid cells rapidly and produced intestinal wall damage; focal brain hemorrhages and destruction of Purkinje cells also occurred within the 4 to 5 days between subcutaneous inoculation and death. Like subtype I virus, a slightly less virulent strain (subtype II) also caused necrosis of bone marrow and brain lesions, but only minimal lymphoid cell damage occurred. The less virulent subtype III VE virus, which killed hamsters between 4 and 14 days after inoculation, usually caused no lesions in hematopoietic tissues, and deaths were related chiefly to hemorrhagic brain lesions and necrosis of Purkinje cells. Two VE viruses, benign for hamsters (the TC-83 attenuated vaccine strain and subtype IV), usually caused no necrosis of hematopoietic or brain tissues; focal extravasations of blood and swollen glial cells were found in brains of the rare hamsters that died. The degrees of necrosis seen in tissues stained with hematoxylin and eosin correlated with the quantities of viral antigens detected by fluorescent antibody, except in pancreas and small intestinal smooth muscle and glands, where antigens of subtype I virus were present without morphologic damage. ImagesFig 5-6Fig 7-8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 12Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16Fig 1-4 PMID:4578265

  2. Expression of Cytokeratin-19 and Thyroperoxidase in Relation to Morphological Features in Non-Neoplastic and Neoplastic Lesions of Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Revathishree; Noorunnisa, Naseen; Durairaj, Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a protein involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. TPO gene suppression and mutation were involved in thyroid tumours. CK-19 plays important role in the structural integrity of epithelial cells. Reduced TPO expression with increased CK-19 immunoreactivity has been implicated as a marker for differentiating non neoplastic and neoplastic thyroid lesions. Aim To study the histopathological features of thyroid lesions and to evaluate the diagnostic role of thyroperoxidase and CK-19 in non-neoplastic and neoplastic thyroid lesions. Materials and Methods Prospective observational study of 65 thyroid specimens was studied for detailed histopathological examination and Expression of Immunohistochemical Markers Cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) and Thyroperoxidase. Results TPO IHC marker was expressed by non-neoplastic and benign lesions of thyroid but not in malignancy. CK-19 was expressed 100% in papillary carcinoma of thyroid and its variants, focal and weak staining noted in goitre and hyperplastic areas. Conclusion Most of the non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions were diagnosed based on histopathological features. When the histopathological diagnosis are equivocal, immunohistochemical markers aids in diagnosing malignancy. Diffuse and strong TPO expression indicates non-neoplastic thyroid lesions whereas diffused and strong CK-19 expression indicates thyroid malignancy. PMID:27504290

  3. Clinical, Epidemiologic, Histopathologic and Molecular Features of an Unexplained Dermopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Michele L.; Selby, Joseph V.; Katz, Kenneth A.; Cantrell, Virginia; Braden, Christopher R.; Parise, Monica E.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Lewin-Smith, Michael R.; Kalasinsky, Victor F.; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Hightower, Allen W.; Papier, Arthur; Lewis, Brian; Motipara, Sarita; Eberhard, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Morgellons is a poorly characterized constellation of symptoms, with the primary manifestations involving the skin. We conducted an investigation of this unexplained dermopathy to characterize the clinical and epidemiologic features and explore potential etiologies. Methods A descriptive study was conducted among persons at least 13 years of age and enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) during 2006–2008. A case was defined as the self-reported emergence of fibers or materials from the skin accompanied by skin lesions and/or disturbing skin sensations. We collected detailed epidemiologic data, performed clinical evaluations and geospatial analyses and analyzed materials collected from participants' skin. Results We identified 115 case-patients. The prevalence was 3.65 (95% CI = 2.98, 4.40) cases per 100,000 enrollees. There was no clustering of cases within the 13-county KPNC catchment area (p = .113). Case-patients had a median age of 52 years (range: 17–93) and were primarily female (77%) and Caucasian (77%). Multi-system complaints were common; 70% reported chronic fatigue and 54% rated their overall health as fair or poor with mean Physical Component Scores and Mental Component Scores of 36.63 (SD = 12.9) and 35.45 (SD = 12.89), respectively. Cognitive deficits were detected in 59% of case-patients and 63% had evidence of clinically significant somatic complaints; 50% had drugs detected in hair samples and 78% reported exposure to solvents. Solar elastosis was the most common histopathologic abnormality (51% of biopsies); skin lesions were most consistent with arthropod bites or chronic excoriations. No parasites or mycobacteria were detected. Most materials collected from participants' skin were composed of cellulose, likely of cotton origin. Conclusions This unexplained dermopathy was rare among this population of Northern California residents, but associated with significantly reduced health-related quality of

  4. Histopathological incidence of facial canal dehiscence in otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Shigenobu; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Kariya, Shin; Morita, Norimasa; Nomiya, Rie; Nishizaki, Kazunori; Paparella, Michael M

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the histopathological incidence of facial canal dehiscence in otosclerosis cases compared with non-otosclerotic controls. 133 temporal bones from 84 otosclerosis (35 unilateral otosclerosis, 49 bilateral otosclerosis) cases were compared to 102 age-matched normal temporal bones from 70 subjects (38 unilateral normal cases, 32 bilateral normal cases). Temporal bones were serially sectioned in the horizontal plane at a thickness of 20 μm, and were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. We evaluated the location and the invasion of otosclerosis to the facial canal and incidence of facial canal dehiscence under light microscopy. Facial canal was subdivided into four portions: (1) the geniculate ganglion, (2) the tensor tympani muscle, (3) the oval window, and (4) mastoid. The incidence of facial canal dehiscence in otosclerosis [66 temporal bones (49.6%)] was significantly lower than normal controls [67 control temporal bones (65.7%)] in the oval window area (P = 0.019). Temporal bones with otosclerotic invasion to the thin bone of the canal were significantly less likely to have dehiscence [10 temporal bones (31.3%)] compared to the otosclerotic bones without invasion [56 temporal bones (55.5%)] (P = 0.025). There was no significant difference in the incidence of facial canal dehiscence between temporal bones with and without otosclerosis in the entire segment of facial nerve. Our findings in this study suggest that otosclerotic lesions have the potential to close dehiscence of the facial canal in the oval window area.

  5. Advanced MRI Techniques in the Evaluation of Complex Cystic Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Popli, Manju Bala; Gupta, Pranav; Arse, Devraj; Kumar, Pawan; Kaur, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this research work was to evaluate complex cystic breast lesions by advanced MRI techniques and correlating imaging with histologic findings. METHODS AND MATERIALS In a cross-sectional design from September 2013 to August 2015, 50 patients having sonographically detected complex cystic lesions of the breast were included in the study. Morphological characteristics were assessed. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI along with diffusion-weighted imaging and MR spectroscopy were used to further classify lesions into benign and malignant categories. All the findings were correlated with histopathology. RESULTS Of the 50 complex cystic lesions, 32 proved to be benign and 18 were malignant on histopathology. MRI features of heterogeneous enhancement on CE-MRI (13/18), Type III kinetic curve (13/18), reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (18/18), and tall choline peak (17/18) were strong predictors of malignancy. Thirteen of the 18 lesions showed a combination of Type III curve, reduced apparent diffusion coefficient value, and tall choline peak. CONCLUSIONS Advanced MRI techniques like dynamic imaging, diffusion-weighted sequences, and MR spectroscopy provide a high level of diagnostic confidence in the characterization of complex cystic breast lesion, thus allowing early diagnosis and significantly reducing patient morbidity and mortality. From our study, lesions showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement, Type III kinetic curve, diffusion restriction, and tall choline peak were significantly associated with malignant complex cystic lesions of the breast. PMID:27330299

  6. Genetic Variability and Phylogenetic Relationships within Trypanosoma cruzi I Isolated in Colombia Based on Miniexon Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Claudia; Guhl, Felipe; Falla, Alejandra; Fajardo, Anabella; Montilla, Marleny; Adolfo Vallejo, Gustavo; Bargues, M. Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies of Trypanosoma cruzi have identified the existence of two groups: T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II. There are aspects that still remain unknown about the genetic variability within the T. cruzi I group. Given its epidemiological importance, it is necessary to have a better understanding of T. cruzi transmission cycles. Our purpose was to corroborate the existence of haplotypes within the T. cruzi I group and to describe the genetic variability and phylogenetic relationships, based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the miniexon gene intergenic region, for the isolates from different hosts and epidemiological transmission cycles in Colombian regions. 31 T. cruzi isolates were molecularly characterized. Phylogenetic relationships within T. cruzi I isolates showed four haplotype groups (Ia–Id), associated with their transmission cycle. In previous studies, we reported that haplotype Ia is mainly associated with the domestic cycle and domiciliated Rhodnius prolixus. Haplotype Ib is associated with the domestic cycle and peridomestic cycle, haplotype Ic is closely related with the peridomestic cycle, and haplotype Id is strongly associated with the sylvatic cycle. The phylogenetic methodologies applied in this study are tools that bolster the associations among isolates and thus shed light on Chagas disease epidemiology. PMID:20798881

  7. Radiologic-Histopathologic Correlation of Cerebral Microbleeds Using Pre-Mortem and Post-Mortem MRI

    PubMed Central

    Montandon, Marie-Louise; Lazeyras, François; Scheffler, Max; Meckel, Stephan; Herrmann, Francois R.; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Kövari, Enikö

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral microbleeds (CMB), also known as cerebral microhemorrhages, are small areas of susceptibility on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that are increasingly detected due to the higher availability of high-field MRI systems and dedicated pulse sequences. The prevalence of CMBs increases in cases with cognitive decline. The current investigation assessed the poorly investigated radiologic–histopathologic correlation of CMBs on MRI. Methods The local ethical committee approved the current investigation. We retrospectively assessed a consecutive series of 1303 autopsy cases hospitalized in Geneva University Hospitals between 2000–2014. Of 112 cases with pre-mortem T2* sequences, we included 25 cases (mean age 77.3 ± 9.6, 9 females) with at least one CMB. We compared pre-mortem CMBs with targeted histopathology and post-mortem MRI. Results 25 cases had 31 CMB lesions detected by pre-mortem MRI. 25 additional CMB were detected on histopathology. 4 CMBs on pre-mortem MRI were false positives, resulting in a total of 52 CMBs. 27 CMBs on pre-mortem MRI were confirmed on histopathology, corresponding to a sensitivity or true positive rate of 51.9% (95% CI 37.6–66.0%). The false negative rate of pre-mortem MRI was 48.1% (95% CI 34.0–62.4%). Post-mortem MRI showed only 3 cases with additional CMBs. Overall, pre-mortem MRI significantly underestimated CMBs (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Routine clinical brain MRI underestimates the prevalence of CMBs by approximately 50%, and 12% of radiologic pre-mortem MRI CMBs were false positives. Post-mortem MRI confirmed that this discordance is not explained by microbleeds occurring after the pre-mortem MRI. PMID:27936213

  8. Magnetic resonance microscopy at 14 Tesla and correlative histopathology of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples.

  9. Demographic and histopathological variation of ameloblastoma: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Patsa, Santanu; Jadav, Riteshkumar Baldevbhai; Halder, Gopal Chandra; Ray, Jay Gopal; Datta, Sila; Deb, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Ameloblastoma is the second most common odontogenic tumor after odontoma which occurs exclusively in the jaws and very rarely in the sinonasal cavities. Aims: The aim of the study was to determine the demographic and histopathological variations of ameloblastoma in Eastern Indian population by retrospectively comparing and evaluating diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma using different parameters. Materials and Methods: Histopathologically diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma retrieved from past records of the Department of Oral Pathology were selected for the study. Totally, 148 cases were isolated from record of previous 7 years. The patients were divided according to (a) gender, (b) age group, (c) site of the lesion and (d) histopathological types. The findings of this study were compared with those available in literature. Statistical Analysis Used: This is a retrospective study, mean and standard deviation was calculated. Results: Among 148 patients, 88 (59.45%) were male and 60 (40.55%) were female. A maximum number of cases (101 of 148) of ameloblastoma were found in the second to fourth decades of life. Mandiblular posterior region was commonly involved (48.6%). Solid/multicystic variety was found in 63.1% followed by unicystic with 21.5%. We found one case each of extraosseous and desmoplastic ameloblastoma. It was difficult for panel of experienced oral pathologists to pinpoint the exact type in 15 (10%) cases, this was due to mixture of follicular and plexiform variety with equal presence of both types of architecture, without predominance of any variety in particular. Conclusions: These data may serve as baseline information on occurrence of various histopathological types of ameloblastoma in Eastern Indian population and helps comparing it with other similar studies conducted in different geographic population. PMID:27601814

  10. Vitamin E pretreatment prevents histopathological effects in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) acutely exposed to cylindrospermopsin.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Guillén, Remedios; Prieto Ortega, Ana I; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Moreno, Isabel M; Moyano, Rosario; Blanco, Alfonso; Cameán, Ana M

    2016-11-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a cyanotoxin frequently involved in blooms with a predominantly extracellular availability, which makes it easily taken up by a variety of aquatic organisms. CYN is a potent protein and glutathione synthesis inhibitor, and also induces genotoxicity, oxidative stress and several histopathological lesions. The present study investigates the protective role of a vitamin E pretreatment (700 mg vit E/kg fish bw/day, for 7 days) on the histopathological alterations induced in different organs of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) acutely exposed to a single oral dose of 400 µg pure CYN/kg bw fish. The major histological changes observed were degenerative glucogenic process and loss of the hepatic structure in the liver, glomerulopathy and tubular tumefaction in the kidney, myofibrolysis and edema in the heart, catarrhal enteritis and necrosis in the gastrointestinal tract, hyperemic processes in the gill lamellae, and high basophilia, degeneration and tumefaction of granular neurons in the brain. Vitamin E pretreatment was effective in preventing or ameliorating the abovementioned alterations induced by CYN. In addition, a morphometric study indicated that the average nuclear diameter of hepatocytes, and cross-sections of proximal and distal convoluted tubules, together with the cardiac fiber and capillaries diameters represent a useful tool to evaluate the damage induced by CYN. This is the first study reporting vitamin E prevention of histopathological damage in tissues (liver, kidney, heart, gastrointestinal tract, gills and brain) of fish intoxicated with CYN. Therefore, vitamin E can be considered a useful chemoprotectant in the treatment of histopathological changes induced in CYN-intoxicated fish. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1469-1485, 2016.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  12. Trans-Sialidase Inhibition Assay Detects Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Different Wild Mammal Species

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Paula A.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Orozco, Marcela M.; Cardinal, Marta V.; Gürtler, Ricardo E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mammals is crucial for understanding the eco-epidemiological role of the different species involved in parasite transmission cycles. Xenodiagnosis (XD) and hemoculture (HC) are routinely used to detect T. cruzi in wild mammals. Serological methods are much more limited because they require the use of specific antibodies to immunoglobulins of each mammalian species susceptible to T. cruzi. In this study we detected T. cruzi infection by trans-sialidase (TS) inhibition assay (TIA). TIA is based on the antibody neutralization of a recombinant TS that avoids the use of anti-immunoglobulins. TS activity is not detected in the co-endemic protozoan parasites Leishmania spp and T. rangeli. In the current study, serum samples from 158 individuals of nine wild mammalian species, previously tested by XD, were evaluated by TIA. They were collected from two endemic areas in northern Argentina. The overall TIA versus XD co-reactivity was 98.7% (156/158). All 18 samples from XD-positive mammals were TIA-positive (co-positivity, 100%) and co-negativity was 98.5% (138/140). Two XD-negative samples from a marsupial (Didelphis albiventris) and an edentate (Dasypus novemcinctus) were detected by TIA. TIA could be used as a novel tool for serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in a wide variety of sylvatic reservoir hosts. PMID:23930975

  13. Molecular characterization and intracellular distribution of the alpha 5 subunit of Trypanosoma cruzi 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Bessy; Osorio, Luis; Motta, María Cristina M; Huima-Byron, Telervo; Erdjument-Bromage, Heydeie; Muñoz, Christian; Sagua, Hernán; Mortara, Renato A; Echeverría, Alex; Araya, Jorge E; González, Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Three different monoclonal antibodies were produced against Trypanosona cruzi proteasomes. These antibodies were shown to react with a single 27-kDa band on immunoblots of purified proteasomes. Using a 7E5 monoclonal antibody (IgG1) that recognized the alpha5 subunit of protozoan protease we have studied the intracellular distribution of the T. cruzi 20S proteasome. Contrary to all cell types described to date, T. cruzi 20S proteasome was found not only in the cytoplasm and nucleus but also in the kinetoplast. As revealed by confocal microscopy, the reactivity of monoclonal antibody 7E5 was highly specific for protozoan proteasome because the antibody recognized only the proteasomes from parasites and not those from the mammalian host in T. cruzi infected cells. These findings were confirmed by immunoblots or immunoprecipitations, followed by chymotrypsin-like activity detection in kinetoplasts isolated by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradients. Proteasome 20S was present in all T. cruzi stages and only slight differences in terms of relative abundance were found. The potential role of the proteasome in kinetoplast remodeling remains to be determined.

  14. From genome screening to creation of vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi by use of immunoinformatics.

    PubMed

    Teh-Poot, Christian; Tzec-Arjona, Evelyn; Martínez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Rosado-Vallado, Miguel; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-01-15

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, and activation of CD8(+) T cells is crucial for a protective immune response. Therefore, the identification of antigens with major histocompatibility complex class I epitopes is a crucial step for vaccine development against T. cruzi. Our aim was to identify novel antigens and epitopes by immunoinformatics analysis of the parasite proteome (12 969 proteins) and to validate their immunotherapeutic potential in infected mice. We identified 172 predicted epitopes, using NetMHC and RANKPEP. The corresponding protein sequences were reanalyzed to generate a consensus prediction, and 26 epitopes were selected for in vivo validation. The interferon γ (IFN-γ) recall response of splenocytes from T. cruzi-infected mice confirmed that 10 of 26 epitopes (38%) induced IFN-γ production. The immunotherapeutic potential of a mixture of all 10 peptides was evaluated in infected mice. The therapeutic vaccine was able to control T. cruzi infection, as evidenced by reduced parasitemia, cardiac tissue inflammation, and parasite burden and increased survival. These findings illustrate the benefits of this approach for the rapid development of a vaccine against pathogens with large genomes. The identified peptides and the proteins from which they are derived are excellent candidates for the development of a vaccine against T. cruzi.

  15. DO COMMERCIAL SEROLOGIC TESTS FOR TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI INFECTION DETECT MEXICAN STRAINS IN WOMEN AND NEWBORNS?

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa-León, Rubi; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Claudia; Padilla-Raygoza, Nicolas; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Caamal-Kantun, Alejandra; Buekens, Pierre; Dumonteil, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine the serological test that could be used for Trypanosoma cruzi seroprevalence studies in Mexico, where lineage I predominates. In a previous study among pregnant women and their newborns in the states of Yucatan and Guanajuato, we reported a 0.8–0.9% of prevalence for T. cruzi–specific antibodies by Stat-Pak and Wiener ELISA. We have expanded this study here by performing an additional non-commercial ELISA and confirming the seropositives with Western blot, using whole antigens of a local parasite strain. We found a seroprevalence of 0.6% (3/500) in Merida and 0.4% in Guanajuato (2/488). The 5 seropositive umbilical cord samples reacted to both non-commercial ELISA and Western blot tests, and only 1 of the maternal samples was not reactive to non-commercial ELISA. A follow-up of the newborns at 10 mo was performed in Yucatan to determine the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in children as evidence of congenital infection. None of the children was seropositive. One newborn from an infected mother died at 2 wk of age of cardiac arrest, but T. cruzi infection was not confirmed. The T. cruzi seroprevalence data obtained with both commercial tests (Stat-Pak and ELISA Wiener) are similar to those from non-commercial tests using a local Mexican strain of T. cruzi. PMID:21506787

  16. Purification and characterization of an 80-kilodalton Trypanosoma cruzi urinary antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Corral, R S; Orn, A; Freilij, H L; Bergman, T; Grinstein, S

    1989-01-01

    A Trypanosoma cruzi antigen eliminated in the urine of experimentally infected dogs was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay between 9 and 28 days after infection. The parasite urinary antigen (UAg) was purified by affinity chromatography with polyclonal antibodies to T. cruzi. The eluate of the antibody column was subjected to high-performance liquid chromatography and showed a single peak of A280. This antigen was the only parasite component found in the urine of infected dogs during the course of acute T. cruzi infection. Antigen characterization was performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, lectin affinity chromatography, proteolytic digestion, and Western blotting (immunoblotting). The isolated UAg exhibited a relative molecular size of 80 kilodaltons (kDa), an isoelectric point of 6.2 to 6.8, binding to concanavalin A, and sensitivity to trypsin. The parasite antigen was electroeluted from polyacrylamide gels and subjected to acid hydrolysis and amino acid analysis by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The 80-kDa glycoprotein was recognized by serum antibodies from a wide variety of T. cruzi-infected hosts. The UAg proved to be a highly antigenic component present in different strains of T. cruzi. This 80-kDa polypeptide resembles one of the parasite antigens previously found in the urine of patients with acute Chagas' disease. Images PMID:2643616

  17. Identification of major Trypanosoma cruzi antigenic determinants in chronic Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Levin, M J; Mesri, E; Benarous, R; Levitus, G; Schijman, A; Levy-Yeyati, P; Chiale, P A; Ruiz, A M; Kahn, A; Rosenbaum, M B

    1989-11-01

    To identify Trypanosoma cruzi target antigens in overt Chagas' heart disease, a parasite lambda gt11 cDNA library was screened with the serum of a patient with a severe chagasic heart involvement (JL). Using a phage dot array immunoassay, 5 highly antigenic clones, JL1, JL5, JL7, JL8, and JL9, were probed with sera from clinically characterized T. cruzi infected subjects. The correlation of cloned T. cruzi antigen recognition with the clinical status of the subjects led to the identification of a recombinant antigen, JL5, that reacted predominantly with sera from patients with Chagas' heart disease. The antigenic determinant of the JL5 recombinant was a small 35 amino acid peptide. The nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequence, together with other experimental data, allowed identification as the C-terminal portion of a T. cruzi P ribosomal protein. The C-terminal undecapeptide in JL5, EDDDMGFGLFD, was highly homologous to the same region of the human P protein SD(D/E)DMGFGLFD. The latter sequence has been identified as the P protein epitope in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Positive SLE sera reacted with the JL5 recombinant phage, suggesting that the T. cruzi P protein might induce antibodies with a similar specificity to that of P antibodies in SLE.

  18. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA.

  19. Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Telomere Association Correlates with Redox Status in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  20. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in captive Neotropical primates in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Michele; de Nazaré Leite Barros, Flávia; Magalhães-Matos, Paulo Cesar; de Souza Gonçalves, Thamirys; Chiesorin Neto, Laerzio; Oliveira Faria, Diogo Cesar Lagroteria; Aparecida Romeiro, Sandra; Barros Monteiro, Frederico Ozanan; Góes-Cavalcante, Gustavo; Scofield, Alessandra

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the infection by Trypanosoma cruzi in captive Neotropical primates in the Brazilian Amazon. From February 2013 to July 2014, 112 blood samples were collected from Neotropical primates from the Amazonas, Amapá, and Pará States, north of Brazil. The subjects belonged to the families Cebidae (N = 59), Atelidae (N = 41), Callitrichidae (N = 5), Pitheciidae (N = 4), and Aotidae (N = 3). Blood smears also were examined for the presence of trypomastigotes by optical microscopy. For the detection of T. cruzi DNA, a Nested-PCR with primers TCZ1/TCZ2 and TCZ3/TCZ4 was performed. T. cruzi DNA was detected in 12.5% (14/112) of Neotropical primates examined. Positive samples were detected in 16%, 12.5%, and 11.11% of the different species of primates sampled from the Amapá, Pará, and Amazonas states, respectively. The analysis of the blood smears did not reveal trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, Neotropical primates kept in captivity were infected by T. cruzi in the studied areas. We recommend that a health management protocol be put into place to prevent the transmission of infectious agents among captive populations, captive and wild populations, and between NHPs and the technicians who handle these animals.

  2. Risk factors associated with Trypanosoma cruzi exposure in domestic dogs from a rural community in Panama

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, José E; Pineda, Vanessa; Perea, Milixa; Rigg, Chystrie; González, Kadir; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Gottdenker, Nicole L; Chaves, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is a zoonosis of humans, wild and domestic mammals, including dogs. In Panama, the main T. cruzi vector is hodnius pallescens, a triatomine bug whose main natural habitat is the royal palm, Attalea butyracea. In this paper, we present results from three T. cruzi serological tests (immunochromatographic dipstick, indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA) performed in 51 dogs from 24 houses in Trinidad de Las Minas, western Panama. We found that nine dogs were seropositive (17.6% prevalence). Dogs were 1.6 times more likely to become T. cruzi seropositive with each year of age and 11.6 times if royal palms where present in the peridomiciliary area of the dog's household or its two nearest neighbours. Mouse-baited-adhesive traps were employed to evaluate 12 peridomestic royal palms. All palms were found infested with R. pallescens with an average of 25.50 triatomines captured per palm. Of 35 adult bugs analysed, 88.6% showed protozoa flagellates in their intestinal contents. In addition, dogs were five times more likely to be infected by the presence of an additional domestic animal species in the dog's peridomiciliary environment. Our results suggest that interventions focused on royal palms might reduce the exposure to T. cruzi infection. PMID:26560985

  3. Suppressive action of melatonin on the TH-2 immune response in rats infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Santello, Fabricia Helena; Frare, Eduardo Osório; dos Santos, Carla Domingues; Caetano, Leony Cristina; Alonso Toldo, Míriam Paula; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2008-10-01

    Control of the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is critically dependent on cytokine-mediated macrophage activation to intracellular killing, natural killer (NK) cells, CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells and B cells. Cell-mediated immunity in T. cruzi infection is also modulated by cytokines, but in addition to parasite-specific responses, autoimmunity can be also triggered. Importantly, cytokines may also play a role in the cell-mediated immunity of infected subjects. Here we studied the role of cytokines in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection in Wistar rats. Melatonin is an effective regulator of the immune system. Macrophages and T lymphocytes, which have melatonin receptors, are target cells for the immunomodulatory function of melatonin. In this paper melatonin was orally given via two protocols: prior to and concomitant with infection. Both treatments were highly effective against T. cruzi with enhanced action for the concomitant treatment. The data suggest an up-regulation of the TH-1 immune response as all analyzed parameters, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta1 and splenocyte proliferation, displayed reduced levels as compared with the untreated counterparts. However, the direct effects of melatonin on immune cells have not been fully investigated during T. cruzi infection. We conclude that in light of the current results, melatonin exerted important therapeutic benefits through its immune regulatory effects.

  4. Risk factors associated with Trypanosoma cruzi exposure in domestic dogs from a rural community in Panama.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, José E; Pineda, Vanessa; Perea, Milixa; Rigg, Chystrie; González, Kadir; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Gottdenker, Nicole L; Chaves, Luis F

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is a zoonosis of humans, wild and domestic mammals, including dogs. In Panama, the main T. cruzi vector is Rhodnius pallescens, a triatomine bug whose main natural habitat is the royal palm, Attalea butyracea. In this paper, we present results from three T. cruzi serological tests (immunochromatographic dipstick, indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA) performed in 51 dogs from 24 houses in Trinidad de Las Minas, western Panama. We found that nine dogs were seropositive (17.6% prevalence). Dogs were 1.6 times more likely to become T. cruzi seropositive with each year of age and 11.6 times if royal palms where present in the peridomiciliary area of the dog's household or its two nearest neighbours. Mouse-baited-adhesive traps were employed to evaluate 12 peridomestic royal palms. All palms were found infested with R. pallescens with an average of 25.50 triatomines captured per palm. Of 35 adult bugs analysed, 88.6% showed protozoa flagellates in their intestinal contents. In addition, dogs were five times more likely to be infected by the presence of an additional domestic animal species in the dog's peridomiciliary environment. Our results suggest that interventions focused on royal palms might reduce the exposure to T. cruzi infection.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of potent inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Murugesan, Srinivasan; Senkovich, Olga; Walker, Kiera; Chenna, Bala C.; Shinkre, Bidhan; Desai, Amar; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2010-09-17

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is a potential target for developing drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have undertaken a detailed structure-activity study of this enzyme. We report here synthesis and characterization of six potent inhibitors of the parasitic enzyme. Inhibitory activity of each compound was determined against T. cruzi and human DHFR. One of these compounds, ethyl 4-(5-[(2,4-diamino-6-quinazolinyl)methyl]amino-2-methoxyphenoxy)butanoate (6b) was co-crystallized with the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase enzyme of T. cruzi and the crystal structure of the ternary enzyme:cofactor:inhibitor complex was determined. Molecular docking was used to analyze the potential interactions of all inhibitors with T. cruzi DHFR and human DHFR. Inhibitory activities of these compounds are discussed in the light of enzyme-ligand interactions. Binding affinities of each inhibi