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Sample records for cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mercedes; Ormazábal, Aida; Antón, Jordi; Aróstegui, Juan I; García-Cazorla, Angels

    2009-12-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is a category of autoinflammatory disorders caused by mutations of the NLRP3 gene, with chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular syndrome being the severest clinical phenotype. Various pterins have been reported as mediating immunologic functions in the central nervous system, but to date studies of pterin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) values and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome have been lacking. A 2-year-old child was affected with a severe atypical form of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, suspected based on the analysis of neopterin in CSF. He initially presented isolated neurologic manifestations mimicking a neuroregressive disorder. Blood and CSF analyses did not present any routine inflammatory markers, but CSF neopterin was elevated. Later, the patient developed arthritis and recurrent episodes of fever, and the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome diagnosis was confirmed by genetic studies. Neopterin was the most altered indicator over the time. Child neurologists should be on the alert when unexplained neurologic signs appear, giving consideration to the possibility of inflammatory or immune-mediated diseases. The present case demonstrates the clinical utility of measurement of CSF neopterin levels in screening for these immune-mediated diseases, especially when neurologic symptoms are associated with normal results on routine CSF tests.

  2. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes: background and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Tetsuo; Koike, Ryuji

    2010-06-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are caused by mutations of the gene encoding the NLR family protein NLRP3, which together with caspase-1 and adaptor proteins constitutes a protein complex termed the inflammasome. In innate immune reactions, a variety of stimuli activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, triggering caspase-1 to process proIL-1 and thus to produce mature IL-1. Excessive production of IL-1 by monocytes/macrophages is the central pathophysiology of CAPS, and daily injection of the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra rapidly ameliorates the inflammatory symptoms in most cases. Furthermore, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials have recently confirmed the efficacy and safety of rilonacept, a fusion protein of the IL-1 receptor and IgG Fc, and canakinumab, a human anti-IL-1 monoclonal antibody, as novel long-lasting agents for treating CAPS.

  3. Diagnostic criteria for cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS).

    PubMed

    Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B; Ozen, Seza; Tyrrell, Pascal N; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lachmann, Helen; Blank, Norbert; Hoffman, Hal M; Weissbarth-Riedel, Elisabeth; Hugle, Boris; Kallinich, Tilmann; Gattorno, Marco; Gul, Ahmet; Ter Haar, Nienke; Oswald, Marlen; Dedeoglu, Fatma; Cantarini, Luca; Benseler, Susanne M

    2016-10-04

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a rare, heterogeneous disease entity associated with NLRP3 gene mutations and increased interleukin-1 (IL-1) secretion. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of IL-1 inhibition prevent organ damage. The aim of the study was to develop and validate diagnostic criteria for CAPS. An innovative process was followed including interdisciplinary team building, item generation: review of CAPS registries, systematic literature review, expert surveys, consensus conferences for item refinement, item reduction and weighting using 1000Minds decision software. Resulting CAPS criteria were tested in large cohorts of CAPS cases and controls using correspondence analysis. Diagnostic models were explored using sensitivity analyses. The international team included 16 experts. Systematic literature and registry review identified 33 CAPS-typical items; the consensus conferences reduced these to 14. 1000Minds exercises ranked variables based on importance for the diagnosis. Correspondence analysis determined variables consistently associated with the diagnosis of CAPS using 284 cases and 837 controls. Seven variables were significantly associated with CAPS (p<0.001). The best diagnosis model included: Raised inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein/serum amyloid A) plus ≥two of six CAPS-typical symptoms: urticaria-like rash, cold-triggered episodes, sensorineural hearing loss, musculoskeletal symptoms, chronic aseptic meningitis and skeletal abnormalities. Sensitivity was 81%, specificity 94%. It performed well for all CAPS subtypes and regardless of NLRP3 mutation. The novel approach integrated traditional methods of evidence synthesis with expert consensus, web-based decision tools and innovative statistical methods and may serve as model for other rare diseases. These criteria will enable a rapid diagnosis for children and adults with CAPS.

  4. Diagnosis of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: challenges, recommendations and emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Sarrabay, Guillaume; Grandemange, Sylvie; Touitou, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome are rare autosomal dominantly inherited diseases. They include three overlapping phenotypes: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous articular syndrome/neonatal onset multisystem autoinflammatory syndrome (NOMID/CINCA). Recurrent fevers, joint pain, and urticarial skin rash are the main clinical features of these conditions. Renal amyloidosis and sensorineural complications may occur. Gain-of-function mutations in NLRP3 gene are responsible for the overactivation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a multimolecular complex involved in the inflammatory process. Missense mutations are almost always encountered, particularly in exon 3, which encodes the nucleotide-binding domain. Mosaicism is not rare, especially in CINCA/NOMID. Next-generation sequencing will grant access to new insights about NLRP3 implication in oligogenic and multifactorial diseases.

  5. Current treatment recommendations and considerations for cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Galeotti, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) encompasses a spectrum of three phenotypes of increasing severity. The syndrome is due to dominant mutations in NLRP3, which encodes a key component of the innate immunity that regulates the secretion of IL-1β. CAPS manifests as systemic inflammation, which compromises quality of life and leads to serious complications and handicap. Anti-IL-1 drugs have shown remarkable efficacy in treating CAPS symptoms and have significantly changed patients' lives. They have acceptable safety profiles but do have some differences. We review three drugs that are currently marketed for CAPS, give additional information for the practical use of these drugs, and provide some recommendations for management.

  6. Rilonacept in the management of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS).

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Justin; Mathews, Rebeccah; McDermott, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a subgroup of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes, which are rare autoinflammatory and inherited disorders, characterized by recurrent inflammation and varying degrees of severity. CAPS are thought to be driven by excessive production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), through over-activation of the inflammasome by gain of function mutations in the gene encoding cryopyrin (NLRP3). This conclusion is supported by the remarkable efficacy of IL-1β blockade in these conditions. Rilonacept (Arcalyst(TM); Regeneron) is the first us Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome and Muckle-Wells syndrome and the first in a new line of drugs designed for longer-acting IL-1 blockade. Rilonacept has been associated with a decrease in disease activity, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) in the treatment of CAPS. The clinical safety and efficacy of rilonacept in CAPS and non-CAPS populations will be summarized in this review. Rilonacept is also beneficial for patients who tolerate injections poorly, due to an extended half-life over the unapproved CAPS treatment, anakinra, requiring weekly rather than daily self-administration. Other autoinflammatory disorders may also benefit from rilonacept treatment, with clinical trials in progress for systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, gout and familial mediterranean fever.

  7. Anakinra and related drugs targeting interleukin-1 in the treatment of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bachove, Inessa; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Anakinra is an interleukin (IL) receptor antagonist that works by blocking the biological activity of IL-1 by competitively inhibiting binding of IL-1 to the type 1 interleukin receptor. IL-1 production is induced in response to inflammatory stimuli and mediates various physiological mechanisms, including inflammation and immunological reactions. Patients with neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) produce excess IL-1β, a major proinflammatory cytokine that regulates innate immune responses. Anakinra binds competitively and this results in a rapid reduction in disease severity. NOMID, also known as chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous, articular syndrome, is the most severe clinical phenotype in the spectrum of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. It is characterized by cutaneous symptoms, arthropathy, and central nervous system involvement. Extensive studies in patients with NOMID have led to advances in characterizing the extent of organ-specific involvement and damage that occurs with chronic overproduction of IL-1β. NOMID is caused predominantly by mutations in the NLRP3/CIAS1 gene that encodes for the protein cryopyrin, leading to activation of the “NLRP3 inflammasome complex”. This in turn regulates the maturation and secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. The clinical value of IL-1β has been demonstrated by the positive response of patients after treatment with anakinra, with rapid improvement in clinical symptoms, markers of inflammation, and a significant decrease in major organ manifestations. PMID:27790031

  8. Canakinumab in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: an update for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B; Haug, Iris

    2013-12-01

    The cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a very rare disease. It is estimated that there are 1-2 cases for every 1 million people in the US and 1 in every 360,000 in France. However, many patients are diagnosed very late or not at all, meaning the real prevalence is likely to be higher. CAPS encompasses the three entities of familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID)/chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome. They have in common a causative mutation in the NLRP3 gene. The altered gene product cryopyrin leads to activation of the inflammasome which in turn is responsible for excessive production of interleukin (IL)-1β. IL-1β causes the inflammatory manifestations in CAPS. These appear as systemic inflammation including fever, headache or fatigue, rash, eye disease, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, musculoskeletal manifestations and central nervous system (CNS) symptoms (NOMID/CINCA only). With the advent of IL-1 Inhibitors, safe and effective therapeutic options became available for this devastating disease. To prevent severe and possible life-threatening disease sequelae, early and correct diagnosis and immediate initiation of therapy are mandatory in most patients. Canakinumab is a fully human monoclonal IgG1 anti-IL-1β antibody. It provides selective and prolonged IL-1β blockade and has demonstrated a rapid (within hours), complete and sustained response in most CAPS patients without any consistent pattern of side effects. Long-term follow-up trials have demonstrated sustained efficacy, safety and tolerability. Canakinumab is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for FCAS and MWS and by European Medicines Agency for treatment of all three phenotypes of CAPS.

  9. Anakinra use during pregnancy in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS).

    PubMed

    Chang, Zenas; Spong, Catherine Y; Jesus, Adriana A; Davis, Michael A; Plass, Nicole; Stone, Deborah L; Chapelle, Dawn; Hoffmann, Patrycja; Kastner, Daniel L; Barron, Karyl; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela T; Stratton, Pamela

    2014-11-01

    Objective: To describe the pregnancy course and outcome, and use of anakinra, a recombinant selective IL-1 receptor blocker, during pregnancy in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), including familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal onset multi-system inflammatory disease (NOMID). Methods: Women currently enrolled in natural history protocols (NCT00059748, and/or NCT00069329 under IND) who have been pregnant were included. Subjects underwent a structured, standardized interview with regards to maternal health, pregnancy and fetal outcomes. Medical records were reviewed. Results: Nine women (four with FCAS, one with MWS and four with NOMID) reported one to four pregnancies, each resulting in a total of fifteen FCAS, three MWS, and six NOMID pregnancies. Six births from FCAS mothers and three births from NOMID mothers occurred while patients were receiving anakinra. If a woman became pregnant while taking anakinra, the pre-pregnancy anakinra dose was continued. Anakinra dose was increased during one twin pregnancy. No preterm births or serious complications of pregnancy were observed. One fetus of the twin pregnancy had renal agenesis and suffered fetal demise. Genetic testing showed the deceased twin carried the same NLRP3 c.785T>C, p.V262A mutation as the mother. The other twin is healthy and mutation negative. Conclusions: Anakinra was continued during pregnancy in women with CAPS and provided significant, persistent CAPS symptom relief while continuing to prevent the long-term sequelae of CAPS. Anakinra was well tolerated. Although a causal relation between anakinra and renal agenesis seems unlikely, further safety data are needed.

  10. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Part II: cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, pediatric systemic granulomatosis and PAPA syndrome].

    PubMed

    Aróstegui, Juan I; Yagüe, Jordi

    2008-03-29

    Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases result from a genetically-based dysregulated inflammatory process, and are clinically characterized by recurrent or persistent systemic inflammatory episodes, which typically occur in the absence of infectious, neoplastic or autoimmune etiology. Elucidation of their molecular basis has enabled the use of genetic analyses to achieve an accurate and definitive diagnosis, and to establish a tailored treatment. The present review is the second and last part of an updated and comprehensive overview of hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases, and will introduce persistent, non-periodic autoinflammatory diseases, such as: a) the group of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), which includes familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome, and CINCA-NOMID syndrome; b) the group of pediatric systemic granulomatosis, which includes both Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis, and c) the pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

  11. [An approach to the patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) : a new biologic response modifier, canakinumab].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Nozawa, Tomo; Kizawa, Toshiatsu; Kanetaka, Taichi; Miyamae, Takako; Mori, Masa-aki; Nishikomori, Ryohta; Takata, Hidetoshi; Heike, Toshio; Hara, Toshiro; Imagawa, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) comprises a group of rare, but severe, autoinflammatory syndrome, and includes 3 distinct conditions, familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (MONID). These syndromes are characterized by urticarial-like rash, periodic fever, central nervous system inflammation, an arthropathy, and the risk of amyloidosis. About 20% die by age 20 years in the most severe cases. The disease is associated with mutations in the NLRP3 gene that encodes for the protein cryopyrin, a component of the inflammasome complex that regulates the production and secretion of IL-1β. Canakinumab is a human IgG monoclonal antibody targeting IL-1β. The clinical trials of canakinumab for patients with CAPS in both western countries and Japan were well-tolerated in most patients, and provided significant advantages over existing competitive therapies. Although no serious adverse effects have been reported, the frequencies of common infectious diseases including nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infections, and gastroenteritis were reported presumably due to the blockade of proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. For us pediatrician, it will be important to be more careful for infectious diseases to provide the maximum safety of canakinumab for these patients.

  12. Methodological challenges in monitoring new treatments for rare diseases: lessons from the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) are a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases and encompass Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), and Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID). Canakinumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against IL-1 beta and approved for CAPS patients but requires post-approval monitoring due to low and short exposures during the licensing process. Creative approaches to observational methodology are needed, harnessing novel registry strategies to ensure Health Care Provider reporting and patient monitoring. Methods A web-based registry was set up to collect information on long-term safety and effectiveness of canakinumab for CAPS. Results Starting in November 2009, this registry enrolled 241 patients in 43 centers and 13 countries by December 31, 2012. One-third of the enrolled population was aged < 18; the overall population is evenly divided by gender. Enrolment is ongoing for children. Conclusions Innovative therapies in orphan diseases require post-approval structures to enable in depth understanding of safety and natural history of disease. The rarity and distribution of such diseases and unpredictability of treatment require innovative methods for enrolment and follow-up. Broad international practice-based recruitment and web-based data collection are practical. PMID:24016338

  13. Canakinumab (ACZ885, a fully human IgG1 anti-IL-1β mAb) induces sustained remission in pediatric patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents a spectrum of three auto-inflammatory syndromes, familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease/chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (NOMID/CINCA) with etiology linked to mutations in the NLRP3 gene resulting in elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. CAPS is a rare hereditary auto-inflammatory disease, which may start early in childhood and requires a life-long treatment. Canakinumab, a fully human anti-IL-1β antibody, produces sustained selective inhibition of IL-1β. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of canakinumab in the treatment of pediatric CAPS patients. Methods Seven pediatric patients (five children and two adolescents) with CAPS were enrolled in a phase II, open-label study of canakinumab in patients with CAPS. Canakinumab was administered at a dose of 2 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.) (for patients with body weight ≤ 40 kg) or 150 mg s.c. (for patients with body weight > 40 kg) with re-dosing upon each relapse. The primary efficacy variable was time to relapse following achievement of a complete response (defined as a global assessment of no or minimal disease activity and no or minimal rash and values for serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and/or serum amyloid A (SAA) within the normal range, < 10 mg/L). Results All patients achieved a complete response within seven days after the first dose of canakinumab and responses were reinduced on retreatment following relapse. Improvements in symptoms were evident within 24 hours after the first dose, according to physician assessments. The estimated median time to relapse was 49 days (95% CI 29 to 68) in children who received a dose of 2 mg/kg. Canakinumab was well tolerated. One serious adverse event, vertigo, was reported, but resolved during treatment. Conclusions Canakinumab, 2 mg/kg or

  14. Targeting interleukin-1β in CAPS (cryopyrin-associated periodic) syndromes: what did we learn?

    PubMed

    Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Piram, Maryam

    2012-11-01

    CAPS is the prototype of an IL-1β driven auto inflammatory disorder. Features of recurrent systemic inflammation compromises patient's quality of life, and may reduce life expectancy by inducing definite organ damage. Recent treatment targeting IL-1 have shown dramatic effect on patient's clinical symptoms and quality of life. Anakinra was first used successfully in treating small series of patients with all CAPS phenotypes. Two pivotal randomized placebo-controlled studies allowed licensing of rilonacept and canakinumab as orphan drugs for CAPS patients. The use of anti-IL-1 drugs in CAPS is still relatively new, and their effect on a long term is not well known. As we can suppress the clinical symptoms of patients with CAPS, important questions remain regarding the full effect of anti-IL-1 treatment on organ involvement and their potential ability to prevent them. As important variations of treatment doses and schedules appear in reaching effectiveness, pharmacologic studies are still warranted to determine a potential diffusion of anti-IL-1 drugs in the fluids and tissues. More studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of anti-IL-1 drugs given in patients before 2 years of age are warranted, since it is believed that the earliest treatment could avoid secondary CAPS complications to develop.

  15. Cryopyrin-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndromes (CAPS) - Juvenile

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient and Caregiver ... Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient and Caregiver ...

  16. Periodic fevers and autoinflammatory syndromes in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ostring, Genevieve T; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent fever is a common presentation in paediatric practice and can be caused by a wide variety of diseases including autoinflammatory conditions. The innate immune system plays an essential role in the 'first line' response to infection through mediation of inflammatory responses. Inflammasomes are part of the regulatory process for this system and result in the production of the powerful pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1B. Dysregulation of inflammasomes, and Interleukin 1 production, contributes to the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory diseases. This review focuses on described periodic fever syndromes (PFS) which are now collectively referred to as autoinflammatory syndromes. Conditions discussed include periodic fever aphthous stomatitis pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy, familial Mediterranean fever, tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndromes, hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. Presenting features, complications, diagnostic and treatment approaches for these conditions are discussed. Nonetheless, as most of these conditions are rare and may have significant long-term complications, it is recommended that they be managed in consultations with a physician experienced in managing PFS.

  17. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet’s and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. PMID:25562014

  18. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II.

    PubMed

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-06-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet's and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry.

  19. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  20. Autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, M; Gasbarrini, G; Ghirardello, A; Grandemange, S; Hoffman, H M; Manna, R; Podswiadek, M; Punzi, L; Sebastiani, G D; Touitou, I; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorders are a new and expanding classification of inflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation in the absence of pathogens, autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells. These disorders are caused by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, without evidence of adaptive immune dysregulation. Innate immune abnormalities include aberrant responses to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) like lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, prominent neutrophilia in blood and tissues, and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha) or their receptors. The autoinflammatory diseases comprise both hereditary (Familial Mediterranean Fever, FMF; Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, MKD; TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome, TRAPS; Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndrome, CAPS; Blau syndrome; Pyogenic sterile Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne syndrome, PAPA; Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, CRMO) and multifactorial (Crohn's and Behçet's diseases) disorders. Mutations responsible for FMF, TRAPS, CAPS, PAPA are in proteins involved in modulation of inflammation and apoptosis.

  1. [Childhood periodic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J-C; Lépine, A

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the so-called "periodic syndromes of childhood that are precursors to migraine", as included in the Second Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Three periodic syndromes of childhood are included in the Second Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders: abdominal migraine, cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal vertigo, and a fourth, benign paroxysmal torticollis is presented in the Appendix. The key clinical features of this group of disorders are the episodic pattern and intervals of complete health. Episodes of benign paroxysmal torticollis begin between 2 and 8 months of age. Attacks are characterized by an abnormal inclination and/or rotation of the head to one side, due to cervical dystonia. They usually resolve by 5 years. Benign paroxysmal vertigo presents as sudden attacks of vertigo, accompanied by inability to stand without support, and lasting seconds to minutes. Age at onset is between 2 and 4 years, and the symptoms disappear by the age of 5. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is characterized in young infants and children by repeated stereotyped episodes of pernicious vomiting, at times to the point of dehydration, and impacting quality of life. Mean age of onset is 5 years. Abdominal migraine remains a controversial issue and presents in childhood with repeated stereotyped episodes of unexplained abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting occurring in the absence of headache. Mean age of onset is 7 years. Both cyclic vomiting syndrome and abdominal migraine are noted for the absence of pathognomonic clinical features but also for the large number of other conditions to be considered in their differential diagnoses. Diagnostic criteria, such as those of the Second Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, have made diagnostic approach and management easier. Their diagnosis

  2. [Papillary edema in Muckle-Wells syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wirths, G; Grenzebach, U; Eter, N

    2015-09-01

    Papillary edema may occur isolated without functional impairment or secondary related to various syndromes, increased intracerebral pressure or associated with medicinal treatment. The Muckle-Wells syndrome is a rare disease, which among many other symptoms can lead to optic disc swelling and recurrent increase in intracerebral pressure. Besides familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID), the Muckle-Wells syndrome also belongs to the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). In most cases of CAP syndromes there is an underlying genetic disorder that leads to overproduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β); therefore, typical symptoms include inflammation reactions, such as repeated skin rash, fatigue, fever, joint pain and conjunctivitis.

  3. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  4. Immunology in clinic review series; focus on autoinflammatory diseases: role of inflammasomes in autoinflammatory syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ozkurede, V U; Franchi, L

    2012-01-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes are disorders characterized by the hyperactivation of the innate immune system in the absence of microbial infection or autoantibody production. Some autoinflammatory syndromes are associated with recurrent episodes of fever and systemic inflammation that are caused by dysregulated activation of inflammasomes, molecular platforms responsible for the activation of caspase-1 and the production of interleukin (IL)-1β. In this review we will discuss the role of IL-1β and the inflammasomes in host defence and how mutations of two genes, NLRP3 and PYRIN, leads to the autoinflammatory syndromes, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Both CAPS and FMF are characterized by increased inflammasome activity and overproduction of IL-1β which is ultimately responsible for disease manifestations. Importantly, understanding the molecular mechanisms of these syndromes has led to effective treatment for these rare diseases with biological drugs that target IL-1β-mediated signalling. PMID:22288581

  5. [Diagnosis and Clinical Examination of Autoinflammatory Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki

    2015-05-01

    Autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by: 1) episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation, 2) the absence of a high titer of autoantibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and 3) an inborn error of innate immunity. In this decade, many autoinflammatory syndromes have been reported in Japan, and so many Japanese physicians have become aware of this syndrome. Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. The main monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), Blau syndrome, and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome. We diagnosed these syndromes as clinical manifestations and performed genetic screening. Many serum cytokines are elevated in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome, but this is not disease-specific. The pathogeneses of many autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be related to inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase 1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 muturation. Especially, NLRP3 inflammasomes may play a crucial role in the intiation and progression of FMF and CAPS. In the future, we hope to discover new clinical examinations which can provide evidence of inflammasome activation independent of genetic screening. In this issue, I introduce autoinflammatory syndromes and discuss the diagnosis and clinical examination of these syndromes.

  6. Autoinflammatory syndromes behind the scenes of recurrent fevers in children.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato

    2009-08-01

    Many children experience recurrent fevers with no easily identifiable source and only a careful follow-up helps in the early identification of other presenting symptoms of other defined conditions which require medical intervention. Autoinflammatory syndromes are rare childhood-onset disorders of the innate immunity in which recurrent flares of fever and inflammation affecting skin, joints, the gastrointestinal tube, or serous membranes are the most striking signs, without any evidence of autoantibody production or underlying infections. Among the pediatric conditions belonging to this group we can consider hereditary recurrent fevers (familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes), pyogenic disorders (PAPA syndrome, CRMO syndrome, Majeed syndrome), immune-mediated granulomatous diseases (Blau syndrome, Crohn's disease), and idiopathic febrile syndromes (systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, PFAPA syndrome, Behçet syndrome). Their genetic background has only been partially elucidated and advances in their molecular pathogenesis are shedding new light on the innate immune system, whilst more and more diseases are being reconsidered at a pathogenetic level and included in this new chapter of postgenomic medicine. The diagnosis of most autoinflammatory syndromes relies on clinical history, demonstration of an increased acute-phase response during inflammatory attacks, and, possibly, genetic confirmation, which is still elusive especially for idiopathic febrile syndromes. This astonishing progress in the awareness and knowledge of autoinflammatory syndromes has anticipated the actual possibilities of medical intervention and rationalized treatment with targeted biologic agents.

  7. Skin manifestations in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases encompass a group of inflammatory diseases that are non-infectious, non-allergic, non-autoimmune and non-immunodeficient. The term was initially coined for a small group of familial periodic fever syndromes of which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common and best known. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrated for the majority of these diseases an impairment of inflammasomes to cause an increased activity of an interleukin-1-dependent inflammatory response. Over the last years an increasing number of either rare hereditary syndromes or acquired common diseases could be summarized under the designation of autoinflammatory disease, thus creating an emerging new rubric of inflammatory diseases. Many of them display cutaneous manifestations as both concomitant or more rarely main symptoms. To name some of them like erysipelas-like erythema in FMF; urticaria-like rashes in tumor necrosis factor receptor 1- or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS, CAPS), hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS) or Schnitzler syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum and acne in PAPA syndrome; or behçetoid aphthous ulcerations in HIDS and PFAPA syndrome. Based on the new insights into pathogenesis one increasingly realizes the good response of these diseases to IL-1 antagonist therapies.

  8. IL-1 blockade in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Adriana A; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. Pathogenic variants in two interleukin-1 (IL-1)-regulating genes, NLRP3 and IL1RN, cause two severe and early-onset autoinflammatory syndromes, CAPS (cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes) and DIRA (deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist). The discovery of the mutations that cause CAPS and DIRA led to clinical and basic research that uncovered the key role of IL-1 in an extended spectrum of immune dysregulatory conditions. NLRP3 encodes cryopyrin, an intracellular "molecular sensor" that forms a multimolecular platform, the NLRP3 inflammasome, which links "danger recognition" to the activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. The success and safety profile of drugs targeting IL -1 in the treatment of CAPS and DIRA have encouraged their wider use in other autoinflammatory syndromes including the classic hereditary periodic fever syndromes (familial Mediterranean fever, TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome, and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome) and additional immune dysregulatory conditions that are not genetically well defined, including Still's, Behcet's, and Schnitzler diseases. The fact that the accumulation of metabolic substrates such as monosodium urate, ceramide, cholesterol, and glucose can trigger the NLRP3 inflammasome connects metabolic stress to IL-1β-mediated inflammation and provides a rationale for therapeutically targeting IL-1 in prevalent diseases such as gout, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease.

  9. The challenge of autoinflammatory syndromes: with an emphasis on hyper-IgD syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Simon, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes are disorders with an exaggerated inflammatory response, mostly in the absence of an appropriate trigger. Prototypic autoinflammatory syndromes are FMF, hyper-IgD syndrome (also known as mevalonate kinase deficiency), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome. The clinical phenotypes partly overlap (with fever and acute phase response), but also differ between the various syndromes (e.g. regarding fever pattern, episodic vs chronic inflammation and accompanying clinical signs). In recent years, the genetic basis of quite a number of these relatively rare and mostly hereditary disorders has been elucidated. These genetic defects lead to either enhanced production of inflammatory mediators or to a lack of inhibition of these components of the innate immune system. Among these dysregulated inflammatory mediators, the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β stands out. Hence, targeted treatment with blockers of IL-1 action, such as recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, anakinra) and mAb against IL-1β has met with impressive clinical results. In this article, hyper-IgD syndrome is discussed in more detail, based on 30 years of experience with this syndrome.

  10. [Pathogenesis and Clinical Examination of Autoinflammatory Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    Autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by: 1) episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation, 2) the absence of a high titer of autoantibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and 3) an inborn error of innate immunity. In this decade, many autoinflammatory syndromes have been reported in Japan, and so many Japanese physicians have become aware of this syndrome. Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. The main monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), Blau syndrome, and syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA). We diagnosed these syndromes as clinical manifestations and performed genetic screening. Many serum cytokines are elevated in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome, but this is not disease-specific. The pathogeneses of many autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be related to inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase 1 activation and interleukin-1β(IL-1β) and IL-18 maturation. Especially, NLRP3 inflammasomes may play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of FMF and CAPS. Recently, it was reported that NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) derived from neutrophils may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of FMF. In the future, we hope to discover new clinical examinations which can provide evidence of inflammasome activation independent of genetic screening. In this issue, I introduce autoinflammatory syndromes and discuss the pathogenesis and clinical examination of these syndromes.

  11. Monogenic Auto-inflammatory Syndromes: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Khadem Azarian, Shahin; Nazeri, Sepideh; Mosayebian, Ali; Ghiasy, Saleh; Sadri, Ghazal; Mohebi, Ali; Khan Nazer, Nikoo Hossein; Afraei, Sanaz; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    Auto-inflammatory syndromes are a new group of distinct hereditable disorders characterized by episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation (most commonly in skin, joints, gut, and eye), the absence of a high titer of auto-antibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and an inborn error of innate immunity. A narrative literature review was carried out of studies related to auto-inflammatory syndromes to discuss the pathogenesis and clinical manifestation of these syndromes. This review showed that the main monogenic auto-inflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), Blau syndrome, TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), and pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA). The data suggest that correct diagnosis and treatment of monogenic auto-inflammatory diseases relies on the physicians' awareness. Therefore, understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of auto-inflammatory syndromes, and especially the fact that these disorders are mediated by IL-1 secretion stimulated by monocytes and macrophages, facilitated significant progress in patient management.

  12. IL-1 Blockade in Autoinflammatory Syndromes1

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Adriana A.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. Pathogenic variants in two interleukin-1 (IL-1)–regulating genes, NLRP3 and IL1RN, cause two severe and early-onset autoinflammatory syndromes, CAPS (cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes) and DIRA (deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist). The discovery of the mutations that cause CAPS and DIRA led to clinical and basic research that uncovered the key role of IL-1 in an extended spectrum of immune dysregulatory conditions. NLRP3 encodes cryopyrin, an intracellular “molecular sensor” that forms a multimolecular platform, the NLRP3 inflammasome, which links “danger recognition” to the activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. The success and safety profile of drugs targeting IL-1 in the treatment of CAPS and DIRA have encouraged their wider use in other autoinflammatory syndromes including the classic hereditary periodic fever syndromes (familial Mediterranean fever, TNF receptor–associated periodic syndrome, and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome) and additional immune dysregulatory conditions that are not genetically well defined, including Still’s, Behcet’s, and Schnitzler diseases. The fact that the accumulation of metabolic substrates such as monosodium urate, ceramide, cholesterol, and glucose can trigger the NLRP3 inflammasome connects metabolic stress to IL-1β-mediated inflammation and provides a rationale for therapeutically targeting IL-1 in prevalent diseases such as gout, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease. PMID:24422572

  13. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part I

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansori, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Alijani, Neda; Aghighi, Yahya; Parvaneh, Nima; Mordinejad, Mohammad-Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. The first manifestation of these disorders are present in childhood and adolescence, but infrequently it may be presented in young and middle ages. Genetic base has been known for all types of periodic fever syndromes except periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). Common periodic fever disorders are Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and PFAPA. In each patient with periodic fever, acquired infection with chronic and periodic nature should be ruled out. It depends on epidemiology of infectious diseases. Some of them such as Familial Mediterranean fever and PFAPA are common in Iran. In Iran and other Middle East countries, brucellosis, malaria and infectious mononucleosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of periodic fever disorders especially with fever and arthritis manifestation. In children, urinary tract infection may be presented as periodic disorder, urine analysis and culture is necessary in each child with periodic symptoms. Some malignancies such as leukemia and tumoral lesions should be excluded in patients with periodic syndrome and weight loss in any age. After excluding infection, malignancy and cyclic neutropenia, FMF and PFAPA are the most common periodic fever disorders. Similar to other countries, Hyper IgD, Chronic Infantile Neurologic Cutaneous and Articular, TRAPS and other auto-inflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. In part 1 of this paper we reviewed the prevalence of FMF and PFAPA in Iran. In part 2, some uncommon auto-inflammatory disorders such as TRAPS, Hyper IgD sydrome and cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes will be reviewed. PMID:25793039

  14. Periodic Fever: a review on clinical, management and guideline for Iranian patients - part I.

    PubMed

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansori, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Alijani, Neda; Aghighi, Yahya; Parvaneh, Nima; Mordinejad, Mohammad-Hassan

    2014-02-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. The first manifestation of these disorders are present in childhood and adolescence, but infrequently it may be presented in young and middle ages. Genetic base has been known for all types of periodic fever syndromes except periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). Common periodic fever disorders are Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and PFAPA. In each patient with periodic fever, acquired infection with chronic and periodic nature should be ruled out. It depends on epidemiology of infectious diseases. Some of them such as Familial Mediterranean fever and PFAPA are common in Iran. In Iran and other Middle East countries, brucellosis, malaria and infectious mononucleosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of periodic fever disorders especially with fever and arthritis manifestation. In children, urinary tract infection may be presented as periodic disorder, urine analysis and culture is necessary in each child with periodic symptoms. Some malignancies such as leukemia and tumoral lesions should be excluded in patients with periodic syndrome and weight loss in any age. After excluding infection, malignancy and cyclic neutropenia, FMF and PFAPA are the most common periodic fever disorders. Similar to other countries, Hyper IgD, Chronic Infantile Neurologic Cutaneous and Articular, TRAPS and other auto-inflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. In part 1 of this paper we reviewed the prevalence of FMF and PFAPA in Iran. In part 2, some uncommon auto-inflammatory disorders such as TRAPS, Hyper IgD sydrome and cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes will be reviewed.

  15. Macrophage activation syndrome in the course of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Emmi, Giacomo; Fastiggi, Michele; Silvestri, Elena; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-08-01

    An overwhelming activation of cytotoxic T cells and well-differentiated macrophages leading to systemic overload of inflammatory mediators characterizes the so-called macrophage activation syndrome (MAS); this potentially life-threatening clinical entity may derive from several genetic defects involved in granule-mediated cytotoxicity but has been largely observed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, many rheumatologic diseases, infections, and malignancies. The occurrence of MAS in the natural history or as the revealing clue of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs), rare conditions caused by disrupted innate immunity pathways with overblown release of proinflammatory cytokines, has been only reported in few isolated patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome since 2001. All these patients displayed various clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic features of MAS and have often required intensive care support. Only one patient has died due to MAS. Defective cytotoxic cell function was documented in a minority of patients. Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment, but anakinra was clinically effective in three refractory cases. Even if MAS and AIDs share multiple clinical features as well as heterogeneous pathogenetic scenes and a potential response to anti-interleukin-1 targeted therapies, MAS requires a prompt specific recognition in the course of AIDs due to its profound severity and high mortality rate.

  16. [Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hidemasa; Heike, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Hyperimmunogloblinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is inherited autoinflammatory syndrome caused by deficiency of the mevalonate kinase (MK), which is involved in metabolism of cholesterol. The disease is characterized as periodic fever from early infancy accompanied by elevated serum C-reactive protein. Since clinical symptoms such as abdominal symptom, skin rash, and arthritis are common to other autoinflammatory disease, the diagnosis of HIDS during clinical work is difficult for the physicians without suspicion of HIDS for infants suffering from fever of unknown origin. Moreover, serum IgD levels are not high during infancy conflicting to the name of the disease, which is often misunderstood in the clinicians. Thus, the diagnosis of HIDS in Japan is bothering, depending on the lack of correct recognition of the disease and on the lack of commercially available examination for the disease. It is important for clinicians, especially pediatricians to update current knowledge about HIDS and to learn the appropriate way to the definitive diagnosis of HIDS, because HIDS patients exist also in Japan and the specific therapies for HIDS would be developed in the near future.

  17. Clinical genetic testing of periodic fever syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Kleiner, Giulio; Tommasini, Alberto; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes (PFSs) are a wide group of autoinflammatory diseases. Due to some clinical overlap between different PFSs, differential diagnosis can be a difficult challenge. Nowadays, there are no universally agreed recommendations for most PFSs, and near half of patients may remain without a genetic diagnosis even after performing multiple-gene analyses. Molecular analysis of periodic fevers' causative genes can improve patient quality of life by providing early and accurate diagnosis and allowing the administration of appropriate treatment. In this paper we focus our discussion on effective usefulness of genetic diagnosis of PFSs. The aim of this paper is to establish how much can the diagnostic system improve, in order to increase the success of PFS diagnosis. The mayor expectation in the near future will be addressed to the so-called next generation sequencing approach. Although the application of bioinformatics to high-throughput genetic analysis could allow the identification of complex genotypes, the complexity of this definition will hardly result in a clear contribution for the physician. In our opinion, however, to obtain the best from this new development a rule should always be kept well in mind: use genetics only to answer specific clinical questions.

  18. Clinical Genetic Testing of Periodic Fever Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Kleiner, Giulio; Tommasini, Alberto; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes (PFSs) are a wide group of autoinflammatory diseases. Due to some clinical overlap between different PFSs, differential diagnosis can be a difficult challenge. Nowadays, there are no universally agreed recommendations for most PFSs, and near half of patients may remain without a genetic diagnosis even after performing multiple-gene analyses. Molecular analysis of periodic fevers' causative genes can improve patient quality of life by providing early and accurate diagnosis and allowing the administration of appropriate treatment. In this paper we focus our discussion on effective usefulness of genetic diagnosis of PFSs. The aim of this paper is to establish how much can the diagnostic system improve, in order to increase the success of PFS diagnosis. The mayor expectation in the near future will be addressed to the so-called next generation sequencing approach. Although the application of bioinformatics to high-throughput genetic analysis could allow the identification of complex genotypes, the complexity of this definition will hardly result in a clear contribution for the physician. In our opinion, however, to obtain the best from this new development a rule should always be kept well in mind: use genetics only to answer specific clinical questions. PMID:23484126

  19. [Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kusuhara, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome is a non-hereditary autoinflammatory disease, characterized by relatively regular recurrence of febrile episodes of 3-6 days duration, accompanied by aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis/tonsillitis, and/or cervical adenititis. It is considered to be the most common periodic fever syndrome in Japan. Although no responsible gene is identified, some genetic factors may confer the predisposition toward this disorder. Important differential diagnosis includes hereditary periodic syndromes and cyclic neutropenia. Although its etiology is still to be elucidated, a recent study suggested an environmentally triggered activation of complement and IL-1β/IL-18 during PFAPA syndrome flares, with induction of Th1-chemokines and subsequent retention of activated T cells in peripheral tissues. This study also demonstrated the possibility that IP-10/CXCL10 might serve as a potential biomarker to differentiate PFAPA syndrome from other periodic fever syndromes. Therapeutic strategy for PFAPA syndrome has not been well established. Recent advances in the understating of etiology and pathophysiology might lead to re-evaluation of recent therapeutic options and/or development of new treatment.

  20. A common pathway in periodic fever syndromes.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Michael F

    2004-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease due to mutations in pyrin, which normally inhibits pro-interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) cytokine processing to the active form. A novel role for pyrin has been proposed by Shoham et al., who studied patients with an autosomal dominant disease called pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome. They demonstrated an interaction between pyrin and proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1), the protein involved in PAPA, and thus revealed a biochemical pathway common to both FMF and PAPA.

  1. [Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome].

    PubMed

    Agbo-kpati, K-P; Condor, R; Hollenberg, H; Chalvon Demersay, A; Cuisset, L; Quartier, P

    2014-07-01

    We report the cases of two sisters born of parents who were first-degree cousins, who started recurrent fever with lymph node and digestive tract involvement at the age of 2 years. There was no mutation of the familial Mediterranean fever gene and a diagnosis of partial mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency was made. However, immunoglobulin (Ig) D and A levels were normal. Elevated mevalonic acid in the patients' urine during an episode and MVK gene analysis provided the diagnosis. Clinical remission was obtained under anti-TNF-alpha treatment with etanercept. These observations and those of several previously reported patients, particularly in French and Dutch series, illustrate the importance of considering the diagnosis in a child with early-onset auto-inflammatory syndrome even in the absence of hyper-IgD or -IgA.

  2. Episodic Syndromes That May Be Associated With Migraine: A.K.A. "the Childhood Periodic Syndromes".

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Amy A

    2015-01-01

    Previously called "childhood periodic syndromes that are commonly precursors of migraine" in International Headache Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II, these disorders were renamed "episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine" in ICHD-III beta. The specific disorders reviewed in this article include: benign paroxysmal torticollis, benign paroxysmal vertigo, abdominal migraine, and cyclical vomiting syndrome, as well as infantile colic, which was recently added under the appendix section in ICHD-III beta.

  3. PFAPA syndrome (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis).

    PubMed

    Lee, W I; Yang, M H; Lee, K F; Chen, L C; Lin, S J; Yeh, K W; Huang, J L

    1999-01-01

    This paper aims to remind paediatric clinicians to suspect and confirm 'PFAPA' syndrome (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and cervical Adenitis syndrome). We report two cases of PFAPA syndrome: a 3-year-old healthy boy with atopic rhinitis and a boy aged 8 years 5 months who simultaneously had lymphocytic vasculitis syndrome treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Both met Marshall's criteria. The literature regarding PFAPA syndrome was complied using a Medline search for articles published between 1963 and 1998 and we then reviewed the reference lists of the articles. The Medline search revealed 28 cases with available clinical manifestations, management and prognosis. Our study describes two additional cases. We divided the cases into typical (28 cases) and atypical (two cases) PFAPA syndrome. In typical PFAPA, the age of onset was less than 5 years in most cases and the patients presented 4.9 +/- 1.4 days of fever (100%), pharyngitis (89.3%), cervical adenitis (72.1%), stomatitis (71.4%), malaise (64.3%), headache (60.7%), abdominal pain (53.6%) and nausea/vomiting (17.9%). Afebrile intervals were 3.2 +/- 2.4 months and increased with age. The time from initial onset to final episode was 3 years 7 months +/- 3 years 6 months. The total number of episodes was 8.3 +/- 2.5 (range 6-14). Effective treatment included steroids, tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy and cimetidine. The general outcome was good. In atypical PFAPF, the clinical manifestations were similar to those of typical PFAPA except that the age of onset was more than 5 years, and life-threatening intestinal perforation happened once in a patient with underlying Fanconi's anaemia. It was concluded that typical PFAPA syndrome is benign and can be diagnosed by detailed history-taking and from physical findings during repeated febrile episodes with tests to rule out other periodic fever syndromes. A review of the literatures since the first report in 1987 has shown that typical PFAPA syndrome is

  4. [Carpal tunnel syndrome, amyloid tenosynovitis and periodic hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Clanet, M; Mansat, M; Durroux, R; Testut, M F; Guiraud, B; Rascol, A; Conte, J

    1981-01-01

    Since 1975, various entrapment neuropathies have been reported in patients undergoing periodic haemodialysis, the most frequent being the carpal tunnel syndrome. Ten patients on chronic haemodialysis developing 15 carpal tunnel syndromes (5 unilateral and 5 bilateral) are reported. Various causes for the renal failure were present and clinical signs of the carpal tunnel syndrome developed at a late stage. The arteriovenous fistula required for extrarenal epuration was antebrachial and of the laterolateral type, except in one case when it was lateroterminal. The carpal tunnel syndrome was always on the same side as the fistula, developing at a later stage on th contralateral side in the 5 cases of bilateral disorders. Lesions were severe, in 11 of the 15 cases. Some patients noted fluctuations in pain symptoms during haemodialysis, either improving or becoming worse. Gross pathological findings during operation (13 cases) were tenosynovitis with epineural hypervascularisation on the opposite side. In 9 cases, however, atypical hypertrophic tenosynovitis was observed. Histological examination in 12 cases demonstrated typical tenosynovitis in 3 patients, but granulomatous tenosynovitis with amyloid deposits was reported in 9 patients. Lesions were bilateral in 2 cases thus present, on the side opposite to the fistula. Ultrastructural study confirmed the amyloid nature of the deposits in 3 cases, the microfibrillary appearance (80 to 100 A) being characteristic of amyloid substance. This rare complication does not represent a common carpal tunnel syndrome, and three mechanisms may be involved in its induction : peripheral uraemic neuropathy, haemodynamic modifications resulting from the antebrachial arteriovenous shunt, and amyloid formation in the flexor synovial sheaths. In the latter case, the type of amyloid disease may be a primary systemic amyloidosis not previously detected, or an elective amyloid process localised to the tenosynovial and periarticular tissues.

  5. [Hematopoiesis during remote period after acute radiation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kotenko, K V; Bushmanov, A Iu; Suvorova, L A; Galstian, I A; Nadezhina, N M; Nugis, V Iu

    2011-01-01

    Based on the long (19.7 +/- 1.8 year) hemopoiesis follow-up study in 152 patients after acute radiation syndrome (ARS) as a result of exposure to gamma-, gamma-beta and gamma-eta radiation in a wide dose range (1.2-9.8 Gy) it was detected that cytopenia appears in the late consequences period: thrombocytopenia was found in 26.9% cases, leukocytopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytopenia--in 13.1% patients. A higher ARS degree causes the increase of various disorders (cytopenia and cytosis) in the late period. It reflects a tight interrelation between blood cell contents and radiation dose. Frequency of cytopenias increases if such somatic disorders: persistent hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis and late radiation ulcers as appear.

  6. [Periodic fever, aphtosus stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome (PFAPA syndrome) in 4-years old girl--case report].

    PubMed

    Krzywicka, Agnieszka; Rusek-Zychma, Małgorzata; Barć-Czarnecka, Małgorzata; Roszkowska, Dagmara

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic feature of PFAPA syndrome is periodic episodes of fever recurring in 21-28 days in infants and young children. Fever is accompanied by aphtosus stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy. Diagnosis of this syndrome are based on typical clinical manifestations, because there are no characteristic changes in laboratory findings. The reason of this syndrome is unknown. We described a case of 4 years old girl with typical manifestations of this syndrome. We excluded others reasons of periodic fever. PFAPA syndrome passed after 2 years of duration after adenothomy.

  7. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-12

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  8. PFAPA syndrome: a rare cause of periodic fever.

    PubMed

    Kurtaran, Hanifi; Karadağ, Ahmet; Catal, Ferhat; Aktaş, Davut

    2004-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenopathy) is characterized by abrupt onset of fever, malaise, aphthous stomatitis, tonsillitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy. The age of onset of the disease is four years, with a range of 6 months to 7 years. The syndrome is sporadic and nonhereditary. Long-term sequelae do not develop. A nine- year-old boy presented with sore throat, fever and oral aphthae. After taking a throat culture, he was prescribed oral antipyretic and was called for a follow-up visit the next day. As the culture result was negative, he was given a single dose prednisolone with the suspected diagnosis of PFAPA. Twenty-four hours later his temperature was 36.8 degrees C, with all his complaints regressed. Twenty-two days later the patient was again admitted to our hospital with the same complaints. Again, single dose oral prednisolone was given after a throat culture. On the next day the patient was free of all symptoms and the culture was again normal. To our knowledge this is the first PFAPA case report from Turkey in the literature.

  9. Syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) in siblings.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Patricia M; Majerson, Daniela; Tapia, Jose L; Talesnik, Eduardo

    2009-10-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by episodes of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis. PFAPA syndrome usually begins in children under 5 years old and normally has self-resolution. The etiology of PFAPA syndrome remains unknown. In this paper, we report the cases of two different families with siblings with PFAPA syndrome: two sisters and two brothers. To our knowledge, this is the first report of siblings with PFAPA syndrome.

  10. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nora S; Sartori-Valinotti, Julio C; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, the most common periodic disorder of childhood, presents with the cardinal symptoms of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis typically before age 5. This review presents the recent literature on PFAPA and summarizes key findings in the pathogenesis, evaluation, and treatment of the disease. Theories surrounding the pathogenesis of PFAPA include a faulty innate immunologic response in conjunction with dysregulated T-cell activation. A potential genetic link is also under consideration. Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene variants have been implicated and appear to modify disease severity. In individuals with the heterozygous variant, PFAPA episodes are milder and shorter in duration. Diagnostic criteria include the traditional clinical signs, in addition to the following biomarkers: elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of elevated procalcitonin, vitamin D, CD64, mean corpuscular volume, and other nonspecific inflammatory mediators in the absence of an infectious explanation for fever. Treatment of PFAPA includes tonsillectomy, a single dose of corticosteroids, and, most recently, interleukin 1 blockers such as anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab. Tonsillectomy remains the only permanent treatment modality.

  11. The Relationship between NALP3 and Autoinflammatory Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lorna; Raheem, Irfan; Malemud, Charles J.; Askari, Ali D.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat/pyrin domain-containing-3 (NALP3) inflammasome, which is required for synthesis of interleukin-1β, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoinflammatory syndromes. This review of the literature summarizes the interconnectedness of NALP3 inflammasome with some of these disorders. Familial Mediterranean fever results from a mutation in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene, which encodes the pyrin protein. Previous study results suggest that pyrin suppresses caspase-1 activation, perhaps by competing for the adaptor protein, termed, pyrin domain of apoptosis/speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ACS) which therefore interferes with NALP3 inflammasome activation. The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat/pyrin domain-containing-3 (NALP3) inflammasome is constitutively activated in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes due to gain-of-function mutations resulting from point mutations within the neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein/class 2 transcription factor/heterokaryon incompatibility/telomerase-associated protein-1 (NACHT) domain of the NALP3 protein. Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome is caused by mutations in the genes encoding proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1). These PSTPIP1 mutants are thought to bind to pyrin causing an increase in the pyrin domain of apoptosis/speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC) pyroptosome assembly leading to procaspase-1 recruitment and therefore its activation. Hyperimmunoglublinemia D syndrome is caused by mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency, which may be affected by protein accumulation that leads to NALP3 inflammasome activation. Tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome is associated with mutations in the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene which decreases the level of soluble tumor necrosis

  12. The Relationship between NALP3 and Autoinflammatory Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lorna; Raheem, Irfan; Malemud, Charles J; Askari, Ali D

    2016-05-13

    The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat/pyrin domain-containing-3 (NALP3) inflammasome, which is required for synthesis of interleukin-1β, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoinflammatory syndromes. This review of the literature summarizes the interconnectedness of NALP3 inflammasome with some of these disorders. Familial Mediterranean fever results from a mutation in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene, which encodes the pyrin protein. Previous study results suggest that pyrin suppresses caspase-1 activation, perhaps by competing for the adaptor protein, termed, pyrin domain of apoptosis/speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ACS) which therefore interferes with NALP3 inflammasome activation. The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat/pyrin domain-containing-3 (NALP3) inflammasome is constitutively activated in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes due to gain-of-function mutations resulting from point mutations within the neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein/class 2 transcription factor/heterokaryon incompatibility/telomerase-associated protein-1 (NACHT) domain of the NALP3 protein. Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome is caused by mutations in the genes encoding proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1). These PSTPIP1 mutants are thought to bind to pyrin causing an increase in the pyrin domain of apoptosis/speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC) pyroptosome assembly leading to procaspase-1 recruitment and therefore its activation. Hyperimmunoglublinemia D syndrome is caused by mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency, which may be affected by protein accumulation that leads to NALP3 inflammasome activation. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome is associated with mutations in the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene which decreases the level of soluble tumor necrosis factor

  13. Two siblings with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Isabel Cristina Ramos Melo; Rodrigo, Maria João; Monteiro Marques, José Gonçalo Duque Pereira

    2009-03-01

    PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenitis) is a benign sporadic syndrome of unknown cause. We report 2 siblings diagnosed with this syndrome. The second case started crisis simultaneously with recurrence of crisis after a 3-year free interval in her brother. This temporal relation suggests environmental factor acting in genetically predisposed children.

  14. Periodic Fever and Neutrophilic Dermatosis: Is It Sweet's Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Raheleh; Parvaneh, Nima; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy with high grade fever (39°C) and warm, erythematous, and indurated plaque above the left knee was referred. According to the previous records of this patient, these indurated plaques had been changed toward abscesses formation and then spontaneous drainage had occurred after about 6 to 7 days, and finally these lesions healed with scars. In multiple previous admissions, high grade fever, leukocytosis, and a noticeable increase in erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were noted. After that, until 7th year of age, he had shoulder, gluteal, splenic, kidney, and left thigh lesions and pneumonia. The methylprednisolone pulse (30 mg/kg) was initiated with the diagnosis of Sweet's syndrome. After about 10–14 days, almost all of the laboratory data regressed to nearly normal limits. After about 5 months, he was admitted again with tachypnea and high grade fever and leukocytosis. After infusion of one methylprednisolone pulse, the fever and tachypnea resolved rapidly in about 24 hours. In this admission, colchicine (1 mg/kg) was added to the oral prednisolone after discharge. In the periodic fever and neutrophilic dermatosis, the rheumatologist should search for sterile abscesses in other organs. PMID:25544911

  15. Genetics Home Reference: tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 link) University College London: National Amyloidosis Center (UK) General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ... of Hereditary Periodic Fever Syndromes NHS Foundation Trust (UK) Orphanet: Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 associated periodic ...

  16. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis, facial dysmorphism and ventricular arrhythmia (clinical triad of Andersen-Tawil syndrome).

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mitesh; Biswas, T K; Desle, Hrishikesh B

    2012-11-01

    Andersen-Tawil Syndrome (ATS) is a rare potassium channel disorder, characterized by episodic weakness, ventricular arrhythmias and dysmorphic features (short stature, scoliosis, clinodactyly, hypertelorism, small or prominent low set ears, micrognathia and broad forehead). We report a case of hypokalemic periodic paralysis with dysmorphic facial features and ventricular arrhythmia resembling Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

  17. Monogenic IL-1 Mediated Autoinflammatory and Immunodeficiency Syndromes: Finding the Right Balance in Response to Danger Signals

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Cailin; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Interleukin -1 was the first cytokine identified and is a powerful inducer of fever and inflammation. The biologically active receptor for IL-1, shares signaling pathways with some pathogen recognition receptors, the toll like receptors (TLRs) which early on suggested an important role in innate immune function. DISCUSSION The discovery that some intracellular “danger receptors”, the NOD like receptors (NLRs) can assemble to form multimolecular platforms, the inflammasomes, that not only sense intracellular danger but also activate IL-1β, has provided the molecular basis for the integration of IL-1 as an early response mediator in danger recognition. The critical role of balancing IL-1 production and signaling in human disease has recently been demonstrated in rare human monogenic diseases with mutations that affect the meticulous control of IL-1 production, release and signaling by leading to decreased or increased TLR/IL-1 signaling. In diseases of decreased TLR/IL-1 signaling (IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies) patients are at risk for infections with gram positive organisms; and in diseases of increased signaling, patients develop systemic autoinflammatory diseases (Cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), and deficiency of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA)). CONCLUSION Monogenic defects in a number of rare diseases that affect the balance of TLR/IL-1 signaling have provided us with opportunities to study the systemic effects of IL-1 in human diseases. The molecular defects in CAPS and DIRA provided a therapeutic rationale for targeting IL-1 and the impressive clinical results from IL-1 blocking therapies have undoubtedly confirmed the pivotal role of IL-1 in human disease and spurred the exploration of modifying IL-1 signaling in a number of genetically complex common human diseases. PMID:20353899

  18. [Periodic fever in children: keep in mind the PFAPA syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Rossetti, G

    2008-02-27

    The autoinflammatory diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent fever in childhood. These diseases are characterized by inflammatory episodes without an evident cause. Some of these diseases, like the Familial Mediterranean Fever, have a genetic origin and need a chronic treatment to avoid severe complications on the long term. PFAPA syndrome is the most frequent cause of recurrent fever and is diagnosed based on unspecific criteria. The treatment is still controversial. One dose of Prednisone is able to interrupt the flare and tonsillectomy may induce a remission in the majority of the cases.

  19. Brugada syndrome and its relevance in the perioperative period

    PubMed Central

    Sorajja, Dan; Ramakrishna, Harish; Poterack, A. Karl; Shen, Win-Kuang; Mookadam, Farouk

    2015-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, as well as ventricular tachyarrhythmias. The defective cardiac sodium channels result in usual electrocardiographic findings of a coved-type ST elevation in precordial leads V1 to V3. The majority of patients have uncomplicated courses with anesthesia, surgery, and invasive procedures. However there is risk of worsening ST elevation and ventricular arrhythmias due to perioperative medications, surgical insult, electrolyte abnormalities, fever, autonomic nervous system tone, as well as other perturbations. Given the increasing numbers of patients with inherited conduction disorders presenting for non-cardiac surgery that are at risk of sudden cardiac death, safe anesthetic management depends upon a detailed knowledge of these conditions. PMID:26139749

  20. Restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kathy P; Rye, David B

    2002-12-01

    Restless leg syndrome and PLMD are nocturnal movement disorders associated with significant adverse effects on the health and well-being of patients and their families [66]. Although the pathophysiological basis remains to be fully described, current research points to abnormalities in CNS function and neurotransmitter systems. The accurate diagnosis of RLS and PMD requires a thorough history, physical examination, diagnostic tests, and often, a referral to a sleep disorders specialist. Considering the prevalence of these conditions and their negative impact, nurses should be well-versed in the assessment and management of these problems as well as in the appropriate education of patients and their families. Nursing research is greatly needed, particularly with regard to the development and testing of biobehavioral interventions designed to decrease associated symptoms and improve clinical outcomes. Finally, because of the complexity of the clinical presentation of RLS and PLMD, this population of patients presents nurse clinicians and researchers alike with an extraordinary opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration.

  1. Propofol-Related Infusion Syndrome in the Peripartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Eziefule, Akwugo A.; Elshatanoufy, Solafa; Thakur, Mili; Rocha, Frederico G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Propofol is a widely known, commonly used drug. Complications can occur with the use of this drug, including propofol-related infusion syndrome (PRIS). PRIS, in the obstetric population, has not been documented; however, we report a case of a patient who developed PRIS after an emergent cesarean delivery of a preterm infant. Case Study A 35-year-old multigravida woman presented complaining of leakage of fluid and decreased fetal movement. Her pregnancy was complicated by methadone maintenance therapy due to a history of opioid abuse. Complications after admission for prolonged monitoring and a prolonged fetal heart tone deceleration was noted with no recovery despite intrauterine resuscitation. An emergent cesarean delivery was performed using general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation after which she developed aspiration pneumonia. She was admitted to the intensive care unit and reintubation and sedation were required secondary to respiratory distress. Sedation was achieved using propofol infusion. She subsequently developed changes in her electrocardiogram, an increase of her serum creatinine, creatinine protein kinase, lipase, amylase, and triglycerides, making the diagnosis of PRIS. Conclusion PRIS should be included in the differential diagnosis of intubated or postoperative patients in the obstetric population. PMID:27738550

  2. Complex exercise rehabilitation program for women of the II period of age with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Ok; Olga, Kozyreva

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a complex exercise program integrating Eastern and Western complex exercise rehabilitation programs in order to examine the effects of it on the human body with the subjects for women of the II period of mature age with metabolic syndrome. The subjects of this study are 60 II period of mature aged women with metabolic syndrome living in G City, and the experimental group conducted Taekwon-aerobic exercise, European rehabilitation gymnastics, gym ball exercise, and elastic band exercise while the control group performed European rehabilitation gymnastics, gym ball exercise, and elastic band exercise which is the rehabilitation program being presently conducted in Russia, for 90 min per day for three weeks. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was utilized to verify pre and post-intergroup difference, and the significant level was set as P< 0.05. Whereas body weight, % fat, WHR, SBP, DBP and blood glucose were significant decreased, muscle weight and pulse wave velocity were significant increased after complex exercise rehabilitation programs Both Eastern and Western complex exercise rehabilitation programs showed positive effects on the body of the II period of mature aged women with metabolic syndrome, and if various exercise programs are conducted, it will be more effective in improving II period of mature aged women’s metabolic syndrome afterwards. PMID:24278877

  3. Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome; treatment with etanercept and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Topaloğlu, Rezan; Ayaz, Nuray Aktay; Waterham, Hans R; Yüce, Aysel; Gumruk, Fatma; Sanal, Ozden

    2008-10-01

    The hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is an autoinflammatory syndrome. It is caused by the mutations of the mevalonate kinase gene. There is no consensus for specific therapy of HIDS, but there are some case reports and studies in regards to its treatment with drugs like colchicine, steroids, nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, simvastatin, anakinra, thalidomide, and etanercept. We are reporting a case evaluated for the complaints of abdominal pain and febrile episodes with massive hepatomegaly, not common finding on physical examination, its treatment with etanercept, and long-term follow-up.

  4. Incubation Period Duration and Severity of Clinical Disease Following Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Virlogeux, Victor; Fang, Vicky J.; Wu, Joseph T.; Ho, Lai-Ming; Malik Peiris, J. S.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few previous studies have investigated the association between the severity of an infectious disease and the length of incubation period. Methods We estimated the association between the length of the incubation period and the severity of infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, using data from the epidemic in 2003 in Hong Kong. Results We estimated the incubation period of SARS based on a subset of patients with available data on exposure periods and a separate subset of patients in a putative common source outbreak, and we found significant associations between shorter incubation period and greater severity in both groups after adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusions Our findings suggest that patients with a shorter incubation period proceeded to have more severe disease. Further studies are needed to investigate potential biological mechanisms for this association. PMID:26133021

  5. [MVK gene abnormality and new approach to treatment of hyper IgD syndrome and periodic fever syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naruto, Takuya

    2007-04-01

    Hyper IgD and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; OMIM 260920) is one of the hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation.. HIDS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent fever attacks in early childhood. HIDS caused by mevalonate kinase (MK) mutations, also that is the gene of mevalonic aciduria (OMIM 251170). During febrile episodes, urinary mevalonate concentrations were found to be significantly elevated in patients. Diagnosis of HIDS was retrieving gene or measurement of the enzyme activity in peripheral blood lymphocyte in general. This of HIDS is an activity decline of MK, and a complete deficiency of MK becomes a mevalonic aciduria with a nervous symptom. The relation between the fever and inflammation of mevalonate or isoprenoid products are uncertain. The therapy attempt with statins, which is inhibited the next enzyme after HMG-CoA reductase, or inhibit the proinflammatory cytokines.

  6. Episodic Syndromes that may be associated with migraine: a.k.a. “the childhood periodic syndromes”

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Amy A.

    2015-01-01

    Previously called “childhood periodic syndromes that are commonly precursors of migraine” in ICHD-II, these disorders were renamed “episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine” in ICHD-III beta. The specific disorders reviewed in this article include: benign paroxysmal torticollis, benign paroxysmal vertigo, abdominal migraine and cyclical vomiting syndrome, as well as infantile colic which was recently added under the appendix section in ICHD-III beta. PMID:26234380

  7. Changes in Yearly Birth Prevalence Rates of Children with Down Syndrome in the Period 1986-2007 in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Graaf, G.; Haveman, M.; Hochstenbach, R.; Engelen, J.; Gerssen-Schoorl, K.; Poddighe, P.; Smeets, D.; van Hove, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Netherlands are lacking reliable national empirical data in relation to the development of birth prevalence of Down syndrome. Our study aims at assessing valid national live birth prevalence rates for the period 1986-2007. Method: On the basis of the annual child/adult ratio of Down syndrome diagnoses in five out of the eight Dutch…

  8. TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Nima

    2006-11-01

    The TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant auto-inflammatory disorder, characterized by recurrent febrile attacks and localized inflammation. TRAPS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the TNF Receptor Super Family 1A (TNFRSF1A) on chromosome 12p13. However, the incomplete penetrance and genetic heterogeneity have been reported in this syndrome. Although the ethnic diversity and clinical heterogeneity may propose the role of other genes in the pathogenesis of TRAPS, some low-penetrance TNFRSF1A variants contribute to atypical inflammatory responses in other autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, molecular studies on TRAPS and other auto-inflammatory disorders could be suggested to identify additional genes coding the molecules in the TNF signalling process.

  9. A hepatic cancer patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome during the perioperative period of partial hepatectomy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Su-Dan; Ye, Bin; Liang, Zhi-Jian

    2015-01-01

    We reported a case of hepatic cancer patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome during the perioperative period of partial hepatectomy in the present study. We analyzed the clinical data and described the characteristics of this patient. PMID:26550403

  10. A recessive Nav1.4 mutation underlies congenital myasthenic syndrome with periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Habbout, Karima; Poulin, Hugo; Rivier, François; Giuliano, Serena; Sternberg, Damien; Fontaine, Bertrand; Eymard, Bruno; Morales, Raul Juntas; Echenne, Bernard; King, Louise; Hanna, Michael G.; Männikkö, Roope; Chahine, Mohamed; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the molecular basis of a complex phenotype of congenital muscle weakness observed in an isolated but consanguineous patient. Methods: The proband was evaluated clinically and neurophysiologically over a period of 15 years. Genetic testing of candidate genes was performed. Functional characterization of the candidate mutation was done in mammalian cell background using whole cell patch clamp technique. Results: The proband had fatigable muscle weakness characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome with acute and reversible attacks of most severe muscle weakness as observed in periodic paralysis. We identified a novel homozygous SCN4A mutation (p.R1454W) linked to this recessively inherited phenotype. The p.R1454W substitution induced an important enhancement of fast and slow inactivation, a slower recovery for these inactivated states, and a frequency-dependent regulation of Nav1.4 channels in the heterologous expression system. Conclusion: We identified a novel loss-of-function mutation of Nav1.4 that leads to a recessive phenotype combining clinical symptoms and signs of congenital myasthenic syndrome and periodic paralysis, probably by decreasing channel availability for muscle action potential genesis at the neuromuscular junction and propagation along the sarcolemma. PMID:26659129

  11. Actigraphic assessment of periodic leg movements in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cippà, Maria A T; Baumann, Christian R; Siccoli, Massimiliano M; Bassetti, Claudio L; Poryazova, Rositsa; Werth, Esther

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of restless legs syndrome (RLS) relies upon diagnostic criteria which are based on history only, and dopaminergic treatment is not normally the first choice of treatment for all patients. It would be worthwhile to identify patients non-responsive to dopaminergic treatment beforehand, because they may suffer from a restless legs-like syndrome and may require alternative treatment. We included retrospectively 24 adult patients fulfilling the four essential criteria for restless legs and 12 age-matched healthy controls. They were investigated by ambulatory actigraphy from both legs over three nights, and patients started treatment with dopamine agonists after this diagnostic work-up. We examined 12 responders to dopaminergic treatment and 12 non-responders and studied the association between response to dopaminergic treatment and the periodic limb movement index (PLMI) as assessed with actigraphy. Demographic characteristics, excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue at baseline were similar in all three groups. Baseline RLS severity was similar between responders and non-responders [International Restless Legs Severity Scale (IRLS): 25 ± 9 and 24 ± 8]. Group comparisons of PLMI before treatment initiation showed significant differences between the three groups. Post-hoc pairwise comparisons revealed that healthy controls had significantly lower PLMI (4.9 ± 4.5) than responders (29.3 ± 22.7) and non-responders (13.3 ± 11.2). Similarly, the PLMI in responders was lower than in non-responders. PLMI day-to-day variability did not differ between responders and non-responders and there was no correlation between treatment effect, as assessed by the decrease of the IRLS and baseline PLMI. Our retrospective study indicates that actigraphy to assess periodic limb movements may contribute to a better diagnosis of dopamine-responsive restless legs syndrome.

  12. Skin manifestations in tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Rebecca; Vogt, Thomas; Reichrath, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disease that belongs to the group of hereditary fever syndromes, that are also named hereditary auto-inflammatory syndromes. TRAPS is characterized by a variety of naturally occurring mutations in a TNF receptor (TNFR), that affect the soluble TNFRSF1A gene in the 12p13 region. In some patients, the pathogenesis of TRAPS involves defective TNFRSF1A shedding from cell membranes in response to varying stimuli. TRAPS is characterized by the periodic occurrence of a broad variety of different clinical symptoms that represent an acute-phase response, including fever and pain in the joints, abdomen, muscles, skin or eyes, with broad variations across patients. In many cases, skin involvement is present that may include migratory patches, skin rashes, erysepela-like erythema, edematous plaques, urticaria, periorbital edema and/or conjunctivitis. The histology of skin lesions in TRAPS is nonspecific, in general a perivascular dermal infiltrate of lymphocytes and monocytes can be found. Cutaneous findings are of particular importance in TRAPS: they have been shown to give direction to the diagnosis of TRAPS and in most cases their treatment is challenging. As the incidence of TRAPS is very low, no prospective randomized controlled trials and only a few studies with case numbers up to twenty-five patients have been published. No guidelines for TRAPS treatment have been established so far. This review summarizes our present knowledge about pathogenesis, clinical outcome and treatment options of skin manifestations in TRAPS.

  13. Periodization

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Daniel S.; Reiman, Michael P.; Walker, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. Periodization is a concept of systematic progression—that is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing periodization schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on periodization principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of periodization, as well as periodization program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of periodization principles into rehabilitation programs. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1979 to 2009 was implemented with the keywords periodization, strength training, rehabilitation, endurance, power, hypertrophy, and resistance training with the Boolean term AND in all possible combinations in the English language. Each author also undertook independent hand searching of article references used in this review. Results: Based on the studies researched, periodized strength training regimens demonstrate improved outcomes as compared to nonperiodized programs. Conclusions: Despite the evidence in the strength training literature supporting periodization programs, there is a considerable lack of data in the rehabilitation literature about program design and successful implementation of periodization into rehabilitation programs. PMID:23015982

  14. Genital ulcers as an unusual sign of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome: a novel symptom?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ming; Wang, Chih-Chien; Lai, Chi-Chieh; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Huang, Wei-Hsuan; Cheng, Shin-Nan

    2011-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome, which is characterized by periodic episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis, is of unknown etiology and manifests usually before 5 years of age. A patient with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome simultaneously presenting with genital ulcers has not been reported previously. We describe a 12-year-old Chinese girl with a 2-year history of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome who exhibited vulvar ulcers accompanying an episode of febrile periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, and cervical adenopathy. Although during a 1-year follow-up this girl did not manifest typical symptoms/signs of Behçet's disease except recurrent oral aphthae and genital ulcers, it is possible that periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome and Behçet's disease could have overlapping manifestations. Furthermore, this report would add to the evidence of a wide variation in the clinical symptomatology of PFAPA syndrome.

  15. Predicting sleep apnoea syndrome from heart period: a time-frequency wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Roche, F; Pichot, V; Sforza, E; Court-Fortune, I; Duverney, D; Costes, F; Garet, M; Barthélémy, J C

    2003-12-01

    Heart rate fluctuations are a typical finding during obstructive sleep apnoea, characterised by bradycardia during the apnoeic phase and tachycardia at the restoration of ventilation. In this study, a time-frequency domain analysis of the nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) was evaluated as the single diagnostic marker for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). The predictive accuracy of time-frequency HRV variables (wavelet (Wv) decomposition parameters from level 2 (Wv2) to level 256 (Wv256)) obtained from nocturnal electrocardiogram Holter monitoring were analysed in 147 consecutive patients aged 53.8+/-11.2 yrs referred for possible OSAS. OSAS was diagnosed in 66 patients (44.9%) according to an apnoea/hypopnoea index > or = 10. Using receiver-operating characteristic curves analysis, the most powerful predictor variable was Wv32 (W 0.758, p<0.0001), followed by Wv16 (W 0.729, p<0.0001) and Wv64 (W 0.700, p<0.0001). Classification and Regression Trees methodology generated a decision tree for OSAS prediction including all levels of Wv coefficients, from Wv2 to Wv256 with a sensitivity reaching 92.4% and a specificity of 90.1% (percentage of agreement 91.2%) with this nonparametric analysis. Time-frequency parameters calculated using wavelet transform and extracted from the nocturnal heart period analysis appeared as powerful tools for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome diagnosis.

  16. Behavioral Sleep Medicine Interventions for Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Yurcheshen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) are sleep disorders that are commonly seen in clinical practice. The standard treatment recommendations for these disorders are pharmacologic; most recently both conditions are most typically managed with pramipexole or ropinerole, which are FDA approved for the treatment of RLS. A mix of behavioral suggestions is included in treatment algorithms for providers as well as in patient education materials. While these suggestions have considerable merit, they are typically not delivered as an intervention, but instead provided as a series of helpful tips. There is emerging evidence for providing such suggestions as a more active and comprehensive intervention as part of a cognitive-behavioral package as well as for exercise therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia to be delivered as active treatments for RLS and/or PLMD. PMID:20161553

  17. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis (PFAPA) Syndrome in Iranian Children First Report of Iranian Periodic Fever and Autoinflammatory Registry (IPFAIR)

    PubMed Central

    Mehregan, Fatemeh Fereshteh; Ziaee, Vahid; Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Tahghighi, Fatemeh; Sabouni, Farah; Moradinejad, Mohamad-Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome is a nonhereditary idiopathic febrile syndrome belonging to the group of autoinflammatory diseases. No longtime sequel was reported in this disease. Early diagnosis can lead physicians to treatment of this disorder with a short course steroid application and provide satisfaction of the patient’s family. Methods: This study is a prospective review of patients diagnosed with PFAPA syndrome who were registered in Iranian Periodic Fever and Autoinflammatory Registry (IPFAIR) through periodic fever clinic in the Children's Medical Center, Pediatric Center of Excellence in Tehran, Iran from January 2013 to March 2014. Findings: One hundred thirty patients were registered in our databases. Twenty-one (16.1%) patients including 15 males and 6 females had PFAPA. Normal growth was seen in all patients. The median age at onset was 18 months. The mean duration of fever was 4 days and the mean duration of intervals between fever episodes 21 days. Along with fever, all patients had characteristic symptoms. All patients were asymptomatic between fever episodes. Steroid was used in all patients and causing immediate reduction by 84.61%. Two patients received both steroid and colchicine because of their clinical feature and positive laboratory tests for PFAPA and familial Mediterranean fever. No patient received biological therapy or a tonsillectomy. Conclusion: The long diagnostic delay of PFAPA gives cause to concern indicating a need for greater awareness of the disease so that the diagnosis may be made timely. PMID:25793068

  18. Rituximab Treatment for PR3-ANCA-Positive Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Associated with Adult-Onset Periodic Fever Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hamano, Yoshitomo; Yoshizawa, Hiromichi; Sugase, Taro; Miki, Takuya; Ohtani, Naoko; Hanawa, Shiho; Takeshima, Eri; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Osamu; Takemoto, Fumi; Muto, Shigeaki; Yumura, Wako; Kusano, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old Japanese woman with nephrotic syndrome due to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) Type I diagnosed after a 5-year history of periodic fever syndrome (PFS). Hypocomplementemia and elevation of anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (PR3-ANCA) were observed. HIV, and hepatitis B and C serology were negative. Nephrotic syndrome and periodic fever did not respond to oral steroid and intravenous steroid pulse therapies combined with cyclosporine, dipyridamole, warfarin and losartan. We tried immunotherapy using rituximab, a human-mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen on mature B cells. This therapeutic approach led to improvement of renal function and remission of nephrotic syndrome and hypocomplementemia. However, it did not have a beneficial effect on periodic fever. Suspecting adult-onset hereditary PFS, we analyzed her genetic alteration of MEFV and TNFRSF1A genes. A rare genotype in intron 6 of TNFRSF1A was revealed. The etiological relationship between periodic fever and MPGN is discussed. Rituximab is a hopeful choice of induction therapy for refractory MPGN. PMID:23197963

  19. Tonsillar microbiota in children with PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tejesvi, M V; Uhari, M; Tapiainen, T; Pirttilä, A M; Suokas, M; Lantto, U; Koivunen, P; Renko, M

    2016-06-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) is a childhood febrile syndrome of unknown origin that is often cured with tonsillectomy. We aimed to compare the bacterial microbiota of the tonsils removed from PFAPA patients with those of controls. We used next-generation sequencing technology to investigate the bacterial microbiota of the tonsils of 30 PFAPA patients and 24 controls. We found significant differences in the presence and relative abundance of many bacteria between PFAPA cases and controls. For example, cyanobacteria, potential producers of microcystins and other toxins, were more common in the case samples (14/30, 47 %) than in the controls (4/24, 17 %, p = 0.02), and the mean relative abundance of cyanobacteria was higher in the case samples (0.2 %) than in the controls (0.01 %, p = 0.01). Streptococci were present in all samples in both groups, but their mean relative abundance was lower in the case samples (3.7 %) than in the controls (9.6 %, p = 0.01). Typical nasopharyngeal microbes such as fusobacteria, Prevotella, Tannerella, Porphyromonas, and Parvimonas dominated the microbiota of the tonsils in both groups. The microbiota of the tonsils removed from PFAPA patients differed significantly from those of the controls. Tonsillar microbiota may play a role in triggering the inflammatory processes that lead to symptoms of PFAPA.

  20. Sleep structure in patients with periodic limb movements and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Jorge; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Toledo, Estefania; Urrestarazu, Elena; Alegre, Manuel; Viteri, Cesar; Salvador, Javier; Baptista, Peter; Alcaide, Belen; Artieda, Julio

    2009-08-01

    Periodic limb movements (PLM) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are two frequent sleep disorders which often occur in the same patient. The goal of this study was to know the influence of the presence of PLM in the sleep architecture in patients with and without OSAS. Two hundred twenty consecutive patients (69 women and 151 men) participated in this transversal study. They were patients with clinical suspicion of dysomnia, including snoring, OSAS, and PLM. All of them underwent a full polysomnography and were interviewed using questionnaires about the sleep quality. The sleep parameters (percentage of sleep stages, rapid eye movement latency, sleep efficiency, awakenings, PLM presence, apnea-hypopnea index) were calculated and compared between groups. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric distribution techniques were used for the analysis. Patients with PLM when compared with patients with OSAS had lower sleep efficiency and less rapid eye movement percentage. The presence of PLM in patients with sleep apnea was less relevant being responsible only for an increase in the rapid eye movement latency and a decrease in the duration of the three to four sleep stages. However, the presence of OSAS was related to a better sleep efficiency (patients with PLM plus OSAS had a better sleep efficiency than patients with only PLM). PLM alters the structure of sleep. In patients with sleep apnea, the presence of PLM is less relevant.

  1. SPAG7 is a candidate gene for the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bens, S; Zichner, T; Stütz, A M; Caliebe, A; Wagener, R; Hoff, K; Korbel, J O; von Bismarck, P; Siebert, R

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is an auto-inflammatory disease for which a genetic basis has been postulated. Nevertheless, in contrast to the other periodic fever syndromes, no candidate genes have yet been identified. By cloning, following long insert size paired-end sequencing, of a de novo chromosomal translocation t(10;17)(q11.2;p13) in a patient with typical PFAPA syndrome lacking mutations in genes associated with other periodic fever syndromes we identified SPAG7 as a candidate gene for PFAPA. SPAG7 protein is expressed in tissues affected by PFAPA and has been functionally linked to antiviral and inflammatory responses. Haploinsufficiency of SPAG7 due to a microdeletion at the translocation breakpoint leading to loss of exons 2-7 from one allele was associated with PFAPA in the index. Sequence analyses of SPAG7 in additional patients with PFAPA point to genetic heterogeneity or alternative mechanisms of SPAG7 deregulation, such as somatic or epigenetic changes.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): definition, semiology, prognosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and place relative to other periodic joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Masson, Charles; Simon, Virginie; Hoppé, Emmanuel; Insalaco, Paolo; Cissé, Idrissa; Audran, Maurice

    2004-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant inherited condition of periodic fever and pain. Most patients are of northern European descent. The attacks manifest as fever and pain in the joints, abdomen, muscles, skin, or eyes, with variations across patients. An acute-phase response occurs during the attacks. Patients with TRAPS are at risk for AA amyloidosis, the most common targets being the kidneys and liver. Soluble TNFRSF1A is usually low between the attacks and may be normal during the attacks, when TNF levels are high. TNFRSF1A is found in abnormally high numbers on leukocyte cell membranes. TRAPS is the first condition for which naturally occurring mutations in a TNF receptor were found; the mutations affect the soluble TNFRSF1A gene in the 12p13 region. In some patients, the pathogenesis involves defective TNFRSF1A shedding from cell membranes in response to a given stimulus. Thus, TRAPS is a model for a novel pathogenic concept characterized by failure to shed a cytokine receptor. This review compares TRAPS to other inherited periodic febrile conditions, namely, familial Mediterranean fever, Muckle-Wells syndrome, cold urticaria, and hyper-IgD syndrome. The place of TRAPS relative to other intermittent systemic joint diseases is discussed. Colchicine neither relieves nor prevents the attacks, whereas oral glucocorticoid therapy is effective when used in dosages greater than 20 mg/day. The pathogenic hypothesis involving defective TNFRSF1A shedding suggests that medications targeting TNF may be effective in TRAPS.

  3. A comprehensive comparison between pediatric and adult patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Vitale, Antonio; Natale, Marco Francesco; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Andreozzi, Laura; Frediani, Bruno; D'Errico, Francesca; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is a mysterious disorder characterized by periodically recurrent fevers, oropharyngeal inflammation, and adenitis, which mainly affects children, though in very recent times, it has been also recognized in adulthood. We enrolled 115 unrelated pediatric and adult patients with history of periodic fevers who fulfilled the current diagnostic criteria for PFAPA syndrome in three Italian referral centers and highlighted differences between children and adults. Eighty-five children and 30 adults were evaluated: the frequency of flares was significantly higher in pediatric cases, while febrile attack duration was significantly longer in adults. Clockwork periodicity of fever and recurrent pharyngitis were more frequently observed in childhood, but no differences were identified for aphthosis and cervical adenopathy. Conversely, joint symptoms, myalgia, headache, fatigue, ocular signs, and rashes were more common in adults. The simultaneous occurrence of two or three cardinal PFAPA signs did not show any statistical difference between the groups, while the occurrence of only one cardinal manifestation was more frequent in adults. Corticosteroids were effective in 98.82 % of children and 88.2 % of adults. Tonsillectomy was rarely performed, resulting effective in only two patients. Our data illustrate the clinical overlap between pediatric and adult cases of PFAPA syndrome. Adults are characterized by a wider repertoire of inflammatory signs, suggesting that onset in adulthood might leave the disease misdiagnosed. Clinicians, not only pediatricians, should take into account this clinical entity in every patient of whatever age suffering from recurrent fevers of unknown origin.

  4. Canakinumab reverses overexpression of inflammatory response genes in tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torene, Rebecca; Nirmala, Nanguneri; Obici, Laura; Cattalini, Marco; Tormey, Vincent; Caorsi, Roberta; Starck-Schwertz, Sandrine; Letzkus, Martin; Hartmann, Nicole; Abrams, Ken; Lachmann, Helen; Gattorno, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore whether gene expression profiling can identify a molecular mechanism for the clinical benefit of canakinumab treatment in patents with tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Methods Blood samples were collected from 20 patients with active TRAPS who received canakinumab 150 mg every 4 weeks for 4 months in an open-label proof-of-concept phase II study, and from 20 aged-matched healthy volunteers. Gene expression levels were evaluated in whole blood samples by microarray analysis for arrays passing quality control checks. Results Patients with TRAPS exhibited a gene expression signature in blood that differed from that in healthy volunteers. Upon treatment with canakinumab, many genes relevant to disease pathogenesis moved towards levels seen in the healthy volunteers. Canakinumab downregulated the TRAPS-causing gene (TNF super family receptor 1A (TNFRSF1A)), the drug-target gene (interleukin (IL)-1B) and other inflammation-related genes (eg, MAPK14). In addition, several inflammation-related pathways were evident among the differentially expressed genes. Canakinumab treatment reduced neutrophil counts, but the observed expression differences remained after correction for this. Conclusions These gene expression data support a model in which canakinumab produces clinical benefit in TRAPS by increasing neutrophil apoptosis and reducing pro-inflammatory signals resulting from the inhibition of IL-1β. Notably, treatment normalised the overexpression of TNFRSF1A, suggesting that canakinumab has a direct impact on the main pathogenic mechanism in TRAPS. Trial registration number NCT01242813. PMID:27474763

  5. Different presentations in patients with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome mutations: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Celebi-Tayfur, Aslı; Bilginer, Yelda; Finetti, Martina; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene encoding the 55-kDa receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. It is characterized by recurrent prolonged episodes of fever accompanied by abdominal pain, pleuritis, migratory skin rashes, fasciitis, headache, conjunctivitis, and periorbital edema. We report two children, one with a severe mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene causing the typical phenotype. The second patient had a homozygous R92Q-type mutation and displayed a periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome-like phenotype. In the eastern Mediterranean region, TRAPS is probably underdiagnosed because of the overwhelming frequency of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). However, TRAPS should be sought for in patients with atypical symptoms for FMF.

  6. Language Development in Down Syndrome: From the Prelinguistic Period to the Acquisition of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbeduto, Leonard; Warren, Steven F.; Conners, Frances A.

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is associated with abnormalities in multiple organ systems and a characteristic phenotype that includes numerous behavioral features. Language, however, is among the most impaired domains of functioning in DS and, perhaps, also the greatest barrier to independent meaningful inclusion in the community. In this article, we review…

  7. A case of split notochord syndrome: Presenting with respiratory failure in the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Yesim; Akman, Ipek; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapicier, Ozlem; Somuncu, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Summary Split notochord syndrome (SNS) is a very rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a male newborn with a neuroenteric cyst in the posterior mediastinum and multiple vertebrae anomalies presenting with respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension. This report also discusses the embryological development and the etiologic theories of SNS. PMID:27195197

  8. A Novel Mutation in the Pyrin Domain of the NOD-like Receptor Family Pyrin Domain Containing Protein 3 in Muckle-Wells Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Rong-Guang; Li, Hou-Min

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a group of rare, heterogeneous autoinflammatory disease characterized by interleukin (IL)-1β-mediated systemic inflammation and clinical symptoms involving skin, joints, central nervous system, and eyes. It encompasses a spectrum of three clinically overlapping autoinflammatory syndromes including familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease. CAPS is associated with gain-of-function missense mutations in NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3), the gene encoding NLRP3. Moreover, most mutations leading to MWS occurred in exon 3 of NLRP3 gene. Here, we reported a novel mutation occurred in exon 1 of NLRP3 gene in an MWS patient and attempted to explore the pathogenic mechanism. Methods: Genetic sequence analysis of NLRP3 was performed in an MWS patient who presented with periodic fever, arthralgia, and multiform skin lesions. NLRP3 was also analyzed in this patient's parents and 50 healthy individuals. Clinical examinations including X-ray examination, skin biopsy, bone marrow aspiration smear, and blood test of C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), serum levels of IL-1β, immunoglobulin E (IgE), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, and extractable nuclear antigen were also analyzed. The protein structure of mutant NLRP3 inflammasome was calculated by SWISS-MODEL software. Proteins of wild type and mutant components of NLRP3 inflammasome were expressed and purified, and the interaction abilities between these proteins were tested by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. Results: X-ray examination showed no abnormality in the patient's knees. Laboratory tests indicated an elevation of CRP (233.24 mg/L) and ESR (67 mm/h) when the patient had fever. Serum IL-1β increased to 24.37 pg/ml, and serum IgE was higher than 2500.00 IU/ml. Other blood tests were

  9. [Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Value of intravenous flecainide for detecting Kent's pathways with short refractory period].

    PubMed

    Talard, P; Cointe, R; Bru, P; Moyal, C; Lacombe, P; Bremondy, M; Levy, S; Gerard, R

    1990-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of a non-invasive test in detecting accessory pathways with short anterograde effective refractory periods (AERP) (less than or equal to 270 ms) in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. An intravenous injection of Flecainide acetate was administered to 19 consecutive patients referred for electrophysiological investigation of a WPW syndrome with permanent pre-excitation of the surface electrocardiogram. The first 8 patients (Group I) received a dose of 1.5 mg/kg over 5 minutes and the following 11 patients (Group II) were given 2 mg/kg in 5 minutes. In Group I, preexcitation disappeared in 3 patients (37.5%) who all had accessory pathways with AERP greater than 270 ms. It persisted in the other 5 patients (62.5%) of whom 4 had AERP less than or equal to 270 ms and 1 an AERP greater than 270 ms (false negative). In Group II, preexcitation disappeared in 8 patients (72.2%) of whom 4 had AERP greater than 270 ms and 4 had AERP less than 270 ms (false positives). Preexcitation persisted in the 3 other patients (27.3%); the AERP was less than or equal to 270 ms in 2 patients and greater than 270 ms in the other patients. These results suggest that intravenous Flecainide acetate at the dose of 1.5 mg/kg could be useful in differentiating WPW syndromes with long refractory periods (greater than 270 ms) from those with short refractory periods (less than or equal to 270 ms) with a satisfactory sensitivity and specificity, and that further studies on larger numbers of patients are required to confirm this hypothesis.

  10. Differential impact of high and low penetrance TNFRSF1A gene mutations on conventional and regulatory CD4+ T cell functions in TNFR1-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Valentina; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Perna, Francesco; Obici, Laura; Merlini, Giampaolo; Cattalini, Marco; La Torre, Francesco; Maggio, Maria Cristina; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Magnotti, Flora; Galgani, Mario; Galeazzi, Mauro; Marone, Gianni; De Rosa, Veronica; Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    TNFR-associated periodic syndrome is an autoinflammatory disorder caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in TNFRSF1A, the gene encoding for TNFR superfamily 1A. The lack of knowledge in the field of TNFR-associated periodic syndrome biology is clear, particularly in the context of control of immune self-tolerance. We investigated how TNF-α/TNFR superfamily 1A signaling can affect T cell biology, focusing on conventional CD4(+)CD25(-) and regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell functions in patients with TNFR-associated periodic syndrome carrying either high or low penetrance TNFRSF1A mutations. Specifically, we observed that in high penetrance TNFR-associated periodic syndrome, at the molecular level, these alterations were secondary to a hyperactivation of the ERK1/2, STAT1/3/5, mammalian target of rapamycin, and NF-κB pathways in conventional T cells. In addition, these patients had a lower frequency of peripheral regulatory T cells, which also displayed a defective suppressive phenotype. These alterations were partially found in low penetrance TNFR-associated periodic syndrome, suggesting a specific link between the penetrance of the TNFRSF1A mutation and the observed T cell phenotype. Taken together, our data envision a novel role for adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of TNFR-associated periodic syndrome involving both CD4(+) conventional T cells and Tregs, suggesting a novel mechanism of inflammation in the context of autoinflammatory disorders.

  11. A case of adult periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome associated with endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, Massimiliano; Neri, Rossella; Possemato, Niccolo; Puccini, Rodolfo; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2013-03-01

    PFAPA is an acronym for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis. This syndrome has been usually described in pediatric patients and it generally resolves spontaneously. The endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis (EPG) is a glomerular injury characterized by hypercellularity in glomerular lumen and is caused by post-infectious or autoimmune diseases. In this paper, we describe the case of a 35-year-old man affected by PFAPA and EPG. To our knowledge this association has never been reported in the literature before.

  12. Prevalence and Characteristics of Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep in Korean Adult Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-won; Koo, Yong Seo; Lee, Byeong Uk; Shin, Won Chul; Lee, Sang Kun; Cho, Yong Won; Jung, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) in Korean patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Methods: Unmedicated adult patients with idiopathic RLS (n = 354) who underwent polysomnography at three major sleep centers in tertiary hospitals were included. Characteristics of PLMS in RLS were analyzed using the time structure of polysomnographically recorded leg movements and periodicity indices (PIs). RLS severity and subjective sleep quality were assessed. Results: Out of 354 patients with idiopathic RLS (mean age: 52.9 ± 12.0 years), 150 patients (42.3%) had RLS with a PLMS index greater than 15 events/h, and 204 (57.9%) had a PLMS index greater than 5 events/h. The distribution of inter-LM intervals was bimodal, and high PIs (0.86 ± 0.10) were observed in patients with RLS and PLMS (PLMS index > 15 events/h). The PLMS index was positively correlated with age (r = 0.228; p < 0.001), the periodic limb movements in wakefulness index (r = 0.455, p < 0.001) and arousal index (r = 0.174, p = 0.014), but not with RLS severity and parameters of sleep quality. In multivariate analysis, age and male gender were independently associated with PLMS > 15 events/h. Conclusions: The prevalence of PLMS in Korean patients with RLS was lower than that observed in Western countries, but the characteristics of PLMS were not different. Ethnic differences and/or different genetic backgrounds may contribute to the varying prevalence of PLMS in RLS. Citation: Shin JW, Koo YS, Lee BU, Shin WC, Lee SK, Cho YW, Jung KY. Prevalence and characteristics of periodic limb movements during sleep in Korean adult patients with restless legs syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1089–1097. PMID:27306390

  13. A novel TNFRSF1A gene mutation in a patient with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khabazi, Alireza; Maralani, Mahafarin; Andalib, Sasan; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2016-10-19

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a periodic fever syndrome inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. It stems from mutations in the TNFRSF1A (accession number: NM_001065) gene expressing the receptor for tumor necrosis factor α. A patient with TRAPS may present with prolonged episodes of fever attacks, abdominal pain, severe myalgia, and painful erythema on the trunk or extremities. Here, we report an 8-year-old boy with febrile attacks occurring every 1-2months and continuing for 3-4days. The patient experienced 40°C-fever attacks without chills. Approximately 80% of fever attacks were accompanied by abdominal manifestations. Direct sequencing analysis was used to assess the genomic DNA of the patient, and a heterozygous R426L mutation in exon 10 of the TNFRSF1A gene in an autosomal dominant inheritance fashion was identified. Further genetic analyses were also carried out on his parents. Due to the fact that the mutation was not inherited from the parents, it was likely that R426L was a de novo and novel mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene, which can trigger TRAPS or TRAPS-like symptoms.

  14. [Neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies for restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movement disorder].

    PubMed

    Happe, S; Paulus, W

    2006-06-01

    The restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a clinical diagnosis based on the four essential criteria defined by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG). An idiopathic form can be separated from a symptomatic form. Neurophysiological studies have investigated the pathophysiology of the idiopathic RLS or have been used to exclude a symptomatic cause, in particular polyneuropathy. So far cortical excitability changes, corticomotor, somatosensory and auditory pathways, spinal cord excitability, B-wave rhythm and cycling alternating pattern, as well as reflex mechanisms have been investigated by electroencephalography, evoked potentials, Bereitschaftspotentials, nerve conduction and thermal threshold measurements, electromyography, transcranial Doppler sonography, measurements of the spinal flexor reflex as well as neuroimaging techniques. The etiology of the RLS cannot be revealed by these methods, neurophysiological studies in RLS are, however, useful for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for exclusion of a polyneuropathy or other symptomatic causes. In addition to neurophysiological investigations, small fiber neuropathy, which seems to be a more common finding in RLS patients than expected to date, may need biopsy for confirmation. This review will focus on investigations of the different systems involved with diverse neurophysiological methods.

  15. Recurrent diplopia over a 30-year period: natural history of a Lewis and Sumner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Romain; Bouwyn, Jean Paul; Wallon, David; Bedat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Ahtoy, Patrick; Perot, Guillaume; Hannequin, Didier; Maltête, David

    2012-06-01

    We described the case of a patient with recurrent episodes of isolated diplopia over the last 30 years. On her last event, neurological examination revealed not only a right third and sixth cranial nerves involvement, but also a right peripheral facial palsy and a motor weakness on the left ulnar territory. Electrophysiological nerves motor conduction study revealed a conduction block on the left ulnar nerve and a less severe on the right ulnar nerve. Asymmetrical upper limb sensorimotor weakness combined with conduction block and cranial nerves palsy led to a diagnosis of Lewis and Sumner syndrome (LSS). This case is unusual by the presentation of the disease and is, to our knowledge the longer natural disease course of LSS reported. Moreover, it suggests that the recurrent diplopia variant may represent a separate entity with a good prognosis even in absence of invasive treatment.

  16. Recurrent aseptic encephalitis in periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frye, Richard E

    2006-05-01

    An 11-year-old boy with episodes of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) is reported. Two PFAPA episodes were associated with aseptic encephalitis and seizures. Recurrent acute aseptic encephalitis or seizures have never been reported during the febrile episodes of PFAPA. This possible association is discussed within the context of the etiology of PFAPA.

  17. Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome Due To Three Different Types of Ganglion During a 12-Year Period: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kawakatsu, Motohisa; Ishiko, Toshihiro; Sumiya, Masafumi

    A 52-year-old male complained of numbness and radiating pain affecting the plantar region of his left foot. He was found to have recurrent tarsal tunnel syndrome due to posterior tibial nerve compression by 3 different types of ganglion during a 12-year period. To the best of our knowledge, a similar case has not been documented. At the first operation, flexor retinaculum release and simple excision of an epineural ganglion were performed without injuring the nerve fascicles; however, an intrafascicular ganglion developed approximately 2 years later. At the second operation, the ganglion cyst was resected completely to prevent recurrence, despite the risk of nerve fiber injury. The cyst originated from the subtalar joint; thus, the joint was closed, and a free fat graft was placed to prevent adhesion formation. However, an extraneural ganglion occurred about 3 years later. At the third operation, the cyst was resected completely, and a free periosteal graft was used to close the joint more effectively. No recurrence had developed at 6 years after the third operation. The findings of the present case show the need for long-term monitoring of patients with tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by a ganglion owing to the possibility of recurrence related to different ganglion types.

  18. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis (PFAPA) Syndrome: a Review of the Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Vanoni, Federica; Hofer, Michaël

    2016-04-01

    PFAPA syndrome represents the most common cause of recurrent fever in children in European populations, and it is characterized by recurrent episodes of high fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis, and aphthous stomatitis. Many possible causative factors have been explored so far, including infectious agents, immunologic mechanisms and genetic predisposition, but the exact etiology remains unclear. Recent findings demonstrate a dysregulation of different components of innate immunity during PFAPA flares, such as monocytes, neutrophils, complement, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, suggesting an inflammasome-mediated innate immune system activation and supporting the hypothesis of an autoinflammatory disease. Moreover, in contrast with previous considerations, the strong familial clustering suggests a potential genetic origin rather than a sporadic disease. In addition, the presence of variants in inflammasome-related genes, mostly in NLRP3 and MEFV, suggests a possible role of inflammasome-composing genes in PFAPA pathogenesis. However, none of these variants seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, indicating a high genetic heterogeneity as well as an oligogenic or polygenic genetic background.

  19. Abnormal movements in Rett syndrome are present before the regression period: a case study.

    PubMed

    Temudo, Teresa; Maciel, Patricia; Sequeiros, Jorge

    2007-11-15

    The suspicion of a diagnosis of Rett syndrome (RTT) is based on clinical criteria that are often not present in the first two stages of the disease, as many of its symptoms will appear at a later age. This sometimes postpones the genetic diagnosis and an early clinical intervention. We present the case of 19-months-old girl who came to the consultation because of an arrest of psychomotor development noticed 5 months earlier without change in sleep pattern, behavior, or social communication. In the observation of 1 hour videotape, she presented subtle stereotypic movements of the face and hands as well as repetitive dystonic posturing of her limbs. A genetic test confirmed the diagnosis of RTT, showing a truncating mutation in the MECP2 gene (R270X). This case confirms that stereotypic movement anomalies, albeit infrequent and subtle, are already present before the regression stage and while maintaining prehension and that, in addition, repetitive dystonic postures may occur. Recognition of these early movement disorders will improve clinicians' ability to perform an earlier diagnosis of RTT.

  20. Determination of rifaximin treatment period according to lactulose breath test values in nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Bae, Suhyun; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kim, Young-Sang; Kim, Kyu-Nam

    2015-06-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) can partly explain irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and rifaximin has been observed to improve abdominal symptoms in nonconstipated IBS patients. However, there are few reports on the association of the rifaximin treatment periods with the results of a lactulose breath test (LBT). Therefore, we performed a retrospective review of patient charts to investigate the relation between the rifaximin treatment periods with LBT results in nonconstipated IBS patients. We also evaluated the time to achieve a symptomatic improvement in the IBS patients as compared to the changes in the LBT. We reviewed the charts for patients who showed IBS symptoms with documented positive results for LBT during their initial visit and who had a follow-up LBT after treatment with rifaximin. The LBT values were compared to the subjects' symptom scores. A total of 102 subjects had a follow-up LBT to assess LBT normalization. The subjects were divided into groups according to treatment periods of 4 weeks (n = 36), 8 weeks (n = 43), and 12 weeks (n = 23). The groups with a longer treatment exhibited an increase in the hydrogen gas value at 90 min and its sum during 90 min at the initial LBT. There were significant differences in hydrogen gas value at 90 min and in its sum during 90 min at the initial LBT between the groups treated for 4 and 12 weeks. The most significant treatment response was observed during the first 4 weeks for all treatment groups. Symptomatic improvement occurred earlier than LBT normalization in the treatment period over 4 weeks. The results indicate that different rifaximin treatment periods are needed in accordance with LBT levels to effectively eradicate SIBO.

  1. Abnormal IgD and IgA1 O-glycosylation in hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Wolff, Jacob F; Dickinson, Stephen J; Smith, Alice C; Molyneux, Karen; Feehally, John; Simon, Anna; Barratt, Jonathan

    2009-12-01

    In order to determine the glycosylation pattern for IgD, and to examine whether there are changes in the pattern of IgD and IgA1 O-glycosylation in patients with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) during acute febrile attacks and during periods of quiescence, serum was obtained from 20 patients with HIDS and 20 control subjects. In the HIDS group, serum was obtained either during an acute febrile episode (n = 9) or during a period of quiescence (n = 11). The O-glycosylation profiles of native and desialylated IgA1 and IgD were measured in an ELISA-type system using the lectins Helix aspersa and peanut agglutinin, which bind to alternative forms of O-glycan moieties. IgD is more heavily O-galactosylated and less O-sialylated than IgA1 in healthy subjects. HIDS is associated with more extensive O-galactosylation of IgD and a reduction in O-sialylation of both IgD and IgA1. These changes are present both during acute febrile attacks and periods of quiescence. The T cell IgD receptor is a lectin with binding affinity for the O-glycans of both IgD and IgA1. The observed changes in IgD and IgA1 O-glycosylation are likely to have a significant effect on IgD/IgA1-T cell IgD receptor interactions including basal immunoglobulin synthesis, and possibly myeloid IgD receptor-mediated cytokine release.

  2. Periodic health examination, 1996 update: 1. Prenatal screening for and diagnosis of Down syndrome. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.

    PubMed Central

    Dick, P T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To make recommendations to physicians providing prenatal care on (1) whether prenatal screening for and diagnosis of Down syndrome (DS) is advisable and (2) alternative screening and diagnosis manoeuvres. OPTIONS: "Triple-marker" screening of maternal serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin and unconjugated estriol; fetal ultrasonographic examination; amniocentesis; and chorionic villus sampling (CVS). OUTCOMES: Accuracy of detection of DS in fetuses, and risks to the mother, including psychologic distress, and to the fetus from the screening and diagnostic interventions. EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search for relevant articles published from Jan. 1, 1966, to Mar. 31, 1994, with the use of MeSH terms "Down syndrome," "prenatal diagnosis," "screening," "prevention," "amniocentesis," "chorionic villus sampling," "ultrasonography," "anxiety," "depression" and "psychological stress" and a manual search of bibliographies, recent issues of key journals and Current Contents. VALUES: The evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination were used. A high value was placed on providing pregnant women with the opportunity to determine whether they are carrying a fetus with DS and to make choices concerning the termination of the pregnancy. The economic issues involved are complex and were not considered. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Triple-marker screening identifies an estimated 58% of fetuses with DS, but it has an estimated rate of true-positive results of 0.1% and of false-positive results of 3.7% (given a risk cut-off of one chance in 190 of DS). These rates vary with maternal age and the risk cut-off chosen. Women with a known risk of having a fetus with DS (e.g., those who have had a previous child with DS) may benefit from a reduction in anxiety after confirmation that their fetus does not have DS. Screening allows women at low risk of having a child with DS to detect fetuses with the syndrome, but

  3. Canakinumab efficacy and long-term tocilizumab administration in tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    La Torre, Francesco; Muratore, Maurizio; Vitale, Antonio; Moramarco, Fulvio; Quarta, Laura; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disease caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene. Treatment is aimed at preventing acute disease attacks, improving quality of life, and preventing long-term complications such as systemic reactive amyloidosis. Biologic agents have significantly improved TRAPS management. In particular, interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition either with the recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra or with the human IgG1 anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody canakinumab has recently shown to induce a prompt and stable disease remission. Conversely, the successful experience with IL-6 inhibition is nowadays limited to a single patient. Anyway, introduction of new treatment options for patients requiring a lifelong therapy is desirable. We describe two TRAPS patients (son and father) successfully treated with canakinumab and tocilizumab, respectively. In particular, we highlight the clinical and laboratory efficacy as well as the good safety profile of tocilizumab during a 42-month follow-up period.

  4. Factors associated with major complications in the short-term postoperative period in dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic airway syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Jennifer J.; Milovancev, Milan; MacIntyre, Laura A.; Townsend, Katy L.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) in dogs has been reported to result in low complication rates and good long-term outcomes. Previous reports have not identified risk factors for the development of complications following BAS surgery. This retrospective study evaluated a wide variety of patient- and procedure-related, pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors for an association with the development of major postoperative complications in the short-term period following BAS surgery. The overall major complication rate, including death or euthanasia, was 4/55 (7%) dogs. Temporary tracheostomy was the only major surgical complication identified (n = 3). Multiple logistic regression identified postoperative radiographic evidence of pneumonia as associated with the development of any major complication overall, requirement of a temporary tracheostomy postoperatively, and death or euthanasia, within the short-term postoperative period. Future prospective studies should evaluate specific risk factors for an association with major complications following BAS surgery in dogs to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27587891

  5. Factors associated with major complications in the short-term postoperative period in dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ree, Jennifer J; Milovancev, Milan; MacIntyre, Laura A; Townsend, Katy L

    2016-09-01

    Surgical correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) in dogs has been reported to result in low complication rates and good long-term outcomes. Previous reports have not identified risk factors for the development of complications following BAS surgery. This retrospective study evaluated a wide variety of patient- and procedure-related, pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors for an association with the development of major postoperative complications in the short-term period following BAS surgery. The overall major complication rate, including death or euthanasia, was 4/55 (7%) dogs. Temporary tracheostomy was the only major surgical complication identified (n = 3). Multiple logistic regression identified postoperative radiographic evidence of pneumonia as associated with the development of any major complication overall, requirement of a temporary tracheostomy postoperatively, and death or euthanasia, within the short-term postoperative period. Future prospective studies should evaluate specific risk factors for an association with major complications following BAS surgery in dogs to improve patient outcomes.

  6. A Novel Unstable Duplication Upstream of HAS2 Predisposes to a Breed-Defining Skin Phenotype and a Periodic Fever Syndrome in Chinese Shar-Pei Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Mia; Mauceli, Evan; Quilez, Javier; Tonomura, Noriko; Zanna, Giordana; Docampo, Maria José; Bassols, Anna; Avery, Anne C.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Thomas, Anne; Kastner, Daniel L.; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Webster, Matthew T.; Sanchez, Armand; Hedhammar, Åke; Remmers, Elaine F.; Andersson, Leif; Ferrer, Lluis; Tintle, Linda; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation with no known pathogenic or autoimmune cause. In humans, several genes have been implicated in this group of diseases, but the majority of cases remain unexplained. A similar periodic fever syndrome is relatively frequent in the Chinese Shar-Pei breed of dogs. In the western world, Shar-Pei have been strongly selected for a distinctive thick and heavily folded skin. In this study, a mutation affecting both these traits was identified. Using genome-wide SNP analysis of Shar-Pei and other breeds, the strongest signal of a breed-specific selective sweep was located on chromosome 13. The same region also harbored the strongest genome-wide association (GWA) signal for susceptibility to the periodic fever syndrome (praw = 2.3×10−6, pgenome = 0.01). Dense targeted resequencing revealed two partially overlapping duplications, 14.3 Kb and 16.1 Kb in size, unique to Shar-Pei and upstream of the Hyaluronic Acid Synthase 2 (HAS2) gene. HAS2 encodes the rate-limiting enzyme synthesizing hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the skin. HA is up-regulated and accumulates in the thickened skin of Shar-Pei. A high copy number of the 16.1 Kb duplication was associated with an increased expression of HAS2 as well as the periodic fever syndrome (p<0.0001). When fragmented, HA can act as a trigger of the innate immune system and stimulate sterile fever and inflammation. The strong selection for the skin phenotype therefore appears to enrich for a pleiotropic mutation predisposing these dogs to a periodic fever syndrome. The identification of HA as a major risk factor for this canine disease raises the potential of this glycosaminoglycan as a risk factor for human periodic fevers and as an important driver of chronic inflammation. PMID:21437276

  7. A novel unstable duplication upstream of HAS2 predisposes to a breed-defining skin phenotype and a periodic fever syndrome in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mia; Meadows, Jennifer R S; Truvé, Katarina; Rosengren Pielberg, Gerli; Puppo, Francesca; Mauceli, Evan; Quilez, Javier; Tonomura, Noriko; Zanna, Giordana; Docampo, Maria José; Bassols, Anna; Avery, Anne C; Karlsson, Elinor K; Thomas, Anne; Kastner, Daniel L; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Webster, Matthew T; Sanchez, Armand; Hedhammar, Ake; Remmers, Elaine F; Andersson, Leif; Ferrer, Lluis; Tintle, Linda; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2011-03-01

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation with no known pathogenic or autoimmune cause. In humans, several genes have been implicated in this group of diseases, but the majority of cases remain unexplained. A similar periodic fever syndrome is relatively frequent in the Chinese Shar-Pei breed of dogs. In the western world, Shar-Pei have been strongly selected for a distinctive thick and heavily folded skin. In this study, a mutation affecting both these traits was identified. Using genome-wide SNP analysis of Shar-Pei and other breeds, the strongest signal of a breed-specific selective sweep was located on chromosome 13. The same region also harbored the strongest genome-wide association (GWA) signal for susceptibility to the periodic fever syndrome (p(raw) = 2.3 × 10⁻⁶, p(genome) = 0.01). Dense targeted resequencing revealed two partially overlapping duplications, 14.3 Kb and 16.1 Kb in size, unique to Shar-Pei and upstream of the Hyaluronic Acid Synthase 2 (HAS2) gene. HAS2 encodes the rate-limiting enzyme synthesizing hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the skin. HA is up-regulated and accumulates in the thickened skin of Shar-Pei. A high copy number of the 16.1 Kb duplication was associated with an increased expression of HAS2 as well as the periodic fever syndrome (p < 0.0001). When fragmented, HA can act as a trigger of the innate immune system and stimulate sterile fever and inflammation. The strong selection for the skin phenotype therefore appears to enrich for a pleiotropic mutation predisposing these dogs to a periodic fever syndrome. The identification of HA as a major risk factor for this canine disease raises the potential of this glycosaminoglycan as a risk factor for human periodic fevers and as an important driver of chronic inflammation.

  8. Profile of inflammatory mediators in tonsils of patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Patricia M; Araya, Andrea; Pérez, Claudio I; Maul, Ximena; Serrano, Carolina; Beltrán, Constanza; Harris, Paul R; Talesnik, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the levels of white blood cells and profile of proinflammatory Th1, Th2, Th17, and T regulatory tissue cytokines in the tonsils of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) patients to contribute to the pathophysiological understanding of the PFAPA syndrome. A cohort of PFAPA patients who had tonsillectomy during 2010 and 2011 was included and compared to control patients who had tonsillectomy for tonsillar hypertrophy. White blood cell counts were measured during flares in PFAPA patients and before tonsillectomy in the control group. Cytokine gene expression was analyzed in removed tonsils by real-time PCR. Nine PFAPA patients with a median age of 5.3 years (1.7-8 years) and 17 hypertrophic tonsils of patients with a median age of 4.8 years (2.3-8.4 years) participated in this study. Tonsillectomy was performed during afebrile period between PFAPA flares. Three of the nine patients had recurrent episodes of aphthous stomatitis without fever after tonsillectomy. Leukocyte and neutrophil counts were higher in PFAPA patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). Eosinophil counts were lower in PFAPA patients during flares (p = 0.006). IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-17, and IFN-γ levels were similar in the tonsils of patients and controls. IL-4 gene expression in the tonsils was lower in PFAPA patients compared to those of the controls (p = 0.04). Proinflammatory, effector, and regulatory cytokine gene expression in tonsil tissue of PFAPA children removed in a noninflammatory asymptomatic interval and in control patients were similar. However, IL-4 cytokine gene expression in the tonsils and peripheral blood eosinophils were lower in the PFAPA patients suggesting a potential pathogenesis pathway based on an inhibition of Th2 responses.

  9. Time, frequency and information domain analysis of heart period and QT variability in asymptomatic long QT syndrome type 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Bari, Vlasta; Girardengo, Giulia; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Brink, Paul A; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J; Porta, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize in time, frequency and information domains heart period (HP) and QT interval variabilities in asymptomatic (ASYMP) long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2) subjects. HP, approximated as the temporal distance between two consecutive R-wave peaks, and QT, approximated as the temporal distance between the R-wave peak and the T-wave offset, were automatically derived from 24h Holter recordings in 10 ASYMP LQT2 patients and 13 healthy non mutation carriers (NMC) subjects. All analyses were carried out during DAY (from 2 to 6 PM) and NIGHT (from 12 to 4 AM). Mean, variance, spectral power and complexity indices at short, medium and long time scales were assessed over HP and QT beat-to-beat series. Circadian rhythmicity was evident in both NMC and ASYMP LQT2 but ASYMP LQT2 subjects were characterized by higher HP, QT interval and HP variability during both DAY and NIGHT. In addition, multiscale complexity analysis was able to differentiate the groups by showing a higher HP complexity and a lower QT complexity at long time scales in ASYMP LQT2 during DAY. ASYMP LQT2 exhibited a different autonomic control compared to NMC and such a differentiation could be protective and assure them a lower risk profile.

  10. Microbes of the tonsils in PFAPA (Periodic Fever, Aphtous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Adenitis) syndrome - a possible trigger of febrile episodes.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Ulla; Koivunen, Petri; Tapiainen, Terhi; Glumoff, Virpi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Uhari, Matti; Renko, Marjo

    2015-06-01

    Periodic Fever, Aphtous stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenitis (PFAPA) is a childhood febrile syndrome that is often cured by tonsillectomy (TE). We hypothesized that microbes present in the tonsils may act as a trigger for the activation of inflammasomes and investigated the microbiology of the tonsils in PFAPA patients and controls. We recruited 31 consecutive children who underwent TE due to PFAPA; 24 children who underwent TE due to other reasons served as controls. We cultured all the samples for bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts, and viruses and used PCR for 15 viruses. Also biofilm formation and histologic findings were identified. The samples of the patients yielded Candida albicans more often than did the controls (16 vs 0%, p = 0.003). Staphylococcus aureus occurred in only 10% of the patients, but in 38% of the controls (p = 0.01). Varicella zoster and Herpes simplex viruses occurred less often in patients than in controls. Biofilm was present in 55% of PFAPA tonsils, but in only 24% of the controls (p = 0.03). The microbes found in the tonsils of PFAPA patients showed significant differences from those of controls. This may in part explain the efficacy of TE in PFAPA.

  11. Physicians' perspectives on the diagnosis and management of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manthiram, Kalpana; Li, Suzanne C; Hausmann, Jonathan S; Amarilyo, Gil; Barron, Karyl; Kim, Hanna; Nativ, Simona; Lionetti, Geraldina; Zeft, Andrew; Goldsmith, Donald; Kimberlin, David; Edwards, Kathryn; Dedeoglu, Fatma; Lapidus, Sivia

    2017-03-07

    To assess the practice patterns of pediatric rheumatology and infectious diseases subspecialists in the diagnosis and treatment of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome. An online survey assessing diagnostic and treatment approaches was sent to 424 members of the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) and 980 members of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society (PIDS). 277 physicians (123 from CARRA and 154 from PIDS representing 21% of the total membership) completed the survey. To diagnose PFAPA, most respondents agreed that patients must have the following features of the diagnostic criteria: stereotypical fever episodes (95%), asymptomatic intervals between episodes (93%), and normal growth and development (81%). However, 71% of the respondents did not require age of onset <5 years, 33% did not require regular intervals between episodes, and 79% did not require the concomitant signs of aphthous stomatitis, adenitis, or pharyngitis during episodes as long as episodes were regular. Over half (58%) considered episode resolution with steroids to be diagnostic of PFAPA. Corticosteroids, antipyretics, tonsillectomy, and cimetidine were the most commonly prescribed treatments, while steroids and tonsillectomy were most effective. Subspecialists in pediatric rheumatology and infectious diseases showed limited adherence to the complete published criteria for diagnosing PFAPA suggesting heterogeneity in the characteristics of patients diagnosed with the disorder. These findings emphasize the need to develop consensus diagnostic and treatment guidelines in well-characterized patient populations.

  12. [Schnitzlers SyndromeDifferential diagnostics, an overview of therapeutic options and description of 5 cases treated with anakinra].

    PubMed

    Adam, Zdeněk; Šedivá, Anna; Koukalová, Renata; Řehák, Zdeněk; Petrášová, Hana; Szturz, Petr; Adamová, Zdenka; Vetešníková, Eva; Pour, Luděk; Krejčí, Marta; Sandecká, Viera; Pourová, Eva; Čermáková, Zdeňka; Ševčíková, Sabina; Král, Zdeněk; Mayer, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Schnitzlers syndrome is an acquired auto-inflammatory disease of still unclear origin. The Strasbourg criteria were adopted (non-infectious fever, chronic urticaria, changes in the bone structure, leukocytosis and higher values of inflammatory markers - CRP and presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin mostly of type IgM, very rarely of IgG) to establish this diagnosis. The first-choice therapy for this disease is the blocking of interleukin-1 effects. In practice, the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, anakinra, is the most commonly used. Currently reports also appear of the use of other medicines blocking the effect of interleukin-1, namely canakinumab and rilonacept. We have been treating 5 patients with anakinra (108, 72, 33, 32 and 1 months) on a long-term basis. In all the patients, we commenced administration of anakinra in a dose of 100 mg once a day. As a result of 100 mg being administered once a day, all symptoms went away completely in 4 patients, while they receded by about 75 % in 1 patient, without disappearing completely. This patient needs an increased dose of 2 ampoules per day on the days of spontaneously intensified medical ailments. After one year of treatment it turned out for one of the four patients whose symptoms had completely disappeared when administered the 100mg daily dose, that he only needed the respective dose of anakinra at 48-hour intervals. However this patient does not tolerate further extension of the intervals between dose administrations. We have not recorded any adverse effects of anakinra in the course of the treatment, and no decline in the efficiency of anakinra has been observed: it acts as effectively now as it did at the beginning of the treatment. The text discusses the differential diagnostics of the Schnitzler syndrome.Key words: anakinra - auto-inflammatory diseases - canakinumab - fever of unknown origin - FUO - interleukin 1 - cryopyrin-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (CAPS) - monoclonal gammopathy - rilonacept

  13. Analysis of the genetic basis of periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Silvio Alessandro Di; Bedoni, Nicola; von Scheven-Gête, Annette; Vanoni, Federica; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Hofer, Michaël; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory syndrome in children from Western countries. In spite of its strong familial clustering, its genetic basis and inheritance pattern are still unknown. We performed a comprehensive genetic study on 68 individuals from 14 families. Linkage analysis suggested a susceptibility locus on chromosome 8, but direct molecular sequencing did not support this initial statistical finding. Exome sequencing revealed the absence of any gene that was mutated in all patients. Exhaustive screening of genes involved in other autoinflammatory syndromes or encoding components of the human inflammasome showed no DNA variants that could be linked to PFAPA molecular pathology. Among these, the previously-reported missense mutation V198M in the NLRP3 gene was clearly shown not to co-segregate with PFAPA. Our results on this relatively large cohort indicate that PFAPA syndrome is unlikely to be a monogenic condition. Moreover, none of the several genes known to be involved in inflammation or in autoinflammatory disorders seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, suggesting that PFAPA results from oligogenic or complex inheritance of variants in multiple disease genes and/or non-genetic factors. PMID:25988833

  14. Analysis of the genetic basis of periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Bedoni, Nicola; von Scheven-Gête, Annette; Vanoni, Federica; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Hofer, Michaël; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-05-19

    PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory syndrome in children from Western countries. In spite of its strong familial clustering, its genetic basis and inheritance pattern are still unknown. We performed a comprehensive genetic study on 68 individuals from 14 families. Linkage analysis suggested a susceptibility locus on chromosome 8, but direct molecular sequencing did not support this initial statistical finding. Exome sequencing revealed the absence of any gene that was mutated in all patients. Exhaustive screening of genes involved in other autoinflammatory syndromes or encoding components of the human inflammasome showed no DNA variants that could be linked to PFAPA molecular pathology. Among these, the previously-reported missense mutation V198M in the NLRP3 gene was clearly shown not to co-segregate with PFAPA. Our results on this relatively large cohort indicate that PFAPA syndrome is unlikely to be a monogenic condition. Moreover, none of the several genes known to be involved in inflammation or in autoinflammatory disorders seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, suggesting that PFAPA results from oligogenic or complex inheritance of variants in multiple disease genes and/or non-genetic factors.

  15. Right pulmonary artery agenesis with patent ductus arteriosus and Eisenmenger syndrome: a rare case diagnosed during the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Beker-Acay, Mehtap; Ozkececi, Gulay; Unlu, Ebru; Hocaoglu, Elif; Kacar, Emre; Onrat, Ersel

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery a very rare congenital disorder. We here present a case of a 22-year-old female patient with agenesis of the right pulmonary artery accompanying patent ductus arteriosus and Eisenmenger syndrome, diagnosed by chest X-ray and multidetector computed tomography 5 days after giving birth.

  16. Markedly elevated CD64 expressions on neutrophils and monocytes are useful for diagnosis of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome during flares.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Takashi; Hokibara, Sho; Shigemura, Tomonari; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Honda, Kimiko; Umeda, Yoh; Agematsu, Kazunaga

    2014-05-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome is the most commonly encountered autoinflammatory disease in children, but its pathogenesis and diagnostic biomarkers are unknown. In this study, we examined the utility of CD64, a member of the Fcγ receptors, expressions on neutrophils and monocytes in diagnosing patients with PFAPA, along with other autoinflammatory diseases exhibiting periodic fever, and bacterial infections. Although CD64 was expressed at a similar level in the attack-free period of PFAPA and in controls, CD64 expressions on both neutrophils and monocytes were dramatically increased during attacks. Serum IFN-γ also increased in some PFAPA patients during flares, suggesting the involvement of T cell activation. Our findings demonstrate that remarkable CD64 expression during PFAPA flares serves as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis. We also suspect that IFN-γ, possibly from retention of activated T cells in peripheral tissues, increases CD64 synthesis in such cases.

  17. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  18. The Pathogenesis of Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis Syndrome: A Review of Current Research

    PubMed Central

    Kraszewska-Głomba, Barbara; Matkowska-Kocjan, Agnieszka; Szenborn, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Background. PFAPA syndrome is a chronic disease that is characterized by recurrent episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis. Knowledge regarding the etiology of PFAPA is limited. Objectives. To provide up-to-date information considering etiology of PFAPA syndrome, by summarizing what has been explored and established in this area so far. Materials and Methods. PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus databases were searched for pertinent reports. Eventually 19 articles were selected. The results were classified into categories regarding three areas of interest: familial occurrence, genetic basis, and immunological mechanisms of PFAPA. Results. Recent findings suggest that there is a familial tendency to PFAPA but the level of evidence does not warrant definite conclusions. The absence of a clear monogenic trait indicates a heterogenous, polygenic, or complex inheritance of PFAPA syndrome. As two mutations with a possible functional effect on the inflammasomes (MEFV E148Q and NLRP3 Q703K) have been found in several PFAPA cohorts, the role of inflammasome-related genes in PFAPA pathogenesis cannot be excluded. Immunological mechanisms of PFAPA involve an abnormal, IL-1β dependent innate immune response to an environmental trigger, which leads to Th1-driven inflammation expressed by recruitment of T-cells to the periphery. PMID:26457006

  19. Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease and Periodic Limb Movements: A Comprehensive Review of Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Treatment Considerations.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Dyveke P

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) or Willis-Ekbom Disease is a common, but frequently under- recognized and misdiagnosed condition seen in many subspecialty practices including neurology, sleep medicine, primary care and rheumatology. Periodic limb movements are a frequent co-morbid diagnosis in RLS. Despite prior beliefs that the condition was "benign", it has been demonstrated to have a considerable impact on sufferers quality of life, physically and psychologically, as well as socially. This chapter is meant as a comprehensive review of RLS encompassing epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment considerations.

  20. Reduced Number of CD8+ Cells in Tonsillar Germinal Centres in Children with the Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Førsvoll, J; Janssen, E A M; Møller, I; Wathne, N; Skaland, I; Klos, J; Kristoffersen, E K; Øymar, K

    2015-07-01

    The syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) is an autoinflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. Tonsillectomy may cause a prompt resolution of the syndrome. The aim was to study the histologic and immunological aspects of the palatine tonsils in PFAPA, to help understand the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Tonsils from children with PFAPA (n = 11) and children with tonsillar hypertrophy (n = 16) were evaluated histologically after haematoxylin and eosin staining. The number of different cell types was identified immunohistochemically by cluster of differentiation (CD) markers: CD3 (T cells), CD4 (T helper cells), CD8 (cytotoxic T cells), CD15 (neutrophils), CD20 (B cells), CD45 (all leucocytes), CD57 (NK cells) and CD163 (monocytes and macrophages). Tonsils from children with PFAPA showed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia dominated by well-developed germinal centres with many tingible body macrophages. The histologic findings were unspecific, and a similar morphologic appearance was also found in the tonsils from controls. The number of CD8+ cells in germinal centres differed between children with PFAPA [median 9 cells (quartiles: 5, 15)] and controls [18 cells (12, 33) (P = 0.001)] and between children with PFAPA with (median 14 cells; 9, 16) and without (4 cells; 3, 8) aphthous stomatitis (P = 0.015). For the other cell types, no differences in germinal centres were found between children with PFAPA and controls. In conclusion, a lower number of CD8+ cells were found in germinal centres of tonsils in children with PFAPA compared to controls, which may be a feature linked to the aetiology of the syndrome.

  1. Basic Characteristics of Adults with Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenopathy Syndrome in Comparison with the Typical Pediatric Expression of Disease.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Marco; Soliani, Martina; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are caused by inflammasome dysregulation leading to overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a pathological delay in the inflammation switching off. The progress of cellular biology has partially clarified pathogenic mechanisms behind monogenic autoinflammatory diseases, whereas little is known about the polygenic ones. Although the genetic susceptibility of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is still obscure, the presence of overlapping symptoms with monogenic periodic fevers, the recurrence in family members, the important role played by dysregulated interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion during flares, the overexpression of inflammasome-associated genes during attacks, and, last but not least, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-1β blockade strongly indicate a potential genetic involvement in its pathogenesis, probably linked with environmental factors. PFAPA syndrome has a typical inception in the pediatric age, but a delayed onset during adulthood has been described as well. Treatments required as well as effectiveness of tonsillectomy remain controversial, even if the disease seems to have a self-limited course mostly in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this complex polygenic/multifactorial autoinflammatory disorder in which the innate immune system undoubtedly plays a basic role.

  2. Basic Characteristics of Adults with Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenopathy Syndrome in Comparison with the Typical Pediatric Expression of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, Marco; Soliani, Martina; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are caused by inflammasome dysregulation leading to overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a pathological delay in the inflammation switching off. The progress of cellular biology has partially clarified pathogenic mechanisms behind monogenic autoinflammatory diseases, whereas little is known about the polygenic ones. Although the genetic susceptibility of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is still obscure, the presence of overlapping symptoms with monogenic periodic fevers, the recurrence in family members, the important role played by dysregulated interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion during flares, the overexpression of inflammasome-associated genes during attacks, and, last but not least, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-1β blockade strongly indicate a potential genetic involvement in its pathogenesis, probably linked with environmental factors. PFAPA syndrome has a typical inception in the pediatric age, but a delayed onset during adulthood has been described as well. Treatments required as well as effectiveness of tonsillectomy remain controversial, even if the disease seems to have a self-limited course mostly in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this complex polygenic/multifactorial autoinflammatory disorder in which the innate immune system undoubtedly plays a basic role. PMID:26357457

  3. Degeneration of the Arnold's prefrontopontocerebellar tract in a case of locked-in syndrome over a 23-year period.

    PubMed

    Cotton, François; Ciancia, Sophie; Tell, Laurence; Lachaise, Laurence; Braun, Marc; Rode, Gilles

    2011-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman has been under observation for a complete locked-in syndrome of vascular origin, since 1984. Her cognitive functions today are still normal. When first diagnosed, a CT-scan was made and 23 years later performed, a cerebral MRI was performed. A focal, bilateral and symmetric atrophy of the dorsomedial prefrontal gyri was clearly shown, contrasting with the non-atrophy of the precentral gyri (motor area), others prefrontal areas, frontopolar gyri and temporal cortices. Degeneration of the corticopontine projection, the first step in the corticopontocerebellar circuit, could explain this selective atrophy. This unique observation leads to the precise in vivo anatomical location of the Arnold tract.

  4. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  5. Recurrent abdominal pain as the presentation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) in an Asian girl: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Ju; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lau, Yu-Lung; Lee, Wen-I; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is characterized by periodic fever, cutaneous rash, conjunctivitis, lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, myalgia, and arthralgia. It is a rare autosomal dominant disease and strongly associated with heterozygous mutations in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor super family 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene. It is believed to be more common in Western countries than in Asian countries. Here, we present the case of a 14-year-old girl with periodic fever and abdominal pain with elevation of inflammatory markers for 2 years. After extensive work-up of infectious etiology with negative results, the diagnosis of TRAPS was made although no gene mutations were identified in the TNFRSF1A gene, MVK gene, and NALP3/CIAS1 gene. She had partial clinical response to corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents. However, the treatment response to TNF-α inhibitor etanercept was dramatic. She has remained symptom free under regular weekly to biweekly etanercept treatment for 2 years. We also reviewed the related literature and summarized the data of 10 Asian cases of TRAPS.

  6. [Demographic characteristics of Down's syndrome in Navarra. Trends of pre and postnatal diagnosis for the period 1991-2009].

    PubMed

    Ramos Arroyo, M A; Lizarraga Rojas, M; Hernández Charro, B; Martínez Jaurrieta, M D; Zabaleta Jurio, J; Alonso Sánchez, A

    2013-09-06

    This study describes the development of pre and postnatal diagnosis of sindrome de Down (SD) in the Autonomous Community of Navarre from 1991 to 2009 and assesses its preventive impact in the population, as well as to associated socio-demographic changes. In the absence of a prenatal diagnosis for DS, the change in maternal age from 1991 to 2009 would have caused a 50% increase in births with this disorder. However, the antenatal rate detection of DS increased from 15.8% in 1991-4 to 64.3% in 2006-9, giving rise to a decreasing incidence trend, not statistically significant, during the study period and to a higher mean age of mothers of live births with DS (32.75± 5,02 and 34.8±4,82 years during the first and second periods of the study, respectively). The proportion of young mothers (<35 years) of live births with DS was 66% in 1991-4 and 45% in 2006-9. Close to one fifth of the total population of pregnant women, however, did not want to go through a maternal screening test or amniocentesis. Seventeen per cent of all live births with DS had a positive screening test, but mothers decided to continue pregnancy. These results suggest that, despite the application of new and more sensitive prenatal screening tests, the incidence of DS may still be relatively high in our population, an important factor to be considered for future antenatal preventive programs and adequate postnatal care.

  7. [Asthenic syndrome in clinical course of acute period of brain concussion during complex treatment using nootropic agents].

    PubMed

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 108 persons aged from 16 till 60 years in acute period of closed craniocerebral injury (CCCT) has been done. Every participants have been divided into 2 groups depending on a nootrop medication they receive in a complex treatment. A control group consisted of 30 practically healthy people. Objective examination by means of tests was done on the 1-st, 10-th that 30-th day of treatment. Patients of 1-st (37 persons) group received piracetam in complex treatment and patients of the 2-nd group (71 persons) pramistar. Patients of the first group received a base treatment (analgetics, tranquilizers, vitamins of group B, magnesium sulfate, diuretic preparations) as well as piracetam at dosage 0.2, two tablets three times per day. The Patients of the 2-nd group received a base treatment as well as pramistar at dosage 0.6, one tablet 2 times per day. Specially developed multiaspects scales and questionnaires, MRT of the brain and EEG have been used for objectification of patient, complaints. During a complex clinico-neuropsychological examination it was found that all cases of concussion of the brain are accompanied by those or other asthenic disorders.

  8. Homozygosity for the V377I mutation in mevalonate kinase causes distinct clinical phenotypes in two sibs with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Laurent; Alsaleh, Ghada; Georgel, Philippe; Carapito, Raphael; Waterham, Hans R; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Bahram, Siamak; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive auto-inflammatory disorder characterised by recurring episodes of fever associated with multiple non-specific inflammatory symptoms and caused by mutations in the MVK gene. The phenotypic spectrum is wide and depends mostly on the nature of the mutations. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is a relatively mild presentation and predominantly associated with a c.1129G>A (p.V377I) mutation in the MVK gene. We report cases of two sisters homozygous for this mutation but exhibiting distinct (symptomatic vs asymptomatic) phenotypes. Methods Patient history was obtained; physical and clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was quantified. Results Low MVK enzymatic activity is not necessarily associated with inflammatory symptoms. Increased inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS is associated with symptomatic MVK deficiency. Conclusions Individuals who are homozygous for the common p.V377I mutation in the MVK gene may not display the characteristic inflammatory episodes diagnostic of MKD and thus may be lost for correct and timely diagnosis. PMID:26977311

  9. Hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome: a new MVK mutation (p.R277G) associated with a severe phenotype.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana A; Aróstegui, Juan I; Brito, Maria J; Neves, Conceição; Conde, Marta

    2014-06-01

    Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; MIM# 260920) is a rare recessively-inherited autoinflammatory condition caused by mutations in the MVK gene, which encodes for mevalonate kinase, an essential enzyme in the isoprenoid pathway. HIDS is clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation. Here we report on the case of a 2 year-old Portuguese boy with recurrent episodes of fever, malaise, massive cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly since the age of 12 months. Rash, arthralgia, abdominal pain and diarrhea were also seen occasionally. During attacks a vigorous acute-phase response was detected, including elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A and leukocytosis. Clinical and laboratory improvement was seen between attacks. Despite normal serum IgD level, HIDS was clinically suspected. Mutational MVK analysis revealed the homozygous genotype with the novel p.Arg277Gly (p.R277G) mutation, while the healthy non-consanguineous parents were heterozygous. Short nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroid courses were given during attacks with poor benefits, whereas anakinra showed positive responses only at high doses. The p.R277G mutation here described is a novel missense MVK mutation, and it has been detected in this case with a severe HIDS phenotype. Further studies are needed to evaluate a co-relation genotype, enzyme activity and phenotype, and to define the best therapeutic strategies.

  10. Retrospective Analysis of Corticosteroid Treatment in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and/or Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis over a Period of 10 Years in Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University, Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Roongpisuthipong, Wanjarus; Prompongsa, Sirikarn; Klangjareonchai, Theerawut

    2014-01-01

    Background. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and/or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are uncommon and life-threatening drug reaction associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Objective. We studied SJS and/or TEN by conducting a retrospective analysis of 87 patients treated during a 10-year period. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of the records of all patients with a diagnosis of SJS and/or TEN based on clinical features and histological confirmation of SJS and/or TEN was not available at the Department of Medicine, Vajira hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. The data were collected from two groups from 2003 to 2007 and 2008 to 2012. Results. A total of 87 cases of SJS and/or TEN were found, comprising 44 males and 43 females whose mean age was 46.5 years. The average length of stay was 17 days. Antibiotics, anticonvulsants, and allopurinol were the major culprit drugs in both groups. The mean SCORTEN on admission was 2.1 in first the group while 1.7 in second the group. From 2008 to 2012, thirty-nine patients (76.5%) were treated with corticosteroids while only eight patients (22.2%) were treated between 2003 and 2007. The mortality rate declined from 25% from the first group to 13.7% in the second group. Complications between first and second groups had no significant differences. Conclusions. Short-term corticosteroids may contribute to a reduced mortality rate in SJS and/or TEN without increasing secondary infection. Further well-designed studies are required to compare the effect of corticosteroids treatment for SJS and/or TEN.

  11. Tumour necrosis factor receptor I blockade shows that TNF-dependent and TNF-independent mechanisms synergise in TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Lucy C; Stoop, A Allart; Negm, Ola H; Radford, Paul M; Tighe, Patrick J; Todd, Ian

    2015-10-01

    TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autoinflammatory disease involving recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation. It is associated with autosomal dominant mutations in TNF receptor superfamily 1A gene localised to exons encoding the ectodomain of the p55 TNF receptor, TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of cell surface TNFR1 in TRAPS, and the contribution of TNF-dependent and TNF-independent mechanisms to the production of cytokines. HEK-293 and SK-HEP-1 cell lines were stably transfected with WT or TRAPS-associated variants of human TNF receptor superfamily 1A gene. An anti-TNFR1 single domain antibody (dAb), and an anti-TNFR1 mAb, bound to cell surface WT and variant TNFR1s. In HEK-293 cells transfected with death domain-inactivated (R347A) TNFR1, and in SK-HEP-1 cells transfected with normal (full-length) TNFR1, cytokine production stimulated in the absence of exogenous TNF by the presence of certain TNFR1 variants was not inhibited by the anti-TNFR1 dAb. In SK-Hep-1 cells, specific TRAPS mutations increased the level of cytokine response to TNF, compared to WT, and this augmented cytokine production was suppressed by the anti-TNFR1 dAb. Thus, TRAPS-associated variants of TNFR1 enhance cytokine production by a TNF-independent mechanism and by sensitising cells to a TNF-dependent stimulation. The TNF-dependent mechanism requires cell surface expression of TNFR1, as this is blocked by TNFR1-specific dAb.

  12. Canakinumab treatment for patients with active recurrent or chronic TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): an open-label, phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Gattorno, Marco; Obici, Laura; Cattalini, Marco; Tormey, Vincent; Abrams, Ken; Davis, Nicole; Speziale, Antonio; Bhansali, Suraj G; Martini, Alberto; Lachmann, Helen J

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of canakinumab, a high-affinity human monoclonal anti-interleukin-1β antibody, in inducing complete or almost complete responses in patients with active tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Methods Twenty patients (aged 7–78 years) with active recurrent or chronic TRAPS were treated with canakinumab 150 mg every 4 weeks for 4 months (2 mg/kg for those ≤40 kg) in this open-label, proof-of-concept, phase II study. Canakinumab was then withdrawn for up to 5 months, with reintroduction on relapse, and 4 weekly administration (subsequently increased to every 8 weeks) for 24 months. The primary efficacy variable was the proportion of patients achieving complete or almost complete response at day 15, defined as clinical remission (Physician's Global Assessment score ≤1) and full or partial serological remission. Results Nineteen patients (19/20, 95%; 95% CI 75.1% to 99.9%) achieved the primary efficacy variable. Responses to canakinumab occurred rapidly; median time to clinical remission 4 days (95% CI 3 to 8 days). All patients relapsed after canakinumab was withdrawn; median time to relapse 91.5 days (95% CI 65 to 117 days). On reintroduction of canakinumab, clinical and serological responses were similar to those seen during the first phase, and were sustained throughout treatment. Canakinumab was well tolerated and clinical responses were accompanied by rapid and sustained improvement in health-related quality of life. Weight normalised pharmacokinetics of canakinumab, although limited, appeared to be consistent with historical canakinumab data. Conclusions Canakinumab induces rapid disease control in patients with active TRAPS, and clinical benefits are sustained during long-term treatment. Trial registration number NCT01242813; Results. PMID:27269295

  13. Molecular identification and genetic diversity of open reading frame 7 field isolated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome in North Sumatera, Indonesia, in the period of 2008-2014

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Faisal; Widayanti, Rini; Haryanto, Aris; Tabu, Charles Rangga

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Molecular identification and genetic diversity of open reading frame 7 (ORF7) of field isolated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in North Sumatera, Indonesia, in the period of 2008-2014. Materials and Methods: A total of 47 PRRSV samples were collected from the death case of pigs. The samples were collected from different districts in the period of 2008-2014 from North Sumatera province. Two pairs of primer were designed to amplify ORF7 of Type 1 and 2 PRRSV based on the sequence of reference viruses VR2332 and Lelystad. Viral RNAs were extracted from samples using PureLink™ micro-to-Midi total RNA purification system (Invitrogen). To amplify the ORF7 of PRRSV, the synthesis cDNA and DNA amplification were performed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR method. Then the DNA sequencing of PCR products and phylogenetic analysis were accomplished by molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 6.0 software program. Results: RT-: PCR and nested PCR used in this study had successfully detected of 18 samples positive PRRS virus with the amplification products at 703bp and 508bp, respectively. Sequencing of the ORF7 shows that 18 PRRS viruses isolated from North Sumatera belonged to North American (NA). JXA1 Like and classic NA type viruses. Several mutations were detected, particularly in the area of nuclear localization signal (NLS1) and in NLS2. In the local viruses, which were related closed to JXA1 virus; there are two differences in amino acids in position 12 and 43 of ORF7. Our tested viruses showed that the amino acid positions 12 and 43 are Asparagine and Arginine, while the reference virus (VR2332, Lelystad, and JXA1) occupied both by Lysine. Based on differences in two amino acids at position 12 and 43 showed that viruses from North Sumatera has its own uniqueness and related closed to highly pathogenic PRRS (HP-PRRS) virus (JXA1). Conclusion: The results demonstrated that North Sumatera

  14. The protean ocular involvement in monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Bascherini, Vittoria; Granato, Carmela; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Emmi, Giacomo; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; Bacherini, Daniela; Franceschini, Rossella; Iannone, Florenzo; Salerni, Annabella; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Frediani, Bruno; Selmi, Carlo; Rigante, Donato; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-07-01

    Ocular involvement is frequent in the monogenic autoinflammatory disorders and generally occurs as spontaneously recurring inflammatory events at different ocular sites caused by the aberrant release of proinflammatory cytokines, mainly IL-1β. Over the past decade, we witnessed a significant growth of eye abnormalities associated with idiopathic granulomatous disorders, familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome. The pathogenetic mechanisms of these disorders have shown the evidence of disrupted cytokine signaling, but the explanation for the heterogeneous ocular involvement remains to be elucidated. We herein review the monogenic autoinflammatory disorders affecting the eye, describing their main clinical features with specific regard to the ocular involvement, which can lead to decreased visual acuity and even blindness, if the primary disorder is undetected or left untreated.

  15. Hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) due to compound heterozygosity for G336S and V377I in a 44-year-old patient with a 27-year history of fever.

    PubMed

    Schlabe, Stefan; Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Lohse, Peter; Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt

    2016-11-29

    Hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes are a rare, but notable cause of fever of unknown origin. During the last few years, the knowledge of the genetic background has significantly increased. Here, we report a novel pathogenic mutation in the MVK gene as the cause of fever in a 44-year-old male patient with a history of fever over a period of 27 years.

  16. [PFAPA syndrome].

    PubMed

    André, Suzete Costa Anjos; Vales, Fernando; Cardoso, Eduardo; Santos, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis and aphthous stomatitis. The bouts of fever can last for days or even weeks. Between crises, patients remain asymptomatic for variable periods. It appears before the age of five and has limited duration (4-8 years). Its aetiopathogeny is unknown. Corticoids are the treatment of choice. Tonsillectomy has been proposed as a solution but remains controversial. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with PFAPA syndrome who underwent tonsillectomy in January, 2008, and we review the literature.

  17. Clinical Features and Genetic Background of the Periodic Fever Syndrome with Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenitis: A Single Center Longitudinal Study of 81 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perko, Daša; Debeljak, Maruša; Toplak, Nataša; Avčin, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory disorder in childhood with unknown etiology. The aim of our study was clinical evaluation of PFAPA patients from a single tertiary care center and to determine whether variations of AIM2, MEFV, NLRP3, and MVK genes are involved in PFAPA pathogenesis. Clinical and laboratory data of consecutive patients with PFAPA syndrome followed up at the University Children's Hospital, Ljubljana, were collected from 2008 to 2014. All four genes were PCR amplified and directly sequenced. Eighty-one patients fulfilled criteria for PFAPA syndrome, 50 (63%) boys and 31 (37%) girls, with mean age at disease onset of 2.1 ± 1.5 years. Adenitis, pharyngitis, and aphthae were present in 94%, 98%, and 56%, respectively. Family history of recurrent fevers in childhood was positive in 78%. Nineteen variants were found in 17/62 (27%) patients, 4 different variants in NLRP3 gene in 13 patients, and 6 different variants in MEFV gene in 5 patients, and 2 patients had 2 different variants. No variants of clinical significance were found in MVK and AIM2 genes. Our data suggest that PFAPA could be the result of multiple low-penetrant variants in different genes in combination with epigenetic and environmental factors leading to uniform clinical picture. PMID:25821352

  18. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: concept and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary "periodic fever syndromes", familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) and 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency.

  19. NLRP3 inflammasome and its inhibitors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Bo-Zong; Xu, Zhe-Qi; Han, Bin-Ze; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Chong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are newly recognized, vital players in innate immunity. The best characterized is the NLRP3 inflammasome, so-called because the NLRP3 protein in the complex belongs to the family of nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) and is also known as “pyrin domain-containing protein 3”. The NLRP3 inflammasome is associated with onset and progression of various diseases, including metabolic disorders, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndrome, as well as other auto-immune and auto-inflammatory diseases. Several NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors have been described, some of which show promise in the clinic. The present review will describe the structure and mechanisms of activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, its association with various auto-immune and auto-inflammatory diseases, and the state of research into NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors. PMID:26594174

  20. Autoinflammatory Skin Disorders: The Inflammasomme in Focus.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Prajwal; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-07-01

    Autoinflammatory skin disorders are a group of heterogeneous diseases that include diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Therapeutic strategies targeting IL-1 cytokines have proved helpful in ameliorating some of these diseases. While inflammasomes are the major regulators of IL-1 cytokines, inflammasome-independent complexes can also process IL-1 cytokines. Herein, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of how IL-1 cytokines, stemming from inflammasome-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in the regulation of skin conditions. Importantly, we discuss several mouse models of skin inflammation generated to help elucidate the basic cellular and molecular effects and modulation of IL-1 in the skin. Such models offer perspectives on how these signaling pathways could be targeted to improve therapeutic approaches in the treatment of these rare and debilitating inflammatory skin disorders.

  1. NLRP3 inflammasome and its inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Shao, Bo-Zong; Xu, Zhe-Qi; Han, Bin-Ze; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Chong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are newly recognized, vital players in innate immunity. The best characterized is the NLRP3 inflammasome, so-called because the NLRP3 protein in the complex belongs to the family of nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) and is also known as "pyrin domain-containing protein 3". The NLRP3 inflammasome is associated with onset and progression of various diseases, including metabolic disorders, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndrome, as well as other auto-immune and auto-inflammatory diseases. Several NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors have been described, some of which show promise in the clinic. The present review will describe the structure and mechanisms of activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, its association with various auto-immune and auto-inflammatory diseases, and the state of research into NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors.

  2. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  3. [The clinical estimation of ketoprofen lysine salt effect on the intensitivity of acute pain syndrome in the oral cavity during surgical procedures and postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Durnovo, E A; Shashurina, S V; Bespalova, N A; Khomutinnikova, N E; Gliavina, I A; Marochkina, M S; Iartseva, A V

    2013-01-01

    Is studying and control of the clinical efficacy and safety of ketoprofen lysine salt (КLS) (the commercial name is "Oki" manufacturer by Dompe CPA, Italy) in the form of sachets and solutions for application in postoperative period after dental surgeries procedures. The comparison of the analgetic effect of systemic and local forms of the "Oki" drug, depending on the type and extent of surgery procedures. Was carried out surgical treatment and patients examination in the postoperative period. Surgical procedures included: vestibulolasty, vestibulolasty with apically-displaced flap, vestibulolasty with apically-displaced flap and a free palatal mucogingival graft, removal impacted and dystopic teeth, periodontal surgery. The research was conducted in the Surgical stomatology and Maxillofacial surgery Department (stomatological policlinic of the Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy). Was noted rapid advanced of anesthesia when using sachets and solutions of the ketoprofen lysine salt (the commercial name is "Oki" manufacturer by Dompe CPA, Italy) in postoperative period after dental surgical procedures. Was noted a more advanced of analgetic effect in the application therapy by DCI solution when open surgical wound presented. Analgetic effect was observed after 20-30 min and was maintained in the postoperative period to an average of 8 hours. Local application sachets and solution of the ketoprofen lysine salt (KLS ), in our opinion, is the most appropriate and is highly effective when open surgical wound presented. Ketoprofen lysine salt (KLS) has a neutral pH and does not irritate the gastrointestinal tract, that determines the safety of its used.

  4. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a spatio-temporal analysis of cases reported in the period 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Alves, André T J; Nobre, Flávio F

    2014-05-01

    Despite increased funding for research on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), neither vaccine nor cure is yet in sight. Surveillance and prevention are essential for disease intervention, and it is recognised that spatio-temporal analysis of AIDS cases can assist the decision-making process for control of the disease. This study investigated the dynamic, spatial distribution of notified AIDS cases in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2001 and 2010, based on the annual incidence in each municipality. Sequential choropleth maps were developed and used to analyse the incidence distribution and Moran's I spatial autocorrelation statistics was applied for characterisation of the spatio-temporal distribution pattern. A significant, positive spatial autocorrelation of AIDS incidence was observed indicating that municipalities with high incidence are likely to be close to other municipalities with similarly high incidence and, conversely, municipalities with low incidence are likely to be surrounded by municipalities with low incidence. Two clusters were identified; one hotspot related to the State Capital and the other with low to intermediate AIDS incidence comprising municipalities in the north-eastern region of the State of Rio de Janeiro.

  5. Elevated levels of CXCL10 in the Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and cervical Adenitis syndrome (PFAPA) during and between febrile episodes; an indication of a persistent activation of the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and cervical Adenitis syndrome (PFAPA) is the most common periodic fever syndrome in childhood. Clinically, PFAPA may resemble autoinflammatory diseases, but the etiology is not fully understood. Methods We measured inflammatory proteins in plasma and hematologic parameters in children with PFAPA during and between febrile episodes, and in a control group with suspected bacterial pneumonia. In children with PFAPA, a first blood sample was taken within 24 hours of a febrile episode and a second sample between episodes. In children with pneumonia, the first sample was taken shortly after admission and a second sample after full recovery. Results A total of 22 children with PFAPA and 14 children with pneumonia were included. In children with PFAPA, levels of interleukin (IL) 6, CXCL10 and CCL4 were significantly increased during febrile episodes. The levels of IL-6 and CXCL10 were higher in children with PFAPA during febrile episodes than in children with pneumonia. The levels of CXCL10 remained higher in children with PFAPA between febrile episodes compared to children with pneumonia after recovery. Children with PFAPA had a relative eosinopenia and lymphocytopenia with reduced numbers of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during febrile episodes. This pattern was not observed in the children with pneumonia. Conclusions The results indicate an innate immune response as the initial step in PFAPA, and a subsequent adaptive response with activation and redistribution of T cells. Moreover, an activation of the innate immune system involving CXCL10 may persist between febrile episodes. CXCL10 may be a possibly clinical marker in children with PFAPA. PMID:24134207

  6. A Comparison of Sexual Function in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Whose Mothers Had PCOS During Their Pregnancy Period with Those Without PCOS.

    PubMed

    Noroozzadeh, Mahsa; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Bahri Khomami, Mahnaz; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-01-09

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women during reproductive ages. Clinical symptoms associated with PCOS, such as hirsutism, acne, alopecia, obesity, and infertility, may lead to emotional morbidity and then impaired sexual function in those affected. During intrauterine development, the fetus may program the development of diseases during adulthood. In this study, we aimed to examine sexual function in women with PCOS, exposed to maternal androgen excess during their prenatal life compared to non-exposed PCOS patients. In this cross-sectional study, 768 married women with PCOS, aged 18-49 years, were subdivided into two groups, based on their mothers' PCOS status: women whose mothers had PCOS (N = 94) and women whose mothers did not have PCOS (N = 674). Data were collected using a questionnaire including information on demographics, anthropometric and reproductive characteristics, and the Female Sexual Function Index. Blood serum samples were collected from patients for assessment of total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Results revealed that sexual dysfunction was significantly higher in PCOS women whose mothers also had PCOS, compared to those whose mothers did not (38.6 vs. 25.3%, p = .01). After adjusting for confounding variables, logistic regression analysis showed that odds ratios for sexual dysfunction (total) and sexual dysfunction in the pain domain were significantly higher in the exposed PCOS women versus the non-exposed women (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.06-3.07, p = .02 and 1.68, 95% CI 1.01-2.77, p = .04, respectively). Our study demonstrates increased sexual dysfunction in PCOS women whose mothers also had PCOS.

  7. Cushing's Syndrome in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Cushing’s Syndrome in Children by Meg Keil, MS, CRNP How is Cushing’s syndrome (CS) in children different than in adults? · CS in children is rare. An estimated ... child or adolescent during this period. Editor’s Note: Meg Keil,MS, CRNP is a nurse practitioner at ...

  8. Second-Impact Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sarah; Battin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS.…

  9. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of days after the last one. The Menstrual Cycle Most girls get their first period between the ... to skip periods or to have an irregular menstrual cycle. Illness, rapid weight change, or stress can also ...

  10. [Syndromes 2. Pfeiffer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Freihofer, H P

    1998-07-01

    Acrocephalosyndactylias are syndromes characterized by abnormalities of the head (craniosynostosis), the face (hypertelorism, retromaxillism), hands and feet (cutaneous or bony syndactyly). Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but spontaneous cases are described also. The group is divided into several syndromes with varying penetrance and expressivity. As an example of an acrocephalosyndactylia is the Pfeiffer syndrome presented.

  11. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system ( ... over a period of weeks and then stabilize. Guillain-Barre can be hard to diagnose. Possible tests include ...

  12. Moebius Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ...

  13. [Fryns syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heljić, Suada; Terzić, Sabina; Dzinović, Amra; Mackić, Mirela

    2006-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is an extremely rare developmental disorder associated with deletion of long arm of chromosome 16. Characteristics of the Fyns syndrome are: craniofacial dysmorfism, diaphragmatic defects with lung hypoplasia, distal digital hypoplasia, brain and urogenital abnormalities and other developmental disturbances. After the first description in two stillborn sisters by Fryns (1971), new reports appeared with descriptions included disorders which have not described previously. We described a case of female live born with deletion of long arm of chromosome 16. Our patient had a typical craniofacial dysmorfism, brain abnormalities (Dandy Walker malformation), cardiac defects (artial septal defect and persistent ductus arteriosus), renal hypoplasia, gastrointestinal problems, hypotonia and feeding difficulties. Our patient had no diaphragmatic hernia and he survived neonatal period with severe neurological impairment.

  14. The Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder in Adults—An Update for 2012: Practice Parameters with an Evidence-Based Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Kristo, David A.; Bista, Sabin R.; Rowley, James A.; Zak, Rochelle S.; Casey, Kenneth R.; Lamm, Carin I.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Rosenberg, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed to update the previous AASM practice parameters on the treatments, both dopaminergic and other, of RLS and PLMD. A considerable amount of literature has been published since these previous reviews were performed, necessitating an update of the corresponding practice parameters. Therapies with a STANDARD level of recommendation include pramipexole and ropinirole. Therapies with a GUIDELINE level of recommendation include levodopa with dopa decarboxylase inhibitor, opioids, gabapentin enacarbil, and cabergoline (which has additional caveats for use). Therapies with an OPTION level of recommendation include carbamazepine, gabapentin, pregabalin, clonidine, and for patients with low ferritin levels, iron supplementation. The committee recommends a STANDARD AGAINST the use of pergolide because of the risks of heart valve damage. Therapies for RLS secondary to ESRD, neuropathy, and superficial venous insufficiency are discussed. Lastly, therapies for PLMD are reviewed. However, it should be mentioned that because PLMD therapy typically mimics RLS therapy, the primary focus of this review is therapy for idiopathic RLS. Citation: Aurora RN; Kristo DA; Bista SR; Rowley JA: Zak RS; Casey KR; Lamm CI; Tracy SL; Rosenberg RS. The treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults—an update for 2012: practice parameters with an evidence-based systematic review and meta-analyses. SLEEP 2012;35(8):1039-1062. PMID:22851801

  15. Period Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may also have other symptoms, such as lower back pain, nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. Period pain is not ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  16. Periodized wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossnagle, G.; Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.

    1993-12-01

    The properties of periodized Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and contrasted against their counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrate by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of periodized wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and several tabulated values are included.

  17. Dressler's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome may also be called postpericardiotomy syndrome, post-myocardial infarction syndrome and post-cardiac injury syndrome. With recent ... Dressler's syndrome. References LeWinter MM. Pericardial complications of myocardial infarction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 27, ...

  18. Role of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and TNFRSF1A R92Q mutation in the pathogenesis of TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Caminero, A; Comabella, M; Montalban, X

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that tumour necrosis factor (TNF)/TNFRSF1A signalling is involved in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Different genetic and clinical findings over the last few years have generated renewed interest in this relationship. This paper provides an update on these recent findings. Genome-wide association studies have identified the R92Q mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene as a genetic risk factor for MS (odds ratio 1·6). This allele, which is also common in the general population and in other inflammatory conditions, therefore only implies a modest risk for MS and provides yet another piece of the puzzle that defines the multiple genetic risk factors for this disease. TNFRSF1A mutations have been associated with an autoinflammatory disease known as TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Clinical observations have identified a group of MS patients carrying the R92Q mutation who have additional TRAPS symptoms. Hypothetically, the co-existence of MS and TRAPS or a co-morbidity relationship between the two could be mediated by this mutation. The TNFRSF1A R92Q mutation behaves as a genetic risk factor for MS and other inflammatory diseases, including TRAPS. Nevertheless, this mutation does not appear to be a severity marker of the disease, neither modifying the clinical progression of MS nor its therapeutic response. An alteration in TNF/TNFRS1A signalling may increase proinflammatory signals; the final clinical phenotype may possibly be determined by other genetic or environmental modifying factors that have not yet been identified. PMID:22059991

  19. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  20. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, polycystic ovary syndrome can cause menstrual disturbances, weight gain beginning in adolescence, excess hair growth, and impaired insulin action and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome-a combination of ...

  1. Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    and require heart surgery in the neonatal period. Newborns with Jacobsen syndrome may have difficulties in feeding and tube feeding may be necessary. Special attention should be devoted due to hematological problems. About 20% of children die during the first two years of life, most commonly related to complications from congenital heart disease, and less commonly from bleeding. For patients who survive the neonatal period and infancy, the life expectancy remains unknown.

  2. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  3. Muckle-Wells cryopyrinopathy: complex phenotyping and response to therapy in a new multiplex kindred.

    PubMed

    Headley, Alexander P; Cordingley, Frank; Hawkins, Phillip N; Riminton, D Sean

    2014-04-01

    Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is a member of the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome family of auto-inflammatory diseases, originally described as a triad of urticaria, sensorineural deafness and amyloidosis. IL-1 blockade is a proven therapy for MWS. The clinical, laboratory and genotypic characteristics of a novel kindred of five individuals with Muckle-Wells syndrome are described. Response to IL-1 blockade therapy in the proband was evaluated. All five affected family members experienced symptoms of multi-organ inflammation. Lead time between symptom onset and diagnosis was approximately 30 years in the proband. Fever was not a universal feature in all affected family members. Anti-IL-1 therapy in the proband resulted in improvements in patient-reported symptoms, inflammatory markers, auditory acuity and reversal of her infertility. Muckle-Wells syndrome is a rare, multisystem, auto-inflammatory syndrome. Delay in diagnosis prevents effective treatment. We propose reversal of infertility to be among the potential benefits of IL-1 inhibition in this disease.

  4. The fresco of autoinflammatory diseases from the pediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato

    2012-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are genetic or acquired clinical entities globally caused by the aberrant release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 and mostly characterized by recurrent spontaneous inflammatory events which do not produce antigen-specific T cells or autoantibodies. Within the past decade, the list of autoinflammatory diseases has included cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, hereditary pyogenic disorders, pediatric granulomatous autoinflammatory diseases, idiopathic febrile syndromes, complement dysregulation syndromes and Behçet's disease. Most of these conditions interact with the inflammasomes, intracellular molecular complexes coordinating the phylogenetically ancient response of the innate immune system. The pathogenetic mechanisms of these diseases have shown the evidence of disrupted interleukin-1 signaling for most of them and allowed to locate interleukin-1 as an attractive therapeutic target. The whole fresco of autoinflammatory diseases in pediatrics will be discussed in this review with the aim of establishing both diagnostic clues and treatments for each condition.

  5. Thyroid Function in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the thyroid function of 181 patients (mean age 14 years) with Down's syndrome and found more thyroid dysfunctions than in the general population. Periodic thyroid hormone function tests are recommended for Down's syndrome individuals, especially as they get older. (Author/DB)

  6. An Up-to-date Approach to a Patient with a Suspected Autoinflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lidar, Merav; Giat, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases (AID) are characterized by seemingly unprovoked self-limited attacks of fever and systemic inflammation potentially leading to amyloidosis. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common AID and therefore the most studied. Besides FMF, the other main hereditary AID are tumor necrosis factor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), and cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndrome (CAPS). These hereditary diseases result from a mutant gene that is involved in the regulation of inflammation, resulting in a characteristic clinical phenotype. The differential diagnosis of AID can be challenging due to a wide overlap in clinical manifestations. Moreover, a considerable proportion of patients present with autoinflammatory symptoms but without a pathogenetic variant on genetic analysis. Furthermore, non-hereditary AID, such as the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, which is the most common AID in children worldwide, must be excluded in certain circumstances. Herein we shall review the main AID and describe a practical approach to diagnosis in a patient with a clinical suspicion of AID. PMID:28178435

  7. An Up-to-date Approach to a Patient with a Suspected Autoinflammatory Disease.

    PubMed

    Lidar, Merav; Giat, Eitan

    2017-01-30

    Autoinflammatory diseases (AID) are characterized by seemingly unprovoked self-limited attacks of fever and systemic inflammation potentially leading to amyloidosis. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common AID and therefore the most studied. Besides FMF, the other main hereditary AID are tumor necrosis factor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), and cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndrome (CAPS). These hereditary diseases result from a mutant gene that is involved in the regulation of inflammation, resulting in a characteristic clinical phenotype. The differential diagnosis of AID can be challenging due to a wide overlap in clinical manifestations. Moreover, a considerable proportion of patients present with autoinflammatory symptoms but without a pathogenetic variant on genetic analysis. Furthermore, non-hereditary AID, such as the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, which is the most common AID in children worldwide, must be excluded in certain circumstances. Herein we shall review the main AID and describe a practical approach to diagnosis in a patient with a clinical suspicion of AID.

  8. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Alam, Tausif; Sollinger, Hans

    2014-09-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome is a rare disease with a prevalence of ∼0.012%. The most prominent clinical features include periods of severe intermittent or persistent unilateral or bilateral loin pain accompanied by either microscopic or gross hematuria. Patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome initially present with hematuria, flank pain, or most often both hematuria and flank pain. Kidney biopsies from patients with loin pain hematuria typically reveal only minor pathologic abnormalities. Further, loin pain hematuria syndrome is not associated with loss of kidney function or urinary tract infections. Loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated hematuria and pain are postulated to be linked to vascular disease of the kidney, coagulopathy, renal vasospasm with microinfarction, hypersensitivity, complement activation on arterioles, venocalyceal fistula, abnormal ureteral peristalsis, and intratubular deposition of calcium or uric acid microcrystals. Many patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome also meet criteria for a somatoform disorder, and analgesic medications, including narcotics, commonly are used to treat loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated pain. Interventional treatments include renal denervation, kidney autotransplantation, and nephrectomy; however, these methods should be used only as a last resort when less invasive measures have been tried unsuccessfully. In this review article, we discuss and critique current clinical practices related to loin pain hematuria syndrome pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  9. Inflammasomes and dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Daniel Coelho; Festa Neto, Cyro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that comprise part of the innate immune response. Since their definition, inflammasome disorders have been linked to an increasing number of diseases. Autoinflammatory diseases refer to disorders in which local factors lead to the activation of innate immune cells, causing tissue damage when in the absence of autoantigens and autoantibodies. Skin symptoms include the main features of monogenic inflammasomopathies, such as Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS), Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF), Schnitzler Syndrome, Hyper-IgD Syndrome (HIDS), PAPA Syndrome, and Deficiency of IL-1 Receptor Antagonist (DIRA). Concepts from other pathologies have also been reviewed in recent years, such as psoriasis, after the recognition of a combined contribution of innate and adaptive immunity in its pathogenesis. Inflammasomes are also involved in the response to various infections, malignancies, such as melanoma, autoimmune diseases, including vitiligo and lupus erythematosus, atopic and contact dermatitis, acne, hidradenitis suppurativa, among others. Inhibition of the inflammasome pathway may be a target for future therapies, as already occurs in the handling of CAPS, through the introduction of IL-1 inhibitors. This study presents a literature review focusing on the participation of inflammasomes in skin diseases. PMID:27828627

  10. Inflammasomes and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sá, Daniel Coelho de; Festa, Cyro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that comprise part of the innate immune response. Since their definition, inflammasome disorders have been linked to an increasing number of diseases. Autoinflammatory diseases refer to disorders in which local factors lead to the activation of innate immune cells, causing tissue damage when in the absence of autoantigens and autoantibodies. Skin symptoms include the main features of monogenic inflammasomopathies, such as Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS), Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF), Schnitzler Syndrome, Hyper-IgD Syndrome (HIDS), PAPA Syndrome, and Deficiency of IL-1 Receptor Antagonist (DIRA). Concepts from other pathologies have also been reviewed in recent years, such as psoriasis, after the recognition of a combined contribution of innate and adaptive immunity in its pathogenesis. Inflammasomes are also involved in the response to various infections, malignancies, such as melanoma, autoimmune diseases, including vitiligo and lupus erythematosus, atopic and contact dermatitis, acne, hidradenitis suppurativa, among others. Inhibition of the inflammasome pathway may be a target for future therapies, as already occurs in the handling of CAPS, through the introduction of IL-1 inhibitors. This study presents a literature review focusing on the participation of inflammasomes in skin diseases.

  11. Clinical and biochemical landmarks in systemic autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Vitale, Antonio; Gianneramo, Valentina; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are a group of inherited disorders of the innate immune system characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammation recurring at variable intervals and involving skin, serosal membranes, joints, and gastrointestinal apparatus, with reactive amyloidosis as a possible severe long-term complication. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have improved our understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases, including familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, and hereditary pyogenic and granulomatous disorders: the vast majority of these conditions are related to the activation of the interleukin-1 pathway, which results in (or from?) a common unifying pathogenetic mechanism. Their diagnostic identification derives from the combination of clinical data, evaluation of acute phase reactants, clinical efficacy in response to specific drugs, and recognition of specific mutations in the relevant genes, although genetic tests may be unconstructive in some cases. This review will discuss clinical and laboratory clues useful for a diagnostic approach to systemic autoinflammatory diseases.

  12. The NLRP3 and Pyrin Inflammasomes: Implications in the Pathophysiology of Autoinflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    de Torre-Minguela, Carlos; Mesa del Castillo, Pablo; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that critically control different aspects of innate and adaptive immunity. Among them we could highlight the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines that induce and maintain the inflammatory response. Usually, inflammasomes result from oligomerization of a nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor (NLR) after sensing different pathogenic or endogenous sterile dangerous signals; however, other proteins such as absent in melanoma 2, retinoic acid-inducible gene I, or pyrin could also form inflammasome platforms. Inflammasome oligomerization leads to caspase-1 activation and the processing and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Mutations in different inflammasomes are causative for multiple periodic hereditary syndromes or autoinflammatory diseases, characterized by acute systemic inflammatory flares not associated with infections, tumors, or autoimmunity. This review focuses on germline mutations that have been described in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) for NLRP3 or in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and pyrin-associated autoinflammation with neutrophilic dermatosis (PAAND) for MEFV. Besides the implication of inflammasomes in autoinflammatory syndromes, these molecular platforms are involved in the pathophysiology of different illnesses, including chronic inflammatory diseases, degenerative processes, fibrosis, or metabolic diseases. Therefore, drug development targeting inflammasome activation is a promising field in expansion. PMID:28191008

  13. [Cyclic Cushing's Syndrome - rare or rarely recognized].

    PubMed

    Kiałka, Marta; Doroszewska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Sandra; Milewicz, Tomasz; Stochmal, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome is a type of Cushing's disease which is characterized by alternating periods of increasing and decreasing levels of cortisol in the blood. The diagnostic criteria for cyclic Cushing's syndrome are at least three periods of hypercortisolism alternating with at least two episodes of normal levels of serum cortisol concentration. The epidemiology, signs, symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment of cyclic Cushing's syndrome have been discussed.

  14. Genetics of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Groop, L

    2000-03-01

    The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors such as abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance in the same persons has been called the metabolic or insulin-resistance syndrome. In 1998 WHO proposed a unifying definition for the syndrome and chose to call it the metabolic syndrome rather than the insulin-resistance syndrome. Although insulin resistance has been considered as a common denominator for the different components of the syndrome, there is still debate as to whether it is pathogenically involved in all of the different components of the syndrome. Clustering of the syndrome in families suggests a genetic component. It is plausible that so-called thrifty genes, which have ensured optimal storage of energy during periods of fasting, could contribute to the phenotype of the metabolic syndrome. Common variants in a number of candidate genes influencing fat and glucose metabolism can probably, together with environmental triggers, increase susceptibility to the syndrome. Among these, the genes for beta 3-adrenergic receptor, hormone-sensitive lipase, lipoprotein lipase, IRS-1, PC-1, skeletal muscle glycogen synthase, etc. appear to increase the risk of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, novel genes may be identified by genome-wide searches.

  15. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  16. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease. Symptoms KIDNEYS With all types of Alport syndrome the kidneys are affected. The tiny blood vessels in the glomeruli of the kidneys are ...

  17. Reye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome has occurred in children who were given aspirin when they had chickenpox or the flu. Reye syndrome has become very rare. This is because aspirin is no longer recommended for routine use in ...

  18. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  19. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... will order several other tests like blood tests, EEG, and brain scans. How Is Tourette Syndrome Treated? ... connected to Tourette syndrome, like ADHD and anxiety. Stress or being upset can make the tics worse, ...

  20. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  1. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy ... can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do not cause early symptoms and are ...

  2. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Like for Kids With Marfan Syndrome? en español Síndrome de Marfan Evan couldn't wait for school ... for Marfan syndrome runs in families, getting passed down to children from parents who have the disease. ...

  3. Edwards' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  4. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift Matching Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome ... approved by the Proteus Syndrome Foundation Assessment and management of the orthopedic and other complications of Proteus ...

  5. Apert Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  6. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  7. Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalpana Kumari, M K; Kamath, Sulata; Mysorekar, Vijaya V; Nandini, G

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  8. Iliopsoas Syndrome in Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Catherine; Swanson, David; Garofolo, Garret; Rose, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coxa saltans refers to a constellation of diagnoses that cause snapping of the hip and is a major cause of anterior hip pain in dancers. When the internal type is accompanied by weakness or pain, it is referred to as iliopsoas syndrome. Iliopsoas syndrome is the result of repetitive active hip flexion in abduction and can be confused with other hip pathology, most commonly of labral etiology. Purpose: To report the incidence, clinical findings, treatment protocol, and results of treatment for iliopsoas syndrome in a population of dancers. Study Design: Retrospective case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A retrospective database review of 653 consecutive patients evaluated for musculoskeletal complaints over a 3-year period was completed. The diagnosis of iliopsoas syndrome was made based on anterior hip or groin pain, weakness with resisted hip flexion in abduction, or symptomatic clicking or snapping with a positive iliopsoas test. Patients identified with iliopsoas syndrome were further stratified according to age at time of onset, insidious versus acute onset, duration of symptoms, side of injury, presence of rest pain, pain with activities of daily living, and associated lower back pain. All patients diagnosed with iliopsoas syndrome underwent physical therapy, including hip flexor stretching and strengthening, pelvic mobilization, and modification of dance technique or exposure as required. Results: A total of 49 dancers were diagnosed and treated for iliopsoas syndrome. Within this injured population of 653 patients, the incidence in female dancers was 9.2%, significantly higher than that in male dancers (3.2%). The mean age at the time of injury was 24.6 years. The incidence of iliopsoas syndrome in dancers younger than 18 years was 12.8%, compared with 7% in dancers older than 18 years. Student dancers had the highest incidence (14%), followed by amateur dancers (7.5%), while professional dancers had the lowest incidence (4.6%). All

  9. [Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wisłowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is the most dangerous form of the antiphospholipid syndrome, which is characterized by rapid onset of thrombosis in small vessels of many organs and intravascular coagulation, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia. The syndrome develops over a short period of time with acute multi-organ failure, including kidney, respiratory, cardiovascular, central nervous system and adrenal glands, often associated with disseminated thrombotic microangiopathy. The catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome involves three or more systems, organs and/or tissues, the development of symptoms must occur within less than one week, it is necessary to confirm the histopathological vascular occlusion in at least one organ or tissue, and laboratory confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in the serum on two occasions over an interval of 12 weeks. This syndrome is characterized by a high mortality despite the use of optimal treatment. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of patients with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is essential to save the life of these patients. In the last 10 years, the mortality in this disease decreased from 50% to 30% with simultaneous treatment with anticoagulants, corticosteroids, plasmapheresis and immunoglobulins.

  10. A small-molecule inhibitor of the NLRP3 inflammasome for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Coll, Rebecca C; Robertson, Avril A B; Chae, Jae Jin; Higgins, Sarah C; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Inserra, Marco C; Vetter, Irina; Dungan, Lara S; Monks, Brian G; Stutz, Andrea; Croker, Daniel E; Butler, Mark S; Haneklaus, Moritz; Sutton, Caroline E; Núñez, Gabriel; Latz, Eicke; Kastner, Daniel L; Mills, Kingston H G; Masters, Seth L; Schroder, Kate; Cooper, Matthew A; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-01

    The NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a component of the inflammatory process, and its aberrant activation is pathogenic in inherited disorders such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) and complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. We describe the development of MCC950, a potent, selective, small-molecule inhibitor of NLRP3. MCC950 blocked canonical and noncanonical NLRP3 activation at nanomolar concentrations. MCC950 specifically inhibited activation of NLRP3 but not the AIM2, NLRC4 or NLRP1 inflammasomes. MCC950 reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in vivo and attenuated the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, MCC950 treatment rescued neonatal lethality in a mouse model of CAPS and was active in ex vivo samples from individuals with Muckle-Wells syndrome. MCC950 is thus a potential therapeutic for NLRP3-associated syndromes, including autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and a tool for further study of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human health and disease.

  11. A small molecule inhibitior of the NLRP3 inflammasome is a potential therapeutic for inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Rebecca C.; Robertson, Avril A. B.; Chae, Jae Jin; Higgins, Sarah C.; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Inserra, Marco C.; Vetter, Irina; Dungan, Lara S.; Monks, Brian G.; Stutz, Andrea; Croker, Daniel E.; Butler, Mark S.; Haneklaus, Moritz; Sutton, Caroline E.; Núñez, Gabriel; Latz, Eicke; Kastner, Daniel L.; Mills, Kingston H. G.; Masters, Seth L.; Schroder, Kate; Cooper, Matthew A.; O’Neill, Luke A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a component of the inflammatory process and its aberrant activation is pathogenic in inherited disorders such as the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) and complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. We describe the development of MCC950, a potent, selective, small molecule inhibitor of NLRP3. MCC950 blocks canonical and non-canonical NLRP3 activation at nanomolar concentrations. MCC950 specifically inhibits NLRP3 but not AIM2, NLRC4 or NLRP1 activation. MCC950 reduces Interleukin-1p (IL-1β) production in vivo and attenuates the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, MCC950 treatment rescues neonatal lethality in a mouse model of CAPS and is active in ex vivo samples from individuals with Muckle-Wells syndrome. MCC950 is thus a potential therapeutic for NLRP3-associated syndromes, including autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and a tool for the further study of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human health and disease. PMID:25686105

  12. Gardner-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Joyce H; Yagerman, Sarah; Feng, Hao; Kim, Randie H; Meehan, Shane A; Lewin, Jesse

    2016-12-15

    Gardner-Diamond syndrome, which also is knownas autoerythrocyte sensitization disorder, is a raresyndrome of inflammatory, edematous papulesthat evolve into painful ecchymoses on the trunkand lower legs after a period of stress with no priorhistory of trauma. This syndrome usually occurs inwomen with a history of psychiatric disorders, themost common one being depression. Although theexact mechanism of injury is not well understood,it is hypothesized that these patients haveautoantibodies to phosphatidylserine, which is aphospholipid membrane component in erythrocytes.Treatment for this disorder includes symptomatictherapies and psychotropic medications to treat theunderlying psychiatric disorder.

  13. From bench to bedside and back again: translational research in autoinflammation.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dirk; Kessel, Christoph; Omenetti, Alessia; Gattorno, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Translational research approaches brought major changes to the understanding and treatment options of autoinflammatory diseases. Patients with common complex multifactorial diseases such as systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), and particularly those with rare monogenic autoinflammatory diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) or TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), benefited from a deeper understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms and new treatment options emerging from preclinical studies. The study of IL-1 and IL-6 in this context led to novel therapies by forward translation. Conversely, effective treatment of sJIA and TRAPS with IL-1 blockade stimulated reverse translational efforts to study the pathophysiology of these cytokines in autoinflammatory diseases. These translational efforts led to the discovery of biomarkers such as S100 proteins, IL-18 or serum amyloid A, which are components of the inflammatory process, support diagnosis and allow for monitoring of disease activity, helping to predict patient outcomes. The ongoing characterization of autoinflammatory diseases in individual patients has led to classification into heterogeneous subgroups. Further characterization of relevant subgroups and the design of tailored treatment regimens, as well as the identification of new therapeutic targets and treatment options, are the major future challenges in the field of autoinflammatory diseases, particularly for paediatric rheumatologists.

  14. Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weir, Robin A P; Petrie, Colin J; Murday, Victoria; Findlay, Iain N

    2011-04-01

    Advances in the understanding of genetic aspects of cardiovascular diseases, together with an increase in the availability of genetic analysis, have resulted in not only increased diagnosis of known inherited conditions, but also the identification of novel syndromes. The combination of potassium-sensitive periodic paralysis, ventricular arrhythmias and dysmorphism, initially described by Andersen and Tawil, represents such a novel condition. We report a case in which genetic analysis led to the diagnosis of Andersen-Tawil syndrome after 15 years of protracted non-invasive and invasive investigations from initial presentation to ultimate diagnosis in a young female. In conclusion, we describe the clinical and genetic features of Andersen-Tawil syndrome and demonstrate the utility of genetic testing in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.

  15. Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  16. Overgrowth Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Andrew C.; Kalish, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall–Smith, Weaver, Simpson–Golabi–Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan–Riley–Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith–Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel–Trenaunay–Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  17. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  18. [Environmental factors in Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Abe, Takaaki; Kato, Satoshi

    2007-03-01

    This paper reviews what is currently known about the environmental factors in Asperger syndrome that is a neurodevelopmental disorder of genetic origins. Its characteristics tend to occur in families of those with the syndrome. The rate of complications during pregnancy or the neonatal period in the patients with Asperger syndrome was about the same as that in the control group. It is true that their involvement in their outer world could not influence the core social deficits very much. But it might facilitate the appearance of the second symptoms such as dissociation, anxiety, depression, persecutory delusion as well as antisocial behavior including serious criminal acts.

  19. Auto-inflammatory syndromes and oral health.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Hodgson, T; Lachmann, H

    2008-11-01

    Auto-inflammatory diseases (periodic syndromes) are rare childhood-onset disorders which are characterized by fluctuating or recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation affecting serosal surfaces, joints, eyes and/or skin without significant autoantibody production or an identifiable underlying infection. They are disorders of innate immunity and the underlying genetic defect has been identified in most of the syndromes. Diagnosis relies on clinical symptoms and evidence of an elevated acute phase response during attacks, supported by finding mutations in the relevant genes. Several syndromes can lead to systemic AA amyloidosis. Aphthous-like oral ulceration has been reported as one manifestation in several of the syndromes, including periodic fever, aphthous-stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenitis (PFAPA) familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome, tumour necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome and pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). Chronic jaw recurrent osteomyelitis has been recorded in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis. Advances in the molecular pathogenesis of these syndromes and the regulation of innate immunity have enhanced diagnosis, and rationalized therapies. This article reviews the periodic fever syndromes relevant to oral health and the suggested association of FMF with Behçet's disease.

  20. Clinical impact of concomitant immunomodulators on biologic therapy: Pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenhua; Davis, Hugh M; Zhou, Honghui

    2015-03-01

    Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases encompass a variety of different clinical syndromes, manifesting as either common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and psoriasis, or rare diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. The therapy for these diseases often involves the use of a wide range of drugs including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, immunomodulators, and biologic therapies. Due to the abundance of relevant clinical data, this article provides a general overview on the clinical impact of the concomitant use of immunomodulators and biologic therapies, with a focus on anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents (anti-TNFα), for the treatment of RA and Crohn's disease (CD). Compared to biologic monotherapy, concomitant use of immunomodulators (methotrexate, azathioprine, and 6-mercaptopurine) often increases the systemic exposure of the anti-TNFα agent and decreases the formation of antibodies to the anti-TNFα agent, consequently enhancing clinical efficacy. Nevertheless, long-term combination therapy with immunomodulators and anti-TNFα agents may be associated with increased risks of serious infections and malignancies. Therefore, the determination whether combination therapy is suitable for a patient should always be based on an individualized benefit-risk evaluation. More research should be undertaken to identify and validate prognostic markers for predicting patients who would benefit the most and those who are at greater risk from combination therapy with immunomodulators and anti-TNFα agents.

  1. Role of biologics in intractable urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Andrew; Bulkhi, Adeeb; Casale, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a common condition faced by many clinicians. CU has been estimated to affect approximately 0.5%–1% of the population, with nearly 20% of sufferers remaining symptomatic 20 years after onset. Antihistamines are the first-line therapy for CU. Unfortunately, nearly half of these patients will fail this first-line therapy and require other medication, including immune response modifiers or biologics. Recent advances in our understanding of urticarial disorders have led to more targeted therapeutic options for CU and other urticarial diseases. The specific biologic agents most investigated for antihistamine-refractory CU are omalizumab, rituximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Of these, the anti-IgE monoclonal antibody omalizumab is the best studied, and has recently been approved for the management of CU. Other agents, such as interleukin-1 inhibitors, have proved beneficial for Schnitzler syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), diseases associated with urticaria. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the efficacy of biologics in antihistamine-refractory CU. PMID:25926715

  2. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Edward; Pross, Hugh

    1992-01-01

    To determine the effect of certain herbal and homeopathic preparations on symptoms, lymphocyte markers, and cytotoxic function of the lymphocytes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, we studied six outpatients diagnosed with the disease by their family physicians. Patients were given herbal and homeopathic preparations after a 3-week symptom-recording period. After treatment, symptoms were again recorded. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment. None of the values showed any significant change after treatment. PMID:21221272

  3. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  4. Cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction in patients with heart failure and cardiovascular disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease are common. A recently proposed consensus definition of cardiorenal syndrome stresses the bidirectional nature of these heart-kidney interactions. The treatment of cardiorenal syndrome is challenging, however, promising new therapeutic options are currently being investigated in recent and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:20948701

  5. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents and caregivers should learn to help a person with Down syndrome deal with frustration. At the same time, it is important to encourage independence. Teen girls and women with Down syndrome are usually able to get pregnant. There is an increased risk of sexual abuse ...

  6. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... opportunity to exchange ideas, develop coping strategies and locate resources. Peer groups for girls with Turner syndrome can help reinforce your daughter's self-esteem and provide her with a social network of people who understand her experience with Turner syndrome. References ...

  7. Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at birth is often smaller than average. A child with Turner syndrome is much shorter than children who are the ... Growth hormone may help a child with Turner syndrome grow taller. ... started when the girl is 12 or 13 years old. These help trigger ...

  8. Syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Derderian, Christopher; Seaward, James

    2012-05-01

    Although most cases of craniosynostosis are nonsyndromic, craniosynostosis is known to occur in conjunction with other anomalies in well-defined patterns that make up clinically recognized syndromes. Patients with syndromic craniosynostoses are much more complicated to care for, requiring a multidisciplinary approach to address all of their needs effectively. This review describes the most common craniosynostosis syndromes, their characteristic features and syndrome-specific functional issues, and new modalities utilized in their management. General principles including skull development, the risk of developing increased intracranial pressure in craniosynostosis syndromes, and techniques to measure intracranial pressure are discussed. Evolving techniques of the established operative management of craniosynostosis are discussed together with more recent techniques including spring cranioplasty and posterior cranial vault distraction osteogenesis.

  9. Linburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, William R.J.; Muller, Hellmuth

    1998-01-01

    Objective To review the causes and demographics of Linburg syndrome. Design An illustrative case report and a demographic study. Setting Adult and pediatric orthopedic clinics at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg. Patients One patient with Linburg syndrome and 200 patients and relatives presenting to adult and pediatric orthopedic clinics with conditions not involving their hands, wrists or forearms. Outcome measures The presence of the intertendinous anomaly and of carpal tunnel syndrome. Results Tendinous connection(s) between flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles were found in 20% of the study population. The anomaly was found in all age groups. No association was found between Linburg syndrome and the presence of carpal tunnel syndrome or previous injury to the hand or forearm. Conclusion Tendinous connection between flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles is a common anomaly that rarely causes clinical symptoms. PMID:9711164

  10. Escobar syndrome mimicing congenital patellar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-08-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a syndrome that is characterized abnormal face, short length and skin pterygiums on some body legions (servical, antecubital, popliteal, interdigital and on neck). It is also called as Pterygium Colli syndrome, Escobar syndrome or Pterygium syndrome. Escobar (multyple pterygium) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome. Primarly autosomal resesive crossing are observed; also autosomal dominant and X-linked crossing. This case were presented as it has components of Escobar syndrome and Isolated Patellar Aplasia syndrome in same time.

  11. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-09-14

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors.

  12. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R.; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors. PMID:26365061

  13. [HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vigil-De Gracia, Paulino

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are one of the most common complications of pregnancy, but one of the most serious expressions of this pathology is HELLP syndrome. The HELLP syndrome is characterized by the presence of hypertension disorder more a triad: microangiopathic hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count. Patient with HELLP syndrome is associated with increased maternal risk complications such as: cerebral hemorrhage, retinal detachment, hematoma/ hepatic rupture, acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, placental abruption and therefore a maternal death. For all these reasons it is recommended to search for findings of HELLP syndrome in patients with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. The main clinical confusion of HELLP syndrome is acute fatty liver of pregnancy, however there are parameters that help correct identification. The presence of HELLP syndrome involves a rapid termination of pregnancy and the administration of corticosteroids does not improve maternal morbidity and mortality but may help raise the platelet count, thus decreasing the need for transfusion and shorten hospital stay. Much of the decline in maternal morbidity and mortality associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is in proper diagnosis and effective management of HELLP syndrome.

  14. Neuroacanthocytosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hans H; Danek, Adrian; Walker, Ruth H

    2011-10-25

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington's disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome) and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes. Differential diagnoses

  15. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benton, A L

    1992-05-01

    Recent case reports describe the occurrence of a more or less pure Gerstmann syndrome in association with a focal lesion in the posterior perisylvian territory of the brain's left hemisphere. In addition, an electrocortical stimulation study reported the Gerstmann symptom combination and a number of other symptom combinations on stimulation of small areas in the left posterior parietotemporal cortex. The neuropsychological implications of these and other recent findings are considered in light of the variety of "syndromes" produced by lesions in this region, the rare occurrence of Gerstmann's syndrome, and its appearance as a consequence of lesions in diverse cerebral areas.

  16. Rapunzel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Altonbary, Ahmed Youssef; Bahgat, Monir Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Bezoars are concretions of human or vegetable fibers that accumulate in the gastrointestinal tract. Trichobezoars are common in patients with underlying psychiatric disorders who chew and swallow their own hair. Rapunzel syndrome is a rare form of gastric trichobezoar with a long tail extending into the small bowel. This syndrome was first described in 1968 by Vaughan et al. and since then till date just 64 cases have been described in the literature. We present the only documented case with Rapunzel syndrome in Egypt. PMID:27847892

  17. Guillain-Barré Syndrome Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education » Fact Sheets Guillain-Barré Syndrome Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... Information Page NINDS Epilepsy Information Page NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page NINDS Farber's Disease Information Page ...

  18. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem. PMID:22927862

  19. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  20. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the development of the egg, sperm or embryo. Translocation Down syndrome is the only form of ... risk of passing along certain genetic conditions. The embryo is tested for genetic abnormalities before it's implanted ...

  1. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  2. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hunter syndrome is a disease in which long chains of sugar molecules (glycosaminoglycans, formerly called mucopolysaccharides ) are ... of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase. Without this enzyme, chains of sugar molecules build up in various body ...

  3. Horner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... birth Tumor of the hormonal and nervous systems (neuroblastoma) Unknown causes In some cases the cause of ... a tumor of the hormonal and nervous systems (neuroblastoma). There's no specific treatment for Horner syndrome. Often, ...

  4. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person is concentrating (like working on a computer) or relaxing (like listening to music). The type ... doctor who knows a lot about the nervous system). All kids who have Tourette syndrome have tics — ...

  5. Reye's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms such as confusion, seizures and loss of consciousness require emergency treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment of ... which can cause seizures, convulsions or loss of consciousness. The signs and symptoms of Reye's syndrome typically ...

  6. Tourette syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines are available to treat Tourette syndrome. The exact medicine that is used depends on the symptoms ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  7. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in different parts of the body) can cause similar problems with cortisol balance. Common symptoms of Cushing's syndrome include upper body obesity, severe fatigue and muscle weakness, high blood pressure, ...

  8. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  9. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help improve skills. They may include speech, physical, occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many people with Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  10. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that your adrenal gland makes. Sometimes, ... can cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper ...

  11. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... make ribosomal proteins) This condition is similar to Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and the 2 conditions should not ... chromosome 19 is found in some people with Diamond-Blackfan anemia. The anemia in Aase syndrome is ...

  12. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... do before that she or he can no longer do? How severe are your child's signs and ... as children become older — it's usually necessary throughout life. Treating Rett syndrome requires a team approach. Treatments ...

  13. Caplan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with rheumatoid arthritis who have breathed in mining dust that contains coal. This lung disease is ... Caplan syndrome is caused by breathing in coal mining dust. This causes inflammation and can lead to ...

  14. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a condition in which your body's connective tissue is abnormal. Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It ... and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects the connective tissue of the heart and blood vessels, eyes, bones, ...

  15. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, and other organs. One of these proteins is fibrillin. A problem with the ...

  16. Marfan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue. This is the tissue that strengthens the body's structures. Disorders of connective tissue affect the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, eyes, and ...

  17. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? In the more severely affected cases of Brown ... acquired and congenital cases. In congenital cases, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  18. Carcinoid syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... things such as blue cheese, chocolate, or red wine. Exams and Tests Most of these tumors are ... outlook is more favorable thanks to new treatment methods. Possible Complications Complications of carcinoid syndrome may include: ...

  19. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sciatic nerve. The syndrome, which affects more women than men, is uncommon. But when it occurs, it can cause sciatica . Causes The piriformis muscle is involved in nearly every movement you make with your lower body, from walking ...

  20. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... will probably do some painless exams — like taking measurements of the body, including an arm span. You ... doors" inside the heart that help direct the flow of blood). In someone with Marfan syndrome, those ...

  1. Metabolic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity ). This body type may be described as "apple-shaped." Insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced ... Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  2. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  3. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menkes syndrome, cells in the body can absorb copper, but they are unable to release it. It ... makes it hard for the body to distribute copper in food from the intestines into the bloodstream ...

  4. Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Eesha; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue, with skeletal, ligamentous, orooculofacial, pulmonary, abdominal, neurological and the most fatal, cardiovascular manifestations. It has no cure but early diagnosis, regular monitoring and preventive lifestyle regimen ensure a good prognosis. However, the diagnosis can be difficult as it is essentially a clinical one, relying on family history, meticulous physical examination and investigation of involved organ systems. Patients of Marfan syndrome portray very typical physical and orofacial characteristics, suggesting obvious recognition, but due to variable phenotypic expression, cases often go unnoticed unless a full range of attributing features is apparent. Dental practitioners are very likely to encounter patients of Marfan syndrome at an early age as they frequently present for dental treatment. The present case report illustrates the preliminary screening of Marfan syndrome in a dental office followed by timely diagnosis and appropriate referrals. PMID:24336584

  5. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone therapy may be prescribed. This can help: Grow body hair Improve appearance of muscles Improve concentration Improve mood and self esteem Increase energy and sex drive Increase strength Most men with this syndrome are not able to get ...

  6. Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to developing cavities if your mouth is dry. Yeast infections. People with Sjogren's syndrome are much more likely to develop oral thrush, a yeast infection in the mouth. Vision problems. Dry eyes ...

  7. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have many of the skeletal (bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments ... appearance to the top of the ear Aortic enlargement and/or mitral valve regurgitation (occasionally) People with ...

  8. [Mobius syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  9. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... turnersyndrome. html • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development (NIH): www. nichd. nih. gov/ health/ topics/ Turner_ Syndrome. cfm • Mayo Clinic: www. mayoclinic. com/ health/ turner- ...

  10. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Cushing syndrome have: Round, red, full face ( moon face ) Slow growth rate (in children) Weight gain ... constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial ...

  11. [Periodic fever: a description of twelve patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA)].

    PubMed

    De Cunto, Carmen; Britos, María; Eymann, Alfredo; Deltetto, Noelia; Liberatore, Diana

    2010-10-01

    PFAPA is a periodic fever syndrome characterized by: fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis. It is one of the autoinflammatory syndromes, but yet of unknown etiology. Our aim is to report our experience, describe clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, relapses occurrence and response to treatment. We present 12 PFAPA patients. Median age at onset: 1.15 years, mean duration of febrile episodes: 4 days, and relapses at regular intervals. All children received prednisone (1-2 mg/kg/dose) one to two doses, 9 patients responded immediately after the first dose and all experienced a lower periodicity of attacks. PFAPA is the most frequent periodic fever syndrome. To our knowledge, there are no other local series of PFAPA patients published. Recognizing this syndrome will prevent from ordering unnecessary studies and will favor family coping.

  12. [HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Ewa; Staszków, Monika

    2015-01-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count) is a relatively rare complication of pregnancy. It usually develops in the IIId trimester or after delivery. HELLP syndrome is associated with increased maternal (placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hepatic hematomas and rupture, and acute kidney injury) and neonatal (prematurity, low birth weight) risk complications. In this article the diagnosis, clinical picture and treatment of this disease have been shortly reviewed.

  13. SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D

    2013-05-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a disorder characterized by Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis. As the osteoarticular and skin manifestations often do not occur simultaneously and there are no validated diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical and imaging investigation is necessary to establish the many differential diagnoses of SAPHO syndrome. The etiopathogenesis involves infectious (probably Propionibacterium acnes), immunologic, and genetic factors. Treatment is based on information gathered from case reports and small series, and is related to specific skin or articular symptoms.

  14. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-26

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS-MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype-phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments.

  15. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Periodic paralysis - hypokalemic; Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis; HOKPP; HypoKPP; HypoPP ... is not inherited. Unlike other forms of periodic paralysis, people with hypoPP have normal thyroid function. But ...

  16. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Periodic paralysis - hyperkalemic; Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis; HyperKPP; HyperPP; Gamstorp disease ... factors include having other family members with periodic paralysis. It affects men more often than women.

  17. Cardiac Syndrome X

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  18. Russell-Silver syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... Organization for Rare Disorders -- rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/russell-silver-syndrome NIH/NLM Genetics Home Reference -- ghr. ...

  19. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome) is a memory disorder that results from vitamin B1 deficiency and is associated with alcoholism. Korsakoff's syndrome damages ... syndrome) is a memory disorder that results from vitamin B1 deficiency and is associated with alcoholism. Korsakoff's syndrome damages ...

  20. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  1. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods; Intermenstrual bleeding; Spotting; Metrorrhagia Images Female reproductive anatomy Bleeding between periods Uterus References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  2. A Case Report: Jacobsen Syndrome Complicated by Paris-Trousseau Syndrome and Shone's Complex.

    PubMed

    Malia, Laurie A; Wolkoff, Leslie I; Mnayer, Laila; Tucker, Joseph W; Parikh, Nehal S

    2015-10-01

    A preterm infant presenting with a congenital cardiac malformation and thrombocytopenia was found to have a karyotype showing a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 of the segment 11q24.1-11qter consistent with Jacobsen syndrome. The infant was later diagnosed with Paris-Trousseau syndrome, commonly associated with Jacobsen syndrome. Because children with cardiac malformations often require high-risk surgical procedures in the early neonatal period, those with platelet dysfunction require prompt identification at birth.

  3. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Kourilovitch, Maria R; Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M; Gaybor, Mariana; Cordero, Christian; Cabrera, Sonia; Soroka, Nikolai F

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pregnancy has a serious impact on maternal and fetal morbidity. It causes recurrent pregnancy miscarriage and it is associated with other adverse obstetric findings like preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome and others. The 2006 revised criteria, which is still valid, is used for APS classification. Epidemiology of obstetric APS varies from one population group to another largely due to different inclusion criteria and lack of standardization of antibody detection methods. Treatment is still controversial. This topic should include a multidisciplinary team and should be individualized. Success here is based on strict control and monitoring throughout pregnancy and even in the preconception and postpartum periods. Further research in this field and unification of criteria are required to yield better therapeutic strategies in the future.

  4. Cardiac surgery for a patient with Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Mitsugi; Higaki, Takashi; Seike, Yoshimasa; Yokoyama, Yuichiro

    2010-07-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome is an uncommon inherited autosomal disorder characterized by a prolonged QT interval, periodic paralysis, and dysmorphic features. The deleterious effects of cardioplegia on periodic paralysis and cardiac arrhythmia are unknown, and no studies have reported the performance of cardiac surgery in patients with Andersen-Tawil syndrome. We present a case of successful cardiac surgery in a patient with Andersen-Tawil syndrome, without using cardioplegia.

  5. PFAPA syndrome: a review on treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Vanoni, Federica; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Hofer, Michaël

    2016-06-27

    The syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA syndrome) is the most common cause of periodic fever in childhood. The current pharmacological treatment includes corticosteroids, which usually are efficacious in the management of fever episodes, colchicine, for the prophylaxis of febrile episodes, and other medication for which efficacy has not been proven so far. Tonsillectomy is an option for selected patients. Usually PFAPA syndrome resolves during adolescence, but there is increasing evidence that this condition may persist into adulthood.

  6. Prenatal Testing for Intellectual Disability: Misperceptions and Reality with Lessons from down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acharya, Kruti

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In the United States, it is recommended that prenatal testing for Down syndrome be offered to all women. Because of this policy and consequent public perception, having Down syndrome has become a disadvantage in the prenatal period. However, in the postnatal period, there may be…

  7. [Pregnancy and antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costedoat-Chalumeau, N; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Leguern, V; Leroux, G; Le Thi Huong, D; Wechsler, B; Morel, N; Vauthier-Brouzes, D; Dommergues, M; Cornet, A; Aumaître, O; Pourrat, O; Piette, J-C; Nizard, J

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is associated with a risk of obstetrical complications, affecting both the mother and the fetus. Obstetrical APS is defined by a history of three consecutive spontaneous miscarriages before 10 weeks of gestation (WG), an intra-uterine fetal death after 10 WG, or a premature birth before 34 WG because of severe pre-eclampsia, eclampsia or placental adverse outcomes (intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios). Pregnancy in women with a diagnosis of obstetric APS is at increased risk for placental abruption, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet count) syndrome and thrombosis that may be part of a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). A previous thrombosis and the presence of a lupus anticoagulant are risk factors for pregnancy failure. A multidisciplinary approach, associating the internist, the anesthesiologist and the obstetrician, is recommended for these high-risk pregnancies. Preconception counseling is proposed to identify pregnancy contraindications, and to define and adapt the treatment prior and during the upcoming pregnancy. Heparin and low-dose aspirin are the main treatments. The choice between therapeutic or prophylactic doses of heparin will depend on the patient's medical history. The anticoagulant therapeutic window for delivery should be as narrow as possible and adapted to maternal thrombotic risk. There is a persistent maternal risk in the postpartum period (thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, CAPS) justifying an antithrombotic coverage during this period. We suggest a monthly clinical and biological monitoring which can be more frequent towards the end of pregnancy. The persistence of notches at the Doppler-ultrasound evaluation seems to be the best predictor for a higher risk of placental vascular complications. Treatment optimization and multidisciplinary antenatal care improve the prognosis of pregnancies in women with obstetric APS, leading to a favorable outcome most of the time.

  8. Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? Since smoking is linked to the ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  9. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic condition. The gene linked to the syndrome is known as PTCH (" ...

  10. Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vogels, Annick; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  11. Preexcitation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2016-03-01

    The classic electrocardiogram in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by a short PR interval and prolonged QRS duration in the presence of sinus rhythm with initial slurring. The clinical syndrome associated with above electrocardiogram finding and the history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is referred to as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Various eponyms describing accessory or anomalous conduction pathways in addition to the normal pathway are collectively referred to as preexcitation syndromes. The latter form and associated eponyms are frequently used in literature despite controversy and disagreements over their actual anatomical existence and electrophysiological significance. This communication highlights inherent deficiencies in the knowledge that has existed since the use of such eponyms began. With the advent of curative ablation, initially surgical, and then catheter based, the knowledge gaps have been mostly filled with better delineation of the anatomic and electrophysiological properties of anomalous atrioventricular pathways. It seems reasonable, therefore, to revisit the clinical and electrophysiologic role of preexcitation syndromes in current practice.

  12. Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keleştimur, Fahrettin

    2003-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome occurs as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. It may be rarely seen without massive bleeding or after normal delivery. Improvement in obstetric care and availability of rapid blood transfusion coincided with a remarkable reduction in the frequency of Sheehan's syndrome particularly in western society. But it has recently been reported more often from well-developed countries. It is one of the most common causes of hypopituitarism in underdeveloped or developing countries. Enlargement of pituitary gland, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity have been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of Sheehan's syndrome in women who suffer from severe postpartum hemorrhage. The patients may seek medical advice because of various presentations ranging from non-specific symptoms to coma and the clinical manifestation may change from one patient to another. Failure of postpartum lactation and failure to resume menses after delivery are the most common presenting symptoms. Although a small percentage of patients with Sheehan's syndrome may cause abrupt onset severe hypopituitarism immediately after delivery, most patients have a mild disease and go undiagnosed and untreated for a long time. It may result in partial or panhypopituitarism and GH is one of the hormones lost earliest. The great majority of the patients has empty sella on CT or MRI. Lymphocytic hypophysitis should be kept in mind in differential diagnosis. In this review, the old and recent data regarding Sheehan's syndrome are presented.

  13. Quercetin Inhibits Inflammasome Activation by Interfering with ASC Oligomerization and Prevents Interleukin-1 Mediated Mouse Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Domiciano, Talita P.; Wakita, Daiko; Jones, Heather D.; Crother, Timothy R.; Verri, Waldiceu A.; Arditi, Moshe; Shimada, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a highly inflammatory cytokine that significantly contributes to both acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. The secretion of IL-1β requires a unique protease, caspase-1, which is activated by various protein platforms called inflammasomes. Data suggests a key role for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species for inflammasome activation. Flavonoids constitute a group of naturally occurring polyphenolic molecules with many biological activities, including antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of three flavonoids, quercetin (QUC), naringenin, and silymarim on inflammasome activation. We found that QUC inhibits IL-1β secretion by both the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in a dose dependent manner, but not the NLRC4 inflammasome. QUC inhibition of the inflammasome was still observed in Atg16l1 knockout macrophages, indicating that QUC’s effect was autophagy independent. Since QUC inhibited both NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes but not NLRC4, we assessed ASC speck formation. QUC reduced ASC speck formation and ASC oligomerization compared with controls. Additionally, QUC inhibited IL-1β in Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) macrophages, where NLRP3 inflammasome is constitutively activated. In conclusion, QUC inhibits both the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome by preventing ASC oligomerization and may be a potential therapeutic candidate for Kawasaki disease vasculitis and other IL-1 mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:28148962

  14. Proton pump inhibitors protect mice from acute systemic inflammation and induce long-term cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Balza, E; Piccioli, P; Carta, S; Lavieri, R; Gattorno, M; Semino, C; Castellani, P; Rubartelli, A

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of sepsis is increasing, representing a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Death in acute sepsis is attributed to hyperinflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We report here that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which block gastric acid secretion, selectively inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated human monocytes in vitro, in the absence of toxic effects. Remarkably, the oversecretion of IL-1β that represents a hallmark of monocytes from patients affected by cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is also blocked. Based on these propaedeutic experiments, we tested the effects of high doses of PPIs in vivo in the mouse model of endotoxic shock. Our data show that a single administration of PPI protected mice from death (60% survival versus 5% of untreated mice) and decreased TNF-α and IL-1β systemic production. PPIs were efficacious even when administered after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. PPI-treated mice that survived developed a long-term cross-tolerance, becoming resistant to LPS- and zymosan-induced sepsis. In vitro, their macrophages displayed impaired TNF-α and IL-1β to different TLR ligands. PPIs also prevented sodium thioglycollate-induced peritoneal inflammation, indicating their efficacy also in a non-infectious setting independent of TLR stimulation. Lack of toxicity and therapeutic effectiveness make PPIs promising new drugs against sepsis and other severe inflammatory conditions. PMID:27441656

  15. Divergence of IL-1, IL-18, and cell death in NLRP3 inflammasomopathies.

    PubMed

    Brydges, Susannah D; Broderick, Lori; McGeough, Matthew D; Pena, Carla A; Mueller, James L; Hoffman, Hal M

    2013-11-01

    The inflammasome is a cytoplasmic multiprotein complex that promotes proinflammatory cytokine maturation in response to host- and pathogen-derived signals. Missense mutations in cryopyrin (NLRP3) result in a hyperactive inflammasome that drives overproduction of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, leading to the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) disease spectrum. Mouse lines harboring CAPS-associated mutations in Nlrp3 have elevated levels of IL-1β and IL-18 and closely mimic human disease. To examine the role of inflammasome-driven IL-18 in murine CAPS, we bred Nlrp3 mutations onto an Il18r-null background. Deletion of Il18r resulted in partial phenotypic rescue that abolished skin and visceral disease in young mice and normalized serum cytokines to a greater extent than breeding to Il1r-null mice. Significant systemic inflammation developed in aging Nlrp3 mutant Il18r-null mice, indicating that IL-1 and IL-18 drive pathology at different stages of the disease process. Ongoing inflammation in double-cytokine knockout CAPS mice implicated a role for caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis and confirmed that CAPS is inflammasome dependent. Our results have important implications for patients with CAPS and residual disease, emphasizing the need to explore other NLRP3-mediated pathways and the potential for inflammasome-targeted therapy.

  16. Inflammasome mediated autoinflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Shruti P.; Cassel, Suzanne L.

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing (NLR) family of receptors are members of the innate immune system with a critical role in host defense. These molecules are key to driving inflammatory responses to abnormal cellular conditions. A number of the NLRs serve this role upon activation by forming a multi-protein complex called an inflammasome. The inflammasome drives the processing and release of cytokines such as the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. The important function of NLR molecules in autoinflammatory disorders has recently been recognized in part through the identification of the role of IL-1β in pathogenesis of several autoinflammatory diseases. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) were the first autoinflammatory disorders found to be directly mediated by dysfunctional inflammasome activation. This finding has subsequently led to studies in both murine models and humans that have revealed several other inflammatory conditions associated with activation of NLR containing inflammasomes. Understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of these autoinflammatory disorders has further guided the successful development of targeted therapy against IL-1. In this review, we will provide an overview of the inflammasomes and describe the important role they play in the development and manifestations of autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:20861596

  17. Quercetin Inhibits Inflammasome Activation by Interfering with ASC Oligomerization and Prevents Interleukin-1 Mediated Mouse Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Domiciano, Talita P; Wakita, Daiko; Jones, Heather D; Crother, Timothy R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Arditi, Moshe; Shimada, Kenichi

    2017-02-02

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a highly inflammatory cytokine that significantly contributes to both acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. The secretion of IL-1β requires a unique protease, caspase-1, which is activated by various protein platforms called inflammasomes. Data suggests a key role for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species for inflammasome activation. Flavonoids constitute a group of naturally occurring polyphenolic molecules with many biological activities, including antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of three flavonoids, quercetin (QUC), naringenin, and silymarim on inflammasome activation. We found that QUC inhibits IL-1β secretion by both the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in a dose dependent manner, but not the NLRC4 inflammasome. QUC inhibition of the inflammasome was still observed in Atg16l1 knockout macrophages, indicating that QUC's effect was autophagy independent. Since QUC inhibited both NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes but not NLRC4, we assessed ASC speck formation. QUC reduced ASC speck formation and ASC oligomerization compared with controls. Additionally, QUC inhibited IL-1β in Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) macrophages, where NLRP3 inflammasome is constitutively activated. In conclusion, QUC inhibits both the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome by preventing ASC oligomerization and may be a potential therapeutic candidate for Kawasaki disease vasculitis and other IL-1 mediated inflammatory diseases.

  18. The Central Role of Anti-IL-1 Blockade in the Treatment of Monogenic and Multi-Factorial Autoinflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Silvia; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Inherited autoinflammatory diseases are secondary to mutations of proteins playing a pivotal role in the regulation of the innate immunity leading to seemingly unprovoked episodes of inflammation. The understanding of the molecular pathways involved in these disorders has shed new lights on the pattern of activation and maintenance of the inflammatory response and disclosed new molecular therapeutic targets. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents the prototype of an autoinflammatory disease. The study of the pathophysiological consequence of mutations in the cryopyrin gene (NLRP3) allowed the identification of intracellular pathways responsible for the activation and secretion of the potent inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). It became clear that several multi-factorial inflammatory conditions display a number of pathogenic and clinical similarities with inherited autoinflammatory diseases. The dramatic effect of interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade in CAPS opened new perspectives for the treatment of other inherited and multi-factorial autoinflammatory disorders. Several IL-1 blockers are now available on the market. In this review we outline the more recent novelties in the treatment with different IL-1 blockers in inherited and multi-factorial autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:24198817

  19. NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition is disrupted in a group of auto-inflammatory disease CAPS mutations.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Leanne; Moreau, France; MacDonald, Justin A; Chadee, Kris

    2016-10-01

    Inflammasomes are positioned to rapidly escalate the intensity of inflammation by activating interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18 and cell death by pyroptosis. However, negative regulation of inflammasomes remains poorly understood, as is the signaling cascade that dampens inflammasome activity. We found that rapid NLRP3 inflammasome activation was directly inhibited by protein kinase A (PKA), which was induced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling via the PGE2 receptor E-prostanoid 4 (EP4). PKA directly phosphorylated the cytoplasmic receptor NLRP3 and attenuated its ATPase function. We found that Ser295 in human NLRP3 was critical for rapid inhibition and PKA phosphorylation. Mutations in NLRP3-encoding residues adjacent to Ser295 have been linked to the inflammatory disease CAPS (cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes). NLRP3-S295A phenocopied the human CAPS mutants. These data suggest that negative regulation at Ser295 is critical for restraining the NLRP3 inflammasome and identify a molecular basis for CAPS-associated NLRP3 mutations.

  20. Apert's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jyothsna, Mandapati; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Sree Lakshmi, Ketham Reddy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apert's syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malforma­tion and symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. Craniofacial deformities include cone-shaped calvarium, fat forehead, prop-tosis, hypertelorism and short nose with a bulbous tip. Intraoral findings include high arched palate with pseudocleft, maxillary transverse and sagittal hypoplasia with concomitant dental crowding, skeletal and dental anterior open bite and several retained primary teeth. We report one such case of 14-year-old boy having all the classical features of Apert's syndrome with particular emphasis on brief review of genetic features. How to cite this article: Kumar GR, Jyothsna M, Ahmed SB, Lakshmi KRS. Apert's Syndrome. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):69-72. PMID:25206244

  1. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  2. [Wilkie's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Ledniczky, György; Palik, Eva; Zubek, László; Sugár, István; Ondrejka, Pál

    2008-10-01

    Loss of retroperitoneal fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions and noxa is believed to be the etiologic factor of superior mesenteric artery syndrome. A case of a 35 years old female patient with severe malnutrition and weight loss is presented, who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Various theories of etiology, clinical course and treatment options of this uncommon disease are discussed. In our case, conservative management was inefficient, while surgical treatment aiming to bypass the obstruction by an anastomosis between the jejunum and the proximal duodenum (duodenojejunostomy) was successful. An interdisciplinary teamwork provides the most beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic result in this often underestimated disease.

  3. Morbihan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Veraldi, Stefano; Persico, Maria Chiara; Francia, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face) in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks). PMID:23741671

  4. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Obesity-hypoventilation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cai, Y; Dong, H; Weng, M

    1996-01-01

    5 cases with obesity-hypoventilaion syndrome were reported. The clinical manifestations were obesity, palpitation, dyspnea, lethargy, cyanosis, distention of cervical vein, edema, enlargement of liver and hypertension. All of them were initially diagnosed as chronic bronchitis or heart diseases. Pulmonary function test showed restrictive ventilative defect and hypercapnia with hypoxemia. Mouth oclusion pressure at 0.1 second was higher than the normal value. The response to CO2 was decreased. Hypertrophy of right heart was shown in ECG and X-ray film improvement in symptoms and blood gases analyses were found to be associated with body weight decrease in a follow up period of one year.

  6. Cardiac surgery for Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tkebuchava, T; von Segesser, L K; Niederhäuser, U; Bauersfeld, U; Turina, M

    1997-01-01

    Two patients (one girl, one boy) with Kartagener syndrome (situs inversus, bronchiectasis, sinusitis), despite pulmonary problems and associated congenital cardiac anomalies, were operated on at the ages of 4 years and 7 years, respectively. They had had previous palliative treatment at the age of 3 months and 1.3 years, respectively. Both postoperative periods after total correction were without significant complications. Long-term follow-up was available for 9 and 19 years, respectively, with no manifestations of heart insufficiency. Both patients are physically active, and neither requires cardiac medication. Patients with Kartagener syndrome and associated congenital cardiac anomalies can successfully undergo multiple cardiac operations with good long-term outcome.

  7. HELLP Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sandvoß, Mareike; Potthast, Arne Björn; von Versen-Höynck, Frauke; Das, Anibh Martin

    2017-04-01

    The hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome is frequently observed in mothers whose offspring have long-chain fatty acid oxidation defects. We previously found that fatty acid oxidation is compromised not only in these inborn errors of metabolism but also in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from all pregnancies complicated by the HELLP syndrome. Sirtuins are oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))dependent deacetylases linked to the metabolic status of the cell. SIRT 4 is known to have regulatory functions in fatty acid oxidation. The HELLP syndrome is often associated with short-term hypoxia. We studied sirtuins (SIRT 1, SIRT 3, and SIRT 4) in HUVECs from pregnancies complicated by the HELLP syndrome and uncomplicated pregnancies exposed to hypoxia (n = 7 controls, 7 HELLP; 0, 10, 60, or 120 minutes of 2% O2). Protein levels of SIRT 4 were significantly higher in HUVECs from HELLP compared to control after 60 and 120 minutes of hypoxia. The NAD(+) levels increased in a time-dependent manner.

  8. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary.

  9. Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Read, A P; Newton, V E

    1997-01-01

    Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are caused by physical absence of melanocytes from the skin, hair, eyes, or the stria vascularis of the cochlea. Dominantly inherited examples with patchy depigmentation are usually labelled Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Type I WS, characterised by dystopia canthorum, is caused by loss of function mutations in the PAX3 gene. Type III WS (Klein-Waardenburg syndrome, with abnormalities of the arms) is an extreme presentation of type I; some but not all patients are homozygotes. Type IV WS (Shah-Waardenburg syndrome with Hirschsprung disease) can be caused by mutations in the genes for endothelin-3 or one of its receptors, EDNRB. Type II WS is a heterogeneous group, about 15% of whom are heterozygous for mutations in the MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor) gene. All these forms show marked variability even within families, and at present it is not possible to predict the severity, even when a mutation is detected. Characterising the genes is helping to unravel important developmental pathways in the neural crest and its derivatives. Images PMID:9279758

  10. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes found in people who have depression or anxiety disorders, drink excess alcohol, have poorly controlled diabetes, or are severely obese. Pseudo-Cushing’s does not have the same long-term effects on health as Cushing's syndrome and does not ...

  11. Aicardi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 591. US National Library of Medicine. Aicardi syndrome. Updated September 20, 2016. ghr.nlm. ... Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us ... Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department ...

  12. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach move to your small intestine in an uncontrolled, abnormally fast manner. This is most often related to changes in your stomach associated with surgery. Dumping syndrome can occur after any stomach operation or removal of the esophagus (esophagectomy). Gastric bypass surgery for ...

  13. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  14. Nephrotic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... child will have a relapse — where the nephrotic syndrome comes back after going away. In that case, treatment would begin again until the child outgrows the condition or it improves on its own./p> Reviewed by: Robert S. Mathias, MD Date reviewed: March 2014 previous 1 • ...

  15. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions are High blood pressure High blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels High levels of triglycerides, a type of fat, in your blood Low levels ...

  16. Waardenburg's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yesudian, D P; Jayaraman, M; Janaki, V R; Yesudian, P

    1995-01-01

    Three children in a family of five presented with heterochromia iridis, lateral displacement of inner canthi and varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. All the 3 showed iris atrophy. The father of the children had only heterochromia iridis. A diagnosis of Waardenburg's syndrome Type I was made in the children with the father probably representing a forme fruste of the condition.

  17. [Waardenburg's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gimñenez, F; Carbonell, R; Pérez, F; Lozano, I

    1994-01-01

    Reporting one case of this condition type-2 with heterochromia iridis and cochlear deafness. The AA. review the syndrome's components and it nomenclature as well. They discuss about the convenience of including this deviation in the chapter of "diseases of the embryonic neural crest". The specific place of the gene responsibly in the chromosome-2 and the possibilities of genetic counselling are considered.

  18. [Locomotive syndrome and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Jun-ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-10-01

    The Japanese Orthopedic Association coined the term locomotive syndrome (LS) to designate a condition of elderly people in high risk groups of requiring nursing care because of problems with their musculoskeletal diseases. LS is a socioeconomic concept, and closely associated with osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and sarcopenia. Recent studies have revealed that metabolic syndrome (MS), a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, has been related with LS. For example, individuals with MS have a greater risk of osteoarthritis and sarcopenia. Secreted factors from adipose tissue and skeletal muscles, namely, adipokines and myokines, are involved in the association of LS and MS.

  19. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  20. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  1. Community College Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pederson, Eldor O.

    Drawing from an examination of community college periodicals, their availability and characteristics, the academic affiliations of contributing authors, and the topics of their articles, this paper discusses the minor role which community college periodicals appear to play. A list of 35 periodicals dealing primary with community college education…

  2. [Soluble brain proteins in autosomal trisomy syndromes].

    PubMed

    Mikhneva, L M; Baryshevskaia, V D

    1981-01-01

    The authors examined the soluble proteins of the brain frontal lobes in the newborn with trisomias of the 13th, 18th, and 21st chromosomes (Down's, Patau's, and Edwards' syndromes). The examinations were carried out on autopsy material (the post-mortem period not exceeding 24 hours) by the method of disc electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel. The brain tissue was taken from 17 newborn infants with Down's syndrome; 9 infants with Patau's syndrome; and 7 infants with Edwards' syndrome. For the control the brain of 21 newborn infants without defects of the CNS development (the death cause being analogous) was taken. In all the syndromes studied diversely directed but relatively specific shifts were revealed on the proteinograms. It was the albumin section which appeared to be the most sensitive to the chromosomal pathology: in cases of Down's and Patau's syndromes the protein content in it was reduced, whereas in cases of Edwards' syndrome it was increased. In the latter syndrome the relative amount of neuronines S-5 and S-6, and in Patau's syndrome the amount of neuronine S-6 were lowered, this lowering being statistically significantly. In all the trisomias a tendency to a diminution of the zone of the acidic neurospecific cerebral proteins was noted. This is, possibly, due to the lower level of the CNS functional activity in chromosomal pathologies.

  3. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in a postpartum woman

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Pooja R.; Ucchil, Rajesh; Shah, Unmil; Chaudhari, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus infection, a rare disease diagnosed in India and carries a very high mortality. There are no reports of this infection in association with pregnancy or postpartum period in our country. We present a case of a 30-year-old female diagnosed to have hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the postpartum period. We intend to create awareness about this infection and consider it in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction in association with pregnancy and postpartum period. PMID:27688634

  4. The Episodic Syndromes That Maybe Associated with Migraines.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Diana; Vasconcellos, Elza

    2016-02-01

    The "childhood periodic syndromes" have been renamed "the episodic syndromes that maybe associated with migraines". These syndromes were initially considered precursors of migraines that only occurred in childhood; however recent literature suggests that the episodic syndromes can occur in adults with known migraine and does not necessarily present as a precursor. This review article discusses the recent literature regarding the episodic syndromes and potential treatments. These disorders are seen by multiple subspecialists, therefore it is important to recognize and use the same definitions, criteria and nomenclature. A collaborative and multidisciplinary approach is critical to characterize, manage and potentially improve outcomes.

  5. Early postpartum hyponatremia in a patient with transient Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Munz, W; Seufert, R; Knapstein, P-G; Pollow, K

    2004-05-01

    In modern day health care, Sheehan's syndrome is a rare disorder affecting the postpartum period. We present a case of a 33-year-old woman with atonic hemorrhage developing a transient Sheehan's syndrome associated with hyponatremia six days postpartum. Evaluation of cranial computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary demonstrated normal finding. Immediate replacement therapy using sodium, chloride, hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and levothyroxine revealed regression of the Sheehan's syndrome to complete recovery. The present report shows that Sheehan's syndrome can be associated with hyponatremia and illustrates the need to include hyponatremia as an initial symptom in the differential diagnosis of Sheehan's syndrome.

  6. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  7. Periodic fevers with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA).

    PubMed

    Vigo, Giulia; Zulian, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    PFAPA syndrome (acronym of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis) is the most common cause of periodic fever in childhood. Nowadays, it is considered part of the wide family of the autoinflammatory diseases, but a genetic or molecular marker hasn't been identified yet, therefore, its etiology is still unknown. Diagnosis is essentially based on clinical criteria but, especially in younger children, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate it from other hereditary periodic fever syndromes. Fever attacks in PFAPA have a spontaneous resolution and in a high rate of patients the syndrome ends spontaneously over time. Treatment is still a matter of debate. Usually a single administration of oral corticosteroids aborts attacks. Tonsillectomy may be an alternative option but its role remains to be clarified.

  8. A Male with Cooccurrence of Down Syndrome and Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tovi; Buterbaugh, Allison; Love, Kaitlin; Visootsak, Jeannie

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common identifiable genetic cause of intellectual disability, with a unique physical gestalt that makes diagnosis possible during the newborn period. However, the physical characteristics of Fragile X syndrome are fairly subtle, resulting in the first clinical suspicion often arising from delayed developmental milestones. In addition, maladaptive behavior and autistic-like tendencies, such as hand flapping, poor eye contact, and hand biting, may be noted in Fragile X syndrome but are not as commonly observed in Down syndrome. Recognition of a potential secondary diagnosis, such as Fragile X syndrome, in individuals with Down syndrome is critical because there have been advances in targeted pharmacologic treatments for both conditions. Thus, an accurate diagnosis has implications in improving the individual's quality of life. PMID:24083039

  9. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Silva, Rodrigo Alencar E; Cunningham, Mauro César Quintão E Silva; Maia, Débora Palma; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Cardoso, Francisco

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old woman with AIDS who developed opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome during a period different from other cases reported in literature. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome had already been reported as the initial neurological presentation of AIDS, as well as at the time of HIV-seroconversion and immune reconstitution syndrome. Our case is unique since the patient had an elevated CD4 count and negative viral load in the period when the opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome occurred.

  10. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  11. Parinaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Stefanko, S Z

    1983-02-01

    Five cases of a tumour in the quadrigeminal area have been described, 4 of which could be verified by autopsy. In 2 cases with a metastasis in the tegmentum of the mesencephalon, a Parinaud syndrome was present. In 2 other cases, however, with extensive destruction of the quadrigeminal plate and of the posterior commissure this syndrome was not present. In the 5th case, with a big vascular tumour of the pineal area, disturbances of eye movements and pupils were also lacking. From these observations we may conclude that (1) destruction of the quadrigeminal plate has no influence upon vertical eye movements. (2) destruction of the posterior commissure, in combination with the quadrigeminal plate, is not always followed by disturbances of vertical eye movements. In man it is still not clear which structures are responsible for the performance of vertical eye movements.

  12. [Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naves, Kattia Cristina; Santos, João Paulo Vieira dos; Santana, José Henrique; Lopes, Gesner Pereira

    2005-01-01

    A white, 48-year-old woman, natural from Uberaba-MG, presented herself to hospital. She had a picture of rest dyspnea, fever, productive cough, greenish catarrh and ventilatory-dependent thoracic pain, for 3 days. During investigation, through radiogram and thoracic tomography, it was visualized the presence of dextrocardia and consolidation in low right lobe by bronchopneumonic process. It was opted for hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. Investigation was carried on with tomography of mastoids and paranasal cavities which showed bilateral chronic otomastoiditis and images of chronic sinusopathy allowing the diagnosis of a case of Kartagener Syndrome. Our purpose in this case report is to include new informations for who search about this syndrome.

  13. Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Jabr, Fadi I

    2011-01-12

    Kartagener syndrome is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes a defect in the action of the cilia lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tube. Patients usually present with chronic recurrent rhinosinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis caused by pseudomonal infection. Situs inversus can be seen in about 50% of cases. Diagnosis can be made by tests to prove impaired cilia function, biopsy, and genetic studies. Treatment is supportive. In severe cases, the prognosis can be fatal if bilateral lung transplantation is delayed. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with chronic recurrent upper respiratory infections, pseudomonal pneumonia, and chronic bronchiectasis who presented with acute respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome based on her clinical presentation and genetic studies. She expired on ventilator with refractory respiratory and multiorgan failure.

  14. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  15. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  16. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, S; Ferguson, G C

    1996-05-01

    Although Gerstmann's syndrome has been well documented since it was characterised in the latter half of last century, there has not been much literature on it in the last few years. We present a classical case in a patient who was admitted into hospital for an unrelated problem. We conclude that clinical examination still has a valuable role in neurology, despite the availability of excellent imaging techniques.

  17. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  18. What is Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Down Syndrome: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome describes a set of cognitive and ...

  19. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... life expectancy. Do children with Down syndrome have eye problems? Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased ... When should children with Down syndrome receive an eye exam? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that ...

  20. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  1. Acrodysostosis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-01-01

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR–Gsα–cAMP–PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway. PMID:24363928

  2. Acrodysostosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-11-21

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR-Gsα-cAMP-PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway.

  3. Gitelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cotovio, Patricia; Silva, Cristina; Oliveira, Nuno; Costa, Fátima

    2013-04-11

    Hypokalaemia is a common clinical disorder, the cause of which can usually be determined by the patient's clinical history. Gitelman syndrome is an inherited tubulopathy that must be considered in some settings of hypokalaemia. We present the case of a 60-year-old male patient referred to our nephrology department for persistent hypokalaemia. Clinical history was positive for symptoms of orthostatic hypotension and polyuria. There was no history of drugs consumption other than potassium supplements. Complementary evaluation revealed hypokalaemia (2.15 mmol/l), hypomagnesaemia (0.29 mmol/l), metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.535, bicarbonate 34.1 mmol/l), hypereninaemia (281.7 U/ml), increased chloride (160 mmol/l) and sodium (126 mmol/l) urinary excretion and reduced urinary calcium excretion (0.73 mmol/l). Renal function, remainder serum and urinary ionogram, and renal ultrasound were normal. A diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome was established. We reinforced oral supplementation with potassium chloride and magnesium sulfate. Serum potassium stabilised around 3 mmol/l. The aim of our article is to remind Gitelman syndrome in the differential diagnosis of persistent hypokalaemia.

  4. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Various types of PNS, singly or in multiples, may be associated with either benign or malignant tumors and may involve almost every organ system, directly or indirectly. These disorders can precede the discovery of the tumor by weeks, months, or even years, and many are good diagnostic and prognostic indicators. The true incidence of PNS in animal cancer patients is unknown, although approximately 75% of all human cancer patients, at some time during the tumor-bearing part of their lives, suffer from one or more of these disorders. Recognition of PNS is valuable because the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor, because they may allow assessment of premalignant states, because they may aid in the search for metastases, because they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy, and because they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformations and oncogene expression. Recognition of these syndromes is relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of many problems in veterinary cancer medicine. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Hepatorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension. This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys, where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration, which ultimately results in uraemia. The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites. Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output. Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure, but refractory ascites, and its impact on prognosis is less negative. Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method, nevertheless, only a few patients can receive it. The most suitable “bridge treatments” or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response. Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS. PMID:23049205

  6. [Crush syndrome].

    PubMed

    Scapellato, S; Maria, S; Castorina, G; Sciuto, G

    2007-08-01

    Crush injuries and crush syndrome are common after natural (e.g. earthquake, land-slide, tornadoes, tsunami) or man-made catastrophes (e.g. wars, terrorist attacks), in fact the history of this disease is well reported both in earthquake rescue reviews and in military literature. However, there are instances due to conventional causes, such as building collapses, road traffic accident, accident at work or altered level of consciousness after stroke or drug overdose. These situations of ''big or small'' catastrophes can occur at any time and anywhere, for this reason every clinician should be prepared to address issues of crush syndrome quickly and aggressively. The treatment has to manage and to predict clinical conditions before they present themselves. In particular, acute renal failure is one of the few life-threatening complications that can be reversed. This article reviews the various evidences and summarizes the treatment strategies available. Fundamental targets in crush syndrome management are early aggressive hydration, urine alkalinization and, when possible, forced diuresis. Since electrolyte imbalance may be fatal due to arrhythmias secondary to hyperkalemia (especially associated with hypocalcemia), it's necessary to correct these abnormalities using insulin-glucose solution and/or potassium binders, and if nevertheless serum potassium levels remain high this serious disease will necessitate dialysis, which is often a vital procedure.

  7. [Sanfilippo Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Osipova, L A; Kuzenkova, L M; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Gevorkyan, A K; Podkletnova, T V; Vashakmadze, N D

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type III) is a lysosomal disorder caused by a defect in the catabolism of heparan sulfate. Mucopolysaccharidosis type III is the most common type of all mucopolysaccharidoses. The pathogenic basis of the disease consists of the storage of undegraded substrate in the central nervous system. Progressive cognitive decline resulting in dementia and behavioural abnormalities are the main clinical characteristics of Sanfilippo syndrome. Mucopolysaccharidosis type III may be misdiagnosed as otherforms of developmental delay, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autistic spectrum disorders because of lack of somatic symptoms, presence of mild and atypical forms of the disease. Patients with Sanfilippo syndrome may have comparatively low urinary glycosaminoglycans levels resulting in false negative urinary assay. Definitive diagnosis is made by enzyme assay on leucocytes and cultured fibroblasts. There is currently no effective treatment of mucopolysaccharidosis type III, though ongoing researches of gene, substrate reduction and intrathecal enzyme replacement therapies expect getting curative method to alter devasting damage of central nervous system in near future.

  8. Sheehan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Züleyha; Laway, Bashir A; Dokmetas, Hatice S; Atmaca, Hulusi; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-12-22

    Sheehan syndrome or postpartum hypopituitarism is a condition characterized by hypopituitarism due to necrosis of the pituitary gland. The initial insult is caused by massive postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), leading to impaired blood supply to the pituitary gland, which has become enlarged during pregnancy. Small sella turcica size, vasospasms (caused by PPH) and/or thrombosis (associated with pregnancy or coagulation disorders) are predisposing factors; autoimmunity might be involved in the progressive worsening of pituitary functions. Symptoms are caused by a decrease or absence of one or more of the pituitary hormones, and vary, among others, from failure to lactate and nonspecific symptoms (such as fatigue) to severe adrenal crisis. In accordance with the location of hormone-secreting cells relative to the vasculature, the secretion of growth hormone and prolactin is most commonly affected, followed by follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone; severe necrosis of the pituitary gland also affects the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone. Symptoms usually become evident years after delivery, but can, in rare cases, develop acutely. The incidence of Sheehan syndrome depends, to a large extent, on the occurrence and management of PPH. Sheehan syndrome is an important cause of hypopituitarism in developing countries, but has become rare in developed countries. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations combined with a history of severe PPH; hormone levels and/or stimulation tests can confirm clinical suspicion. Hormone replacement therapy is the only available management option so far.

  9. How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndromes Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Scored? Doctors often group cancers into different stages ... Ask Your Doctor About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. Periodic chiral structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggard, Dwight L.; Engheta, Nader; Pelet, Philippe; Liu, John C.; Kowarz, Marek W.; Kim, Yunjin

    1989-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a structure that is both chiral and periodic are investigated using coupled-mode equations. The periodicity is described by a sinusoidal perturbation of the permittivity, permeability, and chiral admittance. The coupled-mode equations are derived from physical considerations and used to examine bandgap structure and reflected and transmitted fields. Chirality is observed predominantly in transmission, whereas periodicity is present in both reflection and transmission.

  11. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  12. The changing face of Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tessnow, Alex H; Wilson, Jean D

    2010-11-01

    Postpartum necrosis of the anterior pituitary gland is known as Sheehan's syndrome in honor of Harold Leeming Sheehan who characterized the syndrome as the consequence of ischemia after severe puerperal hemorrhage. With advancements of obstetrical care, Sheehan's syndrome has become uncommon except in developing countries. In many affected women, anterior pituitary dysfunction is not diagnosed for many years after the inciting delivery. This review emphasizes the long period of time that may elapse between the puerperal hemorrhage and the eventual diagnosis of hypopituitarism. The pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical features and treatment of this disorder are discussed.

  13. Periodic Solutions of Spatially Periodic Hamiltonian Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-10

    Theorem 0.2 generalizes Theorem 1.5 of Rabinowitz in [201. 3 Equation (0.1), under spatially periodic assumptions has been studied by several au...n x n symmetric matrix, H satisfying (HO), (H1) and (H2), and f = (0, fq) satisfying (fM), (fl) and (f2), Rabinowitz in [201 showed the existence of... Rabinowitz [17]. We consider a functional I : E x M ) R of class C’, where E is a Hilbert space and M is a compact manifold. Assuming that I satisfies a

  14. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Friderichsen syndrome; Fulminant meningococcal sepsis - Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome; Hemorrhagic adrenalitis ... bacteria growing (multiplying) inside the body. Symptoms include: Fever and chills Joint and muscle pain Headache Vomiting ...

  15. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever: a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, J W; Vossen, J M; Radl, J; van Nieuwkoop, J A; Meyer, C J; Lobatto, S; van Furth, R

    1984-05-19

    Six patients of Dutch ancestry with a long history of recurrent attacks of fever of unknown cause were found to have a high serum IgD level and a large number of plasma cells with cytoplasmic IgD in the bone marrow. Because the clinical picture in some ways resembled that of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), sera of patients with FMF were also investigated; only one of eight such patients had a raised serum IgD.

  16. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can cause symptoms to worsen when the drug’s effect wears off or the drug is stopped. These ... less effective as people become accustomed to their effects. The drugs may also make people sleepy during the day. ...

  17. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (PFAPA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient and Caregiver ... Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient and Caregiver ...

  18. Asherman syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Uterine synechiae; Intrauterine adhesions; Infertility - Asherman ... amenorrhea (lack of menstrual periods), repeated miscarriages, and infertility. However, such symptoms could be related to several ...

  19. The first case of adult-onset PFAPA syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Satoshi; Ohmagari, Norio; Tanizaki, Ryutaro; Hagino, Noboru; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Ujiie, Mugen; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kato, Yasuyuki; Kanagawa, Shuzo

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman presented with fever and pharyngitis. She previously experienced four periodic febrile episodes at 30- to 40-day intervals. We suspected periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, and prescribed predisolone, thereby her fever rapidly subsided. Her febrile episodes improved after daily cimetidine treatment. Genetic testing results of genomic DNA for periodic fever syndromes were negative, although she was heterozygous for p.Glu148Gln variation in MEFV, supporting the diagnosis of PFAPA syndrome.

  20. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  1. Multidimensional period doubling structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yup; Flom, Dvir; Ben-Abraham, Shelomo I

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops the formalism necessary to generalize the period doubling sequence to arbitrary dimension by straightforward extension of the substitution and recursion rules. It is shown that the period doubling structures of arbitrary dimension are pure point diffractive. The symmetries of the structures are pointed out.

  2. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  3. Cyclic Cushing's syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Franco; Scaroni, Carla M; Albiger, Nora M E

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome (CS) involves rhythmic fluctuations in ACTH secretion resulting in a cyclic variation of adrenal steroid production. In the majority of cases, cyclic CS is caused by an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, but it can also be due to ectopic ACTH production or an adrenal adenoma. This condition should be strongly suspected in patients with symptoms or signs of hypercortisolism but normal cortisol levels and paradoxical responses to the dexamethasone test, that may reflect an increasing or decreasing endogenous hormone activity. Dynamic tests are best interpreted if they are performed during a sustained period of hypercortisolism. Sometimes, it is necessary to confirm the diagnosis over lengthy periods of observation. Responses to treatment must be closely monitored, interpreted and evaluated with caution because of the potential variations in steroidogenesis. An original case report of a cyclic Cushing's syndrome is presented in this review.

  4. The Lung Surfactant System in Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERo THE LUNG SURFACTANT SYSTEM IN ADULT RESPIRATORY Annual DISTRESS SYNDROME 6. PERFORMING ORO. REPORT...SURFACTANT SYSTEM IN ADULT RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME - Annual Progress Report John U. Balis December 1979 Sponsored by: US ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND...112-116, 1979. 6. Hallman, M., Feldman, B.H., Kirkpatrick, E. and Gluck, L.: Absence of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in respiratory distress syndrome in

  5. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gharsallah, I; Souissi, A; Dhahri, R; Boussetta, N; Sayeh, S; Métoui, L; Ajili, F; Louzir, B; Othmani, S

    2014-09-01

    SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis) syndrome is a rare entity characterized by the association of heterogeneous osteoarticular and cutaneous manifestations that have for common denominator an aseptic inflammatory process. The etiopathogeny of this disease is still a matter of debate. Although it has been related to the spondylarthritis family, an infectious origin is suggested. Diagnosis is based on the presence of at least one of the three diagnostic criteria proposed by Kahn. The treatment includes NSAIDs, antibiotics, corticosteroids, methotrexate and more recently the bisphosphonates and the TNFα inhibitors.

  6. Postmenopausal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Pronob K.; Agarwal, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is one of the most significant events in a woman's life and brings in a number of physiological changes that affect the life of a woman permanently. There have been a lot of speculations about the symptoms that appear before, during and after the onset of menopause. These symptoms constitute the postmenopausal syndrome; they are impairing to a great extent to the woman and management of these symptoms has become an important field of research lately. This chapter attempts to understand these symptoms, the underlying pathophysiology and the management options available. PMID:26330639

  7. Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casanova, M S; Tuji, F M; Yoo, H J; Haiter-Neto, F

    2006-09-01

    Kartagener syndrome (KS), an autosomal recessively inherited disease, is characterized by the triad of situs inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis. This disorder affects the activity of proteins important to the movement of cilia, especially in the respiratory tract and the spermatozoa, developing a series of systemic alterations, which can be diagnosed through radiographic examination. The aim of this paper is to describe a clinical case of this unusual pathology, including a brief literature review, emphasising the radiographic aspects of this pathology and stressing the importance of early diagnosis, which could be determined by an oral radiologist.

  8. [Metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Shimpei

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (Mets) is a combination of disorders including abdominal obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, which increases risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes when occurring together. In Japan, diagnosis criteria of Mets consists of an increased waist circumference and 2 or more of CVD risk factors. Annual health checkups and health guidance using Mets criteria were established in 2008 for the prevention of life-style related diseases in Japan. In this issue, history and diagnostic criteria of Mets and concerns for Mets concept were described.

  9. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  10. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  11. Setting the Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  12. The Periodic Table CD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  13. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... burn to avoid getting a staph infection. Toxic shock syndrome treatment Because toxic shock syndrome gets worse quickly, you may be seriously ... toxic shock syndrome in a wound? Resources Toxic Shock Syndrome ... treatment, women's health Family Health, Women January 2017 Copyright © ...

  14. Facts about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Down Syndrome Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... with Down syndrome. View charts » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a ...

  15. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Down Syndrome Print A A ... Help en español El síndrome de Down About Down Syndrome Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is ...

  16. KBG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brancati, Francesco; Sarkozy, Anna; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2006-12-12

    KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral) anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG) anomalies (with or without seizures) and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7-8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  17. KBG syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brancati, Francesco; Sarkozy, Anna; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral) anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG) anomalies (with or without seizures) and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment. PMID:17163996

  18. Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smyth, C M; Bremner, W J

    1998-06-22

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. Affected males carry an additional X chromosome, which results in male hypogonadism, androgen deficiency, and impaired spermatogenesis. Some patients may exhibit all of the classic signs of this disorder, including gynecomastia, small testes, sparse body hair, tallness, and infertility, whereas others, because of the wide variability in clinical expression, lack many of these features. Treatment consists of testosterone replacement therapy to correct the androgen deficiency and to provide patients with appropriate virilization. This therapy also has positive effects on mood and self-esteem and has been shown to protect against osteoporosis, although it will not reverse infertility. Although the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome is now made definitively using chromosomal karyotyping, revealing in most instances a 47,XXY genotype, the diagnosis also can be made using a careful history and results of a physical examination, with the hallmark being small, firm testes. As it affects 1 in 500 male patients and presents with a variety of clinical features, primary care physicians should be familiar with this condition.

  19. Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kilicli, Fatih; Dokmetas, Hatice Sebila; Acibucu, Fettah

    2013-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is characterized by various degrees of hypopituitarism, and develops as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Increased pituitary volume, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity are the proposed factors in the pathogenesis of SS. Hormonal insufficiencies, ranging from single pituitary hormone insufficiency to total hypopituitarism, are observed in patients. The first most important issue in the diagnosis is being aware of the syndrome. Lack of lactation and failure of menstrual resumption after delivery that complicated with severe hemorrhage are the most important clues in diagnosing SS. The most frequent endocrine disorders are the deficiencies of growth hormone and prolactin. In patients with typical obstetric history, prolactin response to TRH seems to be the most sensitive screening test in diagnosing SS. Other than typical pituitary deficiency, symptoms such as anemia, pancytopenia, osteoporosis, impairment in cognitive functions and impairment in the quality of life are also present in these patients. Treatment of SS is based on the appropriate replacement of deficient hormones. Growth hormone replacement has been found to have positive effects; however, risk to benefit ratio, side effects and cost of the treatment should be taken into account.

  20. Burning Mouth Syndrome: update.

    PubMed

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo, Eugenia; Salas, Enric Jané; López López, José

    2014-06-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder that predominately affects middle-aged women in the postmenopausal period. The condition is distinguished by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa and the absence of any clinical signs. The etiology of BMS is complex and it includes a variety of factors. Local, systemic and psychological factors such as stress, anxiety and depression are listed among the possible causes of BMS. BMS may sometimes be classified as BMS Type I, II or III. Although this syndrome is not accompanied by evident organic alterations and it does not present health risks, it can significantly reduce the patient's quality of life. This study analyzes the available literature related to BMS, and makes special reference to its therapeutic management. The pages that follow will also discuss the diagnostic criteria that should be respected, etiological factors, and clinical aspects. We used the PubMed database and searched it by using the keywords "burning mouth syndrome", "BMS and review", and "burning mouth and review", in the title or abstract of the publication. BMS treatment usually steers towards the management of the symptoms; however, the specific local factors that could play a significant role in worsening the oral burning sensation should be eradicated. The most widely accepted treatment options that show variable results include tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs; nevertheless there are other therapies that can also be carried out. Professionals that work in the field of dentistry should formulate standardized symptomatic and diagnostic criteria in order to more easily identify the most effective and reliable strategies in BMS treatment through multidisciplinary research.

  1. Allergic acute coronary syndrome (Kounis syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Masrur, Shihab; Parker, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylaxis rarely manifests as a vasospastic acute coronary syndrome with or without the presence of underlying coronary artery disease. The variability in the underlying pathogenesis produces a wide clinical spectrum of this syndrome. We present three cases of anaphylactic acute coronary syndrome that display different clinical variants of this phenomenon. The main pathophysiological mechanism of the allergic anginal syndromes is the inflammatory mediators released during a hypersensitivity reaction triggered by food, insect bites, or drugs. It is important to appropriately recognize and treat Kounis syndrome in patients with exposure to a documented allergen. PMID:26130889

  2. Postpartum HELLP syndrome after a normotensive pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Esan, K; Moneim, T; Page, I J

    1997-01-01

    Severe pre-eclampsia, associated with HELLP syndrome, can occur after a normal delivery and birth in a woman whose blood pressure has remained normal throughout the antenatal period. Although rare, the syndrome can lead to pulmonary oedema or renal failure, and should be borne in mind when a woman develops epigastric or right upper-quadrant pain after a normal pregnancy and delivery. A significant fall in the platelet count in the antenatal period may be a useful indicator of risk. PMID:9281873

  3. Addressing the Needs of Students with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ellenburg, Jennifer S.; Acton, Olivia M.; Torrey, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses symptoms of students with Rett Syndrome, a disability in females characterized by the development of multiple specific deficits following a period of normal functioning after birth. Specific interventions for students with Rett syndrome are provided and address communication, stereotypic movements, self-injurious behaviors,…

  4. Fifteen-Year Follow-Up of Thyroid Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V.; Ninan, S.; Haque, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The natural history of thyroid function in adults with Down syndrome is relatively unknown with limited long-term follow-up data. Method: This study investigated annual thyroid function tests in 200 adults with Down syndrome over a 15-year period. Results: For healthy adults with Down syndrome there is a gradual increase in thyroxine…

  5. Cushing's syndrome caused by nodular adrenal hyperplasia in children with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirk, J M; Brain, C E; Carson, D J; Hyde, J C; Grant, D B

    1999-06-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome consists of fibrous dysplasia of bone, café-au-lait skin pigmentation, and endocrine dysfunction (usually precocious puberty). Other endocrine abnormalities occur in a minority of patients, and of these, Cushing's syndrome is the least often recognized. We present 5 children (4 girls) with features of McCune-Albright syndrome who had Cushing's syndrome in the infantile period (<6 months). In 2 children spontaneous resolution occurred, but the remaining 3 required bilateral adrenalectomy. In addition, all 4 girls have experienced precocious puberty, and 3 children demonstrated radiologic evidence of nephrocalcinosis. Understanding of the underlying defect causing McCune-Albright syndrome emphasizes the importance of searching for other endocrine dysfunction in these children.

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a collection of clinical symptoms and signs caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve compression. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgical treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, local corticosteroids injection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints.

  7. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve damage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, surgical treatments, and postoperative treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, internal neurolysis, local and systemic corticosteroids, massage therapy, nerve and tendon gliding exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), pyridoxine, therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints. PMID:21718565

  8. Cirrhosis and hepatopulmonary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tumgor, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized as a triad: liver disease, intrapulmonary vascular dilatation and arterial hypoxemia. HPS is reported to be present in 4% to 32% of adult patients with end-stage liver disease and in 9%-20% of children. The pathogenesis of HPS has not been clearly identified. Portal hypertension causes impairment in the perfusion of the bowel and increases the enteral translocation of Gram (-) bacteria and endotoxins. This stimulates the release of vasoactive mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, heme oxygenase-derived carbon monoxide and nitric oxide. Genetic alterations have not been associated with this syndrome yet; however, cytokines and chemokines have been suggested to play a role. Recently, it was reported that cumulated monocytes lead to the activation of vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent signaling pathways and pulmonary angiogenesis, which plays an important role in HPS pathogenesis. At present, the most effective and only radical treatment is a liver transplant (LT). Cirrhotic patients who are on the waiting list for an LT have a shorter survival period if they develop HPS. Therefore, it is suggested that all cirrhotic cases should be followed closely for HPS and they should have priority in the waiting list. PMID:24627594

  9. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy.

  10. Mechanical ventilation in Coffin-Lowry syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; de Moura, Érica Leal Teixeira; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Oliveira, Vânia Maria

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 27-year-old patient with Coffin-Lowry syndrome with severe community pneumonia, septic shock and respiratory failure. We summarize both the mechanical ventilatory assistance and the hospitalization period in the intensive care unit. PMID:28099645

  11. Anxiety in Asperger's syndrome: Assessment in real time.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dougal J; Wood, Christopher; Wastell, Sarah; Skirrow, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety is a major problem for many people with Asperger's syndrome who may have qualitatively different fears from a non-Asperger's syndrome population. Research has relied on measures developed for non-Asperger's syndrome populations that require reporting past experiences of anxiety, which may confound assessment in people with Asperger's syndrome due to problems with autobiographical memory as are often reported in this group.Experience sampling methodology was used to record real-time everyday experiences in 20 adults with Asperger's syndrome and 20 neurotypical adults. Within-subject analysis was used to explore the phenomenology of thoughts occurring in people with Asperger's syndrome when they were anxious. Comparisons were made with the group that did not have Asperger's syndrome. The Asperger's syndrome group were significantly more anxious than the comparison group. Factors associated with feelings of anxiety in the Asperger's syndrome group were high levels of self-focus, worries about everyday events and periods of rumination lasting over 10 min. People in the Asperger's syndrome group also had a tendency to think in the image form, but this was not associated with feelings of anxiety. The results are discussed with reference to psychological models of Asperger's syndrome, cognitive models of anxiety and implications for psychological therapy for this group.

  12. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anne M

    2014-10-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common autosomal dominant condition, readily recognisable in childhood. It is characterised by a pattern of typical facial dysmorphism and malformations including congenital cardiac defects, short stature, abnormal chest shape, broad or webbed neck, and a variable learning disability. Mildly affected adults may not be diagnosed until the birth of a more obviously affected child. The phenotype is highly variable. Important progress in understanding the molecular basis of this and other related conditions was made in 2001 when germline mutations in the PTPN11 gene were found to account for ∼50% of cases. Since then, mutations in additional genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) pathway have been identified in a proportion of the remainder. Molecular confirmation of diagnosis is now possible for many families and has become increasingly important in guiding management. Increased awareness by paediatricians will lead to earlier diagnosis, and provide patients and their families with accurate genetic counselling, including options when planning pregnancy.

  13. Fraser Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Adnan Aslam; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani

    2015-10-01

    Fraser's Syndrome (FS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a spectrum of malformations. The most consistent features are Cryptophthalmos (CO), syndactyly, genitourinary tract abnormalities, laryngeal and tracheal anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphism, malformations of the ear and nose, orofacial clefting and musculoskeletal defects. FS is genetically heterogeneous; so far mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 and GRIP1 genes have been linked to FS. FS can be diagnosed on clinical examination, pre-natal ultrasound or perinatal autopsy. We present a case of a 3 months old child born to consanguineous healthy parents with bilateral complete CO, unilateral microphthalmia, hypertelorism, syndactyly (hands and feet bilaterally), ambiguous genitalia with cryptorchidism and an umbilical hernia. We also present the criteria for diagnosing FS and the significant features on pre-natal ultrasonography. Around 200 case reports of patients with FS and CO have been published. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of FS in Pakistan.

  14. Pisa Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michel, Sáenz Farret; Arias Carrión, Oscar; Correa, Thalia Estefania Sánchez; Alejandro, Pellene Luis; Micheli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Lateral trunk flexion is often seen in patients with Parkinson disease, sometimes coming on as a subacute phenomenon associated with medication adjustments, and in others with gradual onset that seems related to a neurodegenerative process related to the evolution of the disease.Either acute or subacute presentations seem to be pure abnormalities in the coronal plane and are usually reversible. However, a chronic form occurs often in a combined fashion with anteroposterior flexion (camptocormia), improves only partially, remains stable, or even worsens over time.The acute/subacute phenotype is the condition originally named as Pisa syndrome (PS).The pathophysiology of PS remains poorly understood, and a cholinergic-dopaminergic imbalance has been suggested as being involved in the cause of this disorder. The role of other neurotransmitters and how they become dysfunctional in PS remains to be elucidated.Specific treatments, other than discontinuing the medications responsible for the disorder, whenever possible, are undeveloped because of the unknown etiology.

  15. Olmsted syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, M E; Sikdar, A U; Akhtar, N; Islam, Z M

    2007-01-01

    Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by symmetrical sharply marginated mutilating keratoderma of palms & soles & hyperkeratotic plaques around the body orifices, onychodystrophy, ainhum & amputation of digital phalanges, flextion deformities of the fingers, localized alopecia, leukokeratosis of the tongue, shortness of stature & laxity of large joints. Inheritance is autosomal dominant, although sporadic cases have been reported. Here we describe two cases of this rare disorder with thickened hyperkeratotic lesion over palm & soles & along with amputation of 3rd , 4th & 5th toes in one case. In one of our case (case no. 2) the immediate younger brother has got the same disease. Both of them were treated with tab. Neotegason 25 mg orally daily for 3 months & there was significant improvement after treatment.

  16. [HYPP--hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in horses].

    PubMed

    Zeilmann, M

    1993-12-01

    A literature review of the clinical syndrome HYPP (Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis) affecting Quarter Horses is given. HYPP is characterized by sporadic attacks of muscle tremors, weakness and/or collapse, lasting for variable periods of time. Diagnosis is based on physical findings in association with hyperkalemia. In horses with HYPP, the regulation of ion transport through the sodium channels in the muscle cells occasionally fails, causing uncontrollable muscle twitching. Further investigations into molecular genetics reveals a mutation in the gene responsible for sodium and potassium regulation. The identification of this gene mutation is the basis for the blood test used to diagnose HYPP. HYPP is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Treatment of HYPP attacks by intravenous application of calcium gluconate, bicarbonate and glucose results in rapid recovery. Consequent dietary management and daily administration of acetazolamide effectively controls the disease.

  17. Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van der Burgt, Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care. PMID:17222357

  18. Hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Neki, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) is a rare life threatening complication of hyperthyroidism commonly occurring in young Asian males but sporadically found in other races. It is characterised by hypokalemia and acute onset paraparesis with prevalence of one in one hundred thousand (1 in 100000). The symptoms resolve promptly with potassium supplementation. Nonselective beta blockers like propranol can also be used to ameliorate and prevent subsequent paralytic attack. We report a case of 22 year old male presenting with hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) having very low serum potassium level. PMID:27648066

  19. Serotonin Syndrome: Prophylactic Treatment With Cyproheptadine.

    PubMed

    Deardorff, O Greg; Khan, Talha; Kulkarni, Gaurav; Doisy, Richard; Loehr, Colleen

    2016-08-25

    Despite the numerous advantages of linezolid therapy, one disadvantage continuing to hinder its use is the risk of serotonin syndrome when coadministered with other serotonergic agents. Developing a better understanding of serotonin syndrome is essential for the prevention and management of this potentially life-threatening condition. This report describes a patient with schizophrenia, depression, and severe, acute osteomyelitis. The patient was taking multiple serotonergic agents and required the use of linezolid without the possibility of a sufficient washout period. The severity of the patient's condition in conjunction with increased risk for serotonin syndrome warranted prophylactic treatment with cyproheptadine. The complex pathophysiology of prophylactic treatment of serotonin syndrome with cyproheptadine is worthy of discussion.

  20. Early onset marfan syndrome: Atypical clinical presentation of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ozyurt, A; Baykan, A; Argun, M; Pamukcu, O; Halis, H; Korkut, S; Yuksel, Z; Gunes, T; Narin, N

    2015-01-01

    Early onset Marfan Syndrome (eoMFS) is a rare, severe form of Marfan Syndrome (MFS). The disease has a poor prognosis and most patients present with resistance to heart failure treatment during the newborn period. This report presents two cases of eoMFS with similar clinical features diagnosed in the newborn period and who died at an early age due to the complications related to the involvement of the cardiovascular system. PMID:26929908

  1. Multiple anesthetics for a patient with stiff-person syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cassavaugh, Jessica M; Oravitz, Todd M

    2016-06-01

    Stiff-person syndrome is a progressive disease of muscle rigidity and spasticity due to a deficiency in the production of γ-aminobutyric acid. Because of the rarity of the condition, little is known about effects of anesthesia on patients with stiff-person syndrome. This report describes the clinical course for a single patient with stiff-person syndrome who received general anesthesia on 3 separate occasions. Her anesthetics included use of both neuromuscular blockade and volatile agents. Unlike several previous reports regarding anesthesia and stiff-person syndrome, the postoperative period for this patient did not require prolonged intubation or result in any residual weakness.

  2. Refeeding syndrome in a vegan patient with stage IV gastric cancer: a novel case.

    PubMed

    Brown, Teresa V; Moss, Rebecca A

    2015-03-01

    The refeeding syndrome encompasses the complex physiologic state that occurs in malnourished patients who receive nutrition after a period of decreased oral intake. The hallmark of the syndrome is hypophosphatemia, though other electrolyte imbalances and severe fluid shifts are commonly involved. Patients with newly diagnosed malignancies and those undergoing treatment for malignancies are at increased risk for developing the refeeding syndrome, however there are few reported cases or other data in the oncology literature regarding this syndrome in cancer patients.

  3. A Modern Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrenden-Harker, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modern Periodic Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)

  4. Periodic Table of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  5. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  6. Oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Machado, Armando

    2009-06-01

    Three experiments examined behavior in extinction following periodic reinforcement. During the first phase of Experiment 1, four groups of pigeons were exposed to fixed interval (FI 16s or FI 48s) or variable interval (VI 16s or VI 48s) reinforcement schedules. Next, during the second phase, each session started with reinforcement trials and ended with an extinction segment. Experiment 2 was similar except that the extinction segment was considerably longer. Experiment 3 replaced the FI schedules with a peak procedure, with FI trials interspersed with non-food peak interval (PI) trials that were four times longer. One group of pigeons was exposed to FI 20s PI 80s trials, and another to FI 40s PI 160s trials. Results showed that, during the extinction segment, most pigeons trained with FI schedules, but not with VI schedules, displayed pause-peck oscillations with a period close to, but slightly greater than the FI parameter. These oscillations did not start immediately after the onset of extinction. Comparing the oscillations from Experiments 1 and 2 suggested that the alternation of reconditioning and re-extinction increases the reliability and earlier onset of the oscillations. In Experiment 3 the pigeons exhibited well-defined pause-peck cycles since the onset of extinction. These cycles had periods close to twice the value of the FI and lasted for long intervals of time. We discuss some hypotheses concerning the processes underlying behavioral oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

  7. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.

  8. Periodically structured plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saj, W. M.; Foteinopoulou, S.; Kafesaki, M.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Economou, E. N.

    2008-04-01

    We study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) guiding structures, which are a modification of the Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) waveguide. The designs are constructed by introducing a periodic modulation in a MIM waveguide, with a glass core and silver claddings. This periodic modulation is created either by causing periodic indentations in the silver slabs encompassing the glass core, or by increasing the glass spacer material in certain periodic locations. Our objective is to achieve long range sub-wavelength waveguiding with vast dispersion engineering capabilities. We employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) with the Auxiliary Differential Equation method (ADE) for the calculation of the dispersion relation of the guided modes, as well as the real time propagation suggests that the guiding mechnism in the examined structures is based on the electromagnetic (EM) couping between the slit plasmon modes. These - depending on the design - exist in the grooves between the silver plates or in the larger areas of the glass core spacer. Put it different, the guiding mechanism in the examined SPP waveguide designs is analogous to the EM energy transfer along metallic nanoparticle chains.

  9. Getting Your Period

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a woman to have a baby. During sexual intercourse, the egg can get fertilized by a male’s sperm and then attach to the lining of the uterus ( endometrium ) and grow into a baby. ( Read more about reproduction. ) Does your period come each month? top Menstrual ...

  10. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME S HARE W ITH W OMEN PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a common birth defect that includes mental retardation and— often— heart ...

  11. Treatment of Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Cihan; Nugent, Kenneth; Shome, Goutam P; Kounis, Nicholas G

    2010-09-03

    Kounis syndrome is potentially a life-threatening medical emergency with both a severe allergic reaction and acute coronary syndrome. Most of the information about this syndrome has come from the case reports. The management of these patients may be challenging for clinicians, and unfortunately guidelines have not been established yet. In this article, we review the current guidelines of acute coronary syndromes and anaphylaxis along with the published cases with Kounis syndrome secondary to beta-lactam antibiotics. We have summarized our recommendations for the work-up and treatment of Kounis syndrome from available data. Obviously, larger prospective studies are needed to establish definitive treatment guidelines for these patients.

  12. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  13. "Fibrositis" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rice, J R

    1986-03-01

    There appears to be as yet undefined but significant and possibly multifactorial elements of personality, stress, or depression in the manifestations and possibly the pathogenesis of FS. If these factors, perhaps amplified by the neurophysiologic effects of disturbed sleep, produce a neurochemical disturbance in CNS function, and if this perturbation includes a reduction or impairment of function involving the pain-modulation pathways, then a simple and perhaps compelling explanation for the experience of pain in FS becomes apparent. Reduced midbrain/brainstem inhibition of ascending nociceptive impulses would clearly explain the finding of tender points in normal-appearing areas of the body, as well as the lack of segmental distribution of discomfort in FS. Local anesthetics, injected peripherally into tender points, would be expected, as is the case, to block pain and tenderness in the local area for the duration of action of the agent used. Analgesics with peripheral activity, such as aspirin and NSAIDs, are relatively ineffective in treating FS, and would be predictably so in a disorder involving reduced central pain inhibition as opposed to increased peripheral nociceptive input. It would not be surprising to find that centrally acting agents, particularly those producing enhancement of serotonergic neurons such as amitriptyline, would provide substantial or total pain relief as well as improvement in mood in a significant number of patients. Most importantly, this concept would highlight the real pain experienced by these patients and the obligation of involved physicians to appropriately diagnose and treat this common pain syndrome. Avoiding excessive conjecture, it is then permissible at the present time to conclude that: FS is a characteristic, clinically common pain syndrome in which aspects of the pain itself appear to be of physiologic origin. Although stress or inherent personality traits may play a role in FS, the relative uniformity in symptomatology

  14. Angelman syndrome (AS, MIM 105830).

    PubMed

    Van Buggenhout, Griet; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2009-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a distinct neurogenetic syndrome, first described in 1965. The phenotype is well known in infancy and adulthood, but the clinical features may change with age. The main clinical characteristics include severe mental retardation, epileptic seizures and EEG abnormalilties, neurological problems and distinct facial dysmorphic features. Behavioural problems such as hyperactivity and sleeping problems are reported, although these patients present mostly a happy personality with periods of inappropriate laughter. Different underlying genetic mechanisms may cause AS, with deletion of chromosome 15 as the most frequent cause. Other genetic mechanisms such as paternal uniparental disomy, imprinting defect and mutation in the UBE3A gene are present in smaller groups of patients with AS. As the recurrence risk can be up to 50%, the clinical diagnosis of AS should be confirmed by laboratory tesing, and genetic counselling should be provided. Treatment of seizures, physical therapy or other intervention strategies are helpful to ameliorate the symptoms.

  15. Cells anticipate periodic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  16. Acute radiation syndrome after endovascular AAA repair.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Saum A; Coyle, Brian W; Vogel, Todd R; Haser, Paul B; Graham, Alan M

    2011-02-01

    Acute radiation syndrome or radiation sickness is a serious illness that occurs after the body receives a high dose of radiation, typically over a short period of time. This condition may be underrecognized by interventionalists and must be considered whenever performing complex endovascular procedures.

  17. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K N; Sukanya, V; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, receiving antiretroviral drugs for 2 years, presented with a recent onset of myoclonic jerks and cognitive deterioration. On examination, he manifested myoclonic jerks once every 10-15 seconds. His electroencephalogram indicated periodic complexes, and his cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for measles antibodies.

  18. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  19. Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lisa; Lehman, Erik; Brown, Ashley D.; Ahmad, Syeda; Berlin, Cheston

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a 35-year single-center experience with pediatric tics and Tourette syndrome was conducted. 482 charts from 1972 to 2007 were reviewed. Follow-up surveys were mailed to last known address and 83 patients responded (17%). Response rate was affected by long interval from last visit; contact information was often incorrect as it was the address of the patient as a child. Males constituted 84%. Mean tic onset was 6.6 years. At first visit, 83% had multiple motor tics and >50% had comorbidities. 44% required only 1 visit and 90% less than 12 visits. Follow-up showed positive clinical and social outcomes in 73/83 survey responses. Of those indicating a poor outcome, mean educational level was lower and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and learning disabilities were significantly higher. Access to knowledgeable caregivers was a problem for adult patients. A shortage of specialists may in part be addressed by interested general pediatricians. PMID:25200367

  20. Premenstrual syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yonkers, Kimberly Ann; O’Brien, P M Shaughn; Eriksson, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Most women of reproductive age have some physical discomfort or dysphoria in the weeks before menstruation. Symptoms are often mild, but can be severe enough to substantially affect daily activities. About 5–8% of women thus suffer from severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS); most of these women also meet criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Mood and behavioural symptoms, including irritability, tension, depressed mood, tearfulness, and mood swings, are the most distressing, but somatic complaints, such as breast tenderness and bloating, can also be problematic. We outline theories for the underlying causes of severe PMS, and describe two main methods of treating it: one targeting the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axis, and the other targeting brain serotonergic synapses. Fluctuations in gonadal hormone levels trigger the symptoms, and thus interventions that abolish ovarian cyclicity, including long-acting analogues of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or oestradiol (administered as patches or implants), effectively reduce the symptoms, as can some oral contraceptives. The effectiveness of serotonin reuptake inhibitors, taken throughout the cycle or during luteal phases only, is also well established. PMID:18395582

  1. Angelman Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Seth S; Sell, Gabrielle L; Zbinden, Mark A; Bird, Lynne M

    2015-07-01

    In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of Angelman syndrome (AS), its molecular and cellular underpinnings, and current treatment strategies. AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive disability, motor dysfunction, speech impairment, hyperactivity, and frequent seizures. AS is caused by disruption of the maternally expressed and paternally imprinted UBE3A, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Four mechanisms that render the maternally inherited UBE3A nonfunctional are recognized, the most common of which is deletion of the maternal chromosomal region 15q11-q13. Remarkably, duplication of the same chromosomal region is one of the few characterized persistent genetic abnormalities associated with autistic spectrum disorder, occurring in >1-2% of all cases of autism spectrum disorder. While the overall morphology of the brain and connectivity of neural projections appear largely normal in AS mouse models, major functional defects are detected at the level of context-dependent learning, as well as impaired maturation of hippocampal and neocortical circuits. While these findings demonstrate a crucial role for ubiquitin protein ligase E3A in synaptic development, the mechanisms by which deficiency of ubiquitin protein ligase E3A leads to AS pathophysiology in humans remain poorly understood. However, recent efforts have shown promise in restoring functions disrupted in AS mice, renewing hope that an effective treatment strategy can be found.

  2. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by venous or arterial thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in patients with persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). Catastrophic APS is the most severe form of APS, which is associated with rapid development of microvascular thrombosis resulting in multiorgan failure in patients with aPLs. Patients with APS and catastrophic APS are recognized to have a high risk of recurrent thrombosis that can occur despite anticoagulant therapy. Although antithrombotic therapy remains the mainstay of treatment, bleeding manifestations can complicate management and contribute to increased morbidity. Patients with persistently elevated aPL levels, particularly those who exhibit positive testing for lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and anti-β2GPI antibodies (triple positivity), appear to be at increased risk for thrombosis and pregnancy complications, whereas isolated positivity for aPLs appears to be associated with low risk. Recognizing that patients with APS have different thrombotic risk profiles may assist clinicians in assessing the risks and benefits of anticoagulation. The optimal type, intensity, and duration of anticoagulation in the treatment of APS remain controversial, particularly for arterial thrombosis and recurrent thrombosis. Future studies that delineate thrombotic risk in APS and evaluate current and novel anticoagulants as well as nonanticoagulant therapies are required.

  3. Asherman's syndrome.

    PubMed

    March, Charles M

    2011-03-01

    Asherman's syndrome is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. Although it usually occurs following curettage of the pregnant or recently pregnant uterus, any uterine surgery can lead to intrauterine adhesions (IUA). Most women with IUA have amenorrhea or hypomenorrhea, but up to a fourth have painless menses of normal flow and duration. Those who have amenorrhea may also have cyclic pelvic pain caused by outflow obstruction. The accompanying retrograde menstruation may lead to endometriosis. In addition to abnormal menses, infertility and recurrent spontaneous abortion are common complaints. Hysteroscopy is the standard method to both diagnose and treat this condition. Various techniques for adhesiolysis and for prevention of scar reformation have been advocated. The most efficacious appears to be the use of miniature scissors for adhesiolysis and the placement of a balloon stent inside the uterus immediately after surgery. Postoperative estrogen therapy is prescribed to stimulate endometrial regrowth. Follow-up studies to assure resolution of the scarring are mandatory before the patient attempts to conceive as is careful monitoring of pregnancies for cervical incompetence, placenta accreta, and intrauterine growth retardation.

  4. Kawasaki Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Anne H.; Shulman, Stanford T.

    1998-01-01

    Kawasaki syndrome (KS) is an acute, sometimes fatal vasculitis of young children. KS has replaced acute rheumatic fever as the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in the United States. The illness is manifested by prolonged fever, conjunctival injection, enanthem, exanthem, erythema and swelling of the hands and feet, and cervical adenopathy. These acute features of illness are self-limiting, but coronary artery abnormalities occur in 20% of untreated patients. The etiology of the illness is unknown, but its clinical and epidemiologic features are most consistent with an infectious cause. Common cardiovascular manifestations of the illness include myocarditis, pericardial effusion, and coronary artery aneurysm formation. Treatment with intravenous gamma globulin (IVGG) and aspirin within the first 10 days of illness reduces the prevalence of coronary artery abnormalities from 20% in those treated with aspirin alone to 4%. Patients who develop coronary artery aneurysms, particularly those who develop giant coronary artery aneurysms, may suffer myocardial infarction secondary to thrombosis or stenosis in the abnormal vessel. Additional research to determine the cause of KS is urgently needed to allow for improved diagnosis, more specific therapy, and prevention of the disorder. PMID:9665974

  5. A Longitudinal Study of Narrative Development in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleave, Patricia; Bird, Elizabeth Kay-Raining; Czutrin, Rachael; Smith, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined narrative development in children and adolescents with Down syndrome longitudinally. Narratives were collected from 32 children and adolescents with Down syndrome three times over a 1-year period. Both micro- and macrolevel analyses were conducted. Significant growth over the 1-year period was seen in semantic complexity…

  6. Down syndrome in diverse populations.

    PubMed

    Kruszka, Paul; Porras, Antonio R; Sobering, Andrew K; Ikolo, Felicia A; La Qua, Samantha; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk; Chung, Brian H Y; Mok, Gary T K; Uwineza, Annette; Mutesa, Leon; Moresco, Angélica; Obregon, María Gabriela; Sokunbi, Ogochukwu Jidechukwu; Kalu, Nnenna; Joseph, Daniel Akinsanya; Ikebudu, Desmond; Ugwu, Christopher Emeka; Okoromah, Christy A N; Addissie, Yonit A; Pardo, Katherine L; Brough, J Joseph; Lee, Ni-Chung; Girisha, Katta M; Patil, Siddaramappa Jagdish; Ng, Ivy S L; Min, Breana Cham Wen; Jamuar, Saumya S; Tibrewal, Shailja; Wallang, Batriti; Ganesh, Suma; Sirisena, Nirmala D; Dissanayake, Vajira H W; Paththinige, C Sampath; Prabodha, L B Lahiru; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Muthukumarasamy, Premala; Thong, Meow-Keong; Jones, Kelly L; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Ekure, Ekanem Nsikak; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Summar, Marshall; Linguraru, Marius George; Muenke, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common cause of cognitive impairment and presents clinically with universally recognizable signs and symptoms. In this study, we focus on exam findings and digital facial analysis technology in individuals with Down syndrome in diverse populations. Photos and clinical information were collected on 65 individuals from 13 countries, 56.9% were male and the average age was 6.6 years (range 1 month to 26 years; SD = 6.6 years). Subjective findings showed that clinical features were different across ethnicities (Africans, Asians, and Latin Americans), including brachycephaly, ear anomalies, clinodactyly, sandal gap, and abundant neck skin, which were all significantly less frequent in Africans (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.05, and P < 0.05, respectively). Evaluation using a digital facial analysis technology of a larger diverse cohort of newborns to adults (n = 129 cases; n = 132 controls) was able to diagnose Down syndrome with a sensitivity of 0.961, specificity of 0.924, and accuracy of 0.943. Only the angles at medial canthus and ala of the nose were common significant findings amongst different ethnicities (Caucasians, Africans, and Asians) when compared to ethnically matched controls. The Asian group had the least number of significant digital facial biometrics at 4, compared to Caucasians at 8 and Africans at 7. In conclusion, this study displays the wide variety of findings across different geographic populations in Down syndrome and demonstrates the accuracy and promise of digital facial analysis technology in the diagnosis of Down syndrome internationally. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baujat, Geneviève; Le Merrer, Martine

    2007-06-04

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a chondral and ectodermal dysplasia characterized by short ribs, polydactyly, growth retardation, and ectodermal and heart defects. It is a rare disease with approximately 150 cases reported worldwide. The exact prevalence is unknown, but the syndrome seems more common among the Amish community. Prenatal abnormalities (that may be detected by ultrasound examination) include narrow thorax, shortening of long bones, hexadactyly and cardiac defects. After birth, cardinal features are short stature, short ribs, polydactyly, and dysplastic fingernails and teeth. Heart defects, especially abnormalities of atrial septation, occur in about 60% of cases. Cognitive and motor development is normal. This rare condition is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with variable expression. Mutations of the EVC1 and EVC2 genes, located in a head to head configuration on chromosome 4p16, have been identified as causative. EVC belongs to the short rib-polydactyly group (SRP) and these SRPs, especially type III (Verma-Naumoff syndrome), are discussed in the prenatal differential diagnosis. Postnatally, the essential differential diagnoses include Jeune dystrophy, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome and Weyers syndrome. The management of EVC is multidisciplinary. Management during the neonatal period is mostly symptomatic, involving treatment of the respiratory distress due to narrow chest and heart failure. Orthopedic follow-up is required to manage the bones deformities. Professional dental care should be considered for management of the oral manifestations. Prognosis is linked to the respiratory difficulties in the first months of life due to thoracic narrowness and possible heart defects. Prognosis of the final body height is difficult to predict.

  8. Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors, and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes? Some cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are linked ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  9. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics > Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem ... of infertility. Expand all | Collapse all What is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome ( ...

  10. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000242.htm Dubin-Johnson syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS) is a disorder passed down through ...

  11. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In children, Horner’s syndrome may be caused by neuroblastoma, a tumor arising in another part of the body. Although rare, the risk of neuroblastoma is significantly greater with acquired Horner’s syndrome than ...

  12. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a genetic risk factor. References Nirken MH, et al. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: ... com/home. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013. High WA, et al. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: ...

  13. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ121 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) • What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? • What causes PCOS? • What is insulin resistance? • ...

  14. Marfan syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, ...

  15. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxic shock syndrome results from toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria, but the condition may also ... a skin or wound infection. Bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus (staph), causes toxic shock syndrome. It can ...

  16. Fragile X syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001668.htm Fragile X syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fragile X syndrome is a genetic condition involving changes in part ...

  17. Fragile X Syndrome Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Fragile X Syndrome: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The genetic disorder Fragile X syndrome, which results from mutations in a gene on ...

  18. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome? Obesity hypoventilation (HI-po-ven-tih-LA-shun) syndrome (OHS) is ... e-DE-mah), pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI-per-TEN-shun), cor pulmonale (pul-meh-NAL- ...

  19. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Scalded skin syndrome (SSS) is caused by infection with certain strains of Staphylococcus bacteria. The bacteria produce a toxin that causes the skin ...

  20. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... people who have it. What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Many kids with Down syndrome ...

  1. Treacher Collins Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss in Treacher Collins syndrome is due to abnormalities in the structures of the outer and middle ear which conduct sound to the nerve endings in the inner ear. Thus, the loss in Treacher Collins syndrome ...

  2. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... present at birth. The syndrome often involves port wine stains, excess growth of bones and soft tissue, ... Symptoms of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome include: Many port wine stains or other blood vessel problems, including dark ...

  3. Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Felix F.

    1985-01-01

    Physical, psychological, and cytogenic characteristics of individuals with the Fragile X syndrome are reviewed. Prospects for therapy with folic acid, prenatal diagnosis, phenotype of heterozygote for the marker X, and unresolved issues about the syndrome are discussed. (CL)

  4. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marfan Syndrome? For More Information What Is Connective Tissue? Connective tissue supports many parts of your body. You can ... races and ethnic backgrounds. What Causes Marfan Syndrome? Connective tissue is made of many kinds of protein. One ...

  5. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001186.htm Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is a growth disorder that causes large ...

  6. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Ramsay Hunt syndrome (herpes zoster oticus) occurs when a shingles outbreak affects the facial nerve near one of your ears. In addition to the painful shingles rash, Ramsay Hunt syndrome can cause facial paralysis ...

  7. Miller Fisher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles, and absence of the tendon reflexes. Like Guillain-Barré syndrome, symptoms may be preceded ... the eye muscles, and absence of the tendon reflexes. Like Guillain-Barré syndrome, symptoms may be preceded ...

  8. Sjogren's Syndrome Information Page

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tel: 301-496-4261 Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation 6707 Democracy Blvd. Suite 325 Bethesda MD Bethesda, MD 20817 ... Tel: 301-496-4261 Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation 6707 Democracy Blvd. Suite 325 Bethesda MD Bethesda, MD 20817 ...

  9. Rett Syndrome: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Selected Staff Profiles Multimedia About NICHD Institute ... this: Page Content Rett syndrome is a neurological and developmental genetic disorder that occurs mostly in females. Infants with Rett syndrome seem to grow and ...

  10. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  11. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... TOS, including rotator cuff injuries, cervical disc disorders, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and tumors ... TOS, including rotator cuff injuries, cervical disc disorders, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and tumors ...

  12. Prader-Willi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001605.htm Prader-Willi syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Prader-Willi syndrome is a disease that is present from birth ( ...

  13. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome irritable bowel syndrome thyroid disease Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common conditions that overlap with PMS. About one half of women seeking treatment for PMS have one of these ...

  14. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  15. Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... worsens. Treatment options for myofascial pain syndrome include physical therapy and trigger point injections. Pain medications and relaxation ... syndrome typically includes medications, trigger point injections or physical therapy. No conclusive evidence supports using one therapy over ...

  16. Nephrotic Syndrome in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children Treatment for Kidney Failure in Children Caring for a ... Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Failure Choosing a Treatment for Kidney Failure Hemodialysis Peritoneal Dialysis Kidney Transplant ...

  17. Sheehan's Syndrome (Postpartum Hypopituitarism)

    MedlinePlus

    Sheehan's syndrome Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Sheehan's syndrome is a condition that affects women who lose a life-threatening amount of blood in childbirth or who have severe low blood pressure ...

  18. Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Density MR with arrows The clinical differential diagnosis of plica syndrome includes lateral epicondylitis (aka tennis elbow ), loose bodies... Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Radiology Corner Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Guarantor: CPT Amit Sanghi, USA, MC FS Contributors: CPT Amit...the case of a 17 year old female with elbow synovial fold syndrome (aka plica synovialis). The etiology is thought to be related to repetitive

  19. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tulika; Noor, Nazia Nagori; Kural, Moolraj; Tripathi, Amita

    2016-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is consist of wide range of fetal malformations which have a genetic linkage. A defect in embryonic acetylcholine receptor which can be inherited as autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked fashion is the cause of this syndrome. We present a sporadic case of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome. PMID:27843868

  20. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  1. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  2. Controls on geyser periodicity.

    PubMed

    Ingebritsen, S E; Rojstaczer, S A

    1993-11-05

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates.

  3. Controls on geyser periodicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Rojstaczer, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (???10-6) strains induced by seismic events, atmospheric loading, and Earth tides. The geyser system is approximated as a permeable conduit of intensely fractured rock surrounded by a less permeable rock matrix. Numerical simulation of this conceptual model yields a set of parameters that controls geyser existence and periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates.

  4. The Axenfeld syndrome and the Rieger syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, N; Kaback, M

    1978-01-01

    A family is reported in which both the syndrome of Axenfeld and the eye malformations of the syndrome of Rieger occur, indicating that both may be expressions of the same gene. We also review the associated anomalies already reported, emphasise their high incidence, suggest that these are not accidental associations, and propose some possible explanations for the high incidence. Images PMID:416212

  5. Lupus Erythematosus and Neutrophilic Urticarial Dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    Gusdorf, Laurence; Bessis, Didier; Lipsker, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (NUD) resembles urticaria clinically but is a neutrophilic dermatosis histopathologically. The majority of patients with NUD have an underlying systemic condition, mainly, autoinflammatory disorders such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, Schnitzler syndrome, and adult-onset Still disease, but a few also have systemic lupus erythematosus (LE). Here, we confirm these data and we report relevant clinical and histopathological data of 7 patients with LE and NUD. We retrospectively retrieved the medical records of all patients with LE in whom skin biopsy showed NUD in registers of Strasbourg and Montpellier University hospitals since 2000. All were female and aged between 13 and 45 years. Skin lesions were typically rose or red macules or slightly elevated papules occurring in a wide distribution. Individual lesions resolved within 24 hours and were not or only slightly itchy. Every patient had associated signs, most of the time polyarthritis and/or fever. NUD was the presenting mode of LE in 2 patients. NUD was misdiagnosed as a classic lupus flare and led to therapeutic intensification with the introduction of immunosuppressive drugs in 4 patients. Histopathological findings consisted of intense neutrophilic interstitial and perivascular infiltrate with leukocytoclasia and without fibrinoid necrosis of vessel walls. Direct immunofluorescence testing showed a lupus band in 4 patients. Antinuclear antibodies were always positive, anti-dsDNA antibodies were positive in 5 patients, and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in 6 patients. Immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate were never effective to treat NUD. Antihistamines were effective in 1 patient and dapsone or colchicine was effective in 5 patients. NUD is not exceptional in patients with systemic LE and is easily misdiagnosed as an acute LE flare. Furthermore, we show that conventional immunosuppressive LE

  6. Interleukin-1, inflammasomes, autoinflammation and the skin.

    PubMed

    Contassot, Emmanuel; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; French, Lars E

    2012-05-31

    Interleukin 1, one of the first cytokines discovered in the 1980s, and a potent mediator of fever, pain and inflammation, is at present experiencing a revival in biology and medicine. Whereas the mechanism of activation and secretion of interleukin 1β, which critically regulates the function of this molecule, has remained mysterious for some 30 years following its discovery, the identification of a new cytoplasmic complex of proteins regulating IL-1β activation and secretion has carried our understanding of the role of IL1 in biology and disease one big step further. The inflammasomes, recently identified innate immune complexes that sense intracellular danger- (e.g. uric acid, ATP, cytoplasmic DNA) or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (e.g. muramyl dipeptide, flagellin, anthrax lethal toxin), are now known to be responsible for triggering inflammation in response to several molecular patterns, including, for example, uric acid, a danger-associated molecular pattern and trigger of gout. Dysregulation of inflammasome function is however also the cause of a family of genetic autoinflammatory diseases known as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) characterised by recurrent episodes of fever, urticarial-like skin lesions, systemic inflammation and arthritis. In mouse models recapitulating mutations observed in CAPS, neutrophilic inflammation of the skin is a cardinal feature, in a manner similar to several autoinflammatory diseases with skin involvement such as PAPA (pyoderma gangrenosum, acne and pyogenic arthritis) and Schnitzler's syndrome, in which IL-1β very probably plays a pathogenic role. In this article the role of the inflammasome in IL-1 biology, autoinflammation and disease is reviewed, together with new avenues for the therapy of these diseases.

  7. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  8. Multifunctional periodic cellular metals.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Haydn N G

    2006-01-15

    Periodic cellular metals with honeycomb and corrugated topologies are widely used for the cores of light weight sandwich panel structures. Honeycombs have closed cell pores and are well suited for thermal protection while also providing efficient load support. Corrugated core structures provide less efficient and highly anisotropic load support, but enable cross flow heat exchange opportunities because their pores are continuous in one direction. Recent advances in topology design and fabrication have led to the emergence of lattice truss structures with open cell structures. These three classes of periodic cellular metals can now be fabricated from a wide variety of structural alloys. Many topologies are found to provide adequate stiffness and strength for structural load support when configured as the cores of sandwich panels. Sandwich panels with core relative densities of 2-10% and cell sizes in the millimetre range are being assessed for use as multifunctional structures. The open, three-dimensional interconnected pore networks of lattice truss topologies provide opportunities for simultaneously supporting high stresses while also enabling cross flow heat exchange. These highly compressible structures also provide opportunities for the mitigation of high intensity dynamic loads created by impacts and shock waves in air or water. By filling the voids with polymers and hard ceramics, these structures have also been found to offer significant resistance to penetration by projectiles.

  9. Periodic truss structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zok, Frank W.; Latture, Ryan M.; Begley, Matthew R.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the recognition of the enormous potential of periodic trusses for use in a broad range of technologies, there are no widely-accepted descriptors of their structure. The terminology has been based loosely either on geometry of polyhedra or of point lattices: neither of which, on its own, has an appropriate structure to fully define periodic trusses. The present article lays out a system for classification of truss structure types. The system employs concepts from crystallography and geometry to describe nodal locations and connectivity of struts. Through a series of illustrative examples of progressively increasing complexity, a rational taxonomy of truss structure is developed. Its conceptual evolution begins with elementary cubic trusses, increasing in complexity with non-cubic and compound trusses as well as supertrusses, and, finally, with complex trusses. The conventions and terminology adopted to define truss structure yield concise yet unambiguous descriptions of structure types and of specific (finite) trusses. The utility of the taxonomy is demonstrated by bringing into alignment a disparate set of ad hoc and incomplete truss designations previously employed in a broad range of science and engineering fields. Additionally, the merits of a particular compound truss (comprising two interpenetrating elementary trusses) is shown to be superior to the octet truss for applications requiring high stiffness and elastic isotropy. By systematically stepping through and analyzing the finite number of structure types identified through the present classification system, optimal structures for prescribed mechanical and functional requirements are expected to be ascertained in an expeditious manner.

  10. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacob; George, Reeba; Dixit, R.; Gupta, R. C.; Gupta, N.

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is an often overlooked cause of breathlessness in trauma wards. Presenting in a wide range of clinical signs of varying severity, fat embolism is usually diagnosed by a physician who keeps a high degree of suspicion. The clinical background, chronology of symptoms and corroborative laboratory findings are instrumental in a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. There are a few diagnostic criteria which are helpful in making a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. Management is mainly prevention of fat embolism syndrome, and organ supportive care. Except in fulminant fat embolism syndrome, the prognosis is usually good. PMID:23661916

  11. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2013-02-01

    Pain in the tongue or oral tissues described as "burning" has been referred to by many terms including burning mouth syndrome. When a burning sensation in the mouth is caused by local or systemic factors, it is called secondary burning mouth syndrome and when these factors are treated the pain will resolve. When burning mouth syndrome occurs in the absence of identified risk indicators, the term primary burning mouth syndrome is utilized. This article focuses on descriptions, etiologic theories, and management of primary burning mouth syndrome, a condition for which underlying causative agents have been ruled out.

  12. [Postpartum endocrine syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ducarme, G; Châtel, P; Luton, D

    2008-05-01

    Postpartum endocrine syndromes occur in the year after delivery. They are due to immunologic and vascular modifications during pregnancy. The Sheehan syndrome is the first described postpartum endocrine syndrome and consists on a hypophyse necrosis in relation with a hypovolemic shock during delivery. The immunologic consequences of the pregnancy are the most frequent, sometimes discrete and transitory. The physiological evolution of the endocrine glands during pregnancy and the most frequent post-partum endocrine syndromes are discussed: postpartum lymphocytic hypophysitis, thyroiditis and Sheehan' syndrome.

  13. Braddock-Carey syndrome: A 21q22 contiguous gene syndrome encompassing RUNX1.

    PubMed

    Braddock, Stephen R; South, Sarah T; Schiffman, Joshua D; Longhurst, Maria; Rowe, Leslie R; Carey, John C

    2016-10-01

    In 1994, Braddock and Carey first reported two unrelated girls with a new multiple malformation syndrome. The primary features included Pierre Robin sequence, persistent neonatal-onset thrombocytopenia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, a distinctive facies, enamel hypoplasia, and severe developmental delay. Since that time, there have been multiple other reported patients with a similar phenotype. In addition, several reports of thrombocytopenia and developmental delay have been documented in association with deletions in the Down syndrome critical region at 21q22. The similarity of the reported cases with deletions involving 21q22 with the clinical presentation of the two patients with Braddock-Carey syndrome resulted in a reinvestigation of the genetic etiology of these two patients 20 years after the original study. This investigation provides evidence that the etiology of this and other "Fanconi-like" disorders represent a newly recognized contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving 21q22 and specifically, the RUNX1 gene. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Behcet's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Sam R; Yildirim, Resit; Yazici, Yusuf

    2012-12-03

    Behcet's syndrome (BS) is a vasculitis, seen more commonly around the Mediterranean and the Far East, and manifests with oral and genital ulcerations, skin lesions, uveitis, and vascular, central nervous system and gastrointestinal involvement. Its natural history of getting less severe over time, more severe disease in males and lack of specific diagnostic testing separates it from other commonly seen conditions in rheumatology. Most of the serious manifestations respond well to immunosuppression, and these are the mainstays of treatment for BS. BS is more prevalent in regions along the Silk Road, from the Mediterranean to the Far East. The genetic risk factor most strongly associated with BS is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B51 allele. While genetic factors seem to play a role in the development of certain features of BS, there is general consensus that as yet unidentified environmental stimuli are necessary for initiation of disease. Proposed exogenous triggers include both bacterial and viral infections, which may then lead to dysregulation of the immune system, ultimately leading to the phenotypic expression of disease. The clinical manifestations of BS are protean in nature. While most patients develop mucocutaneous and genital ulcers along with eye disease, other patients may also present with arthritis, frank vasculitis, thrombophlebitis and CNS disease. Interestingly, the manifestations of this illness vary considerably based on gender and ethnicity. As the phenotypic expression among patients with BS is quite heterogeneous, pharmacological therapy is variable and dependent upon the severity of the disease as well as organ involvement. Treatment for BS overlaps considerably with therapies for other autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and the vasculitides. Pharmacological agents utilized for treatment of BS include corticosteroids, colchicine, azathioprine, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF).α inhibitors

  15. Model Valid Prediction Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P. C.

    2002-12-01

    A new concept, valid prediction period (VPP), is presented here to evaluate model predictability. VPP is defined as the time period when the prediction error first exceeds a pre-determined criterion (i.e., the tolerance level). It depends not only on the instantaneous error growth, but also on the noise level, the initial error, and tolerance level. The model predictability skill is then represented by a single scalar, VPP. The longer the VPP, the higher the model predictability skill is. A theoretical framework on the base of the backward Fokker-Planck equation is developed to determine the probability density function (pdf) of VPP. Verification of a Gulf of Mexico nowcast/forecast model is used as an example to demonstrate the usefulness of VPP. Power law scaling is found in the mean square error of displacement between drifting buoy and model trajectories (both at 50 m depth). The pdf of VPP is asymmetric with a long and broad tail on the higher value side, which suggests long-term predictability. The calculations demonstrate that the long-term (extreme long such as 50-60 day) predictability is not an "outlier" and shares the same statistical properties as the short-term predictions. References Chu P. C., L. M. Ivanov, and C.W. Fan, Backward Fokker-Plank equation for determining model predictability with unknown initial error distribution. J. Geophys. Res., in press, 2002. Chu P.C., L.M.Ivanov, T.M. Margolina, and O.V.Melnichenko, 2002b: On probabilistic stability of an atmospheric model to various amplitude perturbations. J. Atmos. Sci., in press Chu P.C., L.M. Ivanov, L. Kantha, O.V. Melnichenko and Y.A. Poberezhny, 2002c: The long-term correlations and power decay law in model prediction skill. Geophys. Res. Let., in press.

  16. Auto inflammatory syndromes: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Katia; Grateau, Gilles

    2007-12-01

    Hereditary recurrent fevers are rare genetic diseases characterized by apparently spontaneous attacks of inflammation. They include familial Mediterranean fever (FMF); tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor periodic syndrome (TRAPS); hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS); and hereditary periodic fevers related to mutations in the CIAS1 (cold induced autoinflammatory syndrome 1) gene, such as Muckle-Wells syndrome, familial cold urticaria, and CINCA/NOMID (chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular/neonatal-onset multisystemic inflammatory disease). Musculoskeletal manifestations are common. They may occur as features of the acute inflammatory attacks or persist for longer periods. Among them, the most common include arthritis of the large and medium-sized joints in FMF and CINCA, arthralgia in HIDS, and myalgia or pseudo-fasciitis in TRAPS. The outcome is usually favorable, although joint destruction may develop in CINCA or at the hip in FMF. The recurrent bouts of fever and accompanying clinical manifestations suggest the diagnosis, which can be confirmed by genetic testing. Among differential diagnoses, infection should be considered routinely. The treatment of the inflammatory attacks is nonspecific. New pathophysiological insights have led to the development of promising maintenance treatments designed to reduce the number and severity of the inflammatory attacks and to diminish the risk of secondary amyloidosis.

  17. [Epidemiology of Asperger's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yukiko; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Only a little data is available so far on the prevalence of Asperger's syndrome. The prevalence that Fombonne (2003) estimated after considering six European research was 2/10,000. In Ishikawa's study (2006) conducted in Nagoya city, Japan, the prevalence of Asperger's syndrome was 56/10,000. Currently there are not strict diagnostic criteria of Asperger's syndrome and methods of investigation are not consistent in each study. Therefore the prevalence rate for Asperger's syndrome covered very wide range. Although we still don't have a precise prevalence data on Asperger's syndrome, the awareness of this syndrome emerged in these several decades tells us that further research and support for the children of Asperger's syndrome and their family are necessary.

  18. Hospitalizations of Infants and Young Children with Down Syndrome: Evidence from Inpatient Person-Records from a Statewide Administrative Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, S. A.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although individuals with Down syndrome are increasingly living into the adult years, infants and young children with the syndrome continue to be at increased risk for health problems. Using linked, statewide administrative hospital discharge records of all infants with Down syndrome born over a 3-year period, this study "follows…

  19. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in motorcyclists.

    PubMed

    Manes, Harvey R

    2012-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is prevalent in patients who have a repetitive motion, vibration, or pressure exerted on the wrist joint for an extended period of time. The prevalence of this condition in the general population is approximately 5%. Motorcyclists subject themselves to high levels of vibration from the road and use their wrists to control the motorcycle's brakes, gas intake, and gears via the handlebars. Under these conditions, the author hypothesized that an increased prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome would be observed in this population.

  20. A Rare Variant of Wallenberg's Syndrome: Opalski syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kk, Parathan; R, Kannan; P, Chitrambalam; Aiyappan, Senthil Kumar; N, Deepthi

    2014-07-01

    Lateral Medullary Syndrome (LMS) is a well-documented vascular syndrome of the posterior circulation territory. This syndrome is easily localised because of characteristic presentation, unique territory of blood supply and very small area of involvement. We present a case of Wallenberg's syndrome which did not have all the classical components of the syndrome, like Horner's syndrome. Opalski syndrome is a rare variant of Wallenberg syndrome, where lateral medullary syndrome is associated with ipsilateral hemiparesis. This case report highlights how differential involvement of the lateral part of medulla can result in varied presentation.

  1. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Syndromes: State of the Art on Genetic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Issues

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Compagnone, Adele; Caso, Paolo; Frediani, Bruno; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (MAISs) are caused by innate immune system dysregulation leading to aberrant inflammasome activation and episodes of fever and involvement of skin, serous membranes, eyes, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system, predominantly with a childhood onset. To date, there are twelve known MAISs: familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, CINCA syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, NLRP12-associated autoinflammatory disorder, Blau syndrome, early-onset sarcoidosis, PAPA syndrome, Majeed syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Each of these conditions may manifest itself with more or less severe inflammatory symptoms of variable duration and frequency, associated with findings of increased inflammatory parameters in laboratory investigation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the main genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of MAISs and their most recent classification with the ultimate goal of increasing awareness of autoinflammation among various internal medicine specialists. PMID:24282415

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Type I ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (10 links) WAARDENBURG SYNDROME, TYPE 1 WAARDENBURG SYNDROME, TYPE 2A WAARDENBURG SYNDROME, TYPE ... Syndrome Type I Nayak CS, Isaacson G. Worldwide distribution of Waardenburg syndrome. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2003 ...

  3. Profile of altered brain iron acquisition in restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Connor, James R; Ponnuru, Padmavathi; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Patton, Stephanie M; Allen, Richard P; Earley, Christopher J

    2011-04-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by an urgency to move the legs during periods of rest. Data from a variety of sources provide a compelling argument that the amount of iron in the brain is lower in individuals with restless legs syndrome compared with neurologically normal individuals. Moreover, a significant percentage of patients with restless legs syndrome are responsive to intravenous iron therapy. The mechanism underlying the decreased iron concentrations in restless legs syndrome brains is unknown. We hypothesize that the source of the brain iron deficit is at the blood-brain interface. Thus we analysed the expression of iron management proteins in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and the brain microvasculature in post-mortem tissues. The choroid plexus, obtained at autopsy, from 18 neurologically normal controls and 14 individuals who had primary restless legs syndrome was subjected to histochemical staining for iron and immunostaining for iron management proteins. Iron and heavy chain ferritin staining was reduced in the epithelial cells of choroid plexus in restless legs syndrome. Divalent metal transporter, ferroportin, transferrin and its receptor were upregulated in the choroid plexus in restless legs syndrome. Microvessels were isolated from the motor cortex of 11 restless legs syndrome and 14 control brains obtained at autopsy and quantitative immunoblot analyses was performed. Expression of heavy chain ferritin, transferrin and its receptor in the microvessels from restless legs syndrome was significantly decreased compared with the controls but divalent metal protein 1, ferroportin, prohepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and light-chain ferritin remained unchanged. The presence of an iron regulatory protein was demonstrated in the brain microvasculature and the activity of this protein is decreased in restless legs syndrome; a finding similar to our earlier report in neuromelanin cells from the substantia nigra

  4. [Cytogenetic findings in patients with Down's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cortés, F; Alliende, M; Curotto, B

    1990-01-01

    In order to describe the frequency of non classical forms of 21 trisomy in patients with Down's syndrome at the cytogenetic's laboratory of our institution (Instituto de Nutrición y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Universidad de Chile) 201 chromosomal studies from peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients referred with a clinical diagnosis of Down's syndrome were analyzed. Among them 22 (11%) cases showed no chromosomal abnormalities, 161 (80%) had classic 21 trisomy, 7 (3.5%), showed 21 trisomy by translocation, 5 (2.5%) had 21 trisomy mosaicism, 6 (3%) showed 21 trisomy plus an autosomic balanced translocation. Male to female rate was 1.18:1 and diagnosis was done at the neonatal period in 26.8% of cases. Early recognition of the different kinds of chromosomal abnormalities in Down's syndrome is important if appropriate genetic council is the goal.

  5. Intraocular Lens Subluxation in Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Bolaños-Jiménez; Paulina, López-Lizárraga E; Francesc, March de R; Eduardo, Telich-Tarriba J; Alejandro, Navas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : Ectopia lentis (EL) is a major criteria for the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome, it may vary from an asymptomatic mild displacement to a significant subluxation that places the equator of the lens in the pupillary axis. The purpose of this work is to present the case of a patient with Marfan syndrome who received treatment for subluxation at our institution. Case Report : A 51-year-old female diagnosed with Marfan syndrome presented to the emergency department with bilateral eye redness, foreign body sensation and crusting around the eyes on awakening. She had the following history of cardiac and ophthalmologic complications, including: 1. Lens subluxation 2. High myopia 3. Aortic root dilation, 4. Mitral valve prolapse and 5. Tricuspid insufficiency. Conclusion : The ophthalmological management of Marfan patients is challenging and periodical follow-up is needed. Surgical versus conservative management is controversial, each case needs to be evaluated individually to analyze the risks and benefits of the procedures. PMID:25279020

  6. [Current echography diagnosis of pelvic congestion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Malinova, M; Shopov, A

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition. The sources of pelvic pain are multifactorial, and their causes are difficult to determine. Pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS) is associated with varicose ovarian veins and/or varicose veins in the pelvis. The syndrome is associated with constant dull pelvic pain, abnormal menstrual bleeding, tenderness to touch in lower abdomen, pain during intercourse, painful menstrual periods, vaginal discharge, PCOS. The specific diagnosis of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome is made using several tests which include ultrasound, CAT, MIR, MDCT (multidetector) and venogram. The ultrasound is the first test of choice. It can assess the uterus and other organs in the pelvis. Doppler ultrasound can also help visualize the blood flow and asses the presence of varicosities in the pelvis.

  7. Sheehan syndrome with reversible dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Laway, Bashir A; Alai, Mohammad S; Gojwari, Tariq; Ganie, Mohd A; Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac abnormalities in patients with Sheehan syndrome are uncommon. A case of Sheehan syndrome with dilated cardiomyopathy is presented in whom hormone replacement with levothyroxine and prednisolone resulted in complete recovery of cardiomyopathy. A 25-year-old woman presented with lactation failure, secondary amenorrhea, features of hypothyroidism and a hypocortisol state following severe postpartum hemorrhage after her last child birth. She also had smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. After starting antitubercular treatment, she developed shock, suggestive of hypocortisol crisis. Hormonal investigations revealed evidence of panhypopitutarism and magnetic resonance imaging revealed partial empty sella. Meanwhile echocardiography revealed evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The patient was given replacement therapy in the form of glucocorticoids and levothyroxine in addition to antitubercular treatment. She improved and on follow-up over a period of 7 months, the DCM completely reversed. To our knowledge this is the first report of reversible DCM in a patient with Sheehan syndrome.

  8. Sick-building syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Stolwijk, J A

    1991-01-01

    The sick-building syndrome (SBS) is defined as the occurrence of an excessive number of subjective complaints by the occupants of a building. These complaints include headache, irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, lethargy, inability to concentrate, objectionable odors, and less frequently, nausea, dizziness, chest tightness, etc. These complaints will always be reported by a fraction of the occupants of any building if a questionnaire is administered that asks the respondent to recall any subjective symptoms they remember having had in the last 2 weeks or or over some period of time. It is often considered that SBS symptom reports have a minimum prevalence of about 15 to 20% for a 2-week recall period. SBS symptoms reported by 30% or more of occupants are indicative of conditions in the building environment that warrant attention. It is not often that a clear, single cause is responsible for the excess symptom reports. The following factors, often in combinations, are seen to contribute to SBS: outdoor air supply that is inadequate, ventilation distribution or effectiveness that is inadequate, the presence of temporary or long-term sources of contaminants such as tobacco smoke, adhesives, composite materials such as chipboard, and the growth of microorganisms in the HVAC equipment or in carpets or other furnishings. Depending on which causes contribute, the condition may be intermittent or even temporary. Psychosocial factors such as labor-management relations and satisfaction or dissatisfaction with other factors in the work environment can have a profound influence on the level of response of the occupants to their environment. Although hard data are difficult to collect, it is likely that productivity in the office environment is sensitive to conditions causing SBS. PMID:1821387

  9. [Poland syndrome associated with Moebius syndrome].

    PubMed

    Prati, R; Vandelli, C; Prosdocimo, M; Piacentini, F

    1985-01-01

    We present a case of a girl with Poland's Syndrome (absence of pectoral muscle and syndactyly) associated with Moebius Syndrome. More abnormalities, especially visceral, may be associated with it and therefore the clinician must know and identify them as soon as possible. We underline the importance of a precocious correction of the hand's abnormalities in order to avoid changes in the corporal pattern otherwise not correctible later. A retard in surgical treatment will produce a failure like in our patient.

  10. Do you know this syndrome? Leopard syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, Flávio Heleno da Silva Queiroz; da Silva, Luis Candido Pinto; Taitson, Paulo Franco; de Andrade, Ana Carolina Dias Viana; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is known as Leopard syndrome, which is a mnemonic rule for multiple lentigines (L), electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities (E), ocular hypertelorism (O), pulmonary stenosis (P), abnormalities of genitalia (A), retardation of growth (R), and deafness (D). We report the case of a 12-year-old patient with some of the abovementioned characteristics: hypertelorism, macroglossia, lentigines, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, subaortic stenosis, growth retardation, and hearing impairment. Due to this set of symptoms, we diagnosed Leopard syndrome. PMID:28225973

  11. [False victimization syndrome].

    PubMed

    Resch, Mária; Bella, Tamás

    2011-04-03

    Criminology and criminal-psychology are sciences dealing mostly with the personality of the criminals as well as the interconnections of crime and deviance. The other player of the crimes - the victim - has recently come into focus posing the question why and how somebody is becoming a victim, and what effect can the victim have when the crime is being committed. The first international publications appeared at the beginning of the third millennium on so-called victims who are convinced to suffer from material, moral or other damages and, accordingly, who would pursue "justice" at any rate. They often appeal against decisions. Considering these facts the procedures are rather thorough and circumspect. A significant part of the law-enforcement staff is heavily involved for long periods. On the other side there is the person considered criminal being actually the real victim. These people are getting alienated from the society because of their reckoned deeds and, because of the distorting influence of the media they are condemned morally. The present study describes the syndromes of fake-victim, their occurrence as well as psychiatric considerations, social appearance and impact. The authors are drawing attention to the existence and significance of this medical-legal problem.

  12. Coagulopathy in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Trementino, Laura; Arnaldi, Giorgio; Appolloni, Gloria; Daidone, Viviana; Scaroni, Carla; Casonato, Alessandra; Boscaro, Marco

    2010-01-01

    A hypercoagulable state and its consequent increased incidence of thromboembolic complications are reported in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS). These alterations are related to cortisol excess that induces prothrombotic changes in blood by several and complex mechanisms including increased levels of clotting factors, mainly factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (VWF) and impaired fibrinolytic capacity. However, it has recently been observed that the increase in VWF levels is not a constant feature of CS and that VWF response to glucocorticoids is genetically determined and depends on the presence of particular polymorphisms in the VWF gene promoter. The risk of venous thromboembolism is moreover enhanced in patients with CS by additional endogenous and exogenous risk factors such as obesity, bed rest, surgery and invasive diagnostic procedures like inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) sampling. In line with all these data, patients with active CS should be treated as having a prothrombotic disorder and undergo antithrombotic prophylaxis during IPS sampling. Special care should be taken in the immediate perioperative period in order to avoid thromboembolic events. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, preventive antithrombotic treatment (best with heparin) during IPS sampling and low-dose heparin treatment early after surgery should be suggested.

  13. Basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thalakoti, Srikanth; Geller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) or Gorlin syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome sometimes known as the fifth phacomatosis, inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Gorlin syndrome is characterized by development of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of falx cerebri, various developmental skeletal abnormalities such as bifid rib, hemi- or bifid vertebra and predisposition to the development of various tumors. BCNS is caused by a mutation in the PTCH1 gene localized to 9q22.3. Its estimated prevalence varies between 1/55600 and 1/256000 with an equal male to female ratio. The medulloblastoma variant seen in Gorlin syndrome patients is of the desmoplastic type, characteristically presenting during the first 3 years of life. Therefore, children with desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be carefully screened for other features of BCNS. Radiation therapy for desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be avoided in BCNS patients as it may induce development of invasive BCCs and other tumors in the skin area exposed to radiation. This syndrome is a multisystem disorder so involvement of multiple specialists with a multimodal approach to detect and treat various manifestations at early stages will reduce the long-term sequelae and severity of the condition. Life expectancy is not significantly altered but morbidity from complications and cosmetic scarring can be substantial.

  14. SAPHO syndrome associated spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Masato; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Misawa, Haruo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-10-01

    The concept of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome has been well clarified, after Chamot et al. suggested this peculiar disorder in 1987. The most commonly affected site in SAPHO syndrome is the anterior chest, followed by the spine. However, the clinical course and taxonomic concept of SAPHO spinal lesions are poorly understood. This study was performed to analyze: (1) the detailed clinical course of spinal lesions in SAPHO syndrome, and (2) the relationship between SAPHO syndrome with spinal lesions and seronegative spondyloarthropathy. Thirteen patients with spondylitis in SAPHO syndrome were analyzed. The features of spinal lesions were a chronic onset with a slight inflammatory reaction, and slowly progressing non-marginal syndesmophytes at multi spinal levels, besides the coexistence of specific skin lesions. SAPHO syndrome, especially spinal lesions related to palmoplantar pustulosis, can be recognized as a subtype of seronegative spondyloarthropathy.

  15. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Alagille syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... GeneReview: Alagille Syndrome Hartley JL, Gissen P, Kelly DA. Alagille syndrome and other hereditary causes of cholestasis. ... Sanchez-Lara PA, Pai A, Krantz ID, Piccoli DA, Spinner NB. NOTCH2 mutations cause Alagille syndrome, a ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y; Costello and CFC syndrome study group in Japan. Prevalence and clinical features of Costello syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome in Japan: findings from a nationwide epidemiological survey. Am J ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Fryns syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Fryns syndrome Fryns syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Fryns syndrome is a condition that affects the development ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Miller syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Miller syndrome Miller syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Miller syndrome is a rare condition that mainly affects ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Jacobsen syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 11 , Jacobsen syndrome is also known as 11q terminal deletion disorder. The signs and symptoms of Jacobsen ... disorder 11q deletion syndrome 11q- deletion syndrome 11q terminal deletion disorder 11q23 deletion disorder Jacobsen thrombocytopenia Related ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Bloom syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Bloom syndrome Bloom syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Bloom syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by short ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: WAGR syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs and symptoms of WAGR syndrome can include childhood-onset obesity, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), and kidney failure. When WAGR syndrome includes childhood-onset obesity, it is often referred to as WAGRO syndrome. ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fraser syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Fraser syndrome Fraser syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Fraser syndrome is a rare disorder that affects development starting ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Alport syndrome, X-linked recessive Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) GeneReview: Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Nephropathy MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Alport Syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: End-Stage ...

  6. [Chilaidity syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Candela, Stefano; Candela, Giancarlo; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Argano, Francesco; Romano, Ornella; Iannella, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Chilaidity syndrome is a mal position by bowel mal rotation o malfissation. It is more common in right side expecially in obese people. If asyimptomatic, the syndrome is an occasional comparison by radiology, surgical exploration by laparoscopy or autopsy, otherwise, if symptomatic, there are obstructive symptoms,abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, flatulence, breath, constipation and anorexia. Diagnosis is radiological. We present a rare case of this syndrome in a man with serious obstructive symptoms.

  7. Townes-Brocks syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C.; Michaelis, R.

    1999-01-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with multiple malformations and variable expression. Major findings include external ear anomalies, hearing loss, preaxial polydactyly and triphalangeal thumbs, imperforate anus, and renal malformations. Most patients with Townes-Brocks syndrome have normal intelligence, although mental retardation has been noted in a few.


Keywords: Townes-Brocks syndrome; chromosome 16q12.1; SALL1 PMID:10051003

  8. Is PFAPA syndrome really a sporadic disorder or is it genetic?

    PubMed

    Akelma, Ahmet Zulfikar; Cizmeci, Mehmet Nevzat; Kanburoglu, Mehmet Kenan; Mete, Emin; Bozkaya, Davut; Tufan, Naile; Catal, Ferhat

    2013-08-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of disorders sharing similar symptoms, characterized primarily by regularly recurring fevers. PFAPA syndrome, one of the members of this group of disorders, is a clinical entity of unknown etiology which is frequently seen in the early childhood. Currently, the pathogenesis and the genetic basis of most of the disorders in the periodic fever spectrum are known, other than that of PFAPA syndrome. Although, classically PFAPA syndrome is known as a sporadic disease, we propose that it is not sporadic. We think that PFAPA syndrome may be an inherited disease and this hypothesis is supported by the clinical mimicry of PFAPA syndrome with other periodic fever syndromes with well-known genetic transmissions, frequent occurrence of the condition in members of the same family and emergence of common genetic mutations in the periodic fever syndrome spectrum. Moreover, our clinical observation that most of the patients diagnosed with PFAPA syndrome were of the same families strongly suggest a probable genetic transmission of this disorder. We have decided to discuss this hypothesis to contribute to the literature and assist our colleagues who are dealing with this commonly overlooked and often misdiagnosed disorder.

  9. Results of the pregnancies with HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Celik, Cetin; Gezginç, Kazim; Altintepe, Lutfullah; Tonbul, H Zeki; Yaman, S Tülin; Akyürek, Cemalettin; Türk, Süleyman

    2003-07-01

    In this study, clinical features, developing complications, and results of thirty-six patients, which were followed up in our Obstetrics and Gynecology and Nephrology departments between 1997 and 2001, with the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome were searched retrospectively. The mean age of the cases followed up with diagnosis of HELLP syndrome were 30.2 +/- 5.9 (17-46) years. HELLP syndrome was diagnosed on average in the 32.6 +/- 4.8th (23-41) week of gestations. Seventy percent of the cases were with severe preeclampsia and 30% of the cases were with mild preeclampsia. Eleven cases (30%) were nullipara and twenty-five cases (70%) multipara. The average of arterial systolic blood pressure of the cases were 161.6 +/- 26 mmHg, and that of diastolic blood pressure was 98.5 +/- 16.8 mmHg. In thirteen cases (36%) acute renal failure (ARF), six cases (17%) placenta detachment, two cases disseminate intravascular coagulation (DIC), one case Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) were developed. In seven cases (19%) intrauterine dead fetuses were detected. In twenty-three cases by cesarian section (64%), in thirteen cases by induction (36%) the pregnancies were terminated in 72 h after diagnosing HELLP syndrome. Birth weights of eleven babies (30%) were below 1500 g. Five of the eleven babies were dead in the neonatal period. Six of the thirteen patients who had ARF were given hemodialysis. Two patients died because of the development of ARF + DIC and ARDS. No predicting factors for the development of HELLP syndrome could be detected, but severe preeclampsia. Therefore we think that preeclamptic pregnancies must be followed up very closely and if HELLP syndrome develops, termination of the pregnancy would be proper as soon as possible.

  10. Locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Locked-in syndrome is a rare neuropsychological disorder. Its primary features are quadriplegia and paralysis of the cranial nerves except for those responsible for vertical eye movements. The differential diagnosis includes persistent vegetative state, brain death, minimally conscious states, C3 transection of the spinal cord, and conversion locked-in syndrome. Etiologies of locked-in syndrome include hemorrhagic and thrombotic events, tumors affecting the ventral pons, infectious agents, iatrogenic causes, trauma, metabolic abnormalities, and other miscellaneous causes. The clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis, neuropsychological assessment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of patients with locked-in syndrome are discussed.

  11. [Neurobiology of Tourette Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ünal, Dilek; Akdemir, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Although it is a common disorder in childhood, the etiology of Tourette Syndrome has not been fully elucidated yet. Studies, -conducted so far- have revealed differences in neurobiological structures of individuals who suffer from Tourette Syndrome. The objective of this review is to assess etiological and pathophysiological studies in the Tourette Syndrome literature. An electronical search was conducted in PubMed database using the keywords tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome, neurobiology, genetics, neuroimaging and animal models. Research and review studies published between 1985 and 2015, with a selection preference towards recent publications, were reviewed. According to the studies, genetic predisposition hypothesis is considered as a priority. However, a precise genetic disorder associated with Tourette Syndrome has not been found. The evidence from postmortem and neuroimaging studies in heterogenous patient groups and animal studies supports the pathological involvement of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits in Tourette Syndrome. Consequently, the most emphasized hypothesis in the pathophysiology is the dopaminergic dysfunction in these circuits. Furthermore, these findings of the animal, postmortem and neuroimaging studies have confirmed the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of Tourette Syndrome. In conclusion, more studies are needed to understand the etiology of the disorder. The data obtained from neurobiological studies of the disorder will not only shed light on the way of Tourette Syndrome, but also guide studies on its treatment options.

  12. Laugier–Hunziker syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ramakant S; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; Hosmani, Jagadish V

    2012-01-01

    Laugier–Hunziker syndrome is a rare acquired disorder characterized by diffuse hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia in adults. They appear as macular lesions less than 5 mm in diameter. Laugier–Hunziker syndrome is considered to be a benign disease with no systemic manifestation or malignant potential. Therefore, it is important to rule out other mucocutaneous pigmentary disorders that do require medical management. Prompt clinical recognition also averts the need for excessive and invasive procedures and treatments. In India, the reported cases of this syndrome are very few. We provide a review of literature on Laugier–Hunziker syndrome with its differential diagnosis. PMID:22923898

  13. Diabetic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment can correct diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome within hours. Treatment typically includes: Intravenous fluids to counter dehydration Intravenous insulin to lower your blood sugar levels Intravenous potassium, ...

  14. Chromosome instability syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 11, discusses chromosome instability syndromes. The focus is on the most extensively studied genotypic chromosomal aberrations which include Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, ataxia telangiectasia, and xeroderma pigmentosum. The great interest in these syndromes is out of proportion to their rare occurrence; however, studies of genotypic chromosome breakage have been inspired by the hope of throwing light on chromosome structure and behavior. A table is given which relates chromosomal aberrations in Bloom syndrome which may cause or promote cancer. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  16. The Disuse Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bortz II, Walter M.

    1984-01-01

    Our cultural sedentariness, recently acquired, lies at the base of much human ill-being. Physical inactivity predictably leads to deterioration of many body functions. A number of these effects coexist so frequently in our society that they merit inclusion in a specific syndrome, the disuse syndrome. The identifying characteristics of the syndrome are cardiovascular vulnerability, obesity, musculoskeletal fragility, depression and premature aging. The syndrome is experimentally reproducible and, significantly, the clinical features are subject to both preventive and restitutive efforts that happily are cheap, safe, accessible and effective. PMID:6516349

  17. Capgras' syndrome with organic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M. N.; Hawthorne, M. E.; Gribbin, N.; Jacobson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Capgras' syndrome, one form of the delusional misidentification syndromes, is described. Three patients with the syndrome are reported. The first had a right cerebral infarction, the second had nephrotic syndrome secondary to severe pre-eclampsia in the puerperium, and the third had uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with dementia. Evidence is reviewed regarding an organic aetiology for Capgras' syndrome. We conclude that, when the syndrome is present, a thorough search for organic disorder should be made. PMID:2084656

  18. HELLP Syndrome and the Effects on the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    HELLP syndrome is most often diagnosed between 27 and 37 weeks gestation. It is also a diagnosis that can be seen during the postpartum period. The effects of HELLP syndrome on the neonate can be significant. Recognizing the risks to the neonate can assist the clinician in preparing for the neonate prior to delivery. In doing so, the mortality and morbidity rates can be reduced.

  19. [Post-polio syndrome. Part II. Therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Matyja, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The care of patients with post-polio syndrome ought to be carried out by a multidisciplinary team of specialists, including medical professionals, specialists of rehabilitation, psychologists and social workers. Many therapeutic strategies might be employed to reduce the late effects of polio. Today, the management of post-polio syndrome is based on non-pharmacological intervention, including lifestyle modification, decrease of physical activity, rest periods during the day and an individually tailored training program.

  20. Sheehan's Syndrome A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Errarhay, S; Kamaoui, I; Bouchikhi, C; Châara, H; Bouguern, H; Tizniti, S; Melhouf, A; Banani, A

    2009-06-01

    Post-partum pituitary necrosis (Sheehan's syndrome) is a rare complication of post-partum hemorrhage. The diagnosis can be erratic and often delayed. In this case report of Sheehan's syndrome in the post-partum period, the signs were characterized by agalactia, severe hypoglycemia, and low serum levels of thyroid hormones, cortico-adrenal hormones, and gonadotrophin (FSH, LH). The hypophyseal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of hypopituitarism secondary to pituitary necrosis.