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Sample records for cryogenic system commissioning

  1. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  2. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, D.; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Gurd, P.; Howell, M.; Stout, D.; Strong, H.; Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2006-04-27

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  3. Status of the Cryogenic System Commissioning at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    F. Casagrande; I.E. Campisi; P.A. Gurd; D.R. Hatfield; M.P. Howell; D. Stout; W.H. Strong; D. Arenius; J.C. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; P.K. Knudsen

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 Watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning strategy and status will be presented.

  4. Validation and performance of the LHC cryogenic system through commissioning of the first sector

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, L.; Bouillot, A.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chakravarty, A.; Claudet, S.; Gicquel, F.; Gomes, P.; Kumar, M.; Kush, P.K.; Millet, F.; Perin, A.; /CERN /Fermilab /Tata Inst. /CERN

    2007-12-01

    The cryogenic system [1] for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator is presently in its final phase of commissioning at nominal operating conditions. The refrigeration capacity for the LHC is produced using eight large cryogenic plants and eight 1.8 K refrigeration units installed on five cryogenic islands. Machine cryogenic equipment is installed in a 26.7-km circumference ring deep underground tunnel and are maintained at their nominal operating conditions via a distribution system consisting of transfer lines, cold interconnection boxes at each cryogenic island and a cryogenic distribution line. The functional analysis of the whole system during all operating conditions was established and validated during the first sector commissioning in order to maximize the system availability. Analysis, operating modes, main failure scenarios, results and performance of the cryogenic system are presented.

  5. Installation and commissioning of a cryogen distribution system for the TPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, H. H.; Hsiao, F. Z.; Li, H. C.; Lin, M. C.; Wang, C.; Liao, W. R.; Lin, T. F.; Chiou, W. S.; Chang, S. H.; Chuang, P. S. D.

    2016-07-01

    A cryogen distribution system was installed and commissioned to transfer liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid helium (LHe) from storage dewars to superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities for the 3-GeV Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) project. The cryogen distribution system comprises one distribution valve box (DVB), four control valve boxes (CVB) and seven sections of multichannel transfer line (MCL). The DVB distributes the LHe and LN2 to the CVB, and then to the SRF cavities through independent vacuum-jacketed transfer lines. The vaporized GHe and GN2 from the cryomodules are collected via the MCL. The cryogen distribution system was installed and commissioned from October 2014 to the end of March 2015. This paper presents the installation, pre-commissioning and commissioning of the cryogen distribution system, and describes the heat load test. Thermal acoustic oscillation (TAO) was found in the GHe process line; this phenomenon and its solution are also presented and discussed.

  6. ARIEL E-linac Cryogenic System: Commissioning and First Operational Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koveshnikov, A.; Bylinskii, I.; Hodgson, G.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R.; Ma, Y.; Nagimov, R.; Yosifov, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL) is a major expansion of the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF. A key part of the ARIEL project is a 10 mA 50 MeV continuous-wave superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) electron linear accelerator (e-linac). The 1.3 GHz SRF cavities are operated at 2 K. HELIAL LL helium liquefier by Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (ALAT) with a tuneable liquid helium (LHe) production was installed and commissioned in Q4’2013 [1]. It provides 4 K liquid helium to one injector and one accelerator cryomodules that were installed and tested in 2014. The 4 K to 2 K liquid helium transition is achieved on-board of each cryomodule. The cryoplant, LHe and LN2 distributions, sub-atmospheric (S/A) system and cryomodules were successfully commissioned and integrated into the e-linac cryogenic system. Required pressure regulation for both 4 K cryoplant in the Dewar and 2 K with the S/A system was achieved under simulated load. Final integration tests confirmed overall stable performance of the cryogenic system with two cryomodules installed. The paper presents details of the cryogenic system commissioning tests as well as highlights of the initial operational experience.

  7. Integration and Commissioning of the ARIEL e-linac Cryogenic System at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koveshnikov, Alexey; Bylinskii, Iouri; Hodgson, Geoff; Koscielniak, Shane; Nagimov, Ruslan; Yosifov, Dimo

    The Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL) is a major expansion of the Isotope Separation and Acceleration (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF. The key part of the ARIEL project is a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear electron accelerator (e-linac). The e-linac helium cryogenic system was designed to meet the ARIEL specifications. The HELIAL LL helium liquefier byAir Liquide Advanced Technologiessupplies 4 K liquid helium (LHe) to cryomodules via aLHe distribution system. The cryomodules have a top-loaded-coldmass design. The 4 K-2 K temperature conversion is achieved by a counter flow heat exchanger and a JT-valve installed onboard each cryomodule[1]. The temperature in the 2 K volume of the cryomodules is controlled by pressure control in the sub-atmospheric line. Sub-atmospheric helium is warmed up in a custom-designed heat exchanger and after passing sub-atmospheric pumps goes to the helium compressor suction line. The LN2 system supplies liquid nitrogen to the liquefier, 80 K shielding of the cryomodules and LHe distribution system, as well as to the freeze-out helium purifier. The installation of the e-linac cryogenic system components started in February 2013 while the corresponding subsystems tests started in November 2013. This paper describes the e-linac cryogenic system components integration and presents the results of the acceptance tests and commissioning activities performed at TRIUMF since November 2013.

  8. Commissioning of the helium cryogenic system for the HIE- ISOLDE accelerator upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delruelle, N.; Inglese, V.; Leclercq, Y.; Pirotte, O.; Williams, L.

    2015-12-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities at CERN. The most significant improvement will come from replacing the existing REX accelerating structure by a superconducting linear accelerator (SC linac) composed ultimately of six cryo-modules installed in series, each containing superconducting RF cavities and solenoids operated at 4.5 K. In order to provide the cooling capacity at all temperature levels between 300 K and 4.5 K for the six cryo-modules, an existing helium refrigerator, manufactured in 1986 and previously used to cool the ALEPH magnet during LEP operation from 1989 to 2000, has been refurbished, reinstalled and recommissioned in a dedicated building located next to the HIE-ISOLDE experimental hall. This helium refrigerator has been connected to a new cryogenic distribution line, consisting of a 30-meter long vacuum-insulated transfer line, a 2000-liter storage dewar and six interconnecting valve boxes, one for each cryo-module. This paper describes the whole cryogenic system and presents the commissioning results including the preliminary operation at 4.5 K of the first cryo- module in the experimental hall.

  9. Commissioning of the cryogenics of the LHC long straight sections

    SciTech Connect

    Perin, A.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Claudet, S.; Darve, C.; Ferlin, G.; Millet, F.; Parente, C.; Rabehl, R.; Soubiran, M.; van Weelderen, R.; Wagner, U.; /CERN

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is made of eight circular arcs interspaced with eight Long Straight Sections (LSS). Most powering interfaces to the LHC are located in these sections where the particle beams are focused and shaped for collision, cleaning and acceleration. The LSSs are constituted of several unique cryogenic devices and systems like electrical feed-boxes, standalone superconducting magnets, superconducting links, RF cavities and final focusing superconducting magnets. This paper presents the cryogenic commissioning and the main results obtained during the first operation of the LHC Long Straight Sections.

  10. Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.; Wikstrom, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of cryogenic insulation systems performed are presented. The key aspects of thermal insulation relative to cryogenic system design, testing, manufacturing, and maintenance are discussed. An overview of insulation development from an energy conservation perspective is given. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications provide three levels of thermal conductivity. Actual thermal performance of standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is several times less than laboratory performance and often 10 times worse than ideal performance. The cost-effectiveness of the insulation system depends on thermal performance; flexibility and durability; ease of use in handling, installation, and maintenance; and overall cost including operations, maintenance, and life cycle. Results of comprehensive testing of both conventional and novel materials such as aerogel composites using cryostat boil-off methods are given. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems that operate at a soft vacuum level is the primary focus of this paper.

  11. Spacecraft cryogenic gas storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenic gas storage systems were developed for the liquid storage of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium. Cryogenic storage is attractive because of the high liquid density and low storage pressure of cryogens. This situation results in smaller container sizes, reduced container-strength levels, and lower tankage weights. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used cryogenic gas storage systems as standard spacecraft equipment. In addition to the Gemini and Apollo cryogenic gas storage systems, other systems were developed and tested in the course of advancing the state of the art. All of the cryogenic storage systems used, developed, and tested to date for manned-spacecraft applications are described.

  12. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, Thomas H.; Niemann, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.

    1988-01-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member.

  13. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, T.H.; Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1988-11-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member. 7 figs.

  14. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.; Barrios, Matthew N.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  15. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.; Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F.

    2014-01-29

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  16. Cryogenic Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Goloborod'ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  17. Cryogenic magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwinski, R.E.; Purcell, J.R.; Parker, J.W.; Burnett, S.C.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes a cryogenic superconducting magnet system for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices, the system comprising: an evacuated container, a first tank mounted within the evacuated container and thermally insulated; boiling liquid helium disposed in the first tank and exhausted to the outside of the container; a cryogenic superconducting magnet disposed in the first tank, a metallic heat radiation shield disposed in the evacuated container and substantially surrounding the first tank, the shield being thermally insulated from both the container and the first tank; and a neon refrigeration system external to the shield for cooling the shield, the neon refrigeration system including neon refrigerant. A second tank contains the neon refrigerant in its liquid state, at least one thermal siphon for circulating the neon refrigerant by convection from the second tank to the shield. The boiling of the neon refrigerant at the shield acts to circulate the neon refrigerant in the thermal siphon and cool the shield. A mechanical cryoccooler is remote from the container for condensing the neon refrigerant from the gaseous to the liquid state, and thermally insulated transfer means for transferring the neon refrigerant in its gaseous state from the second tank to the cryocooler. The neon refrigerant is in its liquid state from the cryocooler to the second tank.

  18. Commissioning of the cryogenic safety test facility PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidt, C.; Schön, H.; Stamm, M.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    The sizing of cryogenic safety relief devices requires detailed knowledge on the evolution of the pressure increase in cryostats following hazardous incidents such as the venting of the insulating vacuum with atmospheric air. Based on typical design and operating conditions in liquid helium cryostats, the new test facility PICARD, which stands for Pressure Increase in Cryostats and Analysis of Relief Devices, has been constructed. The vacuum-insulated test stand has a cryogenic liquid volume of 100 liters and a nominal design pressure of 16 bar(g). This allows a broad range of experimental conditions with cryogenic fluids. In case of helium, mass flow rates through safety valves and rupture disks up to about 4kg/s can be measured. Beside flow rate measurements under various conditions (venting diameter, insulation, working fluid, liquid level, set pressure), the test stand will be used for studies on the impact of two-phase flow and for the measurement of flow coefficients of safety devices at low temperature. This paper describes the operating range, layout and instrumentation of the test stand and presents the status of the commissioning phase.

  19. Cryogenic System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Arenius, D.; Chronis, W.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2004-06-23

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a neutron-scattering facility being built at Oak Ridge, TN for the US Department of Energy. The SNS accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in cryostats (cryomodules). The linac cryomodules are cooled to 2.1 K by a 2300 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. As an SNS partner laboratory, Jefferson Lab is responsible for the installed integrated cryogenic system design for the SNS linac accelerator consisting of major subsystem equipment engineered and procured from industry. Jefferson Lab's work included developing the major vendor subsystem equipment procurement specifications, equipment procurement, and the integrated system engineering support of the field installation and commissioning. The major cryogenic system components include liquid nitrogen storage, gaseous helium storage, cryogen distribution transfer line system, 2.1-K cold box consisting of four stages of cold compressors, 4.5-K cold box, warm helium compressors with its associated oil removal, gas management, helium purification, gas impurity monitoring systems, and the supportive utilities of electrical power, cooling water and instrument air. The system overview, project organization, the important aspects, and the capabilities of the cryogenic system are described.

  20. Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Rocket fuel needs to stay cool - super cool, in fact. The ability to store gas propellants like liquid hydrogen and oxygen at cryogenic temperatures (below -243 F) is crucial for space missions in order to reduce their volumes and allow their storage in smaller (and therefore, less costly) tanks. The Agency has used these cryogenic fluids for vehicle propellants, reactants, and life support systems since 1962 with the Centaur upper stage rocket, which was powered with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. During proposed long-duration missions, super-cooled fluids will also be used in space power systems, spaceports, and lunar habitation systems. In the next generation of launch vehicles, gaseous propellants will be cooled to and stored for extended periods at even colder temperatures than currently employed via a process called densification. Densification sub-cools liquids to temperatures even closer to absolute zero (-459 F), increasing the fluid s density and shrinking its volume beyond common cryogenics. Sub-cooling cryogenic liquid hydrogen, for instance, from 20 K (-423 F) to 15 K (-432.4 F) reduces its mass by 10 percent. These densified liquid gases can provide more cost savings from reduced payload volume. In order to benefit from this cost savings, the Agency is working with private industry to prevent evaporation, leakage, and other inadvertent loss of liquids and gases in payloads - requiring new cryogenic systems to prevent 98 percent (or more) of boil-off loss. Boil-off occurs when cryogenic or densified liquids evaporate, and is a concern during launch pad holds. Accurate sensing of propellants aboard space vehicles is also critical for proper engine shutdown and re-ignition after launch, and zero boil-off fuel systems are also in development for the Altair lunar lander.

  1. Operation of large cryogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, C.H.; Ferry, B.; Fowler, W.B.; Makara, J.; Peterson, T.; Theilacker, J.; Walker, R.

    1985-06-01

    This report is based on the past 12 years of experiments on R and D and operation of the 27 kW Fermilab Tevatron Cryogenic System. In general the comments are applicable for all helium plants larger than 1000W (400 l/hr) and non mass-produced nitrogen plants larger than 50 tons per day. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Improved cryogenic refrigeration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Two-position shuttle valve simplifies valving arrangement and crank-shaft configuration in gas-balancing and Stirling-cycle refrigeration systems used to produce temperatures below 173 degrees K. It connects the displacer and regenerator alternately to the supply line or the return line of the compressor, and establishes constant pressure on the drive piston.

  3. Shuttle cryogenic supply system optimization study. Volume 4: Cryogenic cooling in environmental control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of cryogenic fluid cooling in the environmental control system of the space shuttle was conducted. The technique for treating the cryogenic fluid storage and supply tanks and subsystems as integrated systems was developed. It was concluded that a basic incompatibility exists between the heat generated and the cryogen usage rate and cryogens cannot be used to absorb the generated heat. The use of radiators and accumulators to provide additional cooling capability is recommended.

  4. Apollo cryogenic integrated systems program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seto, R. K. M.; Cunningham, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The integrated systems program is capable of simulating both nominal and anomalous operation of the Apollo cryogenics storage system (CSS). Two versions of the program exist; one for the Apollo 14 configuration and the other for J Type Mission configurations. The program consists of two mathematical models which are dynamically coupled. A model of the CSS components and lines determines the oxygen and hydrogen flowrate from each storage tank given the tank pressures and temperatures, and the electrical power subsystem and environmental control subsystem flow demands. Temperatures and pressures throughout the components and lines are also determined. A model of the CSS tankage determines the pressure and temperatures in the tanks given the flowrate from each tank and the thermal environment. The model accounts for tank stretch and includes simplified oxygen tank heater and stratification routines. The program is currently operational on the Univac 1108 computer.

  5. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System was tested with LH2 and LOX in a vacuum chamber to simulate space vacuum and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. Testing was successful and results validated the scaling study model that predicts active cooling reduces upper stage cryogenic propulsion mass for loiter periods greater than 2 weeks.

  6. Modeling and Commissioning of a Cold Compressor String for the Superfluid Cryogenic Plant at Fermilab's Cryo-module Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueresin, C.; Decker, L.; Treite, P.

    In 2011, Linde Cryogenics, a division of Linde Process Plants, Tulsa, Oklahoma, was awarded the contract to deliver a 500 W at 2 K superfluid cryogenic plant to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois, USA. This system includes a cold compressor string with three centrifugal compressors and a vacuum pump skid with five volumetric pumps in parallel used to pump down helium to its saturation pressure corresponding to 2 K. Linde Kryotechnik AG, Pfungen Switzerland engineered and supplied the cold compressor system and commissioned it with its control logic to cover the complete range of system operation. The paper outlines issues regarding compressor design, compressor string modeling, control algorithms, controller performance, and surge protection.

  7. FRIB Cryogenic Distribution System and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Yang, S.; Nellis, T.; Jones, S.; Casagrande, F.

    2015-12-01

    The MSU-FRIB cryogenic distribution system supports the 2 K primary, 4 K primary, and 35 - 55 K shield operation of more than 70 loads in the accelerator and the experimental areas. It is based on JLab and SNS experience with bayonet-type disconnects between the loads and the distribution system for phased commissioning and maintenance. The linac transfer line, which features three separate transfer line segments for additional independence during phased commissioning at 4 K and 2 K, connects the folded arrangement of 49 cryomodules and 4 superconducting dipole magnets and a fourth transfer line supports the separator area cryo loads. The pressure reliefs for the transfer line process lines, located in the refrigeration room outside the tunnel/accelerator area, are piped to be vented outdoors. The transfer line designs integrate supply and return flow paths into a combined vacuum space. The main linac distribution segments are produced in a small number of standard configurations; a prototype of one such configuration has been fabricated at Jefferson Lab and has been installed at MSU to support testing of a prototype FRIB cryomodule.

  8. The cryogenic control system of BEPCII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Ke-Xiang; Zhao, Ji-Jiu; Yue, Ke-Juan; Dai, Ming-Hui; Huang, Yi-Ling; Jiang, Bo

    2008-04-01

    A superconducting cryogenic system has been designed and deployed in the Beijing Electron- Positron Collider Upgrade Project (BEPCII). The system consists of a Siemens PLC (S7-PLC, Programmable Logic Controller) for the compressor control, an Allen Bradley (AB) PLC for the cryogenic equipments, and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) that integrates the PLCs. The system fully automates the superconducting cryogenic control with process control, PID (Proportional-Integral-Differential) control loops, real-time data access and data storage, alarm handler and human machine interface. It is capable of automatic recovery as well. This paper describes the BEPCII cryogenic control system, data communication between S7-PLC and EPICS Input/Output Controllers (IOCs), and the integration of the flow control, the low level interlock, the AB-PLC, and EPICS.

  9. D0 Cryogenic System Operator Training

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1991-11-30

    D0 is a collider detector. It will be operating and doing physics at the same time as CDP, therefore it has been decided to train CDP operators to operate and respond to the D0 cryogenic control system. A cryogenic operator will be required to be in residence at D0, during the cooldown and liquid Argon fill of any of the calorimeters. The cryogenic system at D0 is designed to be unmanned during steady state operation. CDP operations has 2 man cryogenic shifts 24 hours a day. It is intended that CDP operators monitor the D0 cryogenic systems, evaluate and respond to alarms, and notify a D0 cryo expert in the event of an unusual problem. A D0 cryogenic system view node has been installed at CDP to help facilitate these goals. It should be noted that even though the CDP view node is a fully operational node it is intended that it be more of an information node and is therefore password protected. The D0 cryo experts may reassess the use of the CDP node at a later date based on experience and operating needs. This engineering note outlines the format of the training and testing given to the CDP operators to make them qualified D0 operators.

  10. Recent progress of cryogenic system for 40 T hybrid magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Ouyang, Z.; Li, H.; Meng, Q.; Shi, L.; Ai, X.; Fang, M.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    The 40 T hybrid magnet under construction at High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CHMFL) consists of an 11 T superconducting outsert with clear bore of 800 mm and a resistive insert with clear bore of 32 mm. The outsert made of Nb3Sn CICC is cooled with 4.5 K forced flow helium. The main cryogenic system includes a helium refrigerator (360 W at 4.5 K) and a helium distribution system for the cooling of coils, structures, transfer line and current leads. The helium refrigerator was successfully commissioned and put into operation in 2012. The helium distribution system installation will be completed in December 2015. This paper discusses the design of cryogenic system and recent progress in construction.

  11. Conceptual design of the FRIB cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Weisend II, J G; Bull, Brad; Burns, Chris; Fila, Adam; Kelley, Patrick; Laumer, Helmut; Mann, Thomas; McCartney, Allyn; Jones, S; Zeller, A

    2012-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new nuclear science facility funded by the DOE Office of Science and Michigan State University (MSU). FRIB is currently under design and will be located on the MSU campus. The centerpiece of FRIB is a heavy ion linac utilizing superconducting RF cavities and magnets which in turn requires a large cryogenic system. The cryogenic system consists of a commercially produced helium refrigeration plant and an extensive distribution system. Superconducting components will operate at both 4.5 K and 2 K. This paper describes the conceptual design of the system including the expected heat loads and operating modes. The strategy for procuring a custom turnkey helium refrigeration plant from industry, an overview of the distribution system, the interface of the cryogenic system to the conventional facilities and the project schedule are also described.

  12. Status of the ESS cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Weisend II, J. G.; Darve, C.; Gallimore, S.; Hees, W.; Jurns, J.; Köttig, T.; Ladd, P.; Molloy, S.; Parker, T.; Wang, X. L.

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a neutron science facility funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries currently under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. The centerpiece of ESS is a 2.5 GeV proton linac utilizing superconducting RF cavities operating at 2 K. In addition to cooling the SRF cavities, cryogenics is also used at ESS in the liquid hydrogen moderators surrounding the target. ESS also uses both liquid helium and liquid nitrogen in a number of the planned neutron instruments. There is also a significant cryogenic installation associated with the site acceptance testing of the ESS cryomodules. The ESS cryogenic system consists of 3 separate helium refrigeration/liquefaction plants supplying the accelerator, target moderators and instruments. An extensive cryogenic distribution system connects the accelerator cryoplant with the cryomodules. This paper describes the preliminary design of the ESS cryogenic system including the expected heat loads. Challenges associated with the required high reliability and turn-down capability will also be discussed. A unique feature of ESS is its commitment to sustainability and energy recovery. A conceptual design for recovering waste heat from the helium compressors for use in the Lund district heating system will also be described.

  13. Advanced long term cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Norman S.

    1987-01-01

    Long term, cryogenic fluid storage facilities will be required to support future space programs such as the space-based Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), Telescopes, and Laser Systems. An orbital liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen storage system with an initial capacity of approximately 200,000 lb will be required. The storage facility tank design must have the capability of fluid acquisition in microgravity and limit cryogen boiloff due to environmental heating. Cryogenic boiloff management features, minimizing Earth-to-orbit transportation costs, will include advanced thick multilayer insulation/integrated vapor cooled shield concepts, low conductance support structures, and refrigeration/reliquefaction systems. Contracted study efforts are under way to develop storage system designs, technology plans, test article hardware designs, and develop plans for ground/flight testing.

  14. Robust Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Scholtens, B. F.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    New requirements for thermal insulation include robust Multilayer insulation (MU) systems that work for a range of environments from high vacuum to no vacuum. Improved MLI systems must be simple to install and maintain while meeting the life-cycle cost and thermal performance objectives. Performance of actual MLI systems has been previously shown to be much worse than ideal MLI. Spacecraft that must contain cryogens for both lunar service (high vacuum) and ground launch operations (no vacuum) are planned. Future cryogenic spacecraft for the soft vacuum environment of Mars are also envisioned. Industry products using robust MLI can benefit from improved cost-efficiency and system safety. Novel materials have been developed to operate as excellent thermal insulators at vacuum levels that are much less stringent than the absolute high vacuum requirement of current MLI systems. One such robust system, Layered Composite Insulation (LCI), has been developed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The experimental testing and development of LCI is the focus of this paper. LCI thermal performance under cryogenic conditions is shown to be six times better than MLI at soft vacuum and similar to MLI at high vacuum. The experimental apparent thermal conductivity (k-value) and heat flux data for LCI systems are compared with other MLI systems.

  15. Cryogenic systems for the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    1988-01-01

    There are five technologies which may have application for Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), one passive and four active. In order of maturity, they are passive stored cryogen systems, and mechanical, sorption, magnetic, and pulse-tube refrigerators. In addition, deep space radiators will be required to reject the heat of the active systems, and may be useful as auxiliary coolers for the stored cryogen systems. Hybrid combinations of these technologies may well be more efficient than any one alone, and extensive system studies will be required to determine the best trade-offs. Stored cryogen systems were flown on a number of missions. The systems are capable of meeting the temperature requirements of LDR. The size and weight of stored cryogen systems are proportional to heat load and, as a result, are applicable only if the low-temperature heat load can be kept small. Systems using chemisorption and physical adsorption for compressors and pumps have received considerable attention in the past few years. Systems based on adiabatic demagnetization of paramagnetic salts were used for refrigeration for many years. Pulse-tube refrigerators were recently proposed which show relatively high efficiency for temperatures in the 60 to 80 K range. The instrument heat loads and operating temperatures are critical to the selection and design of the cryogenic system. Every effort should be made to minimize heat loads, raise operating temperatures, and to define these precisely. No one technology is now ready for application to LDR. Substantial development efforts are underway in all of the technologies and should be monitored and advocated. Magnetic and pulse-tube refrigerators have high potential.

  16. Low cryogen inventory, forced flow Ne cooling system with room temperature compression stage and heat recuperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shornikov, A.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present design and commissioning results of a forced flow cooling system utilizing neon at 30 K. The cryogen is pumped through the system by a room-temperature compression stage. To decouple the cold zone from the compression stage a recuperating counterflow tube-in-tube heat exchanger is used. Commissioning demonstrated successful condensation of neon and transfer of up to 30 W cooling power to the load at 30 K using only 30 g of the cryogen circulating in the system at pressures below 170 kPa.

  17. ESS Cryogenic System Process Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, P.; Hees, W.; Jurns, J.; Su, X. T.; Wang, X. L.; Weisend, J. G., II

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a neutron-scattering facility funded and supported in collaboration with 17 European countries in Lund, Sweden. Cryogenic cooling at ESS is vital particularly for the linear accelerator, the hydrogen target moderators, a test stand for cryomodules, the neutron instruments and their sample environments. The paper will focus on specific process design criteria, design decisions and their motivations for the helium cryoplants and auxiliary equipment. Key issues for all plants and their process concepts are energy efficiency, reliability, smooth turn-down behaviour and flexibility. The accelerator cryoplant (ACCP) and the target moderator cryoplant (TMCP) in particular need to be prepared for a range of refrigeration capacities due to the intrinsic uncertainties regarding heat load definitions. Furthermore the paper addresses questions regarding process arrangement, 2 K cooling methodology, LN2 precooling, helium storage, helium purification and heat recovery.

  18. Method of measuring heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C.; Zelipsky, Steven A.; Rezmer, Ronald R.; Smelser, Peter

    1981-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring the heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system. A gaseous phase of the cryogen used during normal operation of the system is passed through the system. The gaseous cryogen at the inlet to the system is tempered to duplicate the normal operating temperature of the system inlet. The temperature and mass flow rate of the gaseous cryogen is measured at the outlet of the system, and the heat capacity of the cryogen is determined. The heat influx of the system is then determined from known thermodynamic relationships.

  19. Cryogenic Propellant Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Carlberg, E.; Feller, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Lunar missions under consideration would benefit from incorporation of high specific impulse propellants such as LH2 and LO2, even with their accompanying boil-off losses necessary to maintain a steady tank pressure. This paper addresses a cryogenic propellant boil-off reduction system to minimize or eliminate boil-off. Concepts to do so were considered under the In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Project. Specific to that was an investigation of cryocooler integration concepts for relatively large depot sized propellant tanks. One concept proved promising—it served to efficiently move heat to the cryocooler even over long distances via a compressed helium loop. The analyses and designs for this were incorporated into NASA Glenn Research Center's Cryogenic Analysis Tool. That design approach is explained and shown herein. Analysis shows that, when compared to passive only cryogenic storage, the boil-off reduction system begins to reduce system mass if durations are as low as 40 days for LH2, and 14 days for LO2. In addition, a method of cooling LH2 tanks is presented that precludes development issues associated with LH2 temperature cryocoolers.

  20. Cryogenic hydrogen circulation system of neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Y. N.; Hu, Z. J.; Wu, J. H.; Li, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, P.; Wang, G. P.

    2014-01-29

    Cold neutron sources of reactors and spallation neutron sources are classic high flux neutron sources in operation all over the world. Cryogenic fluids such as supercritical or supercooled hydrogen are commonly selected as a moderator to absorb the nuclear heating from proton beams. By comparing supercritical hydrogen circulation systems and supercooled hydrogen circulation systems, the merits and drawbacks in both systems are summarized. When supercritical hydrogen circulates as the moderator, severe pressure fluctuations caused by temperature changes will occur. The pressure control system used to balance the system pressure, which consists of a heater as an active controller for thermal compensation and an accumulator as a passive volume controller, is preliminarily studied. The results may provide guidelines for design and operation of other cryogenic hydrogen system for neutron sources under construction.

  1. NSLS-II RF Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Dilgen, T.; Gash, B.; Gosman, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Papu, J.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, R.; Sitnikov, A.; Wilhelm, H.; Jia, Y.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. A new helium refrigerator system has been installed and commissioned to support the superconducting RF cavities in the storage ring. Special care was taken to provide very stable helium and LN2 pressures and flow rates to minimize microphonics and thermal effects at the cavities. Details of the system design along with commissioning and early operations data will be presented.

  2. Design Tool for Cryogenic Thermal Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Demko, Jonathan A; Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal isolation of low-temperature systems from ambient environments is a constant issue faced by practitioners of cryogenics. For energy-efficient systems and processes to be realized, thermal insulation must be considered as an integrated system, not merely an add-on element. A design tool to determine the performance of insulation systems for comparative trade-off studies of different available material options was developed. The approach is to apply thermal analysis to standard shapes (plane walls, cylinders, spheres) that are relatively simple to characterize with a one-dimensional analytical or numerical model. The user describes the system hot and cold boundary geometry and the operating environment. Basic outputs such as heat load and temperature profiles are determined. The user can select from a built-in insulation material database or input user defined materials. Existing information has been combined with the new experimental thermal conductivity data produced by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory for cryogenic and vacuum environments, including high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum. Materials in the design tool include multilayer insulation, aerogel blankets, aerogel bulk-fill, foams, powders, composites, and other insulation system constructions. A comparison of the design tool to a specific composite thermal insulation system is given.

  3. Design Tool for Cryogenic Thermal Insulation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demko, J. A.; Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2008-03-01

    Thermal isolation of low-temperature systems from ambient environments is a constant issue faced by practitioners of cryogenics. For energy-efficient systems and processes to be realized, thermal insulation must be considered as an integrated system, not merely an add-on element. A design tool to determine the performance of insulation systems for comparative trade-off studies of different available material options was developed. The approach is to apply thermal analysis to standard shapes (plane walls, cylinders, spheres) that are relatively simple to characterize with a one-dimensional analytical or numerical model. The user describes the system hot and cold boundary geometry and the operating environment. Basic outputs such as heat load and temperature profiles are determined. The user can select from a built-in insulation material database or input user defined materials. Existing information has been combined with the new experimental thermal conductivity data produced by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory for cryogenic and vacuum environments, including high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum. Materials in the design tool include multilayer insulation, aerogel blankets, aerogel bulk-fill, foams, powders, composites, and other insulation system constructions. A comparison of the design tool to a specific composite thermal insulation system is given.

  4. Safety Aspects of Big Cryogenic Systems Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Fydrych, J.; Poliński, J.

    2010-04-01

    Superconductivity and helium cryogenics are key technologies in the construction of large scientific instruments, like accelerators, fusion reactors or free electron lasers. Such cryogenic systems may contain more than hundred tons of helium, mostly in cold and high-density phases. In spite of the high reliability of the systems, accidental loss of the insulation vacuum, pipe rupture or rapid energy dissipation in the cold helium can not be overlooked. To avoid the danger of over-design pressure rise in the cryostats, they need to be equipped with a helium relief system. Such a system is comprised of safety valves, bursting disks and optionally cold or warm quench lines, collectors and storage tanks. Proper design of the helium safety relief system requires a good understanding of worst case scenarios. Such scenarios will be discussed, taking into account different possible failures of the cryogenic system. In any case it is necessary to estimate heat transfer through degraded vacuum superinsulation and mass flow through the valves and safety disks. Even if the design of the helium relief system does not foresee direct helium venting into the environment, an occasional emergency helium spill may happen. Helium propagation in the atmosphere and the origins of oxygen-deficiency hazards will be discussed.

  5. Development of dual solid cryogens for high reliability refrigeration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caren, R. P.; Coston, R. M.

    1967-01-01

    High reliability solid cryogen refrigeration system consists of a container initially filled with a solid cryogen which is coupled thermally to an infrared detector by means of a link of high thermal conductivity extending from a heat exchanger within the cryogen container.

  6. Status of the cryogenic payload system for the KAGRA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Chen, D.; Hagiwara, A.; Kajita, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Suzuki, T.; Sakakibara, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Tomaru, T.

    2016-05-01

    KAGRA is a large scale cryogenic gravitational wave telescope currently under construction in Japan. The detector is located 200 m underground in the Kamioka mine and will employ cryogenic technologies to achieve high sensitivity. The mirrors of the interferometer will be in the form of multiple pendulums and the final stages will employ cryogenic sapphire suspension system operating at 20 Kelvin. In this paper we report the ongoing activities of the cryogenic payload group involved in the design and fabrication of the cryogenic payload system for the KAGRA detector

  7. A Rapid Turnaround Cryogenic Detector Characterization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic j.; Dipirro, Michael J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Jackson, Clifton E.; Jackson, Michael L.; Kogut, Al; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shirron, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Upcoming major NASA missions such as the Einstein Inflation Probe and the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory require arrays of detectors with thousands of elements, operating at temperatures near l00 mK and sensitive to wavelengths from approx. 100 microns to approx. 3 mm. Such detectors represent a substantial enabling technology for these missions, and must be demonstrated soon in order for them to proceed. In order to make rapid progress on detector development, the cryogenic testing cycle must be made convenient and quick. We have developed a cryogenic detector characterization system capable of testing superconducting detector arrays in formats up to 8 x 32, read out by SQUID multiplexers. The system relies on the cooling of a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator immersed in a liquid helium bath. This approach permits a detector to be cooled from 300K to 50 mK in about 4 hours, so that a test cycle begun in the morning will be over by the end of the day. Tine system is modular, with two identical immersible units, so that while one unit is cooling, the second can be reconfigured for the next battery of tests. We describe the design, construction, and performance of this cryogenic detector testing facility.

  8. Design concepts for the ASTROMAG cryogenic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Castles, S.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a proposed cryogenic system used to cool the superconducting magnet for the Space Station based ASTROMAG Particle Astrophysics Facility. This 2-meter diameter superconducting magnet will be cooled using stored helium II. The paper presents a liquid helium storage concept which would permit cryogenic lifetimes of up to 3 years between refills. It is proposed that the superconducting coil be cooled using superfluid helium pumped by the thermomechanical effect. It is also proposed that the storage tank be resupplied with helium in orbit. A method for charging and discharging the magnet with minimum helium loss using split gas-cooled leads is discussed. A proposal to use a Stirling cycle cryocooler to extend the storage life of the cryostat will also be presented.

  9. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    SciTech Connect

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; Baisden, P.; Bertolini, L.; Boehm, K; Chernov, A.; Coffee, K.; Coffield, F.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edwards, O.; Fair, J.; Fedorov, M.; Fry, J.; Gibson, C.; Haid, B.; Holunga, D.; Kohut, T.; Lewis, T.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E.; Sater, J.; Skulina, K.; Trummer, D.; Walters, C.

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highly constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.

  10. Design of the NIF Cryogenic Target System

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C; Baltz, J; Malsbury, T; Atkinson, D; Brugmann, V; Coffield, F; Edwards, O; Haid, B; Locke, S; Shiromizu, S; Skulina, K

    2008-06-10

    The United States Department of Energy has embarked on a campaign to conduct credible fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2010. The target assembly specified for this campaign requires the formation of a deuterium/tritium (DT) fuel ice layer in a 2 mm diameter capsule at the center of a 9 mm long by 5 mm diameter cylinder, called a hohlraum. The ice layer must be formed and maintained at temperatures below 20 K. At laser shot time, the target is positioned at the center of the NIF target chamber, aligned to the laser beams and held stable to less than 7 {micro}m rms. We have completed the final design of the Cryogenic Target System and are integrating the devices necessary to create, characterize and position the cryogenic target for ignition experiments. These designs, with supporting analysis and prototype test results, will be presented.

  11. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    DOE PAGES

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; Baisden, P.; Bertolini, L.; Boehm, K; Chernov, A.; Coffee, K.; Coffield, F.; Dylla-Spears, R.; et al

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highlymore » constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.« less

  12. Thermal Performance Testing Of Cryogenic Piping Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Nagy, Z. F.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal performance measurement of piping systems under actual field conditions is important for space launch development and commercial industry. Knowledge of the true insulating effectiveness is needed in system design, development, and research activities. A new 18-meter-long test apparatus for cryogenic pipelines has been developed. Three different pipelines, rigid or flexible, can be tested simultaneously. Critical factors in heat leak measurements include eliminating heat transfer at end connections and obtaining proper liquid saturation condition. Effects due to variations in the external ambient conditions like wind, humidity, and solar radiation must be minimized. The static method of liquid nitrogen evaporation has been demonstrated, but the apparatus can be adapted for dynamic testing with cryogens, chilled water, or other working fluids. This technology is suited for the development of an industry standard test apparatus and method. Examples of the heat transfer data from testing commercially available pipelines are given. Prototype pipelines are currently being tested and evaluated at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  13. CRYOGENIC UPPER STAGE SYSTEM SAFETY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. Kenneth; French, James V.; LaRue, Peter F.; Taylor, James L.; Pollard, Kathy (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Exploration Initiative will require development of many new systems or systems of systems. One specific example is that safe, affordable, and reliable upper stage systems to place cargo and crew in stable low earth orbit are urgently required. In this paper, we examine the failure history of previous upper stages with liquid oxygen (LOX)/liquid hydrogen (LH2) propulsion systems. Launch data from 1964 until midyear 2005 are analyzed and presented. This data analysis covers upper stage systems from the Ariane, Centaur, H-IIA, Saturn, and Atlas in addition to other vehicles. Upper stage propulsion system elements have the highest impact on reliability. This paper discusses failure occurrence in all aspects of the operational phases (Le., initial burn, coast, restarts, and trends in failure rates over time). In an effort to understand the likelihood of future failures in flight, we present timelines of engine system failures relevant to initial flight histories. Some evidence suggests that propulsion system failures as a result of design problems occur shortly after initial development of the propulsion system; whereas failures because of manufacturing or assembly processing errors may occur during any phase of the system builds process, This paper also explores the detectability of historical failures. Observations from this review are used to ascertain the potential for increased upper stage reliability given investments in integrated system health management. Based on a clear understanding of the failure and success history of previous efforts by multiple space hardware development groups, the paper will investigate potential improvements that can be realized through application of system safety principles.

  14. R&D ERL: Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Than, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL cryogenic system will supply cooling to a super-conducting RF (SCRF) gun and the 5-cell super-conducting RF cavity system that need to be held cold at 2K. The engineering of the cavity cryomodules were carried out by AES in collaboration with BNL. The 2K superfluid bath is produced by pumping on the bath using a sub-atmospheric warm compression system. The cryogenic system makes use of mainly existing equipment relocated from other facilities: a 300W 4.5K coldbox, an 45 g/s screw compressor, a 3800 liter liquid helium storage dewar, a 170 m{sup 3} warm gas storage tank, and a 40,000 liter vertical low pressure liquid nitrogen storage dewar. An existing wet expander obtained from another facility has been added to increase the plant capacity. In order to deliver the required 3 to 4 bar helium to the cryomodules while using up stored liquid capacity at low pressure, a new subcooler will be installed to function as the capacity transfer device. A 2K to 4K recovery heat exchanger is also implemented for each cryomodule to recover refrigeration below 4K, thus maximizing 2K cooling capacity with the given sub-atmospheric pump. No 4K-300K refrigeration recovery is implemented at this time of the returning sub-atmospheric cold vapor, hence the 2K load appears as a liquefaction1 load on the cryogenic plant. A separate LN2 cooling loop supplies liquid nitrogen to the superconducting gun's cathode tip.

  15. Cryogenic Insulation System for Soft Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a cryogenic insulation system for operation under soft vacuum is presented in this paper. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications can be divided into three levels of thermal performance, in terms of apparent thermal conductivity [k-value in milliwatt per meter-kelvin (mW/m-K)]. System k-values below 0.1 can be achieved for multilayer insulation operating at a vacuum level below 1 x 10(exp -4) torr. For fiberglass or powder operating below 1 x 10(exp -3) torr, k-values of about 2 are obtained. For foam and other materials at ambient pressure, k-values around 30 are typical. New industry and aerospace applications require a versatile, robust, low-cost thermal insulation with performance in the intermediate range. The target for the new composite insulation system is a k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K (R-30) at a soft vacuum level (from 1 to 10 torr) and boundary temperatures of approximately 77 and 293 kelvin (K). Many combinations of radiation shields, spacers, and composite materials were tested from high vacuum to ambient pressure using cryostat boiloff methods. Significant improvement over conventional systems in the soft vacuum range was demonstrated. The new layered composite insulation system was also shown to provide key benefits for high vacuum applications as well.

  16. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Wright, Mathew C.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  17. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-29

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  18. D0 Cryogenic Auto Dialing Alarm System

    SciTech Connect

    Markely, D.; /Fermilab

    1992-08-03

    The Automatic Dialing system purchased by D0 is intended to help make the D0 cryogenic system operate unattended by cryogenic operating personnel. The auto dialer is completely programmable and is voice synthesized. The auto dialer was purchased with 32 bistable inputs, but is expandable to 64 bistable inputs with the purchase of more electronic cards at an approximate cost of $260 per card (8 bistable inputs). The auto dialer also has the capability for analog inputs, analog outputs, and bistable outputs none of which D0 uses or intends to use. The auto dialer can be called on its operating phone line to describe current alarms with the proper password. The Auto Dialer can dial lab extensions, lab pagers, and any number outside the lab. It cannot dial a long distance pager. The auto dialer monitors alarms and alarm conditions via the T1565 PLC, upon an alarm condition it initiates a phone calling sequence of preprogrammed lists with assigned priorities. When someone is reached, the auto dialer describes the individual alarm it is calling for, by a preprogrammed set of words for that individual alarm, spoken by a female voice. The called person then has a chance to acknowledge the alarm over the telephone, if the alarm is not acknowledged the auto dialer will disconnect and call the next person on the list. The auto dialer will continue to cycle through the list until it is acknowledged, reset, or the alarm condition no longer exists.

  19. Cryogenic Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lusby, Brian S.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Collins, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Branch at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed a parametric analytical tool to address the need to rapidly predict heat leak into propellant distribution lines based on insulation type, installation technique, line supports, penetrations, and instrumentation. The Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool (PFSAT) will also determine the optimum orifice diameter for an optional thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to counteract heat leak into the feed line and ensure temperature constraints at the end of the feed line are met. PFSAT was developed primarily using Fortran 90 code because of its number crunching power and the capability to directly access real fluid property subroutines in the Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Database developed by NIST. A Microsoft Excel front end user interface was implemented to provide convenient portability of PFSAT among a wide variety of potential users and its ability to utilize a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The focus of PFSAT is on-orbit reaction control systems and orbital maneuvering systems, but it may be used to predict heat leak into ground-based transfer lines as well. PFSAT is expected to be used for rapid initial design of cryogenic propellant distribution lines and thermodynamic vent systems. Once validated, PFSAT will support concept trades for a variety of cryogenic fluid transfer systems on spacecraft, including planetary landers, transfer vehicles, and propellant depots, as well as surface-based transfer systems. The details of the development of PFSAT, its user interface, and the program structure will be presented.

  20. Aerogel Beads as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  1. Progress update on cryogenic system for ARIEL E-linac at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koveshnikov, A.; Bylinskii, I.; Hodgson, G.; Yosifov, D.

    2014-01-01

    TRIUMF is involved in a major upgrade. The Advanced Rare IsotopeE Laboratory (ARIEL) has become a fully funded project in July 2010. A 10 mA 50 MeV SRF electron linac (e-linac) operating CW at 1.3 GHz is the key component of this initiative. This machine will serve as a second independent photo-fission driver for Rare Isotope Beams (RIB) production at TRIUMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. The cryogens delivery system requirements are driven by the electron accelerator cryomodule design [1, 2]. Since commencement of the project in 2010 the cryogenic system of e-linac has moved from the conceptual design phase into engineering design and procurement stage. The present document summarizes the progress in cryogenic system development and construction. Current status of e-linac cryogenic system including details of LN2 storage and delivery systems, and helium subatmospheric (SA) system is presented. The first phase of e-linac consisting of two cryomodules, cryogens storage, delivery, and distribution systems, and a 600 W class liquid helium cryoplant is scheduled for installation and commissioning by year 2014.

  2. Progress update on cryogenic system for ARIEL E-linac at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Koveshnikov, A.; Bylinskii, I.; Hodgson, G.; Yosifov, D.

    2014-01-29

    TRIUMF is involved in a major upgrade. The Advanced Rare IsotopeE Laboratory (ARIEL) has become a fully funded project in July 2010. A 10 mA 50 MeV SRF electron linac (e-linac) operating CW at 1.3 GHz is the key component of this initiative. This machine will serve as a second independent photo-fission driver for Rare Isotope Beams (RIB) production at TRIUMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. The cryogens delivery system requirements are driven by the electron accelerator cryomodule design [1, 2]. Since commencement of the project in 2010 the cryogenic system of e-linac has moved from the conceptual design phase into engineering design and procurement stage. The present document summarizes the progress in cryogenic system development and construction. Current status of e-linac cryogenic system including details of LN{sub 2} storage and delivery systems, and helium subatmospheric (SA) system is presented. The first phase of e-linac consisting of two cryomodules, cryogens storage, delivery, and distribution systems, and a 600 W class liquid helium cryoplant is scheduled for installation and commissioning by year 2014.

  3. Cryogenic system options for a superconducting aircraft propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, F.; Palmer, J.; Bertola, L.; Miller, Paul; Dodds, Graham

    2015-12-01

    There is a perceived need in the future for a move away from traditional aircraft designs in order to meet ambitious emissions and fuel burn targets. High temperature superconducting distributed propulsion may be an enabler for aircraft designs that have better propulsive efficiency and lower drag. There has been significant work considering the electrical systems required, but less on the cryogenics to enable it. This paper discusses some of the major choices to be faced in cryocooling for aircraft. The likely need for a disposable cryogen to reduce power demand is explained. A set of cryocooling methods are considered in a sensitivity study, which shows that the feasibility of the cryogenic system will depend strongly on the superconducting technology and the aircraft platform. It is argued that all three aspects must be researched and designed in close collaboration to reach a viable solution.

  4. Fluid management system for a zero gravity cryogenic storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The fluid management system comprises a mixing/recirculation system including an external recirculation pump for receiving fluid from a zero gravity storage system and returning an output flow of the fluid to the storage system. An internal axial spray injection system is provided for receiving a portion of the output flow from the recirculation pump. The spray injection system thermally de-stratifies liquid and gaseous cryogenic fluid stored in the storage system.

  5. Thermal Performance Testing of Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.; Scholtens, Brekke E.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient methods for characterizing thermal performance of materials under cryogenic and vacuum conditions have been developed. These methods provide thermal conductivity data on materials under actual-use conditions and are complementary to established methods. The actual-use environment of full temperature difference in combination with vacuum-pressure is essential for understanding insulation system performance. Test articles include solids, foams, powders, layered blankets, composite panels, and other materials. Test methodology and apparatus design for several insulation test cryostats are discussed. The measurement principle is liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimetry. Heat flux capability ranges from approximately 0.5 to 500 watts per square meter; corresponding apparent thermal conductivity values range from below 0.01 up to about 60 mW/m- K. Example data for different insulation materials are also presented. Upon further standardization work, these patented insulation test cryostats can be available to industry for a wide range of practical applications.

  6. Sizing an emergency venting system for a cryogenic dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. K.; Naes, L. G.; Manikowski, A. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    If the vacuum vessel that insulates a cryogenic dewar for a spaceborne experiment prior to launch is damaged, air will leak into the vacuum insulation space. As the sudden heat load causes the pressure to rise in the dewar, a safety disk in the emergency vent line will burst at the design pressure differential to allow vaporized cryogenic fluid to escape. The emergency vent line should be sized such that sufficient gaseous cryogen will be vented to keep the pressure inside the dewar below the design limit. On the other hand, the line should not be so large as to impose an unnecessary heat load on the dewar filled with cryogenic fluid. A vent-line computer program was generated to compute the maximum flow rate allowed for a proposed vent-line system. Parametric studies have been carried out for different burst disk pressure differentials, liquid cryogen ullage, and vent-line sizes.

  7. Cryogenic system operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of cryogenic system operating experiences, from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space research, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of cryogenic component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with cryogenic systems are discussed, including ozone formation, effects of spills, and modeling spill behavior. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design.

  8. Electric orbit transfer vehicle cryogenic propellant system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, J. R.; Huynh, C. T.; Williams, G. E.

    An electric orbit transfer vehicle (EOTV) is intended to transfer payloads from low Earth orbit (LEO) to higher orbits using low-thrust solar-electric propulsion and hydrogen propellant. Because of its high specific impulse and synergistic sharing of power supply, attitude control and communication systems with the payload, the highly efficient EOTV transfer stage permits use of a smaller, less costly launch vehicle than if orbit transfer were accomplished using chemical propulsion. Study of the propellant storage and supply system for an EOTV intended to fly a 168 day spiral trajectory from LEO to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) reveals that the low propellant flow rate needed by the thrusters can be supplied by the boil-off from the storage tank, eliminating the need for any overboard venting. The tank can be fabricated under the same pressure-stabilized, thin, stainless steel monocoque construction as the current Centaur upper stage, and insulated with Centaur fixed foam and MLI. The tank contains a thermodynamic vent system (TVS) for control of tank pressure in zero and low gravity and for supply of propellant to the thrusters. An external compressor, accumulator and regulator condition the hydrogen boil-off provided by the TVS and provide for start-up and shut-down transients. The resulting system is simple, has a very low structural mass fraction and builds on the Centaur cryogenic upper stage technology, which has been operational for over 25 years.

  9. Modular, Rapid Propellant Loading System/Cryogenic Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Walter, Sr.; Jumper, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenic Test Laboratory (CTL) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has designed, fabricated, and installed a modular, rapid propellant-loading system to simulate rapid loading of a launch-vehicle composite or standard cryogenic tank. The system will also function as a cryogenic testbed for testing and validating cryogenic innovations and ground support equipment (GSE) components. The modular skid-mounted system is capable of flow rates of liquid nitrogen from 1 to 900 gpm (approx equals 3.8 to 3,400 L/min), of pressures from ambient to 225 psig (approx equals 1.5 MPa), and of temperatures to -320 F (approx equals -195 C). The system can be easily validated to flow liquid oxygen at a different location, and could be easily scaled to any particular vehicle interface requirements

  10. Design and testing of the New Muon Lab cryogenic system at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; DeGraff, B.D.; Leibfritz, J.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is constructing a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab building. The facility will be used for testing and validating cryomodule designs as well as support systems. For the initial phase of the project, a single Type III plus 1.3 GHz cryomodule will be cooled and tested using a single Tevatron style standalone refrigerator. Subsequent phases involve testing as many as two full RF units consisting of up to six 1.3 GHz cryomodules with the addition of a new cryogenic plant. The cryogenic infrastructure consists of the refrigerator system, cryogenic distribution system as well as an ambient temperature pumping system to achieve 2 K operations with supporting purification systems. A discussion of the available capacity for the various phases versus the proposed heat loads is included as well as commissioning results and testing schedule. This paper describes the plans, status and challenges of this initial phase of the New Muon Lab cryogenic system.

  11. Miniature Cryogenic Valves for a Titan Lake Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Zimmerman, Wayne; Takano, Nobuyuki; Avellar, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini mission has revealed Titan to be one of the most Earthlike worlds in the Solar System complete with many of the same surface features including lakes, river channels, basins, and dunes. But unlike Earth, the materials and fluids on Titan are composed of cryogenic organic compounds with lakes of liquid methane and ethane. One of the potential mission concepts to explore Titan is to land a floating platform on one of the Titan Lakes and determine the local lake chemistry. In order to accomplish this within the expected mass volume and power budgets there is a need to pursue the development for a low power lightweight cryogenic valves which can be used along with vacuum lines to sample lake liquid and to distribute to various instruments aboard the Lander. To meet this need we have initiated the development of low power cryogenic valves and actuators based on a single crystal piezoelectric flextensional stacks produced by TRS Ceramics Inc. Since the origin of such high electromechanical properties of Relaxor-PT single crystals is due to the polarization rotation effect, (i.e., intrinsic contributions), the strain per volt decrease at cryogenic temperatures is much lower than in standard Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramics. This makes them promising candidates for cryogenic actuators with regards to the stroke for a given voltage. This paper will present our Titan Lake Sampling and Sample Handling system design and the development of small cryogenic piezoelectric valves developed to meet the system specifications.

  12. Miniature cryogenic valves for a Titan Lake sampling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Zimmerman, Wayne; Takano, Nobuyuki; Avellar, Louisa

    2014-04-01

    The Cassini mission has revealed Titan to be one of the most Earthlike worlds in the Solar System complete with many of the same surface features including lakes, river channels, basins, and dunes. But unlike Earth, the materials and fluids on Titan are composed of cryogenic organic compounds with lakes of liquid methane and ethane. One of the potential mission concepts to explore Titan is to land a floating platform on one of the Titan Lakes and determine the local lake chemistry. In order to accomplish this within the expected mass volume and power budgets there is a need to pursue the development for a low power lightweight cryogenic valves which can be used along with vacuum lines to sample lake liquid and to distribute to various instruments aboard the Lander. To meet this need we have initiated the development of low power cryogenic valves and actuators based on a single crystal piezoelectric flextensional stacks produced by TRS ceramics Inc. Since the origin of such high electromechanical properties of Relaxor-PT single crystals is due to the polarization rotation effect, (i.e., intrinsic contributions), the strain per volt decrease at cryogenic temperatures is much lower than in standard Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramics. This makes them promising candidates for cryogenic actuators with regards to the stroke for a given voltage. This paper will present our Titan Lake Sampling and Sample Handling system design and the development of small cryogenic piezoelectric valves developed to meet the system specifications.

  13. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to the high specific impulse that can be achieved using engines suitable for moving 10's to 100's of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several days. The losses can be greatly reduced by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and by the integration of self-supporting multi-layer insulation. The active thermal control technology under development is the integration of the reverse turbo- Brayton cycle cryocooler to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling network of tubes coupled to a shield in the tank insulation and to the tank wall itself. Also, the self-supporting insulation technology was utilized under the shield to obtain needed tank applied LH2 performance. These elements were recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a series of three tests, two that reduced LH2 boil-off and one to eliminate LO2 boil-off. This test series was conducted in a vacuum chamber that replicated the vacuum of space and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. The test results show that LH2 boil-off was reduced 60% by the cryocooler system operating at 90K and that robust LO2 zero boil-off storage, including full tank pressure control was achieved.

  14. Cryogenic fluid management (base R/T): Cryogenic fluid systems, Cryogenic Orbital Nitrogen Experiment (CONE), Cryogenic Orbital Hydrogen Experiment (COHE). (Transportation focused technology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, Pat

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. The concluded remarks are: (1) advanced cryogenic fluid systems technology is enhancing or enabling to all known transportation scenarios for space exploration; (2) an integrated/coordinated program involving LeRC/MSFC has been formulated to address all known CFM needs - new needs should they develop, can be accommodated within available skills/facilities; (3) all required/experienced personnel and facilities are finally in place - data from initial ground-based experiments is being collected and analyzed - small scale STS experiments are nearing flight - program is beginning to yield significant results; (4) future proposed funding to primarily come from two sources; and (5) cryogenic fluid experimentation is essential to provide required technology and assure implementation in future NASA missions.

  15. SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-09

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

  16. Cryogenically Cooled Field Effect Transistors for Low-Noise Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent tends in the design, fabrication and use of High-Electron-Mobility-Transistors (HEMT) in low noise amplifiers are reviewed. Systems employing these devices have achieved the lowest system noise for wavelengths greater than three millimeters with relatively modest cryogenic cooling requirements in a variety of ground and space based applications. System requirements which arise in employing such devices in imaging applications are contrasted with other leading coherent detector candidates at microwave wavelengths. Fundamental and practical limitations which arise in the context of microwave application of field effect devices at cryogenic temperatures will be discussed from a component and systems point of view.

  17. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  18. Cryogenic compressive properties of basic epoxy resin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.W.; Hoffman, J.A.; Muniz, D.P.

    1985-09-01

    The compressive properties of short cylindrical samples of many different epoxy resin systems have been measured at ambient temperature and at 77/sup 0/K. These are pure resin systems of known chemistry, without the inorganic fillers or fibrous reinforcements needed in final cryogenic systems. Of course, chemically incorporated modifiers such as flexibilizing resins have been included. This data should make possible inferences about cryogenic properties from molecular structures and provide specific data useful to formulators and end users. Measurements on some other plastics such as PTFE, Polyimides, and UHMWPE have been made for comparison purposes.

  19. Cryogenic ion trapping systems with surface-electrode traps.

    PubMed

    Antohi, P B; Schuster, D; Akselrod, G M; Labaziewicz, J; Ge, Y; Lin, Z; Bakr, W S; Chuang, I L

    2009-01-01

    We present two simple cryogenic rf ion trap systems in which cryogenic temperatures and ultra high vacuum pressures can be reached in as little as 12 h. The ion traps are operated either in a liquid helium bath cryostat or in a low vibration closed cycle cryostat. The fast turn around time and availability of buffer gas cooling made the systems ideal for testing surface-electrode ion traps. The vibration amplitude of the closed cycled cryostat was found to be below 106 nm. We evaluated the systems by loading surface-electrode ion traps with (88)Sr(+) ions using laser ablation, which is compatible with the cryogenic environment. Using Doppler cooling we observed small ion crystals in which optically resolved ions have a trapped lifetime over 2500 min.

  20. Cryogenic Liquid Sample Acquisition System for Remote Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Trainer, Melissa; Wegel, Don; Hawk, Douglas; Melek, Tony; Johnson, Christopher; Amato, Michael; Galloway, John

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to acquire autonomously cryogenic hydrocarbon liquid sample from remote planetary locations such as the lakes of Titan for instruments such as mass spectrometers. There are several problems that had to be solved relative to collecting the right amount of cryogenic liquid sample into a warmer spacecraft, such as not allowing the sample to boil off or fractionate too early; controlling the intermediate and final pressures within carefully designed volumes; designing for various particulates and viscosities; designing to thermal, mass, and power-limited spacecraft interfaces; and reducing risk. Prior art inlets for similar instruments in spaceflight were designed primarily for atmospheric gas sampling and are not useful for this front-end application. These cryogenic liquid sample acquisition system designs for remote space applications allow for remote, autonomous, controlled sample collections of a range of challenging cryogenic sample types. The design can control the size of the sample, prevent fractionation, control pressures at various stages, and allow for various liquid sample levels. It is capable of collecting repeated samples autonomously in difficult lowtemperature conditions often found in planetary missions. It is capable of collecting samples for use by instruments from difficult sample types such as cryogenic hydrocarbon (methane, ethane, and propane) mixtures with solid particulates such as found on Titan. The design with a warm actuated valve is compatible with various spacecraft thermal and structural interfaces. The design uses controlled volumes, heaters, inlet and vent tubes, a cryogenic valve seat, inlet screens, temperature and cryogenic liquid sensors, seals, and vents to accomplish its task.

  1. Means of protecting cryogenic systems from the geyser effect

    SciTech Connect

    Filina, N.N.

    1986-03-01

    New means of protection, which permit a low fluid boil in the pipeline without proceeding into an avalanchelike process, have been developed on the basis of theoretical and experimental investigations of the geyser effect in cryogenic systems with an end thermal influx from a regulating fitting. An equation is presented for computing the time allowed for the low fluid boil. Pressure increase in the overhead reservoir is discussed and a cryogenic reservoir with concentric pipeline equipped with a hood for vapor elimination is illustrated. Vapor removal from a vertical pipeline is examined. A structural method of protecting cryogenic systems from the geyser effect is discussed; the value of this method consists in its high reliability.

  2. Progress report on the infrared astronomical satellite cryogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, A. R.; Mason, P. V.; Brooks, W. F.

    The main cryogen tank is sized to hold 70 kg of superfluid helium with 12 percent ullage at a temperature of 1.8 K. The insulation system surrounds the main cryogen tank with four blankets of multilayer insulation spaced by means of three vapor-cooled shields. It is noted that the multilayer insulation is 6.4 micron double-aluminized Mylar separated by polyester net. The main shell provides the primary structural integrity of the system. In orbit the main shell is cooled to 170 K using insulation blankets on one side and second surface paint on the opposite side. The aperture cover subassembly is the vacuum seal for the main shell during operation on the ground. It is also a gas condensation trap before and during cooldown of the main cryogen tank during launch hold. It contains 6 kg of supercritical helium, which permits 14 days on orbit with a 48-hour launch pad hold.

  3. Pressure transducer and system for cryogenic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A silicon pressure die is bonded to a borosilicate substrate above the pneumatic port. A Wheatstone bridge circuit is formed on the silicon pressure die and has bridge elements of silicon doped with boron to a deposit density level of approximately 1 x 10(exp 19)-10(exp 21) boron/cc. A current source is provided to excite the Wheatstone bridge circuit. In addition, a temperature sensor is provided to provide temperature readings. An array may be formed of the resulting pressure transducers. This unique solution of materials permits operation of a pressure transducer in cryogenic environments.

  4. Shuttle cryogenic supply system optimization study. Volume 6: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The optimization of the cryogenic supply system for space shuttles is discussed. The subjects considered are: (1) auxiliary power unit parametric data, (2) propellant acquisition, (3) thermal protection and thermodynamic properties, (4) instrumentation and controls, and (5) initial component redundancy evaluations. Diagrams of the systems are provided. Graphs of the performance capabilities are included.

  5. Cryogenic system for COMET experiment at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Taekyung; Yoshida, Makoto; Yang, Ye; Ogitsu, Toru; Iio, Masami; Makida, Yasuhiro; Okamura, Takahiro; Mihara, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Sugano, Michinaka; Sasaki, Ken-ichi

    2016-07-01

    Superconducting conductors and cryogenic refrigeration are key factors in the accelerator science because they enable the production of magnets needed to control and detect the particles under study. In Japan, a system for COMET (Coherent Muon to Electron Transition), which will produce muon beam lines, is under the construction at J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex). The system consists of three superconducting magnets; the first is a pion-capture solenoid, the second is a muon-transport solenoid, and the third is a detector solenoid. It is necessary to cool down the magnets efficiently using two-phase helium and maintain them securely at 4.5 K. For stable cryogenic refrigeration of the magnets, a suitable cooling method, structures, and the irradiation effect on materials should be investigated. In this paper, we focus on the development of an overall cryogenic system for cooling the capture and transport solenoids. A conduction-cooling method is considered for cooling the capture and transport solenoids because of the advantages such as the reduction of total heat load, fewer components, and simplified structure. To supply cryogenic fluids (4.5 K liquid helium and 58 K gas helium) and currents to the conduction-cooled magnets subjected to high irradiation, cryogenic components (cooling paths in the magnets, transfer tubes, and a current lead box) are developed. Based on the environment of high irradiation, the conditions (temperature and pressure) of helium in cooling paths are estimated, as well as the temperature of the capture magnet. We develop a dynamic model for quench simulation and estimate the maximum pressure in the cooling pipe when the capture magnet quenches. We conclude with a discussion of the next steps and estimated challenges for the cryogenic system.

  6. Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, H.; Hara, K.; Honma, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Kojima, Y.; Nakanishi, K.; Kanekiyo, T.; Morita, S.

    2014-01-29

    Recent accelerator projects at KEK, such as the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) for R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project and the compact Energy Recovery Linac (cERL), employ superconducting RF cavities made of pure niobium, which can generate high gradient acceleration field. Since the operation temperature of these cavities is selected to be 2 K, we have developed two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for stable operation of superconducting RF cavities for each of STF and cERL. These two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems are identical in principle. Since the operation mode of the cavities is different for STF and cERL, i.e. the pulse mode for STF and the continuous wave mode for cERL, the heat loads from the cavities are quite different. The 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems mainly consists of ordinary helium liquefiers/refrigerators, 2 K refrigerator cold boxes, helium gas pumping systems and high-performance transfer lines. The 2 K refrigerators and the high-performance transfer lines are designed by KEK. Some superconducting RF cavity cryomodules have been already connected to the 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for STF and cERL respectively, and cooled down to 2 K successfully.

  7. Standardization in Cryogenic Insulation Systems Testing and Performance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    The close relationship between industrial energy use and cryogenics drives the need for optimized thermal insulation systems. Emerging cryofuels usage is enabled by adequate isolation of the liquid hydrogen or liquefied natural gas from the ambient environment. Thermal performance data for the total insulation system, as rendered, are essential for both engineering designs and cost-benefit decisions involving comparisons among alternatives. These data are obtained through rigorous testing with suitable apparatus and repeatable methods. Properly defined terminology, analysis, and reporting are also vital. Advances in cryogenic insulation test apparatus and methods have led to the recent addition of two new technical standards of ASTM International: C1774 - Standard Guide for Thermal Performance Testing of Cryogenic InsulationSystems and C740 - Standard Guide for Evacuated Reflective Cryogenic Insulation. Among the different techniques described in the new standards is the cylindrical boiloff calorimeter for absolute heat measurement over the full range of vacuum pressure conditions. The details of this apparatus, test method, and data analysis are given. Benchmark thermal performance data, including effective thermal conductivity (ke) and heat flux (q) for the boundary temperatures of 293 K and 77 K, are given for a number of different multilayer insulation (MLI) systems in comparison with data for other commonly-used insulation systems including perlite powder, fiberglass, polyurethane foam, and aerogels.

  8. NPBIE cryogenic vacuum pumping system integrated with fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilevand, A.; Calhoun, L. D., II; Poteat, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic vacuum pumping system to be used for the Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) accelerator subsystem, which will use hydrogen, rather than He, and which will be integrated with the fuel cell reactant supply system. The pumping system for the NPB Integrated Experiment is composed of two hydrogen storage tanks, a transfer manifold, eight cryopumps, two hydrogen compressors, a hydrogen heat exchanger, and a reservoir. Component analysis and system analysis were performed on a model of the cryopumping operation for the 168-hr mission. As a result, the cryopump average demand was reduced by thorough insulation of the cryosystem, a design of an efficient cryopump heat exchanger, and the expansion of hydrogen into the two-phase region. The average hydrogen consumption by the fuel cells was also reduced, using waste heat to warm fuel cell hydrogen.

  9. G2 Autonomous Control for Cryogenic Delivery Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dito, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The Independent System Health Management-Autonomous Control (ISHM-AC) application development for cryogenic delivery systems is intended to create an expert system that will require minimal operator involvement and ultimately allow for complete autonomy when fueling a space vehicle in the time prior to launch. The G2-Autonomous Control project is the development of a model, simulation, and ultimately a working application that will control and monitor the cryogenic fluid delivery to a rocket for testing purposes. To develop this application, the project is using the programming language/environment Gensym G2. The environment is an all-inclusive application that allows development, testing, modeling, and finally operation of the unique application through graphical and programmatic methods. We have learned G2 through training classes and subsequent application development, and are now in the process of building the application that will soon be used to test on cryogenic loading equipment here at the Kennedy Space Center Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL). The G2 ISHM-AC application will bring with it a safer and more efficient propellant loading system for the future launches at Kennedy Space Center and eventually mobile launches from all over the world.

  10. Study and design of a cryogenic propellant acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an acquisition system for supplying subcooled liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen under in-orbit conditions is discussed. The system will be applied to the integrated cryogenic feed requirements for space systems such as a space shuttle cryogenic auxiliary propulsion system (APS) and main propulsion for an advanced spacecraft propulsion module (ASPM). Concepts that use the favorable surface tension characteristics of fine mesh screens are emphasized. The specific objectives of the program are: (1) to evolve conceptual designs for candidate acquisition systems, (2) to formulate the analytical models needed to analyze the systems, and (3) to generate parametric data on overall candidate system performance, characteristics, and operational features in sufficient depth to establish critical design problems and criteria to support a sound system design and evaluation.

  11. Method of measuring heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, R.C.; Zelipsky, S.A.; Rezmer, R.R.; Smelser, P.

    1980-10-29

    A method is provided for measuring the heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system. A gaseous phase of the cryogen used during normal operation of the system is passed through the system. The gaseous cryogen at the inlet to the system is tempered to duplicate the normal operating temperature of the system inlet. The temperature and mass flow rate of the gaseous cryogen is measured at the outlet of the system, and the heat capacity of the cryogen is determined. The heat influx of the system is then determined from known thermodynamic relationships.

  12. Cryogenic systems for the HEB accelerator of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abramovich, S.; Yuecel, A.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics related to the Superconducting Super Collider: Cryogenic system -- general requirements; cryogenic system components; heat load budgets and refrigeration plant capacities; flow and thermal characteristics; process descriptions; cryogenic control instrumentation and value engineering trade-offs.

  13. Nanogel Aerogel as Load Bearing Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koravos, J. J.; Miller, T. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.

    2010-04-01

    Load support structures in cryogenic storage, transport and processing systems are large contributors to the total heat leak of the system. Conventional insulation systems require the use of these support members in order to stabilize the process fluid enclosure and prevent degradation of insulation performance due to compression. Removal of these support structures would substantially improve system efficiency. Nanogel aerogel insulation performance is tested at vacuum pressures ranging from high vacuum to atmospheric pressure and under loads from loosely packed to greater than 10,000 Pa. Insulation performance is determined using boil-off calorimetry with liquid nitrogen as the latent heat recipient. Two properties of the aerogel insulation material suit it to act as a load bearing "structure" in a process vessel: (1) Ability to maintain thermal performance under load; (2) Elasticity when subjected to load. Results of testing provide positive preliminary indication that these properties allow Nanogel aerogel to effectively be used as a load bearing insulation in cryogenic systems.

  14. Cryogenic system for the mirror fusion test facility

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.; Slack, D.S.; Nelson, R.L.

    1980-02-26

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), currently being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, has large superconducting magnets, cryopanels, and supporting cryogenic equipment that will comprise one of the world's largest liquid helium (LHe) systems. The facility will provide mirror magnetic confinement for experimental fusion plasmas that will be approximately the same physical size as if in a conceptual fusion reactor. The cryogenic system typifies the magnitude and makeup of systems that will be used in future magnetic fusion reactors. Here we describe the LHe cryopumping and magnet systems. Principal components include a 3300 W helium refrigerator, 30,000 L LHe storage, a 1.5 MW (2000 hp) refrigerator compressor, 1100 m/sup 2/ of cryopanels, and a 420 MJ superconducting magnet system. Design features, method of operation, thermal protection, and helium recovery operations are discussed.

  15. A pressure control analysis of cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.-S.; Vandresar, N. T.; Hasan, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Self-pressurization of cryogenic storage tanks due to heat leak through the thermal protection system is examined along with the performance of various pressure control technologies for application in microgravity environments. Methods of pressure control such as fluid mixing, passive thermodynamic venting, and active thermodynamic venting are analyzed using the homogeneous thermodynamic model. Simplified equations suggested may be used to characterize the performance of various pressure control systems and to design space experiments.

  16. The integrated cryogenic system for the atmospheric vertical interferometric detector on FY-4 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yinong; Liu, EnGuang; Jiang, Zhenhua; Yang, Baoyu; Mu, Yongbin

    2016-05-01

    The cryogenic system for the atmospheric vertical interferometric detector on FY-4 satellite includes a Stirling cryocooler, a radiant cooler, a cryogenic heat pipe and some flexible thermal links as well. These cryogenic elements were integrated together in order to decrease the background radiation and maximize the sensitivity with high efficiency and high reliability. This paper summarizes the cryogenic integration design, technical challenges, and the results of thermal and performance testing.

  17. The Fermilab CMTF cryogenic distribution remote control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) is able to provide the necessary test bed for measuring the performance of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities in a cryomodule (CM). The CMTF have seven 300 KW screw compressors, two liquid helium refrigerators, and two Cryomodule Test Stands (CMTS). CMTS1 is designed for 1.3 GHz cryomodule operating in a pulsed mode (PM) and CMTS2 is for cryomodule operating in Half-Wave (HW) and Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Based on the design requirement, each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in distant locations. Therefore choosing Siemens Process Control System 7-400, DL205 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET are the ideal choices for CMTF cryogenic distribution real-time remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time remote control systems.

  18. Cryogenic system of China Dark matter Experiment (CDEX-10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Feipeng; Zhu, Zian; Wang, Meifen; Geng, Lisi; Yang, Huan; Wang, Kexiang; Zhao, Ling; Hou, Zhilong; Yue, Qian; Xing, Haoyang

    2016-06-01

    Dark matter is a type of matter hypothesized in astronomy and cosmology to account for a large part of the mass that appears to be missing from the universe. China Dark matter EXperiment (CDEX) is a direct detection system of dark matter. A cryogenic system for CDEX-10 has been designed and constructed. This note describes the cryogenic system of the CDEX-10, theoretical predictions of the heat loads to the cryostat, and measured heat loads at operation. The cryostat is an argon cooled bath type cryostat. Two pulse tube refrigerators are used for argon liquefying. The dark matter detecting needs a very quiet condition, so a special thermal shield is designed to reduce the radiation heat leakage.

  19. The Fermilab CMTF cryogenic distribution remote control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.

    2014-01-29

    The Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) is able to provide the necessary test bed for measuring the performance of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities in a cryomodule (CM). The CMTF have seven 300 KW screw compressors, two liquid helium refrigerators, and two Cryomodule Test Stands (CMTS). CMTS1 is designed for 1.3 GHz cryomodule operating in a pulsed mode (PM) and CMTS2 is for cryomodule operating in Half-Wave (HW) and Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Based on the design requirement, each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in distant locations. Therefore choosing Siemens Process Control System 7-400, DL205 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET are the ideal choices for CMTF cryogenic distribution real-time remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time remote control systems.

  20. Dynamic simulations of the cryogenic system of a tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, R.; Hoa, C.; Michel, F.; Poncet, J. M.; Rousset, B.

    2015-12-01

    Power generation in the next decades could be provided by thermo-nuclear fusion reactors like tokamaks. There inside, the fusion reaction takes place thanks to the generation of plasmas at hundreds of millions of degrees that must be confined magnetically with superconductive coils, cooled down to 4.4K. The plasma works cyclically and the coil system is subjected to pulsed heat load which has to be handled by the refrigerator. By smoothing the variable loads, the refrigerator capacity can be set close to the average power; optimizing investment and operational costs. Within the “Broader Approach agreement” related to ITER project, CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) is in charge of providing the cryogenic system for the Japanese tokamak (JT-60SA), that is currently under construction in Naka. The system has been designed to handle the pulsed heat loads. To prepare the acceptance tests of the cryogenic system foreseen in 2016, both dynamic modelling and experimental tests on a scaled down mock-up are of high interest for assessing pulsed load smoothing control. After explaining HELIOS (HElium Loop for hIgh lOad Smoothing) operating modes, a dynamic model is presented, with results on the pulsed heat load scenarios. All the simulations have been performed with EcosimPro® and the associated cryogenic library CRYOLIB.

  1. Transient Study of a Cryogenic Hydrogen Filling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleier, Howard

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was made of producing a workable model for the transient analysis of a cryogenic hydrogen filling system. A series of programs and subprograms defining the momentum, mass, and energy balances and the physical properties, transport properties, and their interactions were devised.The program was modified for a simple theoretical test fluid. Exhaustive runs and modifications were made and at this point no stability was achieved except in trivial cases.

  2. Commissioning of the Liquid Nitrogen Thermo-Siphon System for NASA-JSC Chamber-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, J.; Montz, M.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Garcia, S.; Garza, J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory's (SESL) Chamber A, located at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas has recently implemented major enhancements of its cryogenic and vacuum systems. The new liquid nitrogen (LN2) thermo-siphon system was successfully commissioned in August of 2012. Chamber A, which has 20 K helium cryo-panels (or shrouds ) which are shielded by 80 K nitrogen shrouds, is capable of simulating a deep space environment necessary to perform ground testing of NASA s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Chamber A s previous system used forced flow LN2 cooling with centrifugal pumps, requiring 200,000 liters of LN2 to cool-down and consuming 180,000 liters per day of LN2 in steady operation. The LN2 system did not have the reliability required to meet the long duration test of the JWST, and the cost estimate provided in the initial approach to NASA-JSC by the sub-contractor for refurbishment of the system to meet the reliability goals was prohibitive. At NASA-JSC's request, the JLab Cryogenics Group provided alternative options in 2007, including a thermo-siphon, or natural flow system. This system, eliminated the need for pumps and used one tenth of the original control valves, relief valves, and burst disks. After the thermo-siphon approach was selected, JLab provided technical assistance in the process design, mechanical design, component specification development and commissioning oversight, while the installation and commissioning operations of the system was overseen by the Jacobs Technology/ESC group at JSC. The preliminary commissioning data indicate lower shroud temperatures, 70,000 liters to cool-down and less than 90,000 liters per day consumed in steady operation. All of the performance capabilities have exceeded the design goals. This paper will outline the comparison between the original system and the predicted results of the selected design option, and the commissioning results of thermo-siphon system.

  3. Commissioning of the liquid nitrogen thermo-siphon system for NASA-JSC Chamber-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, J.; Montz, M.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Garcia, S.; Garza, J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory's (SESL) Chamber A, located at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas has recently implemented major enhancements of its cryogenic and vacuum systems. The new liquid nitrogen (LN) thermo-siphon system was successfully commissioned in August of 2012. Chamber A, which has 20 K helium cryo-panels (or "shrouds") which are shielded by 80 K nitrogen shrouds, is capable of simulating a deep space environment necessary to perform ground testing of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Chamber A's previous system used forced flow LN cooling with centrifugal pumps, requiring 220,000 liters of LN to cool-down and consuming 180,000 liters per day of LN in steady operation. The LN system did not have the reliability required to meet the long duration test of the JWST, and the cost estimate provided in the initial approach to NASA-JSC by the sub-contractor for refurbishment of the system to meet the reliability goals was prohibitive. At NASA-JSC's request, the JLab Cryogenics Group provided alternative options in 2007, including a thermo-siphon, or natural flow system. This system, eliminated the need for pumps and used one tenth of the original control valves, relief valves, and burst disks. After the thermo-siphon approach was selected, JLab provided technical assistance in the process design, mechanical design, component specification development and commissioning oversight, while the installation and commissioning operations of the system was overseen by the Jacobs Technology/ESC group at JSC. The preliminary commissioning data indicate lower shroud temperatures, 68,000 liters to cool-down and less than 91,000 liters per day consumed in steady operation. All of the performance capabilities have exceeded the design goals. This paper will outline the comparison between the original system and the predicted results of the selected design option, and the commissioning results of thermo-siphon system.

  4. Commissioning of the Liquid Nitrogen Thermo-Siphon System for NASA-JSC Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, J.; Montz, M.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Garcia, S.; Garza, J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA s Space Environment Simulation Laboratory s (SESL) Chamber A, located at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas has recently implemented major enhancements of its cryogenic and vacuum systems. The new liquid nitrogen (LN) thermo-siphon system was successfully commissioned in August of 2012. Chamber A, which has 20 K helium cryo-panels (or shrouds ) which are shielded by 80 K nitrogen shrouds, is capable of simulating a deep space environment necessary to perform ground testing of NASA s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Chamber A s previous system used forced flow LN cooling with centrifugal pumps, requiring 220,000 liters of LN to cool-down and consuming 180,000 liters per day of LN in steady operation. The LN system did not have the reliability required to meet the long duration test of the JWST, and the cost estimate provided in the initial approach to NASA-JSC by the subcontractor for refurbishment of the system to meet the reliability goals was prohibitive. At NASA-JSC s request, the JLab Cryogenics Group provided alternative options in 2007, including a thermo-siphon, or natural flow system. This system, eliminated the need for pumps and used one tenth of the original control valves, relief valves, and burst disks. After the thermo-siphon approach was selected, JLab provided technical assistance in the process design, mechanical design, component specification development and commissioning oversight, while the installation and commissioning operations of the system was overseen by the Jacobs Technology/ESC group at JSC. The preliminary commissioning data indicate lower shroud temperatures, 68,000 liters to cool-down and less than 91,000 liters per day consumed in steady operation. All of the performance capabilities have exceeded the design goals. This paper will outline the comparison between the original system and the predicted results of the selected design option, and the commissioning results of thermo-siphon system.

  5. An algorithm for control volume analysis of cryogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Michael B.

    1989-06-01

    This thesis presents an algorithm suitable for numerical analysis of cryogenic refrigeration systems. Preliminary design of a cryogenic system commences with a number of decoupling assumptions with regard to the process variables of heat and work transfer (e.g., work input rate, heat loading rates) and state variables (pinch points, momentum losses). Making preliminary performance estimations minimizes the effect of component interactions which is inconsistent with the intent of analysis. A more useful design and analysis tool is one in which no restrictions are applied to the system - interactions become absolutely coupled and governed by the equilibrium state variables. Such a model would require consideration of hardware specifications and performance data and information with respect to the thermal environment. Model output would consist of the independent thermodynamic state variables from which process variables and performance parameters may be computed. This model will have a framework compatible for numerical solution on a digital computer so that it may be interfaced with graphic symbology for user interaction. This algorithm approaches cryogenic problems in a highly-coupled state-dependent manner. The framework for this algorithm revolves around the revolutionary thermodynamic solution technique for computer Aided Thermodynamics (CAT). Fundamental differences exist between the Control Volume (CV) algorithm and CAT, which will be discussed where appropriate.

  6. Cryogenic Transport of High-Pressure-System Recharge Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K,; Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bohannon, Carl

    2010-01-01

    A method of relatively safe, compact, efficient recharging of a high-pressure room-temperature gas supply has been proposed. In this method, the gas would be liquefied at the source for transport as a cryogenic fluid at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Upon reaching the destination, a simple heating/expansion process would be used to (1) convert the transported cryogenic fluid to the room-temperature, high-pressure gaseous form in which it is intended to be utilized and (2) transfer the resulting gas to the storage tank of the system to be recharged. In conventional practice for recharging high-pressure-gas systems, gases are transported at room temperature in high-pressure tanks. For recharging a given system to a specified pressure, a transport tank must contain the recharge gas at a much higher pressure. At the destination, the transport tank is connected to the system storage tank to be recharged, and the pressures in the transport tank and the system storage tank are allowed to equalize. One major disadvantage of the conventional approach is that the high transport pressure poses a hazard. Another disadvantage is the waste of a significant amount of recharge gas. Because the transport tank is disconnected from the system storage tank when it is at the specified system recharge pressure, the transport tank still contains a significant amount of recharge gas (typically on the order of half of the amount transported) that cannot be used. In the proposed method, the cryogenic fluid would be transported in a suitably thermally insulated tank that would be capable of withstanding the recharge pressure of the destination tank. The tank would be equipped with quick-disconnect fluid-transfer fittings and with a low-power electric heater (which would not be used during transport). In preparation for transport, a relief valve would be attached via one of the quick-disconnect fittings (see figure). During transport, the interior of the tank would be kept at a near

  7. Cryogenic system for the MYRRHA superconducting linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Nicolas R.; Junquera, Tomas; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre; Romão, Luis Medeiros; Vandeplassche, Dirk

    2014-01-29

    SCK⋅CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, is designing MYRRHA, a flexible fast spectrum research reactor (80 MW{sub th}), conceived as an accelerator driven system (ADS), able to operate in sub-critical and critical modes. It contains a continuous-wave (CW) superconducting (SC) proton accelerator of 600 MeV, a spallation target and a multiplying core with MOX fuel, cooled by liquid lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi). From 17 MeV onward, the SC accelerator will consist of 48 β=0.36 spoke-loaded cavities (352 MHz), 34 β=0.47 elliptical cavities (704 MHz) and 60 β=0.65 elliptical cavities (704 MHz). We present an analysis of the thermal loads and of the optimal operating temperature of the cryogenic system. In particular, the low operating frequency of spoke cavities makes their operation in CW mode possible both at 4.2 K or at 2 K. Our analysis outlines the main factors that determine at what temperature the spoke cavities should be operated. We then present different cryogenic fluid distribution schemes, important characteristics (storage, transfer line, etc.) and the main challenges offered by MYRRHA in terms of cryogenics.

  8. Cryogenic system for the MYRRHA superconducting linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Nicolas R.; Junquera, Tomas; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre; Romão, Luis Medeiros; Vandeplassche, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    SCKṡCEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, is designing MYRRHA, a flexible fast spectrum research reactor (80 MWth), conceived as an accelerator driven system (ADS), able to operate in sub-critical and critical modes. It contains a continuous-wave (CW) superconducting (SC) proton accelerator of 600 MeV, a spallation target and a multiplying core with MOX fuel, cooled by liquid lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi). From 17 MeV onward, the SC accelerator will consist of 48 β=0.36 spoke-loaded cavities (352 MHz), 34 β=0.47 elliptical cavities (704 MHz) and 60 β=0.65 elliptical cavities (704 MHz). We present an analysis of the thermal loads and of the optimal operating temperature of the cryogenic system. In particular, the low operating frequency of spoke cavities makes their operation in CW mode possible both at 4.2 K or at 2 K. Our analysis outlines the main factors that determine at what temperature the spoke cavities should be operated. We then present different cryogenic fluid distribution schemes, important characteristics (storage, transfer line, etc.) and the main challenges offered by MYRRHA in terms of cryogenics.

  9. Commissioning the NOAO Data Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, H. H.; Seaman, R.; Smith, R. C.

    2007-10-01

    The NOAO Data Management System (Barg et al. 2007) is comprised of several large subsystems. Its Data Transport System (Huang et al. 2007) annually conveys Tbytes of data between six remote, intercontinental sites. The NOAO Science Archive (NSA) has been safeguarding key NOAO data products for almost five years. NSA release 3.0 will dramatically increase the data holdings as well as update the entire suite of technologies. The NOAO High-Performance Pipeline System (Swaters & Valdes 2007, Valdes & Swaters 2007) addresses the need for scientifically verified, pipeline-processed data products from major NOAO instruments. The NOAO Virtual Observatory Portal (Miller, Gasson & Fuentes 2007) is the observatory's keystone VO project. This integrated, yet highly distributed, system is the result of a large software project known as the NOAO End-to-End System (E2E: Smith et al. 2007). E2E involved the development of numerous interfaces and tools requiring careful and thorough review and testing. Extensive test plans were developed to assure that the science and functional requirements of the entire E2E system were met. Integration tests were run by the developers before the individual subsystems were delivered to the Data Products Program (DPP) Operations Group. Acceptance tests were then run by the Operations staff to ensure the delivered system was ready for commissioning and deployment. Performance tests and scientific verification were done concurrently to assure the resulting data quality of the processed data met their science requirements. Testing of infrastructure and user interfaces was invaluable not only in ensuring that functional requirements were met for the current version, but in developing new requirements for future versions. In short, commissioning is an on-going process, not a milestone.

  10. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE CRYOGENIC CONTROL SYSTEM ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    HOLTROP,K.L; ANDERSON,P.M; MAUZEY,P.S

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The cryogenic facility that is part of the DIII-D tokamak system supplies liquid nitrogen and liquid helium to the superconducting magnets used for electron cyclotron heating, the D{sub 2} pellet injection system, cryopumps in the DIII-D vessel, and cryopanels in the neutral beam injection system. The liquid helium is liquefied on site using a Sulzer liquefier that has a 150 l/h liquefaction rate. Control of the cryogenic facility at DIII-D was initially accomplished through the use of three different programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Recently, two of those three PLCs, a Sattcon PLC controlling the Sulzer liquefier and a Westinghouse PLC, were removed and all their control logic was merged into the remaining PLC, a Siemens T1555. This replacement was originally undertaken because the removed PLCs were obsolete and unsupported. However, there have been additional benefits from the replacement. The replacement of the RS-232 serial links between the graphical user interface and the PLCs with a high speed Ethernet link allows for real-time display and historical trending of nearly all the cryosystem's data. this has greatly increased the ability to troubleshoot problems with the system, and has permitted optimization of the cryogenic system's performance because of the increased system integration. To move the control logic of the Sattcon control loops into the T1555, an extensive modification of the basic PID control was required. These modifications allow for better control of the control loops and are now being incorporated in other control loops in the system.

  11. Design theory and performance of cryogenic molecular adsorption refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, W. H.; Woltman, A. W.; Masson, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Closed-cycle operation of molecular adsorption refrigeration systems (MARS) has been demonstrated by using thermally cycled zeolites to adsorb and desorb various gases under pressures of 20-60 atm. This paper develops three aspects of the design theory: the physical theory of molecular adsorption of small molecules such as A, N2, N2O and NH3, the design relations for closed-cycle flow for three or more compressors, and the coefficient of performance. This work is intended to demonstrate nonmechanical gas compression for various cryogenic gases than can compete with mechanical systems with a different mix of advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Strain Gage Measurement System to Determine Cryogenic Propellant Tank Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; St.Cyr, William W.; VanDyke, David; McVay, Greg; Mitchell, Mark; Langford, Lester

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of tank level, particularly for cryogenic propellants, has proven to be a difficult proposition. Current methods based on differential pressure, capacitance sensors, temperature sensors, etc.; do not provide sufficiently accurate or robust measurements, especially at run time. This paper describes a simple, but effective method to determine propellant volume by measuring very small deformations of the structure supporting the tank. Results of a laboratory study to validate the method, and experimental data from a deployed system are presented. A comparison with an existing differential pressure sensor shows that the strain gage system provides a very good quality signal even during pressurization.

  13. Cryogenic system for BERLinPro

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, W.; Hellwig, A.; Knobloch, J.; Pflückhahn, D.; Rotterdam, S.

    2014-01-29

    In 2010 Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) received funding to design and build the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project BERLinPro. The goal of this compact Energy recovery linac (ERL) is to develop the accelerator physics and technology required to generate and accelerate a 100-mA, 1-mm mrad emittance electron beam. The BERLinPro know-how can then be transferred to various ERL-based applications. All accelerating RF cavities including the electron source are based on superconducting technology operated at 1.8 K. A Linde L700 helium liquefier is supplying 4.5 K helium. The subatmospheric pressure of 16 mbar of the helium bath of the cavities will be achieved by pumping with a set of cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps. While the L700 is already in operating, the 1.8 K system and the helium transfer system are in design phase.

  14. Electronic Components and Systems for Cryogenic Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. L.; Hammoud, A.; Dickman, J. E.; Gerber, S.; Elbuluk, M. E.; Overton, E.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic components and systems capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated in many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about - 183 C. In addition to surviving the deep space harsh environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. An on-going research and development program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of reliable electronic devices and efficient power systems capable of surviving in low temperature environments. An overview of the program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with selected data obtained from in-house component testing will also be discussed. Ongoing research activities that are being performed in collaboration with various organizations will also be presented.

  15. Operational and troubleshooting experiences in the SST-1 cryogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesuria, G.; Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Patel, R.; Sonara, D.; Gupta, N. C.; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Christian, D.; Garg, A.; Bairagi, N.; Patel, K.; Shah, P.; Nimavat, H.; Sharma, R.; Patel, J. C.; Tank, J.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the cooldown and current charging campaign have been carried out towards the demonstration of the first successful plasma discharge in the steady state superconducting Tokomak (SST-1). The SST-1 machine consists of cable-in-conduit wound superconducting toroidal as well as poloidal coils, cooled using 1.3 kW at 4.5 K helium refrigerator -cum- liquefier (HRL) system. The cryo system provides the two-phase helium at 0.13 MPa at 4.5 K as well as forced-flow pressurized helium at 0.4 MPa and in addition to 7 g-s-1 liquefaction capacity required for the current leads and other cold mass at 4.5 K. The entire integrated cold masses having different thermo hydraulic resistances cooled with the SST-1 HRL in optimised process parameters. In order to maintain different levels of temperatures and to facilitate smooth and reliable cooldown, warm-up, normal operations as well as to handle abnormal events such as, quench or utilities failures etc., exergy efficient process are adopted for the helium refrigerator-cum-liquefier (HRL) with an installed equivalent capacity of 1.3 kW at 4.5 K. Using the HRL, the cold mass of about 40 tons is being routinely cooled down from ambient temperature to 4.5 K with an average cooldown rate of 0.75 - 1 K-h-1. Long-term cryogenic stable conditions were obtained within 15 days in the superconducting coils and their connecting feeders. Afterwards, all of the cold mass is warmed-up in a controlled manner to ambient temperature. In this paper, we report the recent operational results of the cryogenic system during the first plasma discharge in SST-1 as well as the troubleshooting experiences of the cryogenic plant related hardware.

  16. Nanodielectric system for cryogenic applications: Barium titanate filled polyvinyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Duckworth, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    In the current study the focus is on dielectric properties (as a function of frequency and temperature) of a polymeric composite system composed of polyvinyl alcohol and barium titanate nano powder. In the investigations, the temperature range is between 50-295 K, and the frequency range is between $20\\ \\hertz-1\\ \\mega\\hertz$. Polarization and conduction processes are investigated in the linear regime. Dielectric breakdown strengths of samples are also reported. The materials presented have potential to be implemented in cryogenic capacitor or field grading applications.

  17. Commissioning of the ALICE data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anticic, T.; Barroso, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Cobanoglu, O.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Kiss, T.; Makhlyueva, I.; Ozok, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soós, C.; Vyvre, P. V.; Vergara, S.

    2008-07-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A flexible, large bandwidth Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time foreseen per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. The Data Acquisition and Test Environment (DATE) is the software framework handling the data from the detector electronics up to the mass storage. This paper reviews the DAQ software and hardware architecture, including the latest features of the final design, such as the handling of the numerous calibration procedures in a common framework. We also discuss the large scale tests conducted on the real hardware to assess the standalone DAQ performances, its interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be ready for cosmics data taking scheduled to start in November 2007. The test protocols followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with DAQ and Trigger hardware synchronized by the Experiment Control System are described. Finally, we give an overview of the experiment logbook, and some operational aspects of the deployment of our computing facilities. The implementation of a Transient Data Storage able to cope with the 1.25 GB/s recorded by the event-building machines and the data quality monitoring framework are covered in separate papers.

  18. Fermilab Muon Campus g-2 Cryogenic Distribution Remote Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Muon Campus (MC) is able to measure Muon g-2 with high precision and comparing its value to the theoretical prediction. The MC has four 300 KW screw compressors and four liquid helium refrigerators. The centerpiece of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is a large, 50-foot-diameter superconducting muon storage ring. This one-of-a-kind ring, made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire, was built for the previous g-2 experiment at Brookhaven. Because each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in the distant location, Siemens Process Control System PCS7-400, Automation Direct DL205 & DL05 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET HMI are the ideal choices as the MC g-2 cryogenic distribution real-time and on-Line remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time and On-Line remote control systems.

  19. Fermilab Muon Campus g-2 Cryogenic Distribution Remote Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.

    2015-11-05

    The Muon Campus (MC) is able to measure Muon g-2 with high precision and comparing its value to the theoretical prediction. The MC has four 300 KW screw compressors and four liquid helium refrigerators. The centerpiece of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is a large, 50-foot-diameter superconducting muon storage ring. This one-of-a-kind ring, made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire, was built for the previous g-2 experiment at Brookhaven. Due to each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in the distant location, therefore, Siemens Process Control System PCS7-400, Automation Direct DL205 & DL05 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET HMI are the ideal choices as the MC g-2 cryogenic distribution real-time and on-Line remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time and On-Line remote control systems.

  20. Layered composite thermal insulation system for nonvacuum cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    A problem common to both space launch applications and cryogenic propulsion test facilities is providing suitable thermal insulation for complex cryogenic piping, tanks, and components that cannot be vacuum-jacketed or otherwise be broad-area-covered. To meet such requirements and provide a practical solution to the problem, a layered composite insulation system has been developed for nonvacuum applications and extreme environmental exposure conditions. Layered composite insulation system for extreme conditions (or LCX) is particularly suited for complex piping or tank systems that are difficult or practically impossible to insulate by conventional means. Consisting of several functional layers, the aerogel blanket-based system can be tailored to specific thermal and mechanical performance requirements. The operational principle of the system is layer-pairs working in combination. Each layer pair is comprised of a primary insulation layer and a compressible radiant barrier layer. Vacuum-jacketed piping systems, whether part of the ground equipment or the flight vehicle, typically include numerous terminations, disconnects, umbilical connections, or branches that must be insulated by nonvacuum means. Broad-area insulation systems, such as spray foam or rigid foam panels, are often the lightweight materials of choice for vehicle tanks, but the plumbing elements, feedthroughs, appurtenances, and structural supports all create "hot spot" areas that are not readily insulated by similar means. Finally, the design layouts of valve control skids used for launch pads and test stands can be nearly impossible to insulate because of their complexity and high density of components and instrumentation. Primary requirements for such nonvacuum thermal insulation systems include the combination of harsh conditions, including full weather exposure, vibration, and structural loads. Further requirements include reliability and the right level of system breathability for thermal

  1. Search for 0 νββ with CUORE: experiment and cryogenic systems overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobizhev, Alexey; Cuore Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    CUORE--the Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events--is a search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te based at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy. The experiment, currently in its final stages of commissioning, is expected to begin data taking in 2016 and eventually be sensitive to a ~1026 y half life after a 5 y live time. The detector consists of an array of 988 5 ×5 ×5 cm3 TeO2 crystals (204 kg isotope mass) operated as bolometers at ~10 mK temperatures with Ge NTD readout. Running a ~1 t, ~1 m3 detector at such temperatures necessitated the design and construction of the world's largest and most powerful dilution refrigerator, capable of reaching temperatures <10 mK and producing ~ 2 mW of cooling power at 100 mK. The cryostat is optimized for noise and vibration isolation, as well as radiopurity. We report the expected and observed performance of the CUORE experiment and, in particular, its cryogenic systems. This work is supported by the INFN, DOE, NSF, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the University of Wisconsin Foundation, and Yale University.

  2. Model approach for simulating the thermodynamic behavior of the MFTF cryogenic cooling systems - a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.B.; Stein, W.; Reitter, T.A.; Hindmarsh, A.C.

    1983-08-31

    A numerical model for calculating the thermodynamic behavior of the MFTF-B cryogenic cooling system is described. Nine component types are discussed with governing equations given. The algorithm for solving the coupled set of algebraic and ordinary differential equations is described. The model and its application to the MFTF-B cryogenic cooling system has not been possible due to lack of funding.

  3. The XRS Low Temperature Cryogenic System: Ground Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan; Sirron, Peter; Boyle, Robert; Canavan, Ed; DiPirro, Michael; Serlemitsos, Aristides; Tuttle, James; Whitehouse, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is part of the Astro-E mission scheduled to launch early in 2000. Its cryogenic system is required to cool a 32-element square array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 60-65 mK over a mission lifetime of at least 2 years. This is accomplished using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) contained within a two-stage superfluid helium/solid neon cooler. Goddard Space Flight Center is providing the ADR and helium dewar. The flight system was assembled in Sept. 1997 and subjected to extensive thermal performance tests. This paper presents test results at both the system and component levels. In addition, results of the low temperature topoff performed in Japan with the engineering unit neon and helium dewars are discussed.

  4. Spiral 2 cryogenic system overview: Design, construction and performance test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschildre, C.; Bernhardt, J.; Flavien, G.; Crispel, S.; Souli, M.; Commeaux, C.

    2014-01-01

    The new particle accelerator project Spiral 2 at GANIL ("Grand Accélérateur d'Ions Lourds, i.e. National Large Heavy Ion Accelerator) in Caen (France) is a very large installation, intended to serve fundamental research in nuclear physics. The heart of the future machine features a superconductor linear accelerator, delivering a beam until 20Mev/A, which are then used to bombard a matter target. The resulting reactions, such as fission, transfer, fusion, etc. will generate billions of exotic nuclei. To achieve acceleration of the beam, 26 cavities which are placed inside cryomodules at helium cryogenic temperature will be used. AL-AT (Air Liquide Advanced Technologies) takes part to the project by supplying cryogenic plant. The plant includes the liquefier associated to its compressor station, a large dewar, a storage tank for helium gas and transfer lines. In addition, a helium recovery system composed of recovery compressor, high pressure storage and external purifier has been supplied. Customized HELIAL LF has been designed, manufactured and tested by AL-AT to match the refrigeration power need for the Spiral 2 project which is around 1300 W equivalent at 4.5 K.

  5. Options for the Cryogenic System for the BESSY-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzschbach, A.; Quack, H.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Knobloch, J.; Anders, W.; Pflueckhahn, D.

    2004-06-01

    The Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung (BESSY GmbH), in January 1999, started operation of BESSY II, a third-generation synchrotron light source delivering world-class, high-brilliance photon beams in the VUV to XUV spectral range. Based on this experience, BESSY has recently proposed the construction of a free-electron laser (FEL), covering a photon-energy range from 20 eV to 1 keV. To reduce the development time and cost, BESSY intends to use proven cavity and cryostat technology developed for the TESLA linear collider. However, the cryogenic load per cavity is approximately 15 to 20 times higher than that anticipated for the (pulsed) TESLA operation. This paper describes possible modifications of the cryostat design to accommodate these additional losses. Superconducting RF cavities are the basis of the FEL accelerator providing the driving electron beam with 2.25 GeV. The accelerator consists of five cold sections separated by warm sections reserved for bunch compression and beam extraction. The total refrigeration load will be covered by a single refrigerator. Several possible layouts of the cryogenic system are described and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  6. Spiral 2 cryogenic system overview: Design, construction and performance test

    SciTech Connect

    Deschildre, C.; Bernhardt, J.; Flavien, G.; Crispel, S.; Souli, M.; Commeaux, C.

    2014-01-29

    The new particle accelerator project Spiral 2 at GANIL (“Grand Accélérateur d’Ions Lourds, i.e. National Large Heavy Ion Accelerator) in Caen (France) is a very large installation, intended to serve fundamental research in nuclear physics. The heart of the future machine features a superconductor linear accelerator, delivering a beam until 20Mev/A, which are then used to bombard a matter target. The resulting reactions, such as fission, transfer, fusion, etc. will generate billions of exotic nuclei. To achieve acceleration of the beam, 26 cavities which are placed inside cryomodules at helium cryogenic temperature will be used. AL-AT (Air Liquide Advanced Technologies) takes part to the project by supplying cryogenic plant. The plant includes the liquefier associated to its compressor station, a large dewar, a storage tank for helium gas and transfer lines. In addition, a helium recovery system composed of recovery compressor, high pressure storage and external purifier has been supplied. Customized HELIAL LF has been designed, manufactured and tested by AL-AT to match the refrigeration power need for the Spiral 2 project which is around 1300 W equivalent at 4.5 K.

  7. Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium of Multicomponent Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Calado, Jorge C. G.; Zollweg, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid-vapor and solid-vapor equilibria at low to moderate pressures and low temperatures are important in many solar system environments, including the surface and clouds of Titan, the clouds of Uranus and Neptune, and the surfaces of Mars and Triton. The familiar cases of ideal behavior are limiting cases of a general thermodynamic representation for the vapor pressure of each component in a homogeneous multicomponent system. The fundamental connections of laboratory measurements to thermodynamic models are through the Gibbs-Duhem relation and the Gibbs-Helmholtz relation. Using laboratory measurements of the total pressure, temperature, and compositions of the liquid and vapor phases at equilibrium, the values of these parameters can be determined. The resulting model for vapor-liquid equilibrium can then conveniently and accurately be used to calculate pressures, compositions, condensation altitudes, and their dependencies on changing climatic conditions. A specific system being investigated is CH4-C2H6-N2, at conditions relevant to Titan's surface and atmosphere. Discussed are: the modeling of existing data on CH4-N2, with applications to the composition of Titan's condensate clouds; some new measurements on the CH4-C2H6 binary, using a high-precision static/volumetric system, and on the C2H6-N2 binary, using the volumetric system and a sensitive cryogenic flow calorimeter; and describe a new cryogenic phase-equilibrium vessel with which we are beginning a detailed, systematic study of the three constituent binaries and the ternary CH4-C2H6-N2 system at temperatures ranging from 80 to 105 K and pressures from 0.1 to 7 bar.

  8. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    DOE PAGES

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features ofmore » the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.« less

  9. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features of the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.

  10. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Cryogenics Test Lab Control System Upgrade Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janice Leshay

    2014-01-01

    This project will outfit the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at KSC's Cryogenics Test Laboratory with a new programmable logic control system. The control system upgrade enables the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenace Element Integration Team and other users of the SPLS to conduct testing in a controls environment similar to that used at the launch pad.

  11. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin H.; Holt, James B.; Hastings, Leon J.

    2001-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space, and would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray-bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray-bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger, and a spray-bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses.

  12. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin H.; Holt, James B.; Hastings, Leon J.

    1999-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy is required. a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point. the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating, boil-off losses.

  13. Analysis of the cryogenic system behavior for pulsed heat load in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L. B.; Zhuang, M.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H.

    2014-01-01

    EAST is the first full superconducting fusion device. The plasma is confined by the magnetic fields generated from a large set of superconducting magnets which are made of cable in-conduit conductor (CICC). In operation, these magnets suffer heat loads from thermal and nuclear radiation from the surrounding components and plasma as well as the eddy currents and the AC losses generated within the magnets, together with the heat conduction through supports and the resistive heat generated at the current lead transiting to room temperature. The cryogenic system of our EAST consists of a 2kW/4K helium refrigerator and a distribution system for the cooling of poloidal field (PF) and toroidal field (TF) coils, structures, thermal shields, buslines and current leads. Pulsed heat load is the main difference between the cryogenic system of a full superconducting Tokamak system and other large scale cryogenic systems. The cryogenic system operates in a pulsed heat loads mode requiring the helium refrigerator to remove periodically large heat loads in time. At the same time, the cryogenic system parameters such as helium cooling superconducting magnets, helium refrigerator and helium distribution system are changing. In this paper, the variation range of the parameters of superconducting magnets and refrigerator has been analyzed in the typical plasma discharge mode. The control scheme for the pulsed loads characteristics of the cryogenic system has been proposed, the implementation of which helps to smooth the pulse loads and to improve the stability of the operation of the cryogenic system.

  14. Analysis of the cryogenic system behavior for pulsed heat load in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, L. B.; Zhuang, M.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H.

    2014-01-29

    EAST is the first full superconducting fusion device. The plasma is confined by the magnetic fields generated from a large set of superconducting magnets which are made of cable in-conduit conductor (CICC). In operation, these magnets suffer heat loads from thermal and nuclear radiation from the surrounding components and plasma as well as the eddy currents and the AC losses generated within the magnets, together with the heat conduction through supports and the resistive heat generated at the current lead transiting to room temperature. The cryogenic system of our EAST consists of a 2kW/4K helium refrigerator and a distribution system for the cooling of poloidal field (PF) and toroidal field (TF) coils, structures, thermal shields, buslines and current leads. Pulsed heat load is the main difference between the cryogenic system of a full superconducting Tokamak system and other large scale cryogenic systems. The cryogenic system operates in a pulsed heat loads mode requiring the helium refrigerator to remove periodically large heat loads in time. At the same time, the cryogenic system parameters such as helium cooling superconducting magnets, helium refrigerator and helium distribution system are changing. In this paper, the variation range of the parameters of superconducting magnets and refrigerator has been analyzed in the typical plasma discharge mode. The control scheme for the pulsed loads characteristics of the cryogenic system has been proposed, the implementation of which helps to smooth the pulse loads and to improve the stability of the operation of the cryogenic system.

  15. General purpose multiplexing device for cryogenic microwave systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Benjamin J.; Moores, Bradley A.; Rosenthal, Eric I.; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Lehnert, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and experimentally characterize a general purpose device for signal processing in circuit quantum electrodynamics systems. The device is a broadband two-port microwave circuit element with three modes of operation: it can transmit, reflect, or invert incident signals between 4 and 8 GHz. This property makes it a versatile tool for lossless signal processing at cryogenic temperatures. In particular, rapid switching (≤ 15 ns ) between these operation modes enables several multiplexing readout protocols for superconducting qubits. We report the device's performance in a two-channel code domain multiplexing demonstration. The multiplexed data are recovered with fast readout times (up to 400 ns ) and infidelities ≤ 10-2 for probe powers ≥ 7 fW , in agreement with the expectation for binary signaling with Gaussian noise.

  16. Compact cryogenic system with mechanical cryocoolers for antihydrogen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, M; Mohri, A; Kanai, Y; Enomoto, Y; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a compact cryogenic system which cools a vacuum chamber housing multi-ring trap electrodes (MRTs) of an antihydrogen synthesis trap using mechanical cryocoolers to achieve background pressure less than 10(-12) Torr. The vacuum chamber and the cryocoolers are thermally connected by copper strips of 99.9999% in purity. All components are installed within a diametric gap between the MRT of phi108 mm and a magnet bore of phi160 mm. An adjusting mechanism is prepared to align the MRT axis to the magnet axis. The vacuum chamber was successfully cooled down to 4.0 K after 14 h of cooling with heat load of 0.8 W.

  17. An overview of Ball Aerospace cryogen storage and delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, J.; Keller, J.; Mills, G.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    Starting on the Gemini program in the 1960s, Beech Aircraft (now Ball Aerospace) has been designing and manufacturing dewars for a variety of cryogens including liquid hydrogen and oxygen. These dewars flew on the Apollo, Skylab and Space Shuttle spacecraft providing fuel cell reactants resulting in over 150 manned spaceflights. Since Space Shuttle, Ball has also built the liquid hydrogen fuel tanks for the Boeing Phantom Eye unmanned aerial vehicle. Returning back to its fuel cell days, Ball has designed, built and tested a volume-constrained liquid hydrogen and oxygen tank system for reactant delivery to fuel cells on unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs). Herein past history of Ball technology is described. Testing has been completed on the UUV specific design, which will be described.

  18. Electronically scanned multichannel pressure transducer system for cryogenic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Research into the application of custom doped piezoresistive silicon pressure sensors has led to a multichannel pressure sensor design that will operate accurately and reliably at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal effects upon multichannel pressure sensors are mapped by thermal calibrations and are represented by sets of nth order coefficients specific to each sensor. The thermal offset and sensitivity variations are corrected by computer algorithms which scan the sensors, recall correction coefficients from thermally induced sensor variations, and apply these to correct the sensor's output measurement uncertainty to within 0.5 percent of full scale output for combined offset and sensitivity. A prototype sensor system has been fabricated, and performance test data are presented.

  19. CHARMS: The Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The success of numerous upcoming NASA infrared (IR) missions will rely critically on accurate knowledge of the IR refractive indices of their constituent optical components at design operating temperatures. To satisfy the demand for such data, we have built a Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS), which, for typical 1R materials. can measure the index of refraction accurate to (+ or -) 5 x 10sup -3 . This versatile, one-of-a-kind facility can also measure refractive index over a wide range of wavelengths, from 0.105 um in the far-ultraviolet to 6 um in the IR, and over a wide range of temperatures, from 10 K to 100 degrees C, all with comparable accuracies. We first summarize the technical challenges we faced and engineering solutions we developed during the construction of CHARMS. Next we present our "first light," index of refraction data for fused silica and compare our data to previously published results.

  20. Design of Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer Cryogenic System for Mars Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Lemoine, F. G.; Paik, H. J.; Zagarola, M.; Shirron, P. J.; Griggs, C. E.; Moody, M. V.; Han, S.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of a planet's gravity field provides fundamental information about the planet's mass properties. The static gravity field reveals information about the internal structure of the planet, including crustal density variations that provide information on the planet's geological history and evolution. The time variations of gravity result from the movement of mass inside the planet, on the surface, and in the atmosphere. NASA is interested in a Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer (SGG) with which to measure the gravity field of a planet from orbit. An SGG instrument is under development with the NASA PICASSO program, which will be able to resolve the Mars static gravity field to degree 200 in spherical harmonics, and the time-varying field on a monthly basis to degree 20 from a 255 x 320 km orbit. The SGG has a precision two orders of magnitude better than the electrostatic gravity gradiometer that was used on the ESA's GOCE mission. The SGG operates at the superconducting temperature lower than 6 K. This study developed a cryogenic thermal system to maintain the SGG at the design temperature in Mars orbit. The system includes fixed radiation shields, a low thermal conductivity support structure and a two-stage cryocooler. The fixed radiation shields use double aluminized polyimide to emit heat from the warm spacecraft into the deep space. The support structure uses carbon fiber reinforced plastic, which has low thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperature and very high stress. The low vibration cryocooler has two stages, of which the high temperature stage operates at 65 K and the low temperature stage works at 6 K, and the heat rejection radiator works at 300 K. The study also designed a second option with a 4-K adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) and two-stage 10-K turbo-Brayton cooler.

  1. Design of Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer Cryogenic System for Mars Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Lemoine, F. G.; Shirron, P. J.; Paik, H. J.; Griggs, C. E.; Moody, M. V.; Han, S. C.; Zagarola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of a planets gravity field provides fundamental information about the planets mass properties. The static gravity field reveals information about the internal structure of the planet, including crustal density variations that provide information on the planets geological history and evolution. The time variations of gravity result from the movement of mass inside the planet, on the surface, and in the atmosphere. NASA is interested in a Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer (SGG) with which to measure the gravity field of a planet from orbit. An SGG instrument is under development with the NASA PICASSO program, which will be able to resolve the Mars static gravity field to degree 200 in spherical harmonics, and the time-varying field on a monthly basis to degree 20 from a 255 x 320 km orbit. The SGG has a precision two orders of magnitude better than the electrostatic gravity gradiometer that was used on the ESAs GOCE mission. The SGG operates at the superconducting temperature lower than 6 K. This study developed a cryogenic thermal system to maintain the SGG at the design temperature in Mars orbit. The system includes fixed radiation shields, a low thermal conductivity support structure and a two-stage cryocooler. The fixed radiation shields use double aluminized polyimide to emit heat from the warm spacecraft into the deep space. The support structure uses carbon fiber reinforced plastic, which has low thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperature and very high stress. The low vibration cryocooler has two stages, of which the high temperature stage operates at 65 K and the low temperature stage works at 6 K, and the heat rejection radiator works at 300 K. The study also designed a second option with a 4-K adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) and two-stage 10-K turbo-Brayton cooler.

  2. Simulated Propellant Loading System: Testbed for cryogenic component and control systems research & development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro Medina, J.; Sass, J.; Youney, J.; Schmitz, W.

    2015-12-01

    Technologies in the fields of cryogenic components and control systems are constantly evolving to advance the state of current cryogenic operations that will support future space exploration missions. To meet new demanding requirements, these missions will increasingly rely upon research and development in energy-efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space. The capability to test these technologies is sometimes limited to isolated subsystems with a narrow application spectrum. The initiative to develop the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) is to provide an integrated multipurpose generic testbed to allow dedicated test and evaluation of new technologies in a field environment on a scale that is relevant to launch facility propellant systems. The Cryogenic Test Laboratory (CTL) at the Kennedy Space Center has more than two years of operational experience of using the SPLS to support independent and integrated technology maturation. This paper presents the development of a highly repeatable automated cold flow test sequence that was used in the evaluation and advancement of autonomous control system technologies. A range of other recent applications and capabilities of the SPLS will also be presented in this paper.

  3. Temperature lowering in cryogenic chemical-synthesis techniques and system

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Vikdal, L.N.

    1993-08-01

    When evaluating a chemical synthesis process for a reaction that occurs on the cryogenically cooled walls, it is sometimes necessary to reduce the wall temperatures to enhance the chemical process. To evaluate the chemical process at lower than atmospheric boiling of liquid nitrogen, we built a system and used it to reduce the temperature of the liquid nitrogen. The technique of lowering the liquid nitrogen temperature by reducing the pressure of the boil-off is established knowledge. This paper presents the engineering aspects of the system, design features, equipment requirements, methods of control, and results of the chemical synthesis. The heat input to the system was {approx}400 watts, placing a relatively large demand on the pumping system. Our system is a scale-up of the small laboratory experiment, and it provides the information needed to design an effective system. The major problem encountered was the large quantity of liquid escaping the system during the processing, placing a large gas load on the vacuum system.

  4. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21

    strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

  5. Shuttle cryogenic supply system optimization study. Volume 3: Technical report, section 10, 11 and 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The evaluation of candidate cryogenic fuel systems for space shuttle vehicles is discussed. A set of guidelines was used to establish a matrix of possible combinations for the integration of potential cryogenic systems. The various concepts and combinations which resulted from the integration efforts are described. The parameters which were considered in developing the matrix are: (1) storage of cryogenic materials, (2) fuel lines, (3) tank pressure control, (4) thermal control, (5) fluid control, and (6) fluid conditioning. Block diagrams and drawings of the candidate systems are provided. Performance predictions for the systems are outlined in tables of data.

  6. Shuttle cryogenic supply system optimization study. Volume 5A-1: Users manual for math models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Integrated Math Model for Cryogenic Systems is a flexible, broadly applicable systems parametric analysis tool. The program will effectively accommodate systems of considerable complexity involving large numbers of performance dependent variables such as are found in the individual and integrated cryogen systems. Basically, the program logic structure pursues an orderly progression path through any given system in much the same fashion as is employed for manual systems analysis. The system configuration schematic is converted to an alpha-numeric formatted configuration data table input starting with the cryogen consumer and identifying all components, such as lines, fittings, and valves, each in its proper order and ending with the cryogen supply source assembly. Then, for each of the constituent component assemblies, such as gas generators, turbo machinery, heat exchangers, and accumulators, the performance requirements are assembled in input data tabulations. Systems operating constraints and duty cycle definitions are further added as input data coded to the configuration operating sequence.

  7. Performance and Cost Evaluation of Cryogenic Solid Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirim, Harry; Lo, Roger; Knecht, Thomas; Reinbold, Georg-Friedrich; Poller, Sascha

    2002-01-01

    cooling equipment and its operation during fabrication and launch, neither were there problems with thrust to weight ratio of un-cooled but insulated Cryogenic Solid Motors which ascend into their trajectory while leaving the cooling equipment at the launch pad. In performance calculations for new launchers with CSP-replacements of boosters or existing stages, ARIANE 5 and a 3-stage launcher with CSP - 1st stage into GTO serve as examples. For keeping payload-capacity in the reference orbit constant, the modeling of a rocket system essentially requires a process of iteration, in which the propellant mass is varied as central parameter and - with the help of a CSP mass-model - all other dimensions of the booster are derived from mass models etc. accordingly. The process is repeated until the payload resulting from GTO track-optimization corresponds with that of the model ARIANE 5 in sufficient approximation. Under the assumptions made, the application of cryogenic motors lead to a clear reduction of the launch mass. This is essentially caused by the lower propellant mass and secondary by the reduced structure mass. Finally cost calculations have been made by ASTRIUM and demonstrated the cost saving potential of CSP propulsion. For estimating development, production, ground facilities, and operating cost, the parametric cost modeling tool has been used in combination with Cost Estimating Relationships (CER). Parametric cost models only allow comparative analyses, therefore ARIANE 5 in its current (P1) configuration has been estimated using the same mission model as for the CSP launcher. As conclusion of these cost assessment can be stated, that the utilization of cryogenic solid propulsion could offer a considerable cost savings potential. Academic and industrial cooperation is crucial for the challenging R&D work required. It will take the combined capacities of all experts involved to unlock the promises of clean, high Isp CSP propulsion for chemical Earth

  8. Conceptual design of pressure relief systems for cryogenic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-01

    The conceptual design of pressure relief systems is an important aspect in the early phase of any cryogenic system design, because a prudent and responsible evaluation of relief systems involves much more than just relief devices. The conceptual design consists of various steps: At first, hazard scenarios must be considered and the worst-case scenario identified. Next, a staged interaction against pressure increase is to be defined. This is followed by the selection of the general type of pressure relief device for each stage, such as safety valve and rupture disc, respectively. Then, a decision concerning their locations, their capacities and specific features must be taken. Furthermore, it is mandatory to consider the inlet pressure drop and the back pressure in the exhaust line for sizing the safety devices. And last but not least, economic and environmental considerations must be made in case of releasing the medium to the atmosphere. The development of the system's safety concept calls for a risk management strategy based on identification and analysis of hazards, and consequent risk mitigation using a system-based approach in compliance with the standards.

  9. Conceptual design of pressure relief systems for cryogenic application

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The conceptual design of pressure relief systems is an important aspect in the early phase of any cryogenic system design, because a prudent and responsible evaluation of relief systems involves much more than just relief devices. The conceptual design consists of various steps: At first, hazard scenarios must be considered and the worst-case scenario identified. Next, a staged interaction against pressure increase is to be defined. This is followed by the selection of the general type of pressure relief device for each stage, such as safety valve and rupture disc, respectively. Then, a decision concerning their locations, their capacities and specific features must be taken. Furthermore, it is mandatory to consider the inlet pressure drop and the back pressure in the exhaust line for sizing the safety devices. And last but not least, economic and environmental considerations must be made in case of releasing the medium to the atmosphere. The development of the system's safety concept calls for a risk management strategy based on identification and analysis of hazards, and consequent risk mitigation using a system-based approach in compliance with the standards.

  10. Thermal Stabilization in a High Vacuum Cryogenic Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Rosa; Cripe, Jonathan; Corbitt, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The existing technology for gravitational wave detection is limited in part by quantum noise. In our tabletop experiments, we are attempting to lower the noise floor to the quantum limit through the use of a seismically isolated cryogenic high vacuum environment, with the intention of exploring different methods to reduce quantum noise. In the development phase of this environment, we have implemented a customized strategy of ultraviolet irradiation combined with cryogenically cooled radiation shielding to reduce the impact of water vapor and blackbody radiation on the thermal stability of the cryogenic micro-components. Supported by National Science Foundation REU Site #1262890 and CAREER Award #1150531.

  11. Cryogenic molecular separation system for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Suzuki, K.; Nagatsu, K.; Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2015-12-01

    A 11C molecular production/separation system (CMPS) has been developed as part of an isotope separation on line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. In the ISOL system, 11CH4 molecules will be produced by proton irradiation and separated from residual air impurities and impurities produced during the irradiation. The CMPS includes two cryogenic traps to separate specific molecules selectively from impurities by using vapor pressure differences among the molecular species. To investigate the fundamental performance of the CMPS, we performed separation experiments with non-radioactive 12CH4 gases, which can simulate the chemical characteristics of 11CH4 gases. We investigated the separation of CH4 molecules from impurities, which will be present as residual gases and are expected to be difficult to separate because the vapor pressure of air molecules is close to that of CH4. We determined the collection/separation efficiencies of the CMPS for various amounts of air impurities and found desirable operating conditions for the CMPS to be used as a molecular separation device in our ISOL system.

  12. Cryogenics Vision Workshop for High-Temperature Superconducting Electric Power Systems Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Energetics, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems sponsored the Cryogenics Vision Workshop, which was held on July 27, 1999 in Washington, D.C. This workshop was held in conjunction with the Program's Annual Peer Review meeting. Of the 175 people attending the peer review meeting, 31 were selected in advance to participate in the Cryogenics Vision Workshops discussions. The participants represented cryogenic equipment manufactures, industrial gas manufacturers and distributors, component suppliers, electric power equipment manufacturers (Superconductivity Partnership Initiative participants), electric utilities, federal agencies, national laboratories, and consulting firms. Critical factors were discussed that need to be considered in describing the successful future commercialization of cryogenic systems. Such systems will enable the widespread deployment of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric power equipment. Potential research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities and partnership opportunities for advancing suitable cryogenic systems were also discussed. The workshop agenda can be found in the following section of this report. Facilitated sessions were held to discuss the following specific focus topics: identifying Critical Factors that need to be included in a Cryogenics Vision for HTS Electric Power Systems (From the HTS equipment end-user perspective) identifying R and D Needs and Partnership Roles (From the cryogenic industry perspective) The findings of the facilitated Cryogenics Vision Workshop were then presented in a plenary session of the Annual Peer Review Meeting. Approximately 120 attendees participated in the afternoon plenary session. This large group heard summary reports from the workshop session leaders and then held a wrap-up session to discuss the findings, cross-cutting themes, and next steps. These summary reports are presented in this document. The ideas and suggestions raised during

  13. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technologies for Advanced Green Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Susan M.; Meyer, Michael L.; Tucker, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the Exploration Vision for returning to the Moon and beyond, NASA and its partners are developing and testing critical cryogenic fluid propellant technologies that will meet the need for high performance propellants on long-term missions. Reliable knowledge of low-gravity cryogenic fluid management behavior is lacking and yet is critical in the areas of tank thermal and pressure control, fluid acquisition, mass gauging, and fluid transfer. Such knowledge can significantly reduce or even eliminate tank fluid boil-off losses for long term missions, reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, and simplify vehicle operations. The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) Project is performing experimental and analytical evaluation of several areas within Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) to enable NASA's Exploration Vision. This paper discusses the status of the PCAD CFM technology focus areas relative to the anticipated CFM requirements to enable execution of the Vision for Space Exploration.

  14. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume VII. Cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Poteat, T.J.

    1982-02-26

    This document, Volume VII EBT-P Cryogenic System Title I Design Report, describes the system that resulted from the Title I Preliminary Design effort. It is a self-contained document that can be read apart from the other Volumes comprising the EBT-P Title I Report. This document is a contract deliverable item and provides the detail necessary to support the Cryogenic System design contained in the EBT-P Baseline Design Data Book (BDDB).

  15. ITER relevant testing of a cryogenic distillation column system

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, D.G.; Robins, J.R.; Woodall, K.B.; Sood, S.K.; Gierszewski, P.

    1995-10-01

    A new experimental system has been constructed to test ITER relevant distillation columns and related cryogenic distillation (CD) hardware and control systems. These columns are used to purify tritium in the ITER fuel cycle. The ITER test column reported here has a diameter of about 30 mm and a packed length of approximately 150 cm. It can operate with a hydrogen isotope (Q{sub 2}) boilup of about 60 watts. Two 30 W refrigeration systems were coupled together to deliver as close as possible to 60 watts of cooling. The separation performance of the column was determined by accurately measuring the tritium concentration in the feed and product streams using a mixture of D{sub 2} and DT gas. Conditions which yield a column theoretical plate height as low as 2.05 cm. and a plate inventory of 0.118 moles are reported. The goal of this research program is to measure the performance of ITER relevant columns, packings, condensers, and reboilers in order to minimize hydrogen (Q{sub 2}) and tritium holdup and to show that ITER objectives can be met with smaller diameter and lower tritium inventory columns than have previously been considered. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Progress and status of cryogenic refrigeration system for project Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.; Catseman, F.; Tilleman, H.; Henderson, N.

    2015-12-01

    In the last two decades, HTS cables have been successfully demonstrated around the world, preparing HTS power cables for a full commercial introduction. Among the demonstration projects, circulating subcooled liquid nitrogen to maintain the HTS cable at operating temperature is a widely adopted approach. In this approach, the cooling systems are absolutely critical to the successful operation of the HTS cables. This paper describes the progress and status of the cryogenic refrigeration system designed and manufactured for project Hydra, which is a project jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, American Superconductor and Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. American Superconductor is leading the team supported by Con Edison, Ultera, Altran Solutions, and DH Industries. The cable is an inherently fault current limiting HTS cable, approximately 200 m long and designed to carry 96 MVA at a distribution level voltage of 13.8 kV. The cable will be installed and energized near New York City. The refrigeration system was designed and manufactured by DH Industries. This paper provides details on the successful factory acceptance testing completed in November 2014.

  17. Cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    White, Michael; Martinez, Alex; Bossert, Rick; Dalesandro, Andrew; Geynisman, Michael; Hansen, Benjamin; Klebaner, Arkadiy; Makara, Jerry; Pei, Liujin; Richardson, Dave; Soyars, William; Theilacker, Jay

    2014-01-29

    This paper provides an overview of the current progress and near-future plans for the cryogenic system at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at Fermilab, which includes the helium compressors, refrigerators, warm vacuum compressors, gas and liquid storage, and a distribution system. CMTF will house the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), which is the front end of the proposed Project X. PXIE includes one 162.5 MHz half wave resonator (HWR) cryomodule and one 325 MHz single spoke resonator (SSR) cryomodule. Both cryomodules contain superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities and superconducting magnets operated at 2.0 K. CMTF will also support the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), which is located in the adjacent New Muon Lab (NML) building. A cryomodule test stand (CMTS1) located at CMTF will be used to test 1.3 GHz cryomodules before they are installed in the ASTA cryomodule string. A liquid helium pump and transfer line will be used to provide supplemental liquid helium to ASTA.

  18. A New Cryogenic Sample Manipulator For SRC's Scienta 2002 System

    SciTech Connect

    Gundelach, Chad T.; Fisher, Mike V.; Hoechst, Hartmut

    2004-05-12

    We discuss the first bench tests of a sample manipulator which was recently designed at SRC for the Scienta 2002 User system. The manipulator concept utilizes the 10 deg. angular window of the Scienta in the horizontal plane (angle dispersion) by rotating the sample normal around the vertical axis while angular scans along the vertical axis (energy dispersion) are continuous within {+-}30 deg. relative to the electron lens by rotating the sample around the horizontal axis. With this concept it is possible to precisely map the entire two-dimensional k-space of a crystal by means of stitching together 10 deg. wide stripes centered +15 deg. to -50 deg. relative to the sample normal. Three degrees of translational freedom allow positioning the sample surface at the focal point of the analyzer. Two degrees of rotational freedom are available at this position for manipulating the sample. Samples are mounted to a standard holder and transferred to the manipulator via a load-lock system attached to a prep chamber. The manipulator is configured with a cryogenic cold head, an electrical heater, and a temperature sensor permitting continuous closed-loop operation for 20-380 K.

  19. Cryogenic Testing of Different Seam Concepts for Multilayer Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent testing in a cylindrical, comparative cryostat at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory has focused on various seam concepts for multilayer insulation systems. Three main types of seams were investigated: straight overlap, fold-over, and roll wrapped. Each blanket was comprised of 40 layer pairs of reflector and spacer materials. The total thickness was approximately 12.5-mm, giving an average layer density of 32 layers per centimeter. The blankets were tested at high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum using liquid nitrogen to maintain the cold boundary temperature at 77 K. Test results show that all three seam concepts are all close in thermal performance; however the fold-over method provides the lowest heat flux. For the first series of tests, seams were located 120 degrees around the circumference of the cryostat from the previous seam. This technique appears to have lessened the degradation of the blanket due to the seams. In a follow-on test, a 20 layer blanket was tested in a roll wrapped configuration and then cut down the side of the cylinder, taped together, and re-tested. This test result shows the thermal performance impact of having the seams all in one location versus having the seams clocked around the vessel. This experimental investigation indicates that the method of joining the seams in multilayer insulation systems is not as critical as the quality of the installation process.

  20. COMMISSIONING OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H- front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs from January to April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS will be discussed

  1. A Novel Pre-cooling System for a Cryogenic Pulsating Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Liu, Huiming; Gong, Linghui; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, Laifeng

    To reduce the influence of the pipe material on the measurement of effective thermal conductivity, the pipe of a cryogenic pulsating heat pipe is generally made of stainless steel. Because of the low thermal conductivity of stainless steel, the pre-cooling of the evaporator in cryogenic pulsating heat pipe using helium as working fluid at 4.2 K is a problem. We designed a mechanical-thermal switch between the cryocooler and the evaporator, which was on during the pre-cooling process and off during the test process. By using the pre-cooling system, the cool down time of the cryogenic pulsating heat pipe was reduced significantly.

  2. CERN experience and strategy for the maintenance of cryogenic plants and distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serio, L.; Bremer, J.; Claudet, S.; Delikaris, D.; Ferlin, G.; Pezzetti, M.; Pirotte, O.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.

    2015-12-01

    CERN operates and maintains the world largest cryogenic infrastructure ranging from ageing installations feeding detectors, test facilities and general services, to the state-of-the-art cryogenic system serving the flagship LHC machine complex. After several years of exploitation of a wide range of cryogenic installations and in particular following the last two years major shutdown to maintain and consolidate the LHC machine, we have analysed and reviewed the maintenance activities to implement an efficient and reliable exploitation of the installations. We report the results, statistics and lessons learned on the maintenance activities performed and in particular the required consolidations and major overhauling, the organization, management and methodologies implemented.

  3. Cryogenic mechanical property testing system directly cooled by G-M cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. J.; Liu, Q.; Li, L. F.; Gong, L. H.; Liu, H. M.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic mechanical properties are generally considered to be some of the most important parameters in cryogenic engineering. Therefore, it is very important to test and investigate mechanical properties at low temperatures. Most systems for cryogenic mechanical property testing are cooled using liquid nitrogen (300 K-77 K) or liquid helium (77 K-4.2 K). As we know, liquid helium is relatively rare and thus expensive. In this study, to attain accurate and stable intermediate temperatures and reduce testing cost, a cryogenic mechanical property testing system cooled by a G-M cryocooler was studied and developed. In this system, the sample can be cooled down to 10.5 K after about 10 hours of running. The tension, bending and compression testing (load range up to 50 kN) can be carried out.

  4. Cryogenic thermometry for refrigerant distribution system of JT-60SA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsume, K.; Murakami, H.; Kizu, K.; Yoshida, K.; Koide, Y.

    2015-12-01

    JT-60SA is a fully superconducting fusion experimental device involving Japan and Europe. The cryogenic system supplies supercritical or gaseous helium to superconducting coils through valve boxes or coil terminal boxes and in-cryostat pipes. There are 86 temperature measurement points at 4 K along the distribution line. Resistance temperature sensors will be installed on cooling pipes in vacuum. In this work, two sensor attachment methods, two types of sensor, two thermal anchoring methods, and two sensor fixation materials have been experimentally evaluated in terms of accuracy and mass productivity. Finally, the verification test of thermometry has been conducted using the sample pipe fabricated in the same way to the production version, which has been decided by the comparison experiments. The TVO sensor is attached by the saddle method with Apiezon N grease and the measurement wires made of phosphor bronze are wound on the pipe with Stycast 2850FT as the thermal anchoring. A Cernox sensor is directly immersed in liquid helium as a reference thermometer during the experiment. The measured temperature difference between the attached one and reference one has been within ±15 mK in the range of 3.40-4.73 K. It has satisfies the accuracy requirement of 0.1 K.

  5. Electronic absorption spectra of cryogenic systems with hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, T. G.; Zelikina, G. Ya.; Artamonova, O. M.

    1989-05-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium ? has been studied by recording the 1Lb band of benzene and toluene (YR 2) dissolved in liquid Kr and CF 4 (toluene was also dissolved in liquid Ar), with addition of CHF 3(R 1XH) in a broad temperature range for each of the systems. The narrowness of the vibronic components (VC) of the 1Lb band in cryogenic solvents, i.e. liquified gases, made it possible to work with the separate vibronic components 6 10( A00) for benzene and 0-0 for toluene. The values of the equilibrium constant K were obtained by measuring the integrated intensities of the VCs of the 1Lb band of the complex and of the monomer. The enthalpy Wg  |Δ Hg| of the unexcited complex R 1XH⋯YR 2 formation was obtained from the temperature dependence of the K values; the enthalpy change Δ W due to the electronic excitation in YR 2 was obtained from the spectral shift due to the H-bond formation; therefore the enthalpy We  |Δ He| of formation of the excited complex R 1XH⋯(YE) 2* was calculated: We = Wg - Δ W. For both complexes in all the solvents used the following enthalpy values were obtained: Wg = 2.4±0.4 kcal mol -1; We = 1.6±0.5 kcal mol -1.

  6. Real-Time Model-Based Leak-Through Detection within Cryogenic Flow Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Figueroa, F.

    2015-01-01

    The timely detection of leaks within cryogenic fuel replenishment systems is of significant importance to operators on account of the safety and economic impacts associated with material loss and operational inefficiencies. Associated loss in control of pressure also effects the stability and ability to control the phase of cryogenic fluids during replenishment operations. Current research dedicated to providing Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) coverage of such cryogenic replenishment systems has focused on the detection of leaks to atmosphere involving relatively simple model-based diagnostic approaches that, while effective, are unable to isolate the fault to specific piping system components. The authors have extended this research to focus on the detection of leaks through closed valves that are intended to isolate sections of the piping system from the flow and pressurization of cryogenic fluids. The described approach employs model-based detection of leak-through conditions based on correlations of pressure changes across isolation valves and attempts to isolate the faults to specific valves. Implementation of this capability is enabled by knowledge and information embedded in the domain model of the system. The approach has been used effectively to detect such leak-through faults during cryogenic operational testing at the Cryogenic Testbed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

  7. Safety issues of space liquid-helium and solid-cryogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    2002-05-01

    Safety of hardware and personnel is a major concern in space programs. Space cryogenic systems are particularly prone to risk because of their complexity and because of the potential for overpressurization resulting from blockage of vent paths during the integration and test process. A number of space flight programs with liquid-helium and solid-cryogen systems have had incidents which resulted in risk or actual damage to flight hardware, or in risk to personnel. Since such incidents typically occur late in the development cycle, costs due to delays are extremely high. A second major of area of risk is the use of cooling loops in solid cryogen systems. When cooling is performed, the cryogen contracts and cryogen from warmer locations vaporizes and is deposited in the voids. This can lead to rupture of tankage and plumbing. Risk reduction measures include two-fault tolerant design, systematic use of burst disks and relief valves, careful analysis of possible risks, detailed and well-reviewed procedures and redundancy of critical systems, such as valves and valve drive circuitry. We will discuss the design and operation of space cryogenics systems from a safety point of view. We will also describe a number of incidents, their causes, the corrective steps taken and lessons learned.

  8. Status of Cryogenic System for Spallation Neutron Source's Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ting; Casagrande, Fabio; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N; Strong, William Herb

    2011-01-01

    Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is building an independent cryogenic system for its Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility (SRFTF). The scope of the system is to support the SNS cryomodule test and cavity test at 2-K (using vacuum pump) and 4.5K for the maintenance purpose and Power Upgrade Project of SNS, and to provide the part of the cooling power needed to backup the current CHL to keep Linac at 4.5-K during CHL maintenance period in the future. The system is constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is to construct an independent 4K helium refrigeration system with helium Dewar and distribution box as load interface. It is schedule to be commissioned in 2013. Here we report the concept design of the system and the status of the first phase of this project.

  9. Proposal for a cryogenic magnetic field measurement system for SSC dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Hansen, L.

    1991-03-01

    This proposal describes the research and development required, and the subsequent fabrication of, a system capable of making integrated magnetic multipole measurements of cryogenic 40-mm-bore SSC dipole magnets utilizing a cryogenic probe. Our experience and some preliminary studies indicate that it is highly unlikely that a 16-meter-long probe can be fabricated that will have a twist below several milliradians at cryogenic temperatures. We would anticipate a twist of several milliradians just as a result of cooldown stresses. Consequently, this proposal describes a segmented 16-meter-long probe, for which we intend to calibrate the phase of each segment to within 0.1 milliradians. The data for all segments will be acquired simultaneously, and integrated data will be generated from the vector sums of the individual segments. The calibration techniques and instrumentation required to implement this system will be described. The duration of an integral measurement at one current is expected to be under 10 seconds. The system is based on an extrapolation of the techniques used at LBL to measure cryogenic 1-meter models of SSC magnets with a cryogenic probe. It should be noted that the expansion of the dipole bore from 40 to 50 mm may make a warm-finger device practical at a cost of approximately one quarter of the cryogenic probe. A warm quadrupole measurement system can be based upon the same principles. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravex, Alain; Flachbart, Robin; Holt, Barney

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses. TVS performance testing demonstrated that the spray bar was effective in providing tank pressure control within a 6

  11. Renewal of the Control System and Reliable Long Term Operation of the LHD Cryogenic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, T.; Iwamoto, A.; Oba, K.; Takami, S.; Moriuchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Takahata, K.; Yamada, S.; Yanagi, N.; Hamaguchi, S.; Kishida, F.; Nakashima, T.

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) is a heliotron-type fusion plasma experimental machine which consists of a fully superconducting magnet system cooled by a helium refrigerator having a total equivalent cooling capacity of 9.2 kW@4.4 K. Seventeenplasma experimental campaigns have been performed successfully since1997 with high reliability of 99%. However, sixteen years have passed from the beginning of the system operation. Improvements are being implementedto prevent serious failures and to pursue further reliability.The LHD cryogenic control system was designed and developed as an open system utilizing latest control equipment of VME controllers and UNIX workstations at the construction time. Howeverthe generation change of control equipment has been advanced. Down-sizing of control deviceshas beenplanned from VME controllers to compact PCI controllers in order to simplify the system configuration and to improve the system reliability. The new system is composed of compact PCI controller and remote I/O connected with EtherNet/IP. Making the system redundant becomes possible by doubling CPU, LAN, and remote I/O respectively. The smooth renewal of the LHD cryogenic controlsystem and the further improvement of the cryogenic system reliability are reported.

  12. Concept of a Cryogenic System for a Cryogen-Free 25 T Superconducting Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Sadanori; Takahashi, Masahiko; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Hanai, Satoshi; Ioka, Shigeru; Watanabe, Kazuo; Awaji, Satoshi; Oguro, Hidetoshi

    A cryogen-free 25 T superconducting magnet using a ReBCO insert coil that generates 11.5 T in a 14 T background field of outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils is currently under development. The AC loss of the insert coil during field ramping is approximately 8.8 W, which is difficult to dissipate at the operating temperature of the LTS coils (4 K). However, since a ReBCO coil can operate at a temperature above 4 K, the ReBCO insert coil is cooled to about 10 K by two GM cryocoolers, and the LTS coils are independently cooled by two GM/JT cryocoolers. Two GM cryocoolers cool a circulating helium gas through heat exchangers, and the gas is transported over a long distance to the cold stage located on the ReBCO insert coil, in order to protect the cryocoolers from the leakage field of high magnetic fields. The temperature difference of the 2nd cold stage of the GM cryocoolers and the insert coil can be reduced by increasing the gas flow rate. However, at the same time, the heat loss of the heat exchangers increases, and the temperature of the second cold stage is raised. Therefore, the gas flow rate is optimized to minimize the operating temperature of the ReBCO insert coil by using a flow controller and a bypass circuit connected to a buffer tank.

  13. Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-08-01

    This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  14. Structural Design and Analysis of a 150 kJ HTS SMES Cryogenic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Peng; Wu, Yu; Liu, Huajun; Li, Laifeng; Yang, Huihui

    A 150 kJ high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS-SMES) system is under manufacturing in China. This paper focuses on the structural design and analysis of the SMES cryogenic system. The cryogenic system is designed and fabricated to maintain the working temperature. The system includes a vacuum vessel, its thermal radiation shield, its supporting devices, conduction plates, and current leads. Two G-M cryocoolers are used for the system cooling, the main one is connected to the HTS coils and the other is connected to the thermal shield and the lower ends of the current leads. In this study, the 3D models of the SMES cryogenic system were created with CATIA, a 3D model design software, and the analysis of the SMES cryogenic system was done by ANSYS. The mechanical analysis results on the vacuum vessel, suspension devices and supporting devices are presented, particularly the analyses on suspenders and shelf supports are of vital importance since the finished SMES system should meet vehicle-mounted requirements in long time transport. The heat load and the temperature distribution of the thermal shield were analyzed. A cooling experiment of the cryogenic system was made and the thermal shield was cooled down to about 50 K.

  15. LHC World Largest Vacuum Systems Being Commissioned at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Jose Miguel

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with its 26.7 km of circumference and three different vacuum systems for the beams and insulation vacuum for magnets and liquid helium transfer lines, will have the world's largest vacuum system operating over a wide range of pressures and employing an impressive array of vacuum technologies. This system is composed by 54 km of UHV vacuum for the circulating beams and 50 km of insulation vacuum. Over the 54 km of UHV beam vacuum, 48 km of this are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K). The remaining 6 km of beam vacuum containing the insertions for “cleaning” the proton beams, radiofrequency cavities for accelerating the protons as well as beam-monitoring equipment is at ambient temperature and uses non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings. The noble gases and methane is pumped out by 780 ion pumps. Pressure readings are provided by 170 Bayard-Alpert gauges and 1084 gauges (Pirani and cold cathode Penning). The cryogenic insulation vacuums while technically less demanding, impress by their size (50 km) and volume (15000 m3). Once roughed using mechanical pumps, the vacuum relies on the cryopumping which allows reaching pressure in the 10-4 Pa range.

  16. Web system to support analysis of the Tile Calorimeter commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidantchik, C.; Faria, A.; Grael, F. F.; Ferreira, F. G.; Galvão, K. K.; Dotti, A.; Solans, C.; Price, L.

    2008-07-01

    This article describes the set of computer systems that support the data analysis and quality control during the Tile Calorimeter commissioning phase. The Tile Commissioning Web System (TCWS) encapsulates the steps to retrieve information, execute programs, access the outcomes, register statements and verify the equipment status. TCWS integrates different applications, each one presenting a particular view of the commissioning process. The TileComm Analysis stores plots and analysis results, provides equipment-oriented visualization, collects information regarding the equipment performance, and outlines its status in each test. The Timeline application provides the equipment status history in a chronological way. The Web Interface for Shifters supports monitoring tasks by managing test parameters, graphical views of the detector's performance, and information status of all equipment that was used in each test. The DCS Web System provides a standard way to verify the behaviour of power sources and the cooling system.

  17. Commissioning of a 20 K Helium Refrigeration System for NASA-JSC Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, J.; Redman, R.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Norton, R.; Lauterbach, J.; Linza, R.; Vargas, G.

    2013-01-01

    A new 20 K helium refrigerator installed at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) was successfully commissioned and tested in 2012. The refrigerator is used to create a deep space environment within SESL s Chamber A to perform ground testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The chamber previously and currently still has helium cryo-pumping panels (CPP) and liquid nitrogen shrouds used to create low earth orbit environments. Now with the new refrigerator and new helium shrouds the chamber can create a deep space environment. The process design, system analysis, specification development, and commissioning oversight were performed by the cryogenics department at Jefferson Lab, while the contracts and system installation was performed by the ESC group at JSC. Commissioning data indicate an inverse coefficient of performance better than 70 W/W for a 18 kW load at 20 K (accounting for liquid nitrogen pre-cooling power) that remains essentially constant down to one third of this load. Even at 10 percent of the maximum capacity, the performance is better than 150 W/W at 20 K. The refrigerator exceeded all design goals and demonstrated the ability to support a wide load range from 10 kW at 15 K to 100 kW at 100 K. The refrigerator is capable of operating at any load temperature from 15 K to ambient with tight temperature stability. The new shroud (36 tons of aluminum) can be cooled from room temperature to 20 K in 24 hours. This paper will outline the process design and commissioning results.

  18. Development of Cooling System for Cryogenic Preamplifier in Ft-Icr Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. S.; Kim, D. L.; Painter, T. A.; Choi, M. C.; Kim, H. S.; Yoo, J. S.

    2008-03-01

    The cooling system of cryogenic preamplifier was designed and fabricated for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) ion trap. A cryogenic preamplifier consisted of non-magnetic materials is thermally connected to the cooling medium which is passing through the flange maintaining ultra-high vacuum in the ion cell. At the other end, the cooling medium is thermally anchored to the coldhead of cryocooler (conduction-cooled system) or liquid helium (liquid circulation system). In the conduction-cooled system the temperature distribution along the cooling medium was calculated by the relevant thermal analysis for steady-state. The liquid circulation unit with cryogenic preamplifier was installed in 7 T FT-ICR system and the temperature at the preamplifier was measured during the initial cool-down process. The effects of thermal radiation, contact resistance, and magnetic field on the temperature distribution were also investigated.

  19. Cryogenic helium gas circulation system for advanced characterization of superconducting cables and other devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamidi, Sastry; Kim, Chul Han; Kim, Jae-Ho; Crook, Danny; Dale, Steinar

    2012-04-01

    A versatile cryogenic test bed, based on circulating cryogenic helium gas, has been designed, fabricated, and installed at the Florida State University Center for Advanced Power Systems (FSU-CAPS). The test bed is being used to understand the benefits of integrating the cryogenic systems of multiple superconducting power devices. The helium circulation system operates with four sets of cryocooler and heat exchanger combinations. The maximum operating pressure of the system is 2.1 MPa. The efficacy of helium circulation systems in cooling superconducting power devices is evaluated using a 30-m-long simulated superconducting cable in a flexible cryostat. Experiments were conducted at various mass flow rates and a variety of heat load profiles. A 1-D thermal model was developed to understand the effect of the gas flow parameters on the thermal gradients along the cable. Experimental results are in close agreement with the results from the thermal model.

  20. Cryogenic Hydrogen/helium Storage and Supply System, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, R. H.; Raynor, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An existing cryogenic tank was refurbished, microspheres were installed in the tank annulus, and the thermal performance of the unit was tested. The performance data was compared with NRC-2 multilayer insulation and low emittance aluminized surfaces installed in tanks of the same basic design. The cryogenic tank modified during the program was originally designed for the Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL) Program, and subsequently modified by vacuum-depositing aluminum on all annulus surfaces and leaving out the NRC-2 multilayer insulation. It is concluded that the application of aluminized-microsphere insulation is not yet very predictable for tank design purposes, especially at LH2 temperature and in the presence of a vapor-cooled shield.

  1. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-03-28

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  2. Methods for Automated and Continuous Commissioning of Building Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Luskay; Michael Brambley; Srinivas Katipamula

    2003-04-30

    Avoidance of poorly installed HVAC systems is best accomplished at the close of construction by having a building and its systems put ''through their paces'' with a well conducted commissioning process. This research project focused on developing key components to enable the development of tools that will automatically detect and correct equipment operating problems, thus providing continuous and automatic commissioning of the HVAC systems throughout the life of a facility. A study of pervasive operating problems reveled the following would most benefit from an automated and continuous commissioning process: (1) faulty economizer operation; (2) malfunctioning sensors; (3) malfunctioning valves and dampers, and (4) access to project design data. Methodologies for detecting system operation faults in these areas were developed and validated in ''bare-bones'' forms within standard software such as spreadsheets, databases, statistical or mathematical packages. Demonstrations included flow diagrams and simplified mock-up applications. Techniques to manage data were demonstrated by illustrating how test forms could be populated with original design information and the recommended sequence of operation for equipment systems. Proposed tools would use measured data, design data, and equipment operating parameters to diagnosis system problems. Steps for future research are suggested to help more toward practical application of automated commissioning and its high potential to improve equipment availability, increase occupant comfort, and extend the life of system equipment.

  3. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  4. Fastener load tests and retention systems tests for cryogenic wind-tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A-286 stainless steel screws were tested to determine the tensile load capability and failure mode of various screw sizes and types at both cryogenic and room temperature. Additionally, five fastener retention systems were tested by using A-286 screws with specimens made from the primary metallic alloys that are currently used for cryogenic models. The locking system effectiveness was examined by simple no-load cycling to cryogenic temperatures (-275 F) as well as by dynamic and static loading at cryogenic temperatures. In general, most systems were found to be effective retention devices. There are some differences between the various devices with respect to ease of application, cleanup, and reuse. Results of tests at -275 F imply that the cold temperatures act to improve screw retention. The improved retention is probably the result of differential thermal contraction and/or increased friction (thread-binding effects). The data provided are useful in selecting screw sizes, types, and locking devices for model systems to be tested in cryogenic wind tunnels.

  5. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-29

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  6. Use of thermal sieve to allow optical testing of cryogenic optical systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Wook; Cai, Wenrui; Burge, James H

    2012-05-21

    Full aperture testing of large cryogenic optical systems has been impractical due to the difficulty of operating a large collimator at cryogenic temperatures. The Thermal Sieve solves this problem by acting as a thermal barrier between an ambient temperature collimator and the cryogenic system under test. The Thermal Sieve uses a set of thermally controlled baffles with array of holes that are lined up to pass the light from the collimator without degrading the wavefront, while attenuating the thermal background by nearly 4 orders of magnitude. This paper provides the theory behind the Thermal Sieve system, evaluates the optimization for its optical and thermal performance, and presents the design and analysis for a specific system.

  7. Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Jiang, Wei

    2008-03-31

    This document provides the algorithms for CHP system performance monitoring and commissioning verification (CxV). It starts by presenting system-level and component-level performance metrics, followed by descriptions of algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, using the metric presented earlier. Verification of commissioning is accomplished essentially by comparing actual measured performance to benchmarks for performance provided by the system integrator and/or component manufacturers. The results of these comparisons are then automatically interpreted to provide conclusions regarding whether the CHP system and its components have been properly commissioned and where problems are found, guidance is provided for corrections. A discussion of uncertainty handling is then provided, which is followed by a description of how simulations models can be used to generate data for testing the algorithms. A model is described for simulating a CHP system consisting of a micro-turbine, an exhaust-gas heat recovery unit that produces hot water, a absorption chiller and a cooling tower. The process for using this model for generating data for testing the algorithms for a selected set of faults is described. The next section applies the algorithms developed to CHP laboratory and field data to illustrate their use. The report then concludes with a discussion of the need for laboratory testing of the algorithms on a physical CHP systems and identification of the recommended next steps.

  8. Apparatus for supporting a cryogenic fluid containment system within an enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, B.X.; Ganni, V.; Stifle, K.E.

    1995-01-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for supporting at least one inner cryogenic fluid containment system within an outer isolating enclosure to retard heat transfer into the inner containment system comprising a plurality of supports serially interconnected and laterally spaced by lateral connections to extend the heat conduction path into the inner containment system. 8 figs.

  9. Apparatus for supporting a cryogenic fluid containment system within an enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Burt X.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Stifle, Kirk E.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for supporting at least one inner cryogenic fluid containment system within an outer isolating enclosure to retard heat transfer into the inner containment system comprising a plurality of supports serially interconnected and laterally spaced by lateral connections to extend the heat conduction path into the inner containment system.

  10. Shuttle cryogenic supply system. Optimization study. Volume 5 B-1: Programmers manual for math models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A computer program for rapid parametric evaluation of various types of cryogenics spacecraft systems is presented. The mathematical techniques of the program provide the capability for in-depth analysis combined with rapid problem solution for the production of a large quantity of soundly based trade-study data. The program requires a large data bank capable of providing characteristics performance data for a wide variety of component assemblies used in cryogenic systems. The program data requirements are divided into: (1) the semipermanent data tables and source data for performance characteristics and (2) the variable input data which contains input parameters which may be perturbated for parametric system studies.

  11. Study and design of cryogenic propellant acquisition systems. Volume 1: Design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    An in-depth study and selection of practical propellant surface tension acquisition system designs for two specific future cryogenic space vehicles, an advanced cryogenic space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system and an advanced space propulsion module is reported. A supporting laboratory scale experimental program was also conducted to provide design information critical to concept finalization and selection. Designs using localized pressure isolated surface tension screen devices were selected for each application and preliminary designs were generated. Based on these designs, large scale acquisition prototype hardware was designed and fabricated to be compatible with available NASA-MSFC feed system hardware.

  12. New cryogenic system of the next-generation infrared astronomy mission SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Matsuhara, H.; Shinozaki, K.; Goto, K.; Isobe, N.; Kawada, M.; Mizutani, T.; Sato, Y.; Sugita, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Yamawaki, T.; Shibai, H.

    2016-07-01

    We present the new design of the cryogenic system of the next-generation infrared astronomy mission SPICA under the new framework. The new design employs the V-groove design for radiators, making the best use of the Planck heritage. The new design is based on the ESA-JAXA CDF study (NG-CryoIRTel, CDF-152(A)) with a 2 m telescope, and we modified the CDF design to accommodate the 2.5 m telescope to meet the science requirements of SPICA. The basic design concept of the SPICA cryogenic system is to cool the Science Instrument Assembly (SIA, which is the combination of the telescope and focal-plane instruments) below 8K by the combination of the radiative cooling system and mechanical cryocoolers without any cryogen.

  13. Commissioning and performance of the BNL EBIS LLRF system

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, S.; Smith, K.S.; Hayes, T.; Severino, F.; Harvey, M.; Narayan, G.; Zaltsman, A.

    2011-03-28

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) LLRF system utilizes the RHIC LLRF upgrade platform to achieve the required functionality and flexibility. The LLRF system provides drive to the EBIS high-level RF system, employs I-Q feedback to provide required amplitude and phase stability, and implements a cavity resonance control scheme. The embedded system provides the interface to the existing Controls System, making remote system control and diagnostics possible. The flexibility of the system allows us to reuse VHDL codes, develop new functionalities, improve current designs, and implement new features with relative ease. In this paper, we will discuss the commissioning process, issues encountered, and performance of the system.

  14. Power Systems Development Facility: Design, Construction, and Commissioning Status

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, C.A.; Vimalchand; Hendrix, H.L.; Honeycut, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will provide an introduction to the Power Systems Development Facility, a Department of Energy sponsored, engineering scale demonstration of two advanced coal-fired power technologies; and discuss current status of design, construction and commissioning of this facility. 28 viewgraphs, including 2 figs.

  15. A Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based Cryogenic Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Bierden, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present our first results on the development and evaluation of a cryogenic deformable mirror (DM) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. A MEMS silicon-based DM chip with 32 channels, in which each channel is 300 μm × 300 μm in size, was mounted on a silicon substrate in order to minimize distortion and prevent it from being permanently damaged by thermal stresses introduced by cooling. The silicon substrate was oxidized to obtain electric insulation and had a metal fan-out pattern on the surface. For cryogenic tests, we constructed a measurement system consisting of a Fizeau interferometer, a cryostat cooled by liquid N2, zooming optics, electric drivers. The surface of the mirror at 95 K deformed in response to the application of a voltage, and no significant difference was found between the deformation at 95 K and that at room temperature. The power dissipation by the cryogenic DM was also measured, and we suggest that this is small enough for it to be used in a space cryogenic telescope. The properties of the DM remained unchanged after five cycles of vacuum pumping, cooling, warming, and venting. We conclude that fabricating cryogenic DMs employing MEMS technology is a promising approach. Therefore, we intend to develop a more sophisticated device for actual use, and to look for potential applications including the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology & Astrophysics (SPICA), and other missions.

  16. Overall Design of the ADS Injector I Cryogenic System in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaopeng; Ge, Rui; Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Yaping; Sang, Minjing; Bian, Lin; Han, Ruixiong; Zhang, Jiehao; Sun, Liangrui; Xu, Miaofu; Ye, Rui; Zhang, Jianqin

    The accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS) in China is a kind of transmutation machine to minimize nuclear waste. As one of the important parts in ADS, injector will be built at IHEP,CAS. Injector I needs two cryomodules operating at 2K cryogenic environment to realize a 10MeVproton beam energy. Each cryomodule includes seven spoke cavities and sevensuperconducting magnets. This paper describes the overall design of the cryogenic system, including the cooling flow chart, heat loads estimation, the structure of the operation cryomodule and some of the key components.

  17. Operational modes and control philosophy of the SSCL Magnet Test Lab. (MTL) cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Than, R.; Thirumaleshwar, M.

    1993-05-01

    The MTL`s function is to test prototype and industrially manufactured magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). The cryogenic system of the MTL has a main refrigeration system consisting of a two-stage compression system, a refrigerator/liquefier coldbox, a liquid helium dewar, warm gas storage, and a regeneration skid. The MTL cryogenic system also includes the following auxiliary equipment: two cleaning, cooling, warmup and purification (CCWP) coldbox modules with a regeneration skid for the charcoal beds, two CCWP compressors, a dehydration skid with its own regeneration system, a pump box, a refrigeration recovery unit, and five distribution boxes. At any given time, the refrigeration system has the capacity to simultaneously test at least six magnets under normally required testing conditions. Every magnet will undergo cleaning, cooldown, and filling prior to general testing, conditioning, quench testing, and other experiments. At the completion of general testing, etc., the magnet must be emptied prior to warming it up to ambient temperature. Furthermore, conditioning, training, and testing of the magnets can be carried out at different temperatures between 4.5 K and 2.5 K. The cryogenic system is designed to test multiple magnets, not all of which are necessarily in the same preparational or operational stage. This paper describes the different operational modes and the behavior and control of the total cryogenic system during multiple magnet tests.

  18. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  19. Preparing accelerator systems for the RHIC sextant commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-07-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction is progressing steadily towards completion in 1999 when beams will circulate in both collider rings. One of the major tests of the RHIC project was the commissioning of the first sextant with gold ion beams in early 1997. This is a report on preparation of the RHIC accelerator systems for the first sextant test. It includes beam position monitors, timing, injection correction through the magnetic septum and kickers, current transformers, flags and the ionization beam profile monitors, beam loss monitors, beam and quench permit link system, power supply controls, and the configuration database system. The software and hardware development and coordination of the different systems before commissioning were regularly checked during bi-weekly, and (later) weekly, progress report meetings.

  20. Preparing Accelerator Systems for the RHIC Sextant Commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trbojevic, D.; Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Clifford, T.; Connoly, R.; Fischer, W.; Harrison, M.; Mackay, W.; Olsen, B.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trahern, C.; Witkover, R.

    1997-05-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction is progressing steadily towards the beginning of the 1999 when beams will first be circulated in both collider rings. One of the major tests of the RHIC project is the commissioning of the first sextant with gold ion beams. This is a report on the preparation of the RHIC accelerator systems during the first sextant test, including beam position monitors, timing, injection correction through the magnetic septum and kickers, current transformers, ``flags'' and the ionization beam profile monitors, beam loss monitors, beam and quench permit link system, power supply controls, and the CYBASE data base system. The software and hardware development and coordination of the different systems before commissioning were regularly checked during bi-weekly, and (later) weekly, progress report meetings.

  1. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    SciTech Connect

    Böckmann, Torsten A.; Korth, Olaf; Clausen, Matthias; Schoeneburg, Bernd

    2014-01-29

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning.

  2. Design of propellant acquisition systems for advanced cryogenic space propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.; Castle, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents results of work conducted to expand the technology base and evolve practical propellant surface tension acquisition system designs for future cryogenic space vehicles. Surface tension screen device channel flow analysis and supporting tests showed that reasonable mesh sizes could provide the required retention performance. Integrated subsystem studies and development showed that practical and effective screen surface tension acquisition devices could be designed for typical applications, but that other interfacing feed subsystems are often constrained by the design of the particular acquisition device. These constraints may dominate the total feed system performance.

  3. PERFORMANCE OF A LIQUID XENON CALORIMETER CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR THE MEG EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, T.; Kasami, K.; Hisamitsu, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Mihara, S.; Mori, T.; Nishiguchi, H.; Otani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2008-03-16

    The {mu}-particle rare decay physics experiment, the MU-E-GAMMA (MEG) experiment, will soon be operational at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Zurich. To achieve the extremely high sensitivity required to detect gamma rays, 800 L of liquid xenon is used as the medium in the calorimeter, viewed by 830 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) immersed in it. The required liquid xenon purity is of the order of ppb of water, and is obtained by using a cryogenic centrifugal pump and cold molecular sieves. The heat load of the calorimeter at 165 K is to be approximately 120 W, which is removed by a pulse-tube cryocooler developed at KEK and built by Iwatani Industrial Gas Corp., with a cooling power of about 200 W at 165 K. The cryogenic system is also equipped with a 1000-L dewar. This paper describes the results of an initial performance test of each cryogenic component.

  4. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, M. M.; Zhang, D. X.; Xu, D.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H2 from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H2 in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  5. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.; Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  6. The Cryogenic, High-Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS): A New Facility for Cryogenic Infrared through Vacuum Far-Ultraviolet Refractive Index Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2004-01-01

    The optical designs of future NASA infrared (IR) missions and instruments, such as the James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near-Mixed Camera (NIRCam), will rely on accurate knowledge of the index of refraction of various IR optical materials at cryogenic temperatures. To meet this need, we have developed a Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS). In this paper we discuss the completion of the design and construction of CHARMS as well as the engineering details that constrained the final design and hardware implementation. In addition, we will present our first light, cryogenic, IR index of refraction data for LiF, BaF2, and CaF2, and compare our results to previously published data for these materials.

  7. Thermodynamic Vent System for an On-Orbit Cryogenic Reaction Control Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Romig, Kris A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Flores, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) that integrates a Joule-Thompson (JT) device (expansion valve) and thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with a cryogenic distribution system to allow fine control of the propellant quality (subcooled liquid) during operation of the device. It enables zero-venting when coupled with an RCS engine. The proper attachment locations and sizing of the orifice are required with the propellant distribution line to facilitate line conditioning. During operations, system instrumentation was strategically installed along the distribution/TVS line assembly, and temperature control bands were identified. A sub-scale run tank, full-scale distribution line, open-loop TVS, and a combination of procured and custom-fabricated cryogenic components were used in the cryogenic RCS build-up. Simulated on-orbit activation and thruster firing profiles were performed to quantify system heat gain and evaluate the TVS s capability to maintain the required propellant conditions at the inlet to the engine valves. Test data determined that a small control valve, such as a piezoelectric, is optimal to provide continuously the required thermal control. The data obtained from testing has also assisted with the development of fluid and thermal models of an RCS to refine integrated cryogenic propulsion system designs. This system allows a liquid oxygenbased main propulsion and reaction control system for a spacecraft, which improves performance, safety, and cost over conventional hypergolic systems due to higher performance, use of nontoxic propellants, potential for integration with life support and power subsystems, and compatibility with in-situ produced propellants.

  8. Commissioning results from the recently upgraded RHIC LLRF system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Severino, F.; Yuan, S.; Zaltsman, A.

    2011-03-28

    During RHIC Run 10, the first phase of the LLRF Upgrade was successfully completed. This involved replacing the aging VME based system with a modern digital system based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, and commissioning the system as part of the normal RHIC start up process. At the start of Run 11, the second phase of the upgrade is underway, involving a significant expansion of both hardware and functionality. This paper will review the commissioning effort and provide examples of improvements in system performance, flexibility and scalability afforded by the new platform. The RHIC LLRF upgrade is based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform. The major design goals of the platform are: (1) Design a stand alone, generic, digital, modular control architecture which can be configured to satisfy all of the application demands we currently have, and which will be supportable and upgradeable into the foreseeable future; and (2) It should integrate seamlessly into existing controls infrastructure, be easy to deploy, provide access to all relevant control parameters (eliminate knobs), provide vastly improved diagnostic data capabilities, and permit remote reconfiguration. Although the system is still in its infancy, we think the initial commissioning results from RHIC indicate that these goals have been achieved, and that we've only begun to realize the benefits the platform provides.

  9. Development of the cryogenic system of AEgIS at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Derking, J. H.; Bremer, J.; Burghart, G.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Haider, S.

    2014-01-29

    The AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is located at the antiproton decelerator complex of CERN. The main goal of the experiment is to perform the first direct measurement of the Earth’s gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen atoms within 1% precision. The antihydrogen is produced in a cylindrical Penning trap by combining antiprotons with positrons. To reach the precision of 1%, the antihydrogen has to be cooled to 100 mK to reduce its random velocity. A dilution refrigerator is selected to deliver the necessary cooling capacity of 100 μW at 50 mK. The AEgIS cryogenic system basically consists of cryostats for a 1-T and for a 5-T superconducting magnet, a central region cryostat, a dilution refrigerator cryostat and a measurement cryostat with a Moiré deflectometer to measure the gravitational acceleration. In autumn 2012, the 1-T cryostat, 5-T cryostat and central region cryostat were assembled and commissioned. The apparatus is cooled down in eight days using 2500 L of liquid helium and liquid nitrogen. During operation, the average consumption of liquid helium is 150 L⋅day{sup −1} and of liquid nitrogen 5 L⋅day{sup −1}. The temperature sensors at the Penning traps measured 12 K to 18 K, which is higher than expected. Simulations show that this is caused by a bad thermalization of the trap wiring. The implementation of the sub-kelvin region is foreseen for mid-2015. The antihydrogen will be cooled down to 100 mK in an ultra-cold trap consisting of multiple high-voltage electrodes made of sapphire with gold plated electrode sectors.

  10. Control System For Cryogenic THD Layering At The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M; Blubaugh, J; Edwards, O; Mauvais, M; Sanchez, R; Wilson, B

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world largest and most energetic laser system for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In 2010, NIF began ignition experiments using cryogenically cooled targets containing layers of the tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) fuel. The 75 {micro}m thick layer is formed inside of the 2 mm target capsule at temperatures of approximately 18 K. The ICF target designs require sub-micron smoothness of the THD ice layers. Formation of such layers is still an active research area, requiring a flexible control system capable of executing the evolving layering protocols. This task is performed by the Cryogenic Target Subsystem (CTS) of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The CTS provides cryogenic temperature control with the 1 mK resolution required for beta-layering and for the thermal gradient fill of the capsule. The CTS also includes a 3-axis x-ray radiography engine for phase contrast imaging of the ice layers inside of the plastic and beryllium capsules. In addition to automatic control engines, CTS is integrated with the Matlab interactive programming environment to allow flexibility in experimental layering protocols. The CTS Layering Matlab Toolbox provides the tools for layer image analysis, system characterization and cryogenic control. The CTS Layering Report tool generates qualification metrics of the layers, such as concentricity of the layer and roughness of the growth boundary grooves. The CTS activities are automatically coordinated with other NIF controls in the carefully orchestrated NIF Shot Sequence.

  11. The Evolution of the Cryogenic System of the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, W.; Arnold, Ph; Fydrych, J.; Jurns, J.; Wang, X. L.; Weisend, J. G., II

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is an intergovernmental project building a multidisciplinary research laboratory based upon the world's most powerful neutron source to be built in Lund, Sweden. The ESS will use a superconducting linear accelerator which will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.0 GeV with a nominal current of 62.5 mA. A cryomodule test stand will be supplied with helium for the site acceptance tests. The target will have two moderators using supercritical hydrogen to cool down the neutrons. The neutron instruments and the experiments’ sample environment will use liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to cool detectors and samples. The ESS cryogenic system is designed to deliver cryogenic cooling capacity to all three client system. A first concept of the ESS cryogenic system was developed in 2010 and 2011 with a limited amount of input from the clients as well as from site infrastructure (i.e. buildings and utilities). The design had to be flexible enough to accommodate future changes in scope, schedule and available infrastructure. Over the following years the design has evolved together with these parameters to achieve a maturity today which allowed us to order the accelerator cryoplant and to start procurement of many of the other parts of the ESS cryogenic system. This paper presents the evolution of the design throughout the years and the factors influencing certain design choices.

  12. Commissioning of the IGp Feedback System at DAFNE

    SciTech Connect

    Drago, A.; Fox, J.D.; Teytelman, D.; Tobiyama, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-01

    The iGp (Integrated Gigasample Processor) is an innovative digital bunch-by-bunch feedback system developed by a KEK / SLAC / INFN-LNF joint collaboration. The processing unit can sample at 500 MHz and compute the bunch-by-bunch output signal for up to {approx}5000 bunches. The feedback gateware code is implemented inside just one FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) chip, a Xilinx Virtex-II. The FPGA implements two banks of 16-tap FIR (Finite Impulse Response) filters. Each filter is realtime programmable through the operator interface. At DA{Phi}NE, the Frascati {Phi}-Factory, two iGp units have been commissioned in the April 2007. The iGp systems have substituted the previous betatron feedback systems. This insertion has been very fast and has shown no problems involving just a substitution of the old, less flexible, digital systems, letting unchanged the baseband analog frontend and backend. The commissioning has been very simple, due to the complete and powerful EPICS operator interface, working well in local and remote operations. The software includes also tools for analyzing post processor data. A description of the commissioning with the operations done is reported.

  13. Micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics and Gas Permeability of Composite Laminates for Cryogenic Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sukjoo; Sankar, Bhavani; Ebaugh, Newton C.

    2005-01-01

    A micromechanics method is developed to investigate microcrack propagation in a liquid hydrogen composite tank at cryogenic temperature. The unit cell is modeled using square and hexagonal shapes depends on fiber and matrix layout from microscopic images of composite laminates. Periodic boundary conditions are applied to the unit cell. The temperature dependent properties are taken into account in the analysis. The laminate properties estimated by the micromechanics method are compared with empirical solutions using constituent properties. The micro stresses in the fiber and matrix phases based on boundary conditions in laminate level are calculated to predict the formation of microcracks in the matrix. The method is applied to an actual liquid hydrogen storage system. The analysis predicts micro stresses in the matrix phase are large enough to cause microcracks in the composite. Stress singularity of a transverse crack normal to a ply-interface is investigated to predict the fracture behavior at cryogenic conditions using analytical and finite element analysis. When a transverse crack touches a ply-interface of a composite layer with same fiber orientation, the stress singularity is equal to 1/2. When the transverse crack propagates to a stiffer layer normal to the ply-direction, the singularity becomes less than 1/2 and vice versa. Finite element analysis is performed to predict the fracture toughness of a laminated beam subjected to fracture loads measured by four-point bending tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. As results, the fracture load at cryogenic temperature is significantly lower than that at room temperature. However, when thermal stresses are taken into consideration, for both cases of room and cryogenic temperatures, the difference of the fracture toughness becomes insignificant. The result indicates fracture toughness is a characteristic property, which is independent to temperature changes. The experimental analysis is performed to

  14. Fermilab Main Injector Collimation Systems: Design, Commissioning and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Drozhdin, A.I.; Johnson, David E.; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Morris, Denton K.; Rakhno, Igor; Seiya, Kiyomi; Sidorov, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is moving toward providing 400 kW of 120 GeV proton beams using slip stacking injection of eleven Booster batches. Loss of 5% of the beam at or near injection energy results in 1.5 kW of beam loss. A collimation system has been implemented to localize this loss with the design emphasis on beam not captured in the accelerating RF buckets. More than 95% of these losses are captured in the collimation region. We will report on the construction, commissioning and operation of this collimation system. Commissioning studies and loss measurement tools will be discussed. Residual radiation monitoring of the Main Injector machine components will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of these efforts.

  15. Experimental Studies on Cryogenic System for 22.9 KV Hts Cable Sytem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, S. H.; Lim, J. H.; Yang, H. S.; Kim, D. L.; Ryoo, H. S.; Kim, C. D.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, S. K.; Hwang, S. D.

    2008-03-01

    In terms of high transmission capacity with lower voltage, a high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system is a very attractive challenge for utilities. However, the concomitant cryogenic system for the HTS cable system is one of the tantalizing problems in the operation. The reliability and maintainability of cryogenic system are the key issues to apply it to the real electric power grid. Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) is making an attempt to verify the applicability of the HTS cable system to improve the efficiency of electric power industry. Since May 2006, a 22.9-kV, 50-MVA, 3-phase, 100-m class HTS cable system with an open cooling system has been operated at the KEPCO Gochang test yard. Concurrently, another HTS cable verification test with the same electrical specification and an hybrid cooling system has been carried out by LS Cable (LSC) Ltd in close proximity to the KEPCO's HTS cable system within Gochang test yard. KEPCO conducts the operation of the open cooling system, and is evaluating the hybrid system of LSC with respect to facility performance and usability. This paper compares the cryogenic performance of both HTS cable systems and discusses cooling test results such as step response.

  16. Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

    2001-08-31

    Houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. For example, Walker et al. (1998a) found large variations in thermal distribution system efficiency, as much as a factor of two even between side-by-side houses with the same system design and installation crew. This and other studies (e.g., Jump et al. 1996) indicate that duct leakage testing and sealing can readily achieve a 25 to 30% reduction in installed cooling capacity and energy consumption. As another example, consider that the building industry has recognized for at least 20 years the substantial impact that envelope airtightness has on thermal loads, energy use, comfort, and indoor air quality. However, Walker et al. (1998a) found 50% variances in airtightness for houses with the same design and construction crews, within the same subdivision. A substantial reason for these problems is that few houses are now built or retrofitted using formal design procedures, most are field assembled from a large number of components, and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Solving the problems requires field performance evaluations of houses using appropriate and agreed upon procedures. Many procedural elements already exist in a fragmented environment; some are ready now to be integrated into a new process called residential commissioning (Wray et al. 2000). For example, California's Title 24 energy code already provides some commissioning elements for evaluating the energy performance of new houses. A house consists of components and systems that need to be commissioned, such as building envelopes, air distribution systems, cooling equipment, heat pumps, combustion appliances, controls, and other electrical appliances. For simplicity and practicality, these components and systems are usually evaluated individually, but we need to bear in mind that many of them interact. Therefore, commissioning must not only identify the energy and non-energy benefits

  17. Cryogenic test technology, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, R. J.; Schimanski, D.; Hartzuiker, J. P.

    1985-04-01

    This report reviews the new information available on cryogenic test technology since the report of the Converters' Group on Cryogenic Test Technology was written in 1981. The present position is summarized. The major events since the Converters' report have been the completion and commissioning of the National Transonic Facility (NTF), the suspension of further work on the Douglas 4-WT blowdown tunnel, the conversion of ONERA T2 for cryogenic operation, the steady progress with the DF-LP KKK, and the slow but positive progress with the ETW project, including installation of the pilot tunnel PETW.

  18. The Mirror Fusion Test Facility cryogenic system: Performance, management approach, and present equipment status

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, D.S.; Chronis, W.C.

    1987-06-08

    The cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a 14-kW, 4.35-K helium refrigeration system that proved to be highly successful and cost-effective. All operating objectives were met, while remaining within a few percent of initial cost and schedule plans. The management approach used in MFTF allowed decisions to be made quickly and effectively, and it helped keep costs down. Manpower levels, extent and type of industrial participation, key aspects of subcontractor specifications, and subcontractor interactions are reviewed, as well as highlights of the system tests, operation, and present equipment status. Organizations planning large, high-technology systems may benefit from this experience with the MFTF cryogenic system.

  19. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  20. Upgrade to the Cryogenic Hydrogen Gas Target Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Michael; Tribble, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen gas target at Texas A&M is a vital component for creating a secondary radioactive beam that is then used in experiments in the Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS). A stable beam from the K500 superconducting cyclotron enters the gas cell and some incident particles are transmuted by a nuclear reaction into a radioactive beam, which are separated from the primary beam and used in MARS experiments. The pressure in the target chamber is monitored so that a predictable isotope production rate can be assured. A ``black box'' received the analog pressure data and sent RS232 serial data through an outdated serial connection to an outdated Visual Basic 6 (VB6) program, which plotted the chamber pressure continuously. The black box has been upgraded to an Arduino UNO microcontroller [Atmel Inc.], which can receive the pressure data and output via USB to a computer. It has been programmed to also accept temperature data for future upgrade. A new computer program, with updated capabilities, has been written in Python. The software can send email alerts, create audible alarms through the Arduino, and plot pressure and temperature. The program has been designed to better fit the needs of the users. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  1. A Cryogenic Fluid System Simulation in Support of Integrated Systems Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, John P.; Johnston, Kyle B.; Daigle, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Simulations serve as important tools throughout the design and operation of engineering systems. In the context of sys-tems health management, simulations serve many uses. For one, the underlying physical models can be used by model-based health management tools to develop diagnostic and prognostic models. These simulations should incorporate both nominal and faulty behavior with the ability to inject various faults into the system. Such simulations can there-fore be used for operator training, for both nominal and faulty situations, as well as for developing and prototyping health management algorithms. In this paper, we describe a methodology for building such simulations. We discuss the design decisions and tools used to build a simulation of a cryogenic fluid test bed, and how it serves as a core technology for systems health management development and maturation.

  2. A cryogenic phase locking loop system for a superconducting integrated receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudchenko, A. V.; Koshelets, V. P.; Dmitriev, P. N.; Ermakov, A. B.; Yagoubov, P. A.; Pylypenko, O. M.

    2009-08-01

    The authors present a new cryogenic device, an ultrawideband cryogenic phase locking loop system (CPLL). The CPLL was developed for phase locking of a flux-flow oscillator (FFO) in a superconducting integrated receiver (SIR) but can be used for any cryogenic terahertz oscillator. The key element of the CPLL is the cryogenic phase detector (CPD), a recently proposed new superconducting element. The CPD is an innovative implementation of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction. All components of the CPLL reside inside a cryostat at 4.2 K, with the loop length of cables 50 cm and the total loop delay 4.5 ns. So small a delay results in a CPLL synchronization bandwidth as wide as 40 MHz and allows phase locking of more than 60% of the power emitted by the FFO, even for FFO linewidths of about 11 MHz. This percentage of phase locked power is three times that achieved with conventional room temperature PLLs. Such an improvement enables reducing the FFO phase noise and extending the SIR operation range.

  3. The cryogenic readout system with GaAs JFETs for multi-pixel cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, Y.; Matsuo, H.; Nagata, H.; Ikeda, H.; Fujiwara, M.

    2010-11-01

    Our purpose is to realize a multi-pixel sub-millimeter/terahertz camera with the superconductor - insulator - superconductor photon detectors. These detectors must be cooled below 1 K. Since these detectors have high impedance, signal amplifiers of each pixel must be setting aside of them for precise signal readout. Therefore, it is desirable that the readout system work well even in cryogenic temperature. We selected the n-type GaAs JFETs as cryogenic circuit elements. From our previous studies, the n-type GaAs JFETs have good cryogenic properties even when those power dissipations are low. We have designed several kinds of integration circuits (ICs) and demonstrated their performance at cryogenic temperature. Contents of ICs are following; AC coupled trans-impedance amplifiers, voltage distributors for suppressing input offset voltage of AC coupled CTIAs, multiplexers with sample-and holds, and shift-registers for controlling multiplex timing. The power dissipation of each circuit is 0.5 to 3 micro watts per channel. We also have designed and manufactured 32-channel multi-chip-modules with these ICs. These modules can make 32- channel input photo current signals into one or two serial output voltage signal(s). Size of these is 40mm x 30mm x 2mm and estimated total power dissipation is around 400 micro watts.

  4. Cryogenic Phase-Locking Loop System Based on SIS Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudchenko, A. V.; Koshelets, V. P.; Kalashnikov, K. V.

    An ultra-wideband cryogenic phase-locking loop (CPLL) system is a new cryogenic device. The CPLL is intended for phase-locking of a Flux-Flow Oscillator (FFO) in a Superconducting Integrated Receiver (SIR) but can be used for any cryogenic terahertz oscillator. The key element of the CPLL is Cryogenic Phase Detector (CPD), a recently proposed new superconducting element. The CPD is an innovative implementation of superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction. All components of the CPLL reside inside a cryostat at 4.2 K, with the loop length of about 50 cm and the total loop delay 5.5 ns. Such a small delay results in CPLL synchronization bandwidth as wide as 40 MHz and allows phase-locking of more than 60% of the power emitted by the FFO even for FFO linewidth of about 10 MHz. This percentage of phase-locked power three times exceeds that achieved with conventional room-temperature PLLs. Such an improvement enables reducing the FFO phase noise and extending the SIR operation range.Another new approach to the FFO phase-locking has been proposed and experimentally verified. The FFO has been synchronized by a cryogenic harmonic phase detector (CHPD) based on the SIS junction. The CHPD operates simultaneously as the harmonic mixer (HM) and phase detector. We have studied the HM based on the SIS junction theoretically; in particular we calculated 3D dependences of the HM output signal power versus the bias voltage and the LO power. Results of the calculations have been compared with experimental measurements. Good qualitative and quantitative correspondence has been achieved. The FFO phase-locking by the CHPD has been demonstrated. Such a PLL system is expected to be extra wideband. This concept is very promising for building of the multi-pixel SIR array.

  5. Large-Scale Cryogenic Testing of Launch Vehicle Ground Systems at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, E. W.; Sass, J. P.; Lobemeyer, D. A.; Sojourner, S. J.; Hatfield, W. H.; Rewinkel, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new launch vehicle to support NASA's future exploration plans requires significant redesign and upgrade of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) launch pad and ground support equipment systems. In many cases, specialized test equipment and systems will be required to certify the function of the new system designs under simulated operational conditions, including propellant loading. This paper provides an overview of the cryogenic test infrastructure that is in place at KSC to conduct development and qualification testing that ranges from the component level to the integrated-system level. An overview of the major cryogenic test facilities will be provided, along with a detailed explanation of the technology focus area for each facility

  6. An ultralightweight, evacuated, load-bearing, high-performance insulation system. [for cryogenic propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.; Cunnington, G. R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A new hollow-glass microsphere insulation and a flexible stainless-steel vacuum jacket were demonstrated on a flight-weight cryogenic test tank, 1.17 m in diameter. The weight of the system is three times lighter than the most advanced vacuum-jacketed design demonstrated to date, a free-standing honeycomb hard shell with a multilayer insulation system (for a Space Tug application). Design characteristics of the flexible vacuum jacket are presented along with a model describing the insulation thermal performance as a function of boundary temperatures and emittance, compressive load on the insulation and insulation gas pressure. Test data are compared with model predictions and with prior flat-plate calorimeter test results. Potential applications for this insulation system or a derivative of this system include the cryogenic Space Tug, the Single-Stage-to-Orbit Space Shuttle, LH2 fueled subsonic and hypersonic aircraft, and LNG applications.

  7. ORION OPTICAL DIAGNOSTIC SYSTEMS Construction and commissioning progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, J. B. A.; Drew, D.; Fyrth, J.; Hill, M. P.; Kemshall, P.; Oades, K.; Harvey, E.; Gumbrell, E. T.

    2012-10-01

    The Orion facility provides a unique combined long- and short-pulse laser capability. We report on the progress in constructing a comprehensive plasma optical diagnostic suite for the facility, developed for a range of warm dense matter and other materials' properties experiments. The first VISAR imaging line for the suite is due to be commissioned in 2012 and its progress will be reported. The system consists of configurable optical elements mounted on a TIM, relay optics to an optical table, optics to direct the light through a VISAR bed onto an optical streak camera and the infrastructure systems to provide remote control and services. Due to the operational model of Orion the diagnostic must have comprehensive remote control for its set up and alignment. This makes the system design more complicated than otherwise. The sub-systems required to give the degree of remote control required will be described. A modified version of the suite's ASBO imaging line was used in 2011 to support the commissioning of Orion's long- and short-pulse laser beam lines by imaging optical emission from laser targets. The set up of this system and the data it recorded with an optical streak camera during a short pulse experiment will be presented.

  8. Commissioning of the vacuum system of the KATRIN Main Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, M.; Babutzka, M.; Bahr, M.; Barrett, J. P.; Bauer, S.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behrens, J.; Bergmann, T.; Besserer, U.; Blümer, J.; Bodine, L. I.; Bokeloh, K.; Bonn, J.; Bornschein, B.; Bornschein, L.; Büsch, S.; Burritt, T. H.; Chilingaryan, S.; Corona, T. J.; De Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Dragoun, O.; Drexlin, G.; Dyba, S.; Ebenhöch, S.; Eitel, K.; Ellinger, E.; Enomoto, S.; Erhard, M.; Eversheim, D.; Fedkevych, M.; Felden, A.; Fischer, S.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fränkle, F.; Furse, D.; Ghilea, M.; Gil, W.; Glück, F.; Gonzalez Ureña, A.; Görhardt, S.; Groh, S.; Grohmann, S.; Grössle, R.; Gumbsheimer, R.; Hackenjos, M.; Hannen, V.; Harms, F.; Haußmann, N.; Heizmann, F.; Helbing, K.; Herz, W.; Hickford, S.; Hilk, D.; Hillen, B.; Höhn, T.; Holzapfel, B.; Hötzel, M.; Howe, M. A.; Huber, A.; Jansen, A.; Kernert, N.; Kippenbrock, L.; Kleesiek, M.; Klein, M.; Kopmann, A.; Kosmider, A.; Kovalík, A.; Krasch, B.; Kraus, M.; Krause, H.; Krause, M.; Kuckert, L.; Kuffner, B.; La Cascio, L.; Lebeda, O.; Leiber, B.; Letnev, J.; Lobashev, V. M.; Lokhov, A.; Malcherek, E.; Mark, M.; Martin, E. L.; Mertens, S.; Mirz, S.; Monreal, B.; Müller, K.; Neuberger, M.; Neumann, H.; Niemes, S.; Noe, M.; Oblath, N. S.; Off, A.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Osipowicz, A.; Otten, E.; Parno, D. S.; Plischke, P.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prall, M.; Priester, F.; Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Reich, J.; Rest, O.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Röllig, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, S.; Ryšavý, M.; Schlösser, K.; Schlösser, M.; Schönung, K.; Schrank, M.; Schwarz, J.; Seiler, W.; Seitz-Moskaliuk, H.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Skasyrskaya, A.; Slezák, M.; Špalek, A.; Steidl, M.; Steinbrink, N.; Sturm, M.; Suesser, M.; Telle, H. H.; Thümmler, T.; Titov, N.; Tkachev, I.; Trost, N.; Unru, A.; Valerius, K.; Vénos, D.; Vianden, R.; Vöcking, S.; Wall, B. L.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Weiss, C.; Welte, S.; Wendel, J.; Wierman, K. L.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Winzen, D.; Wolf, J.; Wüstling, S.; Zacher, M.; Zadoroghny, S.; Zbořil, M.

    2016-04-01

    The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the β-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium β-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (``Main Spectrometer''), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120 000 individual parts. The strong magnetic field that guides the β-electrons is provided by super-conducting solenoids at both ends of the spectrometer. Its influence on turbo-molecular pumps and vacuum gauges had to be considered. A system consisting of 6 turbo-molecular pumps and 3 km of non-evaporable getter strips has been deployed and was tested during the commissioning of the spectrometer. In this paper the configuration, the commissioning with bake-out at 300 °C, and the performance of this system are presented in detail. The vacuum system has to maintain a pressure in the 10-11 mbar range. It is demonstrated that the performance of the system is already close to these stringent functional requirements for the KATRIN experiment, which will start at the end of 2016.

  9. The NEON Science Commissioning Plan: Strategies for Confirming System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, G. D.; Thorpe, A.; Buur, H.

    2015-12-01

    A transformation is underway in the field of ecological monitoring as compelling science questions motivate us to build ever-larger networks aiming to acquire uniform datasets over wide geographical ranges and long timescales. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), currently under construction across the U.S., represents the most ambitious such effort to characterize ecology at the continental scale. When completed in 2017, NEON will begin a 30-year program to monitor the state of North American ecosystems at scores of independent sites by employing a combination of terrestrial and aquatic sensors, organismal, biogeochemical, and hydrological sampling conducted by field staff, and airborne remote-sensing imaging and spectroscopy. Simply building and bringing such complex, long-term monitoring networks online is, however, insufficient to produce a useful result: the science team must also confirm that the system fulfills its essential mission to generate accurate and uniform data from all sites over time. This is the role of Science Commissioning, the process which completes the construction stage by confirming that the system operates as designed before entering full operations. Ideally, Science Commissioning involves simply testing the completed system against all applicable science requirements. In the real world of large, complex networks, planners of Science Commissioning must grapple with several key questions: How can we verify that the measurements from a given subsystem reflect "truth"? How can we ensure that similar subsystems at different sites return equivalent results? How can we confirm that data from the same site remain comparable over long periods of time? How can we conduct meaningful tests on a large system in a reasonable amount of time and effort? We describe the specific strategies NEON is developing to meet these challenges and the implications for other large ecological monitoring networks.

  10. Cryogenic sub-system for the 56 MHz SRF storage cavity for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Than, R.; Orfin, P.; Lederle, D.; Tallerico, T.; Masi L.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Storage Cavity is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator that will be operated in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The cavity requires an extremely quiet environment to maintain its operating frequency. The cavity, besides being engineered for a mechanically quiet system, also requires a quiet cryogenic system. The helium is taken from RHIC's main helium supply header at 3.5 atm, 5.3K at a phase separator tank. The boil-off is sent back to the RHIC refrigeration system to recover the cooling. To acoustically separate the RHIC helium supply and return lines, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger condenses the helium vapor generated in the RF cavity bath. A system description and operating parameters are given about the cryogen delivery system. The 56 MHz superconducting storage RF cavity project is making progress. The cryogenic system design is in its final stage. The helium supply lines have been tapped into the RHIC helium distribution lines. The plate-and-fin heat exchanger design is near completion and specification will be sent out for bid soon. The cold helium vapor heating system design will start soon as well. A booster compressor specification is underway. The first phase separator and transfer line design work is near completion and will be sent out for bid soon.

  11. Operation of graphene quantum Hall resistance standard in a cryogen-free table-top system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, T. J. B. M.; Rozhko, S.; Antonov, I.; Tzalenchuk, A.; Williams, J. M.; Melhem, Z.; He, H.; Lara-Avila, S.; Kubatkin, S.; Yakimova, R.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate quantum Hall resistance measurements with metrological accuracy in a small cryogen-free system operating at a temperature of around 3.8 K and magnetic fields below 5 T. Operating this system requires little experimental knowledge or laboratory infrastructure, thereby greatly advancing the proliferation of primary quantum standards for precision electrical metrology. This significant advance in technology has come about as a result of the unique properties of epitaxial graphene on SiC.

  12. Recommendations for a cryogenic system for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, D.S.

    1989-09-20

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Japan, the European Community, the Soviet Union, and the United States. ITER will be a large machine requiring up to 100 kW of refrigeration at 4.5 K to cool its superconducting magnets. Unlike earlier fusion experiments, the ITER cryogenic system must handle pulse loads constituting a large percentage of the total load. These come from neutron heating during a fusion burn and from ac losses during ramping of current in the PF (poloidal field) coils. This paper presents a conceptual design for a cryogenic system that meets ITER requirements. It describes a system with the following features: Only time-proven components are used. The system obtains a high efficiency without use of cold pumps or other developmental components. High reliability is achieved by paralleling compressors and expanders and by using adequate isolation valving. The problem of load fluctuations is solved by a simple load-leveling device. The cryogenic system can be housed in a separate building located at a considerable distance from the ITER core, if desired. The paper also summarizes physical plant size, cost estimates, and means of handling vented helium during magnet quench. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Cryogenic Design of the Deep Space Network Large Array Low-Noise Amplifier System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britcliffe, M. J.; Hanson, T. R.; Franco, M. M.

    2004-05-01

    This article describes the cryogenic design and performance of a prototype low-noise amplifier (LNA) system for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Large Array task. The system is used to cool a dual-frequency feed system equipped with high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers and the associated support electronics. The LNA/feed system operates at a temperature under 18 K. The system is designed to be manufactured at minimum cost. The design considerations, including the cryocooler to be used, vacuum system, microwave interconnects, mechanical components, and radiation shielding, are discussed.

  14. An expert system to manage the operation of the Space Shuttle's fuel cell cryogenic reactant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphey, Amy Y.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a rule-based expert system to manage the operation of the Space Shuttle's cryogenic fuel system. Rules are based on standard fuel tank operating procedures described in the EECOM Console Handbook. The problem of configuring the operation of the Space Shuttle's fuel tanks is well-bounded and well defined. Moreover, the solution of this problem can be encoded in a knowledge-based system. Therefore, a rule-based expert system is the appropriate paradigm. Furthermore, the expert system could be used in coordination with power system simulation software to design operating procedures for specific missions.

  15. EXERGY ANALYSIS OF THE CRYOGENIC HELIUM DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FOR THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Claudet, S.; Lebrun, Ph.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.

    2010-04-09

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN features the world's largest helium cryogenic system, spreading over the 26.7 km circumference of the superconducting accelerator. With a total equivalent capacity of 145 kW at 4.5 K including 18 kW at 1.8 K, the LHC refrigerators produce an unprecedented exergetic load, which must be distributed efficiently to the magnets in the tunnel over the 3.3 km length of each of the eight independent sectors of the machine. We recall the main features of the LHC cryogenic helium distribution system at different temperature levels and present its exergy analysis, thus enabling to qualify second-principle efficiency and identify main remaining sources of irreversibility.

  16. Cryogenic gas target system for intense RI beam productions in nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; He, J. J.; Kim, A.

    2008-05-21

    A cryogenic gas target system was newly developed to produce intense RI beams at the low-energy in-flight radio-isotope beam separator (CRIB) of the University of Tokyo. The main features of the cryogenic gas target system are the direct cooling of the target cell by a liquid N{sub 2} finger and the circulation of the target gas that goes through the liquid N{sub 2} tank. Hydrogen gas was cooled down to 85-90 K by liquid nitrogen and used as a secondary beam production target which has a thickness of 2.3 mg/cm{sup 2} at the gas pressure of 760 Torr. Intense RI beams, such as a {sup 7}Be beam of 2x10{sup 8} particles per second, were successfully produced using the target.

  17. Shuttle cryogenics supply system optimization study. Volume 5, B-3, part 2: Appendix to programmers manual for math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A computer programmer's manual for a digital computer which will permit rapid and accurate parametric analysis of current and advanced attitude control propulsion systems is presented. The concept is for a cold helium pressurized, subcritical cryogen fluid supplied, bipropellant gas-fed attitude control propulsion system. The cryogen fluids are stored as liquids under low pressure and temperature conditions. The mathematical model provides a generalized form for the procedural technique employed in setting up the analysis program.

  18. Gas gap heat switch for a cryogen-free magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, J.; Borges de Sousa, P.; Martins, D.; Kar, S.; Bonfait, G.; Catarino, I.

    2015-12-01

    Cryogen-free superconducting magnet systems (CFMS) have become popular over the last two decades for the simple reason that the use of liquid helium is rather cumbersome and that helium is a scarce resource. Some available CFMS use a mechanical cryocooler as the magnet's cold source. However, the variable temperature insert (VTI) for some existing CFMS are not strictly cryogen-free as they are still based on helium gas circulation through the sample space. We designed a prototype of a gas gap heat switch (GGHS) that allows a thermal management of a completely cryogen-free magnet system, with no helium losses. The idea relies on a parallel cooling path to a variable temperature insert (VTI) of a magnetic properties measurement system under development at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. A Gifford-McMahon cryocooler (1.5 W @ 4.2 K) would serve primarily as the cold source of the superconducting magnet, dedicating 1 W to this cooling, under quite conservative safety factors. The remaining cooling power (0.5 W) is to be diverted towards a VTI through a controlled GGHS that was designed and built with a 80 μm gap width. The built GGHS thermal performance was measured at 4 K, using helium as the exchange gas, and its conductance is compared both with a previously developed analytical model and a finite element method. Lessons learned lead to a new and more functional prototype yet to be reported.

  19. Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C. Bedzyk, M.; Brent, G.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Guy, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Ingraham, S.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Theobald, W.

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si He{sub α} line at ∼1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ∼7 cm in ∼100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ∼1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 μm. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell.

  20. Conceptual design of a cryogenic test bench system for millimeter wavelength detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, S.; Ferrusca, D.; Ibarra-Medel, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present the design of a cryogenic system for testing different technologies of millimeter wavelength detectors. The proposed design is developed at the Astronomical Instrumentation Laboratory for Millimeter Wavelength at the National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, in México. The cryogenic system is integrated by a closed cycle pulse tube cooler with a 4 Kelvin 12 inches cold plate and a He-4/He-3 fridge and would be able to characterize KIDs (Kinetic Inductor Detectors), TES (Transition Edge Sensors) or semiconductor bolometers using a thermal link to a 250 mK stage. Readout electronics will be installed at the 4 Kelvin cold plate along with connectors and cables for the thermometry. In this paper we present a preliminary 3D model design which its main goal is to use efficiently the limited space in the cryostat with emphasis on the interchangeability for installing each time any of the three different detector technologies in the same cold plate; results for the thermal calculations and finite-element modeling are also shown. The system would allow, with some minor changes, to replace the He-4/He-3 fridge by a dilution fridge in order to reach temperatures about 100 mK to have more flexibility in the detector testing. The importance of the cryogenic test bench relies in the need for an easier and quicker characterization of detectors arrays as part of the research for the development of instruments for millimeter telescopes.

  1. Acquisition/expulsion system for earth orbital propulsion system study. Volume 3: Cryogenic test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A ground test program was conducted to verify several of the design methods and techniques that were used in designing cryogenic acquisition/expulsion systems. The testing of a 63.5-cm diameter DSL subscale model was particularly significant. Under these tests, the operational characteristics of the DSL concept were verified using LH2 and LN2. Demonstration of the gas free liquid expulsion characteristics was accomplished by expelling LH2 under -1 g using both GH2 and GHe pressurization. Loading of the acquisition/expulsion device was successfully accomplished using LH2 and LN2. The liquid free vapor venting performance of the model was limited because of the thermal stratification under the -1 g test conditions.

  2. Cryogenic propellant management system requirements for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucillo, R. J.; Stevenson, S. M.; Corban, R. R.

    1991-01-01

    Specific propellant management system requirements have been identified for each facility category of SSF. Distributed systems have been analyzed to indentify momentum management, guidance, and traffic management requirements associated with the guidance, navigation, and control system; space-to-space communications and enhanced tracking requirements associated with the communications and tracking system; and propellant management system utility requirements associated with the electrical power system. Flight element analyses determined attach structure, utility distribution, and structural integrity requirements for the pre-integrated truss and high mass manipulation and translation requirements for the mobile base system.

  3. Fundamentals of Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley; Tomsik, Thomas; Moder, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the extreme conditions that are encountered in cryogenic systems requires the most effort out of analysts and engineers. Due to the costs and complexity associated with the extremely cold temperatures involved, testing is sometimes minimized and extra analysis is often relied upon. This short course is designed as an introduction to cryogenic engineering and analysis, and it is intended to introduce the basic concepts related to cryogenic analysis and testing as well as help the analyst understand the impacts of various requests on a test facility. Discussion will revolve around operational functions often found in cryogenic systems, hardware for both tests and facilities, and what design or modelling tools are available for performing the analysis. Emphasis will be placed on what scenarios to use what hardware or the analysis tools to get the desired results. The class will provide a review of first principles, engineering practices, and those relations directly applicable to this subject including such topics as cryogenic fluids, thermodynamics and heat transfer, material properties at low temperature, insulation, cryogenic equipment, instrumentation, refrigeration, testing of cryogenic systems, cryogenics safety and typical thermal and fluid analysis used by the engineer. The class will provide references for further learning on various topics in cryogenics for those who want to dive deeper into the subject or have encountered specific problems.

  4. Commissioning results of the APS storage ring diagnostics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1996-12-31

    Initial commissionings of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) 7-GeV storage ring and its diagnostics systems have been done. Early studies involved single-bunch measurements for beam transverse size ({sigma}{sub x} {approx} 150 {mu}m, {sigma}{sub y} {approx} 50 {mu}m), current, injection losses, and bunch length. The diagnostics have been used in studies related to the detection of an extra contribution to beam jitter at {approximately} 6.5 Hz frequency; observation of bunch lengthening ({sigma} {approx} 30 to 60 ps) with single-bunch current; observation of an induced vertical, head-tail instability; and detection of a small orbit change with insertion device gap position. More recently, operations at 100-mA stored-beam current, the baseline design goal, have been achieved with the support of beam characterizations.

  5. Commissioning results of the APS storage ring diagnostics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, Alex H.

    1997-01-01

    Initial commissionings of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) 7-GeV storage ring and its diagnostics systems have been done. Early studies involved single-bunch measurements for beam transverse size (σx≈150 μm, σy≈50 μm,) current, injection losses, and bunch length. The diagnostics have been used in studies related to the detection of an extra contribution to beam jitter at ˜6.5 Hz frequency; observation of bunch lengthening (σ≈30 to 60 ps) with single-bunch current; observation of an induced vertical, head-tail instability; and detection of a small orbit change with insertion device gap position. More recently, operations at 100-mA stored-beam current, the baseline design goal, have been achieved with the support of beam characterizations.

  6. Comparative analysis of cryogenic and PTSA technologies for systems of oxygen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaszkiewicz, T.; Chorowski, M.; Gizicki, W.

    2014-01-01

    Development of oxy-combustion technology requires relatively lower purity oxygen production (90 - 95% O2). There are two known methods to produce oxygen in such purity level - cryogenic and sorption. Cryogenic air separation technology is currently well developed and widely used for oxygen production in large quantities (up to 5 000 tons per day from a single technology train). The second method is pressure swing adsorption (PSA), which is well suited for smaller quantities of oxygen (below 500 tons per day). To optimize overall energy consumption, the PSA method can be combined with swing of temperature by using waste heat from combined heat-power generation (cogeneration) processes, leading to pressure temperature swing adsorption (PTSA). In small and medium scale oxygen production systems for oxy-combustion, both PTSA and cryogenic method can be used. The paper shows calculations and experimental validation of the efficiency and economics for both processes. The limitations of applicability for each of these technologies are indicated. The possibility of coupling the technologies, including thermal power plants, in order to improve the efficiency of the oxygen separation is discussed.

  7. Design of 24. 8-kw, 3. 8-K cryogenic system for Isabelle

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.P.; Afrashteh, M.; Bamberger, J.A.; Fresco, A.; Schlafke, A.P.; Schneider, W.J.; Sondericker, J.H.; Werner, A.; Wu, K.C.

    1982-01-01

    The ISABELLE Helium refrigerator is described in terms of performance requirements. Overall design is presented in discussion of the main refrigerator, subcooler/circulation system, distribution and load matching, design heat load, ratio of refrigeration capactity to heat load, system design pressure, physical plant, reliability and redundancy, and process control. The primary and shield circuits for one accelerator ring is diagramed. Isabelle's heat load allowance is given in a table showing primary (W at 4K) and secondary (W at 55K) loads. The redundant components in Isabelle's cryogenic system are illustrated.

  8. Development of a reusable, flight-weight cryogenic foam insulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, P. S.; Davis, R. C.; Taylor, A. H.

    1986-06-01

    Attention is given to a light weight foam insulation system applicable to reusable cryogenic propellant tankage for hypersonic aircraft and space launch vehicles. The insulation system consists of nominally sized blocks of a high temperature-resistant polymethacrylimide foam that is wrapped with a vapor-impermeable membrane of Kapton-aluminum-Kapton laminate, which is adhesively bonded to the outer propellant tank wall. Test results are presented which indicate that this insulation system is capable of enduring a Mach 5 service environment without structural cracking, deterioration, or loss of performance.

  9. Development of a reusable, flight-weight cryogenic foam insulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcauliffe, P. S.; Davis, R. C.; Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to a light weight foam insulation system applicable to reusable cryogenic propellant tankage for hypersonic aircraft and space launch vehicles. The insulation system consists of nominally sized blocks of a high temperature-resistant polymethacrylimide foam that is wrapped with a vapor-impermeable membrane of Kapton-aluminum-Kapton laminate, which is adhesively bonded to the outer propellant tank wall. Test results are presented which indicate that this insulation system is capable of enduring a Mach 5 service environment without structural cracking, deterioration, or loss of performance.

  10. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Cryogen System Engineering Checkout Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, A. D; Cady, E. C.; Jenkins, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    The Solar Thermal Upper Stage technology (STUSTD) program is a solar thermal propulsion technology program cooperatively sponsored by a Boeing led team and by NASA MSFC. A key element of its technology program is development of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage and supply system which employs multi-layer insulation, liquid acquisition devices, active and passive thermodynamic vent systems, and variable 40W tank heaters to reliably provide near constant pressure H2 to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity of space operation. The LH2 storage and supply system is designed to operate as a passive, pressure fed supply system at a constant pressure of about 45 psia. During operation of the solar thermal engine over a small portion of the orbit the LH2 storage and supply system propulsively vents through the enjoy at a controlled flowrate. During the long coast portion of the orbit, the LH2 tank is locked up (unvented). Thus, all of the vented H2 flow is used in the engine for thrust and none is wastefully vented overboard. The key to managing the tank pressure and therefore the H2 flow to the engine is to manage and balance the energy flow into the LH2 tank with the MLI and tank heaters with the energy flow out of the LH2 tank through the vented H2 flow. A moderate scale (71 cu ft) LH2 storage and supply system was installed and insulated at the NASA MSFC Test Area 300. The operation of the system is described in this paper. The test program for the LH2 system consisted of two parts: 1) a series of engineering tests to characterize the performance of the various components in the system: and 2) a 30-day simulation of a complete LEO and GEO transfer mission. This paper describes the results of the engineering tests, and correlates these results with analytical models used to design future advanced Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicles.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Transient in Cryogenic Fluid Network of Rocket Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Flachbart, Robin

    2003-01-01

    Fluid transients, also known as water hammer, can have a significant impact on the design and operation of both spacecraft and launch vehicles propulsion systems. These transients often occur at system activation and shut down. For ground safety reasons, many spacecrafts are launched with the propellant lines dry. These lines are often evacuated by the time the spacecraft reaches orbit. When the propellant isolation valve opens during propulsion system activation, propellant rushes into lines creating a pressure surge. During propellant system shutdown, a pressure surge is created due to sudden closure of a valve. During both activation and shutdown, pressure surges must be predicted accurately to ensure structural integrity of the propulsion system fluid network. The method of characteristics is the most widely used method of calculating fluid transients in pipeline [ 1,2]. The method of characteristics, however, has limited applications in calculating flow distribution in complex flow circuits with phase change, heat transfer and rotational effects. A robust cryogenic propulsion system analyzer must have the capability to handle phase change, heat transfer, chemical reaction, rotational effects and fluid transients in conjunction with subsystem flow model for pumps, valves and various pipe fittings. In recent years, such a task has been undertaken at Marshall Space Flight Center with the development of the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), which is based on finite volume method in fluid network [3]. GFSSP has been extensively verified and validated by comparing its predictions with test data and other numerical methods for various applications such as internal flow of turbo-pump [4], propellant tank pressurization [5,6], chilldown of cryogenic transfer line [7] and squeeze film damper rotordynamics [8]. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the applicability of the finite volume method to predict fluid transient in cryogenic flow

  12. Cryogenic cooling with cryocooler on a rotating system.

    PubMed

    Oguri, S; Choi, J; Kawai, M; Tajima, O

    2013-05-01

    We developed a system that continuously maintains a cryocooler for long periods on a rotating table. A cryostat that holds the cryocooler is set on the table. A compressor is located on the ground and supplies high-purity (>99.999%) and high-pressure (1.7 MPa) helium gas and electricity to the cryocooler. The operation of the cryocooler and other instruments requires the development of interface components between the ground and rotating table. A combination of access holes at the center of the table and two rotary joints allows simultaneous circulation of electricity and helium gas. The developed system provides two innovative functions under the rotating condition, cooling from room temperature and the maintenance of a cold condition for long periods. We have confirmed these abilities as well as temperature stability under a condition of continuous rotation at 20 rpm. The developed system can be applied in various fields, e.g., in tests of Lorentz invariance, searches for axion, radio astronomy, and cosmology, and application of radar systems. In particular, there is a plan to use this system for a radio telescope observing cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. Cryogenic cooling with cryocooler on a rotating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, S.; Choi, J.; Kawai, M.; Tajima, O.

    2013-05-01

    We developed a system that continuously maintains a cryocooler for long periods on a rotating table. A cryostat that holds the cryocooler is set on the table. A compressor is located on the ground and supplies high-purity (>99.999%) and high-pressure (1.7 MPa) helium gas and electricity to the cryocooler. The operation of the cryocooler and other instruments requires the development of interface components between the ground and rotating table. A combination of access holes at the center of the table and two rotary joints allows simultaneous circulation of electricity and helium gas. The developed system provides two innovative functions under the rotating condition, cooling from room temperature and the maintenance of a cold condition for long periods. We have confirmed these abilities as well as temperature stability under a condition of continuous rotation at 20 rpm. The developed system can be applied in various fields, e.g., in tests of Lorentz invariance, searches for axion, radio astronomy, and cosmology, and application of radar systems. In particular, there is a plan to use this system for a radio telescope observing cosmic microwave background radiation.

  14. Cryogenic cooling with cryocooler on a rotating system.

    PubMed

    Oguri, S; Choi, J; Kawai, M; Tajima, O

    2013-05-01

    We developed a system that continuously maintains a cryocooler for long periods on a rotating table. A cryostat that holds the cryocooler is set on the table. A compressor is located on the ground and supplies high-purity (>99.999%) and high-pressure (1.7 MPa) helium gas and electricity to the cryocooler. The operation of the cryocooler and other instruments requires the development of interface components between the ground and rotating table. A combination of access holes at the center of the table and two rotary joints allows simultaneous circulation of electricity and helium gas. The developed system provides two innovative functions under the rotating condition, cooling from room temperature and the maintenance of a cold condition for long periods. We have confirmed these abilities as well as temperature stability under a condition of continuous rotation at 20 rpm. The developed system can be applied in various fields, e.g., in tests of Lorentz invariance, searches for axion, radio astronomy, and cosmology, and application of radar systems. In particular, there is a plan to use this system for a radio telescope observing cosmic microwave background radiation. PMID:23742598

  15. The design and testing of a cooling system using mixed solid cryogen for a portable superconducting magnetic energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. L.; Song, J. B.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Y Koh, D.; Seong, K. C.; Chang, H. M.; Lee, H. G.

    2010-12-01

    A cooling system that uses solid nitrogen (SN2) as an effective heat capacity enhancer was recently introduced to enhance the thermal stability of the HTS SMES. Since SN2 has a large enthalpy with minimal weight, it enables a portable system by increasing the recooling to recooling time period (RRTP). However, contact between the SN2 and HTS SMES magnet can be broken by repeated thermal disturbances (thermal 'dry-out' phenomena). Therefore, it is essential to improve thermal contact to allow full use of the heat capacity of SN2. This study evaluated the effect of using a mixture containing SN2 and a small amount of a liquid cryogen as a cooling system in the HTS SMES system. The performance of the cooling system was evaluated using the mixed cryogen and compared with that of SN2 alone. In addition, the role of liquid neon (Ne) as a heat exchanger between SN2 and the HTS SMES magnet is discussed.

  16. Cryogenic thermal storage system for discontinuous industrial vacuum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, M.; Chesi, A.; Baldi, A.; Tarani, F.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Carnevale, E.

    2012-10-01

    Phase Change Materials are proposed for refrigerating systems in discontinuous industrial vacuum processes where temperatures as low as -140 ÷ -100°C are necessary within time-frames representing 10÷20% of total operating time. An application is proposed for cooling systems used in a Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) apparatus. A prototype has been manufactured which couples a cryopump with a reservoir filled with MethylCycloPentane (MCP-C6H12) and a distribution line where nitrogen in the gaseous state is flowing. Preliminary tests show that temperatures of about -120°C are actually achieved within time windows compatible with PVD applications.

  17. Effect of medium temperature on the characteristics of closed cryogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rura, V.N.

    1985-05-01

    The author analyzes the effect of medium temperature on the characteristics of a gaseous cryogenic system consisting of an engine driven by compressed gas with a regenerator in the dead space and piston-drive compressor. He concludes that, having determined the relationship between the total losses and the temperature of the medium in the volume being cryosated, it is possible to select a volume ratio for the pressure and suction lines so as to reduce the effect of medium temperature on the useful cold production of the system.

  18. Automation, Operation, and Data Analysis in the Cryogenic, High Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has been enhanced in a number of ways in the last year to allow the system to accurately collect refracted beam deviation readings automatically over a range of temperatures from 15 K to well beyond room temperature with high sampling density in both wavelength and temperature. The engineering details which make this possible are presented. The methods by which the most accurate angular measurements are made and the corresponding data reduction methods used to reduce thousands of observed angles to a handful of refractive index values are also discussed.

  19. Automation, Operation, and Data Analysis in the Cryogenic, High Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Duoglas

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center has been enhanced in a number of ways in the last year to allow the system to accurately collect refracted beam deviation readings automatically over a range of temperatures from 15 K to well beyond room temperature with high sampling density in both wavelength and temperature. The engineering details which make this possible are presented. The methods by which the most accurate angular measurements are made and the corresponding data reduction methods used to reduce thousands of observed angles to a handful of refractive index values are also discussed.

  20. Two-Phase Cryogenic Heat Exchanger for the Thermodynamic Vent System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A two-phase cryogenic heat exchanger for a thermodynamic vent system was designed and analyzed, and the predicted performance was compared with test results. A method for determining the required size of the Joule-Thomson device was also developed. Numerous sensitivity studies were performed to show that the design was robust and possessed a comfortable capacity margin. The comparison with the test results showed very similar heat extraction performance for similar inlet conditions. It was also shown that estimates for Joule- Thomson device flow rates and exit quality can vary significantly and these need to be accommodated for with a robust system design.

  1. Environmental control system for cryogenic testing of tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandergrift, E. F.; Yatsko, G. O.

    1967-01-01

    Environmental control system uses a special coil to permit the tensile testing of specimens which may be subjected to temperatures anywhere between liquid nitrogen and room temperature. The test specimen zone is surrounded by the coil which permits the selective flooding of the specimen with warm or cold gas.

  2. Two stage sorption type cryogenic refrigerator including heat regeneration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Wen, Liang-Chi (Inventor); Bard, Steven (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A lower stage chemisorption refrigeration system physically and functionally coupled to an upper stage physical adsorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Waste heat generated by the lower stage cycle is regenerated to fuel the upper stage cycle thereby greatly improving the energy efficiency of a two-stage sorption refrigerator. The two stages are joined by disposing a first pressurization chamber providing a high pressure flow of a first refrigerant for the lower stage refrigeration cycle within a second pressurization chamber providing a high pressure flow of a second refrigerant for the upper stage refrigeration cycle. The first pressurization chamber is separated from the second pressurization chamber by a gas-gap thermal switch which at times is filled with a thermoconductive fluid to allow conduction of heat from the first pressurization chamber to the second pressurization chamber.

  3. Study of cryogenic propellant systems for loading the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voth, R. O.; Steward, W. G.; Hall, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Computer programs were written to model the liquid oxygen loading system for the space shuttle. The programs allow selection of input data through graphic displays which schematically depict the part of the system being modeled. The computed output is also displayed in the form of graphs and printed messages. Any one of six computation options may be selected. The first four of these pertain to thermal stresses, pressure surges, cooldown times, flow rates and pressures during cooldown. Options five and six deal with possible water hammer effects due to closing of valves, steady flow and transient response to changes in operating conditions after cooldown. Procedures are given for operation of the graphic display unit and minicomputer.

  4. Fiber optic cryogenic liquid level detection system for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Yang, Chengning; Chen, Shiping

    2009-05-01

    Liquid hydrogen and oxygen are widely used as fuels in space vehicles. Because both are highly dangerous materials prone to explosion, detection of the liquid level in fuel tank becomes a critical element for the safety and efficiency in space operations. Two liquid level sensing techniques are presented in this paper. The first technique is based on optical fiber long period gratings. In this technique, the full length of a specially fabricated fiber is the body of the probe becomes the length of the sensing fiber that is submerged in the liquid can be detected by the interrogation system. The second system uses optical fibers to guide light to and from an array of point probes. These probes are specially fabricated, miniature optical components which reflects a substantial amount of light back into the lead fiber when the probe is gas but almost no light when it is in liquid. A detailed theoretical study by computer simulation was carried out on these two techniques in order to determine which technique was more suitable for experimental investigation. The study revealed that although the first technique may provide more potential benefits in terms of weight and easy installation; a number of technical challenges make it not suitable for a short term solution. The second, probe array based technique, on the other hand, is more mature technically. The rest of the research program was therefore focused on the experimental investigation of the probe array detection technique and the test results are presented in this paper.

  5. Description of the insulation system for the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.; Dress, D. A.; Kilgore, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal insulation system of the Langley 0.3 Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel is described. The insulation system is designed to operate from room temperature down to about 77.4 K, the temperature of liquid nitrogen at 1 atmosphere. A detailed description is given of the primary insulation sytem consists of glass fiber mats, a three part vapor barrier, and a dry positive pressure purge system. Also described are several secondary insulation systems required for the test section, actuators, and tunnel supports. An appendix briefly describes the original insulation system which is considered inferior to the one presently in place. The time required for opening and closing portions of the insulation system for modification or repair to the tunnel has been reduced, typically, from a few days for the original thermal insulating system to a few hours for the present system.

  6. Six movements measurement system employed for GAIA secondary mirror positioning system vacuum tests at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo; Sánchez Rodríguez, Antonio; Garranzo García-Ibarrola, Daniel; Belenguer Dávila, Tomás

    2008-07-01

    In this work, the optical measurement system employed to evaluate the performance of a 6 degrees of freedom (dof) positioning mechanism under cryogenic conditions is explored. The mechanism, the flight model of three translations and three rotations positioning mechanism, was developed by the Spanish company SENER (for ASTRIUM) to fulfil the high performance requirements from ESA technology preparatory program for the positioning of a secondary mirror within the GAIA Astrometric Mission. Its performance has been evaluated under vacuum and temperature controlled conditions (up to a 10-6mbar and 100K) at the facilities of the Space Instrumentation Laboratory (LINES) of the Aerospace Technical Nacional Institute of Spain (INTA). After the description of the 'alignment tool' developed to compare a fixed reference with the optical signal corresponding to the movement under evaluation, the optical system that allows measuring the displacements and the rotations in the three space directions is reported on. Two similar bread-boards were defined and mounted for the measurements purpose, one containing two distancemeters, in order to measure the displacements through the corresponding axis, and an autocollimator in order to obtain the rotations on the plane whose normal vector is the axis mentioned before, and other one containing one distancemeter and one autocollimator. Both distancemeter and autocollimator measurements have been combined in order to extract the information about the accuracy of the mechanism movements as well as their repeatability under adverse environmental conditions.

  7. Experimental study of cryogenic liquid turbine expander with closed-loop liquefied nitrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Sun, Jinju; Song, Peng

    2015-04-01

    A cryogenic liquid turbine expander is developed as a replacement for traditional Joule-Thomson valves used in the cryogenic systems for the purpose of energy saving. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the turbine expander and is the subject of this paper. The test rig comprises a closed-loop liquefied nitrogen system, cryogenic liquid turbine expander unit, and its auxiliary and measuring systems. The test operating parameters of the turbine expander are determined on the basis of flow similarity rules. Pre-cooling of the liquid nitrogen system is first performed, and then the tests are conducted at different flow rates and speed ratios. The turbine expander flow rate, inlet and outlet pressure and temperature, rotational speed and shaft torque were measured. Experimental results and their uncertainties were analyzed and discussed. The following are demonstrated: (1) For both test cases, turbine expander peak isentropic efficiency is respectively 78.8% and 68.4% obtained at 89.6% and 92% of the design flow rate. The large uncertainties in isentropic efficiency are caused by the large enthalpy variations subjected to small measurement uncertainties in temperature and pressure. (2) Total efficiency and hydraulic efficiency of the turbine expander are obtained. They are essentially the same, since both include flow-related effects and also bearing losses. Comparisons of total efficiency and hydraulic efficiency were used to justify measurement uncertainties of different quantities, since the former involves the measured mass flow rate and enthalpy drop (being dependant on inlet and outlet temperature and pressure), while the latter involves the actual shaft power, volume flow rate, and inlet and outlet pressure. (3) Losses in flow passages and the shaft-bearing system have been inferred based on the measured turbine expander total efficiency, isentropic efficiency, and mechanical efficiency, which are respectively 57.6-74.8%, 62

  8. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamowski, M.; Bremer, J.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Montanari, D.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.

    2015-12-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these installations (parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). This paper gives an overview of the installations involved in these cryogenic projects, describes the functional demands made to these cryogenic systems and presents the initial studies on which these future cryogenic systems will be based.

  9. Design Of A Support System For The Primary Mirror Of A Cryogenic Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiTolla, Robert; Richard, Ralph M.; Vukobratovich, Daniel

    1986-07-01

    The finite element method was used for the structural design of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) primary mirror and its support system in a cryogenic environment similar to space-shuttle cargo-bay launch conditions. Shuttle loads were specified by power spectral density functions (PSDF) obtained from previous shuttle launches. The primary goal in the development of a design to withstand this random loading was to ensure the structural integrity of the support system, which comprised an aluminum baseplate and three titanium flexures. This design was an extension of a support system previously developed for cryogenic static effects only. The displacements and stresses of the support system are greatly affected by the damping characteristics of the flexures, which are very difficult to quantify. A parametric study illustrates the behavior of the system over the range of the estimated damping values. Recommendations and techniques for modeling this type of structure are presented. The methods and approaches used in the analysis and the effect of model refinement upon solution accuracy are discussed.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  11. Status of the cryogenic inertial reference system for the Gravity Probe B mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Gwo, D.-H.; Kirschman, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the status of the development and testing program for the inertial reference system for the Gravity Probe B gyroscopes. The gyroscope housings are attached to a cryogenic telescope with a 14 cm aperture that continuously points at a guide star. The star image is split to provide quadrant pointing information which is used to steer the spacecraft. This data is also combined with the gyro readout data to provide an absolute precession measurement. Motion of the guide star is independently checked by reference to background galaxies. Room temperature testing of a prototype telescope has been completed and preparations are being made for low temperature tests.

  12. Physics Based Model for Online Fault Detection in Autonomous Cryogenic Loading System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, Ali; Devine, Ekaterina Viktorovna P; Luchinsky, Dmitry Georgievich; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Sass, Jared P.; Brown, Barbara L.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2013-01-01

    We report the progress in the development of the chilldown model for rapid cryogenic loading system developed at KSC. The nontrivial characteristic feature of the analyzed chilldown regime is its active control by dump valves. The two-phase flow model of the chilldown is approximated as one-dimensional homogeneous fluid flow with no slip condition for the interphase velocity. The model is built using commercial SINDAFLUINT software. The results of numerical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental time traces. The obtained results pave the way to the application of the SINDAFLUINT model as a verification tool for the design and algorithm development required for autonomous loading operation.

  13. Slosh wave excitation due to cryogenic liquid reorientation in space-based propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquistion or positioning of liquid and vapor within a tank in reduced gravity to enable liquid outflow or vapor venting. In this study slosh wave excitation induced by the resettling flow field activated by 1.0 Hz medium frequency impulsive reverse gravity acceleration during the course of liquid fluid reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid filled levels of 30, 50, and 80 percent have been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves with various frequencies excited are discussed.

  14. Environmental testing of high Tc superconductive thermal isolators for space-borne cryogenic detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Randolf, Henry W.; Verbelyi, Darren; Haertling, Gene H.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Selim, Raouf; Caton, Randall

    1992-01-01

    Thick films of superconductive material on low thermal conductivity substrates (e.g., yttria-stabilized zirconia and fused silica) are considered as a replacement for the existing electrical connections between the detector array and data acquisition and storage electronics in the cryogenic detector systems being developed by NASA. The paper describes some of the design constraints on the superconducting device and presents results of a preliminary analysis of the effects of vibration, gamma irradiation, and long-term exposure to high vacuum and liquid nitrogen encountered in operating such a device in space.

  15. Thermostabilization System Based on Two-phase Closed Cryogenic Thermosyphon for RED100 Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolozdynya, A. I.; Efremenko, Yu. V.; Khromov, V. A.; Shafigullin, R. R.; Shakirov, A. V.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Tolstukhin, I. A.

    The RED 100 emission detector requires thermostabilization at about 100K. The heat transfer characteristics of a two-phase closed cryogenic thermosyphon made of copper pipe and bellow flex hoses with nitrogen fluid have been investigated. The thermosyphon consists of sealed pipe enclosed in a vacuum jacket and uses a free-boiling liquid nitrogen pool as a cooling machine. The system is very flexible and can provide heat transfer rate up to 100 W in the temperature range of 80-100 K.

  16. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  17. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto

    2014-01-29

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  18. Design of a cryogenic system for a 20m direct current superconducting MgB2 and YBCO power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheadle, Michael J.; Bromberg, Leslie; Jiang, Xiaohua; Glowacki, Bartek; Zeng, Rong; Minervini, Joseph; Brisson, John

    2014-01-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, are collaborating to design, construct, and test a 20 m, direct current, superconducting MgB2 and YBCO power cable. The cable will be installed in the State Key Laboratory of Power Systems at Tsinghua University in Beijing beginning in 2013. In a previous paper [1], the cryogenic system was briefly discussed, focusing on the cryogenic issues for the superconducting cable. The current paper provides a detailed discussion of the design, construction, and assembly of the cryogenic system and its components. The two-stage system operates at nominally 80 K and 20 K with the primary cryogen being helium gas. The secondary cryogen, liquid nitrogen, is used to cool the warm stage of binary current leads. The helium gas provides cooling to both warm and cold stages of the rigid cryostat housing the MgB2 and YBCO conductors, as well as the terminations of the superconductors at the end of the current leads. A single cryofan drives the helium gas in both stages, which are thermally isolated with a high effectiveness recuperator. Refrigeration for the helium circuit is provided by a Sumitomo RDK415 cryocooler. This paper focuses on the design, construction, and assembly of the cryostat, the recuperator, and the current leads with associated superconducting cable terminations.

  19. Developments in low-gravity cryogenic propellant acquisition and thermal control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Development programs are described for two low-gravity cryogenic propellant acquisition systems: a full-screen liner system, and a refillable start-tank. First, based on experimental LH2 screen flow data, the fluid-dynamic characteristics of an integrated screen/thermodynamic vent system were analyzed for a design compared to 17.5 cu fg supercritical life-support systems, and for a Tug orbital LH2/LQ2 resupply system. Second, the analysis, design, fabrication, and test of a 10 cu ft, annular-screen start-tank with a wall-mounted thermodynamic vent was performed. The test program demonstrated that the system expelled LH2 against 1-g and performed properly over a range of conditions.

  20. Study and development of a cryogenic heat exchanger for life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    A prototype cryogenic heat exchanger for removal of waste heat from a spacecraft environmental control life support system was developed. The heat exchanger uses the heat sink capabilities of the cryogenic propellants and, hence, can operate over all mission phases from prelaunch to orbit, to post landing, with quiescent periods during orbit. A survey of candidate warm fluids resulted in the selection of E-2, a fluorocarbon compound, because of its low freezing point and high boiling point. The final design and testing of the heat exchanger was carried out, however, using Freon-21, which is similar to E-2 except for its low boiling point. This change was motivated by the desire for cost effectiveness of the experimental program. The transient performance of the heat exchanger was demonstrated by an analog simulation of the heat sink system. Under the realistic transient heat load conditions (20 sec ramp from minimum to maximum Freon-21 inlet temperature), the control system was able to maintain the warm fluid outlet temperature within + or - 3 F. For a 20-sec ramp from 0 F to -400 F in the hydrogen inlet temperature, at maximum heat load, the warm fluid outlet temperature was maintained within + or - 7 F.

  1. Cryogenic Property Measurements on Icy Compositions with Application to Solar System Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, C.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Barmatz, M.; Mitchell, K.

    2007-08-01

    grains). Post-synthesis microstructural characterization will be performed using Cryogenic Optical Microscopy integrating a cross-polarizer to analyze thin sections, and a Cryogenic Scanning Electron Microscope. Mechanical property measurements on solid specimens will be performed between 80 and 270 K with a cryogenically cooled Instron measurement system. Compression measurements will be conducted as a function of temperature, strain-rate, microstructural length scale and orientation. The time dependent viscous response will be measured by performing creep measurements over the same range of temperatures. Using low-frequency cyclic loading, the dissipation factor will be measured at frequencies approaching satellite orbital frequencies. We will report preliminary mechanical property measurements of Antarctic glacial specimens at cryogenic temperatures. Fluids. In order to improve our understanding of effusive cryovolcanism, the rheological properties of liquid and mixed (slurry) materials will be measured between 80 and 300 K using a cryogenically cooled Brookfield rotational rheometer. We will report preliminary measurements of the temperature dependence of the viscous response for several compositions in the Methanol-Water System. Also, we will describe an experiment designed to measure methane wetting on water ice. These experiments will be carried out in order to explore the effects of the presence of methane lakes on Titan's surface. We are developing the capability to investigate more complex materials relevant to surface processes on Titan, including methane-ethane phase studies, hydrocarbons such as acetylene and benzene, as well as tholins and clathrates, which should exhibit a range of rheological and mechanical properties from fast-moving fluids to glacial creep. Acknowledgements: Most of the research described in this presentation was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National

  2. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  3. Cryogenic Control System Migration and Developments towards the UNICOS CERN Standard at INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modanese, Paolo; Calore, Andrea; Contran, Tiziano; Friso, Alessandro; Pengo, Marco; Canella, Stefania; Burioli, Sergio; Gallese, Benedetto; Inglese, Vitaliano; Pezzetti, Marco; Pengo, Ruggero

    The cryogenic control systems at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) are undergoing an important and radical modernization, allowing all the plants controls and supervision systems to be renewed in a homogeneous way towards the CERN-UNICOS standard. Before the UNICOS migration project started there were as many as 7 different types of PLC and 7 different types of SCADA, each one requiring its own particular programming language. In these conditions, even a simple modification and/or integration on the program or on the supervision, required the intervention of a system integrator company, specialized in its specific control system. Furthermore it implied that the operators have to be trained to learn the different types of control systems. The CERN-UNICOS invented for LHC [1] has been chosen due to its reliability and planned to run and be maintained for decades on. The complete migration is part of an agreement between CERN and INFN.

  4. 47 CFR 0.552 - Notice identifying Commission systems of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and business address of the system manager; (g) The address of the agency office to which inquiries... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice identifying Commission systems of... ORGANIZATION Privacy Act Regulations § 0.552 Notice identifying Commission systems of records. The...

  5. Vertically configured collimator for cryogenic vacuum testing of meter scale optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatke, Derek; Meyer, Steve; Siegel, Noah; Byrd, Don; Spuhler, Peter; Atcheson, Paul; Martella, Mark; Penniman, Edwin

    2007-09-01

    Ball Aerospace has constructed a new collimator for interferometric and image quality testing of meter scale optical systems under cryogenic, vacuum conditions. Termed the Vertical Collimator Assembly (VCA), it features 1.5 m diameter off-axis parabolic and calibration flat mirrors. In order to preserve as large a volume as possible for the unit under test, the main platform is suspended inside its vacuum chamber by a hexapod, with the parabolic mirror mounted overhead. A simultaneous interferometer facilitates collimator alignment and monitoring, as well as wavefront quality measurements for the test unit. Diffusely illuminated targets may be employed for through-focus image quality measurements with pinholes and bar targets. Mechanical alignment errors induced by thermal and structural perturbations are monitored with a three-beam distance measuring interferometer to enable mid-test compensation. Sources for both interferometer systems are maintained at atmospheric pressure while still directly mounted to the main platform, reducing vibration and stability problems associated with thermal vacuum testing. Because path lengths inside the ambient pressure vessels are extremely short, problems related to air turbulence and layering are also mitigated. In-chamber support equipment is insulated and temperature controlled, allowing testing while the chamber shrouds and test unit are brought to cryogenic temperatures.

  6. SU-E-T-630: Commissioning for SRS Planning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pella, S; Smith, C; Leventouri, T; Bacala, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study will try to find optimal procedures to collect small fields beam data for commissioning in treatment planning systems (TPS), and to provide a protocol to collect output factors for very small field sizes: 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 4.0 cm × 4.0 cm.This will help in determining the correct beam configuration methods in TPS planning intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and stereotactic radiosurgery SRS using mini multileaf collimation (mMLC). Methods: Data has been collected for a mMLC linear accelerator (linac) Novalis from 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 10 cm × 10 cm (its maximum field size). The TPS chosen is BrainLab, Eclipse and Cyberknife. The beam data collected was modeled and imported in the TPS. Verification plans were generated in solid water to confirm the goodness of the data. 3D and IMRT plans on regular CT scans were generated and verified using Mapcheck. All 3D plans with field sizes above 4 cm × 4 cm verified excellent using a distance to agreement of 2 mm and a 2% tolerance. IMRT plans gave an error of -8%. New scans with new detectors have been taken, new field sizes were introduced, and focus has been applied on determining the dosimetric leaf gap. Results: Although this is still a work in progress, this study brings several issues to light: the importance of the correct technique in beam data collection from the correct watertank to the correct detectors. Readings for rectangular fields have to be taken especially for fields which one side is under 4 cm. Conclusion: The use of equivalent square fields will not provide correct readings for the fields with large differences between the length and the width.

  7. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) for studying the morphology of colloidal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kuntsche, Judith; Horst, Jennifer C; Bunjes, Heike

    2011-09-30

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) has evolved into an indispensable tool for the characterization of colloidal drug delivery systems. It can be applied to study the size, shape and internal structure of nanoparticulate carrier systems as well as the overall colloidal composition of the corresponding dispersions. This review gives a short overview over the instrumentation used in cryo-TEM experiments and over the sample preparation procedure. Selected examples of cryo-TEM studies on colloidal drug carrier systems, including liposomes, colloidal lipid emulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles, polymer-based colloids and delivery systems for nucleic acids, are presented in order to illustrate the wealth of information that can be obtained by this technique.

  8. Cryogenic Viscous Compressor Development and Modeling for the ITER Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Barbier, Charlotte N; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Duckworth, Robert C; Edgemon, Timothy D; Rasmussen, David A; Hechler, Michael P; Kersevan, R.; Dremel, M.; Pearce, R.J.H.; Boissin, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    The ITER vacuum system requires a roughing pump system that can pump the exhaust gas from the torus cryopumps to the tritium exhaust processing plant. The gas will have a high tritium content and therefore conventional vacuum pumps are not suitable. A pump called a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed for the roughing system to pump from ~500 Pa to 10 Pa at flow rates of 200 Pa-m3/ s. A unique feature of this pump is that is allows any helium in the gas to flow through the pump where it is sent to the detritiation system before exhausting to atmosphere. A small scale prototype of the CVC is being tested for heat transfer characteristics and compared to modeling results to ensure reliable operation of the full scale CVC. Keywords- ITER; vacuum; fuel cycle

  9. Thermal performance of a modularized replaceable multilayer insulation system for a cryogenic stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A rugged modularized MLI system for a 2.23-meter-diameter (87.6-in.-diam) liquid hydrogen tank was designed, fabricated, and tested under simulated near-earth and deep-space environments. The two blankets of the system were each composed of 17 double-aluminized Mylar radiation shields separated by silk net. The unit area weight of the installed system was 1.54 kg/sqm (0.32 lb/sq ft). The overall average heat transferred into the insulated tank was 22.7 and 0.98 watts (77.4 and 3.3 Btu/hr) during simulated near-earth and deep-space testing, respectively. The near-earth result was only 2.6 times that predicted for an undisturbed insulation system (i.e., no seams or penetrations). Tests indicate that this insulation concept could be useful for a cryogenic space tug or orbit transfer vehicle application.

  10. Cryogenic fluid management technologies for space transportation. Zero G thermodynamic vent system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Long term storage of subcritical cryogens in space must address the problem of thermal stratification in the storage tanks, liquid acquisition devices, and associated feed systems. Due to the absence of gravity induced body forces, thermal stratification in zero-g is more severe than commonly experienced in a one-g environment. If left uncontrolled, the thermal gradients result in excessive tank pressure rise and the formation of undesirable liquid/vapor mixtures within the liquid bulk, liquid acquisition system, and propellant transfer lines. Since external heat leakage cannot be eliminated, a means of minimizing the thermal stratification in the ullage gas, liquid, and feed system is required. A subsystem which minimizes the thermal stratification and rejects the environmental heat leakage in an efficient manner is therefore needed for zero-g subcritical cryogenic systems. In ground based storage systems the ullage gas location is always known (top of the tank) and therefore direct venting of gases as a means of heat rejection is easily accomplished. In contrast, because the ullage location in a zero-g environment is not easily predictable, heat rejection through direct gaseous venting is difficult in space (requires liquid settling, or surface tension devices). A means of indirect venting through the use of a thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is therefore required. A thermodynamic vent system allows indirect venting of vapor through heat exchange between the vented fluid and the stored fluid. The objective is to ensure that only gas and not liquid is vented, in order to minimize the propellant losses. Consequently, the design of a TVS is a critical enabling technology for future applications such as solar thermal and electric propulsion, single-stage-to-orbit vertical landers and upper stages, and any space based operations involving subcritical cryogenics. To bridge this technology gap NASA MSFC initiated an effort to build and verify through ground tests a zero

  11. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  12. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  13. Conceptual design and analysis of orbital cryogenic liquid storage and supply systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Cunnington, G. R.; Johns, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    A wide variety of orbital cryogenic liquid storage and supply systems are defined in NASA and DOD long-range plans. These systems include small cooling applications, large chemical and electrical orbit transfer vehicles and supply tankers. All have the common requirements of low-g fluid management to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and efficient thermal control to manage heat leak and tank pressure. A preliminary design study was performed to evaluate tanks ranging from 0.6 to 37.4 cu m (22 to 1320 cu ft). Liquids of interest were hydrogen, oxygen, methane, argon and helium. Conceptual designs were generated for each tank system and fluid dynamic, thermal and structural analyses were performed for Shuttle compatible operations. Design trades considered the paradox of conservative support structure and minimum thermal input. Orbital performance and weight data were developed, and a technology evaluation was completed.

  14. Calibration system with cryogenically-cooled loads for cosmic microwave background polarization detectors.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M; Tajima, O; Chinone, Y; Hazumi, M; Ishidoshiro, K; Nagai, M

    2011-05-01

    We present a novel system to calibrate millimeter-wave polarimeters for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements. This technique is an extension of the conventional metal mirror rotation approach, however, it employs cryogenically-cooled blackbody absorbers. The primary advantage of this system is that it can generate a slightly polarized signal (∼100 mK) in the laboratory; this is at a similar level to that measured by ground-based CMB polarization experiments observing a ∼10 K sky. It is important to reproduce the observing condition in the laboratory for reliable characterization of polarimeters before deployment. In this paper, we present the design and principle of the system and demonstrate its use with a coherent-type polarimeter used for an actual CMB polarization experiment. This technique can also be applied to incoherent-type polarimeters and it is very promising for the next-generation CMB polarization experiments.

  15. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems. PMID:25273745

  16. Model predictions and observed performance of JWST's cryogenic position metrology system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Sharon R.; Rhodes, David; DiAntonio, Andrew; Boland, John; Wells, Conrad; Gigliotti, Trevis; Johanning, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) cryogenic testing requires measurement systems that both obtain a very high degree of accuracy and can function in that environment. Close-range photogrammetry was identified as meeting those criteria. Testing the capability of a close-range photogrammetric system prior to its existence is a challenging problem. Computer simulation was chosen over building a scaled mock-up to allow for increased flexibility in testing various configurations. Extensive validation work was done to ensure that the actual as-built system meets accuracy and repeatability requirements. The simulated image data predicted the uncertainty in measurement to be within specification and this prediction was borne out experimentally. Uncertainty at all levels was verified experimentally to be <0.1 mm.

  17. Analysis of a topping-cycle, aircraft, gas-turbine-engine system which uses cryogenic fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, G. E.; Fishbach, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    A topping-cycle aircraft engine system which uses a cryogenic fuel was investigated. This system consists of a main turboshaft engine that is mechanically coupled (by cross-shafting) to a topping loop, which augments the shaft power output of the system. The thermodynamic performance of the topping-cycle engine was analyzed and compared with that of a reference (conventional) turboshaft engine. For the cycle operating conditions selected, the performance of the topping-cycle engine in terms of brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was determined to be about 12 percent better than that of the reference turboshaft engine. Engine weights were estimated for both the topping-cycle engine and the reference turboshaft engine. These estimates were based on a common shaft power output for each engine. Results indicate that the weight of the topping-cycle engine is comparable with that of the reference turboshaft engine.

  18. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  19. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  20. Comparison of reusable insulation systems for cryogenically-tanked earth-based space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Barber, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Three reusable insulation systems concepts were developed for use with cryogenic tanks of earth-based space vehicles. Two concepts utilized double-goldized Kapton (DGK) or double-aluminized Mylar (DAM) multilayer insulation (MLI), while the third utilized a hollow-glass-microsphere, loadbearing insulation (LBI). Thermal performance measurements were made under space-hold (vacuum) conditions for insulating warm boundary temperatures of approximately 291 K. The resulting effective thermal conductivity was approximately 0.00008 W/m-K (W = weight,Kg; m = measured; K = temperature) for the MLI systems (liquid hydrogen test results) and 0.00054 W/m-K for the LBI system (liquid nitrogen test results corrected to liquid hydrogen temperature).

  1. Cryogen-free lkA-class Ic measurement system featuring an 8 T HTS magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, N. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Wimbush, S. C.; Pooke, D. M.; Huang, T.; Lazic, Z.; Chamritski, V.; Talantsev, E. F.; Long, N. J.; Tallon, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a cryogen-free critical-current (Ic) measuring system comprising a conduction-cooled 8 T HTS magnet and convection-cooled sample, both cooled by commercial cryocoolers. The sample can be rotated and transport currents of up to 800 A delivered with less than 0.5 K temperature rise during the Ic measurement. The system is automated with respect to variations in temperature (30-90 K), field (0-8 T), and field angle (0-360°). We have used this system to measure HTS wire samples, concentrating on metal-organic deposited YBCO on RABiTS substrates. Particular emphasis is given to the evolution of Ic anisotropy with temperature, and the dangers of extrapolating from 77 K to 30 K.

  2. The Development and Implementation of a Cryogenic Pressure Sensitive Paint System in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.; Goad, Linda R.; Massey, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    The Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) method was used to measure global surface pressures on a model at full-scale flight Reynolds numbers. In order to achieve these conditions, the test was carried out at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) operating under cryogenic conditions in a nitrogen environment. The upper surface of a wing on a full-span 0.027 scale commercial transport was painted with a porous PSP formulation and tested at 120K. Data was acquired at Mach 0.8 with a total pressure of 200 kPa, resulting in a Reynolds number of 65 x 106/m. Oxygen, which is required for PSP operation, was injected using dry air so that the oxygen concentration in the flow was approximately 1535 ppm. Results show qualitative agreement with expected results. This preliminary test is the first time that PSP has been successfully deployed to measure global surface pressures at cryogenic condition in the NTF. This paper will describe the system as installed, the results obtained from the test, as well as proposed upgrades and future tests.

  3. Development and test of a cryogenic pulsating heat pipe and a pre-cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Fabien; Gully, Philippe; Nikolayev, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    The needs of thermal links in cryogenic applications are increasing, especially because of the use of cryocoolers which offer a reduced size cold finger. The Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP) is a passive two-phase high performance thermal link. Like the conventional heat pipe, it features a closed tube filled with a two-phase fluid able to transfer heat from its hot part (evaporator) to the cold part (condenser). A general problem for any two-phase cryogenic thermal link is the pre-cooling of the evaporator to ensure the presence of liquid inside the evaporator to start the flow motion. In conventional heat pipes, this problem is by passed by the wick but in the case of PHPs it has to be specially addressed. We have designed, manufactured and tested a helium PHP associated to a novel pre-cooling system. The cool down time of the PHP evaporator is reduced significantly. The maximum transferred power of the PHP is 145 mW with a cold source at 4.2 K.

  4. Cryogenically Cooled Monochromator with Multi-crystal Switching System on BL11XU at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiwaku, Hideaki; Mitsui, Takaya; Tozawa, Kazukiyo; Kiriyama, Koji; Harami, Taikan; Mochizuki, Tetsuro

    2004-05-01

    We developed a multi-crystal switching system on a cryogenically cooled monochromator of the JAERI materials science beamline, BL11XU at SPring-8. In order to make progress in our science, it is necessary to ensure at least the energy range of 6 ˜ 70 keV which is achieved by employing Si(111) and Si(311) crystals. The principle of the crystal switching is that, two crystals is arranged side by side, and they are translated in the horizontal direction for exchanging the crystals. Indium sheets were inserted between the crystals in order to improve the thermal contact. Four adjustment stages of the SPring-8 standard type monochromator were removed to avoid the crystal vibration. A sheet heater was installed on the α-axis stage to prevent the over-cooling of the residual adjustment stages. The cryogenically cooled monochromator provides the 7.4 times higher flux intensity at 14.4 keV in comparison with a previous indirect water-cooling diamond (111) crystal monochromator. It takes only 5 minutes to exchange the crystal from Si(111) to Si(311) and adjust crystals geometry. This mechanism will be easily applied to other crystals, for example asymmetrical-cut crystals or more pair of the crystals.

  5. Ultra-light flexible temperature and liquid level sensing probe for cryogenic propellant mass gauging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberbusch, Mark S.

    2002-05-01

    The Cryo-Tracker™, a patent pending, ultra-light, flexible sensing probe for measuring fluid temperature gradients and liquid level has been created for launch vehicle mass gauging systems for cryogenic propellant tanks. The unique one-piece, polyimide mechanically-flexible sensing probe integrates multiple dual-use silicon diode sensing elements within the probe substrate. The Cryo-Tracker has several features including: flexibility, lightweight, high strength, solderless connections, and one-piece construction. The easy-to-install flexible sensing probe measures temperature between 576 °R (320 °K) down to 2.5 °R (1.4 °K). The Cryo-Tracker™ can be integrated into existing standard tank designs or into vehicles that have irregular shaped tank geometries that conform to the aerodynamic shape of the vehicle. The Cryo-Tracker™ probe technology was selected by the NASA 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program to provide accurate stratified propellant mass gauging on future launch vehicles that utilize densified cryogenic propellants. Prototype probes were constructed with one and two sensing elements per probe and tested in liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen. Several Cryo-Tracker test programs are in progress including a liquid hydrogen test and a high-pressure liquid oxygen test. The objective of this paper is to report test results demonstrating the capabilities of the new probe technology and to provide an update on the current test programs.

  6. OVERVIEW AND STATUS OF THE 12 GeV CRYOGENIC SYSTEM UPGRADE AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2010-04-09

    As part of the planned Jefferson Laboratory's electron accelerator (CEBAF) power upgrade, ten additional superconducting RF cryomodules will be added to its accelerator linacs. Although physically the same size as each of the original 40 linac cryomodules, each new cryomodule will have approximately 4 times the acceleration power. To support the additional cryomodule heat loads generated, the existing 2 K, 4600 W Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) plant capacity will be doubled to a total of 9200 W at 2 K plus 24,000 W at 35 K for shield loads. The specified base line process cycle has been modeled after the laboratory's 'Ganni Helium Cycle' process technology. In addition, a fourth physics experimental 'Hall D' will be constructed which will have an additional stand alone 200 W at 4 K helium cryogenic plant. In October of 2008, Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) received approval for project 'Critical Decision 3' construction phase status from the US Department of Energy. An overview of the planned cryogenic systems and current design baseline as it relates to operations will be presented.

  7. Progress on the MICE Liquid Absorber Cooling and CryogenicDistribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Drumm, P.; Ivanyushenkov,Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Lau, W.W.; Yang, S.Q.

    2005-05-13

    This report describes the progress made on the design of the cryogenic cooling system for the liquid absorber for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The absorber consists of a 20.7-liter vessel that contains liquid hydrogen (1.48 kg at 20.3 K) or liquid helium (2.59 kg at 4.2 K). The liquid cryogen vessel is located within the warm bore of the focusing magnet for the MICE. The purpose of the magnet is to provide a low beam beta region within the absorber. For safety reasons, the vacuum vessel for the hydrogen absorber is separated from the vacuum vessel for the superconducting magnet and the vacuum that surrounds the RF cavities or the detector. The absorber thin windows separate the liquid in the absorber from the absorber vacuum. The absorber vacuum vessel also has thin windows that separate the absorber vacuum space from adjacent vacuum spaces. Because the muon beam in MICE is of low intensity, there is no beam heating in the absorber. The absorber can use a single 4 K cooler to cool either liquid helium or liquid hydrogen within the absorber.

  8. Cryogenic system design of 11 GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer superconducting magnets at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Eric; Brindza, Paul; Lassister, Steven; Fowler, Mike

    2012-06-01

    The design of the cryogenic system for the 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) is presented. A description of the cryogenic control reservoir and the cryogenic transfer line is given. Details of the cryogenic control reservoirs, cryogenic transfer lines, and pressure piping are summarized. Code compliance is ensured through following the requirements of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code and Pressure Piping Code. An elastic-plastic-analysis-based combined safety factor approach is proposed to meet the low stress requirement of ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 so that Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact testing can be avoided through analysis. Material toughness requirements in ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 are adopted as CVN impact testing rules of stainless steel 304 piping at 4.2 K and 77 K. A formula-based combined safety factor approach for pressure piping is also proposed to check whether the impact testing can be avoided due to low stress. Analysis and calculation have shown that no CVN impact testing of base metal and heat affected zones is required for the helium reservoir, nitrogen reservoir, and their relevant piping. Total heat loads to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are studied also. The total heat load to LHe for SHMS is estimated to be 137 W, and the total load to LN2 is calculated to be 420 W.

  9. Cryogenic system design of 11 GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer superconducting magnets at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Sun, Paul Brindza, Steven Lassister, Mike Fowler

    2012-07-01

    The design of the cryogenic system for the 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) is presented. A description of the cryogenic control reservoir and the cryogenic transfer line is given. Details of the cryogenic control reservoirs, cryogenic transfer lines, and pressure piping are summarized. Code compliance is ensured through following the requirements of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code and Pressure Piping Code. An elastic-plastic-analysis-based combined safety factor approach is proposed to meet the low stress requirement of ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 so that Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact testing can be avoided through analysis. Material toughness requirements in ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 are adopted as CVN impact testing rules of stainless steel 304 piping at 4.2 K and 77 K. A formula-based combined safety factor approach for pressure piping is also proposed to check whether the impact testing can be avoided due to low stress. Analysis and calculation have shown that no CVN impact testing of base metal and heat affected zones is required for the helium reservoir, nitrogen reservoir, and their relevant piping. Total heat loads to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are studied also. The total heat load to LHe for SHMS is estimated to be 137 W, and the total load to LN2 is calculated to be 420 W.

  10. 78 FR 49763 - Certain Sleep-Disordered Breathing Treatment Systems and Components Thereof; Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Diego, California; ResMed Incorporated of San Diego, California; and ResMed Limited of Australia. 78 FR... COMMISSION Certain Sleep-Disordered Breathing Treatment Systems and Components Thereof; Commission... importation of certain sleep- disordered breathing treatment systems and components thereof by reason...

  11. 78 FR 76858 - Certain Sleep-Disordered Breathing Treatment Systems and Components Thereof; Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ..., ``Complainants''). 78 FR 52563 (August 23, 2013). The complaint alleged violations of Section 337 of the Tariff... COMMISSION Certain Sleep-Disordered Breathing Treatment Systems and Components Thereof; Commission... United States after importation of certain sleep- disordered breathing treatment systems and...

  12. 78 FR 41950 - Certain Video Game Systems and Wireless Controllers and Components Thereof; Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... COMMISSION Certain Video Game Systems and Wireless Controllers and Components Thereof; Commission... Island and New Kingdoms, LLC of Nehalem, Oregon (collectively, ``CK''). 76 FR 23624 (Apr. 27, 2011). The..., ``Nintendo''). The products accused of infringing the asserted patents are gaming systems and...

  13. 29 CFR 1602.43 - Commission's remedy for school systems' or districts' failure to file report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commission's remedy for school systems' or districts' failure to file report. 1602.43 Section 1602.43 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL... Elementary-Secondary Staff Information Report § 1602.43 Commission's remedy for school systems' or...

  14. Developments with the Commission's Longitudinal Student Data System. Working Paper WP/06-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the many uses of the California Postsecondary Education Commission's data system and describes work in progress on adding additional data elements. It describes how the Commission is using its Longitudinal Student Data System (LSDS) to examine the movement of students through California's public colleges and universities. The…

  15. Design, construction and cooling system performance of a prototype cryogenic stopping cell for the Super-FRS at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Dickel, T.; Reiter, M. P.; Ayet, S.; Haettner, E.; Moore, I. D.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Geissel, H.; Plaß, W. R.; Schäfer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schreuder, F.; Timersma, H.; Van de Walle, J.; Weick, H.

    2015-01-01

    A cryogenic stopping cell for stopping energetic radioactive ions and extracting them as a low energy beam was developed. This first ever cryogenically operated stopping cell serves as prototype device for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS at FAIR. The cell has a stopping volume that is 1 m long and 25 cm in diameter. Ions are guided by a DC field along the length of the stopping cell and by a combined RF and DC fields provided by an RF carpet at the exit-hole side. The ultra-high purity of the stopping gas required for optimum ion survival is reached by cryogenic operation. The design considerations and construction of the cryogenic stopping cell, as well as some performance characteristics, are described in detail. Special attention is given to the cryogenic aspects in the design and construction of the stopping cell and the cryocooler-based cooling system. The cooling system allows the operation of the stopping cell at any desired temperature between about 70 K and room temperature. The cooling system performance in realistic on-line conditions at the FRS Ion Catcher Facility at GSI is discussed. A temperature of 110 K at which efficient ion survival was observed is obtained after 10 h of cooling. A minimum temperature of the stopping gas of 72 K was reached. The expertise gained from the design, construction and performance of the prototype cryogenic stopping cell has allowed the development of a final version for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS to proceed.

  16. The high Beta cryo-modules and the associated cryogenic system for the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delruelle, N.; Leclercq, Y.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Tibaron, P.; Vandoni, G.; Williams, L.

    2014-01-01

    The major upgrade of the energy and intensity of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facilities at CERN requires the replacement of most of the existing ISOLDE post-acceleration equipment by a superconducting linac based on quarter-wave resonators housed together with superconducting solenoids in a series of four high-β and two low-β cryo-modules. As well as providing optimum conditions for physics, the cryo-modules need to function under stringent vacuum and cryogenic conditions. We present the detail design and expected cryogenic performance of the high- β cryo-module together with the cryogenic supply and distribution system destined to service the complete superconducting linac.

  17. The high Beta cryo-modules and the associated cryogenic system for the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Delruelle, N.; Leclercq, Y.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Tibaron, P.; Vandoni, G.; Williams, L.

    2014-01-29

    The major upgrade of the energy and intensity of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facilities at CERN requires the replacement of most of the existing ISOLDE post-acceleration equipment by a superconducting linac based on quarter-wave resonators housed together with superconducting solenoids in a series of four high-β and two low-β cryo-modules. As well as providing optimum conditions for physics, the cryo-modules need to function under stringent vacuum and cryogenic conditions. We present the detail design and expected cryogenic performance of the high- β cryo-module together with the cryogenic supply and distribution system destined to service the complete superconducting linac.

  18. Test techniques: A survey paper on cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.; Dress, David A.; Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to get good experimental data in wind tunnels is often compromised by things seemingly beyond our control. Inadequate Reynolds number, wall interference, and support interference are three of the major problems in wind tunnel testing. Techniques for solving these problems are available. Cryogenic wind tunnels solve the problem of low Reynolds number. Adaptive wall test sections can go a long way toward eliminating wall interference. A magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) completely eliminates support interference. Cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and MSBS are surveyed. A brief historical overview is given and the present state of development and application in each area is described.

  19. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  20. Three-stage sorption type cryogenic refrigeration systems and methods employing heat regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven (Inventor); Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A three-stage sorption type cryogenic refrigeration system, each stage containing a fluid having a respectively different boiling point, is presented. Each stage includes a compressor in which a respective fluid is heated to be placed in a high pressure gaseous state. The compressor for that fluid which is heated to the highest temperature is enclosed by the other two compressors to permit heat to be transferred from the inner compressor to the surrounding compressors. The system may include two sets of compressors, each having the structure described above, with the interior compressors of the two sets coupled together to permit selective heat transfer therebetween, resulting in more efficient utilization of input power.

  1. Integrated Cryogenic System for CO2 Separation and Lng Production from Landfill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. M.; Chung, M. J.; Park, S. B.

    2010-04-01

    An integrated cryogenic system to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) and produce LNG from landfill gas is investigated and designed. The main objective of this design is to eliminate the requirement of a standard CO2 removal process in the liquefaction system such distillation or (temperature or pressure) swing adsorption, and to directly separate carbon dioxide as frost at the liquefying channel of methane. Two identical sets of heat exchangers are installed in parallel and switched alternatively with a time period so that one is in separation-liquefaction mode while the other is in CO2 clean-up mode. A thermal regeneration scheme is presented for the purpose of saving energy and avoiding the stoppage of LNG production followed by the flow switching. The switching period is determined from results of a combined heat and mass transfer analysis on the CO2 freeze-out process.

  2. Overview of the cryogenic system for the ariel e-linac at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylinskii, Iouri; Kishi, David; Koveshnikov, Alexey; Laxdal, Robert; Sekachev, Igor; Sitnikov, Alexandre; Yosifov, Dimo

    2012-06-01

    The Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL) is a major upgrade of the existing ISAC radioactive beam facility. After completion, ARIEL will triple TRIUMF's capability of the rare isotope production for the needs of the international scientific community. The key feature of this upgrade is the 50 MeV 10 mA continuous-wave (CW) electron linear accelerator (e-linac) utilizing superconducting bulk niobium technology at 1.3GHz. This paper presents the proposed layout of the e-linac cryogenic system including details of the accelerator cryomodules, estimated heat load of the helium refrigerator, and the description of the helium and LN2 storage and distribution systems with requirements for major components.

  3. Design and simulation of a wire position monitor for cryogenic systems in an ADS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong-Yan; Dong, Lan; Li, Bo

    2014-08-01

    This paper introduces the design and simulation of a Wire Position Monitor (WPM) used in the cryogenic system of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS). The WPM is designed to monitor the contraction of cold masses during the cooling-down operation. In this paper, POISSON-2D electrostatic field software is used to calculate the best characteristic impedance for the WPM. Furthermore, the time domain signal of different end structures is theoretically analyzed and simulated. The coupling of electrodes and the influence of signal carrier size, which may influence the induced signal, are also discussed. Finally, the linearity of the induced voltage and the sensitivity of the WPM are analyzed. The time domain simulation results are consistent with the theoretical analysis. The influences of the coupling and carrier size are very small, and the linearity of the normalized voltage is good within r/2.

  4. Study and design of cryogenic propellant acquisition systems. Volume 2: Supporting experimental program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Areas of cryogenic fuel systems were identified where critical experimental information was needed either to define a design criteria or to establish the feasibility of a design concept or a critical aspect of a particular design. Such data requirements fell into three broad categories: (1) basic surface tension screen characteristics; (2) screen acquisition device fabrication problems; and (3) screen surface tension device operational failure modes. To explore these problems and to establish design criteria where possible, extensive laboratory or bench test scale experiments were conducted. In general, these proved to be quite successful and, in many instances, the test results were directly used in the system design analyses and development. In some cases, particularly those relating to operational-type problems, areas requiring future research were identified, especially screen heat transfer and vibrational effects.

  5. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Casagrande, F.

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  6. Cryogenic Cooling System for 5 kA, 200 μH Class HTS DC Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heecheol; Kim, Seokho; Kim, Kwangmin; Park, Minwon; Park, Taejun; Kim, A.-rong; Lee, Sangjin

    DC reactors, made by aluminum busbar, are used to stabilize the arc of an electric furnace. In the conventional arc furnace, the transport current is several tens of kilo-amperes and enormous resistive loss is generated. To reduce the resistive loss at the DC reactor, a HTS DC reactor can be considered. It can dramatically improve the electric efficiency as well as reduce the installation space. Similar with other superconducting devices, the HTS DC reactor requires current leads from a power source in room temperature to the HTS coil in cryogenic environment. The heat loss at the metal current leads can be minimized through optimization process considering the geometry and the transport current. However, the transport current of the HTS DC reactor for the arc furnace is much larger than most of HTS magnets and the enormous heat penetration through the current lead should be effectively removed to keep the temperature around 70∼77 K. Current leads are cooled down by circulation of liquid nitrogen from the cooling system with a stirling cryocooler. The operating temperature of HTS coil is 30∼40 K and circulation of gaseous helium is used to remove the heat generation at the HTS coil. Gaseous helium is transported through the cryogenic helium blower and a single stage GM cryocooler. This paper describes design and experimental results on the cooling system for current leads and the HTS coil of 5 kA, 200 μH class DC reactor as a prototype. The results are used to verify the design values of the cooling systems and it will be applied to the design of scale-up cooling system for 50 kA, 200 μH class DC reactor.

  7. The TORE SUPRA Cryogenic System Behaviour During Long Plasma Discharges with a High Injected Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, D.; Hertout, P.; Journeaux, J. Y.; Duchateau, J. L.; Reynaud, P.

    2006-04-27

    After the CIEL project completion including the upgrade of the plasma facing components and the water cooling system, the superconducting Tore Supra Tokamak achieved a world record of injected energy (1.1 GJ), during long duration (6 min) plasma discharges, which was enabled by the upgrade of the transfer system capacities, but also by the steady state toroidal field. The Tore Supra cryogenic refrigerator enables the toroidal field coils to be operated at nominal current along the full daily plasma operation shift. It has capacities of 300 W at 1.8 K, 750 W at 4.5 K and 30 kW at 80 K and was operated with a high reliability for more than 16 years. After a brief recall on the cryogenic refrigeration of the toroidal superconducting magnet, the distribution of the heat loads at the various levels of temperature (in standby mode 150W at 1.8 K and 200W at 4.5 K) is presented. The inventory of the calculated static and variable heat loads deposited within each part of toroidal field coils and thermal shields, is given with the factors of dependence. This analysis identifies and quantifies the major magnetic disturbances like a disruption (about 12 kJ onto the coils and 300 kJ onto the thick casings) which generate additional heat loads for the refrigerator.The measurements associated with the He II saturated bath pumping system, and the supercritical helium loop cooling the thick casings, allow us to verify thereafter the behaviour of the cryo-refrigerator during the long duration discharges, and the compliance with the theoretical model.The conclusions bring results also applicable to the cyoplant of future plant like ITER which will operate with long duration discharges.

  8. Cryogenic & Gas System Piping Pressure Tests (A Collection of PT Permits)

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russell A.; /Fermilab

    2002-08-22

    This engineering note is a collection of pipe pressure testing documents for various sections of piping for the D-Zero cryogenic and gas systems. High pressure piping must conform with FESHM chapter 5031.1. Piping lines with ratings greater than 150 psig have a pressure test done before the line is put into service. These tests require the use of pressure testing permits. It is my intent that all pressure piping over which my group has responsibility conforms to the chapter. This includes the liquid argon and liquid helium and liquid nitrogen cryogenic systems. It also includes the high pressure air system, and the high pressure gas piping of the WAMUS and MDT gas systems. This is not an all inclusive compilation of test documentation. Some piping tests have their own engineering note. Other piping section test permits are included in separate safety review documents. So if it isn't here, that doesn't mean that it wasn't tested. D-Zero has a back up air supply system to add reliability to air compressor systems. The system includes high pressure piping which requires a review per FESHM 5031.1. The core system consists of a pressurized tube trailer, supply piping into the building and a pressure reducing regulator tied into the air compressor system discharge piping. Air flows from the trailer if the air compressor discharge pressure drops below the regulator setting. The tube trailer is periodically pumped back up to approximately 2000 psig. A high pressure compressor housed in one of the exterior buildings is used for that purpose. The system was previously documented, tested and reviewed for Run I, except for the recent addition of piping to and from the high pressure compressor. The following documents are provided for review of the system: (1) Instrument air flow schematic, drg. 3740.000-ME-273995 rev. H; (2) Component list for air system; (3) Pressure testing permit for high pressure piping; (4) Documentation from Run I contained in D-Zero Engineering note

  9. Physics based model for online fault detection in autonomous cryogenic loading system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, Ali; Ponizhovskaya, Ekaterina; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Sass, Jared; Brown, Barbara; Patterson-Hine, Anna

    2014-01-01

    We report the progress in the development of the chilldown model for a rapid cryogenic loading system developed at NASA-Kennedy Space Center. The nontrivial characteristic feature of the analyzed chilldown regime is its active control by dump valves. The two-phase flow model of the chilldown is approximated as one-dimensional homogeneous fluid flow with no slip condition for the interphase velocity. The model is built using commercial SINDA/FLUINT software. The results of numerical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental time traces. The obtained results pave the way to the application of the SINDA/FLUINT model as a verification tool for the design and algorithm development required for autonomous loading operation.

  10. Physics based model for online fault detection in autonomous cryogenic loading system

    SciTech Connect

    Kashani, Ali; Ponizhovskaya, Ekaterina; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Patterson-Hine, Anna; Sass, Jared; Brown, Barbara

    2014-01-29

    We report the progress in the development of the chilldown model for a rapid cryogenic loading system developed at NASA-Kennedy Space Center. The nontrivial characteristic feature of the analyzed chilldown regime is its active control by dump valves. The two-phase flow model of the chilldown is approximated as one-dimensional homogeneous fluid flow with no slip condition for the interphase velocity. The model is built using commercial SINDA/FLUINT software. The results of numerical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental time traces. The obtained results pave the way to the application of the SINDA/FLUINT model as a verification tool for the design and algorithm development required for autonomous loading operation.

  11. The European Commission Stepping Up Both the Efficiency and Equity of Education and Training Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baye, Ariane; Demeuse, Marc

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the Communication of the European Commission (EC) devoted to efficiency and equity of European education systems. It shows the Commission's difficulties in integrating the multiple dimensions of education equity and the confusion between pedagogical and economical notions of efficiency. The authors also analyse the means…

  12. 75 FR 74025 - Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Testing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... Program, Version 2.0 AGENCY: United States Election Assistance Commission (EAC). ACTION: Notice; publication of Voting System Testing and Certification Manual, Version 2.0, for 60 day public comment period on EAC Web site. SUMMARY: The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) is publishing a...

  13. A Fully Redundant On-Line Mass Spectrometer System Used to Monitor Cryogenic Fuel Leaks on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Naylor, Guy R.; Haskell, William D.; Breznik, Greg S.; Mizell, Carolyn A.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An on-line gas monitoring system was developed to replace the older systems used to monitor for cryogenic leaks on the Space Shuttles before launch. The system uses a mass spectrometer to monitor multiple locations in the process, which allows the system to monitor all gas constituents of interest in a nearly simultaneous manner. The system is fully redundant and meets all requirements for ground support equipment (GSE). This includes ruggedness to withstand launch on the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP), ease of operation, and minimal operator intervention. The system can be fully automated so that an operator is notified when an unusual situation or fault is detected. User inputs are through personal computer using mouse and keyboard commands. The graphical user for detecting cryogenic leaks, many other gas constituents could be monitored using the Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) 2000.

  14. Comparison of reusable insulation systems for cryogenically-tanked earth-based space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Barber, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Three reusable insulation systems concepts have been developed for use with cryogenic tanks of earth-based space vehicles. Two concepts utilized double-goldized Kapton (DGK) or double-aluminized Mylar (DAM) multilayer insulation (MLI), while the third utilized a hollow-glass-microsphere, load-bearing insulation (LBI). All three insulation systems have recently undergone experimental testing and evaluation under NASA-sponsored programs. Thermal performance measurements were made under space-hold (vacuum) conditions for insulation warm boundary temperatures of approximately 291 K. The resulting effective thermal conductivity was approximately .00008 W/m-K for the MLI systems (liquid hydrogen test results) and .00054 W/m-K for the LBI system (liquid nitrogen test results corrected to liquid hydrogen temperature). The DGK MLI system experienced a maximum thermal degradation of 38 percent, the DAM MLI system 14 percent, and the LBI system 6.7 percent due to repeated thermal cycling representing typical space flight conditions. Repeated exposure of the DAM MLI system to a high humidity environment for periods as long as 8 weeks provided a maximum degradation of only 24 percent.

  15. Thermal System Verification and Model Validation for NASA's Cryogenic Passively Cooled James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Paul E.; Parrish, Keith A.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough and unique thermal verification and model validation plan has been developed for NASA s James Webb Space Telescope. The JWST observatory consists of a large deployed aperture optical telescope passively cooled to below 50 Kelvin along with a suite of several instruments passively and actively cooled to below 37 Kelvin and 7 Kelvin, respectively. Passive cooling to these extremely low temperatures is made feasible by the use of a large deployed high efficiency sunshield and an orbit location at the L2 Lagrange point. Another enabling feature is the scale or size of the observatory that allows for large radiator sizes that are compatible with the expected power dissipation of the instruments and large format Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays. This passive cooling concept is simple, reliable, and mission enabling when compared to the alternatives of mechanical coolers and stored cryogens. However, these same large scale observatory features, which make passive cooling viable, also prevent the typical flight configuration fully-deployed thermal balance test that is the keystone to most space missions thermal verification plan. JWST is simply too large in its deployed configuration to be properly thermal balance tested in the facilities that currently exist. This reality, when combined with a mission thermal concept with little to no flight heritage, has necessitated the need for a unique and alternative approach to thermal system verification and model validation. This paper describes the thermal verification and model validation plan that has been developed for JWST. The plan relies on judicious use of cryogenic and thermal design margin, a completely independent thermal modeling cross check utilizing different analysis teams and software packages, and finally, a comprehensive set of thermal tests that occur at different levels of JWST assembly. After a brief description of the JWST mission and thermal architecture, a detailed description

  16. Cryogenic system for the ArTeMiS large sub millimeter camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolani, E.; Relland, J.; Clerc, L.; Duband, L.; Jourdan, T.; Talvard, M.; Le Pennec, J.; Martignac, J.; Visticot, F.

    2014-07-01

    A new photonic camera has been developed in the framework of the ArTéMis project (Bolometers architecture for large field of view ground based telescopes in the sub-millimeter). This camera scans the sky in the sub-millimeter range at simultaneously three different wavelengths, namely 200 μm, 350 μm, 450 μm, and is installed inside the APEX telescope located at 5100m above sea level in Chile. Bolometric detectors cooled to 300 mK are used in the camera, which is integrated in an original cryostat developed at the low temperature laboratory (SBT) of the INAC institut. This cryostat contains filters, optics, mirrors and detectors which have to be implemented according to mass, size and stiffness requirements. As a result the cryostat exhibits an unusual geometry. The inner structure of the cryostat is a 40 K plate which acts as an optical bench and is bound to the external vessel through two hexapods, one fixed and the other one mobile thanks to a ball bearing. Once the cryostat is cold, this characteristic enabled all the different elements to be aligned with the optical axis. The cryogenic chain is built around a pulse tube cooler (40 K and 4 K) coupled to a double stage helium sorption cooler (300 mK). The cryogenic and vacuum processes are managed by a Siemens PLC and all the data are showed and stored on a CEA SCADA system. This paper describes the mechanical and thermal design of the cryostat, its command control, and the first thermal laboratory tests. This work was carried out in collaboration with the Astrophysics laboratory SAp of the IRFU institut. SAp and SBT have installed the camera in July 2013 inside the Cassegrain cabin of APEX.

  17. Acquisition/expulsion system for earth orbital propulsion system study. Volume 1: Summary report. [cryogenic storage and fuel flow regulation system for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Design, construction, and quality control tests on a dual screen liner device for the space shuttle orbiter cryogenic fuel tank and feedliner system are summarized. The dual stainless steel mesh of the device encloses eight liquid fuel channels and provides the liquid/vapor interface stability required for low gravity orbits.

  18. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    SciTech Connect

    Jurns, John M.; Bäck, Harald; Gierow, Martin

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  19. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurns, John M.; Bäck, Harald; Gierow, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  20. Sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cryogenic system with neon turbo-refrigerator for HTS power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hirai, H.; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hirokawa, M.; Eguchi, T.; Hayashi, H.; Iwakuma, M.; Shiohara, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a prototype sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN) circulation system for HTS power equipment. The system consists of a neon turbo-Brayton refrigerator with a LN sub-cooler and LN circulation pump unit. The neon refrigerator has more than 2 kW cooling power at 65 K. The LN sub-cooler is a plate-fin type heat exchanger and is installed in a refrigerator cold box. In order to carry out the system performance tests, a dummy cryostat having an electric heater was set instead of a HTS power equipment. Sub-cooled LN is delivered into the sub-cooler by the LN circulation pump and cooled within it. After the sub-cooler, sub-cooled LN goes out from the cold box to the dummy cryostat, and comes back to the pump unit. The system can control an outlet sub-cooled LN temperature by adjusting refrigerator cooling power. The refrigerator cooling power is automatically controlled by the turbo-compressor rotational speed. In the performance tests, we increased an electric heater power from 200 W to 1300 W abruptly. We confirmed the temperature fluctuation was about ±1 K. We show the cryogenic system details and performance test results in this paper.

  1. Thermal Integration of a Liquid Acquisition Device into a Cryogenic Feed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, L. J.; Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Schunk, R. G.; Martin, A. K.; Eskridge, R. H.; Frenkel, A.; Grayson, G.; Pendleton, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    Primary objectives of this effort were to define the following: (1) Approaches for quantification of the accumulation of thermal energy within a capillary screen liquid acquisition device (LAD) for a lunar lander upper stage during periods of up to 210 days on the lunar surface, (2) techniques for mitigating heat entrapment, and (3) perform initial testing, data evaluation. The technical effort was divided into the following categories: (1) Detailed thermal modeling of the LAD/feed system interactions using both COMSOL computational fluid device and standard codes, (2) FLOW-3D modeling of bulk liquid to provide interfacing conditions for the LAD thermal modeling, (3) condensation conditioning of capillary screens to stabilize surface tension retention capability, and (4) subscale testing of an integrated LAD/feed system. Substantial progress was achieved in the following technical areas: (1) Thermal modeling and experimental approaches for evaluating integrated cryogen LAD/feed systems, at both the system and component levels, (2) reduced gravity pressure control analyses, (3) analytical modeling and testing for capillary screen conditioning using condensation and wicking, and (4) development of rapid turnaround testing techniques for evaluating LAD/feed system thermal and fluid integration. A comprehensive effort, participants included a diverse cross section of representatives from academia, contractors, and multiple Marshall Space Flight Center organizations.

  2. Fiber-Optic Strain-Gage Tank Level Measurement System for Cryogenic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Mitchell, Mark; Langford, Lester

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of tank level, particularly for cryogenic propellants, has proven to be a difficult problem. Current methods based on differential pressure, capacitance sensors, temperature sensors, etc.; do not provide sufficiently accurate or robust measurements, especially at run time. These methods are designed to measure tank-level, but when the fluids are in supercritical state, the liquid-gas interface disappears. Furthermore, there is a need for a non-intrusive measurement system; that is, the sensors should not require tank modifications and/or disturb the fluids. This paper describes a simple, but effective method to determine propellant mass by measuring very small deformations of the structure supporting the tank. Results of a laboratory study to validate the method, and experimental data from a deployed system are presented. A comparison with an existing differential pressure sensor shows that the strain gage system provides a much better quality signal across all regimes during an engine test. Experimental results also show that the use of fiber optic strain gages (FOSG) over classic foil strain gages extends the operation time (before the system becomes uncalibrated), and increases accuracy. Finally, a procedure is defined whereby measurements from the FOSG mounted on the tank supporting structure are compensated using measurements of a FOSG mounted on a reference plate and temperature measurements of the structure. Results describing the performance of a deployed system that measures tank level during propulsion tests are included.

  3. Testing of a Spray-Bar Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor; Flachbart, Robin; Nguyen, Han; Martin, James

    1999-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a fundamental technology need that involves practically all uses of subcritical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule- Thomson (J-T) valve to extract then-nal energy from the propellant. In a cooperative effort, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (N4HTB) was used to test a unique "spray bar" TVS system developed by Boeing. A schematic of this system is included in Figure 1. The system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it radially into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the spray bar heat exchanger element, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. Figure 2 is a plot of ullage pressure (P4) and liquid vapor pressure (PSAI) versus time. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses. The primary advantage of the

  4. Ambient and Cryogenic, Decade Bandwidth, Low Noise Receiving System for Radio Astronomy Using Sinuous Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawande, Rohit Sudhir

    of the composite structure resulting in frequency dependent impedance variations. We demonstrate, using simulations and measurements, how the return loss can be improved by modifying the sinuous geometry. The feed-LNA combination is characterized for important properties such as return loss, system noise, far field beam patterns including cross-polarization over a wide frequency range. The system is developed as a feed for a parabolic reflector. The overall system performance is calculated in terms of the A/Tsys ratio. A cryogenic version would have a direct impact on specialized observing applications requiring large instantaneous bandwidths with high sensitivity. A novel cryogenic implementation of this system is demonstrated using a Stirling cycle, one-stage refrigerator. The cryocooler offers advantages like low cost, light weight, small size, low power consumption, and does not require routine maintenance. The higher antenna input impedance and a balanced feeding method for the sinuous antenna offers a unique set of challenges when developing a cryogenic system.

  5. 78 FR 57414 - Certain Video Game Systems and Wireless Controllers and Components Thereof, Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Island and New Kingdoms, LLC of Nehalem, Oregon (collectively, ``CK''). 76 FR 23624 (Apr. 27, 2011). The... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Video Game Systems and Wireless Controllers and Components Thereof,...

  6. The cryogenic system for the VIRUS array of spectrographs on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael P.; Mulholland, George T.; Booth, John A.; Good, John M.; Hill, Gary J.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Rafal, Marc D.; Savage, Richard D.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2008-07-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an existing innovative large telescope of 9.2 meter aperture, located at the McDonald Observatory in West Texas. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) requires a major upgrade to the HET, including a substantial increase in the telescope field of view, as well as the development and integration of a revolutionary new integral field spectrograph called VIRUS. The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) is an instrument comprising approximately 150 individual IFU-fed spectrographs which will be mounted on the telescope structure. Each spectrograph has a CDD camera detector package which must be cryogenically cooled during scientific operation. In order to cool each of these camera systems a liquid nitrogen system has been proposed and design study completed. The proposed system includes: a liquid nitrogen source, vacuum jacket distribution system, local storage on the telescope, and distribution under a thermal siphon to the individual spectrographs and local thermal connectors.

  7. Performance test of the cryogenic cooling system for the superconducting fault current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong-Ju; In, Sehwan; Yeom, Han-Kil; Kim, Heesun; Kim, Hye-Rim

    2015-12-01

    A Superconducting Fault Current Limiter is an electric power device which limits the fault current immediately in a power grid. The SFCL must be cooled to below the critical temperature of high temperature superconductor modules. In general, they are submerged in sub-cooled liquid nitrogen for their stable thermal characteristics. To cool and maintain the target temperature and pressure of the sub-cooled liquid nitrogen, the cryogenic cooling system should be designed well with a cryocooler and coolant circulation devices. The pressure of the cryostat for the SFCL should be pressurized to suppress the generation of nitrogen bubbles in quench mode of the SFCL. In this study, we tested the performance of the cooling system for the prototype 154 kV SFCL, which consist of a Stirling cryocooler, a subcooling cryostat, a pressure builder and a main cryostat for the SFCL module, to verify the design of the cooling system and the electric performance of the SFCL. The normal operation condition of the main cryostat is 71 K and 500 kPa. This paper presents tests results of the overall cooling system.

  8. In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot (ISCPD) Architecture Definitions and Systems Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John C.; Howell, Joe T.; Henley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the ISCPD Architecture Definitions and Systems Studies were to determine high leverage propellant depot architecture concepts, system configuration trades, and related technologies to enable more ambitious and affordable human and robotic exploration of the Earth Neighborhood and beyond. This activity identified architectures and concepts that preposition and store propellants in space for exploration and commercial space activities, consistent with Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESR&T) objectives. Commonalities across mission scenarios for these architecture definitions, depot concepts, technologies, and operations were identified that also best satisfy the Vision of Space Exploration. Trade studies were conducted, technology development needs identified and assessments performed to drive out the roadmap for obtaining an in-space cryogenic propellant depot capability. The Boeing Company supported the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) by conducting this Depot System Architecture Development Study. The primary objectives of this depot architecture study were: (1) determine high leverage propellant depot concepts and related technologies; (2) identify commonalities across mission scenarios of depot concepts, technologies, and operations; (3) determine the best depot concepts and key technology requirements and (4) identify technology development needs including definition of ground and space test article requirements.

  9. Cryogenic molecular separation system for radioactive {sup 11}C ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Suzuki, K.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.; Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    A {sup 11}C molecular production/separation system (CMPS) has been developed as part of an isotope separation on line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive {sup 11}C ion beams. In the ISOL system, {sup 11}CH{sub 4} molecules will be produced by proton irradiation and separated from residual air impurities and impurities produced during the irradiation. The CMPS includes two cryogenic traps to separate specific molecules selectively from impurities by using vapor pressure differences among the molecular species. To investigate the fundamental performance of the CMPS, we performed separation experiments with non-radioactive {sup 12}CH{sub 4} gases, which can simulate the chemical characteristics of {sup 11}CH{sub 4} gases. We investigated the separation of CH{sub 4} molecules from impurities, which will be present as residual gases and are expected to be difficult to separate because the vapor pressure of air molecules is close to that of CH{sub 4}. We determined the collection/separation efficiencies of the CMPS for various amounts of air impurities and found desirable operating conditions for the CMPS to be used as a molecular separation device in our ISOL system.

  10. Cryogenic propellant thermal control system design considerations, analyses, and concepts applied to a Mars human exploration mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Tucker, Stephen; Hoffman, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes, defines, and sizes cryogenic storage thermal control systems that meet the requirements of future NASA Mars human exploration missions. The design issues of this system include the projection of the existing Multilayer Insulation data base for cryogenic storage to much thicker (10 cm or more) insulation systems, the unknown heat leak from mechanical interfaces, and the thermal and structural performance effects of the large tank sizes required for a Mars mission. Acknowledging these unknown effects, heat loss projections are made based on extrapolation of the existing data base. The results indicate that hydrogen, methane, and oxygen are feasible propellants, and that the best suited thermal control sytems are 'thick' MLI, thermodynamic vent sytems, cryocoolers, and vacuum jackets.

  11. Cryogenic-Compatible Winchester Connector Mount and Retaining System for Composite Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James; McGuffey, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    A connector retainer and mounting system has been designed to replace screw-mounting of Winchester connectors. Countersunk screws are normally used to secure connectors to structures, and to keep them from coming apart. These screws are normally put into threaded or through-holes in metallic structures. This unique retainer is designed such that integral posts keep the connector halves retained, and a groove permits a cable tie to be fastened around the retainer and composite tube, thus securing the connector to the structure. The system is compatible for use on cryogenic (and conventional) bonded composite tube assemblies. Screws and tapped/through-holes needed to retain and mount Winchester connectors cannot be used on blind-access composite tubes. This system allows for rapid installation, removal, low-molecular-outgassing materials, and particulate-free installation and removal. Installation and/or changes late in the integration, and test flow with limited access in a cleanroom environment are possible. No sanding or bonding is needed.

  12. A 1 kA-class cryogen-free critical current characterization system for superconducting coated conductors.

    PubMed

    Strickland, N M; Hoffmann, C; Wimbush, S C

    2014-11-01

    A cryogenic electrical transport measurement system is described that is particularly designed to meet the requirements for routine and effective characterization of commercial second generation high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires in the form of coated conductors based on YBa2Cu3O7. Specific design parameters include a base temperature of 20 K, an applied magnetic field capability of 8 T (provided by a HTS split-coil magnet), and a measurement current capacity approaching 1 kA. The system accommodates samples up to 12 mm in width (the widest conductor size presently commercially available) and 40 mm long, although this is not a limiting size. The sample is able to be rotated freely with respect to the magnetic field direction about an axis parallel to the current flow, producing field angle variations in the standard maximum Lorentz force configuration. The system is completely free of liquid cryogens for both sample cooling and magnet cool-down and operation. Software enables the system to conduct a full characterization of the temperature, magnetic field, and field angle dependence of the critical current of a sample without any user interaction. The system has successfully been used to measure a wide range of experimental and commercially-available superconducting wire samples sourced from different manufacturers across the full range of operating conditions. The system encapsulates significant advances in HTS magnet design and efficient cryogen-free cooling technologies together with the capability for routine and automated high-current electrical transport measurements at cryogenic temperatures. It will be of interest to both research scientists investigating superconductor behavior and commercial wire manufacturers seeking to accurately characterize the performance of their product under all desired operating conditions. PMID:25430124

  13. Security Systems Commissioning: An Old Trick for Your New Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Sophisticated, software-based security systems can provide powerful tools to support campus security. By nature, such systems are flexible, with many capabilities that can help manage the process of physical protection. However, the full potential of these systems can be overlooked because of unfamiliarity with the products, weaknesses in security…

  14. Study on mitigation of pulsed heat load for ITER cryogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, N.; Xiong, L. Y.; Jiang, Y. C.; Tang, J. C.; Liu, L. Q.

    2015-03-01

    One of the key requirements for ITER cryogenic system is the mitigation of the pulsed heat load deposited in the magnet system due to magnetic field variation and pulsed DT neutron production. As one of the control strategies, bypass valves of Toroidal Field (TF) case helium loop would be adjusted to mitigate the pulsed heat load to the LHe plant. A quasi-3D time-dependent thermal-hydraulic analysis of the TF winding packs and TF case has been performed to study the behaviors of TF magnets during the reference plasma scenario with the pulses of 400 s burn and repetition time of 1800 s. The model is based on a 1D helium flow and quasi-3D solid heat conduction model. The whole TF magnet is simulated taking into account thermal conduction between winding pack and case which are cooled separately. The heat loads are given as input information, which include AC losses in the conductor, eddy current losses in the structure, thermal radiation, thermal conduction and nuclear heating. The simulation results indicate that the temperature variation of TF magnet stays within the allowable range when the smooth control strategy is active.

  15. Analytical Verifications in Cryogenic Testing of NGST Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Ramona; Levine, Marie; VanBuren, Dave; Kegley, Jeff; Green, Joseph; Hadaway, James; Presson, Joan; Cline, Todd; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ground based testing is a critical and costly part of component, assembly, and system verifications of large space telescopes. At such tests, however, with integral teamwork by planners, analysts, and test personnel, segments can be included to validate specific analytical parameters and algorithms at relatively low additional cost. This paper opens with strategy of analytical verification segments added to vacuum cryogenic testing of Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) assemblies. These AMSD assemblies incorporate material and architecture concepts being considered in the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) design. The test segments for workmanship testing, cold survivability, and cold operation optical throughput are supplemented by segments for analytical verifications of specific structural, thermal, and optical parameters. Utilizing integrated modeling and separate materials testing, the paper continues with support plan for analyses, data, and observation requirements during the AMSD testing, currently slated for late calendar year 2002 to mid calendar year 2003. The paper includes anomaly resolution as gleaned by authors from similar analytical verification support of a previous large space telescope, then closes with draft of plans for parameter extrapolations, to form a well-verified portion of the integrated modeling being done for NGST performance predictions.

  16. Natural guide star adaptive optics systems at LBT: FLAO commissioning and science operations status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Riccardi, A.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A. T.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Arcidiacono, C.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Busoni, L.; Fini, L.; Argomedo, J.; Gherardi, A.; Agapito, G.; Brusa, G.; Miller, D. L.; Guerra Ramon, J. C.; Boutsia, K.; Stefanini, P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and the principal results achieved during the commissioning of the two Natural Guide Star (NGS) AO systems called FLAO#1 & 2 installed at the bent Gregorian focal stations of the 2x8.4m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The commissioning activities of FLAO#1 took place in the period February 2010 - October 2011, while FLAO#2 commissioning started in December 2011 and should be completed by November 2012. The main results of the commissioning campaign are presented in terms of the H-band Strehl Ratio values achieved under different observing conditions. We will also describe the automatic procedures to configure and set-up the FLAO systems, and in particular the modal gain optimization procedure, which has been proven to be a very important one in achieving the nominal performance. Finally, some of the results achieved in two science runs using the near infra-red camera PISCES are briefly highlighted.

  17. The analysis of the transient pressure response of the shuttle EPS-ECS cryogenic tanks with external pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. E.; Patterson, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of transient pressures in externally pressurized cryogenic hydrogen and oxygen tanks was conducted and the effects of design variables on pressure response determined. The analysis was conducted with a computer program which solves the compressible viscous flow equations in two-dimensional regions representing the tank and external loop. The external loop volume, thermal mass, and heat leak were the dominant design variables affecting the system pressure response. No significant temperature stratification occurred in the fluid contained in the tank.

  18. Shuttle cryogenics supply system. Optimization study. Volume 5 B-2, part 1: Appendix programmers manual for math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An appendix to the programmers manual for the mathematical model pertaining to the design of cryogenic supply systems for spacecraft is presented. The program listing was produced using the EXEC-8 LISTALL processor which lists a file in alphabetical order. Since the processor does not differentiate between subroutines, functions, and procedure definition processors, each subprogram has been relabeled to clearly identify the type of symbolic listing.

  19. Cryogenic Propellant Densification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewart, R. O.; Dergance, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ground and vehicle system requirements are evaluated for the use of densified cryogenic propellants in advanced space transportation systems. Propellants studied were slush and triple point liquid hydrogen, triple point liquid oxygen, and slush and triple point liquid methane. Areas of study included propellant production, storage, transfer, vehicle loading and system requirements definition. A savings of approximately 8.2 x 100,000 Kg can be achieved in single stage to orbit gross liftoff weight for a payload of 29,484 Kg by utilizing densified cryogens in place of normal boiling point propellants.

  20. Field Commissioning of a Daylight-Dimming Lighting System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, David B.; Parker, Danny S.

    A Florida elementary school cafeteria, retrofitted with a fluorescent lighting system that dims in response to available daylight, was evaluated through real time measurement of lighting and air conditioning power, work plane illumination, and interior/exterior site conditions. The new system produced a 27 percent reduction in lighting power due…

  1. Comparative study of differential flow and cryogenic modulators comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography systems for the detailed analysis of light cycle oil.

    PubMed

    Semard, G; Gouin, C; Bourdet, J; Bord, N; Livadaris, V

    2011-05-27

    The modulator is the key point of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). This interface ensures the sampling and transfer of the sample from the first to the second dimension. Many systems based on different principles have been developed. However, to our knowledge, almost only cryogenic modulators are used in the petroleum industry. Nevertheless cryogenic fluids represent some disadvantages in term of safety, cost and time consuming. This paper reports a comparative study between differential flow and cryogenic liquid modulators for the detailed analysis of hydrocarbons in middle distillates type light cycle oil (LCO). Optimization of geometrical dimensions of a set of columns was carried out on the differential flow modulator system in order to reproduce the quality of separation of cryogenic modulation. Then a comparative study was investigated on sensibility and resolution (separation space and peak capacity) between the two systems.

  2. Development of a cryogenic system for the VIRUS array of 150 spectrographs for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chonis, Taylor S.; Vattiat, Brian L.; Hill, Gary J.; Marshall, J. L.; Cabral, Kris; DePoy, D. L.; Smith, Michael P.; Good, John M.; Booth, John A.; Rafal, Marc D.; Savage, Richard D.

    2010-07-01

    The upcoming Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) has provided motivation for upgrading the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) at the McDonald Observatory. This upgrade includes an increase in the field-of-view to accommodate the new and revolutionary Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS). VIRUS is the instrument designed to conduct the HETDEX survey and consists of 150 individual integral-field spectrographs fed by 33,600 total optical fibers covering the 22 arc-minute field-of-view of the upgraded HET. The spectrographs are mounted in four enclosures, each 6.0×3.0×1.4 meters in size. Each spectrograph contains a CCD detector that must be cryogenically cooled, presenting an interesting cryogenic and vacuum challenge within the distribution system. In this paper, we review the proposed vacuum jacketed, thermal siphon, liquid nitrogen distribution system used to cool the array of detectors and discuss recent developments. We focus on the design, prototyping, and testing of a novel "make-break" thermal connector, built from a modified cryogenic bayonet, that is used to quickly detach a single spectrograph pair from the system.

  3. Laser heated pedestal growth system commissioning and fiber processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buric, Michael; Yip, M. J.; Chorpening, Ben; Ohodnicki, Paul

    2016-05-01

    A new Laser Heated Pedestal Growth system was designed and fabricated using various aspects of effective legacy designs for the growth of single-crystal high-temperature-compatible optical fibers. The system is heated by a 100-watt, DC driven, CO2 laser with PID power control. Fiber diameter measurements are performed using a telecentric video system which identifies the molten zone and utilizes edge detection algorithms to report fiber-diameter. Beam shaping components include a beam telescope; along with gold-coated reflaxicon, turning, and parabolic focusing mirrors consistent with similar previous systems. The optical system permits melting of sapphire-feedstock up to 1.5mm in diameter for growth. Details regarding operational characteristics are reviewed and properties of single-crystal sapphire fibers produced by the system are evaluated. Aspects of the control algorithm efficacy will be discussed, along with relevant alternatives. Finally, some new techniques for in-situ processing making use of the laser-heating system are discussed. Ex-situ fiber modification and processing are also examined for improvements in fiber properties.

  4. Integrated system modeling analysis of a cryogenic multi-cell deflecting-mode cavity resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-09-15

    A deflecting mode cavity is the integral element for six-dimensional phase-space beam control in bunch compressors and emittance transformers at high energy beam test facilities. RF performance of a high-Q device is, however, highly sensitive to operational conditions, in particular in a cryo-cooling environment. Using analytic calculations and RF simulations, we examined cavity parameters and deflecting characteristics of TM{sub 110,π} mode of a 5 cell resonator in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, which has long been used at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector (A0PI). The sensitivity analysis indicated that the cavity could lose 30%–40% of deflecting force due to defective input power coupling accompanying non-uniform field distribution across the cells with 40 ∼ 50 MeV electron beam and 70–80 kW klystron power. Vacuum-cryomodules of the 5 cell cavity are planned to be installed at the Fermilab Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. Comprehensive modeling analysis integrated with multi-physics simulation tools showed that RF loading of 1 ms can cause a ∼5 K maximum temperature increase, corresponding to a ∼4.3 μm/ms deformation and a 1.32 MHz/K maximum frequency shift. The integrated system modeling analysis will improve design process of a high-Q cavity with more accurate prediction of cryogenic RF performance under a high power pulse operation.

  5. Cryogen-free superconducting magnet system for multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance up to 12.1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alex I.; Smirnova, Tatyana I.; MacArthur, Ryan L.; Good, Jeremy A.; Hall, Renny

    2006-03-01

    Multifrequency and high field/high frequency (HF) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a powerful spectroscopy for studying paramagnetic spin systems ranging from organic-free radicals to catalytic paramagnetic metal ion centers in metalloproteins. Typically, HF EPR experiments are carried out at resonant frequencies ν =95-300GHz and this requires magnetic fields of 3.4-10.7T for electronic spins with g ≈2.0. Such fields could be easily achieved with superconducting magnets, but, unlike NMR, these magnets cannot operate in a persistent mode in order to satisfy a wide range of resonant fields required by the experiment. Operating and maintaining conventional passively cooled superconducting magnets in EPR laboratories require frequent transfer of cryogens by trained personnel. Here we describe and characterize a versatile cryogen-free magnet system for HF EPR at magnetic fields up to 12.1T that is suitable for ramping the magnetic field over the entire range, precision scans around the target field, and/or holding the field at the target value. We also demonstrate that in a nonpersistent mode of operation the magnetic field can be stabilized to better than 0.3ppm/h over 15h period by employing a transducer-controlled power supply. Such stability is sufficient for many HF EPR experiments. An important feature of the system is that it is virtually maintenance-free because it is based on a cryogen-free technology and therefore does not require any liquid cryogens (liquid helium or nitrogen) for operation. We believe that actively cooled superconducting magnets are ideally suited for a wide range of HF EPR experiments including studies of spin-labeled nucleic acids and proteins, single-molecule magnets, and metalloproteins.

  6. Vibration dampers for cryogenic turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Olan, Emmanuel; Ibrahim, Azman Syed; Kascak, Albert F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of effective and reliable minimum-weight and minimum-envelope vibration dampers for cryogenic turbines. To meet this objective, a high speed test rig was designed and fabricated, which is currently used to test a curved beam type damper. The operation, capacity, structural characteristics, measurement system, and safety features of the cryogenic damper test rig are discussed.

  7. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  8. Cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier for radio-astronomical observations and centimeter-wave deep-space communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, V. F.; Grachev, V. G.; Dryagin, S. Yu.; Eliseev, A. I.; Kamaletdinov, R. K.; Korotaev, D. V.; Lesnov, I. V.; Mansfeld, M. A.; Pevzner, E. L.; Perminov, V. G.; Pilipenko, A. M.; Sapozhnikov, B. D.; Saurin, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    We report a design solution for a highly reliable, low-noise and extremely efficient cryogenically cooled transmit/receive unit for a large antenna system meant for radio-astronomical observations and deep-space communications in the X band. We describe our design solution and the results of a series of laboratory and antenna tests carried out in order to investigate the properties of the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier developed. The transmit/receive unit designed for deep-space communications (Mars missions, radio observatories located at Lagrangian point L2, etc.) was used in practice for communication with live satellites including "Radioastron" observatory, which moves in a highly elliptical orbit.

  9. Design of a scanning gate microscope for mesoscopic electron systems in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Pelliccione, M; Sciambi, A; Bartel, J; Keller, A J; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2013-03-01

    We report on our design of a scanning gate microscope housed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 15 mK. The recent increase in efficiency of pulse tube cryocoolers has made cryogen-free systems popular in recent years. However, this new style of cryostat presents challenges for performing scanning probe measurements, mainly as a result of the vibrations introduced by the cryocooler. We demonstrate scanning with root-mean-square vibrations of 0.8 nm at 3 K and 2.1 nm at 15 mK in a 1 kHz bandwidth with our design. Using Coulomb blockade thermometry on a GaAs/AlGaAs gate-defined quantum dot, we demonstrate an electron temperature of 45 mK.

  10. A Fully Redundant On-Line Mass Spectrometer System Used to Monitor Cryogenic Fuel Leaks on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Naylor, Guy R.; Haskell, William D.; Breznik, Greg S.; Mizell, Carolyn A.; Helms, William R.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An on-line gas monitoring system was developed to replace the older systems used to monitor for cryogenic leaks on the Space Shuttles before launch. The system uses a mass spectrometer to monitor multiple locations in the process, which allows the system to monitor all gas constituents of interest in a nearly simultaneous manner. The system is fully redundant and meets all requirements for ground support equipment (GSE). This includes ruggedness to withstand launch on the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP), ease of operation, and minimal operator intervention. The system can be fully automated so that an operator is notified when an unusual situation or fault is detected. User inputs are through personal computer using mouse and keyboard commands. The graphical user interface is very intuitive and easy to operate. The system has successfully supported four launches to date. It is currently being permanently installed as the primary system monitoring the Space Shuttles during ground processing and launch operations. Time and cost savings will be substantial over the current systems when it is fully implemented in the field. Tests were performed to demonstrate the performance of the system. Low limits-of-detection coupled with small drift make the system a major enhancement over the current systems. Though this system is currently optimized for detecting cryogenic leaks, many other gas constituents could be monitored using the Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) 2000.

  11. Commissioning a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Levashov, Michael Y

    2010-12-03

    Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of the quadrupoles. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing such a system. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). A previous study investigated the error associated with each step by using a permanent quadrupole magnet on an optical mover system. The study reported an error of 11{micro}m for step 1 and a repeatability of 4{micro}m for step 2. However, the set up used a FARO arm to measure tooling balls and didn't allow to accurately check step 2 for errors; an uncertainty of 100{micro}m was reported. Therefore, even though the repeatability was good, there was no way to check that the error in step 2 was small. Following the recommendations of

  12. Cryogenic safety aspect of the low -$\\beta$ magnest systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    The low-{beta} magnet systems are located in the LHC insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process and will allow proton collisions at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 34}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Large radiation dose deposited at the proximity of the beam collisions dictate stringent requirements for the design and operation of the systems. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in the winter of 2010 and permitted to validate this system safe operation. This paper presents the analysis used to qualify and quantify the safe operation of the low-{beta} magnet systems in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the first years of operation.

  13. CRYOGENICS FOR FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Dauguet, P.; Bonneton, M.; Fauve, E.; Bernhardt, J. M.; Beauvisage, J.; Andrieu, F.; Gistau-Baguer, G. M.; Boissin, J. C.

    2008-03-16

    Fusion of Hydrogen to produce energy is one of the technologies under study to meet the mankind raising need in energy and as a substitute to fossil fuels for the future. This technology is under investigation for more than 30 years already, with, for example, the former construction of the experimental reactors Tore Supra, DIII-D and JET. With the construction of ITER to start, the next step to 'fusion for energy' will be done. In these projects, an extensive use of cryogenic systems is requested. Air Liquide has been involved as cryogenic partner in most of former and presently constructed fusion reactors. In the present paper, a review of the cryogenic systems we delivered to Tore Supra, JET, IPR and KSTAR will be presented.

  14. The integration of liquid cryogen cooling and cryocoolers withsuperconducting electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-07-09

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been a critical issuethat has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the marketplace. Even though the performance of many of the superconductingcircuits is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement forcryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a seriousdisadvantage. This report discusses the process of refrigeratingsuperconducting devices with cryogenic liquids and small cryocoolers.Three types of cryocoolers are compared for vibration, efficiency, andreliability. The connection of a cryocooler to the load is discussed. Acomparison of using flexible copper straps to carry the heat load andusing heat pipe is shown. The type of instrumentation needed formonitoring and controlling the cooling is discussed.

  15. Division H Commission 33: Structure & Dynamics of the Galactic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordström, Birgitta; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Wyse, Rosemary; Athanassoula, Lia; Feltzing, Sofia; Jog, Chanda; Lockman, Jay; Minniti, Dante; Robin, Annie

    2016-04-01

    Research on the structure and dynamics of the Galactic System covers a large field of research, from formation scenarios to long-term evolution and secular processes. Today we speak of near-field cosmology where the oldest parts of the Galaxy are used to probe back to early times, e.g. studying the chemical signatures of the oldest star clusters and dwarf galaxies to learn about the byproducts of the first stars. Some of the most detailed work relates to the structure of the dark matter and baryons in order to compare with expectation from N-body models. Secular processes have been identified (e.g. stellar migration) where material within the Galaxy is being reorganized by dynamical resonances and feedback processes.

  16. 47 CFR 0.552 - Notice identifying Commission systems of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... regarding storage, retrievability, access controls, retention, and disposal of the records; (f) The title... access can be gained to any record pertaining to that individual contained in a system of records, and... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice identifying Commission systems...

  17. Suitability of commercially available laboratory cryogenic refrigerators to support shipboard electro-optical systems in the 10 - 77 Kelvin region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, R. G.; Byrd, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The primary development of cryogenically cooled infrared systems was accomplished by FLIR systems designed for airborne, passive night vision. Essential to the development of these FLIR systems was a family of closed cycle refrigerators which had to meet a limited envelope requirement, utilize a nonlubricated compressor module, and be light in weight. Closed cycle refrigerators accomplished the same cooling function, they use modified oil lubricated reciprocating compressors which are limited in their axis of orientation to an angle of approximately 15-20 degrees maximum from horizon.

  18. Initial commissioning results from the APS loss monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    The design of the beam loss monitor system for the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source is based on using a number of air dielectric coaxial cables as long ionization chambers. Results to date show that the loss monitor is useful in helping to determine the cause of injection losses and losses large enough to limit circulating currents in the storage ring to short lifetimes. Sensitivities ranging from 13 to 240 pC of charge collected in the injector BTS (booster-to-storage-ring) loss monitor per picocoulomb of loss have been measured, depending on the loss location. These results have been used to predict that the storage ring loss monitor leakage current limit of 10 pA per cable should allow detection of losses resulting in beam lifetimes of 100 hours or less with 100 mA stored beam. Significant DC bias levels associated with the presence of stored beam have been observed. These large bias levels are most likely caused by the loss monitor responding to hard x-ray synchrotron radiation. No such response to synchrotron radiation was observed during earlier tests at SSRL. However, the loss monitor response to average stored beam current in APS has provided a reasonable alternative to the DC current transformer (DCCT) for measuring beam lifetimes.

  19. Cool Down Experiences with the SST-1 Helium Cryogenics System before and after Current Feeders System Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R.; Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Tank, J.; Mahesuriya, G.; Sonara, D.; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Garg, A.; Bairagi, N.; Christian, D.; Patel, K.; Shah, P.; Nimavat, H.; Sharma, R.; Patel, J. C.; Gupta, N. C.; Prasad, U.; Sharma, A. N.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    The SST-1 machine comprises a superconducting magnet system (SCMS), which includes TF and PF magnets. In order to charge the SCMS, we need superconducting current feeders consisting of SC feeders and vapor cooled current leads (VCCLs). We have installed all 10 (+/-) pairs of VCCLs for the TF and PF systems. While conducting initial engineering validation of the SST-1 machine, our prime objective was to produce circular plasma using only the TF system. During the SST-1 campaign I to VI, we have to stop the PF magnets cooling in order to get the cryo- stable conditions for current charging of the TF magnets system. In that case, the cooling of the PF current leads is not essential. It has been also observed that after aborting the PF system cooling, there was a limited experimental window of TF operation. Therefore, in the recent SST-1 campaign-VII, we removed the PF current leads (9 pairs) and kept only single (+/-) pair of the 10,000 A rated VCCLs to realize the charging of the TF system for the extended window of operation. We have observed a better cryogenic stability in the TF magnets after modifications in the CFS. In this paper, we report the comparison of the cool down performance for the SST-1 machine operation before and after modifications of the current feeders system.

  20. Performance of the primary mirror center-of-curvature optical metrology system during cryogenic testing of the JWST Pathfinder telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse and fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment and phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development and spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software and procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate and efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  1. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-curvature Optical Metrology System During Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius-of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse & fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment & phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development & spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software & procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate & efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  2. Unique Cryogenic Welded Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, K. A.; Monko, G. G.

    2004-06-01

    For the last few decades, the E. O. Paton Electric Welding Institute has been active in the field of cryogenic materials science. Integrated research on development of new grades of steels and alloys for cryogenic engineering was carried out in collaboration with the leading institutions of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Commercially applied welding technologies and consumables were developed. They include large, spherical tanks for storage of liquefied gases (from oxygen to helium) under high pressures; space simulators with a capacity of 10 000 m3 and more; and load-carrying elements of superconducting fusion magnetic systems for the TOKAMAK, MGD, and ITER series.

  3. Unique Cryogenic Welded Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yushchenko, K.A.; Monko, G.G.

    2004-06-28

    For the last few decades, the E. O. Paton Electric Welding Institute has been active in the field of cryogenic materials science. Integrated research on development of new grades of steels and alloys for cryogenic engineering was carried out in collaboration with the leading institutions of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Commercially applied welding technologies and consumables were developed. They include large, spherical tanks for storage of liquefied gases (from oxygen to helium) under high pressures; space simulators with a capacity of 10 000 m3 and more; and load-carrying elements of superconducting fusion magnetic systems for the TOKAMAK, MGD, and ITER series.

  4. Evaluation of static mixer flow enhancements for cryogenic viscous compressor prototype for ITER vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C.; Baylor, Larry R.; Meitner, Steven J.; Combs, Stephen K.; Ha, Tam; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, T.; Rasmussen, David A.; Hechler, Michael P.; Pearce, Robert J. H.; Dremel, Mattias; Boissin, J.-C.

    2014-01-29

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (up to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype.

  5. Evaluation of Static Mixer Flow Enhancements for Cryogenic Viscous Compressor Prototype for ITER Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Ha, Tam T; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, Theodore M; Rasmussen, David A; Hechler, Michael P; Pearce, R.J.H.; Dremel, M.; Boissin, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (50 to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype

  6. Compact cryogenic inductors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Carr, W.J. Jr.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Hordubay, T.D.; Chuboy, H.L. . Science and Technology Center)

    1994-07-01

    Power systems requiring power levels as high as a few megawatts to a few gigawatts for periods of several microseconds to several milliseconds with repetitive frequencies of a few hertz to a few kilohertz are being considered for potential space applications. The impulsive nature of the power presents the opportunity to use inductive energy storage techniques for pulse duty to enhance economic and practical considerations. An inductors must be efficient, lightweight, and reliable, and it must have high energy density if it is to be used in space based power systems. Cryogenic inductors are best studied for such an application. Parametric analyses of the two potential types of cryogenic inductors (superconducting and hyperconducting reveal that the hyperconducting (high purity aluminum)) inductor would be significantly lighter and achieve higher energy densities without the added penalty of a helium refrigeration system, thus resulting in improved overall system reliability. The lightweight hyperconducting cryogenic inductor technology is, however, in its infancy. This paper describes the required technology base which would allow the eventual application of the lightweight cryogenic inductor in space power systems, and also conclusively demonstrates the underlying principles.

  7. Biological Applications of Cryogenic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S

    2003-12-03

    High energy resolution and broadband efficiency are enabling the use of cryogenic detectors in biological research. Two areas where they have found initial application are X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). In synchrotron-based fluorescence-detected XAS cryogenic detectors are used to examine the role of metals in biological systems by measuring their oxidation states and ligand symmetries. In time-of-flight mass spectrometry cryogenic detectors increase the sensitivity for biomolecule detection and identification for masses above {approx}50 kDa, and thus enable TOF-MS on large protein complexes or even entire viruses. More recently, cryogenic detectors have been proposed as optical sensors for fluorescence signals from biomarkers. We discuss the potential for cryogenic detectors in biological research, as well as the challenges the technology faces.

  8. Remote, PCM-controlled, multi-channel radio frequency FM telemetry system for cryogenic wind tunnel application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A telemetry system used in the NASA-Langley cryogenic transonic wind tunnel to obtain rotational strain and temperature data is described. The system consists of four FM transmitters allowing for a remotely controlled PCM combination. A rotating four-contact mercury slip-ring is used as an interface between the fixed and rotating mechnical structures. Over 60 channels of data on the main fan disk and blade structures have been obtained. These data are studied to verify computer predictions and mechanical life. A series of block diagrams are included.

  9. Optimization of a muon collider interaction region with respect to detector backgrounds and the heat load to the cryogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.J.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1996-10-16

    In a 2 X 2 TeV {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} Collider almost 15 MW of power is deposited in the machine and detector components due to the unavoidable {mu}{r_arrow}{ital e{nu}{nu}{anti {nu}}} decays. The resulting heat load to the cryogenic systems and the background levels in the collider detectors significantly exceed those in any existing or designed hadron and {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} colliders. This paper shows that by carefully designing the final focus system, by embedding shielding and by taking other protective measures the heat load and backgrounds can be mitigated by several orders of magnitude.

  10. The Trading Post System on the Navajo Reservation. Staff Report to the Federal Trade Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Trade Commission, Los Angeles, CA.

    Since the late 19th century, trading posts have been a prominant feature in Navajo economic life. Today, due to geographic isolation and an absence of economic alternatives, many Navajos are still dependent upon trading posts. This report of a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) investigation details the system on the Navajo Reservation, including the…

  11. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  12. Adjustable mount for electro-optic transducers in an evacuated cryogenic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, Edward A., Jr. (Inventor); Haynes, David P. (Inventor); Jones, Howard C. (Inventor); Jones, Irby W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention is an adjustable mount for positioning an electro-optic transducer in an evacuated cryogenic environment. Electro-optic transducers are used in this manner as high sensitivity detectors of gas emission lines of spectroscopic analysis. The mount is made up of an adjusting mechanism and a transducer mount. The adjusting mechanism provided five degrees of freedom, linear adjustments and angular adjustments. The mount allows the use of an internal lens to focus energy on the transducer element thereby improving the efficiency of the detection device. Further, the transducer mount, although attached to the adjusting mechanism, is isolated thermally such that a cryogenic environment can be maintained at the transducer while the adjusting mechanism remains at room temperature. Radiation shields also are incorporated to further reduce heat flow to the transducer location.

  13. Mechanical and Thermal Characteristics of Insulation Materials for the KSTAR Magnet System at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Wooho; Lim, Bungsu; Kim, Myungkyu; Park, Hyunki; Kim, Keeman; Chu, Yong; Lee, Sangil

    2004-06-01

    The KSTAR(Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) superconducting magnet is electrically insulated by the composite material of epoxy resin and glass fiber (2.5 kV/mm) and Kapton (8 kV/mm). The insulation composite material of epoxy resin and glass fiber is prepared using a VPI (Vacuum Pressure Impregnation) process. The superconducting magnet is under mechanical stress caused by the large temperature difference between the operation temperature of the magnet and room temperature. The large electro-magnetic force during the operation of the magnet is also exerted on the magnet. Therefore, the characteristics of the insulation material at cryogenic temperatures are very important and the tensile stress and thermal expansion coefficient for the insulation materials of the KSTAR superconducting magnet are measured. This paper presents results on mechanical properties of the insulation material for KSTAR magnets, such as density, ultimate tensile stress and thermal contraction between room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  14. [Comparison of cryogenic support systems of surgical instruments for the local destruction of large biological tissue lesions].

    PubMed

    Boiarskiĭ, M Iu; Filippov, Iu P

    1978-01-01

    Of two types of systems for cryogenic support (SCS) of surgical instruments made with open and closed contours those of the discharge type meet to a greater extent basic requirements on the SCS as concerns destruction of extensive areas of the biological tissue. These SCS permit it more readily to withstand optimal conditions of cooling, can secure better reliability in performing operations, offer greater possibilities for unification of parts in packing up the set and for covering a wider range of operations. In cases when it is important to provide for self-containment and a longer period of continuous operation the application of the SCS with a closed contour is more advisable.

  15. Thermal performance of an integrated thermal protection system for long-term storage of cryogenic propellants in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, R. L.; Boyle, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    It was demonstrated that cryogenic propellants can be stored unvented in space long enough to accomplish a Saturn orbiter mission after 1,200-day coast. The thermal design of a hydrogen-fluorine rocket stage was carried out, and the hydrogen tank, its support structure, and thermal protection system were tested in a vacuum chamber. Heat transfer rates of approximately 23 W were measured in tests to simulate the near-Earth portion of the mission. Tests to simulate the majority of the time the vehicle would be in deep space and sun-oriented resulted in a heat transfer rate of 0.11 W.

  16. Commission Review of New Academic Programs Proposed by the Public Higher Education Systems, 2002 to 2004. Commission Report 04-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The California Postsecondary Education Commission is statutorily responsible for reviewing and commenting on the need for new degree and certificate programs proposed by the public higher education systems. This report summarizes the results of approximately 100 independent reviews conducted between 2002 and 2004. The long-range academic plans of…

  17. NASA Cryogenic Propellant Systems Technology Development and Potential Opportunities for Discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the eCryo Team are traveling to France to meet with CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) on the benchmarking of CFM (Cryogenic Fluids Management) analytical models the week of January 26th, 2015. Mike Meyer is representing the Agency and eCryo Project and will conduct a conversation to explore future work. This slide package (28 charts and 3 movies) requires approval via a 1676. ISS data in this chart set has been copied from public websites.

  18. Conceptual Design of the Cryogenic System for the High-luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.; Van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This paper will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  19. Interlinked Test Results for Fusion Fuel Processing and Blanket Tritium Recovery Systems Using Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Takumi; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Iwai, Yasunori; Isobe, Kanetsugu; Uzawa, Masayuki; Nishi, Masataka

    2005-07-15

    A simulated fuel processing (cryogenic distillation columns and a palladium diffuser) and CMSB (cryogenic molecular sieve bed) systems were linked together, and were operated. The validity of the CMSB was discussed through this experiment as an integrated system for the recovery of blanket tritium. A gas stream of hydrogen isotopes and He was supplied to the CMSB as the He sweep gas in blanket of a fusion reactor. After the breakthrough of tritium was observed, regeneration of the CMSB was carried out by evacuating and heating. The hydrogen isotopes were finally recovered by the diffuser. At first, only He gas was sent by the evacuating. The hydrogen isotopes gas was then rapidly released by the heating. The system worked well against the above drastic change of conditions. The amount of hydrogen isotopes gas finally recovered by the diffuser was in good agreement with that adsorbed by the CMSB. The dynamic behaviors (breakthrough and regeneration) of the system were explained well by a set of basic codes.

  20. Determination of the Optimal Operating Parameters for the Jefferson Lab's Cryogenic Cold Compressor System

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Wilson; Venkatarao Ganni; Dana Arenius; Jonathan Creel

    2004-06-01

    Jefferson Lab's (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) are supported by 2 K helium refrigerator known as the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL), which maintains a constant low vapor pressure over the accelerators' large liquid helium inventory with a five-stage centrifugal compressor train. The cold compressor train operates with constrained discharge pressure and can be varied over a range of suction pressures and mass flows to meet the operational requirements of the two accelerators. Using data from commissioning and routine operations of the cold compressor system, the presented procedure predicts an operating point for each cold compressor such that maximum efficiency is attained for the overall cold compressor system for a given combination of mass flow and vapor pressure. The procedure predicts expected efficiency of the system and relative compressors speeds for operating vapor pressures from 4 to 2.5 kPa (corresponds to overall pressure ratios of 29 to 56) and flow rates of 135 g/s to 250 g/s. The results of the predictions are verified by test for a few operating conditions of mass flows and vapor pressures.

  1. Commissioning and initial experience with the first clinical gantry-mounted proton therapy system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianyu; Sun, Baozhou; Grantham, Kevin; Rankine, Leith; Cai, Bin; Goddu, Sreekrishna M; Santanam, Lakshmi; Knutson, Nels; Zhang, Tiezhi; Reilly, Michael; Bottani, Beth; Bradley, Jeffrey; Mutic, Sasa; Klein, Eric E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the comprehensive commissioning process and initial clinical experience of the Mevion S250 proton therapy system, a gantry-mounted, single-room proton therapy platform clinically implemented in the S. Lee Kling Proton Therapy Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, MO, USA. The Mevion S250 system integrates a compact synchrocyclotron with a C-inner gantry, an image guidance system and a 6D robotic couch into a beam delivery platform. We present our commissioning process and initial clinical experience, including i) CT calibration; ii) beam data acquisition and machine characteristics; iii) dosimetric commissioning of the treatment planning system; iv) validation through the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core credentialing process, including irradiations on the spine, prostate, brain, and lung phantoms; v) evaluation of localization accuracy of the image guidance system; and vi) initial clinical experience. Clinically, the system operates well and has provided an excellent platform for the treatment of diseases with protons. PMID:27074470

  2. Large Scale Testing of a Foam/Multilayer Insulation Thermal Control System (TCS) for Cryogenic Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Leon; Martin, James

    1998-01-01

    The development of high energy cryogenic upper stages is essential for the efficient delivery of large payloads to various destinations envisioned in future programs. A key element in such upper stages is cryogenic fluid management (CFM) advanced development/technology. Due to the cost of and limited opportunities for orbital experiments, ground testing must be employed to the fullest extent possible. Therefore, a system level test bed termed the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB), which is representative in size and shape (3 meter diameter by 3 meter long with a volume of 18 cubic meters) of a fully integrated space transportation vehicle liquid hydrogen propellant tank has been established. To date, upper stage studies have often baselined the foam/multilayer insulation (FMLI) combination concept; however, hardware experience with the concept is minimal and was therefore selected for the MHTB. The foam element (isofoam SS-1 171 with an average thickness of 3.5 centimeters) is designed to protect against ground hold/ascent flight environments, and allows for the use of a dry nitrogen purge as opposed to the more complex/heavy helium purge subsystem normally required with MLI in cryogenic applications. The MLI (45 layers of Double Aluminized Mylar with Dacron spacers) provides protection in the vacuum environment of space and is designed for an on-orbit storage period of 45 days. Several unique features were incorporated in the MLI concept and included: variable density MLI (reduces weight and radiation losses by changing the layer density), larger but fewer DAM perforations for venting during ascent to orbit (reduces radiation losses), and roll wrap installation of the MLI with a commercially established process to lower assembly man-hours and reduce seam heat leak. Thermal performance testing of the MHTB TCS was conducted during three test series conducted between September 1995 and May 1996. Results for the ground hold portion of the tests were as expected

  3. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 33 - Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Saint Charles, IL, June 14-18, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, R. W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on superconductivity applications including magnets, electronics, rectifiers, magnet stability, coil protection, and cryogenic techniques. Also considered are insulation, heat transfer to liquid helium and nitrogen, heat and mass transfer in He II, superfluid pumps, and refrigeration for superconducting systems. Other topics include cold compressors, refrigeration and liquefaction, magnetic refrigeration, and refrigeration for space applications. Papers are also presented on cryogenic applications, commercial cryogenic plants, the properties of cryogenic fluids, and cryogenic instrumentation and data acquisition.

  4. Neutron yield study of direct-drive, low-adiabat cryogenic D{sub 2} implosions on OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Elbaz, Y.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-11-15

    Neutron yields of direct-drive, low-adiabat ({alpha}{approx_equal}2 to 3) cryogenic D{sub 2} target implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have been systematically investigated using the two-dimensional (2D) radiation hydrodynamics code DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)]. Low-mode (l{<=}12) perturbations, including initial target offset, ice-layer roughness, and laser-beam power imbalance, were found to be the primary source of yield reduction for thin-shell (5 {mu}m), low-{alpha}, cryogenic targets. The 2D simulations of thin-shell implosions track experimental measurements for different target conditions and peak laser intensities ranging from 2.5x10{sup 14}-6x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Simulations indicate that the fusion yield is sensitive to the relative phases between the target offset and the ice-layer perturbations. The results provide a reasonable good guide to understanding the yield degradation in direct-drive, low-adiabat, cryogenic, thin-shell-target implosions. Thick-shell (10 {mu}m) implosions generally give lower yield over clean than low-l-mode DRACO simulation predictions. Simulations including the effect of laser-beam nonuniformities indicate that high-l-mode perturbations caused by laser imprinting further degrade the neutron yield of thick-shell implosions. To study ICF compression physics, these results suggest a target specification with a {<=}30 {mu}m offset and ice-roughness of {sigma}{sub rms}<3 {mu}m are required.

  5. First Engineering Commissioning of EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yuanxi; Li, Jiangang; Weng, Peide; EAST Team

    2006-05-01

    Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is the first fully superconducting tokamak. The first commissioning started on Feb. 1st of 2006 and finished on March 30th of 2006 at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It consists of leakage testing at both room temperature and low temperature, pumping down, cooling down all coils, current leads, bus bar and the thermal shielding, exciting all the coils, measuring magnetic configuration and warming up the magnets. The electromagnetic, thermal hydraulic and mechanical performance of EAST Toroidal Field (TF) and Poloidal Field (PF) magnets have also been tested. All sub-systems, including pumping system, cryogenic system, PF& TF power supply systems, magnet instrumentation system, quench detection and protection system, water cooling system, data acquisition system, main control system, plasma control system (PCS), interlock and safety system have been successfully tested.

  6. Pressure Rise Analysis When Hydrogen Leak from a Cracked Pipe in the Cryogenic Hydrogen System in J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Ushijima, I.; Kato, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    2006-04-01

    As one of the main experimental facilities in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1 MW proton beam is being constructed. Cryogenic hydrogen at supercritical pressure is selected as a moderator. The total nuclear heating at the moderators is estimated to be a 3.7 kW. A hydrogen system to cool the moderators has been designed. The most severe off-normal event for the cryogenic hydrogen system is considered to be a hydrogen leak when a pipe cracks. In such a case, the hydrogen must be discharged to atmosphere quickly and safely. An analytical code that simulates the pressure change during a hydrogen leak was developed. A pressure rise analysis for various sized cracks was performed, and the required sizes for relief devices were determined. A safety valve size is φ42.7 mm and a rupture disc for vacuum layer should have a diameter of 37.1 mm, respectively.

  7. Pressure Rise Analysis When Hydrogen Leak from a Cracked Pipe in the Cryogenic Hydrogen System in J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Ushijima, I.; Kato, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    2006-04-27

    As one of the main experimental facilities in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1 MW proton beam is being constructed. Cryogenic hydrogen at supercritical pressure is selected as a moderator. The total nuclear heating at the moderators is estimated to be a 3.7 kW. A hydrogen system to cool the moderators has been designed. The most severe off-normal event for the cryogenic hydrogen system is considered to be a hydrogen leak when a pipe cracks. In such a case, the hydrogen must be discharged to atmosphere quickly and safely. An analytical code that simulates the pressure change during a hydrogen leak was developed. A pressure rise analysis for various sized cracks was performed, and the required sizes for relief devices were determined. A safety valve size is {phi}42.7 mm and a rupture disc for vacuum layer should have a diameter of 37.1 mm, respectively.

  8. Polymeric compositions and their method of manufacture. [forming filled polymer systems using cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, B. G.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    Filled polymer compositions are made by dissolving the polymer binder in a suitable sublimable solvent, mixing the filler material with the polymer and its solvent, freezing the resultant mixture, and subliming the frozen solvent from the mixture from which it is then removed. The remaining composition is suitable for conventional processing such as compression molding or extruding. A particular feature of the method of manufacture is pouring the mixed solution slowly in a continuous stream into a cryogenic bath wherein frozen particles of the mixture result. The frozen individual particles are then subjected to the sublimation.

  9. Commissioning and operational results of the 12 GeV helium compression system at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    The new compressor system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in the spring of 2013 and incorporates many design changes, discussed in previous publications, to improve the operational range, efficiency, reliability and maintainability as compared to previous compressor skids used for this application. The 12 GeV helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels supporting three pressure levels in the new cold box. During compressor commissioning the compressors were operated independent of the cold box over a wide range of process conditions to verify proper performance including adequate cooling and oil removal. Isothermal and volumetric efficiencies over these process conditions for several built-involume ratios were obtained. This paper will discuss the operational envelope results and the modifications/improvements incorporated into the skids.

  10. Commissioning and operational results of the 12 GeV helium compression system at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Norton, R.; Creel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The new compressor system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in the spring of 2013 and incorporates many design changes, discussed in previous publications, to improve the operational range, efficiency, reliability and maintainability as compared to previous compressor skids used for this application. The 12 GeV helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels supporting three pressure levels in the new cold box. During compressor commissioning the compressors were operated independent of the cold box over a wide range of process conditions to verify proper performance including adequate cooling and oil removal. Isothermal and volumetric efficiencies over these process conditions for several built-involume ratios were obtained. This paper will discuss the operational envelope results and the modifications/improvements incorporated into the skids.

  11. Control mechanism for attenuation of thermal energy pulses using cold circulators in the cryogenic distribution system of fusion devices in tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R.; Sarkar, B.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.

    2014-01-29

    Operation and control of superconducting (SC) magnets in the fusion devices having tokamak configuration opens up the domain of varying peak thermal energy environment as a function of time, commensurate with the plasma pulses. The varied thermal energy environment, thus propagated to upstream of the cooling system, is responsible for the system level instability of the overall cryogenic system. The cryogenic distribution system, the regime of first impact point, therefore, has to be tuned so as to stay at the nearly stable zone of operation. The configuration of the cryogenic distribution system, considered in the present study, involves a liquid helium (LHe) bath as a thermal buffer, LHe submerged heat exchangers and cold circulator apart from the valves for implementations of the precise controls. The cold circulator supplies the forced flow supercritical helium, used for the cooling of SC magnets. The transients of the thermal energy pulses can be attenuated in the cryogenic distribution system by various methodologies. One of the adopted methodologies in the present study is with the precise speed control of the cold circulators. The adopted methodology is applied to various configurations of arrangements of internal components in the distribution system for obtaining system responses with superior attenuation of energy pulses. The process simulation approach, assumptions, considered inputs and constraints, process modeling with different configuration as well as results to accomplish the control scheme for the attenuation of the thermal energy pulses are described.

  12. Control mechanism for attenuation of thermal energy pulses using cold circulators in the cryogenic distribution system of fusion devices in tokamak configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Sarkar, B.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.

    2014-01-01

    Operation and control of superconducting (SC) magnets in the fusion devices having tokamak configuration opens up the domain of varying peak thermal energy environment as a function of time, commensurate with the plasma pulses. The varied thermal energy environment, thus propagated to upstream of the cooling system, is responsible for the system level instability of the overall cryogenic system. The cryogenic distribution system, the regime of first impact point, therefore, has to be tuned so as to stay at the nearly stable zone of operation. The configuration of the cryogenic distribution system, considered in the present study, involves a liquid helium (LHe) bath as a thermal buffer, LHe submerged heat exchangers and cold circulator apart from the valves for implementations of the precise controls. The cold circulator supplies the forced flow supercritical helium, used for the cooling of SC magnets. The transients of the thermal energy pulses can be attenuated in the cryogenic distribution system by various methodologies. One of the adopted methodologies in the present study is with the precise speed control of the cold circulators. The adopted methodology is applied to various configurations of arrangements of internal components in the distribution system for obtaining system responses with superior attenuation of energy pulses. The process simulation approach, assumptions, considered inputs and constraints, process modeling with different configuration as well as results to accomplish the control scheme for the attenuation of the thermal energy pulses are described.

  13. Clinical implementation and rapid commissioning of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; van Herk, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    Using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to perform in-vivo dosimetry is one of the most effective and efficient methods of verifying the safe delivery of complex radiotherapy treatments. Previous work has detailed the development of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system that was subsequently used to replace pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Here we show that this system can be readily implemented on a commercial megavoltage imaging platform without modification to EPID hardware and without impacting standard imaging procedures. The accuracy and practicality of the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was confirmed through a comparison with traditional TLD in-vivo measurements performed on five prostate patients. The commissioning time required for the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was initially prohibitive at approximately 10 h per linac. Here we present a method of calculating linac specific EPID dosimetry correction factors that allow a single energy specific commissioning model to be applied to EPID data from multiple linacs. Using this method reduced the required per linac commissioning time to approximately 30 min. The validity of this commissioning method has been tested by analysing in-vivo dosimetry results of 1220 patients acquired on seven linacs over a period of 5 years. The average deviation between EPID based isocentre dose and expected isocentre dose for these patients was (-0.7  ±  3.2)%. EPID based in-vivo dosimetry is now the primary in-vivo dosimetry tool used at our centre and has replaced nearly all pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT treatments.

  14. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  15. Heat release in the cryogenic system of a superconducting integrated detector and the influence of heat on its operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinev, N. V.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2013-03-01

    Heat release in the cryogenic system of a subterahertz-range superconducting integrated detector at ≈4.2 K is studied, and the influence of the released heat on its main characteristics is estimated. The detector chip mounted on a silicon lens is connected to a bias board by aluminum wires 25 μm in diameter, which are fixed by ultrasonic bonding. They are necessary for setting a bias current through the working components of the detector and represent an integral part of the system. The contact resistance between the wires and contact pads of the microchip is measured. The contact resistance is found to considerably exceed the resistance of the aluminum wire and, hence, makes a major contribution to heat release in the system. A "multipoint contact with one wire" technique is suggested. Tests show its efficiency: the contact resistance decreases considerably compared with the standard approach.

  16. Contact voltage-induced softening of RF microelectromechanical system gold-on-gold contacts at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D.; Krim, J.; Walker, M. J.

    2010-08-15

    A series of experiments were performed in vacuum environments to investigate the impact of rf micromechanical system switch contact voltage versus resistance for gold-on-gold contacts at cryogenic temperatures. The purpose of this work was twofold as follows: (1) to examine whether asperity heating models already validated for high temperature contacts were also applicable at cryogenic temperatures and (2) to explore the implications and validity of prior suggestions that contact temperatures between 338 and 373 K are high enough to dissociate adsorbed film and/or push them aside but low enough to prevent asperities from becoming soft and adherent. Measurements on two distinct switch types, fabricated at independent laboratories, were performed in the temperature range 79-293 K and for contact voltages ranging from 0.01 to 0.13 V. Contact resistance values at all temperatures were observed to be lower for higher contact voltages, consistent with the aforementioned asperity heating models, whereby increased contact currents are associated with increased heating and softening effects. In situ removal of adsorbed species by oxygen plasma cleaning resulted in switch adhesive failure. Switches that had not been cleaned meanwhile exhibited distinct reductions in resistance at contact temperatures close to 338 K, consistent with suggestions that films begin to desorb, disassociate, and/or be pushed aside at that temperature.

  17. Design, development and testing of a cryogenic temperature heat pipe for the icicle system. [breadboard models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical model was formulated for a cryogenic heat pipe, and thermal and transport analyses were developed to predict the performance characteristics of various heat pipe designs. These analyses permitted optimization of various design parameters. A series of four breadboard heat pipes were fabricated and tested to provide inputs such as internal film coefficients, minimum capillary radii, and wick permeabilities which are required for the analyses. The results of instrumentation, charging, and testing of cryogenic heat pipes were applied to the prototype heat pipes. After a thorough design analysis of three potential heat pipe wicks (slab, artery, and axial groove), the first two were chosen for application to two prototype heat pipes. Detailed designs were made of the two heat pipes and the units were fabricated. Tests were conducted which verified the integrity and safety margin of the design to withstand the internal pressure at ambient temperature and fatigue of thermal cycling. During the acceptance testing in the vacuum chamber, no difficulty was experienced in priming the slab-wick heat pipe and it met the performance design requirements. The artery-wick heat pipe would not prime with nitrogen working fluid for any test conditions.

  18. A review of experimental methods for solid solubility determination in cryogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stefani, V.; Baba-Ahmed, A.; Richon, D.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past years, there have been a number of serious explosions in air industry, which have resulted in workers injuries and fatalities. At the same time, there has been an increase in the use of air separation products for industrial activities. The quality of air entering an air separation plant is of crucial importance for its safe and reliable operation and the interest in the solubility data of solids in cryogenic liquid solvents is closely connected to the problem of impurities accumulation in the process plant and storage tanks. Such accumulations, especially in liquid oxygen, may cause fouling and blockage in heat exchangers and pipelines and they may eventually cause serious explosions. For this reason the air contaminants composition in liquid oxygen must be determined with great precision. This paper aims at reviewing experimental methods for determining the solubility of solid compounds that may be present in the cryogenic liquefaction processing of air distillation. A review of the literature data on solubility of solids in liquid oxygen and nitrogen is included as well. Emphasis is given to the difficulties in setting-up measuring apparatuses working at extreme conditions, i.e. low compositions and low temperatures.

  19. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Pipe Sizing for Solenoid / VLPC Cryogenic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; Sakla, Steve; /Fermilab

    1995-02-20

    The addition of a solenoid magnet and VLPC detectors are two of a number of upgrades which will occur at the D-Zero detector in the near future. Both of these upgrades will require cryogenic services for their operation. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the pipe/tube size choices made for these cryogenic services. This was done by calculating the required flow rates to cool down the magnet and VLPC's over a reasonable length of time and to determine the required piping sizes for a given allowable pressure drop. The pressure drops for steady state conditions also are addressed. The cool down requirements drove the pipe size decision. The raw engineering calculations that were done for this project are included as an appendix to this note. The body of this document discusses the methods and results of the calculations. As a quick summary, Figures 1 and 2 show the size selections. Tables 1 and 2 give a more detailed size and description of each section of Solenoid and VLPC transfer line.

  20. Acquisition/expulsion system for earth orbital propulsion system study. Volume 2: Cryogenic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Detailed designs were made for three earth orbital propulsion systems; (1) the space shuttle (integrated) OMS/RCS, (2) the space shuttle (dedicated) OMS (LO2), and (3) the space tug. The preferred designs from the integrated OMS/RCS were used as the basis for the flight test article design. A plan was prepared that outlines the steps, cost, and schedule required to complete the development of the prototype DSL tank and feedline (LH2 and LO2) systems. Ground testing of a subscale model using LH2 verified the expulsion characteristics of the preferred DSL designs.

  1. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  2. Commissions of audit in Australia: health system privatisation directives and civil conscription protections.

    PubMed

    Colton, Caroline; Faunce, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The use of commissions of audit as vehicles to drive privatisation policy agendas in areas such as health service delivery has become popular with conservative federal and State governments. Such commissions have characteristically been established early in the terms of such governments with carefully planned terms of reference and membership. The policy directions they advocate, unlike election policies, have not come under the intense scrutiny, wide public debate or the opportunities for (dis)endorsement afforded by the electoral process. Governments do, however, anticipate and often accept recommendations from these reviews, and use them as justification to implement policy based on their findings. This highlights the power entrusted to review bodies and the risks to the public interest arising from limited public consultation. An example can be seen in the proposed privatisation of important aspects of Australia's public sector, particularly including those related to health systems delivery, currently entering a new iteration through the work of the National Commission of Audit appointed in October 2013. The NCA follows on from various State audit commissions which in recent years have directed the divestment of government responsibilities to the private and not-for-profit sectors. Through a discussion on the formation of policy frameworks by the NCA and the Queensland Commission of Audit, this column examines the ideological thrust of the commissions and how they synergise to produce a national directive on the future of public sector health services. The practical impacts on health service procurement and delivery in critical areas are examined, using the case of the federally contracted out medical service for asylum seekers and two hospitals in Western Australia, a State which is well advanced in the privatisation of public hospitals. The column then examines the release to the media early in the NCA's process of the submission to introduce a $6 general

  3. Commissioning of the LHC Low Level RF System Remote Configuration Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, Daniel; Fox, John; Mastorides, Themis; Rivetta, Claudio; Baudrenghien, Philippe; Butterworth, Andrew; Molendijk, John; /CERN

    2010-08-26

    The LHC Low Level RF system (LLRF) is a complex multi-loop system used to regulate the superconductive cavity gap voltage as well as to reduce the impedance presented by RF stations to the beam. The RF system can have a profound impact on the stability of the beam; a mis-configured RF system has the potential of causing longitudinal instabilities, beam diffusion and beam loss. To configure the RF station for operation, a set of parameters in the LLRF multi-loop system have to be defined. Initial system commissioning as well as ongoing operation requires a consistent method of computer based remote measurement and model-based design of each RF station feedback system. This paper describes the suite of Matlab tools used for configuring the LHC RF system during the start up in Nov2009-Feb2010. We present a brief overview of the tool, examples of commissioning results, and basics of the model-based design algorithms. This work complements our previous presentation, where the algorithms and methodology followed in the tools were described.

  4. Cryogenics and the Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current plans within NASA involve extending the human exploration of space from low earth orbit into the solar system, with the first human exploration of Mars presently planned in 2011. Integral to all hum Mars mission phases is cryogenic fluid management. Cryogenic fluids will be required both as propellant and for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Without safe and efficient cryogen storage human Mars missions will not be possible. Effective control and handling of cryogenic fluids is the key to affordable Mars missions, and advancing active thermal control technology is synergistic with all of NASA's exploration initiatives and with existing and future instrument cooling programs, including MTPE and Origins. Present mission scenarios for human exploration require cryogenic propellant storage for up to 1700 days and for up to 60 metric tons. These requirements represent increases of an order of magnitude over previous storage masses and lifetimes. The key cryogenic terminology areas to be addressed in human Mars missions are long-term propellant storage, cryogenic refrigeration, cryogenic liquefaction, and zero gravity fluid management. Long-term storage for the thermal control of cryogenic propellants is best accomplished with a mix of passive and active technologies. Passive technologies such as advanced multilayer insulation (MLI) concepts will be combined with the development of active coolers (cryogenic refrigerators). Candidates for long-life active cooling applications include Reverse Turbo-Brayton, Stirling, and Pulse-Tube coolers. The integration of passive and active technologies will form a hybrid system optimized to minimize the launch mass while preserving the cryogenic propellants. Since cryogenic propellants are the largest mass that Mars missions must launch from earth, even a modest reduction in the percentage of propellant carried results in a significant weight saving. This paper will present a brief overview of cryogenic fluid management

  5. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Under our NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) project we have theoretically demonstrated a novel selective surface that reflects roughly 100 times more solar radiation than any other known coating. If this prediction holds up under experimental tests it will allow cryogenic temperatures to be reached in deep space even in the presence of the sun. It may allow LOX to be carried to the Moon and Mars. It may allow superconductors to be used in deep space without a refrigeration system.

  6. Continuous-Reading Cryogen Level Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barone, F. E.; Fox, E.; Macumber, S.

    1984-01-01

    Two pressure transducers used in system for measuring amount of cryogenic liquid in tank. System provides continuous measurements accurate within 0.03 percent. Sensors determine pressure in liquid and vapor in tank. Microprocessor uses pressure difference to compute mass of cryogenic liquid in tank. New system allows continuous sensing; unaffected by localized variations in composition and density as are capacitance-sensing schemes.

  7. Cryogenics at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Arnold, P.; Hees, J. Fydrych. W.; Jurns, J. M.; Wang, X. L.

    Cryogenics plays an important role at the European Spallation Source, a world class neutron science center, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. Three principal applications of cryogenics are found at ESS. The SRF cryomodules of the ESS proton linac require cooling at 2 K, 4.5 K and 40 K; the hydrogenmoderator surrounding the target that produces neutrons, requires cooling via 16.5 K helium and LHe is required for many of the scientific instruments. These needs will be met by a set of three cryogenic refrigeration/liquefaction plants and an extensive cryogenic distribution system. Significant progress has been made on the ESS cryogenic system in preparation for the expected first beam on target in 2019. This work includes: funding of industry studies for the accelerator cryoplant, preliminary design of the cryogenic distribution system, investigation of possible in kind contributors and release of the invitation to tender for the accelerator cryoplant.This paper describes the requirements, design solutions and current status of the ESS cryogenic system. The planned recovery of waste heat from the cryogenic plants, a unique aspect of ESS, is described. The procurement of the cryogenic system, expected to be done via a combination of purchase via competitive bids and in kind contributions is also discussed.

  8. Commissioning and quality assurance for a respiratory training system based on audiovisual biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guoqiang; Gopalan, Siddharth; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Berger, Jonathan; Maxim, Peter G; Keall, Paul J

    2010-07-12

    A respiratory training system based on audiovisual biofeedback has been implemented at our institution. It is intended to improve patients' respiratory regularity during four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image acquisition. The purpose is to help eliminate the artifacts in 4D-CT images caused by irregular breathing, as well as improve delivery efficiency during treatment, where respiratory irregularity is a concern. This article describes the commissioning and quality assurance (QA) procedures developed for this peripheral respiratory training system, the Stanford Respiratory Training (START) system. Using the Varian real-time position management system for the respiratory signal input, the START software was commissioned and able to acquire sample respiratory traces, create a patient-specific guiding waveform, and generate audiovisual signals for improving respiratory regularity. Routine QA tests that include hardware maintenance, visual guiding-waveform creation, auditory sounds synchronization, and feedback assessment, have been developed for the START system. The QA procedures developed here for the START system could be easily adapted to other respiratory training systems based on audiovisual biofeedback.

  9. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, K R; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K K D

    2013-07-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System.

  10. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K. K. D.

    2013-01-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System. PMID:24049322

  11. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, K R; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K K D

    2013-07-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System. PMID:24049322

  12. Optimization and testing of the Beck Engineering free-piston cryogenic pump for LNG systems on heavy vehicles. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Douglas S.

    2003-01-10

    Task 7 was completed by reaching Milestone 7: Test free piston cryogenic pump (FPCP) in Integrated LNG System. Task 4: Alternative Pump Design was also completed. The type of performance of the prototype LNG system is consistent with requirements of fuel systems for heavy vehicles; however, the maximum flow capacity of the prototype LNG system is significantly less than the total flow requirement. The flow capacity of the prototype LNG system is determined by a cavitation limit for the FPCP.

  13. The CUORE cryostat: commissioning and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Cereseto, R.; Chott, N.; Copello, S.; Cremonesi, O.; Cushman, J. S.; D’Addabbo, A.; Davis, C. J.; Dell’Oro, S.; Drobizhev, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Guetti, M.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pattavina, L.; Rusconi, C.; Santone, D.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Wallig, J.; Wise, T.; Uttaro, S.

    2016-05-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) will search for the 0vββ decay in 130Te using a cryogenic array of TeO2 bolometers, operated at a base temperature of ~10mK. CUORE will consist of a closely packed array of 19 towers each containing 52 crystals, for a total mass of 741kg. The detector assembly is hosted in one of the largest cryostats ever constructed and will be cooled down to base temperature using a custom-built cryogen free dilution refrigerator. The CUORE cryostat along with the pulse tube based dilution refrigerator has been already commissioned at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and a record base temperature, on a cubic meter scale, of ~6mK was achieved during one of the integration runs. We present the results from integration runs, characterizing the system and the cooling performance of the dilution refrigerator, effectively showcasing its stability at base temperature for the expected thermal load.

  14. CRYOGENIC DEWAR

    DOEpatents

    Chamberlain, W.H.; Maseck, H.E.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a dewar for storing cryogenic gase and is of the type having aii inner flask surrounded by a vacuum jacket and having a vent spout through which evaporating gas escapes. Heretofore substantial gas loss has resulted from the radiation of heat towards the flask from the warmer outer elements of the dewar. In this invention, the mask is surrounded by a thermally conducting shield which is disposed in the vacuum space between the flask and the outer elements of the dewar. The shield contacts only the vent spout, which is cooled by the evaporating gas, and thus is maintained at a temperature very close to that of the flask itself. Accordingly, heat radiated toward the flask is intercepted and conducted to the evaporating gas rather than being re-radiated towards the hask. In a liquid helium dewar of typical configniration the mention reduces the boil-off rate by approximately one-half.(AEC)

  15. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  16. Lightweight thermally efficient composite feedlines for the space tug cryogenic propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spond, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Six liquid hydrogen feedline design concepts were developed for the cryogenic space tug. The feedlines include composite and all-metal vacuum jacketed and nonvacuum jacketed concepts, and incorporate the latest technological developments in the areas of thermally efficient vacuum jacket end closures and standoffs, radiation shields in the vacuum annulus, thermal coatings, and lightweight dissimilar metal flanged joints. The feedline design concepts are evaluated on the basis of thermal performance, weight, cost, reliability, and reusability. Design concepts were proved in a subscale test program. Detail design was completed on the most promising composite feedline concept and an all-metal feedline. Three full scale curved composite feedlines and one all-metal feedline assembly were fabricated and subjected to a test program representative of flight hardware qualification. The test results show that composite feedline technology is fully developed. Composite feedlines are ready for space vehicle application and offer significant reduction in weights over the conventional all-metal feedlines presently used.

  17. Overview and Status of the 12 GeV Cryogenic System Upgrade At Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Arenius, Jonathan Creel, Venkatarao Ganni, Kelly Dixon, Peter Knudsen

    2010-04-01

    As part of the planned Jefferson Laboratory's electron accelerator (CEBAF) power upgrade, ten additional superconducting RF cryomodules will be added to its accelerator linacs. Although physically the same size as each of the original 40 linac cryomodules, each new cryomodule will have approximately 4 times the acceleration power. To support the additional cryomodule heat loads generated, the existing 2K, 4600W Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) plant capacity will be doubled to a total of 9200W at 2K plus 24,000W at 35K for shield loads. The specified base line process cycle has been modeled after the laboratory s "Ganni Helium Cycle" process technology. In addition, a fourth physics experimental "Hall D" will be constructed which will have an additional stand alone 200W at 4K helium cryogenic plant. In October of 2008, Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) received approval for project "Critical Decision 3" construction phase status from the US Department of Energy.

  18. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Jose Luis; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  19. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  20. A new guide for commissioning air handling systems: Using a model functional test

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, Tudi; Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Piette, Mary Ann; Bourassa, Norman; Gillespie, Ken

    2002-05-01

    Functional tests are a set of detailed instructions for building commissioning that demand extensive HVAC system knowledge to write and perform. Understanding the energy use implications and theory behind the test procedures, estimating the costs and benefits of doing a particular test, implementing the tests correctly, and resolving problems require years of field experience. As part of a large research project now underway, a practical guide is being developed that communicates this knowledge. This paper presents the components and intended use of the Functional Testing Guide and Model Functional Test for Air Handling Systems. A series of model functional tests, starting at the outdoor air intake section and proceeding through the air handling unit, distribution system, and terminal equipment and ending at the exhaust air discharge point, are provided for many commonly installed air handling system configurations. The model functional tests contain advice for tailoring the test procedures to specific system configurations, desirable and undesirable testing outcomes, a calculation appendix, references to other resources, and examples of completed test forms. The guide is an educational resource, with background information that clarifies the principles behind testing configurations and results. The functional tests have been selected from an extensive commissioning test protocol library compiled by Pacific Gas and Electric in 2001. The guide also includes a design guideline for the selection of control and monitoring points and a design intent documentation form.

  1. Cryogenic Technology Development for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the status and findings of different cryogenic technology research projects in support of the President s Vision for Space Exploration. The exploration systems architecture study is reviewed for cryogenic fluid management needs. It is shown that the exploration architecture is reliant on the cryogenic propellants of liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen and liquid methane. Needs identified include: the key technologies of liquid acquisition devices, passive thermal and pressure control, low gravity mass gauging, prototype pressure vessel demonstration, active thermal control; as well as feed system testing, and Cryogenic Fluid Management integrated system demonstration. Then five NASA technology projects are reviewed to show how these needs are being addressed by technology research. Projects reviewed include: In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot; Experimentation for the Maturation of Deep Space Cryogenic Refueling Technology; Cryogenic Propellant Operations Demonstrator; Zero Boil-Off Technology Experiment; and Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development. Advances are found in the areas of liquid acquisition of liquid oxygen, mass gauging of liquid oxygen via radio frequency techniques, computational modeling of thermal and pressure control, broad area cooling thermal control strategies, flight experiments for resolving low gravity issues of cryogenic fluid management. Promising results are also seen for Joule-Thomson pressure control devices in liquid oxygen and liquid methane and liquid acquisition of methane, although these findings are still preliminary.

  2. Specification of Selected Performance Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2006-10-06

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Distributed Energy (DE) Program by developing advanced control algorithms that would lead to development of tools to enhance performance and reliability, and reduce emissions of distributed energy technologies, including combined heat and power technologies. This report documents phase 2 of the program, providing a detailed functional specification for algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, scheduled for development in FY 2006. The report identifies the systems for which algorithms will be developed, the specific functions of each algorithm, metrics which the algorithms will output, and inputs required by each algorithm.

  3. Development and assessment of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission thermal-hydraulic system computer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Shotkin, L.M.

    1996-11-01

    A review is provided of the reasons why the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs thermal-hydraulic system computer codes, the assumptions and approximations contained within these codes, and the reasons why test data are required to assess the accuracy of the codes. Specific examples of codes and test programs are given. The use of computer codes assessed against data from scaled test facilities to predict the full-scale plant response is discussed. A method to help focus resources and the need for quantifying code uncertainties are discussed. This paper concentrates on the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) because most of the analytical and experimental research has been concentrated in LOCAs.

  4. Design and evaluation of thermodynamic vent/screen baffle cryogenic storage system. [for space shuttles, space tugs, and spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical program was performed to compare an integrated thermodynamic vent/screen baffle orbital cryogenic propellant storage and transfer system with other concepts. The screen systems were found to be 20% to 29% lighter in weight than a propulsively accelerated Tug-scale LH2/LO2 resupply module. The screen systems were compared with small-scale supercritical storage systems for the space shuttle fuel cell reactant and life support system fluid supply and were lighter by up to 556 kg (1225 lb) for the extended 30-day mission. When compared with high-pressure gas storage for the spacelab atmosphere supply, the screen system saved 79% of the inert system weight for the 30-day mission. An experimental program found that heat flux rates up to 9,450 watts/sq m (3,000 Btu/hr-sq ft) degraded the LH2 bubble point performance of eight screens by a maximum of 12.5%. No effects of helium pressurant, screen material, or LH2 superheat were observed.

  5. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced NEP.

  6. Commissioning of helium compression system for the 12 GeV refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Arenius, Dana M.

    2014-01-01

    The compressor system used for the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade, also known as the CHL-2 compressor system, incorporates many design changes to the typical compressor skid design to improve the efficiency, reliability and maintainability from previous systems. These include a considerably smaller bulk oil separator design that does not use coalescing elements/media, automated control of cooling oil injection based on the helium discharge temperature, a helium after-cooler design that is designed for and promotes coalescing of residual oil and a variable speed bearing oil pump to reduce oil bypass. The CHL-2 helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels that supports the three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will briefly review several of these improvements and discuss some of the recent commissioning results.

  7. Design of a simple cryogenic system for ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy with a back-reflectance fiber optic probe.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, Andrew; Hansen, Kaj A; Byrd, Ross; Stuart, Douglas A; Hansen, John E

    2014-01-01

    We report a convenient and inexpensive technique for the rapid acquisition of absorption spectra from small samples at cryogenic temperatures using a home built cryostat with novel collection optics. A cylindrical copper block was constructed with a coaxial bore to hold a 4.00 mm diameter electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tube and mounted on a copper feed in thermal contact with liquid nitrogen. A 6.35 mm diameter hole was bored into the side of the cylinder so a fiber optic cable bundle could be positioned orthogonally to the EPR tube. The light passing through the sample is reflected off of the opposing surfaces of the EPR tube and surrounding copper, back through the sample. The emergent light is then collected using the fiber optic bundle and analyzed using a dispersive spectrometer. Absorption spectra for KMnO4 were measured between 400 and 700 nm. Absorption intensity at 506, 525, 545, and 567 nm was found to be proportional to concentration, displaying Beer's law-like behavior. The EPR tube had an internal diameter of 3.2 mm; the double pass of the probe beam through the sample affords a central path length of about 6.4 mm. Comparing these measurements with those recorded on a conventional tabletop spectrometer using a cuvette with a 10.00 mm path length, we consistently found a ratio between intensities of 0.58 rather than the anticipated 0.64. These 6% smaller values we attribute to the curvature of the EPR tube and transmission/reflection losses. This system is particularly well-suited to studying the kinetics and dynamics of chemical reactions at cryogenic temperatures. The rapid response (100 ms) and multiplex advantage provided the opportunity of recording simultaneous time courses at several wavelengths following initiation of a chemical reaction with a pulsed laser source. PMID:24405962

  8. Cryogenic VPH grisms for MOIRCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Ichiyama, Kotaro; Ebizuka, Noboru; Murata, Chihiro; Taniguchi, Yuichiro; Okura, Tsutomu; Harashima, Masakazu; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Maruyama, Miyoko; Iye, Masanori; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2008-07-01

    We present the development and first astronomical applications of VPH grisms which are now operated at cryogenic temperature in MOIRCS, a Cassegrain near-infrared instrument of the Subaru Telescope. We designed and fabricated the VPH grisms with a resolving power ~3000 for the use in near-infrared bands. The VPH grating, encapsulated in BK7 glass, is glued between two ZnSe prisms with vertex angle of 20 deg. After repeating several thermal cycles down to ~100 K carefully enough not to cause irreparable damage on the grism during cooling, we evaluated the performance at cryogenic temperature in the laboratory and found no deterioration and no large difference in the performance from that measured in room temperature. Based on commissioning observations with MOIRCS, we have confirmed the high efficiency (~0.8) and the resolving power of the original design. Common use of the grisms is due to start in the second semester of 2008.

  9. Commissioning of a multiple-frequency modulation smoothing by spectral dispersion demonstration system on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Kelly, J. H.; Dorrer, C.; Okishev, A. V.; Waxer, L. J.; Balonek, G.; Begishev, I. A.; Bittle, W.; Consentino, A.; Cuffney, R.; Hill, E.; Marozas, J. A.; Moore, M.; Roides, R. G.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-02-01

    A one-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) demonstration system for smoothing focal-spot nonuniformities using multiple modulation frequencies (multi-FM SSD) was commissioned on one long-pulse beamline of OMEGA EP—the first use of such a system in a high-energy laser. System models of frequency modulation-to-amplitude modulation (FM-to-AM) conversion in the OMEGA EP beamline and final optics were used to develop an AM budget. The AM budget in turn provided a UV power limit of 0.85 TW, based on accumulation of B-integral in the final optics. The front end of the demonstration system utilized a National Ignition Facility preamplifier module (PAM) with a custom SSD grating inserted into the PAM's multipass amplifier section. The dispersion of the SSD grating was selected to cleanly propagate the dispersed SSD bandwidth through various pinholes in the system while maintaining sufficient focal-spot smoothing performance. A commissioning plan was executed that systematically introduced the new features of the demonstration system into OMEGA EP. Ultimately, the OMEGA EP beamline was ramped to the UV power limit with various pulse shapes. The front-end system was designed to provide flexibility in pulse shaping. Various combinations of pickets and nanosecond-scale drive pulses were demonstrated, with multi-FM SSD selectively applied to portions of the pulse. Analysis of the dispersion measured by the far-field diagnostics at the outputs of the infrared beamline and the frequency-conversion crystals indicated that the SSD modulation spectrum was maintained through both the beamline and the frequency-conversion process. At the completion of the plan, a series of equivalent-target-plane measurements with distributed phase plates installed were conducted that confirmed the expected timeintegrated smoothing of the focal spot.

  10. Cryogenics maintenance strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzat, Fabiola

    2012-09-01

    ALMA is an interferometer composed of 66 independent systems, with specific maintenance requirements for each subsystem. To optimize the observation time and reduce downtime maintenance, requirements are very demanding. One subsystem with high maintenance efforts is cryogenics and vacuum. To organize the maintenance, the Cryogenic and Vacuum department is using and implementing different tools. These are monitoring and problem reporting systems and CMMS. This leads to different maintenance approaches: Preventive Maintenance, Corrective Maintenance and Condition Based Maintenance. In order to coordinate activities with other departments the preventive maintenance schedule is kept as flexible as systems allow. To cope with unavoidable failures, the team has to be prepared to work under any condition with the spares on time. Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) will help to manage inventory control for reliable spare part handling, the correct record of work orders and traceability of maintenance activities. For an optimized approach the department is currently evaluating where preventive or condition based maintenance applies to comply with the individual system demand. Considering the change from maintenance contracts to in-house maintenance will help to minimize costs and increase availability of parts. Due to increased number of system and tasks the cryo team needs to grow. Training of all staff members is mandatory, in depth knowledge must be built up by doing complex maintenance activities in the Cryo group, use of advanced computerized metrology systems.

  11. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  12. Refrigeration for Cryogenic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, M. G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Research in cryogenically cooled refrigerators is discussed. Low-power Stirling cryocoolers; spacecraft-borne long-life units; heat exchangers; performance tests; split-stirling, linear-resonant, cryogenic refrigerators; and computer models are among the topics discussed.

  13. Commissioning a Tape Transport System for Decay Studies and Beam Diagnostics at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Lister, C. J.; Teh, K.; Kondev, F. G.; Nair, C.; Chowdhury, P.; Deo, A. Y.; Lakshmi, S.

    2011-10-01

    The CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to the ATLAS facility at Argonne utilizes the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf for producing neutron-rich radioactive nuclei. CARIBU will be used for a wide variety of experiments, involving both reaccelerated and stopped beams, in nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and applications. Many of these experiments will require a means of transporting radioactivity to and from detector counting stations for the purpose of assaying beam content, measuring half-lives, β- γ spectroscopy and determining Gamow-Teller strength distributions. We have commissioned the first of several tape transport systems that will perform these functions. An overview of the design and deployment of the system will be given along with preliminary test results. Supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  14. Commissioning of helium refrigeration system at JLab for 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Knudsen, Peter N.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system added to the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) for the 12 GeV upgrade will double its previous capacity. It includes a 4.5 K cold box system and compressor system with associated oil removal and gas management systems. At its maximum capacity condition, this new system supports an additional 238 g/s 30 K 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6 kW 35–55 K shield load. Five more design conditions, ranging from liquefaction to refrigeration and a stand-by/reduced load state, were specified for the sizing and selection of its components. The cold box system is comprised of a 300–60 K vertical cold box that incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and a 60–4.5 K horizontal cold box housing seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will briefly review the salient 4.5 K system design features and discuss the recent commissioning results.

  15. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  16. Evaluation du systeme de traduction automatique SYSTRAN anglais-Francais, version 1978, de la Commission des Communautes Europeennes (Evaluation of the English-French SYSTRAN Machine Translation System, 19 version, of the Commission of European Communities).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Slype, Georges

    1979-01-01

    Describes the French-English version of the SYSTRAN machine translation system, used by the Commission of European Communities, and an evaluation study which examined the quality, cost, and weaknesses of the system. The study concluded that this type of system is useful for "pretranslation" and "rough" translation only. (AM)

  17. Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

  18. [Cryogenic Raman spectroscopic studies in the system of NaCl-MgCl2-H2O].

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Xu, Wen-Yi

    2010-03-01

    In the present paper, the best experimental conditions for producing hydrates in the NaCl-H2O and MgCl2-H2O systems were found through the cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. This experimental condition is rapidly cooling to -180 degrees C and slowly warming to observe hydrate formation process (that is manifested as a darkening of the vision in the microscope), and finally, rapidly cooling down to -180 degrees C. Moreover, a qualitative or semiquantitative analytical method for NaCl-MgCl2-H2O system was established. This method is that 3 537 cm(-1) may instruct the existence of NaCl hydrates, 3 514 cm(-1) may instruct the existence of MgCl2 hydrates, and comparison of the intensity of 3 537 and 3 514 cm(-1) peaks can be used to estimate the ratio of NaCl and MgCl2 in the system. All these are the foundations for quantifying the components of natural fluid inclusions. The author supports Samson's idea through observing the phenomenon of experiments in the controversy of the meta-stable eutectics formation model, that is ice forms on initial cooling, leaving a residual, interstitial, hypersaline liquid. On warming, the salt hydrates crystallize from this liquid.

  19. Status Of Sorption Cryogenic Refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews sorption refrigeration. Developed for cooling infrared detectors, cryogenic research, and other advanced applications, sorption refrigerators have few moving parts, little vibration, and lifetimes of 10 years or more. Describes types of sorption stages, multistage and hybrid refrigeration systems, power requirements, cooling capacities, and advantages and disadvantages of various stages and systems.

  20. CUORE: Cryogenic challenges and prospects for a future upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vivek; Cuore Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale bolometric experiment searching for the 0 νββ decay in 130Te. It consists of a closely packed array of 988 TeO2 crystals (5 × 5 × 5 cm3 each) and will be hosted in one of the largest cryostats ever constructed to reach a base temperature of ~10 mK. With a background goal of 10 c/keV/ton/y and an expected energy resolution of ~5 keV in the region of interest, CUORE has the potential to probe the effective Majorana neutrino mass down to 50-130 meV (90 % C.L). A natural follow-up to CUORE would be a ton-scale bolometric experiment which can be sensitive to the effective mass of ~10 meV, covering the entire inverted hierarchy region of the mass spectrum. CUPID (CUORE Upgrade with Particle ID) is a proposed next-generation bolometric experiment which aims to use the CUORE cryogenic infrastructure in conjunction with new detector technologies and novel background mitigation techniques. After briefly outlining the design of CUORE with a focus on its novel cryogenic system, an overview of the current status of CUORE commissioning effort would be presented. The talk will then delve on some of the R&D activities which are being actively pursued under the CUPID framework.

  1. SU-E-T-73: Commissioning of a Treatment Planning System for Proton Spot Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, J; Kang, Y; Schultz, L; Nicewonger, D; Herrera, M; Wong, T; Bowen, S; Bloch, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned for clinical use with a fixed beam line proton delivery system. An outline of the data collection, modeling, and verification is provided. Methods: Beam data modeling for proton spot scanning in CMS Xio TPS requires the following measurements: (i) integral depth dose curves (IDDCs); (ii) absolute dose calibration; and (iii) beam spot characteristics. The IDDCs for 18 proton energies were measured using an integrating detector in a single spot field in a water phantom. Absolute scaling of the IDDCs were performed based on ion chamber measurements in mono-energetic 10×10 cm{sup 2} fields in water. Beam spot shapes were measured in air using a flat panel scintillator detector at multiple planes. For beam model verification, more than 45 uniform dose phantom and patient plans were generated. These plans were used to measure range, point dose, and longitudinal and lateral profiles. Tolerances employed for verification are: point dose and longitudinal profiles, ±2%; range, ±1 mm; FWHM for lateral profiles, ±2 mm; and patient plan dose distribution, gamma index of >90% at 3%/3 mm criteria. Results: More than 97% of the point dose measurements out of 115 were within +/-2% with maximum deviation of 3%. 98% of the ranges measured were within 1 mm with maximum deviation of 1.4mm. The normalized depth doses were within 2% at all depths. The maximum error in FWHM of lateral profiles was found to be less than 2mm. For 5 patient plans representing different anatomic sites, a total of 38 planes for 12 beams were analyzed for gamma index with average value of 99% and minimum of 94%. Conclusions: The planning system is successfully commissioned and can be safely deployed for clinical use. Measurements of IDDCs on user beam are highly recommended instead of using standard beam IDDCs.

  2. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  3. Cryogenic insulation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhard, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    Multilayer insulations for long term cryogenic storage are described. The development effort resulted in an insulation concept using lightweight radiation shields, separated by low conductive Dacron fiber tufts. The insulation is usually referred to as Superfloc. The fiber tufts are arranged in a triangular pattern and stand about .040 in. above the radiation shield base. Thermal and structural evaluation of Superfloc indicated that this material is a strong candidate for the development of high performance thermal protection systems because of its high strength, purge gas evacuation capability during boost, its density control and easy application to a tank.

  4. Installing and Commissioning a New Radioactive Waste Tracking System - Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Anderson; Miklos Garamszeghy; Fred Rodrigues; Ed Nicholls

    2005-05-01

    Ontario Power Generation (OPG) recognizes the importance of information management particularly with regards to its low and intermediate level waste program. Various computer based waste tracking systems have been used in OPG since the 1980s. These systems tracked the physical receipt, processing, storage, and inventory of the waste. As OPG moved towards long-term management (e.g. disposal), it was recognized that tracking of more detailed waste characterization information was important. This required either substantial modification of the existing system to include a waste characterization module or replacing it entirely with a new system. After a detailed review of available options, it was decided that the existing waste tracking application would be replaced with the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Integrated Waste Tracking System (IWTS). Installing and commissioning a system which must receive historical operational waste management information (data) and provide new features, required much more attention than was originally considered. The operational readiness of IWTS required extensive vetting and preparation of historic data (which itself had been created from multiple databases in varied formats) to ensure a consistent format for import of some 30,000-container records, and merging and linking these container records to a waste stream based characterization database. This paper will discuss some of the strengths and weaknesses contributing to project success or hindrance so that others can understand and minimize the difficulties inherent in a project of this magnitude.

  5. Commissioning of the 112 MHz SRF Gun and 500 MHz bunching cavities for the CeC PoP Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J. C.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntosh, P.; Moss, A.; Narayan, G.; Orfin, P.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, E.; Wheelhouse, A.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Xin, T.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment at BNL includes a short electron linac. During Phase 1, a 112 MHz superconducting RF photo-emission gun and two 500 MHz normal conducting bunching cavities were installed and are under commissioning. The paper describes the Phase1 linac layout and presents commissioning results for the cavities and associated RF, cryogenic and other sub-systems

  6. The use of information systems to transform utilities and regulatory commissions: The application of geographic information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wirick, D.W.; Montgomery, G.E.; Wagman, D.C.; Spiers, J.

    1995-09-01

    One technology that can assist utilities remain financially viable in competitive markets and help utilities and regulators to better serve the public is information technology. Because geography is an important part of an electric, natural gas, telecommunications, or water utility, computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related Automated Mapping/Facilities Management systems are emerging as core technologies for managing an ever-expanding variety of formerly manual or paper-based tasks. This report focuses on GIS as an example of the types of information systems that can be used by utilities and regulatory commissions. Chapter 2 provides general information about information systems and effects of information on organizations; Chapter 3 explores the conversion of an organization to an information-based one; Chapters 4 and 5 set out GIS as an example of the use of information technologies to transform the operations of utilities and commissions; Chapter 6 describes the use of GIS and other information systems for organizational reengineering efforts; and Chapter 7 examines the regulatory treatment of information systems.

  7. Numerical modeling of self-pressurization and pressure control by a thermodynamic vent system in a cryogenic tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Valenzuela, Juan; LeClair, Andre; Moder, Jeff

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of a system-level test bed-the multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). MHTB is representative in size and shape of a space transportation vehicle liquid hydrogen propellant tank, and ground-based testing was performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to generate data for cryogenic storage. GFSSP is a finite volume-based network flow analysis software developed at MSFC and used for thermofluid analysis of propulsion systems. GFSSP has been used to model the self-pressurization and ullage pressure control by the Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS). A TVS typically includes a Joule-Thompson (J-T) expansion device, a two-phase heat exchanger (HEX), and a mixing pump and liquid injector to extract thermal energy from the tank without significant loss of liquid propellant. For the MHTB tank, the HEX and liquid injector are combined into a vertical spray bar assembly. Two GFSSP models (Self-Pressurization and TVS) were separately developed and tested and then integrated to simulate the entire system. The Self-Pressurization model consists of multiple ullage nodes, a propellant node, and solid nodes; it computes the heat transfer through multilayer insulation blankets and calculates heat and mass transfer between the ullage and liquid propellant and the ullage and tank wall. A TVS model calculates the flow through a J-T valve, HEX, and spray and vent systems. Two models are integrated by exchanging data through User Subroutines of both models. Results of the integrated models have been compared with MHTB test data at a 50% fill level. Satisfactory comparison was observed between tests and numerical predictions.

  8. Cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.

    1979-01-01

    The development of spiral artery cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes was continued. Ethane was the working fluid and stainless steel the heat pipe material in all cases. The major tasks included: (1) building a liquid blockage (blocking orifice) thermal diode suitable for the HEPP space flight experiment; (2) building a liquid trap thermal diode engineering model; (3) retesting the original liquid blockage engineering model, and (4) investigating the startup dynamics of artery cryogenic thermal diodes. An experimental investigation was also conducted into the wetting characteristics of ethane/stainless steel systems using a specially constructed chamber that permitted in situ observations.

  9. Generation of 6.05J nanosecond pulses at a 1Hz repetition rate from a cryogenic cooled diode-pumped Yb:YAG MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojin; Wang, Jianlei; Yang, Zhongguo; Liu, Jin; Li, Lei; Shi, Xiangchun; Huang, Wenfa; Wang, Jiangfeng; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    Diode-pumped solid state laser system based on cryogenic Yb:YAG active-mirror scheme are presented with recent energy output. With improved optical design, 6.05J/1Hz pulse energy is achieved and a conceptual design with 30J output energy is theoretical simulated. The doubling efficiency of YCa4O (BO3)(YCOB) crystal is also discussed in this paper.

  10. Addendum to brachytherapy dose-volume histogram commissioning with multiple planning systems.

    PubMed

    Gossman, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The process for validating dose-volume histogram data in brachytherapy software is presented as a supplement to a previously published article. Included is the DVH accuracy evaluation of the Best NOMOS treatment planning system called "Best TPS VolumePlan." As done previously in other software, a rectangular cuboid was contoured in the treatment planning system. A single radioactive 125I source was positioned coplanar and concentric with one end. Calculations were performed to estimate dose deposition in partial volumes of the cuboid structure, using the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism defined in AAPM Task Group 43. Hand-calculated, dose-volume results were compared to TPS-generated, point-source-approximated dose-volume histogram data to establish acceptance. The required QA for commissioning was satisfied for the DVH as conducted previously for other software, using the criterion that the DVH %VolTPS "actual variance" calculations should differ by no more than 5% at any specific radial distance with respect to %VolTG-43, and the "average variance" DVH %VolTPS calculations should differ by no more than 2% over all radial distances with respect to %VolTG-43. The average disagreement observed between hand calculations and treatment planning system DVH was less than 0.5% on average for this treatment planning system and less than 1.1% maximally for 1 ≤ r ≤ 5 cm. PMID:27167288

  11. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A SUPERCRITICAL HELIUM-COOLED CRYOGENIC VISCOUS COMPRESSOR PROTOTYPE FOR THE ITER VACUUM SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Rasmussen, David A; Edgemon, Timothy D; Hechler, Michael P; Barbier, Charlotte N; Pearce, R.J.H.; Kersevan, R.; Dremel, M.; Boissin, Jean Claude

    2012-01-01

    As part of the vacuum system for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscouscompressor (CVC) is being developed to collect hydrogenic exhaust gases from the toruscryopumps and compress them to a high enough pressure by regeneration for pumping tothe tritium reprocessing facility. Helium impurities that are a byproduct of the fusionreactions pass through the CVC and are pumped by conventional vacuum pumps andexhausted to the atmosphere. Before the development of a full-scale CVC, a representative,small-scale test prototype was designed, fabricated, and tested. With cooling provided bycold helium gas, hydrogen gas was introduced into the central column of the test prototypepump at flow rates between 0.001 g/s and 0.008 g/s. Based on the temperatures and flowrates of the cold helium gas, different percentages of hydrogen gas were frozen to the column surface wall as the hydrogen gas flow rate increased. Results from the measured temperatures and pressures will form a benchmark that will be used to judge future heattransfer enhancements to the prototype CVC and to develop a computational fluid dynamicmodel that will help develop design parameters for the full-scale CVC.

  12. Introduction of a Saturated Bath in Vincenta Models: Application to the Cryogenic System for JT-60SA Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, B.; Roussel, P.; Michel, F.; Hitz, D.

    2010-04-01

    The CEA is involved in large helium refrigeration applied to the future experimental fusion reactors (e.g. ITER or JT-60SA). Pulsed operation of such machines results in heat load variations which the refrigerators have to cope with. One solution to smooth pulsed loads is to use a large thermal buffer, and in the case of JT-60SA cryogenic system, a saturated thermal bath is one of the investigated solutions. A 1D thermo hydraulic model describing the cooling loop associated with TF (Toroidal Field) coils and TF casing has been developed using Vincenta code to calculate the heat load arriving to the buffer (saturated bath). However, the liquid helium buffer itself and its coupling with the primary loop was not modelized. This paper shows results obtained using the existing functionalities in Vincenta code to model a saturated bath. For very large bath volumes, bath temperature remains almost steady and the power removed is equal to those previously calculated. On the other side, for smaller buffer volumes (e.g. JT-60SA scheme), it has been found that the increase of temperature fluctuations does not vary proportionally with the decrease of the buffer volume.

  13. The Commission's Student Data System: A Progress Report. Working Paper WP/05-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In May 2005, the University of California, the California State University, and the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office provided the Commission with enrollment and degree data that identifies individual students. The data was provided in accordance with AB 1570, which authorizes the Commission to use a student identifier in its data…

  14. Intra- and intervariability in beam data commissioning among water phantom scanning systems.

    PubMed

    Akino, Yuichi; Gibbons, John P; Neck, Daniel W; Chu, Connel; Das, Indra J

    2014-07-08

    Accurate beam data acquisition during commissioning is essential for modeling the treatment planning system and dose calculation in radiotherapy. Although currently several commercial scanning systems are available, there is no report that compared the differences among the systems because most institutions do not acquire several scanning systems due to the high cost, storage space, and infrequent usage. In this report, we demonstrate the intra- and intervariability of beam profiles measured with four commercial scanning systems. During a recent educational and training workshop, four different vendors of beam scanning water phantoms were invited to demonstrate the operation and data collection of their systems. Systems were set up utilizing vendor-recommended protocols and were operated with a senior physicist, who was assigned as an instructor along with vendor. During the training sessions, each group was asked to measure beam parameters, and the intravariability in percent depth dose (PDD). At the end of the day, the profile of one linear accelerator was measured with each system to evaluate intervariability. Relatively very small (SD < 0.12%) intervariability in PDD was observed among four systems at a region deeper than peak (1.5 cm). All systems showed almost identical profiles. At the area within 80% of radiation field, the average, and maximum differences were within ± 0.35% and 0.80%, respectively, compared to arbitrarily chosen IBA system as reference. In the penumbrae region, the distance to agreement (DTA) of the region where dose difference exceed ± 1% was less than 1 mm. Repeated PDD measurement showed small intravariability with SD < 0.5%, although large SD was observed in the buildup region. All four water phantom scanning systems demonstrated adequate accuracy for beam data collection (i.e., within 1% of dose difference or 1 mm of DTA among each other). It is concluded that every system is capable of acquiring accurate beam. Thus the selection

  15. Implementation of Sub-Cooling of Cryogenic Propellants by Injection of Non-condensing Gas to the Generalized Fluid Systems Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, Daniel J.; Majumdar, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants are readily heated when used. This poses a problem for rocket engine efficiency and effective boot-strapping of the engine, as seen in the "hot" LOX (Liquid Oxygen) problem on the S-1 stage of the Saturn vehicle. In order to remedy this issue, cryogenic fluids were found to be sub-cooled by injection of a warm non-condensing gas. Experimental results show that the mechanism behind the sub-cooling is evaporative cooling. It has been shown that a sub-cooled temperature difference of approximately 13 deg F below saturation temperature [1]. The phenomenon of sub-cooling of cryogenic propellants by a non-condensing gas is not readily available with the General Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) [2]. GFSSP is a thermal-fluid program used to analyze a wide variety of systems that are directly impacted by thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. In order to model this phenomenon, additional capabilities had to be added to GFSSP in the form of a FORTRAN coded sub-routine to calculate the temperature of the sub-cooled fluid. Once this was accomplished, the sub-routine was implemented to a GFSSP model that was created to replicate an experiment that was conducted to validate the GFSSP results.

  16. Performance of a Cryogenic 21 Meter-Path Copper Herriott Cell Vacuum Coupled to a Bruker 125HR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, Arlan W.; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Yu, Shanshan; Brown, Linda R.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2013-06-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary atmospheres requires a detailed knowledge of the temperature and pressure dependence of spectroscopic line parameters of atmospheric molecules. With this requirement in mind, a new Herriott cell having a 21 meter folded absorption path was designed and fabricated with Oxygen-Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper body and gold coated OFHC copper mirrors to operate for the first time with a broad-band Fourier transform spectrometer. The cell, enclosed in an isolated vacuum box, is cooled by a CTI Cryogenics, Inc. model 1050 closed-cycle helium refrigerator which also cryopumps the vacuum box. The temperature of the cell is monitored by a silicon temperature sensor and regulated by a Lakeshore model 331 temperature controller. The new cell system was integrated to the JPL Bruker model 125HR interferometer with transfer optics which are fully evacuated to 12 mTorr (the pressure inside the interferometer). The optics were through-put matched for entrance apertures smaller than 2 mm. The system has successfully operated for several months at gas sample temperatures between 75 and 250 K with extremely good stability to obtain spectra of methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen bands between 0.76 and 3 μm. We present the characterization and performance of the Herriott cell system and preliminary analyses of newly recorded spectra. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, NASA Langley Research Center, and The College of William and Mary under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Analyzing the Use of Gaseous Helium as a Pressurant with Cryogenic Propellants with Thermodynamic Venting System Modelling and Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.L.; Hastings, L.J.; Flachbart, R.H.; Vermillion, D.J.; Tucker, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogens are viable candidate propellants for NASA's Lunar and Mars exploration programs. To provide adequate mass flow to the system's engines and/or to prevent feed system cavitation, gaseous helium (GHe) is frequently considered as a pressurant. During low gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) is designed to maintain tank pressure during low gravity operations without propellant resettling. Therefore, a series of tests were conducted in the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in order to evaluate the effects of GHe pressurant on pressure control performance of a TVS with liquid hydrogen (LH2) and nitrogen (LN2) as the test liquids. The TVS used in these test series consists of a recirculation pump, Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. Using a small amount of liquid extracted from the tank recirculation line, passing it through the J-T valve, and then through the heat exchanger, thermal energy is extracted from the bulk liquid and ullage thereby enabling pressure control. The LH2/GHe tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25% and LN2/GHe tests were conducted at fill levels of 50% and 25%. Moreover, each test was conducted with a specified tank ullage pressure control band. A one-dimensional TVS performance program was used to analyze and correlate the test data. Predictions and comparisons with test data of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  18. Structural damping studies at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1994-01-01

    Results of an engineering study to measure changes in structural damping properties of two cryogenic wind tunnel model systems and two metallic test specimens at cryogenic temperatures are presented. Data are presented which indicate overall, a trend toward reduced structural damping at cryogenic temperatures (-250 degrees F) when compared with room temperature damping properties. The study was focused on structures and materials used for model systems tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The study suggests that the significant reductions in damping at extremely cold temperatures are most likely associated with changes in mechanical joint compliance damping rather than changes in material (solid) damping.

  19. Commissioning and validation of COMPASS system for VMAT patient specific quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimthong, J.; Kakanaporn, C.; Tuntipumiamorn, L.; Laojunun, P.; Iampongpaiboon, P.

    2016-03-01

    Pre-treatment patient specific quality assurance (QA) of advanced treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is one of important QA in radiotherapy. The fast and reliable dosimetric device is required. The objective of this study is to commission and validate the performance of COMPASS system for dose verification of VMAT technique. The COMPASS system is composed of an array of ionization detectors (MatriXX) mounted to the gantry using a custom holder and software for the analysis and visualization of QA results. We validated the COMPASS software for basic and advanced clinical application. For the basic clinical study, the simple open field in various field sizes were validated in homogeneous phantom. And the advanced clinical application, the fifteen prostate and fifteen nasopharyngeal cancers VMAT plans were chosen to study. The treatment plans were measured by the MatriXX. The doses and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) reconstructed from the fluence measurements were compared to the TPS calculated plans. And also, the doses and DVHs computed using collapsed cone convolution (CCC) Algorithm were compared with Eclipse TPS calculated plans using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) that according to dose specified in ICRU 83 for PTV.

  20. Cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The cryogenic fluid management experiment (CFME), designed to characterize subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and expulsion in the low-q space environment, is discussed. The experiment utilizes a fine mesh screen fluid management device to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and a thermodynamic vent system to intercept heat leak and control tank pressure. The experiment design evolved from a single flight prototype to provision for a multimission (up to 7) capability. A detailed design of the CFME, a dynamic test article, and dedicated ground support equipment were generated. All materials and parts were identified, and components were selected and specifications prepared. Long lead titanium pressurant spheres and the flight tape recorder and ground reproduce unit were procured. Experiment integration with the shuttle orbiter, Spacelab, and KSC ground operations was coordinated with the appropriate NASA centers, and experiment interfaces were defined. Phase 1 ground and flight safety reviews were conducted. Costs were estimated for fabrication and assembly of the CFME, which will become the storage and supply tank for a cryogenic fluid management facility to investigate fluid management in space.

  1. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  2. Evaluation of two designs for cryogenic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Shingle-type, crinkled, aluminized polyethylene ester is thermally and structurally tested for cryogenic insulation. Insulation systems require thermal efficiency with minimum weight, and the ability to withstand vibration, acceleration, and rapid pressure drops.

  3. Response to Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ten questions pertaining to site-specific models for use in the license termination rule: Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Hoopes, B.L.; McDonald, J.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Pelton, M.A.; Gelston, G.M.; Taira, R.Y.

    1998-05-01

    This paper is in response to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ten questions posed at the Modeling Workshop held November 13 and 14, 1997. The ten questions were developed in advance of the workshop to allow model developers to prepare a presentation at the Workshop. This paper is an expanded version of the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) presentation given at the Modeling Workshop by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. This paper is organized by the ten questions asked by the NRC, each section devoted to a single question. The current version of methodology is MEPAS 3.2 (NRC 1997) and the discussion in this paper will pertain to that version. In some cases, MEPAS 4.0, which is currently being developed under the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) (Whelan et al. 1997), will be referenced to inform the reader of potential capabilities in the near future. A separate paper is included in the document that discusses the FRAMES concept.

  4. Cryogenics program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the cryogenics program of the Goddard Space Flight Center is given in viewgraph form. Goddard's role and the flight programs requiring cryogenics are outlined. Diagrams are given of the Cosmic Background Explorer, the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, a liquid cryogenic cooler for the Shuttle Glow Experiment, a liquid helium dewar, and the X-ray spectrometer on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility.

  5. A cryogenic monitor system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter in the SLD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.J.; Fox, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    This paper describes the monitoring electronics system design for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) portion of the SLD detector. This system measures temperatures and liquid levels inside the LAC cryostat and transfers the results over a fiber-optic serial link to an external monitoring computer. System requirements, unique design constraints, and detailed analog, digital and software designs are presented. Fault tolerance and the requirement for a single design to work in several different operating environments are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Quantitative analysis of brass compensators for commissioning of the Pinnacle planning system for IMRT.

    PubMed

    Gates, Larry L; Gladstone, David J

    2015-01-01

    Brass compensators for beam modulation present an alternative method for IMRT treatment planning to traditional dynamic leaf modulation. In this work, we present a detailed method to commission the Pinnacle treatment planning system for IMRT using brass compensators. Beam attenuation from various brass thicknesses were measured using an ion chamber, as well as a MapCHECK device, for a representative seven-field IMRT plan. We show that Pinnacle's parameters for compensators can be optimized to match the measured results while still maintaining the original open-beam model. Only Pinnacle's modified scatter factor and brass density value were adjusted. Beam attenuation in several brass slabs were optimized by minimizing a χ(2) function of measured and modeled data for several depths in solid water. Using MapCHECK, Pinnacle's parameters were optimized by minimizing the number of points that fail during a gamma analysis of seven fields in a typical IMRT plan. Our results show that Pinnacle's 10X beam is best modeled using a brass density of 7.8 g/cm(3) and a modified scatter factor of 0.1 cm(-1).

  7. Test and Commissioning of the AST3-1 Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Wang, Daxing

    2013-01-01

    The first of three Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3-1), a 50/68cm Schmidt-like equatorial-mount telescope, is the first trackable Chinese telescope operating on the Antarctic plateau. It was installed at Dome A (80°22', 77°21'E, 4,093m), the highest place on the Antarctic plateau, in 2012. The telescope is unmanned during night-time operations through the Austral winter. The telescope optics and mechanics, as well as the motors and position sensors, are exposed to a harsh environment. The mechanics is enclosed with a foldable tent-like dome to prevent snow, diamond dust and ice. While the control cabinet containing drive boxes, circuit board boxes, power converters and the Telescope Control Computer (TCC) is located inside the warm instrumental module. In about 15 weeks remote testing and commissioning, from January 24 when the expedition team left there to May 8, when the communication failed, we obtained images with the best FWHM of less than 2''. We also recorded the telescope movement performance and fine-tuned the dynamic properties of the telescope control system. Some experiences and lessons will be disscussed in this paper.

  8. Below-Ambient and Cryogenic Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems operating in below-ambient temperature conditions are inherently susceptible to moisture intrusion and vapor drive toward the cold side. The subsequent effects may include condensation, icing, cracking, corrosion, and other problems. Methods and apparatus for real-world thermal performance testing of below-ambient systems have been developed based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry. New ASTM International standards on cryogenic testing and their extension to future standards for below-ambient testing of pipe insulation are reviewed.

  9. Thermal Characterization and Effect of Deposited hbox {CO}2 on a Cryogenic Insulation System Based on a Spherical Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, M.; Ebert, H.-P.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work is to study the effect of deposited hbox {CO}2 on the solid thermal conductivity of a cryogenic insulation system. Therefore, measurements were performed using a guarded hot plate apparatus at temperatures in the range from 80 K to 290 K in combination with a bellow acting as the sample containment. The unique experimental setup and sample preparation are described in detail. Furthermore, existing thermal models which are based on a superposition of thermal transfer due to radiation and solid thermal conductivity were modified to account for the thermal effects of deposited gases and the consequently increased solid thermal conductivity for a spherical powder. Measurements showed a significant increase of the solid thermal conductivity depending on the amount of hbox {CO}2 that was provided for deposition-evacuation. 2.77 Vol-‰hbox {CO}2 resulted in an increase of 5.5 % in the overall solid thermal conductivity. Twice this amount (5.54 Vol-‰hbox {CO}2) and four times this amount (11.1 Vol-‰hbox {CO}2) resulted in an increase of 8.8 % and 14.1 % in the overall solid thermal conductivity, respectively. Due to additional temperature sensors, it was possible to measure the effective thermal conductivity in different layers of the insulation material. Thus, a significant change in the innermost layer of 75 % was measured for the solid thermal conductivity comparing the evacuated sample with the hbox {CO}2-loaded (11.1 Vol-‰hbox { CO}2) sample.

  10. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Michael D.; Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A.; Holdsworth, David W.; Drangova, Maria; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 × 2 to 60 × 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 × 70 × 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 × 50 × 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 × 70 × 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 × 50, 40 × 40, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%–20%) from 3.9 to

  11. Accreditation Role of the National Universities Commission and the Quality of the Educational Inputs into Nigerian University System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibijola; Yinka, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation role of the National Universities Commission (NUC) and the quality of the educational inputs into Nigerian university system was investigated in this work, using a descriptive research of survey design. The population consisted of public Universities in South-West, Nigeria. The sample was made up of 300 subjects, consisting of 50…

  12. Nanosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser

    SciTech Connect

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Vadimova, O L; Palashov, O V

    2014-05-30

    A cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser is modernised to increase its average and peak power. The master oscillator unit of the laser is considerably modified so that the pulse duration decreases to several nanoseconds with the same pulse energy. A cryogenic disk laser head with a flow-through cooling system is developed. Based on two such laser heads, a new main amplifier is assembled according to an active multipass cell scheme. The total small-signal gain of cryogenic cascades is ∼10{sup 8}. (lasers)

  13. Evaluation of Power Electronic Components and Systems at Cryogenic Temperatures For Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Power electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space applications and outer planetary exploration are required to operate reliably and efficiently under extreme temperature conditions. This requirement is dictated by the fact that the operational environments associated with some of the space missions would encompass temperatures as low as -183 C. The development and utilization of electronics capable of low temperature operation would not only fulfill the advanced technology requirements, but also would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. These benefits are generally achieved by the improved intrinsic properties of some of the electronic materials at low temperature, reduced device losses, and the elimination of heating elements used in conventional systems at low temperatures. Power electronic circuits are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management, conditioning, and control. In this work, the performance of certain power electronic components and systems was investigated under low temperature. These include inductors, capacitors, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) controllers, and advanced commercial DC/DC converter modules. Different properties were determined as a function of temperature in the range of 20 C to -140 C, at various current and voltages levels. The experimental procedures along with the experimental data obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  14. LCT for the European data relay system: in orbit commissioning of the Alphasat and Sentinel 1A LCTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, F.; Mühlnikel, G.; Zech, H.; Tröndle, D.; Seel, S.; Motzigemba, M.; Meyer, R.; Philipp-May, S.; Benzi, E.

    2015-03-01

    The European Data Relay System (EDRS) relies on optical communication links between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and geostationary (GEO) spacecrafts. Data transmission at 1.8 Gbps between the S/Cs will be applied. EDRS is foreseen to go into operation in 2015. As a precursor to the EDRS GEO Laser Communication Terminals (LCT), an LCT is embarked on the Alphasat GEO S/C. Sentinel 1A is a LEO earth observation satellite as part of ESAs Copernicus program and carries an LCT on board. Both the Alphasat and the Sentinel 1A LCT have completed their individual in orbit commissioning and a joint link commissioning phase, with first LEO to GEO optical communication links in 2014. In this presentation, the design principle of the LCT applied for EDRS will be investigated. The most recent results of the in-orbit link commissioning phase of the LCTs on board of Alphasat and Sentinel 1A will be presented.

  15. Determination of the Optimal Operating Parameters for Jefferson Laboratory's Cryogenic Cold Compressor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Joe D. Wilson, Jr.

    2003-04-01

    The technology of Jefferson Laboratory's (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) requires cooling from one of the world's largest 2K helium refrigerators known as the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL). The key characteristic of CHL is the ability to maintain a constant low vapor pressure over the large liquid helium inventory using a series of five cold compressors. The cold compressor system operates with a constrained discharge pressure over a range of suction pressures and mass flows to meet the operational requirements of CEBAF and FEL. The research topic is the prediction of the most thermodynamically efficient conditions for the system over its operating range of mass flows and vapor pressures with minimum disruption to JLab operations. The research goal is to find the operating points for each cold compressor for optimizing the overall system at any given flow and vapor pressure.

  16. Functional Fault Modeling of a Cryogenic System for Real-Time Fault Detection and Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Perotti, Jose; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Brown, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the model development process used to create a Functional Fault Model (FFM) of a liquid hydrogen (L H2) system that will be used for realtime fault isolation in a Fault Detection, Isolation and Recover (FDIR) system. The paper explains th e steps in the model development process and the data products required at each step, including examples of how the steps were performed fo r the LH2 system. It also shows the relationship between the FDIR req uirements and steps in the model development process. The paper concl udes with a description of a demonstration of the LH2 model developed using the process and future steps for integrating the model in a live operational environment.

  17. Method and apparatus of cryogenic cooling for high temperature superconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing; Mine, Susumu

    2005-02-15

    A method and apparatus for providing cryogenic cooling to HTS devices, in particular those that are used in high-voltage electric power applications. The method involves pressurizing liquid cryogen to above one atmospheric pressure to improve its dielectric strength, while sub-cooling the liquid cryogen to below its saturation temperature in order to improve the performance of the HTS components of the device. An apparatus utilizing such a cooling method consists of a vessel that contains a pressurized gaseous cryogen region and a sub-cooled liquid cryogen bath, a liquid cryogen heating coupled with a gaseous cryogen venting scheme to maintain the pressure of the cryogen to a value in a range that corresponds to optimum dielectric strength of the liquid cryogen, and a cooling system that maintains the liquid cryogen at a temperature below its boiling point to improve the performance of HTS materials used in the device.

  18. Commissioning MMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Stone, John; Smith, Patrick; Reiter, Jenifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASAs Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  19. Tri-Gas Pressurization System Testing and Modeling for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B.; Polsgrove, R.; Stephens, J.; Hedayat, A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of Tri-gas in rocket propulsion systems is somewhat of a new technology. This paper defines Tri-gas as a mixture of gases composed largely of helium with a small percentage of a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. When exposed to a catalyst the hydrogen and oxygen in the mixture combusts, significantly raising the temperature of the mixture. The increase in enthalpy resulting from the combustion process significantly decreases the required quantity of gas needed to pressurize the ullage of the vehicle propellant tanks. The objective of this effort was to better understand the operating characteristics of Tri-gas in a pressurization system with low temperature applications. In conjunction with ongoing programs at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, an effort has been undertaken to evaluate the operating characteristics of Tri-gas through modeling and bench testing. Through improved understanding of the operating characteristics, the risk of using this new technology in a launch vehicle propulsion system was reduced. Bench testing of Tri-gas was a multistep process that targeted gas characteristics and performance aspects that pose a risk to application in a pressurization system. Pressurization systems are vital to propulsion system performance. Keeping a target ullage pressure in propulsions tanks is necessary to supply propellant at the conditions and flow rates required to maintain desired engine functionality. The first component of testing consisted of sampling Tri-gas sources that had been stagnant for various lengths of time in order to determine the rate at which stratification takes place. Second, a bench test was set up in which Tri-gas was sent through a catalyst bed. This test was designed to evaluate the performance characteristics of Tri-gas, under low temperature inlet temperatures, in a flight-like catalyst bed reactor. The third, most complex, test examined the performance characteristics of Tri-gas at low temperature temperatures

  20. Parametric analysis of a novel cryogenic CO2 capture system based on Stirling coolers.

    PubMed

    Song, Chun Feng; Kitamura, Yutaka; Li, Shu Hong; Jiang, Wei Zhong

    2012-11-20

    CO(2) capture and storage (CCS) is an important alternative to control greenhouse gas (GHG) effects. In previous work, a novel desublimation CO(2) capture process has been exploited making use of three free piston Stirling coolers (namely, SC-1, SC-2, and SC-3, respectively). Based on the developed system, moisture and CO(2) in the flue gas can condense and desublimate in the prefreezing and main-freezing towers, respectively. Meanwhile, the storage column is chilled by SC-3 to preserve the frosted CO(2), and permanent gas (such as N(2)) passes through the system without phase change. The whole process can be implemented at atmospheric pressure and reduce the energy penalty (e.g., solvent regeneration and pressure drop) in other technologies. In this work, the influence of process parameters has been investigated in detail. The optimal conditions for the system are as follows: idle operating time is 240 min, flow rate is 5 L/min, vacuum degree of the interlayer is 2.2 × 10(3) Pa, and temperatures of SC-1, -2, and -3 are -30, -120, and -120 °C, respectively. Under these conditions, the energy consumption of the system is around 0.5 MJ(electrical)/kg CO(2) with above 90% CO(2) recovery.