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Sample records for cryptogenic organising pneumonia

  1. Ochronosis of the knee with secondary osteoarthritis requiring total knee replacement in a patient with cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Jorrit; Metsaars, Wieneke; Jansen, Joris

    2016-05-20

    Ochronosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by homogentisic acid oxidase enzyme deficiency. High homogentisic acid levels will eventually result in black deposits in skin, sclerae, connective tissues and urine (alkaptonuria). It can lead to early degeneration of connective tissues and cartilage. Ochronosis can damage normal cartilage, leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often delayed because of its low prevalence and non-specific early symptoms. In our patient, the secondary osteoarthritis due to ochronosis deposits in the cartilage was treated by total knee arthroplasty, with good clinical outcome. This article reports the first case of ochronosis with secondary osteoarthritis of the knee in a patient previously diagnosed with cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP).

  2. 'Crazy-paving' pattern: an exceptional presentation of cryptogenic organising pneumonia associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kunal, Shekhar; Pilaniya, Vikas; Jain, Sudhir; Shah, Ashok

    2016-05-06

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is a distinct but uncommon entity with characteristic clinicoradiological features and histological findings. When the aetiology of OP remains unknown, it is termed as cryptogenic OP (COP). COP is seen in the majority of patients with OP and usually observed in non/former smokers. A 54-year-old man, a smoker, presented with breathlessness, cough and mucoid sputum. Imaging demonstrated unilateral 'Crazy-paving' pattern in the left upper lobe and left-sided effusion. In addition, paraseptal emphysema and left lower lobe bullae along with very severe obstructive ventilatory defect and impaired diffusion suggested chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Transbronchial biopsy was suggestive of OP. In the absence of a definite aetiology, a diagnosis of COP associated with COPD was established. COP presenting as a unilateral 'Crazy-paving' pattern is yet to be documented. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed description of COP presenting as unilateral 'Crazy-paving' pattern associated with COPD.

  3. Nocardia brasiliensis Infection Complicating Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alison M.; Sluzevich, Jason C.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a severe and uncommon opportunistic infection caused by Nocardia species. We present a patient with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia who was receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy, whose treatment course was complicated by cutaneous and pulmonary nocardiosis. Tissue cultures confirmed Nocardia brasiliensis. Nocardiosis should be a diagnostic consideration for patients treated with long-term immunosuppression who have worsening pulmonary symptoms and relapsing pustular skin lesions. PMID:28348912

  4. Spontaneous resolution of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia in pediatrics: A case report.

    PubMed

    Abi-Khalil, S; Fadel, N; Menassa-Moussa, L; Torbey, P H; Haddad-Zebouni, S

    2016-05-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare entity in childhood, particularly in previously healthy children. Moreover, the spontaneous remission of the disease is exceptional. We report on the case of a previously healthy 10-year-old girl who consulted her doctor for a 2-month history of mild pyrexia, fatigue, weight loss, and exertional dyspnea with no response to amoxicillin. A chest CT revealed bilateral, asymmetrical peribronchovascular consolidation areas predominating in the lower lobes and imaging features of COP. The bronchoalveolar lavage and the biological findings were negative. On follow-up, the girl showed clinical and radiological remission of the disease with no treatment. Our report describes an extremely rare case of spontaneously resolving COP in a child, the diagnosis being made based on the imaging pattern.

  5. Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you tell me about cryptogenic organizing pneumonia? Answers from Teng Moua, M.D. Previously called bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare lung ...

  6. Cytomegalovirus pneumonitis complicated by a central peribronchial pattern of organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Maria M; Ahmed, Asia; Carpenter, Ben; Brown, Jeremy S

    2017-01-01

    We present five cases of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonitis occurring in patients after recent T cell deplete allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloHSCT). These cases were complicated by an organising pneumonia (during the recovery period) with a predominantly central peribronchial pattern. All patients presented with evidence of active CMV pneumonitis which was treated successfully with anti-viral therapy but was followed by persistent severe dyspnoea, cough and hypoxia. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) imaging showed widespread central peribronchial consolidation with traction bronchiectasis. There was a marked clinical and physiological improvement after treatment with systemic corticosteroids. However, in all patients the lung function remained abnormal and in some cases imaging revealed a fibrosing lung disease. These cases represent a previously undescribed central peribronchial pattern of organising pneumonia complicating CMV pneumonitis that can result in chronic lung damage.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: cryptogenic cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cryptogenic cirrhosis cryptogenic cirrhosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Cryptogenic cirrhosis is a condition that impairs liver function. People ...

  8. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Kids > Pneumonia A A A What's ... it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  9. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Teens > Pneumonia A A A What's ... having to go to the hospital. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (pronounced: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  10. Cryptogenic Tuberculosis - 1990 Cairo - Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    AD-A269 664 i l•l lI ,iI I i h4Ji PUBLICATION REPORT 1753 SEP TE5195, 31/93EYP CRYPTOGENIC TUBERCULOSIS - 1990 CAIRO - EGYPT BY Z. Farid, M.E...FUNDING NUMBERS Cryptogenic Tuberculosis - 1990 Cairo - Egypt PE- 61102A WU- 3M161102BS13.AK.311 6. AUTHORjS) Farid, Z., Kilpatrick, M.E. and Kamal...is unlimited. 13- A8B TRACT %’ 4 , n ;.’ Please see attached. DTIC 7T-3 t A 2-d~~t (r’ oa Dist__ _._ .S pecial. Cryptogenic tuberculosis ; Prolonged

  11. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is often caused by a tiny microorganism, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (pronounced: my-co-PLAZ-ma noo-MO- ... help the doctor identify the type of pneumonia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae , for example, often causes headaches, sore throats, ...

  12. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Pneumonia is an infection that inflames the air sacs in one or both lungs. The air sacs may fill with fluid or pus ( ... organisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, can cause pneumonia. Pneumonia can range in seriousness from mild to ...

  13. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or another health care facility such as a nursing home or rehab facility. Pneumonia that affects people in ... You can help prevent pneumonia by following the measures below. Wash your hands often, especially: Before preparing ...

  14. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Pulmonía You're out in the rain, jumping around in puddles, and somebody yells, "Get ... you really catch it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  16. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  17. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the flu Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you ...

  18. Cryptogenic Gelastic Epilepsy: A Pediatric Case Vignette

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Devendra; Juneja, Monica; Chutani, Taruna; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    Gelastic seizures, characterized by epileptic laughter, are rare and the majority is associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report a case with cryptogenic Gelastic seizure (without hypothalamic hamartoma), as the MRI was normal and, EEG and clinical data suggested a focal origin of the seizures. PMID:24783118

  19. Cryptogenic gelastic epilepsy: a pediatric case vignette.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Devendra; Juneja, Monica; Chutani, Taruna; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2014-03-01

    Gelastic seizures, characterized by epileptic laughter, are rare and the majority is associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report a case with cryptogenic Gelastic seizure (without hypothalamic hamartoma), as the MRI was normal and, EEG and clinical data suggested a focal origin of the seizures.

  20. Left Atrial Septal Pouch in Cryptogenic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jonathan M.; Lombardo, Dawn M.; Barseghian, Ailin; Dhoot, Jashdeep; Hundal, Harkawal S.; Salcedo, Jonathan; Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Wong, Nathan D.; Fisher, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: The left atrial septal pouch (LASP), an anatomic variant of the interatrial septum, has uncertain clinical significance. We examined the association between LASP and ischemic stroke subtypes in patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Methods: We determined the prevalence of LASP among consecutive patients who underwent TEE at our institution. Patients identified with ischemic strokes were further evaluated for stroke subtype using standard and modified criteria from the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST). We compared the prevalence of LASP in ischemic stroke, cryptogenic stroke, and non-stroke patients using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: The mean age of all 212 patients (including stroke and non-stroke patients) was 57 years. The overall prevalence of LASP was 17% (n = 35). Of the 75 patients who were worked-up for stroke at our institution during study period, we classified 31 as cryptogenic using standard TOAST criteria. The prevalence of LASP among cryptogenic stroke patients (using standard and modified TOAST criteria) was increased compared to the prevalence among other ischemic stroke patients (26 vs. 9%, p = 0.06; PR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–3.1, and 30 vs. 10%, p = 0.04; PR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.2–4.1, respectively). Conclusion: In this population of relatively young patients, prevalence of LASP was increased in cryptogenic stroke compared to stroke patients of other subtypes. These findings suggest LASP is associated with cryptogenic stroke, which should be verified by future large-scale studies. PMID:25852636

  1. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laria, A.; Lurati, A.; Scarpellini, M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  2. Intravenous immune globulins (IVIg) treatment for organizing pneumonia in a selective IgG immune deficiency state.

    PubMed

    Gueta, Itai; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Orbach, Hedi

    2014-12-01

    We describe herein a 61-year-old woman who presented with fever, night sweats and cough. The diagnosis of pneumonia was established, but with symptom recurrence following antibiotic therapy, further diagnostics were performed. Biopsy via bronchoscopy revealed cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, and later on follow-up, a selective IgG immune deficiency was also diagnosed. Initial treatment of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy induced remission, but with dose reduction recurrence was observed. Intravenous immune globulin treatment was initiated and induced a successful clinical and radiological remission. Few cases of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and hypogammaglobulinemia have been reported. To our knowledge, this is the fourth case described of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia with a hypogammaglobulinemia state and the first reported case of a selective immune deficiency state treated successfully with intravenous immune globulins.

  3. Silent Atrial Fibrillation and Cryptogenic Strokes.

    PubMed

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S

    2017-03-01

    A new suspected cause of cryptic strokes is "silent atrial fibrillation." Pacemakers and other implanted devices allow continuous recording of cardiac rhythm for months or years. They have discovered that short periods of atrial fibrillation lasting minutes or hours are frequent and usually are asymptomatic. A meta-analysis of 50 studies involving more than 10,000 patients with a recent stroke found that 7.7% had new atrial fibrillation on their admitting electrocardiogram. In 3 weeks during and after hospitalization, another 16.9% were diagnosed. A total of 23.7% of these stroke patients had silent atrial fibrillation; that is, atrial fibrillation diagnosed after hospital admission. Silent atrial fibrillation is also frequent in patients with pacemakers who do not have a recent stroke. In a pooled analysis of 3 studies involving more than 10,000 patients monitored for 24 months, 43% had at least 1 day with atrial fibrillation lasting more than 5 minutes. Ten percent had atrial fibrillation lasting at least 12 hours. Despite the frequency of silent atrial fibrillation in these patients with multiple risk factors for stroke, the annual incidence of stroke was only 0.23%. When silent atrial fibrillation is detected in patients with recent cryptogenic stroke, anticoagulation is indicated. In patients without stroke, silent atrial fibrillation should lead to further monitoring for clinical atrial fibrillation rather than immediate anticoagulation, as some have advocated.

  4. Voluntary Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Shirley; Spiret, Claire; Dimitriadi, Yota; McCrindle, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) is the umbrella organisation for Member Organisations from 145 countries, with a total membership of 10 million. While Member Organisations offer training and development within their own countries, WAGGGS offers international opportunities, such as leadership development at…

  5. Organisational Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of organisational structure can provide guidance for organisations that want to change and innovate. Many writers agree that this understanding allows organisations to shape how their work is done to ultimately achieve their business goals--and that too often structure is given little consideration in business strategy and…

  6. Atypical pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due to Chlamydophila pneumoniae bacteria ...

  7. A Comparison of Atrial Fibrillation Monitoring Strategies After Cryptogenic Stroke (from the Cryptogenic Stroke and Underlying AF Trial).

    PubMed

    Choe, William C; Passman, Rod S; Brachmann, Johannes; Morillo, Carlos A; Sanna, Tommaso; Bernstein, Richard A; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Rymer, Marilyn M; Beckers, Frank; Koehler, Jodi; Ziegler, Paul D

    2015-09-15

    Ischemic stroke cause remains undetermined in 30% of cases, leading to a diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major cause of ischemic stroke but may go undetected with short periods of ECG monitoring. The Cryptogenic Stroke and Underlying Atrial Fibrillation trial (CRYSTAL AF) demonstrated that long-term electrocardiographic monitoring with insertable cardiac monitors (ICM) is superior to conventional follow-up in detecting AF in the population with cryptogenic stroke. We evaluated the sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) of various external monitoring techniques within a cryptogenic stroke cohort. Simulated intermittent monitoring strategies were compared to continuous rhythm monitoring in 168 ICM patients of the CRYSTAL AF trial. Short-term monitoring included a single 24-hour, 48-hour, and 7-day Holter and 21-day and 30-day event recorders. Periodic monitoring consisted of quarterly monitoring through 24-hour, 48-hour, and 7-day Holters and monthly 24-hour Holters. For a single monitoring period, the sensitivity for AF diagnosis was lowest with a 24-hour Holter (1.3%) and highest with a 30-day event recorder (22.8%). The NPV ranged from 82.3% to 85.6% for all single external monitoring strategies. Quarterly monitoring with 24-hour Holters had a sensitivity of 3.1%, whereas quarterly 7-day monitors increased the sensitivity to 20.8%. The NPVs for repetitive periodic monitoring strategies were similar at 82.6% to 85.3%. Long-term continuous monitoring was superior in detecting AF compared to all intermittent monitoring strategies evaluated (p <0.001). Long-term continuous electrocardiographic monitoring with ICMs is significantly more effective than any of the simulated intermittent monitoring strategies for identifying AF in patients with previous cryptogenic stroke.

  8. Organisational Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yolles, Maurice

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Seeks to explore the notion of organisational intelligence as a simple extension of the notion of the idea of collective intelligence. Design/methodology/approach: Discusses organisational intelligence using previous research, which includes the Purpose, Properties and Practice model of Dealtry, and the Viable Systems model. Findings: The…

  9. Aspiration pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  10. Seropositivity of Toxoplasma gondii and Toxocara spp. in Children with Cryptogenic Epilepsy, Benha, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Eraky, Maysa Ahmad; Abdel-Hady, Soha; Abdallah, Karim Fetouh

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the possible association of Toxoplasma gondii and Toxocara spp. infections with cryptogenic epilepsy in children. The study was carried out between June 2014 and March 2015. Total 90 children (40 with cryptogenic epilepsy, 30 with non-cryptogenic epilepsy, and 20 healthy control children) were evaluated to determine the anti-Toxocara and anti-T. gondii IgG seropositivity using ELISA kits. Epileptic cases were selected from those attending the pediatrics outpatient clinic of Benha University Hospital, Pediatrics Neurology Unit, and from Benha Specialized Hospital of children. The results showed that the level of anti-T. gondii IgG seropositivity was significantly higher among children with cryptogenic epilepsy (20%) than among children with non-cryptogenic children (0%). In healthy controls (10%), there was no association between toxocariasis seropositivity and cryptogenic epilepsy (only 5.7%; 4 out of 70 cases) among cases and 10% (2 out of 20) among controls. Among toxocariasis IgG positive cases, 3 (7.5%) were cryptogenic, and only 1 (3.3%) was non-cryptogenic. These statistically significant results support the association between T. gondii infection and cryptogenic epilepsy while deny this association with toxocariasis. PMID:27417090

  11. [Stroke and Cancer: Are Cryptogenic Strokes a Paraneoplastic Syndrome?].

    PubMed

    Eschle, Daniel

    2015-07-22

    Cancer is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, and stroke can precede tumour diagnosis by many months. A paraneoplastic hypercoagulability has been implicated. Overall, cancer is a rare cause, but should be suspected in cases of cryptogenic stroke. In patients with cryptogenic stroke, two criteria – ischemic lesions in multiple vascular territories and D-dimer values >2,15 µg/ml – predict cancer with 100% specificity according to one relevant study. An adenocarcinoma at an advanced stage is identified in many cases, the risk of stroke-recurrence is high. There is a lack of evidence-based recommendations regarding secondary prevention in these cases. In analogy to the guidelines for venous thromboembolism in cancer patients, low molecular weight heparins might be more efficient compared to other anti-clotting agents.

  12. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - mycoplasma; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Mycoplasma pneumonia usually affects people younger than 40. People who live or work in crowded areas such ...

  13. Patent foramen ovale and cryptogenic stroke: the hole story.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Anthony J; Jauss, Marek

    2013-09-01

    Despite 3 recent randomized clinical trials, the management of patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale remains unsettled. The primary results of Evaluation of the STARFlex Septal Closure System in Patients with a Stroke and/or Transient Ischemic Attack due to Presumed Paradoxical Embolism Through a Patent Foramen Ovale (CLOSURE), Percutaneous Closure of Patent Foramen Ovale in Cryptogenic Stroke (PC), and Randomized Evaluation of Recurrent Stroke Comparing PFO Closure to Established Current Standard of Care Treatment (RESPECT) were the same; the intent to treat analysis for the primary end point in all 3 trials failed to demonstrate superiority of device closure compared with medical therapy. CLOSURE put the brakes on indiscriminate device closure of patent foramen ovales in patients with cryptogenic stroke or transient ischemic attack. RESPECT suggested, but did not prove, that highly selected patients without vascular risk factors, with a cortical infarct on baseline magnetic resonance imaging and a substantial patent foramen ovale shunt may benefit from the Amplatzer device during a multiple-year period. In the absence of definitive clinical trial results, the precise definition of which patient subgroups should be considered for patent foramen ovale device closure should be agreed to by the stakeholder societies and the Food and Drug Administration.

  14. Mutation of human keratin 18 in association with cryptogenic cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ku, N O; Wright, T L; Terrault, N A; Gish, R; Omary, M B

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in 11 of the more than 20 keratin intermediate filaments cause several epidermal and oral associated diseases. No disease-associated mutations have been described in keratin 8 or 18 (K8/18) which are the major keratin pair in simple-type epithelia, as found in the liver, pancreas, and intestine. However, transgenic mice that express mutant keratin 18 develop chronic hepatitis, and have an increased susceptibility to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Also, ectopic expression of epidermal K14 in mouse liver results in chronic hepatitis, and disruption of mouse K8 leads to embryo lethality with extensive liver hemorrhage. We tested if patients with liver disease of unknown cause may harbor mutations in K18. We describe a his127-->leu (H127L) K18 mutation in a patient with cryptogenic cirrhosis that is germline transmitted. The K18 H127L isolated from the liver explant, or after expression in bacteria, showed an altered migration on two-dimensional gel analysis as compared with normal human liver or bacterially expressed K18. Electron microscopy of in vitro assembled K18 H127L and wild type K8 showed an assembly defect as compared with normal K8/18 assembly. Our results suggest that mutations in K18 may be predispose to, or result in cryptogenic cirrhosis in humans. PMID:9011570

  15. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia.

  16. Role of hospitalists in the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation for the management of cryptogenic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2016-12-01

    Cryptogenic strokes are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Identifying the underlying cause of cryptogenic stroke is imperative for appropriate short and long-term management of these patients. In particular, detecting atrial fibrillation in cryptogenic stroke patients may shed insight into the cause of the index stroke, but is also important to identify an important cause of secondary stroke. There is accumulating evidence indicating that monitoring for durations beyond the guideline recommended 30 day-period results in greater atrial fibrillation yield. This article reviews current guidelines and practices for the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke, as well as outpatient cardiac monitoring options available, and focuses on the role that hospitalists have to play in the care of these patients.

  17. The Role of Patent Foramen Ovale in Cryptogenic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    ŞENADIM, Songül; BOZKURT, Dilek; ÇABALAR, Murat; BAJRAMI, Arsida; YAYLA, Vildan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Almost one-third of ischemic strokes has an unknown etiology and are classified as cryptogenic stroke. Paradoxical embolism because of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is detected in 40%–50% of these patients. Recently, PFO has been reported as a risk factor for patients of all age groups. Methods In this study, 1080 ischemic stroke patients admitted to our clinic (2011–2013) were retrospectively evaluated. Age, sex, risk factors, complete blood count, vasculitis, biochemical and hypercoagulability tests, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, transthoracic echocardiography, transeosophageal echocardiography (TEE) findings, and therapeutic approaches were evaluated. Results The age range of the participants (seven male and four female patients) was 20–60 years (mean=43.09±11.13 years). Hemiparesis (n=10), diplopia (n=2), hemianopsia (n=2), and dysarthria (n=2) were the main findings of the neurological examinations. Patient medical history revealed hypertension (n=3), asthma (n=1), deep venous thrombosis (n=1), and smoking (n=4). Diffusion-weighted imaging showed middle cerebral artery (n=8) and posterior cerebral artery (n=3) infarctions. In one case, symptomatic severe carotid stenosis was detected. In eight cases, TEE showed PFO without any other abnormalities, but PFO was associated with atrial septal aneurysm in two cases, and in one case it was associated with ventricular hypokinesia and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Antiplatelet therapy was applied to nine patients and percutaneous PFO closure operation to two patients. In a 2-year follow-up, no recurrent ischemic stroke was recorded. Conclusion PFO, especially in terms of the etiology of cryptogenic stroke in young patients, should not be underestimated. We want to emphasize the importance of TEE in identifying potential cardioembolic sources not only in young but also in all ischemic stroke patients with unknown etiology; we also discuss the controversial management

  18. Pneumonia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  19. Characteristics of Patent Foramen Ovale Associated with Cryptogenic Stroke: A Biplane Transesophageal Echocardiography Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homma, S.; DiTullio, M. R.; Sacco, R. L.; Mihalatos, D..; LiMandri, G.; Mohr, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale is associated with ischemic stroke in patients without a clearly identifiable etiology for stroke (cryptogenic stroke). Paradoxical embolization is thought to be a potential mechanism. However, patent foramen ovale is also found in patients with known cause of stroke. Therefore, using contrast transesophageal echocardiography, we characterized the patent foramen ovale in cryptogenic stroke patients to assess morphological factors that may contribute to paradoxical embolization. Methods: Contrast transesophageal echocardiographic studies of 74 consecutive patients referred for ischemic stroke were reviewed. Twenty-three patients with patent foramen ovale were identified. These patients were classified as having strokes of determined origin or cryptogenic strokes according to criteria developed for the Stroke Data Bank of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Separation of septum primum from secundum and the number of microbubbles appearing in left atrium were then quantitated. These parameters were compared between patients with cryptogenic stroke and those with known cause of stroke. Results: The patent foramen ovale dimension was significantly larger in patients with cryptogenic stroke compared with patients with an identifiable cause of stroke (2.1+/-1.7 mm versus 057+/-0.78 mm [mean+/-SD]; P<.01). The number of microbubbles was also greater in patients with cryptogenic stroke compared with patients with an identifiable cause of stroke (13.9+/-10.7 versus 1.62+/-0.8 [mean+/-SD]; P<.0005). Conclusions: Patients with cryptogenic stroke have larger patent foramen ovale with more extensive right-to-left inter-atrial shunting than patients with stroke of determined cause. Transesophageal echocardiographically identifiable characteristics of patent foramen ovale may be important in defining the clinical significance of individual patent foramina.

  20. Early transoesophageal echocardiography in cryptogenic and lacunar stroke and transient ischaemic attack

    PubMed Central

    Censori, B.; Colombo, F.; Valsecchi, M. G.; Clivati, L.; Zonca, A.; Camerlingo, M.; Casto, L.; De Tommasi, M. S.; Mamoli, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To test the hypothesis that transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) carried out within three days of a first stroke or transient ischaemic attack of cryptogenic or lacunar type may disclose more thrombi or spontaneous echo contrast (SEC) than previously reported. This finding may help early treatment decisions.
METHODS—Patients aged between 40 and 80 years, admitted for transient ischaemic attack or ischaemic stroke during a 40 month period, were prospectively considered. TOE was carried out within 72 hours of symptom onset with a 5 MHz biplanar transducer. Subjects with recurring events, very severe strokes, large artery obstructions, or obvious cardiac sources of embolism were excluded.
RESULTS—Sixty five patients were studied, 43 with a cryptogenic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (66.2%), and 22 with a lacunar stroke (33.8%). The mean (SD) interval between symptom onset and TOE was 43.4 (17.2) hours for cryptogenic, and 48.5 (19.5) hours for lacunar patients. Atrial thrombi were found in one patient with a cryptogenic stroke (2.32% of cryptogenic events; 95% confidence interval 0.06-12.29), whereas SEC was found in five patients (7.7% overall), two with a lacunar and three with a cryptogenic stroke.
CONCLUSIONS—An early TOE does not seem to increase substantially the detection of atrial thrombi or SEC in patients with a first stroke or transient ischaemic attack of cryptogenic or lacunar nature. Therefore, this examination can be carried out when the patients' conditions are stable, and without overloading the cardiovascular laboratory daily schedule.

 PMID:9598678

  1. Micronodular pattern of organizing pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lebargy, François; Picard, Davy; Hagenburg, Jean; Toubas, Olivier; Perotin, Jeanne-Marie; Sandu, Sebastian; Deslee, Gaëtan; Dury, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Organizing pneumonia (OP) is a clinicopathological entity characterized by granulation tissue plugs in the lumen of small airways, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. OP can be cryptogenic (primary) (COP) or secondary to various lung injuries. Patient concerns: We report the case of a 38-year-old male smoker with COP presenting in the form of diffuse micronodules on computed tomography (CT) scan and describe the clinical, radiological, and functional characteristics of micronodular pattern of organizing pneumonia (MNOP) based on a review of the literature including 14 cases. Patients were younger (36.3 ± 15.5 years) than those with the classical form of OP. The clinical presentation was subacute in all cases with a mean duration of symptoms before admission of 14.5 ± 13.2 days. The radiological pattern was characterized by centrilobular nodules and “bud-in-tree” sign in 86.7% of patients. The diagnosis was based on histological examination of transbronchial (28.6%) or surgical biopsies (71.4%). Diagnosis: An associated condition was identified in 65% of cases and included illicit substance abuse (44.5%), myeloproliferative disease (33.5%), and infections (22%). Outcomes: Steroid therapy was effective in all patients with improvement of symptoms and documented radiologic resolution. No relapse was recorded. Lessons: MNOP should be recognized and distinguished from other diagnoses, mainly infectious bronchiolitis and disseminated tumor, as it requires early specific steroid therapy. PMID:28099335

  2. Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis and Epstein-Barr virus: an association?

    PubMed

    Vergnon, J M; Vincent, M; de Thé, G; Mornex, J F; Weynants, P; Brune, J

    1984-10-06

    13 patients with cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (CFA) and 12 with interstitial lung disease (ILD) of known cause were studied for their humoral response to herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Serum antibodies to HSV and CMV were within the normal range in all patients. 10 patients with CFA had raised serum antibodies to EBV, and IgA against viral-capsid antigen (VCA) was detectable in all 13. In the other 12 patients EBV serological profiles were normal and IgA against VCA was detectable in only 1 patient. The EBV antibody levels did not correlate with the level of circulating immune complexes, the presence of rheumatoid factors, or the cytological findings of the alveolitis. The presence of IgG against VCA in 5 CFA patients suggests local production of EBV-specific immunoglobulins. Elevated IgG and IgA against EBV in CFA may indicate non-specific depression of cell-mediated immunity or that EBV plays a part in the aetiology of CFA.

  3. Telomere Dysfunction in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cryptogenic Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Laish, Ido; Mannasse-Green, Batya; Hadary, Ruth; Biron-Shental, Tal; Konikoff, Fred M; Amiel, Aliza; Kitay-Cohen, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC) are considered preneoplastic conditions that might progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. We evaluated parameters of telomere dysfunction in these patient groups to study the correlation between telomere length and the progression of NAFLD. We analyzed peripheral lymphocytes from 22 patients with NAFLD, 20 patients with CC, and 20 healthy, age-matched controls. Telomere length was analyzed using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization, and cellular senescence was evaluated by the percentage of cells with senescence-associated heterochromatin foci. The expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA was measured using polymerase chain reaction, and telomere capture (TC) was assessed with 2 Cytocell probes, 15qter and 13qter. Shorter telomere length and increased cellular senescence was demonstrated in patients with NAFLD, compared to the CC patients and healthy controls. While hTERT mRNA was significantly decreased, TC was increased in CC patients, compared to the NAFLD group and healthy individuals. Thus, there is a correlation between hTERT mRNA expression and telomere length in patients with NAFLD, which might be related to associated metabolic disorders and the risk of malignant transformation. Patients with CC, on the contrary, elongate their telomeres through the TC mechanism.

  4. Voxel-based morphometry in patients with cryptogenic occipital epilepsies. Preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Bilo, L; De Leva, M F; Meo, R; Tortora, F; Esposito, F; Aragri, A; Elefante, A

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the differences in grey matter concentration (GMC) by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in patients with cryptogenic occipital epilepsies. VBM analysis was performed in 11 patients with cryptogenic occipital epilepsies compared to 11 healthy controls. VBM analysis in patients revealed focal areas of reduced GMC in the occipital cortex and, more interestingly, increased GMC in the midbrain tegmentum and basal ganglia (globus pallidus and thalamus). VBM may disclose slight structural abnormalities in the brain of cryptogenic epilepsy patients, not evident with standard MRI. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first literature report describing areas of altered GMC in patients with occipital epilepsy. We hypothesize that these findings might be related to epileptic discharges and/or their diffusion and suggest that midbrain, globus pallidus and thalamus may be part of a functional network originating from the occipital areas.

  5. Prognostic factors for outcome in pediatric probable lesional frontal lobe epilepsy with an unknown cause (cryptogenic).

    PubMed

    Lee, Inn-Chi; Chen, Yung-Jung; Lee, Hong-Shen; Li, Shuan-Yow

    2014-12-01

    The outcomes of children with cryptogenic seizures most probably arising from the frontal lobe are difficult to predict. We retrospectively collected data on 865 pediatric patients with epilepsy. In 78 patients with cryptogenic frontal lobe epilepsy, the age at first seizure was inversely correlated with the outcome, including the degree of intellectual disability/developmental delay (P = .002) and seizure frequency (P = .02) after adequate treatment. Intellectual disability was more prevalent in children with a first seizure at 0 to 3 years old (P = .002), and seizures were more frequent in those with a first seizure at 0 to 6 years old than at 7 to 16 years old (P = .026). For pediatric cryptogenic frontal lobe epilepsy, the age at first seizure is important and inversely correlated with outcome, including seizure frequency and intellectual disability.

  6. Behavior and social competency in idiopathic and cryptogenic childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Berg, Anne T; Vickrey, Barbara G; Testa, Francine M; Levy, Susan R; Shinnar, Shlomo; DiMario, Francis

    2007-07-01

    Behavioral and related disorders are frequently reported in association with childhood epilepsy but the reasons for this are unclear. In a long-term prospective, community-based study of newly-diagnosed childhood epilepsy, behavioral assessments (Child Behavior Checklist) were performed in children 8 to 9 years after the initial diagnosis of epilepsy to determine the impact of remission and medication status on behavioral problems. Children with epilepsy were also compared with sibling controls. A total of 226 children (108 females, 118 males; mean age 13y 1mo [SD 2y 8mo], range 8-17y) with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy were included in the analyses. One hundred and twenty-eight matched pairs were included in analyses of case-sibling differences. Lack of remission and current medication use were associated with worse behavioral problem and competency scores. Lack of remission generally had a greater effect than medication use, except for attention problems; medication status had the more deleterious effect (p<0.001). Children with epilepsy had significantly worse behavioral problems and competency scores relative to sibling controls. Even in paris in which the patient was seizure-free and off medication, significant case-sibling differences persisted for most scales (p=0.05 to p=0.001). Lack of remission and continued use of antiepileptic drugs have a negative influence on behavioral problems in children with epilepsy but do not fully explain the worse scores relative to siblings. This suggests an independent effect associated with the epilepsy itself.

  7. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; Walking pneumonia - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor JJ. Viral infections. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  8. CMV - pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone marrow transplant Breathing difficulty Chemotherapy CMV retinitis HIV/AIDS Immune response Mononucleosis Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) WBC count Patient Instructions Pneumonia in adults - discharge Review Date 12/10/2015 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant ...

  9. Organisational Structure & Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Structural change is seen as a way to meet the challenges of the future that face many organisations. While some writers agree that broad-ranging structural change may not always transform an organisation or enhance its performance, others claim that innovation will be a major source of competitive advantage to organisations, particularly when…

  10. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  11. Necrotizing Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Elitsa V; Bartlett, Allison H

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia refers to the development of necrosis, liquefication, and cavitation of the lung parenchyma from an infectious pathogen. Nearly 4% of all community-acquired pneumonias are necrotizing, although studies retrospectively evaluating the incidence have found it to be increasing during the past 20 years. Common presenting symptoms include fever, tachypnea, and cough, and most of those afflicted also develop complications such as parapneumonic effusions, empyemas, or bronchopleural fistulae. When compared to age-matched controls with parapneumonic effusions or severe pneumonias without a necrotizing component, those with necrotizing pneumonia have been shown to have more elevated white blood cell counts and inflammatory markers that take longer to normalize, a longer duration of symptoms despite initiation of therapy, and a longer hospital stay. Despite the high incidence of complications during the acute phase of illness, the overall prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia has been shown to be promising, with nearly all children surviving the illness. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(2):e65-e68.].

  12. Comparison of medical treatments in cryptogenic stroke patients with patent foramen ovale: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Abdolhamid; Yaghoubi, Ehsan; Farazdaghi, Mohsen; Aghasadeghi, Kamran; Haghighi, Afshin Borhani

    2013-01-01

    Background: This randomized clinical trial compared rates of stroke or transient ischemic attack recurrence or death in patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO) who received medical treatment with aspirin or warfarin. Materials and Methods: Forty-four Iranian patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale participated in this randomized, single-blind trial between July 2007 and June 2010. All patients underwent transesophageal echocardiography and contrast-transcranial Doppler sonography to confirm the presence of patent foramen ovale. The patients were randomly assigned to receive aspirin or warfarin and were followed for 18 months for the recurrence of ischemic events or death. The principal investigator was blind to the group assignment. This trial is registered under number IRCT138805192323N1. Results: Five (11.4%) patients had a stroke, 2 (4.5%) had a transient ischemic attack and 2 (4.5%) died. There was no difference in the rate of ischemic events or death between the aspirin- and warfarin-treated groups (hazard ratio: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.1-1.8; P = 0.259). Conclusion: There was no difference in ischemic event recurrence, death rates or side-effects between patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale who were treated with aspirin vs. warfarin. PMID:23914208

  13. Organisational skills and tools.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Paul

    2009-04-01

    While this article mainly applies to practitioners who have responsibilities for leading teams or supervising practitioners, many of the skills and tools described here may also apply to students or junior practitioners. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the main points about organisation, some of the organisational skills and tools that are available, and some examples of how these skills and tools can be used to make practitioners more effective at organising their workload. It is important to realise that organising work and doing work are two completely different things and shouldn't be mixed up. For example, it would be very difficult to start organising work in the middle of a busy operating list: the organisation of the work must come before the work starts and therefore preparation is often an important first step in organising work. As such, some of the tools and skills described in this article may need to be used hours or even days prior to the actual work taking place.

  14. Chemical organisation theory.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Peter; di Fenizio, Pietro Speroni

    2007-05-01

    Complex dynamical reaction networks consisting of many components that interact and produce each other are difficult to understand, especially, when new component types may appear and present component types may vanish completely. Inspired by Fontana and Buss (Bull. Math. Biol., 56, 1-64) we outline a theory to deal with such systems. The theory consists of two parts. The first part introduces the concept of a chemical organisation as a closed and self-maintaining set of components. This concept allows to map a complex (reaction) network to the set of organisations, providing a new view on the system's structure. The second part connects dynamics with the set of organisations, which allows to map a movement of the system in state space to a movement in the set of organisations. The relevancy of our theory is underlined by a theorem that says that given a differential equation describing the chemical dynamics of the network, then every stationary state is an instance of an organisation. For demonstration, the theory is applied to a small model of HIV-immune system interaction by Wodarz and Nowak (Proc. Natl. Acad. USA, 96, 14464-14469) and to a large model of the sugar metabolism of E. Coli by Puchalka and Kierzek (Biophys. J., 86, 1357-1372). In both cases organisations where uncovered, which could be related to functions.

  15. Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Shelley A; Bennett, Nicholas J

    2011-12-01

    Pneumocystis (carinii) jiroveci pneumonia can occur in immunocompromised individuals, especially hematopoietic stem and solid organ transplant recipients and those receiving immunosuppressive agents, and is the most common opportunistic infection in persons with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The Pneumocystis genus was initially mistaken as a trypanosome and later as a protozoan. Genetic analysis identified the organism as a unicellular fungus. Pneumocystis jiroveci is the species responsible for human infections. A slow indolent time course with symptoms of pneumonia progressing over weeks to months is characteristic in HIV-infected patients. Fulminant respiratory failure associated with fever and dry cough is typical in non-HIV-infected patients. Definitive diagnosis relies on histopathological testing of sputum, induced or sampled by fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The first-line drug for treatment and prevention is trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

  16. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections.

  17. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia A A A What's in this article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  18. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids under 6 years old. Take your child's temperature at least once each morning and each evening, ... Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza (Flu) Walking Pneumonia Word! Pneumonia Pneumonia Hib ...

  19. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cure the infection and prevent complications. Bacterial pneumonia Bacterial pneumonia is treated with medicines called antibiotics. ... fewer symptoms such as cough and fever. Viral pneumonia Antibiotics don't work when the cause of ...

  20. What Is Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Pneumonia Pneumonia is a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection of ... and trouble breathing. Many factors affect how serious pneumonia is, such as the type of germ causing ...

  1. An Organisational Interoperability Agility Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Government Organisations Organisation OIM Level 0 r anisation OIM Level 1 OIM Level 2 OIM Level 4 OIM Level 3 Layer for one Operational Type I l Figure...Government Organisations Organisation OIM Level 0 r anisation OIM Level 1 OIM Level 2 OIM Level 4 OIM Level 3 Layer for one Operational Type I l

  2. [Cryptogenic and iatrogenic papillary thyroid carcinoma in children and adolescences: comparative study].

    PubMed

    Fridman, M V; Demidchik, Iu E; Papok, V E; Savva, N N; Zborovskaia, A A; Spivak, L V; Schmid, K W

    2011-01-01

    The clinico-morphological investigations of 117 children and adolescences with papillary thyroid carcinoma, surgically treated in the Republic Centre for Thyroid Tumors, Minsk, Belarus in 1995-2009 and dutifully followed-up have been studied. Ninety -five observations of all cases were sporadic, but 22 patients had been treated earlier from other neoplasm (Hodgkin's diseases, malignant lymphoma, leukemia, sarcoma, medulloblastoma). Epidemiologic, clinical and pathological peculiarities of thyroid carcinoma in Belarus were analyzed. A number of features distinguished "cryptogenic" and "iatrogenic" papillary thyroid carcinoma in children and adolescents were found out.

  3. Cryptogenic Multifocal Ulcerous Stenosing Enteritis (CMUSE): A Tale of Three Decades

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Panigrahi, Manas Kumar; Misra, Debasis

    2017-01-01

    We present a patient who, over the course of 35 years, presented with repeated episodes of ileus and melena and was misdiagnosed several times, leading to several surgeries. Macroscopic and microscopic features of his resected intestine were compatible with cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosis enteritis (CMUSE), but additional angioectatic lesions were also noted. The patient responded dramatically to hormonal therapy consisting of ethinylestradiol and norethisterone. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CMUSE that has shown response to hormonal therapy. We suggest that this is a variant of CMUSE in which vasculopathy plays a role in the pathogenesis. PMID:28331882

  4. Healthcare-associated Pneumonia and Aspiration Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Kosaku; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a new concept of pneumonia proposed by the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2005. This category is located between community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia with respect to the characteristics of the causative pathogens and mortality, and primarily targets elderly patients in healthcare facilities. Aspiration among such patients is recognized to be a primary mechanism for the development of pneumonia, particularly since the HCAP guidelines were published. However, it is difficult to manage patients with aspiration pneumonia because the definition of the condition is unclear, and the treatment is associated with ethical aspects. This review focused on the definition, prevalence and role of aspiration pneumonia as a prognostic factor in published studies of HCAP and attempted to identify problems associated with the concept of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:25657850

  5. Bilateral optic papillitis following mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Milla, E; Zografos, L; Piguet, B

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that can cause a great variety of respiratory infections and be responsible for ocular involvement such as conjunctivitis, anterior uveitis and very rarely optic neuropathy. We report herein an additional case of bilateral optic disc swelling with profound visual loss following Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and review the world literature on the ocular manifestations associated with this pathogen.

  6. Evidence of a Native Northwest Atlantic COI Haplotype Clade in the Cryptogenic Colonial Ascidian Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Yund, Philip O; Collins, Catherine; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-06-01

    The colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri should be considered cryptogenic (i.e., not definitively classified as either native or introduced) in the Northwest Atlantic. Although all the evidence is quite circumstantial, over the last 15 years most research groups have accepted the scenario of human-mediated dispersal and classified B. schlosseri as introduced; others have continued to consider it native or cryptogenic. We address the invasion status of this species by adding 174 sequences to the growing worldwide database for the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and analyzing 1077 sequences to compare genetic diversity of one clade of haplotypes in the Northwest Atlantic with two hypothesized source regions (the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean). Our results lead us to reject the prevailing view of the directionality of transport across the Atlantic. We argue that the genetic diversity patterns at COI are far more consistent with the existence of at least one haplotype clade in the Northwest Atlantic (and possibly a second) that substantially pre-dates human colonization from Europe, with this native North American clade subsequently introduced to three sites in Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean waters. However, we agree with past researchers that some sites in the Northwest Atlantic have more recently been invaded by alien haplotypes, so that some populations are currently composed of a mixture of native and invader haplotypes.

  7. Cryptogenic liver disease in four children: a novel congenital disorder of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Mandato, Claudia; Brive, Lena; Miura, Yoshiaki; Davis, Joseph Alex; Di Cosmo, Nicolina; Lucariello, Stefania; Pagliardini, Severo; Seo, Neung-Seon; Parenti, Giancarlo; Vecchione, Raffaella; Freeze, Hudson H; Vajro, Pietro

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the metabolic defect(s) of four children who presented with isolated cryptogenic chronic liver disease, coagulopathy, and abnormalities of several unrelated serum glycoproteins. Analysis of the patients' serum glycoproteins and fibroblasts suggest they have a novel congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). All had abnormal transferrin (Tf) isoelectric focusing (IEF) profiles. More detailed analysis of Tf by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) showed a plethora of abnormal glycosylations that included loss of 1-2 sialic acids and 1-2 galactose units, typical of Group II defects. Tf from two patients also lacked 1-2 entire oligosaccharide chains, typical of Group One disorders. Total serum N-glycans were analyzed by HPLC and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and also showed increased proportion of neutral glycan chains lacking sialic acids and galactose units. Analysis of patient fibroblasts eliminated CDG-Ia, through CDG-Ih, -IL and CDG-IId. Our results suggest that a subset of children with clinically asymptomatic, cryptogenic hypertransaminasemia and/or liver steato-fibrosis may represent a novel type of CDG-X with an unknown defect(s). Clinicians are encouraged to test such patients for abnormal Tf glycosylation by ESI-MS.

  8. Segregation analysis of cryptogenic epilepsy and an empirical test of the validity of the results

    SciTech Connect

    Ottman, R.; Hauser, W.A.; Barker-Cummings, C.; Lee, J.H.

    1997-03-01

    We used POINTER to perform segregation analysis of crytogenic epilepsy in 1,557 three-generation families (probands and their parents, siblings, and offspring) ascertained from voluntary organizations. Analysis of the full data set indicated that the data were most consistent with an autosomal dominant (AD) model with 61% penetrance of the susceptibility gene. However, subsequent analyses revealed that the patterns of familial aggregation differed markedly between siblings and offspring of the probands. Risks in siblings were consistent with an autosomal recessive (AR) model and inconsistent with an AD model, whereas risks in offspring were inconsistent with an AR model and more consistent with an AD model. As a further test of the validity of the AD model, we used sequential ascertainment to extend the family history information in the subset of families judged likely to carry the putative susceptibility gene because they contained at least three affected individuals. Prevalence of idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy was only 3.7% in newly identified relatives expected to have a 50% probability of carrying the susceptibility gene under an AD model. Approximately 30% (i.e., 50% X 61%) were expected to be affected under the AD model resulting from the segregation analysis. These results suggest that the familial distribution of cryptogenic epilepsy is inconsistent with any conventional genetic model. The differences between siblings and offspring in the patterns of familial risk are intriguing and should be investigated further. 28 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Abdominal aortitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Rondina, Matthew T; Raphael, Kalani; Pendleton, Robert; Sande, Merle A

    2006-07-01

    Endovascular infections are 1 cause of fever of unknown origin. We describe a diagnostically challenging case of cryptogenic abdominal aortitis from Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes. A 72-year-old male presented with epigastric pain, fevers, and chills. A computed tomography scan demonstrated enlargement and ulceration of the distal abdominal aorta, prompting urgent vascular surgery. Intraoperative tissue cultures grew S. pneumoniae and E. aerogenes and gatifloxacin was administered for 6 weeks. Spontaneous abdominal aortitis is uncommon and usually due to a single pathogen. This is the second reported case of polymicrobial infectious aortitis and to date, Enterobacter has only been reported in infected aortic grafts. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for infectious aortitis as the mortality, if only treated medically, approaches 100%.

  10. Nosocomial pneumonia: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Niederman, Michael S

    2013-07-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia remains a significant cause of hospital-acquired infection, imposing substantial economic burden on the health care system worldwide. Various preventive strategies have been increasingly used to prevent the development of pneumonia. It is now recognized that patients with health care-associated pneumonia are a heterogeneous population and that not all are at risk for infection with nosocomial pneumonia pathogens, with some being infected with the same organisms as in community-acquired pneumonia. This review discusses the risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia, controversies in its diagnosis, and approaches to the treatment and prevention of nosocomial and health care-associated pneumonia.

  11. D-dimer for prediction of long-term outcome in cryptogenic stroke patients with patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Dae; Song, Dongbeom; Nam, Hyo Suk; Lee, Kijeong; Yoo, Joonsang; Hong, Geu-Ru; Lee, Hye Sun; Nam, Chung Mo; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2015-08-31

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a potential cause of cryptogenic stroke, given the possibility of paradoxical embolism from venous to systemic circulation. D-dimer level is used to screen venous thrombosis. We investigated the risk of embolism and mortality according to the presence of PFO and D-dimer levels in cryptogenic stroke patients. A total of 570 first-ever cryptogenic stroke patients who underwent transesophageal echocardiography were included in this study. D-dimer was assessed using latex agglutination assay during admission. The association of long-term outcomes with the presence of PFO and D-dimer levels was investigated. PFO was detected in 241 patients (42.3 %). During a mean 34.0 ± 22.8 months of follow-up, all-cause death occurred in 58 (10.2 %) patients, ischaemic stroke in 33 (5.8 %), and pulmonary thromboembolism in 6 (1.1 %). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that a D-dimer level of > 1,000 ng/ml was an independent predictor for recurrent ischaemic stroke in patients with PFO (hazard ratio 5.341, 95 % confidence interval 1.648-17.309, p=0.005), but not in those without PFO. However, in patients without PFO, a D-dimer level of > 1,000 ng/ml was independently related with all-cause mortality. The risk of pulmonary thromboembolism tended to be high in patients with high D-dimer levels, regardless of PFO. Elevated D-dimer levels in cryptogenic stroke were predictive of the long-term outcome, which differed according to the presence of PFO. The coexistence of PFO and a high D-dimer level increased the risk of recurrent ischaemic stroke. The D-dimer test in cryptogenic stroke patients may be useful for predicting outcomes and deciding treatment strategy.

  12. World Organisation for Animal Health

    MedlinePlus

    World Organisation for Animal Health Home About us Presentation Director general office Biography Photos Strategic plan Our ... Food safety and animal welfare History General organisation World Assembly Council Headquarters OIE Regional Representations OIE Regional ...

  13. The Army Learning Organisation Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge Management DALO DSTO Army Learning Organisation DASS Defence Assisted Study Scheme DLOQ Dimensions of a Learning Organisation Questionnaire...realised. Facilitation was provided through external (academic/subject matter expert) and internal (DALO Research Team) providers. The external...being an organisational archetype characterised by the existence of certain internal conditions and proclivities which facilitate learning at

  14. Embolic Strokes of Unknown Source and Cryptogenic Stroke: Implications in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Nouh, Amre; Hussain, Mohammed; Mehta, Tapan; Yaghi, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Up to a third of strokes are rendered cryptogenic or of undetermined etiology. This number is specifically higher in younger patients. At times, inadequate diagnostic workups, multiple causes, or an under-recognized etiology contributes to this statistic. Embolic stroke of undetermined source, a new clinical entity particularly refers to patients with embolic stroke for whom the etiology of embolism remains unidentified despite through investigations ruling out established cardiac and vascular sources. In this article, we review current classification and discuss important clinical considerations in these patients; highlighting cardiac arrhythmias and structural abnormalities, patent foramen ovale, paradoxical sources, and potentially under-recognized, vascular, inflammatory, autoimmune, and hematologic sources in relation to clinical practice. PMID:27047443

  15. Interdisciplinarity to reconstruct historical introductions: solving the status of cryptogenic crayfish.

    PubMed

    Clavero, Miguel; Nores, Carlos; Kubersky-Piredda, Susanne; Centeno-Cuadros, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Anciently introduced species can be confounded with native species because introduction pre-dates the first species inventories or because of the loss of the collective memory of the introductions. The term 'cryptogenic species' denotes species of unknown or unclear status (native versus non-native) in a given territory, and disciplinary approaches are often insufficient for solving their true status. Here, we follow an integrative, multidisciplinary approach to solve the status of a cryptogenic species, proposing that building on evidence from multiple disciplines can produce robust and clarifying insights. We undertook an exhaustive review of information on a putatively native crayfish (Austropotamobius italicus) in Spain. The reviewed information included taxonomy, genetics and phylogeography, history, archaeology, linguistics, biogeography, ecology, symbiotic organisms and even gastronomy and pharmacy. The knowledge produced by different scientific disciplines converges to indicate that A. italicus is a non-native species in Spain. Historical documents even identify the first introduction event: crayfish were shipped from Italy to Spain in 1588 as a diplomatic gift from Francesco I de' Medici to King Philip II of Spain. Previous discussions on the status of A. italicus focussed on inconclusive and often confusing genetic results and excluded the rich and clarifying evidence available from other approaches and disciplines. Interdisciplinarity is an often-invoked but rarely implemented practice in an academic environment that increasingly promotes narrow-focussed specialization. Our review shows that the integration of disciplines can surpass disciplinary approaches in solving scientific controversies. Our results have straightforward implications for strategies to conserve biological diversity in Spain and Europe, urging a debate on the appropriateness of devoting conservation efforts to non-native species.

  16. Cortical Organization of Language Pathways in Children with Non-Localized Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Richard Eugene; Liederman, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Children with a history of epilepsy are almost six times more likely than their unaffected siblings to be referred for speech or language therapy. However, the abnormalities in neural pathway that cause these delays are poorly understood. We recorded evoked fields using whole-head magnetoencephalography during real and non-word visual and auditory rhyme tasks in 15 children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy. Basic phonological and orthographic language skills were assessed using Woodcock–Johnson Test of Achievement subtests. Dynamic statistical parameter mapping was used with individual participant magnetic resonance images. Significant cortical activity was visualized on average and performance weighted maps. For the auditory rhyme tasks, bilateral primary and secondary auditory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus, and insular cortex were activated early with later increases in left hemisphere activity. Visual rhyme tasks evoked early bilateral primary and secondary occipital cortical and angular gyri activity followed by later activation of the planum temporale and supramarginal gyri and the left ventral occipitotemporal area. For the auditory rhyme tasks, performance weighted maps demonstrated that early right hemisphere activation was associated with poorer reading skills while later activity was associated with better reading skills; for the left hemisphere, greater early activation of the secondary auditory cortex, including the planum temporale, was related to better reading skills while relatively later activation of these areas was associated with poorer reading skills. For the visual rhyme tasks, greater activity in the bilateral ventral occipitotemporal and insular areas and angular and supramarginal gyri were associated with better performance. These data suggest that spatiotemporal cortical activation patterns are associated with variations in language performance in non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy. PMID:25346681

  17. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia after radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cottin, V; Frognier, R; Monnot, H; Levy, A; DeVuyst, P; Cordier, J F

    2004-01-01

    The priming of bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia by radiation therapy (RT) to the breast is now a well recognised syndrome. This study describes the occurrence of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia following RT after surgery for breast cancer in five female patients, with a mean age of 68 yrs (range 49-77). All patients had a history of asthma and/or allergy. At the onset of eosinophilic pneumonia, all patients were symptomatic. Chest radiograph showed pulmonary infiltrates, unilateral and limited to the irradiated lung in three patients, and bilateral in two. Pulmonary opacities were migratory in one patient. All patients had blood eosinophilia >1.0 10(9) x L(-1) and/or eosinophilia >40% at bronchoalveolar lavage differential cell count. The median time interval between the end of radiation therapy and the onset of eosinophilic pneumonia was 3.5 months (range 1-10). All patients rapidly improved with oral corticosteroids without sequelae. Relapse occurred in two patients after treatment withdrawal. Priming of alveolitis by radiation therapy to the breast might promote either bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia or chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, with the latter depending on genetic or acquired characteristics of patients and/or further stimulation that may trigger a T-helper cell type 2 form of lymphocyte response, especially in patients with asthma or other atopic manifestations.

  18. American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: Advances in Knowledge since 2002.

    PubMed

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Lynch, David A; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; King, Talmadge E; Travis, William D

    2015-01-01

    In the updated American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), the major entities have been preserved and grouped into (a) "chronic fibrosing IIPs" (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia), (b) "smoking-related IIPs" (respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease and desquamative interstitial pneumonia), (c) "acute or subacute IIPs" (cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia), and (d) "rare IIPs" (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis). Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that a final diagnosis is not always achievable, and the category "unclassifiable IIP" has been proposed. The diagnostic interpretation of the IIPs is often challenging because other diseases with a known etiology (most notably, connective tissue disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) may show similar morphologic patterns. Indeed, more emphasis has been given to the integration of clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings for multidisciplinary diagnosis. Typical CT-based morphologic patterns are associated with the IIPs, and radiologists play an important role in diagnosis and characterization. Optimal CT quality and a systematic approach are both pivotal for evaluation of IIP. Interobserver variation for the various patterns encountered in the IIPs is an issue. It is important for radiologists to understand the longitudinal behavior of IIPs at serial CT examinations, especially for providing a framework for cases that are unclassifiable or in which a histologic diagnosis cannot be obtained.

  19. Organisational aspects of care.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Jacqueline; Pegram, Anne

    2015-03-04

    Organisational aspects of care, the second essential skills cluster, identifies the need for registered nurses to systematically assess, plan and provide holistic patient care in accordance with individual needs. Safeguarding, supporting and protecting adults and children in vulnerable situations; leading, co-ordinating and managing care; functioning as an effective and confident member of the multidisciplinary team; and managing risk while maintaining a safe environment for patients and colleagues, are vital aspects of this cluster. This article discusses the roles and responsibilities of the newly registered graduate nurse. Throughout their education, nursing students work towards attaining this knowledge and these skills in preparation for their future roles as nurses.

  20. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000671.htm Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a fungal infection of the lungs. The ...

  1. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  2. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia. Pulse oximetry. For this test, a small sensor is attached to your finger or ear. The sensor uses light to estimate how much oxygen is ... to help find the cause of your pneumonia. Types of pneumonia Your doctor may also diagnosis you ...

  3. Cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis (CMUSE), and neuromuscular and vascular hamartoma (NMVH): two sides of the same coin?

    PubMed

    Setaffy, Lisa; Osuna, María José Martín; Plieschnegger, Wolfgang; del Pino Florez Rial, María; Geboes, Karel; Langner, Cord

    2015-04-01

    Multifocal stenosing enteritis, not related to Crohn's disease or drug intake, has been described under two different terms: "cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis" (CMUSE) and "neuromuscular and vascular hamartoma" (NMVH). We present three new cases of this condition and argue that the two terms reflect the same disease entity. Although etiology and pathogenesis of the disease remain largely unclear, obliterative vascular changes may play an important role.

  4. Solving cryptogenic histories using host and parasite molecular genetics: the resolution of Littorina littorea's North American origin.

    PubMed

    Blakeslee, April M H; Byers, James E; Lesser, Michael P

    2008-08-01

    Even after decades of investigation using multiple sources of evidence, the natural histories of some species remain unclear (i.e. cryptogenic). A key example is Littorina littorea, the most abundant intertidal snail in northeastern North America. Native to Europe, the snail's ecological history in North America has been debated for over 100 years with no definitive resolution. To resolve its cryptogenic status, we used molecular genetics from a novel combination of the snail and a highly associated trematode parasite, Cryptocotyle lingua. Based on mitochondrial sequences of 370 L. littorea and 196 C. lingua individuals, our results demonstrate a significant reduction in genetic diversity in North America vs. Europe, North American haplotypes nested within European haplotypes, and mean divergence estimates of approxiamtely 500 years ago from Europe for both host and parasite--thus supporting a recent introduction of both host and parasite to North America from Europe. Our study therefore resolves not only a specific cryptogenic history, but it also demonstrates the success of our approach generally and could be used in resolving difficult invasion histories worldwide.

  5. Organising, Educating... Changing the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, John

    2005-01-01

    Over the past few years a constellation of social movements and organisations concerned with issues of globalisation and world poverty have exploded onto the world stage. They have mobilised demonstrations, organised mass gatherings and conferences, created e-networks and websites and become major players in international political lobbying and…

  6. Model Checking Normative Agent Organisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Louise; Tinnemeier, Nick; Meyer, John-Jules

    We present the integration of a normative programming language in the MCAPL framework for model checking multi-agent systems. The result is a framework facilitating the implementation and verification of multi-agent systems coordinated via a normative organisation. The organisation can be programmed in the normative language while the constituent agents may be implemented in a number of (BDI) agent programming languages.

  7. General attributes of safe organisations

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, P

    2004-01-01

    In analysing the safety strategies of organisations successfully managing hazardous systems it is apparent that safety itself is a problematic, and even risky, concept. It is less the valuation of safety per se than the disvalue surrounding mis-specification, misidentification, and misunderstanding that drives reliability in these organisations. Two contrasting models of high reliability can be identified in precluded event and resilience focused organisations. Each model is adapted to different properties in the raw material, process variances, and knowledge base of the organisation. These two models bound the reliability approaches available to medicine. The implications of each for medical reliability strategy are explored, and the possible adaptation of features from each for medical organisations are assessed. PMID:15576691

  8. Building Organisational Capability the Private Provider Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Organisational capability is recognised as a key to organisational success. The combination of human capital (peoples' skills and knowledge), social capital (relationships between people) and organisational capital (the organisation's processes), is central to building an organisation's capability. This paper, presented at the 2008 annual…

  9. Coupled biophysical global ocean model and molecular genetic analyses identify multiple introductions of cryptogenic species.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Michael N; Sen Gupta, Alex; England, Matthew H

    2005-08-23

    The anthropogenic introduction of exotic species is one of the greatest modern threats to marine biodiversity. Yet exotic species introductions remain difficult to predict and are easily misunderstood because knowledge of natural dispersal patterns, species diversity, and biogeography is often insufficient to distinguish between a broadly dispersed natural population and an exotic one. Here we compare a global molecular phylogeny of a representative marine meroplanktonic taxon, the moon-jellyfish Aurelia, with natural dispersion patterns predicted by a global biophysical ocean model. Despite assumed high dispersal ability, the phylogeny reveals many cryptic species and predominantly regional structure with one notable exception: the globally distributed Aurelia sp.1, which, molecular data suggest, may occasionally traverse the Pacific unaided. This possibility is refuted by the ocean model, which shows much more limited dispersion and patterns of distribution broadly consistent with modern biogeographic zones, thus identifying multiple introductions worldwide of this cryptogenic species. This approach also supports existing evidence that (i) the occurrence in Hawaii of Aurelia sp. 4 and other native Indo-West Pacific species with similar life histories is most likely due to anthropogenic translocation, and (ii) there may be a route for rare natural colonization of northeast North America by the European marine snail Littorina littorea, whose status as endemic or exotic is unclear.

  10. Branhamella catarrhalis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Milton H.; Gabay, Elizabeth L.; Mathisen, Glenn E.; Finegold, Sydney M.

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of Branhamella catarrhalis pneumonia in five cases was established by culture of pulmonary secretions obtained by transtracheal aspiration. B catarrhalis caused an acute lobar pneumonia which usually responded promptly to appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Recognition that this organism may cause pneumonia in a nonimmunocompromised person should alert clinicians to consider it as a possible pathogen when Gramnegative diplococci are seen on smears of specimens from the lower respiratory tract. Images PMID:6837019

  11. Building a strategic security organisation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Mike

    2016-01-01

    In everyone's day-to-day jobs there is constant need to deal with current and newly detected matters. This is now a world of immediacy, driven by the cadence of the business and its needs. These concerns should not be ignored, as failing to deal with these issues would not bode well for the future. It is essential that the gears are kept spinning. The challenge for any security organisation is to identify its short-term tactical requirements, while developing longer-term strategic needs. Once done, the differences can be accounted for and strides can be made toward a desired future state. This paper highlights several steps that the author and his team have taken in their own journey. There is no magic answer, each organisation will have its own unique challenges. Nevertheless, some of the approaches to building a strategic security organisation described in this paper are applicable to all organisations, irrespective of their size.

  12. A typology of organisational cultures

    PubMed Central

    Westrum, R

    2004-01-01

    There is wide belief that organisational culture shapes many aspects of performance, including safety. Yet proof of this relationship in a medical context is hard to find. In contrast to human factors, whose contributions are many and notable, culture's impact remains a commonsense, rather than a scientific, concept. The objectives of this paper are to show that organisational culture bears a predictive relationship with safety and that particular kinds of organisational culture improve safety, and to develop a typology predictive of safety performance. Because information flow is both influential and also indicative of other aspects of culture, it can be used to predict how organisations or parts of them will behave when signs of trouble arise. From case studies and some systematic research it appears that information culture is indeed associated with error reporting and with performance, including safety. Yet this relationship between culture and safety requires more exploration before the connection can be considered definitive. PMID:15576687

  13. [Pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Catherinot, Emilie

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is a serious medical pathology frequent in elderly people. The physiological changes of the respiratory system linked with age reduce postural drainage capacities and increase the risk of acute respiratory failure. Associated with other comorbidities, chronic inhalation is a major risk factor of pneumonia in elderly people. Prevention is based on vaccination, nutrition, dental care and an adapted diet.

  14. Bronchitis and Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a health care provider. How serious are bronchitis and pneumonia? Both conditions are more serious if a child has a chronic health condition or if the condition is caused by a bacteria, in which case antibiotics are the treatment of choice. When pneumonia is caused by bacteria, ...

  15. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes type 2 in cryptogenic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Avila, Felix I; Sanchez-Avila, Francisco; García-Saenz-de-Sicilia, Mauricio; Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Franco-Guzman, Ada M; Lopez-Arce, Gustavo; Cerda-Contreras, Eduardo; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a group of Mexican Mestizo patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC) and to compare this group with patients with cirrhosis secondary to other causes (disease controls). METHODS: Patients with CC, diagnosed between January, 1990 and April, 2005, were included in a retrospective study. Patients with cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis C, alcohol abuse or autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) served as disease controls. RESULTS: A total of 134 patients with CC were analyzed. Disease controls consisted of 81 patients with chronic hepatitis C, 33 with alcohol abuse and 20 with AIH. The median age of patients with CC was 57 years (range, 16-87); 83 (61.9%) patients were female; 53 (39.6%) were Child A, 65 (48.5%) Child B, and 16 (11.9%) were Child C cirrhosis. The prevalence of MS (29.1% vs 6%; P < 0.001), obesity (16.4% vs 8.2%; P = 0.04) and T2DM (40% vs 22.4%; P = 0.013) was higher in CC patients than in disease controls. There were no differences in sex, age or liver function tests between the two groups. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of MS, obesity and T2DM were higher in patients with CC than in patients with cirrhosis secondary to others causes. Our findings support the hypothesis that non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) plays an under-recognized role in CC. PMID:18720537

  16. Antibody responses of Chlamydophila pneumoniae pneumonia: Why is the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia difficult?

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2015-07-01

    The ELNAS Plate Chlamydophila pneumoniae commercial test kit for the detection of anti-C. pneumoniae-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA and IgG antibodies has become available in Japan recently. To determine the optimum serum collection point for the ELNAS plate in the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, we analyzed the kinetics of the antibody response in patients with laboratory-confirmed C. pneumoniae pneumonia. We enrolled five C. pneumoniae pneumonia cases and collected sera from patients for several months. The kinetics of the IgM and IgG antibody responses were similar among the five patients. Significant increases in IgM and IgG antibody titer between paired sera were observed in all patients. IgM antibodies appeared approximately 2-3 weeks after the onset of illness, reached a peak after 4-5 weeks, and were generally undetectable after 3-5 months. IgG antibodies developed slowly for the first 30 days and reached a plateau approximately 3-4 months after the onset of illness. The kinetics of IgA antibody responses were different among the five patients, and significant increases in IgA antibody titer between paired sera were observed in only two patients. Although the sample size was small, the best serum collection time seemed to be approximately 3-6 weeks after onset of illness when using a single serum sample for the detection of IgM antibodies. Paired sera samples should be obtained at least 4 weeks apart. IgA antibody analysis using ELNAS may not be a useful marker for acute C. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  17. Joining Forces: Working with Spirituality in Organisations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Robin; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Includes "Joining Forces" (Lindamood); "Spiritual Dimension of the Learning Organisation" (Hawkins); "Management--A 'Spiritual' Foundation?" (Nevard); "Hermit in Organisations" (Murray); "Towards a Spiritual Perspective on Behavior at Work" (Henson); "On Uncertainty" (Adlam); "Spirituality in Organisations" (Lee); "Ecological Organisation" (Conn);…

  18. Increased interictal cerebral glucose metabolism in a cortical-subcortical network in drug naive patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, M; Lucignani, G; Del Sole, A; Grana, C; Bressi, S; Minicucci, F; Messa, C; Canevini, M P; Fazio, F

    1995-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) has been used to assess the pattern of cerebral metabolism in different types of epilepsies. However, PET with [18F]FDG has never been used to evaluate drug naive patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy, in whom the mechanism of origin and diffusion of the epileptic discharge may differ from that underlying other epilepsies. In a group of patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy, never treated with antiepileptic drugs, evidence has been found of significant interictal glucose hypermetabolism in a bilateral neural network including the temporal lobes, thalami, basal ganglia, and cingular cortices. The metabolism in these areas and frontal lateral cortex enables the correct classification of all patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and controls by discriminant function analysis. Other cortical areas--namely, frontal basal and lateral, temporal mesial, and cerebellar cortices--had bilateral increases of glucose metabolism ranging from 10 to 15% of normal controls, although lacking stringent statistical significance. This metabolic pattern could represent a pathophysiological state of hyperactivity predisposing to epileptic discharge generation or diffusion, or else a network of inhibitory circuits activated to prevent the diffusion of the epileptic discharge. PMID:7561924

  19. Investigation of Association between PFO Complicated by Cryptogenic Stroke and a Common Variant of the Cardiac Transcription Factor GATA4

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Cemil; Berger, Felix; Hetzer, Roland; Otway, Robyn; Butler, Tanya L.; Blue, Gillian M.; Griffiths, Lyn R.; Fatkin, Diane; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Winlaw, David S.; Feneley, Michael P.; Harvey, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is associated with clinical conditions including cryptogenic stroke, migraine and varicose veins. Data from studies in humans and mouse suggest that PFO and the secundum form of atrial septal defect (ASDII) exist in an anatomical continuum of septal dysmorphogenesis with a common genetic basis. Mutations in multiple members of the evolutionarily conserved cardiac transcription factor network, including GATA4, cause or predispose to ASDII and PFO. Here, we assessed whether the most prevalent variant of the GATA4 gene, S377G, was significantly associated with PFO or ASD. Our analysis of world indigenous populations showed that GATA4 S377G was largely Caucasian-specific, and so subjects were restricted to those of Caucasian descent. To select for patients with larger PFO, we limited our analysis to those with cryptogenic stroke in which PFO was a subsequent finding. In an initial study of Australian subjects, we observed a weak association between GATA4 S377G and PFO/Stroke relative to Caucasian controls in whom ASD and PFO had been excluded (OR = 2.16; p = 0.02). However, in a follow up study of German Caucasians no association was found with either PFO or ASD. Analysis of combined Australian and German data confirmed the lack of a significant association. Thus, the common GATA4 variant S377G is likely to be relatively benign in terms of its participation in CHD and PFO/Stroke. PMID:21673957

  20. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  1. Environmental health organisations against tobacco.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Maurice; Evans, David S; Lahiffe, Blaithin; Goggin, Deirdre; Smyth, Colm; Hastings, Gerard; Byrne, Miriam

    2009-04-01

    Implementing the World Health Organisation (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) relies heavily on enforcement. Little is known of the way different enforcement agencies operate, prioritise or network. A questionnaire was sent to representatives of the International Federation of Environmental Health (IFEH) in 36 countries. Tobacco control was given low priority. Almost two thirds did not have any tobacco control policy. A third reported their organisation had worked with other agencies on tobacco control. Obstacles to addressing tobacco control included a lack of resources (61%) and absence of a coherent strategy (39%).

  2. PREFACE: Scientific Organising Committee Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    Edited by: Oliver Roberts Lorraine Hanlon Sheila McBreen Local Organising Committee: Oliver Roberts (Chair) Antonio Martin-Carrillo Lorraine Hanlon Sheila McBreen Alexey Uliyanov David Murphy Sinéad Hales Scientific Organising Committee:: Sheila McBreen, (UCD, Ireland) (Chair) Franco Camera (INFN-Milano, Italy) Nerine Cherepy (LLNL, USA) Jarek Glodo (RMD, USA) Lorraine Hanlon (UCD, Ireland) Paul Lecoq (CERN, Switzerland) Julie McEnery (NASA, USA) Oliver Roberts (UCD, Ireland) Anant Setlur, (GE, USA) Brian Shortt, (ESA, the Netherlands) Kenneth Stanton (UCD, Ireland)

  3. Population genetics of the invasive cryptogenic anemone, Anemonia alicemartinae, along the southeastern Pacific coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales-Aguirre, C. B.; Quiñones, A.; Hernández, C. E.; Neill, P. E.; Brante, A.

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important issues in biological invasions is understanding the factors and mechanisms determining the invasion success of non-native species. Theoretical and empirical works have shown that genetic diversity is a determinant of invasion success; thus, studying spatial patterns of genetic diversity, and exploring how biological and physical factors shape this population trait, are fundamental for understanding this phenomenon. Coastal marine ecosystems are one of the most susceptible habitats to invasion given the complex network of maritime transport. In this work we study the cryptogenic anemone, Anemonia alicemartinae, which has rapidly increased its geographical range southward during the last 50 years (approx. 2000 km) along the southeastern Pacific coast. Based on COI mtDNA sequences we evaluated three main hypotheses: a) the genetic diversity of A. alicemartinae decreases according to the direction of invasion (from north to south); b) there is biogeographic-phylogeographic concordance at the 30°S biogeographic break; and c) the demographic history is coherent with a recent geographic expansion. A total of 161 individual samples of A. alicemartinae were collected along the southeastern Pacific coast range of distribution, covering more than 2000 km, including samples along the 30°S biogeographical break. Results showed low genetic diversity (Hd = 0.253; π = 0.08) and a lack of geographic population genetic structure (FST = - 0.009, p-value = 0.656). The highest genetic diversity was observed in Peru (Chero and Mesas) and at localities close to the main Chilean seaports. We did not observe concordance between biogeographic and phylogeographic patterns or isolation by distance. Demographic indices (D = - 2.604, p < 0.001; Fu's = - 26.619, p < 0.001), as well as a star-like configuration of the haplotype network support recent population expansion of this species. Our results, together with historical field observations, support the idea that

  4. Clinical features and natural history of cryptogenic cirrhosis compared to hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Luca; Nascimbeni, Fabio; Giordano, Mauro; Masetti, Chiara; Guerrera, Barbara; Amelia, Annalisa; Fascione, Maria Chiara; Ballestri, Stefano; Romagnoli, Dante; Zampino, Rosa; Nevola, Riccardo; Baldelli, Enrica; Iuliano, Natalina; Rosato, Valerio; Lonardo, Amedeo; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio

    2017-01-01

    AIM To characterize natural history of cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC) and compare its clinical features and outcomes to those of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis. METHODS A prospective cohort of 102 consecutive patients at their first diagnosis of CC were enrolled in this study. The clinical data and outcomes were compared to an age- and Child-Pugh class-matched cohort of 110 patients with HCV-related cirrhosis. Diagnosis of cirrhosis was based on compatible clinical and laboratory parameters, ultrasound/endoscopic parameters and, whenever possible, on histological grounds and transient elastography. All cases of cirrhosis without a definite etiology were enrolled in the CC group. The parameters assessed were: (1) severity of liver disease at the time of first diagnosis; (2) liver decompensation during follow-up; (3) hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); (4) orthotopic liver transplantation; and (5) death. The independent associated factors were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, and survival and its determinants by the Kaplan-Meier model, log-rank test and Cox regression. RESULTS At the first observation, median age was 66 and 65 years and male gender was 36% and 58% for CC and HCV cirrhosis, respectively. CC showed Child-Pugh class A/B/C of 47%/31%/22%, respectively. Compared to HCV cirrhosis, CC exhibited a significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (12% vs 54%, respectively), overweight/obesity, high BMI, impaired glucose tolerance, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia, cardiovascular diseases, extrahepatic cancer, and gallstones. Over a median period of 42 mo of follow-up, liver decompensation, HCC development and death for CC and HCV-related cirrhosis were 60.8%, and 54.4%, 16.7% and 17.2%, 39.2% and 30%, respectively. The median survival was 60 mo for CC. Independent predictors of death were age and Child-Pugh class at diagnosis. CC showed an approximately twofold higher incidence of HCC in Child-Pugh class A

  5. Pneumocystis pneumonia: an update.

    PubMed

    Sritangratanakul, Sureeporn; Nuchprayoon, Surang; Nuchprayoon, Issarang

    2004-09-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of illness and death in immunocompromised hosts. The numbers of pneumocystis pneumonia cases in Thailand have increased each year from 1992 to 2000 and peaked in 2000 at 6,255 cases. The microbe that causes pneumocystis pneumonia in humans is called Pneumocystis jirovecii. Pneumocystis sp. was discovered nearly a century ago, but the knowledge of Pneumocystis sp. remained poorly understood, until the molecular biology techniques help scientists verify it fungus nature. In the past, Pneumocystis sp. was misclassified as protozoan due to its morphologic features. Later, it was reclassified as fungus due to DNA analysis. Cotrimaxazole, the combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, is the drug of choice for treatment and prophylaxis of pneumocystis pneumonia. However, increasing evidence of mutations in the enzyme dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), the target of sulfa drugs represent emergence of sulfa resistance.

  6. What Is Walking Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... M.D. References Goldman L, et al., eds. Mycoplasma infections. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, ... for Medical Education and Research; 2014. Baum SG. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  7. Pneumonia in adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 69. Mandell LA. Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 289.

  8. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dysplasia (BPD) Respiratory Syncytial Virus Coughing Lungs and Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza ( ... Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) Bronchitis Pneumonia Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  9. 'Ethos' Enabling Organisational Knowledge Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Yoshito

    This paper examines knowledge creation in relation to improvements on the production line in the manufacturing department of Nissan Motor Company and aims to clarify embodied knowledge observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation will be clarified. For that purpose, this study adopts an approach that adds a first, second, and third-person's viewpoint to the theory of knowledge creation. Embodied knowledge, observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation, is the continued practice of 'ethos' (in Greek) founded in Nissan Production Way as an ethical basis. Ethos is knowledge (intangible) assets for knowledge creating companies. Substantiated analysis classifies ethos into three categories: the individual, team and organisation. This indicates the precise actions of the organisational members in each category during the knowledge creation process. This research will be successful in its role of showing the indispensability of ethos - the new concept of knowledge assets, which enables knowledge creation -for future knowledge-based management in the knowledge society.

  10. School Building Organisation in Greece.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEB Exchange, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the past and current organizational structure of Greece's School Building Organisation, a body established to work with government agencies in the design and construction of new buildings and the provisioning of educational equipment. Future planning to incorporate culture and creativity, sports, and laboratory learning in modern school…

  11. Penicillin resistance and serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Paulo; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Mocelin, Helena; Dias, Cícero; Ruvinsky, Raúl

    2006-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Strep. pneumoniae) is the main cause of bacterial pneumonia in children less than 5 years of age, with high mortality rates in developing countries. In 1993, the Regional System for Vaccines Group (SIREVA) of the pan-American Health Organisation (PAHO) began a study involving six Latin American countries to identify serotypes and their representativity in the new conjugated vaccines, and to determine the degree of resistance to penicillin. Serotypes 14 (highest resistance level), 5, 1, 6A/B, 23F, 7F, 9V, 19F, 18C, 19A, 9N, were prevalent in the region, with some differences among countries. Although resistance to penicillin ranged from 2% (Brazil) to 21.1% (Mexico), studies have shown that pneumonia caused by Strep. pneumoniae with diminished sensitivity to penillin can be treated with this antibiotic. Only 58% of the serotypes isolated in the region studied were represented in the seven-valent vaccine. Continual surveillance is essential to determine which formulation of conjugated vaccine will be suitable for use in Latin America.

  12. Use of artificial substrata by introduced and cryptogenic marine species in Paranaguá Bay, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Neves, Carolina Somaio; Rocha, Rosana Moreira; Pitombo, Fabio Bettini; Roper, James J

    2007-01-01

    Ports are important locations for the introduction of marine species, while marinas and pontoons often serve as secondary habitats for these species. In a marina near Paranaguá Port, a major international port in southern Brazil, the encrusting community was studied to (i) identify possibly introduced species, and (ii) examine the use of artificial substrata by these species. Samples (20 x 20 cm) were taken from fibreglass floats (boardwalks and boat hulls) and concrete columns. A total of 85 species were found of which 50 were classified into three categories: four introduced, 33 cryptogenic and 13 native. The introduced species were the hydrozoan Garveia franciscana (on floats, boats and submerged concrete), the polychaete Polydora cornuta (more abundant on floats and submerged concrete) and the barnacles Amphibalanus reticulatus (equally abundant on the three substrata) and Striatobalanus amaryllis (only on floats and submerged concrete). Organisms were most abundant on floating boardwalks, while species richness and composition were similar to that on boat hulls (32 and 37, respectively), which are an important vector for intraregional transport. All substrata supported at least three of the four introduced, and many of the cryptogenic species. The proportion of introduced to the total number of species was greater than observed in other ports. This demonstrates that the introduction potential is great in Paranaguá Bay, especially considering that this study was restricted to one site and sampled only hard substrata. None of the introduced species has yet been identified as invasive, but all are generalists with respect to substratum, indicating their invasive potential. The ability to colonise stable concrete walls shows that they could also colonise the natural granite rocky substrata in the bay, and the ability to colonise floating surfaces indicate their capability of spreading in the region on the hulls of recreational boats.

  13. Pediatric round pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Lin; Wu, Ping-Sheng; Tsai, Li-Ping; Tsai, Wen-Hsin

    2014-12-01

    "Round pneumonia" or "spherical pneumonia" is a well-characterized clinical entity that seems to be less addressed by pediatricians in Taiwan. We herein report the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with prolonged fever, cough, and chest X-rays showing a well-demarcated round mass measuring 5.9 × 5.6 × 4.3 cm in the left lower lung field, findings which were typical for round pneumonia. The urinary pneumococcal antigen test was positive, and serum anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibody titer measurement using a microparticle agglutination method was 1:160 (+). After oral administration of antibiotics including azithromycin and amoxicillin/clavulanate, which was subsequently replaced by ceftibuten due to moderate diarrhea, the fever subsided 2 days later and the round patch had completely resolved on the 18th day after the diagnosis. Recent evidence suggests treating classical round pneumonia with antibiotics first and waiving unwarranted advanced imaging studies, while alternative etiologies such as abscesses, tuberculosis, nonbacterial infections, congenital malformations, or neoplasms should still be considered in patients with atypical features or poor treatment response.

  14. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal pneumonia vaccines Two vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal ... Vaccination Web page. Other ways to help prevent pneumonia You also can take the following steps to ...

  15. Understanding bullying in healthcare organisations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Belinda

    2015-12-02

    Bullying is a pervasive problem in healthcare organisations. Inquiries and reports on patient care and poor practice in the NHS have emphasised the substantial negative effects this behaviour may have on patient care. If bullying is to be addressed, it is crucial we develop clarity about what behaviours constitute bullying and how these behaviours differ from other negative behaviours in the workplace. It is important that we recognise the extent of the problem; statistics on the prevalence of bullying are likely to be an underestimate because of under-reporting of bullying. Effective interventions may only be designed and implemented if there is knowledge about what precipitates bullying and the magnitude of the changes required in organisations to tackle bullying. Individuals should also be aware of the options that are available to them should they be the target of bullying behaviour and what they should do if they witness bullying in their workplace.

  16. Reflection as a Catalyst for Organisational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipfer, Kristin; Kump, Barbara; Wessel, Daniel; Cress, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    This article takes a psychological perspective on organisational learning, putting "reflection" into the centre of attention. We argue that (1) organisational learning is based on individual and team learning at work, (2) reflection is the driving force that leads to organisational learning and (3) cumulation of the staff's reflection outcomes…

  17. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  18. Ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops initially more than 48 h from the start of tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The route of infection is almost always through the respiratory tract. Intake of contaminants from outside the tracheal tube (silent aspiration) is considered a key route, and suctioning of secretions that have accumulated above the cuff of the endotracheal tubes is effective in preventing infection. The circuit is managed and heated-wire humidifiers and suction are manipulated based on appropriate infection control measures. To diagnose pathogens, efforts should be made to collect specimens from the pneumonia focus. Realistically, however, diagnosis can also be achieved based on the clinical course and from the results of culture of samples from tracheal aspirate. Use of prophylactic antimicrobials is not recommended, but once a diagnosis is made, antimicrobials are administered that combat the causative microorganism.

  19. Pneumocystis Jiroveci Pneumonia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly P. carinii) Pneumonia (PJP). A 60 year old HIV+ male with a CD4+ count of 144 cells/mm3 complaining of cough ...case the lucency is too wide and irregular for a Mach band. Clinically, patients with PJP demonstrate nonspecific complaints. Fever, cough

  20. Fungal diagnostics in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lease, Erika D; Alexander, Barbara D

    2011-12-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. Although standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstays of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serological and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This article reviews the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease.

  1. Vaccinating welders against pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Cosgrove, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2011 the Department of Health in England recommended that welders should each receive a single dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23). This review assesses the evidence behind the advice and its practical implications. Method The review was informed by a systematic search in Medline, which related pneumonia to welding and/or exposure to metal fume, and was supplemented using the personal libraries of the authors. Findings There is consistent evidence that welders die more often of pneumonia, especially lobar pneumonia, are hospitalised more often with lobar and pneumococcal pneumonia, and more often develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). It is estimated that one case of IPD may be prevented over a 10-year period by vaccinating 588 welders against pneumococcal infection. Conclusions A good case exists that employers should offer PPV23 vaccination to welders and other employees exposed to metal fume. Additionally, reasonable measures must be taken to minimise exposure to welding fume and welders should be encouraged not to smoke. PMID:22764269

  2. Business continuity management in international organisations.

    PubMed

    Adamou, Christel

    2014-01-01

    In the area of business continuity management, a preliminary review of the literature reveals extensive knowledge, expertise and experience concerning organisations in the private and public sectors. It is interesting to note, however, that there is little literature about business continuity management in international organisations, although these entities are complex and particularly prone to threats. This apparent absence of literature suggests that business continuity management has not yet hit the agenda of international organisations. In recent years, member states have encouraged senior management to design and implement business continuity strategies to minimise the mishandling of an internal crisis and build organisational resilience, but very few of them have actually been able to design and implement comprehensive business continuity programmes. Based on actual experience working in international organisations, this paper outlines some of the challenges faced by international organisations in developing and implementing business continuity activities and attempts to make suggestions for further improvement.

  3. Improving Organisational Effectiveness of Coalition Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    organisational effectiveness of coalition HQs conducting Non-article 5 crisis response operations. The paper will present intermediate results of the work of...PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Swiss Military Academy at ETH Zurich...their organisational effectiveness. It is the result of the work of NATO Research and Technology Organisation (RTO) Task Group HFM-163 “Improving

  4. Osteopontin promotes host defense during Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van der Windt, G J W; Hoogerwerf, J J; de Vos, A F; Florquin, S; van der Poll, T

    2010-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein involved in inflammatory processes, some of which is mediated by CD44. The aim of this study was to determine the role of OPN during K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and OPN knockout (KO) mice were intranasally infected with 10⁴ colony forming units of K. pneumoniae, or administered Klebsiella lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In addition, recombinant OPN (rOPN) was intranasally administered to WT and CD44 KO mice. During Klebsiella pneumonia, WT mice displayed elevated pulmonary and plasma OPN levels. OPN KO and WT mice showed similar pulmonary bacterial loads 6 h after infection; thereafter, Klebsiella loads were higher in lungs of OPN KO mice and the mortality rate in this group was higher than in WT mice. Early neutrophil recruitment into the bronchoalveolar space was impaired in the absence of OPN after intrapulmonary delivery of either Klebsiella bacteria or Klebsiella LPS. Moreover, rOPN induced neutrophil migration into the bronchoalveolar space, independent from CD44. In vitro, OPN did not affect K. pneumoniae growth or neutrophil function. In conclusion, OPN levels were rapidly increased in the bronchoalveolar space during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, where OPN serves a chemotactic function towards neutrophils, thereby facilitating an effective innate immune response.

  5. Idiopathic endogenous lipoid pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Ohri, Shivani; Bambery, Pradeep; Singh, Surjit

    2006-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare pulmonary disorder having no classical radiological appearance. We report a 33-year-old male, ex-smoker who was referred to us with history of cough, mild mucoid expectoration and progressively increasing dyspnoea since one year. He was investigated at local hospital and was treated with 30 mg prednisolone per day for 6 months for sarcoidosis without any response. On examination, he was normal except for fine basal crepitations in chest. Pulmonary function test (PFT) revealed mild airway obstruction. High resolution computerised tomographic scan (HRCT scan) revealed bilateral reticulonodular shadows and bronchiectasis in lower zones. Open lung biopsy revealed lipoid pneumonia. As there was no history of nasal distillation of oils, it was diagnosed to be idiopathic. The relevant literature is reviewed.

  6. Aspiration Pneumonia After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John R.; Mosher, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen million strokes occur worldwide each year with 5 million associated deaths and an additional 5 million people left permanently disabled. In the United States, about 780 000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year. There were an estimated total 5.8 million stroke survivors as of 2008. Mortality from stroke is the third leading cause of death in America following heart disease and cancer. Chest infection may affect up to as many as one-third of stroke patients. This increases the morbidity and mortality of this patient population. Pneumonia causes the highest attributable mortality of all medical complications following stroke. A comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach is required at the hospital level. This requires active administrative commitment and participation. Implementation of evidence-based management strategies can improve outcomes and reduce costs. We sought to review the problem of post-stroke pneumonia and discuss strategies for prevention and intervention. PMID:23983842

  7. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the sole cause of the pneumonia in two patients and a contributing cause, along with aerobic gram-negative bacteria, in another five, four of whom also had a fungal infection. Two patients, both of whom survived, had nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. PMID:6342741

  8. Electrocardiogram in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Ekkah, Maan; Saleh, Tarek; Janjua, Muhammad; Patel, Yash R; Khadra, Helmi

    2012-12-15

    Findings on electrocardiogram may hint that pulmonary embolism (PE) is present when interpreted in the proper context and lead to definitive imaging tests. However, it would be useful to know if electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities also occur in patients with pneumonia and whether these are similar to ECG changes with PE. The purpose of this investigation was to determine ECG findings in patients with pneumonia. We retrospectively evaluated 62 adults discharged with a diagnosis of pneumonia who had no previous cardiopulmonary disease and had electrocardiogram obtained during hospitalization. The most prevalent ECG abnormality, other than sinus tachycardia, was minor nonspecific ST-segment or T-wave changes occurring in 13 of 62 (21%). Right atrial enlargement occurred in 4 of 62 (6.5%). QRS abnormalities were observed in 24 of 62 (39%). Right-axis deviation and S(1)S(2)S(3) were the most prevalent QRS abnormalities, which occurred in 6 of 62 (9.7%). Complete right bundle branch block and S(1)Q(3)T(3) pattern occurred in 3 of 62 (4.8%). ECG abnormalities that were not present within 1 month previously or abnormalities that disappeared within 1 month included left-axis deviation, right-axis deviation, right atrial enlargement, right ventricular hypertrophy, S(1)S(2)S(3), S(1)Q(3)T(3), low-voltage QRS complexes, and nonspecific ST-segment or T-wave abnormalities. In conclusion, electrocardiogram in patients with pneumonia often shows QRS abnormalities or nonspecific ST-segment or T-wave changes. ECG findings are similar to ECG abnormalities in PE and electrocardiogram cannot assist in the differential diagnosis.

  9. Acinetobacter Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Joshua D.; Kim, Andrew S.; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Moran, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are becoming a major cause of nosocomial infections, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Acinetobacter species have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics over the past several years and currently present a significant challenge in treating these infections. Physicians now rely on older agents, such as polymyxins (colistin), for treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of this emerging pathogen. PMID:18092011

  10. IAU Public Astronomical Organisations Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canas, Lina; Cheung, Sze Leung

    2015-08-01

    The Office for Astronomy Outreach has devoted intensive means to create and support a global network of public astronomical organisations around the world. Focused on bringing established and newly formed amateur astronomy organizations together, providing communications channels and platforms for disseminating news to the global community and the sharing of best practices and resources among these associations around the world. In establishing the importance that these organizations have for the dissemination of activities globally and acting as key participants in IAU various campaigns social media has played a key role in keeping this network engaged and connected. Here we discuss the implementation process of maintaining this extensive network, the processing and gathering of information and the interactions between local active members at a national and international level.

  11. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  12. Organisational culture, organisational learning and total quality management: a literature review and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bloor, G

    1999-01-01

    As health services face increasing pressure to meet the expectations of different stakeholders, they must continuously improve and learn from their experience. Many fail in attempts at continuous improvement programs because managers have not understood the complexity of making changes in organisations with multiple subcultures and interests. This article examines the related concepts of organisational culture, organisational learning and total quality management and shows how a synthesis of this knowledge can assist in developing continuous organisational learning and improvement.

  13. Patterns of genetic diversity of the cryptogenic red alga Polysiphonia morrowii (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta) suggest multiple origins of the Atlantic populations.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Alexandre; Destombe, Christophe; Kim, Byeongseok; Mauger, Stéphane; Raffo, María Paula; Kim, Myung Sook; Le Gall, Line

    2016-08-01

    The red alga Polysiphonia morrowii, native to the North Pacific (Northeast Asia), has recently been reported worldwide. To determine the origin of the French and Argentine populations of this introduced species, we compared samples from these two areas with samples collected in Korea and at Hakodate, Japan, the type locality of the species. Combined analyses of chloroplastic (rbcL) and mitochondrial (cox1) DNA revealed that the French and Argentine populations are closely related and differ substantially from the Korean and Japanese populations. The genetic structure of P. morrowii populations from South Atlantic and North Atlantic, which showed high haplotype diversity compared with populations from the North Pacific, suggested the occurrence of multiple introduction events from areas outside of the so-called native regions. Although similar, the French and Argentine populations are not genetically identical. Thus, the genetic structure of these two introduced areas may have been modified by cryptic and recurrent introduction events directly from Asia or from other introduced areas that act as introduction relays. In addition, the large number of private cytoplasmic types identified in the two introduced regions strongly suggests that local populations of P. morrowii existed before the recent detection of these invasions. Our results suggest that the most likely scenario is that the source population(s) of the French and Argentine populations was not located only in the North Pacific and/or that P. morrowii is a cryptogenic species.

  14. Exploring the Interconnectedness among Strategy Development, Shared Mental Models, Organisational Learning and Organisational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malan, Renee

    2011-01-01

    The cognitive psychological processes related to learning and change behaviour are factors that impact on organisational strategy development. Strategy development is dependent on strategic thinking that is reciprocally influenced by shared mental models, organisational learning and organisational change. Although strategy development, shared…

  15. Organisational Learning and Employees' Intrinsic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remedios, Richard; Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational learning initiatives on employee motivation. Four initiatives consistent with theories of organisational learning were a priori ranked in terms of concepts that underpin intrinsic-motivation theory. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of…

  16. E-Learning in Small Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambrook, Sally

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the existing and potential role of electronic learning in small and medium-sized organisations (SMEs). Innovations in information and communication technologies (ICTs) could create new forms of learning, particularly appealing to small organisations, to overcome traditional barriers such as lack of financial resources, time,…

  17. A Sociocultural Analysis of Organisational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boreham, Nick; Morgan, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The concept of organisational learning has been widely debated and frequently contested by educationalists, but the specific processes and actions which constitute this form of learning have received relatively little research attention. This paper reports a three-year empirical investigation into organisational learning in a large industrial…

  18. International Organisations and Transnational Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moutsios, Stavros

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the World Bank/IMF (International Monetary Fund), the OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) and the WTO (World Trade Organisation) as institutions of transnational policy making. They are all at present making education policies which are decisively shaping current directions and developments in…

  19. Achieving Organisational Change through Values Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to, first, establish the interdependency between the successful achievement of organisational change and the attainment of values alignment within an organisation's culture and then, second, to describe an effective means for attaining such values alignment. Design/methodology/approach: Literature from the…

  20. Building Innovative Vocational Education and Training Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Highly innovative organisations demonstrate six key characteristics. They create learning cultures which promote innovation as a core organisational capability; employ leaders who are "failure-tolerant"; identify innovators; reward people who propose innovative ideas; use partnerships; and, promote innovation through teams. This report…

  1. Organising European technical documentation to avoid duplication.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The development of comprehensive accurate and well-organised technical documentation that demonstrates compliance with regulatory requirements is a resource-intensive, but critically important activity for medical device manufacturers. This article discusses guidance documents and method of organising technical documentation that may help avoid costly and time-consuming duplication.

  2. Learning Organisations: A Literature Review and Critique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    organisational learning, and accompanying processes and mechanisms designed to facilitate learning across these levels. For example, there is a tendency by...and leaders would need to relinquish control over the learning process . The reliance on employee’s initiative and creativity may challenge...organisational processes .................................................................................................................... 29 5.3

  3. Leadership Practices in German and UK Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Grace

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to determine whether leadership practices vary between German and UK organisations. Design/methodology/approach: The author used self-assessment documents submitted by German and UK organisations to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM), to identify leadership practices in both countries. A…

  4. Organisational Change: A Solution-Focused Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a solution-focused approach to organisational change. Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope (PATH) is an intervention more commonly applied to individuals. In this study the intervention is used with groups of people working in educational organisations to help manage the change process. The approach…

  5. The "State of Art" of Organisational Blogging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Gavin J.; Connolly, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the "state of art" of organisational blogging. It also aims to provide a critical review of the literature on organisational blogging and propose recommendations on how to advance the subject area in terms of academic research. Design/methodology/approach: A systematic literature review…

  6. Determinants of Organisational Climate for Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Adela; Scott, Don

    2013-01-01

    Being aware of the factors that develop a positive organisational climate is especially important in universities, where the academic members of staff are, in large measure, self-motivated. To identify the determinants of organisational climate for university academia, the validity and reliability of the first-order constructs of autonomy,…

  7. Organisational Blogs: Benefits and Challenges of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Gavin J.; Connolly, Thomas M.; Stansfield, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the theoretical link between blogs and organisational learning. It aims to provide a set of practical guidelines on how to overcome the challenges of implementing an organisational blog. Design/methodology/approach: A literature review will be used to examine blogs and their association towards…

  8. Facilitating "Organisational Learning" in a "Learning Institution"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Alan; Sillitoe, James

    2013-01-01

    The term "organisational learning" was popularised by Peter Senge in "The Fifth Discipline", his seminal book from 1990. Since then, the term has become widely accepted among those interested in organisational learning and change management. However, partly due to the somewhat ambiguous situation which arises in a university…

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae FimK Promotes Virulence in Murine Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David A; Hilliard, Julia K; Tiemann, Kristin M; Todd, Elizabeth M; Morley, S Celeste; Hunstad, David A

    2016-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a chief cause of nosocomial pneumonia, is a versatile and commonly multidrug-resistant human pathogen for which further insight into pathogenesis is needed. We show that the pilus regulatory gene fimK promotes the virulence of K. pneumoniae strain TOP52 in murine pneumonia. This contrasts with the attenuating effect of fimK on urinary tract virulence, illustrating that a single factor may exert opposing effects on pathogenesis in distinct host niches. Loss of fimK in TOP52 pneumonia was associated with diminished lung bacterial burden, limited innate responses within the lung, and improved host survival. FimK expression was shown to promote serum resistance, capsule production, and protection from phagocytosis by host immune cells. Finally, while the widely used K. pneumoniae model strain 43816 produces rapid dissemination and death in mice, TOP52 caused largely localized pneumonia with limited lethality, thereby providing an alternative tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis and control within the lung.

  10. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Baek, Jin Yang; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens the successful treatment of pneumococcal infections. Here we report a case of bacteremic pneumonia caused by an extremely drug-resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae, nonsusceptible to at least one agent in all classes but vancomycin and linezolid, posing an important new public health threat in our region.

  11. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia.

  12. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae, le transformiste.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Campo, Nathalie; Bergé, Matthieu J; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Natural genetic transformation, which was discovered in this species, involves internalization of exogenous single-stranded DNA and its incorporation into the chromosome. It allows acquisition of pathogenicity islands and antibiotic resistance and promotes vaccine escape via capsule switching. This opinion article discusses how recent advances regarding several facets of pneumococcal transformation support the view that the process has evolved to maximize plasticity potential in this species, making the pneumococcus le transformiste of the bacterial kingdom and providing an advantage in the constant struggle between this pathogen and its host.

  14. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process.

  15. Animal models of polymicrobial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Bregeon, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of severe and occasionally life-threatening infections. The physiopathology of pneumonia has been extensively studied, providing information for the development of new treatments for this condition. In addition to in vitro research, animal models have been largely used in the field of pneumonia. Several models have been described and have provided a better understanding of pneumonia under different settings and with various pathogens. However, the concept of one pathogen leading to one infection has been challenged, and recent flu epidemics suggest that some pathogens exhibit highly virulent potential. Although “two hits” animal models have been used to study infectious diseases, few of these models have been described in pneumonia. Therefore the aims of this review were to provide an overview of the available literature in this field, to describe well-studied and uncommon pathogen associations, and to summarize the major insights obtained from this information. PMID:26170617

  16. The learning organisation and health care education.

    PubMed

    Al-Abri, Rashid K; Al-Hashmi, Intisar S

    2007-12-01

    The 'Learning Organisation' is a concept first described by Peter Senge as an organisation where people continuously learn and enhance their capabilities to create. It consists of five main disciplines: team learning, shared vision, mental models, personal mastery and systems thinking. These disciplines are dynamic and interact with each other. System thinking is the cornerstone of a true learning organisation and is described as the discipline used to implement the disciplines. In a learning organisation, health care education aims to educate its members with up to date knowledge to produce competent and safe personnel, who can promote quality in health care services. In addition, there are some educational concepts and theoretical models, which are of relevance to the learning organisation, and can provide a framework for managerial decisions. The stages required to achieve the principles of a learning organisation will be described in detail. Moreover, in a proper culture which supports the learning organisation, members continuously learn to improve the environment and never remain passive recipients.

  17. Granzyme A impairs host defense during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Vernooy, Juanita H; Medema, Jan P; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Endeman, Henrik; Biesma, Douwe H; Boon, Louis; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Granzyme A (GzmA) is a serine protease produced by a variety of cell types involved in the immune response. We sought to determine the role of GzmA on the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. GzmA was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from CAP patients from the infected and contralateral uninfected side and in lung tissue slides from CAP patients and controls. In CAP patients, GzmA levels were increased in BALF obtained from the infected lung. Human lungs showed constitutive GzmA expression by both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells. In an experimental setting, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and GzmA-deficient (GzmA(-/-)) mice by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae In separate experiments, WT and GzmA(-/-) mice were treated with natural killer (NK) cell depleting antibodies. Upon infection with S. pneumoniae, GzmA(-/-) mice showed a better survival and lower bacterial counts in BALF and distant body sites compared with WT mice. Although NK cells showed strong GzmA expression, NK cell depletion did not influence bacterial loads in either WT or GzmA(-/-) mice. These results implicate that GzmA plays an unfavorable role in host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia by a mechanism that does not depend on NK cells.

  18. Corporate information systems in health organisations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nature of corporate information systems and their applications in health organisations. It emphasises the importance of financial and human resource information in the creation of a corporate data model. The paper summarises the main features of finance and human resource systems as they are used in health organisations. It looks at a series of case studies carried out in health organisations, which were selected on the basis of their representation of different aspects of service delivery. It also discusses the theoretical and practical perspectives of the systems themselves, their roles in information management, executive and decision support, and in planning and forecasting.

  19. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infections of Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, James D.; Welliver, Robert C.

    1976-01-01

    Although the hallmark of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is pneumonia, the organism is also responsible for a protean array of other symptoms. With an increased awareness of the board clinical spectrum of M. pneumoniae disease and the ready availability of the cold agglutinin and M. pneumoniae complement-fixation tests, interested clinicians will note additional clinical-mycoplasmal associations in their patients. PMID:782043

  20. The relationship between organisational communication and perception.

    PubMed

    Marynissen, H M F

    2011-01-01

    Both researchers and managers search for the most appropriate form of organisational communication. The aim of such an organisational communication is to influence the receivers' perception to confirm, adapt or change behaviour according to the sender's intention. This paper argues that to influence the receivers' perception, a specific form of communication that is embedded in a specific organisational culture is required. It also demands prior knowledge of the existing organisational schemata and the current perception concerning the topic that has to be communicated. The rationale is that three obstacles hinder the objectives of traditional communication strategies to influence perception according to the sender's objectives. The first challenge is that a receiver of a certain message never garners one single, clearly pronounced message conveyed by one single person. Yet, few studies are based on multiple messages from various sources. This makes most of the communication strategies in use obsolete. The second strain is the dual mode of thinking that forms organisational members' perceptions: the heuristic and the cogitative (Taleb, 2010). Most organisational communication theories are based on the paradigm in which receivers of information process this information in a rational way, while research in the field of neurobiology (Lehrer, 2009) indicates that rationality is dominated by emotions. The third difficulty is that organisational members constrain to well-established, ingrained schemas (Labianca et al., 2000; Balogun and Johnson, 2004). Based on these existing schemas, the scattered information from multiple sources, and the inability to process that information through cognitive reasoning, organisational members construct perceptions that are not in line with the objectives of the sender's communication. This article reviews different communication theories, points out key concepts in the literature on individual and collective perceptions, and suggests

  1. Leading organisational learning in health care.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J S; Edmondson, A C

    2002-03-01

    As healthcare organisations seek to enhance safety and quality in a changing environment, organisational learning practices can help to improve existing skills and knowledge and provide opportunities to discover better ways of working together. Leadership at executive, middle management, and local levels is needed to create a sense of shared purpose. This shared vision should help to build effective relationships, facilitate connections between action and reflection, and strengthen the desirable elements of the healthcare culture while modifying outdated assumptions, procedures, and structures.

  2. The Learning Organisation and Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abri, Rashid K; Al-Hashmi, Intisar S

    2007-01-01

    The ‘Learning Organisation’ is a concept first described by Peter Senge as an organisation where people continuously learn and enhance their capabilities to create. It consists of five main disciplines: team learning, shared vision, mental models, personal mastery and systems thinking. These disciplines are dynamic and interact with each other. System thinking is the cornerstone of a true learning organisation and is described as the discipline used to implement the disciplines. In a learning organisation, health care education aims to educate its members with up to date knowledge to produce competent and safe personnel, who can promote quality in health care services. In addition, there are some educational concepts and theoretical models, which are of relevance to the learning organisation, and can provide a framework for managerial decisions. The stages required to achieve the principles of a learning organisation will be described in detail. Moreover, in a proper culture which supports the learning organisation, members continuously learn to improve the environment and never remain passive recipients. PMID:21748105

  3. Clinical Features of Severe or Fatal Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Izumikawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. The incidence of fulminant M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection. This literature review highlights the clinical features of fulminant MPP by examining the most recent data in epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment. Fulminant MPP accounts for 0.5–2% of all MPP cases and primarily affects young adults with no underlying disease. Key clinical findings include a cough, fever, and dyspnea along with diffuse abnormal findings in radiological examinations. Levels of inflammatory markers such as white blood cells and C-reactive protein are elevated, as well as levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-18, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. The exact pathogenesis of fulminant MPP remains unclear, but theories include a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to M. pneumoniae and the contribution of delayed antibiotic administration to disease progression. Treatment options involve pairing the appropriate anti-mycoplasma agent with a corticosteroid that will downregulate the hypersensitivity response, and mortality rates are quite low in this treatment group. Further research is necessary to determine the exact pathogenesis of severe and fulminant types of MPP. PMID:27313568

  4. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  5. [Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias in 2016].

    PubMed

    Debray, M-P; Borie, R; Danel, C; Khalil, A; Majlath, M; Crestani, B

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias comprise 8 clinicopathological entities, most of them with a chronic course and various prognosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most frequent and most severe of these. Computed tomography has an important role for its diagnosis. It can identify the corresponding pathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia in about 50 percent of cases. It can suggest differential diagnosis in other cases, most frequently fibrosing nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Imaging features should be integrated to clinical and available pathologic data during multidisciplinary team meetings involving physicians with a good knowledge of interstitial diseases. Some cases may be unclassifiable, but these could later be reclassified as new data may occur or imaging features may change. Surgical lung biopsy is being less frequently performed and an emerging less invasive technique, lung cryobiopsy, is under evaluation. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis is a distinct entity only recently described, with uncertain prevalence and prognosis that seems being quite often associated to another pattern of interstitial pneumonia.

  6. [Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Vallés, Jordi; Mariscal, Dolors

    2005-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the leading causes of Gram-negative nosocomial pneumonia. It is the most common cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia and carries the highest mortality among hospital-acquired infections. P. aeruginosa produces a large number of toxins and surface components that make it especially virulent compared with other microorganisms. These include pili, flagella, membrane bound lipopolysaccharide, and secreted products such as exotoxins A, S and U, elastase, alkaline protease, cytotoxins and phospholipases. The most common mechanism of infection in mechanically ventilated patients is through aspiration of upper respiratory tract secretions previously colonized in the process of routine nursing care or via contaminated hands of hospital personnel. Intravenous therapy with an antipseudomonal regimen should be started immediately when P. aeruginosa pneumonia is suspected or confirmed. Empiric therapy with drugs active against P. aeruginosa should be started, especially in patients who have received previous antibiotics or present late-onset pneumonia.

  7. Organisational Learning and the Organisational Life Cycle: The Differential Aspects of an Integrated Relationship in SMEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Steven; Gray, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to relate the practice of organisational learning in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to the organisational life cycle (OLC), contextualising the differential aspects of an integrated relationship between them. Design/methodology/approach: It is a mixed-method study with two consecutive phases. In…

  8. Responses to Climate Change: Exploring Organisational Learning across Internationally Networked Organisations for Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Emily; Osbahr, Henny

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from the organisational learning and governance literature, this paper assesses four internationally networked governmental and non-governmental organisations in the UK addressing climate change. We analyse how those concerned understand the climate change crisis, what mechanisms are put in place to address information flows, and what…

  9. Action Research and Organisational Learning: A Norwegian Approach to Doing Action Research in Complex Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eikeland, Olav

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a specific approach to the practice of action research "in complex organisations". Clearly, there are many approaches to the challenge of doing action research in organisations; approaches that are, and also must be, quite context dependent and specific. But my purpose is neither to give an…

  10. Human Resource Development in Construction Organisations: An Example of a "Chaordic" Learning Organisation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiden, Ani B.; Dainty, Andrew R. J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The concept of the learning organisation (LO) is associated with an advanced approach to human resource development (HRD) characterised by an ethos of self-responsibility and self-development. The learning climate that this engenders is supported by temporary organisational structures responsive to environmental change. The purpose of his…

  11. The Strength of Organisational Culture: Organisational Performance in South African Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bipath, Keshni; Adeyemo, Kolawole Samuel

    2014-01-01

    One of the more frequently cited cultural dimensions within the field of cultural research is that of cultural strength (Cameron & Ettington, 1998). Early published works on organisational culture argue that there is an absolute need for a "strong" culture for organisations to be effective. This study has examined the contradiction…

  12. Inter-organisational response to disasters.

    PubMed

    Paturas, James L; Smith, Stewart R; Albanese, Joseph; Waite, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Inter-organisational communication failures during times of real-world disasters impede the collaborative response of agencies responsible for ensuring the public's health and safety. In the best of circumstances, communications across jurisdictional boundaries are ineffective. In times of crisis, when communities are grappling with the impact of a disaster, communications become critically important and more complex. Important factors for improving inter-organisational communications are critical thinking and problem-solving skills; inter-organisational relationships; as well as strategic, tactical and operational communications. Improving communication, critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making requires a review of leadership skills. This discussion begins with an analysis of the existing disaster management research and moves to an examination of the importance of inter-organisational working relationships. Before a successful resolution of a disaster by multiple levels of first responders, the group of organisations must have a foundation of trust, collegiality, flexibility, expertise, openness, relational networking and effective communications. Leaders must also be prepared to improve leadership skills through continual development in each of these foundational areas.

  13. Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT as risk factors of alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis, in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Mario; Pasta, Francesca; Pasta, Linda

    2015-08-15

    The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and Prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 865 Caucasian patients with liver cirrhosis, consecutively enrolled from June 2008 to January 2014. A total of 582 HCV, 80 HBV, 94 alcohol, (82 with more than one etiologic factor) and 191 cryptogenic patients with liver cirrhosis had been consecutively enrolled; 243 patients showed portal vein thrombosis (PVT). At least one of the above THRGFs was present in 339/865 patients (39.2%). PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT were the most frequent THRGFs, statistically significant in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT: respectively 24 and 28, 50 and 73, and 65 and 83 (all chi-square tests>3.84, and p values<0.05). Two logistic regression analysis, using PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, as dependent variable, confirmed the independent significant relationship of these THRGFs with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and PVT. PAI 1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes, deviated from those expected in populations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (all p values<0.05), in the subgroups of patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and presence of PVT. Our study shows the pivotal role of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT, in a Caucasian population. In conclusion, thrombo and fibro-genetic mechanisms of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, could have a role in the development of liver cirrhosis, mainly in patients without HCV and HBV, and PVT.

  14. Nuclear organisation and RNAi in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Woolcock, Katrina J; Bühler, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been used extensively for investigating RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated heterochromatin assembly. However, only recently have studies begun to shed light on the 3D organisation of chromatin and the RNAi machinery in the fission yeast nucleus. These studies indicate association of repressive and active chromatin with different regions of the nuclear periphery, similar to other model organisms, and clustering of functionally related genomic features. Unexpectedly, RNAi factors were shown to associate with nuclear pores and were implicated in the regulation of genomic features outside of the well-studied heterochromatic regions. Nuclear organisation is likely to contribute to substrate specificity of the RNAi pathway. However, further studies are required to elucidate the exact mechanisms and functional importance of this nuclear organisation.

  15. Organisational socialisation in a crisis context.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Carole

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the dimensions characterising the socialisation process in a crisis context. Based on the definition of organisational socialisation advanced by Van Maanen and Schein (1979) and employed later by Jones (1986), a crisis is presented as a passage from a 'normal' situation to an 'exceptional' situation. A crisis represents a socialisation context in the sense that it is a novel state in which actors must develop a different way of mobilising their knowledge, utilising their skills, and practicing their trade or profession. The paper discusses certain findings that have emerged from the literature on organisational socialisation, as well as from the testimony of actors who participated in efforts to manage the Quebec ice-storm crisis of early 1998. It is hoped that this exploratory study's data will give rise to fruitful interaction between the field of organisational socialisation and that of crisis management.

  16. [Interstitial Pneumonia and Emphysema].

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Kato, Yuko; Ishii, Sachiyo

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial pneumonia (IP) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are representative diseases of restrictive pulmonary dysfunction and obstructive pulmonary dysfunction, respectively. In the preoperative anesthesia clinic, anesthesiologists are frequently asked to assess the anesthesia management of patients with these diseases. In respiratory function tests, IP is detected as a decrease in % vital capacity (< 80%), and COPD as a decrease in % FEV1.0 (< 70%). Other key factors which affect the assessment are; 1) severity assessment that affects the safety of anesthesia management, 2) prognostic evaluation including the acute exacerbation in the postoperative period, and 3) patient-related factors (age, life degree of autonomy, other comorbidities, surgery-related factors, and anesthesia method). In the patients in the disease stage I or II, anesthesia management is relatively safe. On the other hand, the patients in the disease stage IV have no surgical indication except life-saving emergent situation. In another words, anesthesiologists are required to make the judgment for the anesthesia management of the patient in the disease stage III, based on the assessment of patient-related factors, surgery-related factors, and prognosis.

  17. Utility of Duranta, a wireless patch-type electrocardiographic monitoring system developed in Japan, in detecting covert atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Hisanao; Nukui, Saki; Araga, Takashi; Hoshino, Masashi; Tanaka, Keita; Kashima, Satoru; Sasaki, Rie; Uchino, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Subcutaneous implantable electrocardiographs are highly effective in detecting covert atrial fibrillation (AF) in cryptogenic stroke. However, these invasive devices are not indicated for all cryptogenic stroke patients, and noninvasive improvements over conventional Holter-type ambulatory electrocardiography are needed. We evaluated the clinical application and effectiveness of Duranta (ImageONE Co., Ltd.), a wireless patch-type electrocardiographic monitoring system developed in Japan for chronically ill patients or home-based patients at the end of life. A Duranta device was used to detect covert AF in patients with acute ischemic stroke of undetermined source with no sign of AF during cardiographic monitoring ≥24 hours postadmission. Patient concerns: A 72-year-old man with severe aortic stenosis was admitted to our hospital with dysarthria and right upper limb weakness. Diffusion-weighted plain head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed acute cerebral infarctions across the left middle cerebral artery territory. Twelve-lead electrocardiography, Holter-type ambulatory electrocardiography, and cardiographic monitoring for ≥24 hours revealed no AF, indicating a probable diagnosis of artery-to-artery embolism following left common carotid artery stenosis detected by carotid ultrasound imaging and cerebral angiography. Interventions: However, because of high blood brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and valvular heart disease, continuous monitoring using Duranta was performed from the 2nd to 13th days after onset to exclude possible cardioembolic stroke. Waveform and heart rate trend graph analysis showed paroxysmal AF (PAF) occurred on the 5th and 9th days after onset. PAF did not occur at any other time during the observation period. The quality of the cardiograms sufficed for analysis and diagnosis of AF. The lightweight compact device can be placed quickly with no movement restriction. These features and our findings show the

  18. Atrial Septal Aneurysm and Patent Foramen Ovale as Risk Factors for Cryptogenic Stroke in Patients Less Than 55 Years of Age: A Study using Transesophageal Echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabanes, L.; Mas, J. L.; Cohen, A.; Amarenco, P.; Cabanes, P. A.; Oubary, P.; Chedru, F.; Guerin, F.; Bousser, M. G.; deRecondo, J.

    1993-01-01

    Background and Purpose: An association between atrial septal aneurysm and embolic events has been suggested. Atrial septal aneurysm has been shown to be associated with patent foramen ovale and,.in some reports, with mitral valve prolapse. These two latter cardiac disorder; have been identified as potential risk factors for ischemic stroke. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the role of atrial septal aneurysm as an independent risk factor for stroke, especially for cryptogenic stroke. Methods: We studied the prevalence of atrial septal aneurysm, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve prolapse in 100 consecutive patients <55 years of age with ischemic stroke who underwent extensive etiological investigations. We compared these results with those in a control group of 50 consecutive patients. The diagnosis of atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale relied on transesophageal echocardiography with a contrast study and that of mitral valve prolapse, on two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Results: Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that atrial septal aneurysm (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 14.6; P=.01) and patent foramen ovale (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 10; P=.003) but not mitral valve prolapse were significantly associated with the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke. The stroke odds of a patient with both atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale were 33.3 times (95% confidence interval, 4.1 to 270) the stroke odds of a patient with neither of these cardiac disorders. For a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of >lo-mm excursion, the stroke odds were approximately 8 times the stroke odds of a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of <10 mm. Conclusions: This study shows that atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale are both significantly associated with cryptogenic stroke and that their association has a marked synergistic effect. Atrial septal aneurysms of >lo-mm excursion are

  19. Measuring business continuity programmes in large organisations.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In the field of business continuity management, organisations commit sums of money (often very large sums) to develop and maintain their continuity capability. Despite this, there is almost no measurement of whether this expense offers value for money, or whether it is targeted in the right areas. This paper will explain some methods of measuring components of a business continuity programme. The important outputs from this measurement activity are to demonstrate that an organisation's continuity capability is improving over time, and to identify areas of weakness that should be targeted during future work.

  20. [Fatal pneumonia caused by carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    van Apeldoorn, Marjan; Lettinga, Kamilla; Bernards, Alexandra; Paltansing, Sunita; alNaiemi, Nashwan; Kalpoe, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    A 63-year-old Dutch man became colonized with a carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae during a period of hospitalization in India. His recovery in the Netherlands was complicated by pneumonia due to this difficult-to-control multiresistant bacteria to which he eventually succumbed. Carbapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, such as K. pneumoniae, is usually caused by carbapenemase (a betalactamase) production. Carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are spreading throughout the world and cause difficult-to-treat infections that are associated with high mortality. This case report illustrates the clinical challenges associated with infection with these multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae. In the Netherlands, there are no guidelines for detection of CPE and carbapenemase production can frequently go undetected in clinical microbiology laboratories. As a consequence, adequate treatment of CPE infections and infection control measures to prevent the spread of CPE can be delayed. Expeditious development and implementation of existing Dutch draft guidelines for detection methods of CPE is therefore warranted.

  1. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  2. Actinomyces endophthalmitis and pneumonia in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Laura D.; Grahn, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    Actinomyces endophthalmitis and pneumonia were diagnosed in a young rottweiler that was presented with lethargy, weight loss, right blepharospasm, and ocular discharge. The affected eye was enucleated, and the pneumonia was treated successfully with systemic antibiotics. PMID:18050796

  3. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate intervention is critical in reducing deaths among under-five, severe acutely malnourished (SAM) children with danger signs of severe pneumonia; however, there is paucity of data on outcome of World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended interventions of SAM children with severe pneumonia. We sought to evaluate outcome of the interventions in such children. Methods We prospectively enrolled SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) ward of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), between April 2011 and June 2012 with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia. All the enrolled children were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and micronutrients as recommended by the WHO. Comparison was made among pneumonic children with (n = 111) and without WHO defined danger signs of severe pneumonia (n = 296). The outcomes of interest were treatment failure (if a child required changing of antibiotics) and deaths during hospitalization. Further comparison was also made among those who developed treatment failure and who did not and among the survivors and deaths. Results SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia more often experienced treatment failure (58% vs. 20%; p<0.001) and fatal outcome (21% vs. 4%; p<0.001) compared to those without danger signs. Only 6/111 (5.4%) SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia and 12/296 (4.0%) without danger signs had bacterial isolates from blood. In log-linear binomial regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, danger signs of severe pneumonia, dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia were independently associated both with treatment failure and deaths in SAM children presenting with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia (p<0.01). Conclusion and Significance The result suggests that SAM children with cough or

  4. Prophylaxis for Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia: is it a necessity in pulmonary patients on high-dose, chronic corticosteroid therapy without AIDS?

    PubMed

    Liebling, Maryjane; Rubio, Edmundo; Ie, Susanti

    2015-04-01

    The benefit of prophylaxis for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is well documented in immunocompromised patients, particularly those with HIV and/or AIDS; therefore, guidelines dictate this as standard of care. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding those without HIV and/or AIDS who are potentially predisposed to PJP, including patients with sarcoidosis, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who may require high dose of prolonged corticosteroids for disease maintenance or to prevent relapses. In this review, the authors examine the available literature regarding prophylaxis in these groups, elaborate on the pathogenesis of PJP, when to suspect PJP in these patients, as well as explore current recommendations that guide clinical practice regarding implementation of PJP prophylaxis, namely with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole being the preferred agent. In summary, the role of PJP prophylaxis in non-HIV patients on chronic steroids remains controversial. The authors present a review of the literature to provide better guidance to the clinician regarding the need to initiate PJP prophylaxis in this patient population.

  5. Management of Adult Education Organisations in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nafukho, Fredrick Muyia; Wawire, Nelson H. W.; Lam, Penina Mungania

    2011-01-01

    Adult education is now considered a mainstream academic discipline in several African countries, and its importance in today's knowledge and "ideas" economies is growing steadily. It is provided by organisations such as public universities, training colleges, corporate universities and employers. The successful operation of educational…

  6. Why Youth Workers Need to Collectively Organise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corney, Tim; Broadbent, Robyn; Darmanin, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Recent attempts at professionalising the youth sector have focused on "codes of ethics" and left pay and conditions issues to community sector unions. The authors suggest that the history of nursing in Victoria provides a case example of the benefits of combining professional aspirations with industrial organisation.

  7. Managing Evaluation: A Community Arts Organisation Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Peter; Atkinson, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Arts and health organisations must increasingly provide measurable evidence of impact to stakeholders, which can pose both logistical and ideological challenges. This paper examines the relationship between the ethos of an arts and health organisation with external demands for evaluation. Methods Research involved an ethnographic engagement where the first author worked closely with the organisation for a year. In addition to informal discussions, twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with core staff and participants. Transcribed interviews were coded and emerging themes were identified. Results Staff considered evaluation to be necessary and useful, yet also to be time consuming and a potential threat to their ethos. Nevertheless, they were able to negotiate the terms of evaluation to enable them to meet their own needs as well as those of funders and other stakeholders. Conclusions While not completely resisting outside demands for evaluation, the organisation was seen to intentionally rework demands for evidence into processes they felt they could work with, thus enabling their ethos to be maintained. PMID:25429306

  8. Organisational Learning for School Quality and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagrosen, Yvonne; Lagrosen, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to shed light upon the connections between quality management, employee health and organisational learning in a school setting. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a quantitative survey. Items measuring health status and values of quality management were included in a questionnaire addressed to…

  9. Qualifications and Skills: The Organisational Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dafou, Efthimia

    2009-01-01

    This paper portrays the inferences that employers in Greece draw from particular aspects of study programmes, as recorded on educational qualifications. Based on semi-structured interviews with human resource managers in 37 industrial and service organisations and general directors of careers offices in eight higher education institutions, and…

  10. Learning, Learning Organisations and the Global Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manikutty, Sankaran

    2009-01-01

    The steadily increasing degree of globalisation of enterprises implies development of many skills, among which the skills to learn are among the most important. Learning takes place at the individual level, but collective learning and organisational learning are also important. Learning styles of individuals are different and learning styles are…

  11. Organising Communities-of-Practice: Facilitating Emergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkerman, Sanne; Petter, Christian; de Laat, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The notion of communities of practice (CoP) has received great attention in educational and organisational practice and research. Although the concept originally refers to collaborative practices that emerge naturally, educational and HRD practitioners are increasingly searching for ways to create these practices intentionally in order to…

  12. Organisational Capability--What Does It Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Organisational capability is rapidly becoming recognized as the key to organizational success. However, the lack of research on it has been well documented in the literature, and organizational capability remains an elusive concept. Yet an understanding of organizational capability can offer insights into how RTOs might work most effectively,…

  13. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    El Solh, Ali A

    2009-02-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) was first described in 1978. Since then there has been much written regarding NHAP and its management despite the lack of well-designed studies in this patient population. The most characteristic features of patients with NHAP are the atypical presentation, which may lead to delay in diagnosis and therapy. The microbial etiology of pneumonia encompasses a wide spectrum that spans microbes recovered from patients with community-acquired pneumonia to organisms considered specific only to nosocomial settings. Decision to transfer a nursing home patient to an acute care facility depends on a host of factors, which include the level of staffing available at the nursing home, patients' advance directives, and complexity of treatment. The presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens dictates approach to therapy. Prevention remains the cornerstone of reducing the incidence of disease. Despite the advance in medical services, mortality from NHAP remains high.

  14. Percutaneous PFO closure for cryptogenic stroke in the setting of a systematic cardiac and neurological screening and a standardised follow-up protocol

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Stéphane; Bonvini, Robert F; Rigamonti, Fabio; Sztajzel, Roman; Perren, Fabienne; Meyer, Philippe; Müller, Hajo; Roffi, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background There are no uniform workup and follow-up (FU) protocols for patients presenting with cryptogenic embolism (CE) who undergo percutaneous closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Methods We prospectively performed a systematic cardiac and neurological FU protocol in all patients who underwent percutaneous PFO closure in order to assess the incidence of subsequent cardiac and neurological adverse events. All patients received dual antiplatelet therapy for 6 months and were systematically included in a 12-month standardised FU protocol including: clinical evaluation—transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography, 24-hour Holter monitoring and/or 1-week R-test, and transcranial Doppler. Late FU (>12 months) was performed by reviewing medical records. Results Over a 10-year period, 221 consecutive patients underwent PFO closure for CE and 217 of them (98%) completed the 12-month FU. Ischaemic event recurrence at 12-month and late FU (mean time 69±35 months, median time 65 months, Q1:38 months, Q3:98 months) was observed in 6 (2.8%) and 3 patients (1.4%), respectively. The initial diagnosis of CE was reconsidered in 17 cases (7.8%), as the clinical and paraclinical FU exams showed possible alternative aetiologies for the initial event: 13 patients (6.0%) presented at least 1 episode of atrial fibrillation, while in 4 cases (1.8%) a non-ischaemic origin of the initial symptoms was identified. Conclusions Alternative diagnoses explaining the initial symptoms are rarely detected with an in-depth screening for alternative diagnoses before PFO closure. Despite extensive screening, atrial fibrillation is the most frequently observed alternative aetiology for cryptogenic stroke. PMID:28123762

  15. Organised surfactant assemblies in analytical atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Fernandez de la Campa, Maria del Rosario; Gonzalez, Elisa Blanco; Fernandez-Sanchez, Maria Luisa

    1999-02-01

    The use of surfactant-based organised assemblies in analytical atomic spectroscopy is extensively and critically reviewed along three main lines: first, the ability of organised media to enhance detection of atomic spectroscopic methods by favourable manipulation of physical and chemical properties of the sample solution second, the extension of separation mechanisms by resorting to organised media and third a discussion of synergistic combinations of liquid chromatography separations and atomic detectors via the use of vesicular mobile phases. Changes in physical properties of sample solutions aspirated in atomic spectrometry by addition of surfactants can be advantageously used in at least four different ways: (i) to improve nebulisation efficiency; (ii) to enhance wettability of solid surfaces used for atomisation; (iii) to improve compatibility between aqueous and organic phases; and (iv) to achieve good dispersion of small particles in "slurry" techniques. Controversial results and statements published so far are critically discussed. The ability of surfactant-based organised assemblies, such as micelles and vesicles, to organise reactants at the molecular level has also been applied to enhance the characteristics of chemical generation of volalite species of metals and semi-metals (e.g., hydride or ethylide generation of As, Pb, Cd, Se, Sn, and cold vapour Hg generation) used in atomic methods. Enhancements in efficiency/transport of volatile species, increases in the reaction kinetics, stabilisation of some unstable species and changes in the selectivity of the reactions by surfactants are dealt with. Non-chromatographic cloud-point separations to design pre-concentration procedures with subsequent metal determination by atomic methods are addressed along with chromatographic separations of expanded scope by addition of surfactants to the conventional aqueous mobile phases of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Finally, the synergistic

  16. Information Security Status in Organisations 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawileh, Anas; Hilton, Jeremy; McIntosh, Stephen

    This paper presents the results of the latest survey on information security management and pracitces in organisations. The study is based on a holistic approach to information security that does not confine itself to technical measures and technology implementations, but encompasses other equally important aspects such as human, social, motiviational and trust. In order to achieve this purpose, a comprehensive intellectual framework of the concepts of information security using Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) was utilised. The survey questions were drived from this conceptual model to ensure their coherence, completeness and relevance to the topic being addressed. The paper concludes with a discussion of the survey results and draws significant insight into the existing status of informaiton assurance in organisations that could be useful for security practitioners, researchers and managers.

  17. Knowledge Creation in Construction Organisations: A Case Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliufoo, Harriet

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and characterise the knowledge creation process in construction organisations and explore to what extent organisations facilitate the process. Design/methodology/approach: A case study approach is adopted using four construction organisations; a knowledge creation model is also used as the…

  18. A Longitudinal Study of Individual and Organisational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Timothy T.; Armstrong, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine organisational learning (OL) and individual managerial learning and provide a comparative evaluation of the ability of each to generate organisational benefits. Design/methodology/approach: A theoretical model of organisational learning is developed which was then longitudinally tested…

  19. Bridging Theory and Practice: A Conceptual Framework for Consulting Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Meca B.; Welch, Jennie; Hazle Bussey, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of organisations are emerging as partners to districts pursuing systemic improvement. Given the critical role a consulting organisation could play in supporting system reform efforts, how does a district leader looking to establish a consulting partnership determine what characteristics in a consulting organisation may be more…

  20. Intelligence Base: Strategic Instrument of an Organisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    RTO-MP-IST-055 1 - 1 Intelligence Base: Strategic Instrument of an Organisation Major Marc Rabaey and Colonel Jean-Marie Leclercq, Ir...in the fight against international terrorism a nation has to share intelligence and exchange information with other nations. This requires a secure...and performing communication system. This paper introduces the concept of the Intelligence Base, which meets the needs of an efficient and effective

  1. Hierarchical organisation in perception of orientation.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, D; Antonucci, G; Daini, R; Martelli, M L; Zoccolotti, P

    1999-01-01

    According to Rock [1990, in The Legacy of Solomon Asch (Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates)], hierarchical organisation of perception describes cases in which the orientation of an object is affected by the immediately surrounding elements in the visual field. Various experiments were performed to study the hierarchical organisation of orientation perception. In most of them the rod-and-frame-illusion (RFI: change of the apparent vertical measured on a central rod surrounded by a tilted frame) was measured in the presence/absence of a second inner frame. The first three experiments showed that, when the inner frame is vertical, the direction and size of the illusion are consistent with expectancies based on the hierarchical organisation hypothesis. An analysis of published and unpublished data collected on a large number of subjects showed that orientational hierarchical effects are independent from the absolute size of the RFI. In experiments 4 to 7 we examined the perceptual conditions of the inner stimulus (enclosure, orientation, and presence of luminance borders) critical for obtaining a hierarchical organisation effect. Although an inner vertical square was effective in reducing the illusion (experiment 3), an inner circle enclosing the rod was ineffective (experiment 4). This indicates that definite orientation is necessary to modulate the illusion. However, orientational information provided by a vertical or horizontal rectangle presented near the rod, but not enclosing it, did not modulate the RFI (experiment 5). This suggests that the presence of a figure with oriented contours enclosing the rod is critical. In experiments 6 and 7 we studied whether the presence of luminance borders is important or whether the inner upright square might be effective also if made of subjective contours. When the subjective contour figure was salient and the observers perceived it clearly, its effectiveness in modulating the RFI was comparable to that observed with

  2. Self-organisation and motion in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenau, T. A.; Hesselberg, T.

    2014-03-01

    Self-organisation appeals to humans because difficult and repeated actions can be avoided through automation via bottom-up nonhierarchical processes. This is in contrast to the top-level controlled action strategy normally applied in automated products and in manufacturing. There are many situations where it is required that objects perform an action dependent on external stimuli. An example is automatic window blinds that open or closes in response to sunlight level. However, simpler and more robust designs could be made using the self-organising principles for movement found in many plants. Plants move to adapt to external conditions, e.g. sun-flower buds tracking the sun, touch-me-not Mimosa and Venus fly trap responding to mechanical stimuli by closing leaves to protect them and capture insects respectively. This paper describes 3 of the basic biomimetic principles used by plants to track the sun; i) light causing an inhibiting effect on the illuminated side causing it to bend, ii) light inducing a signal from the illuminated side that causes an action on the darker side and iii) light illuminating a number of sensing plates pointing upwards at an angle activate an expansion on the same side. A concept for mimicking the second principle is presented. It is a very simple and possible reliable self-organising structure that aligns a plate perpendicular to the source of illumination.

  3. Community-onset Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia in Taiwan: clinical features of the disease and associated microbiological characteristics of isolates from pneumonia and nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Wang, Yu-Ping; Wang, Fu-Der; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-onset pneumonia in Asian countries and South Africa. We investigated the clinical characteristics of K. pneumoniae causing community-onset pneumonia, and the associated microbiological features between K. pneumoniae isolates from pneumonia and those from the nasopharynx in Taiwan. This study was conducted at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital during July, 2012 to February, 2014. The clinical characteristics in patients with community-onset K. pneumoniae pneumonia were analyzed. K. pneumoniae isolates from the nasopharynx of adults attending otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinics were collected to compare their microbiological features with those from pneumonia. Capsular genotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility, and multilocus sequence type (MLST) were determined among these strains. Ninety-one patients with community-onset K. pneumoniae pneumonia were enrolled. We found a high mortality (29.7%) among these patients. Capsular types K1, K2, K5, K20, K54, and K57 accounted for ∼70% of the K. pneumoniae isolates causing pneumonia, and ∼70% of all the K. pneumoniae strains isolated from the nasopharynx of patients in outpatient clinics. The MLST profiles further demonstrated the genetic relatedness between most pneumonia isolates and those from the nasopharynx. In conclusion, our results show that community-onset pneumonia caused by K. pneumoniae was associated with high mortality and could have a reservoir in the nasopharynx. To tackle this high-mortality disease, the distribution of capsular types in the nasopharynx might have implications for future vaccine development.

  4. Clinical implications and treatment of multiresistant Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    File, T M

    2006-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Prior to the 1970s this pathogen was uniformly susceptible to penicillin and most other antimicrobials. However, since the 1990s there has been a significant increase in drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (DRSP) due, in large part, to increased use of antimicrobials. The clinical significance of this resistance is not definitely established, but appears to be most relevant to specific MICs for specific antimicrobials. Certain beta-lactams (amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone), the respiratory fluoroquinolones, and telithromycin are among several agents that remain effective against DRSP. Continued surveillance studies, appropriate antimicrobial usage campaigns, stratification of patients based on known risk factors for resistance, and vaccination programmes are needed to appropriately manage DRSP and limit its spread.

  5. Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma masquerading as pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William H

    2004-11-01

    Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) is a relatively rare adenocarcinoma that typically arises in the lung periphery and grows along alveolar walls, without destroying the lung parenchyma. It is often multicentric and may arise from a previously stable scar. Because the parenchyma is preserved and because BAC may arise simultaneously in multiple lobes, the chest radiograph and symptoms (cough, chest pain, and sputum production) may be indistinguishable from pneumonia or other noninfectious inflammatory processes (eg, hypersensitivity pneumonitis or bronchiolitis obliterans). The clinician should suspect BAC if what otherwise appears to be pneumonia lacks fever or leukocytosis or does not respond to antibiotics. BAC accounts for 2.6-4.3 % of all lung cancers. On a radiograph, BAC often appears as a solitary nodule, but may also appear as a patchy, lobar or multilobar infiltrates, often with air bronchograms indistinguishable from pneumonia. Positron-emission tomography does not help distinguish BAC from pneumonia. Among BAC patients, 62% present without symptoms and with only an abnormal radiograph, whereas 38% present with symptoms of cough, chest pain, and sputum production. Bronchoscopy is usually normal. Preoperative diagnosis with transbronchial biopsy, bronchoscopic cytology examination, or expectorated sputum cytology is more common with the diffuse or multicentric forms. Cure depends on complete resection. A trial of antibiotics and reassessment of clinical findings is a reasonable approach, but biopsy or cytology is the only means of ruling in malignancy and ruling out other etiologies, so biopsy should always be considered when a presumed pneumonia does not respond to antibiotics. I saw a 61-year-old man whose initial diagnosis was pneumonia. He took a 10-day course of oral azithromycin, but his symptoms and chest radiograph were unchanged. A tomogram showed interstitial prominence and peripheral air-space disease in the right upper and lower lobes

  6. Pulmonary pathophysiology of pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Light, R B

    1999-09-01

    Respiratory failure is one of the most important causes of death in patients with acute pneumococcal pneumonia. There are two forms that may or may not coexist: ventilatory failure and hypoxemic respiratory failure. Ventilatory failure is principally caused by mechanical changes in the lungs resulting from pneumonia. Inflammatory exudate fills alveoli at slightly less than their normal functional residual capacity (FRC), causing a volume loss at FRC roughly proportional to the extent of the pulmonary infiltrate. Because this consolidated air space does not inflate easily at higher transpulmonary pressures, at higher lung volumes the volume loss is proportionally greater. This loss of volume reduces total lung compliance and increases the work of breathing. There is also evidence that the dynamic compliance of the remaining ventilated lung is reduced in pneumococcal pneumonia, possibly by reduction in surfactant activity, further increasing the work of breathing. Arterial hypoxemia early in acute pneumococcal pneumonia is principally caused by persistence of pulmonary artery blood flow to consolidated lung resulting in an intrapulmonary shunt, but also, to a varying degree, it is caused by intrapulmonary oxygen consumption by the lung during the acute phase and by ventilation-perfusion mismatch later. The persistence of pulmonary blood flow to consolidated lung appears to be caused by a relative failure of the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) mechanism during acute pneumonia, which is at least caused by endogenous vasodilator prostaglandins associated with the inflammatory process but also by other as yet undefined mechanisms. During convalescence, arterial oxygenation improves as blood flow to consolidated lung falls. The magnitude of the intrapulmonary shunt may be influenced by a number of factors that modify the distribution of pulmonary blood flow. Factors that tend to increase flow to consolidated lung and worsen shunt include endogenous vasodilator

  7. Relationship Between the Inoculum Dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pneumonia Onset in a Rabbit Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    of ventilator- associated pneumonia and urinary tract infections . J Chemother 2003; 15: 536 542. PNEUMOCOCCI INOCULUM DOSE AND PNEUMONIA ONSET A.L. YERSHOV ET AL. 700 VOLUME 25 NUMBER 4 EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae ATCC 9621.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Najdenski, Hristo; Simeonova, Diliana D

    2017-03-23

    We present here the 5.561-Mbp assembled draft genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae ATCC 9621, a phosphite- and organophosphonate-assimilating Gammaproteobacterium. The genome harbors 5,179 predicted protein-coding genes.

  9. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made. PMID:26122810

  10. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn; Van Opstal, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made.

  11. Levetiracetam-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Aisling; Fuld, Jonathan; Soon, Elaine

    2017-03-08

    Levetiracetam is widely regarded as a benign antiepileptic drug, compared to older antiepileptic medication. We report a case of eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam use in a non-smoking woman aged 59 years with no previous respiratory history. Our patient presented with exertional breathlessness and marked desaturation on exertion. She displayed 'reverse bat-wing' infiltrates on her chest radiograph and peripheral eosinophilia on a complete blood count. Her symptoms, radiology and peripheral eosinophilia resolved completely with cessation of levetiracetam and a course of prednisolone. This is the first report of isolated eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam. Other reports of levetiracetam-induced eosinophilia describe drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome). Detection of pulmonary drug reactions requires a careful drug history and high index of suspicion. Identifying and reporting a causative agent is crucially important, as cessation of the drug is essential for resolution of the syndrome.

  12. Childhood recurrent pneumonia caused by endobronchial sutures

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Yiheng; Liu, Hanmin; Zhong, Lin; Qiu, Li; Tao, Qingfen; Chen, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recurrent pneumonia is defined as more than two episodes of pneumonia in one year or three or more episodes anytime in life. Common clinical scenarios leading to recurrent pneumonia include anatomical abnormalities of respiratory tract, immunodeficiency, congenital heart diseases, primary ciliary dyskinesia, etc. Case report: A school-aged girl suffered from 1-2 episodes of pneumonia each year after trachea connection and lung repair operation resulted from an accident of car crash. Bronchoscopy revealed the sutures twisted with granulation in the left main bronchus and the patient's symptoms relieved after removal of the sutures. Here we report for the first time that surgical suture was the cause of recurrent pneumonia. Conclusions: This case indicates that children with late and recurrent onset of pneumonia should undergo detailed evaluation including bronchoscopy. PMID:28121955

  13. Pneumonia Outbreak Caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae Among US Air Force Academy Cadets, Colorado, USA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    high at the time of this cluster, cases of pneumonia other than in football players were not identified. Laboratory testing ruled out Streptococcus ...Article 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) Sep 2013 – May 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pneumonia Outbreak Caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae among US Air Force...October 2013–May 2014, there were 102 cases of pneumonia diagnosed in US Air Force Academy cadets. A total of 73% of tested nasal washes contained

  14. HIV-associated Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Laurence; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Davis, J Lucian; den Boon, Saskia; Kovacs, Joseph; Meshnick, Steven; Miller, Robert F; Walzer, Peter D; Worodria, William; Masur, Henry

    2011-06-01

    During the past 30 years, major advances have been made in our understanding of HIV/AIDS and Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), but significant gaps remain. Pneumocystis is classified as a fungus and is host-species specific, but an understanding of its reservoir, mode of transmission, and pathogenesis is incomplete. PCP remains a frequent AIDS-defining diagnosis and is a frequent opportunistic pneumonia in the United States and in Europe, but comparable epidemiologic data from other areas of the world that are burdened with HIV/AIDS are limited. Pneumocystis cannot be cultured, and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is the gold standard procedure to diagnose PCP, but noninvasive diagnostic tests and biomarkers show promise that must be validated. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is the recommended first-line treatment and prophylaxis regimen, but putative trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole drug resistance is an emerging concern. The International HIV-associated Opportunistic Pneumonias (IHOP) study was established to address these knowledge gaps. This review describes recent advances in the pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of HIV-associated PCP and ongoing areas of clinical and translational research that are part of the IHOP study and the Longitudinal Studies of HIV-associated Lung Infections and Complications (Lung HIV).

  15. Repertoire of intensive care unit pneumonia microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bousbia, Sabri; Papazian, Laurent; Saux, Pierre; Forel, Jean Marie; Auffray, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Claude; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Despite the considerable number of studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely identified. We comprehensively applied modern and traditional laboratory diagnostic techniques to identify microbiota in patients who were admitted to or developed pneumonia in intensive care units (ICUs). During a three-year period, we tested the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, community-acquired pneumonia, non-ventilator ICU pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia, and compared the results with those from patients without pneumonia (controls). Samples were tested by amplification of 16S rDNA, 18S rDNA genes followed by cloning and sequencing and by PCR to target specific pathogens. We also included culture, amoeba co-culture, detection of antibodies to selected agents and urinary antigen tests. Based on molecular testing, we identified a wide repertoire of 160 bacterial species of which 73 have not been previously reported in pneumonia. Moreover, we found 37 putative new bacterial phylotypes with a 16S rDNA gene divergence ≥ 98% from known phylotypes. We also identified 24 fungal species of which 6 have not been previously reported in pneumonia and 7 viruses. Patients can present up to 16 different microorganisms in a single BAL (mean ± SD; 3.77 ± 2.93). Some pathogens considered to be typical for ICU pneumonia such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus species can be detected as commonly in controls as in pneumonia patients which strikingly highlights the existence of a core pulmonary microbiota. Differences in the microbiota of different forms of pneumonia were documented.

  16. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS.

  17. Pneumonia Outbreak Caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae among US Air Force Academy Cadets, Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Kevin A; Zorich, Shauna C; Voss, Jameson D; Thervil, Jeffrey W

    2015-06-01

    During October 2013-May 2014, there were 102 cases of pneumonia diagnosed in US Air Force Academy cadets. A total of 73% of tested nasal washes contained Chlamydophila pneumoniae. This agent can be considered to be present on campus settings during outbreaks with numerous, seemingly disconnected cases of relatively mild pneumonia.

  18. Pneumonia Outbreak Caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae among US Air Force Academy Cadets, Colorado, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zorich, Shauna C.; Voss, Jameson D.; Thervil, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    During October 2013–May 2014, there were 102 cases of pneumonia diagnosed in US Air Force Academy cadets. A total of 73% of tested nasal washes contained Chlamydophila pneumoniae. This agent can be considered to be present on campus settings during outbreaks with numerous, seemingly disconnected cases of relatively mild pneumonia. PMID:25988545

  19. Global burden of childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christa L Fischer; Rudan, Igor; Liu, Li; Nair, Harish; Theodoratou, Evropi; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Campbell, Harry; Black, Robert E

    2013-04-20

    Diarrhoea and pneumonia are the leading infectious causes of childhood morbidity and mortality. We comprehensively reviewed the epidemiology of childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in 2010-11 to inform the planning of integrated control programmes for both illnesses. We estimated that, in 2010, there were 1·731 billion episodes of diarrhoea (36 million of which progressed to severe episodes) and 120 million episodes of pneumonia (14 million of which progressed to severe episodes) in children younger than 5 years. We estimated that, in 2011, 700,000 episodes of diarrhoea and 1·3 million of pneumonia led to death. A high proportion of deaths occurs in the first 2 years of life in both diseases--72% for diarrhoea and 81% for pneumonia. The epidemiology of childhood diarrhoea and that of pneumonia overlap, which might be partly because of shared risk factors, such as undernutrition, suboptimum breastfeeding, and zinc deficiency. Rotavirus is the most common cause of vaccine-preventable severe diarrhoea (associated with 28% of cases), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (18·3%) of vaccine-preventable severe pneumonia. Morbidity and mortality from childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea are falling, but action is needed globally and at country level to accelerate the reduction.

  20. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOEpatents

    Triplett, Eric W.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Chelius, Marisa K.

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  1. Challenging the Post-Fordist/Flexible Organisation Thesis: The Case of Reformed Educational Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehony, Kevin J.; Deem, Rosemary

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines claims that recent reforms to UK education have led to significant organisational changes in primary school and higher education. It also examines two main theoretical explanations for these, namely post-Fordism and New Managerialism. Examples of changes in both schools and universities, including flexibility and teamwork, are…

  2. Incorporating organisational safety culture within ergonomics practice.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Tim; Tappin, David

    2010-10-01

    This paper conceptualises organisational safety culture and considers its relevance to ergonomics practice. Issues discussed in the paper include the modest contribution that ergonomists and ergonomics as a discipline have made to this burgeoning field of study and the significance of safety culture to a systems approach. The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics work with regard to the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process, and implications for participatory ergonomics approaches, are also discussed. A potential user-friendly, qualitative approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented, based on a recently published conceptual framework that recognises the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of safety culture. The paper concludes by considering the use of such an approach, where an understanding of different aspects of safety culture within an organisation is seen as important to the success of ergonomics projects. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics practice is a key focus of this paper, including its relationship with the systems approach, participatory ergonomics and the ergonomics analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process. An approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented.

  3. The network organisation of consumer complaints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, L. E. C.; Holme, P.

    2010-07-01

    Interaction between consumers and companies can create conflict. When a consensus is unreachable there are legal authorities to resolve the case. This letter is a study of data from the Brazilian Department of Justice from which we build a bipartite network of categories of complaints linked to the companies receiving those complaints. We find the complaint categories organised in an hierarchical way where companies only get complaints of lower degree if they already got complaints of higher degree. The fraction of resolved complaints for a company appears to be nearly independent of the equity of the company but is positively correlated with the total number of complaints received. We construct feature vectors based on the edge-weight —the weight of an edge represents the times complaints of a category have been filed against that company— and use these vectors to study the similarity between the categories of complaints. From this analysis, we obtain trees mapping the hierarchical organisation of the complaints. We also apply principal component analysis to the set of feature vectors concluding that a reduction of the dimensionality of these from 8827 to 27 gives an optimal hierarchical representation.

  4. Landscape self organisation: Modelling Sediment trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoorl, J. M.; Temme, A. J. A. M.; Veldkamp, A.

    2012-04-01

    Rivers tend to develop towards an equilibrium length profile, independently of exogenous factors. In general, although still under debate, this so-called self-organisation is assumed to be caused by simple feedbacks between sedimentation and erosion. Erosion correlates positively with gradient and discharge and sedimentation negatively. With the LAPSUS model, which was run for the catchment of the Sabinal, a small river in the South of Spain, this interplay of erosion and sedimentation results in sediment pulses (sequences of incision and sedimentation through time). These pulses are visualised in a short movie ( see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5LDUMvYZxU). In this case the LAPSUS model run did not take climate, base level nor tectonics into account. Therefore, these pulses can be considered independent of them. Furthermore, different scenarios show that the existence of the pulses is independent of precipitation, erodibility and sedimentation rate, although they control the number and shape of the pulses. A fieldwork check showed the plausibility of the occurrence of these sediment pulses. We conclude that the pulses as modelled with LAPSUS are indeed the consequence of the feedbacks between erosion and sedimentation and are not depending on exogenous factors. Keywords: Landscape self-organisation, Erosion, Deposition, LAPSUS, Modelling

  5. Organisational culture: an important concept for pharmacy practice research.

    PubMed

    Scahill, Shane; Harrison, Jeff; Carswell, Peter; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2009-10-01

    Throughout the developed world, community pharmacy is under considerable pressure to play a greater part in delivering effective primary health care. The requirement to adopt new roles continues to challenge community pharmacy and drive change. The factors that determine the ability of community pharmacy to effectively deliver services for health gain are complex and include; policy, professional, financial and structural elements. There is also evidence to suggest that organisational culture may influence the effectiveness of an organisation. In order to address this there is a need to understand the dimensions of organisational culture that lead to successful implementation of the change necessary for community pharmacy to become a more effective primary health care organisation. In this commentary, we introduce the concept of organisational culture, outline two frameworks for studying culture, and argue the benefits of pursuing an organisational culture research agenda for the evolution of pharmacy practice and research.

  6. Protochlamydia naegleriophila as etiologic agent of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Casson, Nicola; Michel, Rolf; Müller, Karl-Dieter; Aubert, John David; Greub, Gilbert

    2008-01-01

    Using ameba coculture, we grew a Naegleria endosymbiont. Phenotypic, genetic, and phylogenetic analyses supported its affiliation as Protochlamydia naegleriophila sp. nov. We then developed a specific diagnostic PCR for Protochlamydia spp. When applied to bronchoalveolar lavages, results of this PCR were positive for 1 patient with pneumonia. Further studies are needed to assess the role of Protochlamydia spp. in pneumonia.

  7. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Meric, Meliha; Ozcan, Sema Keceli

    2012-03-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that causes infections primarily in animals. In humans, this bacterium usually causes localized cutaneous infections called erysipeloid. Here we report a case of pneumonia with isolation of E. rhusiopathiae from bronchoalveolar lavage and sputum. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a pneumonia case caused by E. rhusiopathiae confirmed by culture.

  8. Gallium-67 pulmonary uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Morais, J.; Carrier, L.; Gariepy, G.; Le Bel, L.; Chartrand, R.; Picard, D.

    1988-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia is usually diagnosed based on the findings on chest x-ray, white blood count, and transbronchial biopsy. After reporting a case of Ga-67 lung uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia, its histopathology is discussed and the mechanisms of Ga-67 uptake by inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  9. A Developmental Guide to the Organisation of Close Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Brett; Bukowski, William M.

    2009-01-01

    A developmental guide to close relationships is presented. Parent-child, sibling, friend, and romantic relationships are described along dimensions that address permanence, power, and gender. These dimensions describe relationship differences in organisational principles that encompass internal representations, social understanding, and interpersonal experiences. The concept of domain specificity is borrowed from cognitive development to address the shifting developmental dynamics of close relationships. Distinct relationships are organised around distinct socialisation tasks, so each relationship requires its own organisational system. As a consequence, different principles guide different relationships, and these organisational principles change with development. PMID:20090927

  10. Recognising and managing community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Vanessa

    2015-11-18

    Pneumonia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK and yet the seriousness of the disease is underestimated. Pneumonia can be life-threatening because the delicate tissues of the alveoli and pulmonary capillaries are susceptible to damage from the inflammatory response. This damage leads to consolidation that prevents the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and this in turn can lead to respiratory failure. This article summarises guidance on the diagnosis and management of community-acquired pneumonia, and also includes information on the prevention of pneumonia. This information should be valuable to nurses working in a variety of clinical areas since patients with community-acquired pneumonia are encountered in primary, intermediate, secondary and critical care.

  11. Organisation of biotechnological information into knowledge.

    PubMed

    Boh, B

    1996-09-01

    The success of biotechnological research, development and marketing depends to a large extent on the international transfer of information and on the ability to organise biotechnology information into knowledge. To increase the efficiency of information-based approaches, an information strategy has been developed and consists of the following stages: definition of the problem, its structure and sub-problems; acquisition of data by targeted processing of computer-supported bibliographic, numeric, textual and graphic databases; analysis of data and building of specialized in-house information systems; information processing for structuring data into systems, recognition of trends and patterns of knowledge, particularly by information synthesis using the concept of information density; design of research hypotheses; testing hypotheses in the laboratory and/or pilot plant; repeated evaluation and optimization of hypotheses by information methods and testing them by further laboratory work. The information approaches are illustrated by examples from the university-industry joint projects in biotechnology, biochemistry and agriculture.

  12. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in community-acquired pneumonia and exacerbations of COPD or asthma: therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Meloni, F; Paschetto, E; Mangiarotti, P; Crepaldi, M; Morosini, M; Bulgheroni, A; Fietta, A

    2004-02-01

    Rates of acute Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections were determined in 115 adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), purulent exacerbations of COPD and acute exacerbations of bronchial asthma, by means of serology and molecular methods. Results were compared with those obtained in a matched control group. Common respiratory pathogens were isolated by cultures in 22.5% and 22.2% of CAP and exacerbated COPD patients, respectively. Cultures from exacerbated asthma patients were always negative. Serological and molecular evidence of current C. pneumoniae infection was obtained in 10.0%, 8.9% and 3.3% of CAP, COPD and asthma cases. The corresponding rates of acute M. pneumoniae infection were 17.5%, 6.7% and 3.3%, respectively. Finally, no difference was found between typical and atypical pathogen rates. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae infections in guiding the choice of empirical antibacterial treatment for CAP and purulent exacerbations of COPD.

  13. Organizing pneumonia: chest HRCT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Igor Murad; Zanetti, Gláucia; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Araujo-Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of HRCT findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma of patients with organizing pneumonia. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of the HRCT scans of 36 adult patients (26 females and 10 males) with biopsy-proven organizing pneumonia. The patients were between 19 and 82 years of age (mean age, 56.2 years). The HRCT images were evaluated by two independent observers, discordant interpretations being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT finding was that of ground-glass opacities, which were seen in 88.9% of the cases. The second most common finding was consolidation (in 83.3% of cases), followed by peribronchovascular opacities (in 52.8%), reticulation (in 38.9%), bronchiectasis (in 33.3%), interstitial nodules (in 27.8%), interlobular septal thickening (in 27.8%), perilobular pattern (in 22.2%), the reversed halo sign (in 16.7%), airspace nodules (in 11.1%), and the halo sign (in 8.3%). The lesions were predominantly bilateral, the middle and lower lung fields being the areas most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Ground-glass opacities and consolidation were the most common findings, with a predominantly random distribution, although they were more common in the middle and lower thirds of the lungs. PMID:26176521

  14. Making Decisions about Workforce Development in Registered Training Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawke, Geof

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research activity is to understand further how large and small registered training organisations (RTOs) make decisions about the allocation of resources for developing their workforces. Six registered training organisations--four technical and further education (TAFE) institutes and two private providers--were selected for…

  15. Cage Painting within the Fifth Discipline of Learning Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmington, Glyn M.; Alagic, Mara

    2009-01-01

    Learning organisations face new challenges in the 21st century. Increased flow of trade in commodities, manufactured goods and information as well as mobility of people have led to increased global interdependence, interconnectedness and cultural diversity. People and teams within learning organisations have become globally distributed with the…

  16. Influence of Organisational Defensive Patterns on Learning ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Hon Keung; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the IT professionals in a Hong Kong public transport company have a general perception of influence of the organisational defensive patterns on learning of ICT; and whether skilled incompetence, organisational defensive routines and fancy footwork are positively associated with each…

  17. Towards Zero Management Learning Organisations: A Honey-Bee Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keeffe, Ted

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This research paper is a distinctive element of an empirical study on learning organisations carried out between 1999 and 2002. It seeks to examine a whole range of issues that seem to permeate higher-performing organisations. Design/methodology/approach: The study design utilised both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies.…

  18. Organisational Commitments and Teaching Styles among Academics in Mainland China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Li-Fang; Jing, Li-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    This research pioneered the investigation of the predictive power of organisational commitments for academics' teaching styles. Participants were 370 faculty members from 15 higher educational institutions in Beijing, the People's Republic of China. Results showed that academics' organisational commitments as measured by the Organisational…

  19. Organisational Stress among Faculty Members of Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Areekkuzhiyil, Santhosh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Quality faculty members is a must for any higher education institution aspiring for Quality. Organisational stress one of the most important factors influencing the quality and efficiency of the faculty. Hence, the Organisational stress has to be managed in such a way that it should contribute to the quality of higher education. Hence…

  20. The Impact of Graphic Organisers on Learning from Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casteleyn, Jordi; Mottart, André; Valcke, Martin

    2013-01-01

    There is abundant educational research indicating that graphic organisers (knowledge maps, concept maps, or mind maps) have a beneficial impact on learning, but hardly any research has examined this in the context of presentations. This study therefore investigated how graphic organisers -- as delivered via presentation software -- affect learning…

  1. A Longitudinal Study on Newcomers' Perception of Organisational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turker, Duygu; Altuntas, Ceren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse how newcomers' perceptions of organisational culture can change over time. The study tries to address whether initial working experience changes newcomers' perceptions about the ideal organisational culture, and whether these perceptions converge with those of their supervisors.…

  2. Transferability of Skills and Education and Thai Academics' Organisational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rungruang, Parisa; Donohue, Ross

    2007-01-01

    Few studies have examined the links between perceived transferability of education or perceived transferability of skills and organisational commitment. This paper reports on a study examining the relationships between transferability of education and transferability of skills, and the three components of organisational commitment (affective,…

  3. The Strength of Accountability and Teachers' Organisational Citizenship Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elstad, Eyvind; Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB) involves discretionary behaviour advantageous to the organisation that goes beyond existing role expectations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the link between the strength of accountability and teachers' OCB within three different management systems in which teachers are working: a…

  4. Students' Perceptions on Intrapreneurship Education--Prerequisites for Learning Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansikas, Juha; Murphy, Linda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study is to understand the prerequisites for learning organisations (LO) as perceived by university students. Intrapreneurship education offers possibilities to increase student's adaptation of learning organisation's climate and behaviour. By analysing students' perceptions, more information about learning organisation…

  5. An Action Learning Method for Increased Innovation Capability in Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Annika; Wadell, Carl; Odenrick, Per; Norell Bergendahl, Margareta

    2010-01-01

    Product innovation in highly complex and technological areas, such as medical technology, puts high requirements on the innovation capability of an organisation. Previous research and publications have highlighted organisational issues and learning matters as important and necessary for the development of innovation capability. Action learning…

  6. Measuring Organisational Capabilities in the Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobe, Belete J.; Kober, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Drawing on the resource-based view (RBV), the purpose of this paper is to develop a framework and instrument to measure the organisational capabilities of university schools/departments. In doing so, this study provides evidence of the way competitive resources are bundled to generate organisational capabilities that give university…

  7. Conceptualising Work Engagement: An Individual, Collective and Organisational Efficacy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearon, Colm; McLaughlin, Heather; Morris, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of multi-level forms of efficacy and organisational interactions necessary for promoting effective work engagement. Design/methodology/approach: Work engagement is explored from a multi-level efficacy perspective (self, collective and organisational). Based on the ideas of Bandura,…

  8. Organisational Studies in an Era of Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyle, Eric; Wallace, Mike

    2014-01-01

    One social science base for educational administration proposed in the Baron and Taylor collection was organisation theory. In the event this expectation turned out to be over-optimistic. Organisation theory was much too contested and insufficiently pragmatic for the British taste. Major developments in this field occurred mainly in the USA.…

  9. The Ideology of Learning Organisations in Africa: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akella, Devi

    2010-01-01

    Organisations worldwide have acknowledged the connection between corporate learning, development and business sustainability. Emphasis is being laid on creating and designing a learning organisation "that is skilled at creating, acquiring, interpreting, transferring and retaining knowledge" [Garvin, (2000), p.32]. Extensive literature…

  10. Organisational Capability in Internalising Quality Culture in Higher Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bello, Muhammad Ibrahim; Ibrahim, Burhan Muhammad Bn; Bularafa, Mohammed Waziri

    2015-01-01

    The study examines the influence of leadership roles related to organisational capability consisting of directing setting, strategic and organisational process, alignment, intervention and strategic capability on depending variable internalising quality culture in IIUM. The study used 100 samples consisting of lecturers, non-academic staff and…

  11. Towards Coordination Preparedness of Soft-Target Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Mohammed Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    In this paper, we introduce a network enabled coordination model to examine the coordination preparedness of soft-target organisations such as common public access areas including transit hubs, schools, parks, and sports areas. It is apparent that little attention is given in recent research focusing on the use of network analysis as a way to explore coordination preparedness for this type of organisation. In this study, we emphasise this type of soft-target organisation and propose a model to examine the coordination preparedness to any disasters by testing hypothesis related to network relationship and coordination preparedness. We analyse the dataset entitled Preparedness of Large Retail Malls to Prevent and Respond to Terrorist Attack, 2004, which contains a total of 120 completed surveys of security directors of retail malls. The following questions form the basis of this study: What do soft-target organisations need to be better prepared to respond to disaster? How does network relationship between soft-target organisation and emergency agencies affect the coordination preparedness of soft-target organisation for disaster recovery? Which degree of centrality measure needs to be followed to measure network variables in order to analyse the coordination preparedness? Result shows that soft-target organisation with high level of network relationship with other emergency agencies are better prepared to disaster response. Using this result, the preparedness of a soft-target organisation might be judged for successfully participation in an actual emergency.

  12. [A Case of Pneumocystis Pneumonia after Cetuximab-based Bioradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Asano; Kogo, Ryunosuke; Uryu, Hideoki; Yasumatsu, Ryuji; Nakashima, Torahiko; Komune, Shizuo

    2016-03-01

    Reports of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia caused by Cetuximab have been increasing. Pneumocystis pneumonia is important as a differential diagnosis of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia. We report herein on a 64-year-old man with pneumocystis pneumonia after cetuximab-based bioradiotherapy for laryngeal cancer. After radiotherapy, the patient developed multi-drug resistant pneumonia. Chest CT imaging revealed diffuse ground-glass opacities in the lung field. He was diagnosed as having pneumocystis pneumonia based on the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) findings, and then his symptoms improved after treatment with Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole. It is important to assess the risk factor for pneumocystis pneumonia for early its detection and treatment.

  13. Chylothorax in dermatomyositis complicated with interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Kentaro; Kiboshi, Takao; Shoda, Takeshi

    2016-11-24

    Chylothorax is a disease in which chyle leaks and accumulates in the thoracic cavity. Interstitial pneumonia and pneumomediastinum are common thoracic manifestations of dermatomyositis, but chylothorax complicated with dermatomyositis is not reported. We report a case of dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia complicated by chylothorax. A 77-year-old woman was diagnosed as dermatomyositis with Gottron's papules, skin ulcers, anti-MDA5 antibody and rapid progressive interstitial pneumonia. Treatment with betamethasone, tacrolimus and intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide was initiated, and her skin symptoms and interstitial pneumonia improved once. However, right-sided chylothorax began to accumulate and gradually increase, and at the same time, her interstitial pneumonia began to exacerbate, and skin ulcers began to reappear on her fingers and auricles. Although her chylothorax improved by fasting and parenteral nutrition, she died due to further exacerbations of dermatomyositis and interstitial pneumonia in spite of steroid pulse therapy, increase in the betamethasone dosage, additional intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide and plasma pheresis. An autopsy showed no lesions such as malignant tumors in the thoracic cavity. This is the first report of chylothorax complicated by dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia.

  14. Experimental rabbit models of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, T. C.; Kuo, C.; Patton, D. L.; Grayston, J. T.; Campbell, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR), a common cause of acute respiratory disease in humans, has recently been associated with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis. In this study, we evaluated rabbit models of chlamydial infection to investigate the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae infection. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with C. pneumoniae, strain AR-39, and primary and repeated infection were assessed. After a single inoculation, lung pathology was characterized by a moderate self-resolving interstitial pneumonia with bronchiolitis of 21 days in duration. Chlamydial DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) intermittently in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 21 postinoculation, spleen tissue at day 14, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells at days 3 and 21. After repeated inoculations, chlamydial DNA was detected by PCR in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 42. Lung lesions consisted of multifocal interstitial mononuclear cell aggregates that persisted up to day 42. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were less susceptible to C. pneumoniae infection. After multiple inoculations of Watanabe rabbits, C. pneumoniae was detected by PCR and/or immunocytochemistry until day 21. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae induced a moderate respiratory infection in these rabbit models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8579129

  15. [Construction of polyhydroxybutyrate pathway in Klebsiella pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaochen; Liu, Hongjuan; Wang, Yanping; Zhang, Jian'an; Liu, Dehua

    2013-10-01

    1,3-propanediol production with the byproduct of biodiesel production is important to increase the economic benefit of biodiesel industry. Accumulation of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde is one of the key problems in the 1,3-propanediol fermentation process, leading to the cell death and the fermentation abnormal ceasing. Different from the traditional way of reducing the accumulation of the 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, we introduced the polyhydroxybutyrate pathway into the Klebsiella pneumoniae for the first time to enhance the tolerance of K. pneumoniae to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, at the same time, to improve the 1,3-propanediol production. Plasmid pDK containing phbC, phbA, phbB gene was constructed and transformed into K. pneumoniae successfully. PHB was detected in the engineered K. pneumoniae after IPTG induction and its content enhanced with the IPTG concentration increasing. The optimized IPTG concentration was 0.5 mmol/L. The constructed K. pneumoniae could produce 1,3-propanediol normally, at the same time accumulate polyhydroxybutyrate. With the constructed strain, the fermentation proceeds normally with the initial glucose was 70 g/L which the wild type strain stopped growing and the fermentation was ceasing; 1,3-propanediol concentration and yield reached 31.3 g/L and 43.9% at 72 h. Our work is helpful for the deep understanding of 1,3-propanediol metabolic mechanism of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and also provides a new way for strain optimization of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  16. The Student Volunteer Army: a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Sally; Mills, Colleen E

    2017-01-17

    This paper seeks to contribute to understanding of the factors associated with an effective emergent emergency response organisation and to provide new insights into this understudied area. It examines, through an analysis of a range of textual resources, the emergence and re-emergence of the Student Volunteer Army (SVA) during the devastating earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, in 2010-11. This evaluation is conducted in relation to the four key features of an effective emergency response organisation: adaptability; direction; leadership; and communication. In addition, the paper aims to further understanding of 'emergency entrepreneurship' and thus of the values and strategies that underpin social entrepreneur organisations in times of normalcy. The paper concludes that the unique position of the SVA as a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation enabled it to innovate continually and to improve repeatedly its systems, relationships, and image, such that it exhibited features common to emergent and established emergency response organisations.

  17. Impact of organisational change on mental health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, Simon Grandjean; Vinding, Anker Lund; Larsen, Anelia; Nielsen, Peter; Fonager, Kirsten; Nielsen, René Nesgaard; Ryom, Pia; Omland, Øyvind

    2012-08-01

    Although limited evidence is available, organisational change is often cited as the cause of mental health problems. This paper provides an overview of the current literature regarding the impact of organisational change on mental health. A systematic search in PUBMED, PsychInfo and Web of Knowledge combining MeSH search terms for exposure and outcome. The criterion for inclusion was original data on exposure to organisational change with mental health problems as outcome. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were included. We found in 11 out of 17 studies, an association between organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems was observed, with a less provident association in the longitudinal studies. Based on the current research, this review cannot provide sufficient evidence of an association between organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems. More studies of long-term effects are required including relevant analyses of confounders.

  18. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Well-Being Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men SeniorsIn The NewsYour Health ResourcesHealthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your ...

  19. Evolving trends in Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance: implications for therapy of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Jacobs, Michael R; Sader, Helio S

    2010-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major infectious disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality and utilisation of healthcare resources. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), accounting for 20-60% of bacterial cases. Emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae has become a significant problem in the management of CAP. Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccine usage in children has led to significant decreases in morbidity and mortality due to S. pneumoniae in all age groups, disease management has been further complicated by the unexpected increase in resistant serotypes, such as 19A, in some regions. Until rapid and accurate diagnostic tests become available, initial treatment of CAP will remain empirical. Thus, selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for CAP must be based on prediction of the most likely pathogens and their local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. This article reviews information on antimicrobial resistance patterns amongst S. pneumoniae and implications for managing CAP.

  20. Current organisation of clinical cytology in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Milicić-Juhas, Valerija; Loncar, Branka; Mahovlić, Vesna; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Pajtler, Marija

    2010-03-01

    Current cytological service in Croatia is organised in 46 cytological organisational units in 23 towns with total of 350 employees: 101 specialists of clinical cytology, 20 residents in clinical cytology, 141 cytotechnologists (cytoscreeners), 45 health technicians, and 25 administrators and 18 auxiliary personnel. In spite of employment of significant number of cytotechnologists in the last ten years, there is still an unacceptable ratio of number of cytologists and cytotechnologists (1:1.4) which is the result of unresolved education of cytotechnologists which should be permanent, complete and acknowledged. Education and scientific promotion of cytologists is continuous and today our profession has 31 masters of science and 9 doctors of science, one of which is the assistant professor, and four of them are associate or full professors at medical schools in Zagreb and Osijek. Croatian cytology, in average, is in its "best years", i.e. an average cytologist is 46-years-old and cytotechnologist is averagely 43-years-old, but "suffers" from personnel deficit. With regard to the type of activity, the most numerous are units dealing the entire diagnostic cytology (72%), 13% general cytology without gynaecological cytology, while 15% are engaged in one diagnostic field (gynaecological, pulmological or thyroid cytology). According to accessible data, total of 770996 cytological examinations were done in Croatia in 2008. The increasing application of additional methods (cytochemical, immunocytochemical, molecular, cytogenetics and computer-assisted image analysis) has become a trend in numerous cytological units. Exclusively morphological analysis of standard stained samples is performed in 37% of units, morphological and cytochemical staining methods are used in 17% of units, and additional immunocytochemical methods in 30% of units. According to the long tradition of cytology in Croatia, that has progressed thanks to the enthusiasm and great effort of our teachers, we

  1. Synaptic organisation of the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    BOLAM, J. P.; HANLEY, J. J.; BOOTH, P. A. C.; BEVAN, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    The basal ganglia are a group of subcortical nuclei involved in a variety of processes including motor, cognitive and mnemonic functions. One of their major roles is to integrate sensorimotor, associative and limbic information in the production of context-dependent behaviours. These roles are exemplified by the clinical manifestations of neurological disorders of the basal ganglia. Recent advances in many fields, including pharmacology, anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology have provided converging data that have led to unifying hypotheses concerning the functional organisation of the basal ganglia in health and disease. The major input to the basal ganglia is derived from the cerebral cortex. Virtually the whole of the cortical mantle projects in a topographic manner onto the striatum, this cortical information is ‘processed’ within the striatum and passed via the so-called direct and indirect pathways to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia, the internal segment of the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra pars reticulata. The basal ganglia influence behaviour by the projections of these output nuclei to the thalamus and thence back to the cortex, or to subcortical ‘premotor’ regions. Recent studies have demonstrated that the organisation of these pathways is more complex than previously suggested. Thus the cortical input to the basal ganglia, in addition to innervating the spiny projection neurons, also innervates GABA interneurons, which in turn provide a feed-forward inhibition of the spiny output neurons. Individual neurons of the globus pallidus innervate basal ganglia output nuclei as well as the subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars compacta. About one quarter of them also innervate the striatum and are in a position to control the output of the striatum powerfully as they preferentially contact GABA interneurons. Neurons of the pallidal complex also provide an anatomical substrate, within the basal ganglia, for the synaptic

  2. Vaccines in the Prevention of Viral Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Clementine S; Jha, Akhilesh; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is of great global public health importance. Viral infections play both direct and indirect parts in its cause across the globe. Influenza is a leading cause of viral pneumonia in both children and adults, and respiratory syncytial virus is increasingly recognized as causing disease at both extremes of age. Vaccination offers the best prospect for prevention but current influenza vaccines do not provide universal and durable protection, and require yearly reformulation. In the future, it is hoped that influenza vaccines will give better and universal protection, and that new vaccines can be found for other causes of viral pneumonia.

  3. [Patient's Risk Factors for Perioperative Aspiration Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Isono, Shiroh

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews patient's own risk factors for perioperative aspiration pneumonia. Maintaining the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the airway protective reflex, and the oral hygiene are the most important to prevent the pneumonia. The LES is adversely affected by excessive stomach distention, some medication given in perioperative periods, and habitual smoking, as well as pathological status such as esophageal hiatus hernia and achalasia. Postapoplectic patients may have insufficient airway protective reflex including swallowing and laryngeal reflex. It is emphasized that the perioperative oral care is increasing in its importance for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia.

  4. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia: a hypersensitivity phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; King, T E; Schwarz, M I

    1989-01-01

    A previously healthy young man presented with acute respiratory distress and diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph. Eosinophilic pneumonia was diagnosed by bronchoalveolar lavage and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy. There was no evidence of an infectious etiology, and the patient rapidly improved with corticosteroid therapy. Most cases of eosinophilic pneumonia reported previously have followed a chronic course. The case presented here was acute in onset, suggesting a hypersensitivity reaction. High levels of bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophils indicate the diagnosis but not the etiology of eosinophilic pneumonia.

  5. Many radiologic facies of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, H.G.

    1981-12-01

    In 1978, 89 patients were treated for (S. pneumoniae) pneumonia at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Only 40 cases met rather strict diagnostic criteria. Of these, 12 demonstrated the classical consolidative (air space) pattern usually ascribed to this disease. A bronchopneumonic (patch) pattern was demonstrated in an equal number of patients; interstitial (irregular linear) infiltrates were manifest in nine cases and a mixed interstitial and patchy presentation shown in seven cases. Absence of the consolidative pattern does not exclude pneumococcal pneumonia. Bacteriologic investigation is required to determine the proper diagnosis and course of therapy.

  6. Included or Excluded? The Dual Influences of the Organisational Field and Organisational Practices on New Female Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elg, Ulf; Jonnergard, Karin

    2010-01-01

    A number of measures have been taken by the society to ensure gender equality in higher education. Nevertheless, women still face great difficulties when pursuing an academic career. Our aim is to increase the understanding of how the society, conceptualised as the organisational field, interacts with organisational factors and personal actions as…

  7. First report of an outbreak of pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6A.

    PubMed

    Prebil, Karla; Beović, Bojana; Paragi, Metka; Seme, Katja; Kastrin, Tamara; Plesničar, Blanka Kores; Petek, Bojana; Martinčič, Žiga

    2016-01-01

    Five patients in a geropsychiatric unit of a psychiatric hospital became abruptly ill with pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6A. Four other residents were colonized with the same serotype, which has previously not been reported in association with pneumonia outbreaks. Furthermore, serotype 6A is not included in all vaccine types, which may be important for the choice of vaccine in some settings. All isolates showed identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis restriction patterns.

  8. Sustainability reporting in public sector organisations: Exploring the relation between the reporting process and organisational change management for sustainability.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Ana Rita; Lozano, Rodrigo; Ceulemans, Kim; Ramos, Tomás B

    2017-05-01

    Sustainability Reporting has become a key element in different organisations. Although there have been a number of academic publications discussing the adoption of sustainability reports in the public sector, their numbers have been quite low when compared to those focussing on corporate reports. Additionally, there has been little research on the link between sustainability reporting in Public Sector Organisations (PSOs) and Organisational Change Management for Sustainability (OCMS). This paper focuses on the contribution of sustainability reporting to OCMS. A survey was sent to all PSOs that have published at least one sustainability report based on the GRI guidelines. The study provides a critical analysis of the relation between sustainability reporting and OCMS in PSOs, including the drivers for reporting, the impacts on organisation change management, and the role of stakeholders in the process. Despite still lagging in sustainability reporting journey, PSOs are starting to use sustainability reporting as a communication tool, and this could drive organisational changes for sustainability.

  9. Granzymes A and B Regulate the Local Inflammatory Response during Klebsiella pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    García-Laorden, M Isabel; Stroo, Ingrid; Blok, Dana C; Florquin, Sandrine; Medema, Jan Paul; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. Granzymes (gzms), mainly found in cytotoxic lymphocytes, have been implicated as mediators of infection and inflammation. We here sought to investigate the role of gzmA and gzmB in the host response to K. pneumoniae-induced airway infection and sepsis. For this purpose, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and gzmA-deficient (gzmA-/-), gzmB-/- and gzmAxB-/- mice by intranasal infection with K. pneumoniae. In WT mice, gzmA and gzmB were mainly expressed by natural killer cells. Pneumonia was associated with reduced intracellular gzmA and increased intracellular gzmB levels. Gzm deficiency had little impact on antibacterial defence: gzmA-/- and gzmAxB-/- mice transiently showed modestly higher bacterial loads in the lungs but not in distant organs. GzmB-/- and, to a larger extent, gzmAxB-/- mice displayed transiently increased lung inflammation, reflected in the semi-quantitative histology scores and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Most differences between gzm-deficient and WT mice had disappeared during late-stage pneumonia. Gzm deficiency did not impact on distant organ injury or survival. These results suggest that gzmA and gzmB partly regulate local inflammation during early pneumonia but eventually play an insignificant role during pneumosepsis by the common human pathogen K. pneumoniae.

  10. Update on the pathogenesis and management of pneumonia in the elderly-roles of aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Shinji; Yoshida, Kazufumi; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Pneumonia in the elderly results in the highest mortality among cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The pathophysiology of pneumonia in the elderly is primarily due to aspiration pneumonia (ASP). ASP comprises two pathological conditions: airspace infiltration with bacterial pathogens and dysphagia-associated miss-swallowing. The first-line therapy for the treatment of bacterial pneumonia in the elderly is a narrow spectrum of antibiotics, including sulbactam/ampicillin, which are effective against major lower respiratory infection pathogens and anaerobes. The bacterial pathogens of ASP cases of pneumonia in the elderly are similar to those associated with adult CAP. In addition to an appropriate course of antibiotics, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches for dysphagia and upper airway management are necessary for the treatment and prevention of pneumonia. Swallowing rehabilitation, oral health care, pneumococcal vaccination, gastroesophageal reflux management, and a head-up position during the night are necessary for the treatment and prevention of repeated episodes of pneumonia in elderly patients. In addition, tuberculosis should always be considered for the differential diagnosis of pneumonia in this patient population.

  11. Extracellular matrix, supramolecular organisation and shape.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J E

    1995-01-01

    Connective tissue function is defined as the formation and maintenance of shape, without which centralised physiologies (circulatory, digestive or nervous) could not have evolved. Two elements, inextensible (collagenous) fibrils and compression-resistant interfibrillar soluble polymers (proteoglycans), cope with all usual stresses. Relationships between the two are highly specific, as demonstrated by electron histochemistry based on Cupromeronic blue and critical electrolyte concentration (CEC) methodologies. Recent ideas on (1) the protofibrillar or modular structure of collagen fibrils, (2) the nature of specific binding sites for proteoglycans on fibrils, and (3) fundamental similarities in secondary and tertiary structures of the glycosaminoglycans (hyaluronan, chondroitin, keratan and dermatan sulphates) are described. They have greatly illuminated the study of extracellular matrix structure and function in normal, pathological (osteogenesis imperfecta) and ageing tissues. The small proteoglycans are proposed to be tissue organisers, orienting and ordering the collagen fibrils--thus shaping the tissue at a molecular and ultimately macro level. These interfibrillar structures are based on their bifunctional character, the protein parts binding to collagen fibrils at specific sites and the glycosaminoglycans duplexing and aggregating to hold the proteins and hence the collagen fibrils at defined distances from each other, rather like yardsticks. Examples of the way these functions work in specific tissues are drawn from the cornea and vitreous humour of the eye and developing tendon. Images Fig. 3 (cont.) Fig. 3 PMID:7591990

  12. Self-organisation of symbolic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Information is encountered in two different appearances, in native form by arbitrary physical structures, or in symbolic form by coded sequences of letters or the like. The self-organised emergence of symbolic information from structural information is referred to as a ritualisation transition. Occurring at some stage in evolutionary history, ritualisation transitions have in common that after the crossover, arbitrary symbols are issued and recognised by information-processing devices, by transmitters and receivers in the sense of Shannon's communication theory. Symbolic information-processing systems exhibit the fundamental code symmetry whose key features, such as largely lossless copying or persistence under hostile conditions, may elucidate the reasons for the repeated successful occurrence of ritualisation phenomena in evolution history. Ritualisation examples are briefly reviewed such as the origin of life, the appearance of human languages, the establishment of emergent social categories such as money, or the development of digital computers. In addition to their role as carriers of symbolic information, symbols are physical structures which also represent structural information. For a thermodynamic description of symbols and their arrangements, it appears reasonable to distinguish between Boltzmann entropy, Clausius entropy and Pauling entropy. Thermodynamic properties of symbols imply that their lifetimes are limited by the 2nd law.

  13. Self-organisation of symbolic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.

    2016-12-01

    Information is encountered in two different appearances, in native form by arbitrary physical structures, or in symbolic form by coded sequences of letters or the like. The self-organised emergence of symbolic information from structural information is referred to as a ritualisation transition. Occurring at some stage in evolutionary history, ritualisation transitions have in common that after the crossover, arbitrary symbols are issued and recognised by information-processing devices, by transmitters and receivers in the sense of Shannon's communication theory. Symbolic information-processing systems exhibit the fundamental code symmetry whose key features, such as largely lossless copying or persistence under hostile conditions, may elucidate the reasons for the repeated successful occurrence of ritualisation phenomena in evolution history. Ritualisation examples are briefly reviewed such as the origin of life, the appearance of human languages, the establishment of emergent social categories such as money, or the development of digital computers. In addition to their role as carriers of symbolic information, symbols are physical structures which also represent structural information. For a thermodynamic description of symbols and their arrangements, it appears reasonable to distinguish between Boltzmann entropy, Clausius entropy and Pauling entropy. Thermodynamic properties of symbols imply that their lifetimes are limited by the 2nd law.

  14. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Emails CDC Features Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... like antibiotics and antivirals). Lower Your Risk with Vaccines In the United States, there are vaccines that ...

  15. A College Epidemic of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, David; Cochran, Burt

    1979-01-01

    The article reports on an outbreak of mycoplasma pneumoniae at the California Polytechnic State University including a historical background of the disease, clinical features, laboratory findings for treated patients, treatment, and clinical clues for diagnosis. (JMF)

  16. [Thousand faces of Streptococcus pneumonia (pneumococcus) infections].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Bálint Gergely; Lénárt, Katalin Szidónia; Kádár, Béla; Gombos, Andrea; Dezsényi, Balázs; Szanka, Judit; Bobek, Ilona; Prinz, Gyula

    2015-11-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are high worldwide and in Hungary among paediatric as well as adult populations. Pneumococci account for 35-40% of community acquired adult pneumonias requiring hospitalization, while 25-30% of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonias are accompanied by bacteraemia. 5-7% of all infections are fatal but this rate is exponentially higher in high risk patients and elderly people. Mortality could reach 20% among patients with severe invasive pneumococcal infections. Complications may develop despite administration of adequate antibiotics. The authors summarize the epidemiology of pneumococcal infections, pathogenesis of non-invasive and invasive disease and present basic clinical aspects through demonstration of four cases. Early risk stratification, sampling of hemocultures, administration of antibiotics and wider application of active immunization could reduce the mortality of invasive disease. Anti-pneumococcal vaccination is advisable for adults of ≥50 years and high risk patients of ≥18 years who are susceptible to pneumococcal disease.

  17. Lipoid Pneumonia in a Gas Station Attendant

    PubMed Central

    Yampara Guarachi, Gladis Isabel; Barbosa Moreira, Valeria; Santos Ferreira, Angela; Sias, Selma M. De A.; Rodrigues, Cristovão C.; Teixeira, Graça Helena M. do C.

    2014-01-01

    The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O) evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement. PMID:25374742

  18. Aspiration pneumonia in children: an iconographic essay.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Antonio; Pessanha, Laís Bastos; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Martins, Diego Lima Nava; Rondina, Ronaldo Garcia; Silva, Jamine Ronacher Passos

    2015-01-01

    In most cases of aspiration pneumonia in children, the disease is specific to this age group. Clinical and radiological correlation is essential for the diagnosis. The present pictorial essay is aimed at showing typical images of the most common etiologies.

  19. Hierarchical radial and polar organisation of chromosomes in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Millan, N M; Lau, P; Hann, M; Ioannou, D; Hoffman, D; Barrionuevo, M; Maxson, W; Ory, S; Tempest, H G

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that chromosomes occupy distinct positions within the interphase nuclei, conferring a potential functional implication to the genome. In addition, alterations in the nuclear organisation patterns have been associated with disease phenotypes (e.g. cancer or laminopathies). The human sperm is the smallest cell in the body with specific DNA packaging and the mission of delivering the paternal genome to the oocyte during fertilisation. Studies of nuclear organisation in the sperm have postulated nonrandom chromosome position and have proposed a chromocentre model with the centromeres facing toward the interior and the telomeres toward the periphery of the nucleus. Most studies have assessed the nuclear address in the sperm longitudinally predominantly using centromeric or telomeric probes and to a lesser extent with whole chromosome paints. To date, studies investigating the radial organisation of human sperm have been limited. The purpose of this study was to utilise whole chromosome paints for six clinically important chromosomes (18, 19, 21, 22, X, and Y) to investigate nuclear address by assessing their radial and longitudinal nuclear organisation. A total of 10,800 sperm were analysed in nine normozoospermic individuals. The results have shown nonrandom chromosome position for all chromosomes using both methods of analysis. We present novel radial and polar analysis of chromosome territory localization within the human sperm nucleus. Specifically, a hierarchical organisation was observed radially with chromosomes organised from the interior to the periphery (chromosomes 22, 21, Y, X, 19, and 18 respectively) and polar organisation from the sperm head to tail (chromosomes X, 19, Y, 22, 21, and 18, respectively). We provide evidence of defined nuclear organisation in the human sperm and discuss the function of organisation and potential possible clinical ramifications of these results in regards to male infertility and early human development.

  20. Are organisational factors affecting the emotional withdrawal of community nurses?

    PubMed

    Karimi, Leila; Leggat, Sandra G; Cheng, Cindy; Donohue, Lisa; Bartram, Timothy; Oakman, Jodi

    2016-12-05

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of work organisation on the emotional labour withdrawal behaviour of Australian community nurses.Methods Using a paper-based survey, a sample of 312 Australian community nurses reported on their emotional dissonance, withdrawal behaviours (i.e. job neglect, job dissatisfaction, stress-related presenteeism) and work organisation. A model to determine the partial mediation effect of work organisation was developed based on a literature review. The fit of the proposed model was assessed via structural equation modelling using Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS; IMB).Results Community nurses with higher levels of emotional dissonance were less likely to be satisfied with their job and work organisation and had a higher tendency to exhibit withdrawal behaviours. Work organisational factors mediated this relationship.Conclusion Emotional dissonance can be a potential stressor for community nurses that can trigger withdrawal behaviours. Improving work organisational factors may help reduce emotional conflict and its effect on withdrawal behaviours.What is known about the topic? Although emotional labour has been broadly investigated in the literature, very few studies have addressed the effect of the quality of work organisation on nurses' withdrawal behaviours in a nursing setting.What does this paper add? This paper provides evidence that work organisation affects levels of emotional dissonance and has an effect on job neglect through stress-related presenteeism.What are the implications for practitioners? In order to minimise stress-related presenteeism and job neglect, healthcare organisations need to establish a positive working environment, designed to improve the quality of relationships with management, provide appropriate rewards, recognition and effective workload management and support high-quality relationships with colleagues.

  1. The European Stroke Organisation Guidelines: a standard operating procedure.

    PubMed

    Ntaios, George; Bornstein, Natan M; Caso, Valeria; Christensen, Hanne; De Keyser, Jacques; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose M; Ford, Gary A; Grau, Armin; Keller, Emanuella; Leys, Didier; Russell, David; Toni, Danilo; Turc, Guillaume; Van der Worp, Bart; Wahlgren, Nils; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    In 2008, the recently founded European Stroke Organisation published its guidelines for the management of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. This highly cited document was translated in several languages and was updated in 2009. Since then, the European Stroke Organisation has published guidelines for the management of intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, for the establishment of stroke units and stroke centers, and recently for the management of intracerebral hemorrhage. In recent years, the methodology for the development of guidelines has evolved significantly. To keep pace with this progress and driven by the strong determination of the European Stroke Organisation to further promote stroke management, education, and research, the European Stroke Organisation decided to delineate a detailed standard operating procedure for its guidelines. There are two important cornerstones in this standard operating procedure: The first is the implementation of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for the development of its Guideline Documents. The second one is the decision of the European Stroke Organisation to move from the classical model of a single Guideline Document about a major topic (e.g. management of ischemic stroke) to focused modules (i.e. subdivisions of a major topic). This will enable the European Stroke Organisation to react faster when new developments in a specific stroke field occur and update its recommendations on the related module rather swiftly; with the previous approach of a single large Guideline Document, its entire revision had to be completed before an updated publication, delaying the production of up-to-date guidelines. After discussion within the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and significant input from European Stroke Organisation members as well as methodologists and analysts, this document presents the official standard operating procedure for

  2. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with subpleural curvilinear shadow.

    PubMed

    Kagohashi, Katsunori; Ohara, Gen; Kurishima, Koichi; Kawaguchi, Mio; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with subpleural curvilinear shadow. CT scan showed a patchy consolidation in the bilateral upper lungs. In addition, subpleural curvilinear shadow was found in the bilateral upper lungs. A bronchoalveolar lavage obtained from the right middle lobe showed 25 % eosinophils. Although very rare, we should therefore keep in mind that patients, who have patchy consolidation with areas of subpleural curvilinear shadow in the bilateral upper lungs, may have chronic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  3. Pneumonia caused by a previously undescribed bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Hopfer, R L; Mills, K; Fainstein, V; Fischer, H E; Luna, M P

    1982-01-01

    A new and as yet unidentified bacterium was isolated from the lung tissue of a cancer patient with bilateral pneumonia. Clinically, the pneumonia was consistent with legionellosis; the organism cultured from the lung grew only on the charcoal-yeast extract agar routinely used for Legionella isolation. Subsequent testing, however, showed the organism to be quite distinct from the known Legionella species in its biochemical, antigenic, and growth characteristics. Images PMID:7130363

  4. Subselective magnification angiography of experimental pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstein, J.J.; Alazraki, N.P.; Jassy, L.N.

    1983-04-01

    An experiment was designed to determine whether or not acute pneumococcal pneumonia in dogs is associated with intravascular thrombosis, or with angiographic features distinguishable from pulmonary embolism. In dogs with normal baseline chest radiographs and perfusion scans, pneumonia was produced by transbronchial instillation of type III pneumococcus. After 2 days, perfusion scans demonstrated discrete appropriate defects. In vivo magnification pulmonary arteriography, postmortem pulmonary arteriography, and histologic examination disclosed no evidence of thrombi.

  5. Risk Factors and Clinical Impact of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase–Producing K. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gasink, Leanne B.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Synnestvedt, Marie; Fishman, Neil O.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–producing K. pneumoniae is an emerging pathogen with serious clinical and infection control implications. To our knowledge, no study has specifically examined risk factors for KPC-producing K. pneumoniae or its impact on mortality. METHODS To identify risk factors for infection or colonization with KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, a case-control study was performed. Case patients with KPC-producing K. pneumoniae were compared with control subjects with carbapenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae. A cohort study evaluated the association between KPC-producing K. pneumoniae and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS Fifty-six case patients and 863 control subjects were identified. In multivariable analysis, independent risk factors for KPC-producing K. pneumoniae were (1) severe illness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.25–8.25), (2) prior fluoroquinolone use (AOR, 3.39; 95% CI, 1.50, 7.66), and (3) prior extended-spectrum cephalosporin use (AOR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.18, 5.52). Compared with samples from other anatomic locations, K. pneumoniae isolates from blood samples were less likely to harbor KPC (AOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12, 0.86). KPC-producing K. pneumoniae was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (AOR, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.87–6.91). CONCLUSIONS KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is an emerging pathogen associated with significant mortality. Our findings highlight the urgent need to develop strategies for prevention and infection control. Limiting use of certain antimicrobials, specifically fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins, use may be effective strategies. PMID:19860564

  6. Acute pneumonia and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Medina, Vicente F; Musher, Daniel M; Shachkina, Svetlana; Chirinos, Julio A

    2013-02-09

    Although traditionally regarded as a disease confined to the lungs, acute pneumonia has important effects on the cardiovascular system at all severities of infection. Pneumonia tends to affect individuals who are also at high cardiovascular risk. Results of recent studies show that about a quarter of adults admitted to hospital with pneumonia develop a major acute cardiac complication during their hospital stay, which is associated with a 60% increase in short-term mortality. These findings suggest that outcomes of patients with pneumonia can be improved by prevention of the development and progression of associated cardiac complications. Before this hypothesis can be tested, however, an adequate mechanistic understanding of the cardiovascular changes that occur during pneumonia, and their role in the trigger of various cardiac complications, is needed. In this Review, we summarise knowledge about the burden of cardiac complications in adults with acute pneumonia, the cardiovascular response to this infection, the potential effects of commonly used cardiovascular and anti-infective drugs on these associations, and possible directions for future research.

  7. Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lau, Arthur C W; So, H M; Tang, S L; Yeung, Alwin; Lam, S M; Yan, W W

    2015-02-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the commonest, yet mostly preventable, infection in mechanically ventilated patients. Successful control of ventilator-associated pneumonia can save hospitalisation cost, and is possible by using a multidisciplinary clinical and administrative approach. The ventilator-associated pneumonia rate should be expressed as the number of ventilator-associated pneumonia days per 1000 ventilator days to take into account the device-utilisation duration for meaningful comparison. Various strategies address the issue, including general infection control measures, body positioning, intubation and mechanical ventilation, oral and gastro-intestinal tract, endotracheal tube, airway pressure, cuff pressure, selective digestive and/or oropharyngeal decontamination, and probiotic or early antibiotic treatment, as well as overall administration at a policy level. The rationale and controversy of these approaches are discussed in this article. The authors suggest that all units treating mechanically ventilated patients should have a ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention protocol in place, and ventilator-associated pneumonia should be seriously considered as a key performance indicator in local intensive care units.

  8. Pneumonia in the neutropenic cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E.; Ost, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Pneumonia is the leading cause of death among neutropenic cancer patients, particularly those with acute leukemia. Even with empiric therapy, case fatality rates of neutropenic pneumonias remain unacceptably high. However, recent advances in the management of neutropenic pneumonia offer hope for improved outcomes in the cancer setting. This review summarizes recent literature regarding the clinical presentation, microbiologic trends, diagnostic advances and therapeutic recommendations for cancer-related neutropenic pneumonia. Recent findings While neutropenic patients acquire pathogens both in community or nosocomial settings, patients’ obligate healthcare exposures result in the frequent identification of multidrug resistant bacterial organisms on conventional culture-based assessment of respiratory secretions. Modern molecular techniques, including expanded use of galactomannan testing, have further facilitated identification of fungal pathogens, allowing for aggressive interventions that appear to improve patient outcomes. Multiple interested societies have issued updated guidelines for antibiotic therapy of suspected neutropenic pneumonia. The benefit of antibiotic medications may be further enhanced by agents that promote host responses to infection. Summary Neutropenic cancer patients have numerous potential causes for pulmonary infiltrates and clinical deterioration, with lower respiratory tract infections among the most deadly. Early clinical suspicion, diagnosis and intervention for neutropenic pneumonia provide cancer patients’ best hope for survival. PMID:25784246

  9. Vector promoters used in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao; Zhu, Chengqian; Lin, Jie; Li, Jingkang; Fu, Shuilin; Gong, Heng

    2016-09-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the metabolic engineering of Klebsiella pneumoniae; however, our knowledge of the actual expression level of promoters used in K. pneumoniae is limited. In this study, the expression levels of three promoters were compared systematically by using the lacZ reporter gene with different carbon sources in K. pneumoniae. The results showed that, although promoters PT5 and Ptac designed for Escherichia coli were functional, PT5 appeared more efficient and the induction/repression ratio of Ptac was decreased extremely in K. pneumoniae. The basal level of Ptac for lacZ expression reached 396.5 U/mg, which was 9.5-fold higher compared with PT5 in LB medium, indicating Ptac can be used as an efficient "constitutive" promoter as well as an efficient induced promoter in K. pneumoniae. In different carbon sources medium, a newly constructed endogenous constitutive Pbud proved to be a stable and weak promoter. On the basis of our data, a set of Pbud and Ptac promoters could meet the broad range (about 1,000 orders of magnitude) of gene expression needed for engineered K. pneumoniae in glycerol-based medium.

  10. Clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Okada, Fumito; Ando, Yumiko; Honda, Koichi; Nakayama, Tomoko; Kiyonaga, Maki; Ono, Asami; Tanoue, Shuichi; Maeda, Toru; Mori, Hiromu

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively evaluated thin-section CT examinations performed between January 1991 and December 2007 from 962 patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia. Seven hundred and sixty-four cases with concurrent infectious diseases were excluded. Thus, our study group comprised 198 patients (118 male, 80 female; age range 18-97 years, mean age 61.5). Underlying diseases and clinical findings were assessed. Parenchymal abnormalities were evaluated along with the presence of enlarged lymph nodes and pleural effusion. CT findings in patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia consisted mainly of ground-glass attenuation (100%), consolidation (91.4%), and intralobular reticular opacity (85.9%), which were found in the periphery (96%) of both sides of the lungs (72.2%) and were often associated with pleural effusion (53%). The underlying conditions in patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia were alcoholism or smoking habit.

  11. Preliminary investigation of a mice model of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Renois, Fanny; Jacques, Jérôme; Guillard, Thomas; Moret, Hélène; Pluot, Michel; Andreoletti, Laurent; de Champs, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we comparatively assessed the pathophysiological mechanisms developed during lung infection of BALB/C female mice infected by an original wild type Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae strain (CH137) or by a referent subspecies K. pneumoniae. subsp. pneumoniae strain (ATCC10031). The mice infected with 2.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. pneumoniae (n = 10) showed transient signs of infection and all of them recovered. All of those infected with 1.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. ozaenae (n = 10) developed pneumonia within 24 h and died between 48 and 72 h. Few macrophages, numerous polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes were observed in their lungs in opposite to K. p. subsp. pneumoniae. In bronchoalveolar lavage, a significant increase in MIP-2, IL-6, KC and MCP-1 levels was only observed in K. p. subsp. ozaenae infected mice whereas high levels of TNF-α were evidenced with the two subspecies. Our findings indicated a lethal effect of a wild type K. p. subsp. ozaenae strain by acute pneumonia reflecting an insufficient alveolar macrophage response. This model might be of a major interest to comparatively explore the pathogenicity of K. p. subsp ozaenae strains and to further explore the physiopathological mechanisms of gram-negative bacteria induced human pneumonia.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae ATCC 9621

    PubMed Central

    Najdenski, Hristo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the 5.561-Mbp assembled draft genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae ATCC 9621, a phosphite- and organophosphonate-assimilating Gammaproteobacterium. The genome harbors 5,179 predicted protein-coding genes. PMID:28336608

  13. Characterization of the inflammatory infiltrate in Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia in young and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Menter, Thomas; Giefing-Kroell, Carmen; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased susceptibility and mortality in the elderly due to pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. We aimed to assess the inflammatory cell composition with respect to age in pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Neutrophilic granulocytes and various lymphocyte and macrophage subpopulations were immunohistochemically quantified on lung tissue specimens of young (n = 5; mean age 8.4 years), middle-aged (n = 8; mean age 55.9 years) and elderly (n = 9; mean age 86.6 years) pneumonia patients with microbiologically proven S. pneumoniae pneumonia. We discovered a higher percentage of neutrophilic granulocytes in elderly as opposed to young patients (95 vs. 75%, p = 0.012). Conversely, young patients versus elderly patients had more alveolar macrophages (CD11c+: 20 vs. 9%, p = 0.029) and M1 macrophages (CD14+: 30 vs. 10%, p = 0.012 and HLA-DR+: 52 vs. 11%, p = 0.019). There was no significant difference concerning M2 macrophages and lymphocytes. Comparison of young patients with middle-aged patients showed similar significant results for alveolar macrophages (p = 0.019) and subsignificant results for M1 macrophages and neutrophilic granulocytes (p < 0.08). This is the first study characterizing the inflammatory infiltrate of pneumococcal pneumonia in situ. Our observations improve the understanding of the innate immune mechanisms of pneumococcal lung infection and point at the potential of therapies for restoring macrophage function and decreasing neutrophilic influx in order to help prevent or cure pneumonia.

  14. Capsule Switching and Antimicrobial Resistance Acquired during Repeated Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia Episodes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bin; Nariai, Akiyoshi; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Akeda, Yukihiro; Kuroda, Makoto; Oishi, Kazunori; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharyngeal mucus in healthy people and causes otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. In this study, we analyzed an S. pneumoniae strain that caused 7 repeated pneumonia episodes in an 80-month-old patient with cerebral palsy during a period of 25 months. A total of 10 S. pneumoniae strains were obtained from sputum samples, and serotype 6B was isolated from samples from the first 5 episodes, whereas serotype 6A was isolated from samples from the last 2. Whole-genome sequencing showed clonality of the 10 isolates with 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genomes. Among these SNPs, one single point mutation in the wciP gene was presumed to relate to the serotype switching from 6B to 6A, and the other mutations in parC and gyrA were related to fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggested that an S. pneumoniae strain, which asymptomatically colonized the patient's nasopharynx or was horizontally transmitted from an asymptomatic carrier, caused the repeated pneumonia events. Phenotypic variations in the capsule type and antimicrobial susceptibility occurred during the carrier state. Hyporesponsiveness to serotypes 6B and 6A of S. pneumoniae was found even after vaccination with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. After an additional vaccination with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, opsonic activities for both serotypes 6A and 6B significantly increased and are expected to prevent relapse by the same strain.

  15. Therapeutic effects of garenoxacin in murine experimental secondary pneumonia by Streptococcus pneumoniae after influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yoshiko; Furuya, Yuri; Nozaki, Yusuke; Takahata, Masahiro; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi

    2014-02-01

    In a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model following influenza virus infection, garenoxacin was more effective than other fluoroquinolones and demonstrated high levels of bacterial eradication in the lung, low mortality, and potent histopathological improvements. Garenoxacin could potentially be used for the treatment of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia following influenza.

  16. Adenovirus Type 7 Pneumonia in Children Who Died from Measles-Associated Pneumonia, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hai, Le Thanh; Thach, Hoang Ngoc; Tuan, Ta Anh; Nam, Dao Huu; Dien, Tran Minh; Sato, Yuko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Katano, Harutaka; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawachi, Shoji; Nakajima, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    During a 2014 measles outbreak in Vietnam, postmortem pathologic examination of hospitalized children who died showed that adenovirus type 7 pneumonia was a contributory cause of death in children with measles-associated immune suppression. Adenovirus type 7 pneumonia should be recognized as a major cause of secondary infection after measles.

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Victoria I.; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. PMID:27624128

  18. Organisational impact: Definition and assessment methods for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Christophe; Carbonneil, Cédric; Audry, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a rapidly developing area and the value of taking non-clinical fields into consideration is growing. Although the health-economic aspect is commonly recognised, evaluating organisational impact has not been studied nearly as much. The goal of this work was to provide a definition of organisational impact in the sector of medical devices by defining its contours and exploring the evaluation methods specific to this field. Following an analysis of the literature concerning the impact of technologies on organisations as well as the medical literature, and also after reviewing the regulatory texts in this respect, the group of experts identified 12 types of organisational impact. A number of medical devices were carefully screened using the criteria grid, which proved to be operational and to differentiate properly. From the analysis of the practice and of the methods described, the group was then able to derive a few guidelines to successfully evaluate organisational impact. This work shows that taking organisational impact into consideration may be critical alongside of the other criteria currently in favour (clinically and economically). What remains is to confer a role in the decision-making process on this factor and one that meets the economic efficiency principle.

  19. Clinical service organisation for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephanie JC; Bestall, Janine C; Cotter, Sarah; Falshaw, Margaret; Hood, Sonja G; Parsons, Suzanne; Wood, Lesley; Underwood, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a serious, common condition associated with frequent hospitalisation. Several different disease management interventions (clinical service organisation interventions) for patients with CHF have been proposed. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of disease management interventions for patients with CHF. Search methods We searched: Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials (to June 2003); MEDLINE (January 1966 to July 2003); EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2003); CINAHL (January 1982 to July 2003); AMED (January 1985 to July 2003); Science Citation Index Expanded (searched January 1981 to March 2001); SIGLE (January 1980 to July 2003); DARE (July 2003); National Research Register (July 2003); NHS Economic Evaluations Database (March 2001); reference lists of articles and asked experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing disease management interventions specifically directed at patients with CHF to usual care. Data collection and analysis At least two reviewers independently extracted data information and assessed study quality. Study authors were contacted for further information where necessary. Main results Sixteen trials involving 1,627 people were included. We classified the interventions into three models: multidisciplinary interventions (a holistic approach bridging the gap between hospital admission and discharge home delivered by a team); case management interventions (intense monitoring of patients following discharge often involving telephone follow up and home visits); and clinic interventions (follow up in a CHF clinic). There was considerable overlap within these categories, however the components, intensity and duration of the interventions varied. Case management interventions tended to be associated with reduced all cause mortality but these findings were not statistically significant (odds ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.67 to 1.10, P = 0.23), although the

  20. 75 FR 73107 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY... Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of... antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of hospital- acquired bacterial pneumonia (HABP) and...

  1. Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in Children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ivy; Schibler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common complication in mechanically ventilated children and adults. There remains much controversy in the literature over the definition, treatment and prevention of VAP. The incidence of VAP is variable, depending on the definition used and can effect up to 12% of ventilated children. For the prevention and reduction of the incidence of VAP, ventilation care bundles are suggested, which include vigorous hand hygiene, head elevation and use of non-invasive ventilation strategies. Diagnosis is mainly based on the clinical presentation with a lung infection occurring after 48hours of mechanical ventilation requiring a change in ventilator settings (mainly increased oxygen requirement, a positive culture of a specimen taken preferentially using a sterile sampling technique either using a bronchoscope or a blind lavage of the airways). A new infiltrate on a chest X ray supports the diagnosis of VAP. For the treatment of VAP, initial broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used followed by a specific antibiotic therapy with a narrow target once the bacterium is confirmed.

  2. Clinical characteristics of pulmonary embolism with concomitant pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung-Ick; Choi, Keum-Ju; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-04-01

    Although pneumonia is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, patients with pulmonary embolism and concomitant pneumonia are uncommon. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical features of pulmonary embolism with coexisting pneumonia. We retrospectively compared clinical, radiologic and laboratory parameters between patients with pulmonary embolism and concomitant pneumonia (pneumonia group) and those with unprovoked pulmonary embolism (unprovoked group), and then between the pneumonia group and those with pulmonary infarction (infarction group). Of 794 patients with pulmonary embolism, 36 (5%) had coexisting pneumonia and six (1%) had no provoking factor other than pneumonia. Stroke was significantly more common in the pneumonia group, than either the unprovoked group or the infarction group. In the pneumonia group, fever was significantly more common and serum C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher. By contrast, central pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dilation on computed tomography were significantly less frequent in the pneumonia group. In addition, an adverse outcome due to pulmonary embolism was less common in the pneumonia group than in either of the other two groups. The coexistence of pulmonary embolism and pneumonia is rarely encountered in clinical practice, especially without the presence of other factors that could provoke venous thromboembolism and is commonly associated with stroke. It is characterized by lower incidences of central pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dilation and by a lower rate of adverse outcomes due to pulmonary embolism itself.

  3. Ventilator associated pneumonia in major paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Alan David; Deal, Cailin; Argent, Andrew Charles; Hudson, Donald Anthony; Rode, Heinz

    2014-09-01

    More than three-quarters of deaths related to major burns are a consequence of infection, which is frequently ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). A retrospective study was performed, over a five-year period, of ventilated children with major burns. 92 patients were included in the study; their mean age was 3.5 years and their mean total body surface area burn was 30%. 62% of the patients sustained flame burns, and 31% scalds. The mean ICU stay was 10.6 days (range 2-61 days) and the mean ventilation time was 8.4 days (range 2-45 days). There were 59 documented episodes of pneumonia in 52 patients with a rate of 30 infections per 1000 ventilator days. Length of ventilation and the presence of inhalational injury correlate with the incidence of VAP. 17.4% of the patients died (n=16); half of these deaths may be attributed directly to pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and Staphylococcus aureus were the most prominent aetiological organisms. Broncho-alveolar lavage was found to be more specific and sensitive at identifying the organism than other methods. This study highlights the importance of implementing strictly enforced strategies for the prevention, detection and management of pneumonia in the presence of major burns.

  4. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  5. The management of pneumonia in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; Capdevila, J A; Muñoz, P

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia generates a high workload for internal medicine departments. Management of this disease is challenging, because patients are usually elderly and have multiple comorbid conditions. Furthermore, the interpretation and adherence to guidelines are far from clear in this setting. We report the opinion of 43 internists especially interested in infectious diseases that were questioned at the 2011 XXXII National Conference of Spanish Society of Internal Medicine about the main issues involved in the management of pneumonia in the internal medicine departments, namely, classification, admission criteria, microbiological workup, therapeutic management, discharge policy, and prevention of future episodes. Participants were asked to choose between 2 options for each statement by 4 investigators. Consensus could not be reached in many cases. The most controversial issues concerned recognition and management of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). Most participants were aware of the differences in terms of underlying diseases, etiological distribution, and outcome of HCAP compared with community-acquired pneumonia, but only a minority agreed to manage HCAP as hospital-acquired pneumonia, as suggested by some guidelines. A clinical patient-to-patient approach proved to be the option preferred by internists in the management of HCAP.

  6. Perianal Abscess and Proctitis by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Shin; Choi, Sung Youn; Jeong, Eun Haeng; Bang, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Sik; Lee, Dae Sung; Park, Dong Il; Jung, Yoon Suk

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) can at times cause invasive infections, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus and a history of alcohol abuse. A 61-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and a history of alcohol abuse presented with abdominal and anal pain for two weeks. After admission, he underwent sigmoidoscopy, which revealed multiple ulcerations with yellowish exudate in the rectum and sigmoid colon. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin and metronidazole. After one week, follow up sigmoidoscopy was performed owing to sustained fever and diarrhea. The lesions were aggravated and seemed webbed in appearance because of damage to the rectal mucosa. Abdominal computed tomography and rectal magnetic resonance imaging were performed, and showed a perianal and perirectal abscess. The patient underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colostomy and perirectal abscess incision and drainage. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae was identified in pus culture. The antibiotics were switched to ertapenem. He improved after surgery and was discharged. K. pneumoniae can cause rapid invasive infection in patients with diabetes and a history of alcohol abuse. We report the first rare case of proctitis and perianal abscess caused by invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  7. An outbreak of Legionella pneumonia originating from a cooling tower.

    PubMed

    Isozumi, Rie; Ito, Yutaka; Ito, Isao; Osawa, Makoto; Hirai, Toyohiro; Takakura, Syunji; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Mishima, Michiaki

    2005-01-01

    We report 2 cases of Legionella pneumonia in individuals who were exposed to aerosols during maintenance of a cooling tower at a waste processing plant. This report documents the first known occupation-related outbreak of Legionella pneumonia in Japan.

  8. Therapeutic potential of bacteriophage in treating Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-mediated lobar pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Chhibber, Sanjay; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumari, Seema

    2008-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes infections in humans especially in immunocompromised patients. About 80 % of nosocomial infections caused by K. pneumoniae are due to multidrug-resistant strains. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains necessitates the exploration of alternative antibacterial therapies, which led our group to study the ability of bacterial viruses (known as bacteriophages or simply phages) to treat mice challenged with K. pneumoniae. Phage SS specific for K. pneumoniae B5055 was isolated and characterized, and its potential as a therapeutic agent was evaluated in an experimental model of K. pneumoniae-mediated lobar pneumonia in mice. Mice were challenged by intranasal (i.n.) inoculation with bacteria (10(8) c.f.u. ml(-1)). A single intraperitoneal injection of 10(10) p.f.u. ml(-1) phage administered immediately after i.n. challenge was sufficient to rescue 100 % of animals from K. pneumoniae-mediated respiratory infections. Administration of the phage preparation 3 h prior to i.n. bacterial challenge provided significant protection in infected mice, while even 6 h delay of phage administration after the induction of infection rendered the phage treatment ineffective. The results of this study therefore suggest that the timing of starting the phage therapy after initiation of infection significantly contributes towards the success of the treatment.

  9. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae caused different microbial structure and correlation network in lung microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heping; Dai, Wenkui; Qiu, Chuangzhao; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Wenjian; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Hongmei; Li, Yuzheng; Yang, Zhenyu; Feng, Xin; Zhou, Qian; Han, Lijuan; Li, Yinhu

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most serious diseases for children, with which lung microbiota are proved to be associated. We performed 16S rDNA analysis on broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for 32 children with tracheomalacia (C group), pneumonia infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (D1 group) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) (D2 group). Children with tracheomalacia held lower microbial diversity and accumulated Lactococcus (mean ± SD, 45.21%±5.07%, P value <0.05), Porphyromonas (0.12%±0.31%, P value <0.05). D1 and D2 group were enriched by Streptococcus (7.57%±11.61%, P value <0.01 when compared with D2 group) and Mycoplasma (0.67%±1.25%, P value <0.01) respectively. Bacterial correlation in C group was mainly intermediated by Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. Whilst, D1 group harbored simplest microbial correlation in three groups, and D2 group held the most complicated network, involving enriched Staphylococcus (0.26%±0.71%), Massilia (0.81%±2.42%). This will be of significance for understanding pneumonia incidence and progression more comprehensively, and discerning between bacterial infection and carriage. PMID:27293852

  10. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp. infection in community-acquired pneumonia, Germany, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Dumke, Roger; Schnee, Christiane; Pletz, Mathias W; Rupp, Jan; Jacobs, Enno; Sachse, Konrad; Rohde, Gernot

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp., which are associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), are difficult to propagate, and can cause clinically indistinguishable disease patterns. During 2011-2012, we used molecular methods to test adult patients in Germany with confirmed CAP for infection with these 2 pathogens. Overall, 12.3% (96/783) of samples were positive for M. pneumoniae and 3.9% (31/794) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; C. psittaci (2.1%) was detected more frequently than C. pneumoniae (1.4%). M. pneumoniae P1 type 1 predominated, and levels of macrolide resistance were low (3.1%). Quarterly rates of M. pneumoniae-positive samples ranged from 1.5% to 27.3%, showing a strong epidemic peak for these infections, but of Chlamydia spp. detection was consistent throughout the year. M. pneumoniae-positive patients were younger and more frequently female, had fewer co-occurring conditions, and experienced milder disease than did patients who tested negative. Clinicians should be aware of the epidemiology of these pathogens in CAP.

  11. Taxonomic and thematic organisation of proper name conceptual knowledge.

    PubMed

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Warrington, Elizabeth K

    2011-01-01

    We report the investigation of the organisation of proper names in two aphasic patients (NBC and FBI). The performance of both patients on spoken word to written word matching tasks was inconsistent, affected by presentation rate and semantic relatedness of the competing responses, all hallmarks of a refractory semantic access dysphasia. In a series of experiments we explored the semantic relatedness effects within their proper name vocabulary, including brand names and person names. First we demonstrated the interaction between very fine grain organisation and personal experience, with one patient with a special interest in the cinema demonstrating higher error rates when identifying the names of actors working in a similar film genre (e.g., action movies: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Bruce Willis, Sylvester Stallone, Mel Gibson) than those working in different genres (e.g., Arnold Schwarzenegger, Gregory Peck, Robin Williams, Gene Kelly). Second we compared directly two potential principles of semantic organisation - taxonomic and thematic. Furthermore we considered these principles of organisation in the context of the individuals' personal knowledge base. We selected topics matching the interests and experience of each patient, namely cinema and literature (NBC) and naval history (FBI). The stimulus items were arranged in taxonomic arrays (e.g., Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Agatha Christie), thematic arrays (e.g., Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Mr Darcy), and unrelated arrays (e.g., Jane Austen, Wuthering Heights, Hercule Poirot). We documented that different patterns of taxonomic and thematic organisation were constrained by whether the individual has limited knowledge, moderate knowledge or detailed knowledge of a particular vocabulary. It is suggested that moderate proper name knowledge is primarily organised by taxonomy whereas extensive experience results in a more detailed knowledge base in which theme is a powerful organising principle.

  12. Sustaining health promotion programs within sport and recreation organisations.

    PubMed

    Casey, Meghan M; Payne, Warren R; Eime, Rochelle M; Brown, Sue J

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of the sport and recreation sector as a setting for health promotion is a new strategy implemented by health policy makers and strategic planners. Strategies to promote and sustain health promotion activities are important considering the risk that programs may cease after initial funding ends. This study explored the factors affecting the sustainability of a sport- and recreation-based health promotion program. A stratified sampling method was used to select four of the nine Regional Sports Assemblies (RSAs) that delivered a state-wide health promotion program funded by the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation in Australia. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with four Executive Officers (EOs) and focus group discussions with their Boards of Management. A sustainability checklist with pre-specified dimensions (e.g. organisational setting, broader community environment, and program design and implementation) guided data collection and analysis. The results showed that the organisational setting and the broader community environment supported program institutionalisation; whilst the design and implementation of the program worked against institutionalisation. The capacity of the organisations to generate new funds for the program was limited; the relationship between the central funding organisation and the Boards of Management was weak; and the program did not support the retention of staff. The engagement of sport and recreation organisations has potential to facilitate health promotion and public health. To enhance organisational capacity and achieve program sustainability, it is important that organisational processes, structures, and resources that support long-term health promotion practice are effectively and efficiently planned and managed.

  13. Post-Activity Report: DHSS Organisational Culture and Performance Workshop 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    summarises the outcomes of the workshop hosted by the DSTO Army Learning Organisation (ALO) team. Professor Karen Watkins (University of Georgia) facilitated...the workshop (applying Action Learning principles) to generate critical reflection and questioning of Defence organisational culture. The workshop...Culture and Performance Workshop Executive Summary The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) Army Learning Organisation (ALO

  14. Linking Shared Organisational Context and Relational Capital through Unlearning: An Initial Empirical Investigation in SMEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cegarra-Navarro, Juan G.; Dewhurst, Frank W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The environment provided by an organisation to facilitate learning and create knowledge has been defined as the shared organisational context. The value to an organisation of knowledge created by the shared organisational context is called intellectual capital, of which one key component is relational capital. The purpose of this paper is…

  15. Pneumonia treated in the internal medicine department: focus on healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Capdevila, J A; Martínez Alarcón, J; Muñoz, P; López Álvarez, J; Bouza, E

    2012-08-01

    Patients with pneumonia treated in the internal medicine department (IMD) are often at risk of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The importance of HCAP is controversial. We invited physicians from 72 IMDs to report on all patients with pneumonia hospitalized in their department during 2 weeks (one each in January and June 2010) to compare HCAP with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). We analysed 1002 episodes of pneumonia: 58.9% were CAP, 30.6% were HCAP and 10.4% were HAP. A comparison between CAP, HCAP and HAP showed that HCAP patients were older (77, 83 and 80.5 years; p < 0.001), had poorer functional status (Barthel 100, 30 and 65; p < 0.001) and had more risk factors for aspiration pneumonia (18, 50 and 34%; p < 0.001). The frequency of testing to establish an aetiological diagnosis was lower among HCAP patients (87, 72 and 79; p < 0.001), as was adherence to the therapeutic recommendations of guidelines (70, 23 and 56%; p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality increased progressively between CAP, HCAP and HAP (8, 19 and 27%; p < 0.001). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the main pathogen in CAP and HCAP. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused 17 and 12.3% of HCAP. In patients with a confirmed aetiological diagnosis, the independent risk factors for pneumonia due do difficult-to-treat microorganisms (Enterobacteriaceae, P. aeruginosa or MRSA) were HCAP, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and higher Port Severity Index. Our data confirm the importance of maintaining high awareness of HCAP among patients treated in IMDs, because of the different aetiologies, therapy requirements and prognosis of this population.

  16. [Medical history from SARS to pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Cheng

    2003-05-31

    SARS is a new kind of pneumonia. From the end of 2002 to the beginning of 2003, SARS broke in Guangdong province, Hong Kong and Beijing, and then gradually spread to the world. SARS is extremely contagious. The symptoms of SARS progress very quickly. SARS smashes the people's tranquil life and many people live in horror, worry and anxiety. But if we review the medical history of pneumonia, we would have a better understanding of SARS. This article focuses the history of people's understanding of pneumonia on the historical documents, diagnosis, etiology and treatment. Through the epidemic of SARS, the author hopes to express that contagion will live with us for a long time, but it is not a deadly disease. It is preventable and good care is essential for contagious patients. As Chinese people, we should have the best use of TCM in our combat with contagion.

  17. Repetitive DNA sequences in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of different repetitive DNA sequences called RepMP1 and RepMP2 were identified in the genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The number of these repeated elements, their nucleotide sequence and their localization on a physical map of the M. pneumoniae genome were determined. The results show that RepMP1 appears at least 10 times and RepMP2 at least 8 times in the genome. The repeated elements are dispersed on the chromosome and, in three cases, linked to each other by a homologous DNA sequence of 400 bp. The elements themselves are 300 bp (for RepMP1) and 150 bp (for RepMP2) long showing a high degree of homology. One copy of RepMP2 is a translated part of the gene for the major cytadhesin protein P1 which is responsible for the adsorption of M. pneumoniae to its host cell. Images PMID:3138660

  18. Complications of oropharyngeal dysphagia: aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Cabré, Mateu; Clavé, Pere

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of aspiration pneumonia (AP) are poorly defined. They increase in direct relation with age and underlying diseases. The pathogenesis of AP presumes the contribution of risk factors that alter swallowing function and predispose to the oropharyngeal bacterial colonization. The microbial etiology of AP involves Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae for community-acquired AP and Gram-negative aerobic bacilli in nosocomial pneumonia. It is worth bearing in mind the relative unimportance of anaerobic bacteria in AP. When we choose the empirical antibiotic treatment, we have to consider some pathogens identified in oropharyngeal flora. Empirical treatment with antianaerobics should only be used in certain patients. According to some known risks factors, the prevention of AP should include measures in order to avoid it.

  19. Prevention strategies for healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Lee E

    2009-02-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) represents one of the largest subsets of patients with pneumonia. Based on epidemiological projections for the aging U.S. population, the number of hospitalizations for HCAP is expected to increase exponentially for the next several decades. The unique risk factors for colonization with resistant pathogens in these patients provide multiple opportunities for HCAP prevention. However, our current understanding of the most effective prevention measures is woefully inadequate and constitutes an extrapolation from studies done in community-acquired and hospital-acquired pneumonia patients. This review explores common prevention strategies that may be applicable to HCAP, highlights areas of controversy that require further study, and describes several areas of ongoing novel investigation.

  20. Air pollution and infant mortality from pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Penna, M.L.; Duchiade, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between air pollution, measured as concentration of suspended particulates in the atmosphere, and infant mortality due to pneumonia in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. Multiple linear regression (progressive or stepwise method) was used to analyze infant mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, and all causes in 1980, by geographic area, income level, and degree of contamination. While the variable proportion of families with income equivalent to more than two minimum wages was included in the regressions corresponding to the three types of infant mortality, the average contamination index had a statistically significant coefficient (b = 0.2208; t = 2.670; P = 0.0137) only in the case of mortality due to pneumonia. This would suggest a biological association, but, as in any ecological study, such conclusions should be viewed with caution. The authors believe that air quality indicators are essential to consider in studies of acute respiratory infections in developing countries.

  1. Rhabdomyolysis associated with antimicrobial drug-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Narita, Mitsuo; Ohya, Hitomi; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Aizawa, Yuta; Matsuo, Mai; Matsunaga, Masamichi; Tsukano, Shinya; Taguchi, Testuo

    2012-05-01

    We describe a case of rhabdomyolysis in a patient infected with antimicrobial drug-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae The patient's acute-phase serum levels of interleukin-18 and tumor necrosis factor-α were high, which suggests a pathogenic role for M. pneumoniae. In an era of increasing antimicrobial drug resistance, a system for rapidly identifying resistant M. pneumoniae would be beneficial.

  2. Health care-associated pneumonia: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Attridge, Russell T; Frei, Christopher R

    2011-08-01

    Health care-associated pneumonia is a relatively new classification of pneumonia that includes community-dwelling pneumonia patients having contact with the health care system. Current data indicate that health care-associated pneumonia patients present with more severe disease, are more likely to be infected with drug-resistant pathogens, and suffer increased mortality compared with community-acquired pneumonia patients. Guidelines recommend that these patients receive empiric antibiotics similar to those recommended for nosocomial pneumonia; however, it is not currently known if outcomes are improved when health care-associated pneumonia patients are treated with these therapies. In addition, the individual health care-associated pneumonia risk factors are based on limited data and are a poor predictor of patients likely to be infected with drug-resistant pathogens. Many questions remain on how to most appropriately care for this growing group of pneumonia patients. This review is an evidence-based discussion of current health care-associated pneumonia data, the individual health care-associated pneumonia risk factors, and limitations and additional considerations for the health care-associated pneumonia classification system.

  3. Cranial neuropathy, myeloradiculopathy, and myositis: complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, T L; Kenny, G E

    1979-08-01

    Polymyositis, transverse myelitis, ascending polyneuritis, bilateral optic neuritis, and hearing loss developed in a patient with high complement-fixing antibody titers to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Each of her three children had primary atypical pneumonia with isolation of the organism. The neurologic disturbance is thought to represent a postinfectious complication of M pneumoniae infection.

  4. Novel preventive and therapuetic strategy for post-stroke pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Shinji

    2009-08-01

    Pneumonia is a significant complication of ischemic stroke that increases mortality. Post-stroke pneumonia is defined as newly developed pneumonia following stroke onset. Clinically and chronologically, post-stroke pneumonia is divided into two types of aspiration pneumonia. First, acute-onset post-stroke pneumonia occurs within 1 month after stroke. Second, insidious or chronic-onset post-stroke pneumonia occurs 1 month after the stroke. The mechanisms of pneumonia are apparent aspiration and dysphagia-associated microaspiration. Stroke and the post-stroke state are the most significant risk factors for aspiration pneumonia. The preventive and therapeutic strategies have been developed thoroughly and appropriate antibiotic use, and both pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches for the treatment of post-stroke pneumonia have been studied rigorously. Increases in substance P levels, oral care, and swallowing rehabilitation are necessary to improve swallowing function in post-stroke patients, resulting in a reduction in the incidence of post-stroke pneumonia in a chronic stage. The stroke must be a cause of aspiration pneumonia.

  5. Inhaled corticosteroids and the increased risk of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Marzoratti, Lucía; Iannella, Hernán A; Waterer, Grant W

    2013-08-01

    Recently it has been suggested that there is a causal association between the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and the risk of developing pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). An increased risk of pneumonia associated with ICS use has been seen in trials with different design, different study populations and with evidence of a dose-response relationship. However, as none of these clinical trials were originally designed to assess pneumonia risk, radiographic confirmation of pneumonia was not always obtained. The extent to which pneumonia events have been confounded with acute exacerbations of COPD is unclear. As increased pneumonia events were not associated with increased mortality it remains unclear what the clinical significance of these findings are. Further complicating the association between ICSs and pneumonia is that meta-analyses restricted to budesonide trials have not shown an increased risk of pneumonia, and no association has been seen in patients with asthma. A number of mechanisms by which ICSs could increase the risk of pneumonia have been proposed, principally related to their immunosuppressive effect. Well-designed clinical trials with predefined endpoints and objective pneumonia definitions are needed before the real risk of pneumonia conferred by ICSs can be established. In the meantime, it seems reasonable to reduce ICSs given to COPD patients to the lowest effective doses, reduce the risk in individual patients by ensuring appropriate vaccination and to be vigilant for the possibility of pneumonia in patients with COPD on ICSs as they largely overlap with those of an acute exacerbation.

  6. Incidence of Pneumonia After Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hannae; Park, Jung-Gyoo; Min, David; Park, Hee-Won; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Kun-Jai; Baek, Sora

    2016-02-01

    Pneumonia after videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) is sometimes considered to be caused by aspiration during VFSS; however, to our knowledge, a relationship between these events has not been clearly investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of VFSS-related pneumonia and related factors. Overall, 696 VFSS cases were retrospectively reviewed. Cases in which blood culture was performed within 3 days after VFSS due to newly developed infectious signs were considered as post-VFSS infection cases. Pneumonia was suspected when there was some evidence of respiratory infectious signs in clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. The underlying disease, clinical signs, and VFSS findings of the pneumonia group were assessed. Among 696 cases, pneumonia was diagnosed in 15 patients. The patients in the pneumonia group tended to be older and had higher aspiration rate on VFSS than those in the non-pneumonia group. In the pneumonia group, 2 patients showed no aspiration during VFSS. In 6 patients, pneumonia developed after massive aspiration of gastric content in 5 patients and inappropriate oral feeding with risk of aspiration before VFSS in 1 patient. Only 7 patients (1.0 %) were finally determined as having VFSS-related pneumonia. In conclusion, the 72-h incidence of VFSS-related pneumonia was 1.0 %. Old age and severity of swallowing difficulty are associated with occurrence of pneumonia.

  7. Etiology of severe pneumonia in Ecuadorian children

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Sivani; Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Estrella, Bertha; Sabin, Lora L.; Sempértegui, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background In Latin America, community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Few studies have examined the etiology of pneumonia in Ecuador. Methods This observational study was part of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among children aged 2–59 months with severe pneumonia in Quito, Ecuador. Nasopharyngeal and blood samples were tested for bacterial and viral etiology by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for specific respiratory pathogens were also evaluated. Results Among 406 children tested, 159 (39.2%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 71 (17.5%) had human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and 62 (15.3%) had adenovirus. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified in 37 (9.2%) samples and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three (0.74%) samples. The yearly circulation pattern of RSV (P = 0.0003) overlapped with S. pneumoniae, (P = 0.03) with most cases occurring in the rainy season. In multivariable analysis, risk factors for RSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, P = 0.01) and being underweight (aOR = 1.8, P = 0.04). Maternal education (aOR = 0.82, P = 0.003), pulse oximetry (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.005), and rales (aOR = 0.25, P = 0.007) were associated with influenza A. Younger age (aOR = 3.5, P = 0.007) and elevated baseline respiratory rate were associated with HPIV-3 infection (aOR = 0.94, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results indicate the importance of RSV and influenza, and potentially modifiable risk factors including undernutrition and future use of a RSV vaccine, when an effective vaccine becomes available. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00513929 PMID:28182741

  8. Does health care associated pneumonia really exist?

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alejandra; Amaro, Rosanel; Polverino, Eva

    2012-07-01

    The most recent ATS guidelines for nosocomial pneumonia of 2005 describe a new clinical category of patients, Health Care-Associated Pneumonia which includes a number of very heterogeneous conditions possibly associated with a high risk of multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections and of mortality. This paper aims at reviewing the current literature on HCAP and examines the controversial issues of HCAP etiology and outcomes, underlining the need of a profound revision of the HCAP concept in the face of the poor and contrasting scientific evidence supporting its basis.

  9. Ocular manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Salzman, M B; Sood, S K; Slavin, M L; Rubin, L G

    1992-05-01

    Ocular manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, other than conjunctivitis, are uncommon. Optic disk swelling, optic nerve atrophy, retinal exudates and hemorrhages, and cranial nerve palsies have been infrequently reported. We describe a 15-year-old patient who developed bilateral optic disk edema and iritis during an acute infection with M. pneumoniae and review the world literature on findings associated with ocular manifestations of infection with this pathogen. Although our patient experienced complete resolution of iritis and optic disk edema after 6 weeks, several patients described in the literature have experienced permanent sequelae as a result of optic neuropathy.

  10. [Three cases of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Fujino, Satoru; Hisatomi, Keiko; Iida, Tetsuya; Ohe, Nobuharu; Hirakata, Yoichi; Hara, Kohei

    2003-07-01

    We encountered 3 cases of pneumonia caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia between January and June 2001. S. maltophilia is resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotics including carbapenem. Reported studies indicate that excessive use of broad-spectrum antibiotics may induce resistance in this organism. However, our data showed that there was no clear correlation between the amounts of carbapenems used in our hospital and the isolation of the organism. If broad-spectrum antibiotics are ineffective or even actually worsen a case of pneumonia, S. maltophilia may be the sole causative organism, and a potent double- (or triple-) combination therapy consisting of minocyclin and one or two other potent antimicrobial agents should be considered.

  11. FDG PET Imaging in Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kono, Masanori; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Kazuo; Kano, Toshikazu; Mimori, Akio

    2015-08-01

    A 69-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis and pleuritis presented with dyspnea. On admission, she was afebrile and had an oxygen saturation of 97% on ambient air. Chest radiography and CT revealed only subtle ground-glass opacities. However, FDG PET revealed pathological uptake in both lungs. A diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia was made based on a positive β-D-glucan assay and polymerase chain reaction amplification of Pneumocystis jirovecii from the sputum. Posttreatment FDG PET revealed resolution of the previously noted uptake. This case illustrates that FDG PET can be used to diagnose Pneumocystis pneumonia when the CT findings are equivocal.

  12. Cloning of the complete Mycoplasma pneumoniae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1989-01-01

    The complete genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was cloned in an ordered library consisting of 34 overlapping or adjacent cosmids, one plasmid and two lambda phages. The genome size was determined by adding up the sizes of either the individual unique EcoRI restriction fragments of the gene bank or of the XhoI fragments of genomic M. pneumoniae DNA. The values from these calculations, 835 and 849 kbp, are in good agreement. An XhoI restriction map was constructed by identifying adjacent DNA fragments by probing with selected cosmid clones. Images PMID:2506532

  13. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  14. Latrogenic lipoid pneumonia in an adult horse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A 20-year-old gelding presented with a history of acute respiratory distress which began immediately after administration of a mineral oil and water mix, via nasogastric intubation, for treatment of suspected gastrointestinal dysfunction. An initial presumptive diagnosis of acute lipoid pneumonia was made; this was further supported by evidence of arterial hypoxaemia and oxygen desaturation on arterial blood gas analysis, ultrasonographic signs of bilateral ventral lung consolidation and a mixed bronchoalveolar-interstitial lung pattern seen on thoracic radiographs. Despite intensive supportive therapy the horse's condition continued to deteriorate and the decision was made for humane euthanasia. Gross necropsy findings supported the clinical diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia. PMID:21851746

  15. Infected Pneumatocele Following Anaerobic Pneumonia in Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeon Tae; Lee, Kyung Duk; Seon, Kyoung Youn; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Se Ho

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of an infected pneumatocele in the course of anaerobic pneumonia in an adult. To the best of our knowledge, anaerobic pneumonia complicated by a pneumatocele in an adult has not previously been described. The pneumatocele occurred on the fifth day of hospitalization, and rapidly increased in size, with the development of a subsequent mixed anaerobe infection. A pig-tail catheter was inserted and the pus drained. The bacterial culture from the pus was positive for three anaerobes: Bacteroid species, Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus and Fusobacterium species. Intravenous antibiotics and percutaneous catheter drainage resulted in a successful treatment. PMID:16491835

  16. Carcinoma of the lung complicating lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Felson, B.; Ralaisomay, G.

    1983-11-01

    The authors have encountered four cases of oil aspiration pneumonia complicated by carcinoma. Each had a clear-cut history of chronic intake of an oily substance, radiographic changes, and histologically documented oil aspiration pneumonia. Lung cancer later appeared in the involved area. A small number of similar cases also have been reported. The implication is that oil aspiration pneumonitis may induce bronchogenic carcinoma, particularly either the alveolar cell or the squamous cell variety. The radiographic diagnosis of the malignant transformation is difficult, and consequently the prognosis is poor.

  17. Effects of Microgravity on Streptoccoccus Pneumonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These gels were obtained by two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis, in which proteins move different substances through a polyacrylamide gel matrix based on their molecular weight and total charge in an electric field. The gels illustrate principal investigator David Niesel's findings that exposure to modeled microgravity results in some Streptoccoccus Pneumonia's proteins being upregulated and others being downregulated. In 2D protein profiles of whole cell lysates of Streptoccoccus Pneumonia, 6,304 cultured under normal gravity (left), appear to be expressed at higher levels indicated with black circles. Red circles (right) indicate proteins that were grown under modeled microgravity in a high aspect ratio vessel HARV).

  18. The organisational stressors encountered by athletes with a disability.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Rachel; Wagstaff, Christopher R D; Steadman, Lauren; Pratt, Yasmin

    2017-06-01

    Organisational stressors have been found to be prevalent and problematic for sport performers, with research identifying demographic differences in the stressors encountered. Nevertheless, extant sport psychology research on the topic of stress has generally focused on able-bodied athletes; whilst that which has been conducted on performers with a disability has typically recruited relatively small samples to explore a narrow selection of organisational stressors, or examined other components of the stress process. The purpose of the present study was to explore the various organisational stressors that athletes with a disability encounter. The sample comprised 18 elite athletes with a disability (10 male, 8 female) who had a classified disability and experience of competing at a major championships in their sport (e.g., Paralympic Games, World Championships). Participants took part in a semi-structured interview which was analysed by drawing from grounded theory procedures. A total of 316 organisational stressors were identified, which were abstracted into 31 concepts and four, previously conceptualised, exploratory schemes: leadership and personnel issues, cultural and team issues, logistical and environmental issues, and performance and personal issues. This study not only provides the first illustration of the prevalence of organisational stressors for athletes with a disability, but also significantly points to salient similarities and distinct differences between the stress experiences of performers with and without a disability.

  19. [Nursing-home-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia--comparison of sputum cultures with Binax NOW Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary antigen assay].

    PubMed

    Rikimaru, Toru; Nishiyama, Mamoru; Yonemitsu, Junko; Nagabuchi, Masako; Shimada, Akiko; Koga, Takeharu; Aizawa, Hisamichi

    2008-11-01

    To clarify the clinical significance of Pneumococcal pneumonia in nursing-home-acquired pneumonia, we examined the positive disease rate of using sputum cultures and the Binax NOW Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary antigen assay in 154 nursing-home patients with pneumonia. These included 54 males and 100 females with a mean age of 86.2 years. Bacteriological findings for sputum culture in 130 patients showed Streptococcus pneumoniae to be cultured in 11 cases (8%). In 72 in whom the Streptococcus pneumoniae-urinary antigen test (Binax NOW) was done, the urinary-antigen-positive rate (26/72 ; 36%) was higher than the culture positive rate for S. pneumoniae. Both examinations were done in 64 patients, among whom 5 in whom S. pneumoniae was cultured also had positive results for the urinary antigen test. Almost half of those undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastroscopy (PEG) tube nutrition had positive results for the urinary antigen test, but not all such patients had positive cultures for S. pneumoniae. Although the culture-positive rate for S. pneumoniae in sputum was low, we concluded that S. pneumoniae was frequently linked to nursing-home-acquired pneumonia, especially in "total-care" patients.

  20. Prognostic implications of aspiration pneumonia in patients with community acquired pneumonia: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Kosaku; Rubin, Bruce K; Kadota, Jun-Ichi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Akaba, Tomohiro; Moro, Hiroshi; Aoki, Nobumasa; Tsukada, Hiroki; Noguchi, Shingo; Shime, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Osamu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-12-07

    Aspiration pneumonia is thought to be associated with a poor outcome in patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, there has been no systematic review regarding the impact of aspiration pneumonia on the outcomes in patients with CAP. This review was conducted using the MOOSE guidelines: Patients: patients defined CAP.

  1. Prognostic implications of aspiration pneumonia in patients with community acquired pneumonia: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Kosaku; Rubin, Bruce K.; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Akaba, Tomohiro; Moro, Hiroshi; Aoki, Nobumasa; Tsukada, Hiroki; Noguchi, Shingo; Shime, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Osamu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is thought to be associated with a poor outcome in patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, there has been no systematic review regarding the impact of aspiration pneumonia on the outcomes in patients with CAP. This review was conducted using the MOOSE guidelines: Patients: patients defined CAP. Exposure: aspiration pneumonia defined as pneumonia in patients who have aspiration risk. Comparison: confirmed pneumonia in patients who were not considered to be at high risk for oral aspiration. Outcomes: mortality, hospital readmission or recurrent pneumonia. Three investigators independently identified published cohort studies from PubMed, CENTRAL database, and EMBASE. Nineteen studies were included for this systematic review. Aspiration pneumonia increased in-hospital mortality (relative risk, 3.62; 95% CI, 2.65–4.96; P < 0.001, seven studies) and 30-day mortality (3.57; 2.18–5.86; P < 0.001, five studies). In contrast, aspiration pneumonia was associated with decreased ICU mortality (relative risk, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.26–0.60; P < 0.00001, four studies). Although there are insufficient data to perform a meta-analysis on long-term mortality, recurrent pneumonia, and hospital readmission, the few reported studies suggest that aspiration pneumonia is also associated with these poor outcomes. In conclusion, aspiration pneumonia was associated with both higher in-hospital and 30-day mortality in patients with CAP outside ICU settings. PMID:27924871

  2. Community-Acquired Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Viasus, Diego; Di Yacovo, Silvana; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Verdaguer, Ricard; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Legionella pneumophila has been increasingly recognized as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and an important public health problem worldwide. We conducted the present study to assess trends in epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of sporadic community-acquired L. pneumophila pneumonia requiring hospitalization at a university hospital over a 15-year period (1995–2010). Among 3934 nonimmunosuppressed hospitalized patients with CAP, 214 (5.4%) had L. pneumophila pneumonia (16 cases were categorized as travel-associated pneumonia, and 21 were part of small clusters). Since the introduction of the urinary antigen test, the diagnosis of L. pneumophila using this method remained stable over the years (p = 0.42); however, diagnosis by means of seroconversion and culture decreased (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). The median age of patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia was 58.2 years (SD 13.8), and 76.4% were male. At least 1 comorbid condition was present in 119 (55.6%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia, mainly chronic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic pulmonary disease. The frequency of older patients (aged >65 yr) and comorbidities among patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia increased over the years (p = 0.06 and p = 0.02, respectively). In addition, 100 (46.9%) patients were classified into high-risk classes according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (groups IV–V). Twenty-four (11.2%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia received inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy at hospital admission. Compared with patients who received appropriate empirical antibiotic, patients who received inappropriate therapy more frequently had acute onset of illness (p = 0.004), pleuritic chest pain (p = 0.03), and pleural effusion (p = 0.05). The number of patients who received macrolides decreased over the study period (p < 0.001), whereas the number of patients who received levofloxacin increased (p

  3. Detection of TT virus (TTV) by three frequently-used PCR methods targeting different regions of viral genome in children with cryptogenic hepatitis, chronic B hepatitis and hbs carriers.

    PubMed

    Ergünay, Koray; Gürakan, Figen; Usta, Yusuf; Yüce, Aysel; Karabulut, Hasan Ozen Erdem; Ustaçelebi, Semsettin

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed so that three sensitive and widely-used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection of TT virus or Torque Teno virus (TTV) would be simultaneously applied to a large number of subjects to evaluate performances of the various PCR protocols with different genotype sensitivities. Sera were collected from 92 children admitted to Hacettepe University Ihsan Doğramaci Children's Hospital Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit (17 cryptogenic chronic hepatitis, 17 asymptomatic HBs carriers, 18 chronic HBV patients and 40 healthy children). TTV DNA was detected via nested N22, nested 3'-UTR and 5'-UTR PCRs for all samples. Differences in TTV D N A detection prevalences were n o t statistically significantbetween the study groups with all TTV DNA and liver enzyme levels. A significant agreement between PCR methods that target UTR was observed. TTV detection rate increased with age, suggesting a non-parenteral, environmental exposure to the virus for the study population.

  4. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society research statement: interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Aryeh; Antoniou, Katerina M; Brown, Kevin K; Cadranel, Jacques; Corte, Tamera J; du Bois, Roland M; Lee, Joyce S; Leslie, Kevin O; Lynch, David A; Matteson, Eric L; Mosca, Marta; Noth, Imre; Richeldi, Luca; Strek, Mary E; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Wells, Athol U; West, Sterling G; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with an idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) have clinical features that suggest an underlying autoimmune process but do not meet established criteria for a connective tissue disease (CTD). Researchers have proposed differing criteria and terms to describe these patients, and lack of consensus over nomenclature and classification limits the ability to conduct prospective studies of a uniform cohort.The "European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society Task Force on Undifferentiated Forms of Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease" was formed to create consensus regarding the nomenclature and classification criteria for patients with IIP and features of autoimmunity.The task force proposes the term "interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features" (IPAF) and offers classification criteria organised around the presence of a combination of features from three domains: a clinical domain consisting of specific extra-thoracic features, a serologic domain consisting of specific autoantibodies, and a morphologic domain consisting of specific chest imaging, histopathologic or pulmonary physiologic features.A designation of IPAF should be used to identify individuals with IIP and features suggestive of, but not definitive for, a CTD. With IPAF, a sound platform has been provided from which to launch the requisite future research investigations of a more uniform cohort.

  5. Revisitingmolecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ninety-two Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes have been described so far, but the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduced in the Brazilian basic vaccination schedule in 2010 covers only the ten most prevalent in the country. Pneumococcal serotype-shifting after massive immunization is a major concern and monitoring this phenomenon requires efficient and accessible serotyping methods. Pneumococcal serotyping based on antisera produced in animals is laborious and restricted to a few reference laboratories. Alternatively, molecular serotyping methods assess polymorphisms in the cps gene cluster, which encodes key enzymes for capsular polysaccharides synthesis in pneumococci. In one such approach, cps-RFLP, the PCR amplified cps loci are digested with an endonuclease, generating serotype-specific fingerprints on agarose gel electrophoresis. Methods In this work, in silico and in vitro approaches were combined to demonstrate that XhoII is the most discriminating endonuclease for cps-RFLP, and to build a database of serotype-specific fingerprints that accommodates the genetic diversity within the cps locus of 92 known pneumococci serotypes. Results The expected specificity of cps-RFLP using XhoII was 76% for serotyping and 100% for serogrouping. The database of cps-RFLP fingerprints was integrated to Molecular Serotyping Tool (MST), a previously published web-based software for molecular serotyping. In addition, 43 isolates representing 29 serotypes prevalent in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013, were examined in vitro; 11 serotypes (nine serogroups) matched the respective in silico patterns calculated for reference strains. The remaining experimental patterns, despite their resemblance to their expected in silico patterns, did not reach the threshold of similarity score to be considered a match and were then added to the database. Conclusion The cps-RFLP method with XhoII outperformed the antisera-based and other molecular serotyping

  6. Improving organisational resilience through enterprise security risk management.

    PubMed

    Petruzzi, John; Loyear, Rachelle

    Enterprise Security Risk Management (ESRM) is a new philosophy and method of managing security programmes through the use of traditional risk principles. As a philosophy and life cycle, ESRM is focused on creating a business partnership between security practitioners and business leaders to more effectively provide protection against security risks in line with acceptable risk tolerances as defined by business asset owners and stakeholders. This paper explores the basics of the ESRM philosophy and life cycle and also shows how embracing the ESRM philosophy and implementing a risk-based security management model in the business organisation can lead to higher levels of organisational resilience as desired by organisation leaders, executives and the board of directors.

  7. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: an update for outpatients management].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Noémie; Gehri, Mario; Gervaix, Alain; Guinan, Stéphane; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2016-02-17

    Pneumonia should be considered in febrile children with tachypnea and/or chest recession. Virus are the most common cause of pneumonia in children under 5 years old. Streptococcus pneumonia can be found at any age. Mycoplasma pneumonia is more frequent in older children. Systematic chest radiograph is not necessary but must be obtained in patients with hypoventilation and in those with failed initial antibiotic therapy. Mycoplasma pneumonia should be tested according to patient age and response to initial antibiotic. First line antibiotherapy is amoxicilline. Antibiotic treatment is frequently not necessary in children under 5 but should be considered depending on clinical presentation and C reactive protein value.

  8. [Importance of Chlamydia pneumoniae as a new respiratory pathogen].

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, C; Mata, M; Bernárdez, I

    1996-03-01

    The incidence of Chlamydia pneumoniae as a cause of respiratory tract infection was evaluated in a one-year prospective study in 142 patients with community-acquired pneumonia. An indirect immunofluorescence method which detects antibodies in acute and convalescent serum samples was used. Serological evidence of current infection was a four-fold rise in IgG antibody titer or a positive IgM fraction. C. pneumoniae was the causative pathogen in nine patients. This result is similar to those obtained in other studies and suggests that C. pneumoniae is a common etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia in the studied area.

  9. Aspiration pneumonia and death in Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Anne-Wil; Roos, Raymund A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative autosomal dominant disease characterized by choreatic and hypokinetic movements, disturbed behaviour, and cognitive decline. Pneumonia is the most common cause of death, followed by cardiovasculair diseases. It has been suggested that choking is the causative underlying factor for pneumonia in HD. As a detailed specification of the type of pneumonia has never been performed, we analyzed the records of our Brain Bank containing 224 cases to determine the exact cause of death and type of pneumonia. The conclusion is that the majority (86.8%) of our HD patients where the cause of death could be identified died from aspiration pneumonia. PMID:22307361

  10. Risk and outcome of aspiration pneumonia in a city hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J.

    1993-01-01

    Because aspiration pneumonia contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, this study was undertaken to identify risk factors for morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonia. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia in 1985 and 1990 were studied. Factors associated with death from aspiration pneumonia were: altered mental status, cerebrovascular accident, endotracheal intubation, tachycardia, and hypoxemia. Fever, cough, and unilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph were associated with survival. Attention to proper positioning of comatose patients, aggressive treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, and strict attention to endotracheal tubes and tracheostomies should decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonia. PMID:8350375

  11. Molecular epidemiological characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae associated with bacteremia among patients with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryota; Shindo, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ando, Masahiko; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Kimura, Kouji; Yagi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-03-01

    Some important virulence factors have been elucidated in Klebsiella pneumoniae infections. We investigated the relationship between virulence factors and multilocus sequence types (STs) and assessed the risk factors for bacteremia in patients with pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae. From April 2004 through April 2012, a total of 120 K. pneumoniae isolates from patients with pneumonia (23 with bacteremia and 97 without bacteremia) were collected from 10 medical institutions in Japan. Additionally, 10 strains of K. pneumoniae serotype K2 that were isolated >30 years ago were included in this study. These isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the characteristics of their virulence factors, such as hypermucoviscosity phenotype and RmpA and aerobactin production between patients with and without bacteremia, were examined. MLST analysis was performed on the 120 isolates from patients with pneumonia, and some sequence type groups were defined as genetic lineages (GLs). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia (21.7%) than in those without bacteremia (7.2%). The majority of the strains with serotype K2 were classified into GL14 or GL65, and rmpA and the gene for aerobactin were present in all GL65-K2 strains but absent in all GL14-K2 strains. In a multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for bacteremia included GL65 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 9.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81 to 49.31), as well as neoplastic disease (AOR, 9.94; 95% CI, 2.61 to 37.92), immunosuppression (AOR, 17.85; 95% CI, 1.49 to 214.17), and hypoalbuminemia (AOR, 4.76; 95% CI, 1.29 to 17.61). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia and was associated with the virulence factors of K. pneumoniae.

  12. Role of E-selectin for diagnosing myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming-Hong; Lin, Chun-Wang; Sun, Yan-Na; Zeng, Xiang-Lin; Wen, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds Effects of myocardial injury on E-selectin remain unclear. Thus, we investigated the diagnostic value of E-selectin for myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. Methods In this prospective and blinded clinical study, plasma E-selectin, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase isoenzyme MB, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha concentrations were measured in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP group, n = 138). The control group comprised 120 healthy children. The definition of cardiac injury was based on cardiac troponin I or CK-MB (with or possibly without abnormal electrocardiogram evidence). Diagnostic value of E-selectin for myocardial injury was determined by analysing receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Among the 138 mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia patients, 40 patients were identified with myocardial injury, while 98 patients were identified without myocardial injury. Plasma E-selectin concentrations were: 40.22 ± 4.80 ng/mL, in patients with myocardial injury; 18.55 ± 2.16 ng/mL, in patients without myocardial injury and 12.39 ± 3.27 ng/mL, in healthy children. For the 40 patients identified with myocardial injury, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value for plasma E-selectin concentrations was 0.945 (95% CI: 0.899-0.991), and optimal diagnostic cut-off value was 29.93 ng/mL (positive likelihood ratio = 72.5). Conclusion E-selectin was shown to be an effective index for myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, and its role in other causes of myocardial injury warrants further investigation.

  13. Mechanisms of interferon-γ production by neutrophils and its function during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gomez, John C; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Martin, Jessica R; Dang, Hong; Brickey, W June; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Dinauer, Mary C; Doerschuk, Claire M

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a common public health problem associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and cost. Neutrophils are usually the earliest leukocytes to respond to bacteria in the lungs. Neutrophils rapidly sequester in the pulmonary microvasculature and migrate into the lung parenchyma and alveolar spaces, where they perform numerous effector functions for host defense. Previous studies showed that migrated neutrophils produce IFN-γ early during pneumonia induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae and that early production of IFN-γ regulates bacterial clearance. IFN-γ production by neutrophils requires Rac2, Hck/Lyn/Fgr Src family tyrosine kinases, and NADPH oxidase. Our current studies examined the mechanisms that regulate IFN-γ production by lung neutrophils during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia in mice and its function. We demonstrate that IFN-γ production by neutrophils is a tightly regulated process that does not require IL-12. The adaptor molecule MyD88 is critical for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor CalDAG-GEFI modulates IFN-γ production. The CD11/CD18 complex, CD44, Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, TRIF, and Nrf2 are not required for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The recently described neutrophil-dendritic cell hybrid cell, identified by its expression of Ly6G and CD11c, is present at low numbers in pneumonic lungs and is not a source of IFN-γ. IFN-γ produced by neutrophils early during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia induces transcription of target genes in the lungs, which are critical for host defense. These studies underline the complexity of the neutrophil responses during pneumonia in the acute inflammatory response and in subsequent resolution or initiation of immune responses.

  14. Mechanisms of Interferon-γ Production by Neutrophils and Its Function during Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, John C.; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Martin, Jessica R.; Dang, Hong; Brickey, W. June; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Dinauer, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a common public health problem associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and cost. Neutrophils are usually the earliest leukocytes to respond to bacteria in the lungs. Neutrophils rapidly sequester in the pulmonary microvasculature and migrate into the lung parenchyma and alveolar spaces, where they perform numerous effector functions for host defense. Previous studies showed that migrated neutrophils produce IFN-γ early during pneumonia induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae and that early production of IFN-γ regulates bacterial clearance. IFN-γ production by neutrophils requires Rac2, Hck/Lyn/Fgr Src family tyrosine kinases, and NADPH oxidase. Our current studies examined the mechanisms that regulate IFN-γ production by lung neutrophils during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia in mice and its function. We demonstrate that IFN-γ production by neutrophils is a tightly regulated process that does not require IL-12. The adaptor molecule MyD88 is critical for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor CalDAG-GEFI modulates IFN-γ production. The CD11/CD18 complex, CD44, Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, TRIF, and Nrf2 are not required for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The recently described neutrophil–dendritic cell hybrid cell, identified by its expression of Ly6G and CD11c, is present at low numbers in pneumonic lungs and is not a source of IFN-γ. IFN-γ produced by neutrophils early during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia induces transcription of target genes in the lungs, which are critical for host defense. These studies underline the complexity of the neutrophil responses during pneumonia in the acute inflammatory response and in subsequent resolution or initiation of immune responses. PMID:25100610

  15. Contrasting DNA sequence organisation patterns in sauropsidian genomes.

    PubMed

    Epplen, J T; Diedrich, U; Wagenmann, M; Schmidtke, J; Engel, W

    1979-11-01

    The genomic DNA organisation patterns of four sauropsidian species, namely Python reticularis, Caiman crocodilus, Terrapene carolina triungius and Columba livia domestica were investigated by reassociation of short and long DNA fragments, by hyperchromicity measurements of reannealed fragments and by length estimations of S1-nuclease resistant repetitive duplexes. While the genomic DNA of the three reptilian species shows a short period interspersion pattern, the genome of the avian species is organised in a long period interspersion pattern apparently typical for birds. These findings are discussed in view of the close phylogenetic relationships of birds and reptiles, and also with regard to a possible relationship between the extent of sequence interspersion and genome size.

  16. Leading European Intergovernmental Research Organisations at FP6 Launch Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    EIROforum at "European Research 2002" (Brussels, November 11-13, 2002) Go to the EIROforum website Last year, seven of Europe's leading intergovernmental research organisations set up a high-level co-ordination and collaboration group, known as EIROforum , cf. ESO PR 12/01. They include CERN (particle physics), EMBL (molecular biology), ESA (space activities), ESO (astronomy and astrophysics), ESRF (synchrotron radiation), ILL (neutron source) and EFDA (fusion). All of them have powerful research infrastructures and laboratories which are used by an extensive network of scientists. Together, they represent European spearheads in some of the most crucial basic and applied research fields. The EIROforum organisations will be highly visible at the upcoming EU-conference on "European Research 2002 - The European Research Area and the Framework Programme" , to be held on November 11-13, 2002, at the "Palais du Heysel" in Brussels (Belgium). This meeting will be attended by more than 8000 scientists and decision-makers from all over Europe and serves to launch the 6th EC Framework Programme (2002 - 2006), which will have an important impact on Europe's R&D landscape during the coming years. A joint 400 sq.m. exhibition , featuring the individual EIROforum organisations, their current programmes and many front-line achievements in their respective areas of activity, will be set up at Stand L in Hall 11 . It includes a central area, with a small cinema, displaying information about their current interactions via EIROforum. The stands will be manned throughout the conference by high-level representatives from the seven organisations. On Tuesday, November 12, 2002, 14:00 hrs, a Press Conference will take place at this exhibition stand, in the presence of the European Commissioner for Research, M. Phillippe Busquin, and most of the Directors General (or equivalent) of the EIROforum organisations. The main themes will be the increasingly intense interaction and co

  17. Recent patents on self-organised magnetic nanodot arrays.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, J J; Bobek, T; Teichert, C

    2011-01-01

    As the continuous advance in the process of device miniaturisation reaches down to the nanometre range, fabrication techniques based on self-organisation, i.e., the spontaneous formation of ordered patterns on surfaces, are becoming increasingly attractive as potential, highly efficient alternatives to lithographic methods. In this article we review some of the methodologies that have been developed recently to produce ordered arrays of nanomagnets using self-organised surface templates, and we list the patents that have been filed recently to protect those fabrication procedures. We describe the underlying phenomena giving rise to the appearance of the ordered structures, and discuss their characteristics and the controllable parameters.

  18. Modular functional organisation of the axial locomotor system in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Charrier, Vanessa; Mathou, Alexia

    2014-02-01

    Most investigations on tetrapod locomotion have been concerned with limb movements. However, there is compelling evidence that the axial musculoskeletal system contributes to important functions during locomotion. Adult salamanders offer a remarkable opportunity to examine these functions because these amphibians use axial undulations to propel themselves in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this article, we review the currently available biological data on axial functions during various locomotor modes in salamanders. We also present data showing the modular organisation of the neural networks that generate axial synergies during locomotion. The functional implication of this modular organisation is discussed.

  19. Export Requirements of Pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Price, Katherine E.; Greene, Neil G.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major causative agent of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Pneumolysin (Ply), a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), is produced by virtually all clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae, and ply mutant strains are severely attenuated in mouse models of colonization and infection. In contrast to all other known members of the CDC family, Ply lacks a signal peptide for export outside the cell. Instead, Ply has been hypothesized to be released upon autolysis or, alternatively, via a nonautolytic mechanism that remains undefined. We show that an exogenously added signal sequence is not sufficient for Sec-dependent Ply secretion in S. pneumoniae but is sufficient in the surrogate host Bacillus subtilis. Previously, we showed that Ply is localized primarily to the cell wall compartment in the absence of detectable cell lysis. Here we show that Ply released by autolysis cannot reassociate with intact cells, suggesting that there is a Ply export mechanism that is coupled to cell wall localization of the protein. This putative export mechanism is capable of secreting a related CDC without its signal sequence. We show that B. subtilis can export Ply, suggesting that the export pathway is conserved. Finally, through truncation and domain swapping analyses, we show that export is dependent on domain 2 of Ply. PMID:22563048

  20. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities.

  1. Cases of parasitic pneumonia in Scottish cattle.

    PubMed

    2016-02-06

    Parasitic pneumonia in cattleNutritional osteodystrophy in cattleWhite liver disease in lambsErysipelas in pigsLead poisoning and atherosclerosis in an eagle These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for October 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  2. The diversity of Klebsiella pneumoniae surface polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Wyres, Kelly L.; Ellington, Matthew J.; Kowarik, Michael; Holt, Kathryn E.; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is considered an urgent health concern due to the emergence of multi-drug-resistant strains for which vaccination offers a potential remedy. Vaccines based on surface polysaccharides are highly promising but need to address the high diversity of surface-exposed polysaccharides, synthesized as O-antigens (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and K-antigens (capsule polysaccharide, CPS), present in K. pneumoniae. We present a comprehensive and clinically relevant study of the diversity of O- and K-antigen biosynthesis gene clusters across a global collection of over 500 K. pneumoniae whole-genome sequences and the seroepidemiology of human isolates from different infection types. Our study defines the genetic diversity of O- and K-antigen biosynthesis cluster sequences across this collection, identifying sequences for known serotypes as well as identifying novel LPS and CPS gene clusters found in circulating contemporary isolates. Serotypes O1, O2 and O3 were most prevalent in our sample set, accounting for approximately 80 % of all infections. In contrast, K serotypes showed an order of magnitude higher diversity and differ among infection types. In addition we investigated a potential association of O or K serotypes with phylogenetic lineage, infection type and the presence of known virulence genes. K1 and K2 serotypes, which are associated with hypervirulent K. pneumoniae, were associated with a higher abundance of virulence genes and more diverse O serotypes compared to other common K serotypes. PMID:28348868

  3. Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae as an Otopathogen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Kaur, Ravinder; Casey, Janet R.; Sabharwal, Vishakha; Pelton, Stephen; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Among 34 Spn sequential isolates from middle ear fluid we found a case of a nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae (NT-Spn) in a child with AOM. The strain was pneumolysin PCR positive and capsule gene PCR negative. Virulence of the NT-Spn was confirmed in a chinchilla model of AOM. PMID:21251566

  4. Pneumocystis Carinii Pneumonia Following 5-Fluorouracil Administration

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Robert; Cummings, Clinton; Faulkner, Marquetta; Obianyo, Ifeanyi

    1987-01-01

    A 54-year-old man who had been treated with monthly courses of 5-fluorouracil for one year developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. No evidence of significant, permanent, immunologic impairment was evident one year after the patient became infected. An infection associated with 5-fluorouracil treatment is implicated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:3501015

  5. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF DIPLOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE

    PubMed Central

    Tomasz, Alexander; Jamieson, James D.; Ottolenghi, Elena

    1964-01-01

    The fine structure of an unencapsulated strain of Diplococcus pneumoniae is described. A striking feature of these bacteria is an intracytoplasmic membrane system which appears to be an extension of septa of dividing bacteria. The possible function of these structures and their relationship to the plasma membrane and other types of intracytoplasmic membranes found in pneumococcus is discussed. PMID:14203390

  6. Aspiration pneumonia in children: an iconographic essay*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Antonio; Pessanha, Laís Bastos; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Martins, Diego Lima Nava; Rondina, Ronaldo Garcia; Silva, Jamine Ronacher Passos

    2015-01-01

    In most cases of aspiration pneumonia in children, the disease is specific to this age group. Clinical and radiological correlation is essential for the diagnosis. The present pictorial essay is aimed at showing typical images of the most common etiologies. PMID:26811557

  7. Cytokines as the good predictors of refractory Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Mei, Shufen; Zhou, Yunlian; Huang, Meixia; Dong, Guijuan; Chen, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Excessive immune response against pathogens may play an important role in refracory Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (RMPP). The aim of this study was to elucidate the associations between cytokines and the prediction of RMPP in school-aged patients. Retrospective analysis was performed on school-aged children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) hospitalized in our hospital between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2015. The clinical charcteristics, including the cytokines in serum between the RMPP group and the general Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (GMPP) group were compared and the predictive values of RMPP were explored. Of total 180 patients, 115 patients were in the GMPP group, 65 were in the RMPP group. We found the levels of cytokines, including nterleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in RMPP group were significantly higher than those in GMPP group (P < 0.01). In ROC curve analysis, IL-10 and IFN-γ were useful for differentiating patients with RMPP from those with GMPP. Logistic regression analysis showed that the IL-10 ≥ 3.65 pg/ml and IFN-γ ≥ 29.05 pg/ml were significant predictors regarding to RMPP. Additionally, a positive correlation between serum IL-10 and IFN-γ concentrations was observed. Conclusions: IL-10 and IFN-γ could be used as the good predictors of RMPP in school-aged children. PMID:27833154

  8. Molecular evidence of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection in reptiles in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Frutos, María C; Monetti, Marina S; Ré, Viviana E; Cuffini, Cecilia G

    2014-01-01

    In the central area of Argentina, the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infections in reptiles are still unknown. A nested polymerase chain reaction of the rpoB gene was used to detect C. pneumoniae in cloacal swab samples from 19 reptiles at a recreational area. Eleven (57.89%) reptiles were positive; the sequencing and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of this bacterium. Neither C. pneumoniae DNA in the caregivers pharynges nor IgM antibodies anti-C. pneumoniae in their serum samples were detected; however, caregivers presented very high titers of IgG anti-C. pneumoniae. The detection of C. pneumoniae DNA in reptiles demonstrated the circulation of this agent in the recreational area and could be responsible for the exacerbated immune response of the personnel handling the reptiles, which suggests a potential zoonotic cycle. This is the first report of the detection of C. pneumoniae in reptiles in Argentina.

  9. [Risk Factor Analysis of Pneumonia after Cardiovascular Surgery].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Shuichi; Nakamura, Ken; Uchida, Tetsuro; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki; Morikane, Keita

    2016-08-01

    Pneumonia is a major and life-threatening complication after cardiovascular surgery. The objective of our study was to describe epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery. From January 2007 to December 2011, 511 consecutive patients (age 67.3±11.9;336 men, 175 women) were enrolled in this study. Pneumonia was diagnosed according to Centers of Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria for healthcare associated infection. Data collection included preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative variables. The overall incidence of pneumonia was 72 cases(14.0%). The mortality in pneumonia group was significantly higher than that in non-pneumonia group (16.6% vs 4.3%, Odds ratio 4.4 p<0.001). Multi-logistic analysis revealed that elderly patient, preoperative congestive heart failure, preoperative hemodialysis, and operation of the thoracic aorta were independent risk factors for pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery.

  10. Transformations? Skilled Change Agents Influencing Organisational Sustainability Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Keith; Boulet, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Training employees in sustainability knowledge and skills is considered a vital element in creating a sustainability culture within an organisation. Yet, the particular types of training programs that are effective for this task are still relatively unknown. This case study describes an innovative workplace training program using a "head,…

  11. A Multi-organisational Approach to Service Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purchase, Valerie; Mills, John; Parry, Glenn

    Who is involved in delivering a service? There has been growing recognition in a wide variety of contexts that service is increasingly being delivered by multi-rather than single-organisational entities. Such recognition is evident not only in our experience but in a number of areas of literature including strategy development, core competence analysis, operations and supply chain management, and is reflected in and further facilitated by ICT developments. Customers have always been involved in some degree in the process of value delivery and such involvement is increasing to include complex co-creation of value. Such interactions are challenging when they involve individual customers, however, this becomes ever more challenging when the 'customer' is another organisation or when there are multiple 'customers'. Within this chapter we will consider some of the key drivers for a multi-organisational approach to service delivery; examine the ways in which the parties involved in service co-creation have expanded to include multiple service providers and customers; and finally, identify some of the challenges created by a multi-organisational approach to service delivery.

  12. Self-Organisation and Capacity Building: Sustaining the Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Alan; Walker, Allan; Chan, Anissa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to describe the application of theoretical principles derived from a study of self-organisation and complex systems theory and their application to school-based capacity building to support planned change. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs a case example in a Hong Kong School to illustrate the application of…

  13. Organisational change: a methodology to uncover the business idea.

    PubMed

    Barker, J; Anderson, P

    2001-01-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the "Business Idea", as defined by van der Heijden (1996), in The Family Planning Association of WA Inc (FPWA) which is a Non-Government Organisation (NGO) in Perth, Western Australia. This organisation was chosen as, along with many other NGOs, it was undergoing major changes in its funding, role and required outcomes. A qualitative interpretivist single case study methodology employing grounded theory research principles and methods was used to study the Business Idea framework in this setting. Thirty-four members of FPWA's staff were interviewed and data was managed using NUD*IST4 and Decision Explorer data storage, data retrieval and graphical reproduction facilities. Results indicated that images of the Business Idea model within FPWA were largely consistent across all staff levels excepting members of the Board of Management. Changes within the organisation were impacting heavily on staff, who needed to be assisted over the transitional phase. Strong leadership and corporate direction were identified as essential if the FPWA was to balance the strongly held sense of social justice amongst its staff with a need for greater productivity efficiency and accountability across the organisation.

  14. The Sound of Silence: The Case of Virtual Team Organising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panteli, N.; Fineman, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the role of silence within a virtual organising context. The paper raises issues related to the construction of silence in the virtual team context and the implications it has on team interactions. By drawing upon existing studies on virtual teams, we argue that members' silence may not always have negative effects on team…

  15. Learning robot actions based on self-organising language memory.

    PubMed

    Wermter, Stefan; Elshaw, Mark

    2003-01-01

    In the MirrorBot project we examine perceptual processes using models of cortical assemblies and mirror neurons to explore the emergence of semantic representations of actions, percepts and concepts in a neural robot. The hypothesis under investigation is whether a neural model will produce a life-like perception system for actions. In this context we focus in this paper on how instructions for actions can be modeled in a self-organising memory. Current approaches for robot control often do not use language and ignore neural learning. However, our approach uses language instruction and draws from the concepts of regional distributed modularity, self-organisation and neural assemblies. We describe a self-organising model that clusters actions into different locations depending on the body part they are associated with. In particular, we use actual sensor readings from the MIRA robot to represent semantic features of the action verbs. Furthermore, we outline a hierarchical computational model for a self-organising robot action control system using language for instruction.

  16. Knowledge Organisation Systems in North American Digital Library Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiri, Ali; Chase-Kruszewski, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation into the types of knowledge organisation systems (KOSs) utilised in North American digital library collections. Design/methodology/approach: The paper identifies, analyses and deep scans online North American hosted digital libraries. It reviews the literature related to the…

  17. Uses and Risks of Microblogging in Organisational and Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad Kharman Shah, Nordiana; Latif Shabgahi, Soureh; Cox, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to clarify the relationship between organisational and educational use of microblogging. Although enterprise and education are very different sectors of activity and have diverse research traditions, this review argues that there is a benefit to be derived from comparing research work across the two settings.…

  18. Reflection--A Method for Organisational and Individual Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randle, Hanne; Tilander, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents how organisational development can be the results when politicians, managers, social workers and teaching staff take part in reflection. The results are based on a government-funded initiative in Sweden for lowering sick absenteeism. Three local governments introduced reflection as a strategy to combat work related stress and a…

  19. Education for Active Citizenship: Women's Organisations in Interwar Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    Following the enfranchisement of women in 1918 women's organisations throughout Britain reconsidered and revised their aims for the future. In many cases this involved educating their members, and women in general, on how to use their new influence in society. Such "education for citizenship", which also drove attempts to raise the…

  20. Sense Making in the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) Intelligence Community

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Sense Making in the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) Intelligence Community Mark Burnett, Pete Wooding * and Paul Prekop...3 And it is possible to inter-relate all three models – see Rousseau and Breton 2005. DSTO-GD...worthy of more detailed consideration. DSTO-GD-0440 22 References Breton , R. and Rousseau, R. (2005), "The C-OODA: A Cognitive Version

  1. Exploring SME Market Orientation: An Organisational Learning Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Robert; Maycock, Carina; Oztel, Hulya

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop and enhance organisational capability through learning within a small firm context. This paper forms part of a KTP project. The paper considers here traditional quantitative approaches where data was gathered largely through questionnaires received from a single source within the firm approaches for…

  2. Organisational and Task Factors Influencing Teachers' Professional Development at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Arnoud T.; Van der Heijden, Béatrice I. J. M.; Kreijns, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate organisational (cultural and relational) and task factors which potentially enhance teachers' professional development at work (TPD at Work). The development of lifelong learning competencies and, consequently, the careers of teachers, has become a permanent issue on the agenda of schools…

  3. Clustered Self Organising Migrating Algorithm for the Quadratic Assignment Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davendra, Donald; Zelinka, Ivan; Senkerik, Roman

    2009-08-01

    An approach of population dynamics and clustering for permutative problems is presented in this paper. Diversity indicators are created from solution ordering and its mapping is shown as an advantage for population control in metaheuristics. Self Organising Migrating Algorithm (SOMA) is modified using this approach and vetted with the Quadratic Assignment Problem (QAP). Extensive experimentation is conducted on benchmark problems in this area.

  4. Recognising Current Competencies of Volunteers in Emergency Service Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catts, Ralph; Chamings, Dave

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to show the relationship between organisational structure and flexibility of training has not been well researched. Focusing on the role of recognition of current competencies, this study provides evidence of the effects of the former on the latter. Design/methodology/approach: In this paper evidence was obtained by…

  5. The Components and Determinants of Preschool Teacher Organisational Citizenship Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oplatka, Izhar; Stundi, Masada

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the components and determinants of preschool teacher organisational citizenship behaviours (OCB), i.e. role behaviours that are discretionary, unrewarded and beyond formal-role expectations. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 12 Israeli kindergarten teachers and four supervisors participated in…

  6. Professional relations in sport healthcare: workplace responses to organisational change.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Dominic; Scott, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    This article examines the impact of organisational changes in UK elite sport on the professional relations among and between different healthcare providers. The article describes the processes by which demand for elite sport healthcare has increased in the UK. It further charts the subsequent response within medicine and physiotherapy and, in particular, the institutionalisation of sport-specific sub-disciplines through the introduction of specialist qualifications. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 14 doctors and 14 physiotherapists, the article argues that organisational changes have led to intra-professional tensions within both professional groups but in qualitatively different forms reflecting the organisational traditions and professional identities of the respective disciplines. Organisational changes promoting multi-disciplinary healthcare teams have also fostered an environment conducive to high levels of inter-professional cooperation though significant elements of inter-professional conflict remain. This study illustrates how intra-professional relations are affected by specialisation, how legitimation discourses are used by different professions, and how intra- and inter-professional conflict and cooperation should be seen as highly interdependent processes.

  7. Teachers' Professional Identity Negotiations in Two Different Work Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vähäsantanen, Katja; Hökkä, Päivi; Eteläpelto, Anneli; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Littleton, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have described professional identity as the interplay between individual agency and social context. However, we need to understand how these are intertwined in different kinds of work settings. This paper focuses on teachers' professional identity negotiations as involving the work organisation, the professional community and…

  8. What Impact Can Organisations Expect from Professional Doctorates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Alison; Slade, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study of the impact of professional doctorate programmes on graduates and their work organisations. Telephone interviews were carried out with graduates and nominated peer and senior colleagues to elucidate the types of change apparent and the impact of those changes. We found that all interviewees reported development…

  9. The Mechanism for Organising and Propelling Educational Technology in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yongqian, Liu; Dongyuan, Cheng; Xinli, Liu

    2010-01-01

    Having started early in the 1920s as a spontaneously launched educational activity by civil organisations under the influence of American audio-visual theory and practice, Chinese educational technology was later put under governmental management. This paper is composed of five parts covering mainly the historical development of educational…

  10. Use of Cognitive Organisers as a Self Regulated Learning Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kym; Dawson, Vaille; Venville, Grady

    2008-01-01

    This research investigates the use of cognitive organisers as a self-regulated learning strategy by gifted and talented science students in a Year 9 class at a metropolitan high school in Perth, Western Australia. The case study research design incorporates three primary methods of data collection including participant observation in classrooms,…

  11. Organisational Legitimacy of the Singapore Ministry of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Cheng Yong

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the perceived organisational legitimacy of the Singapore Ministry of Education (MOE) in preparing the population for work in the knowledge-based economy (KBE). It is argued that challenges to MOE's legitimacy are emerging with ramifications that are difficult to ignore. These challenges relate to equipping the population with…

  12. Small Organisations and Cultural Institutions--A Digital Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Jaqueline

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine how technology presents both problems and opportunities for the historian, the researcher, small organisations, and cultural heritage institutions. Ways of safeguarding historical material in digital form are suggested, and the role of cultural heritage bodies as managers of sustainable digital collections is…

  13. Introducing Live ePortfolios to Support Self Organised Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkham, Thomas; Winfield, Sandra; Smallwood, Angela; Coolin, Kirstie; Wood, Stuart; Searchwell, Louis

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a platform on which a new generation of applications targeted to aid the self-organised learner can be presented. The new application is enabled by innovations in trust-based security of data built upon emerging infrastructures to aid federated data access in the UK education sector. Within the proposed architecture, users and…

  14. Franchisees in Crisis: Using Action Learning to Self-Organise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Carol

    2011-01-01

    The present article describes the use of action learning by a group of 30 franchisees to organise themselves and work through a period of upheaval and uncertainty when their parent company faced liquidation. Written from the perspective of one of the franchisees who found herself adopting action learning principles to facilitate the group, it…

  15. Reconciling Organisational Culture and External Quality Assurance in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Dhaya

    2013-01-01

    Organisational culture and external quality assurance have both been presented as significant drivers of effectiveness, efficiency and excellence in higher education institutions. However, these assumptions have not been critically examined given the philosophical, conceptual and methodological contestations surrounding both constructs. A…

  16. Emergent Communities of Practice in Temporary Inter-Organisational Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juriado, Rein; Gustafsson, Niklas

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to discuss the emergence of communities of practice in a temporary event organisation involving public and private partners. Design/methodology/approach: The study employs qualitative methods in the form of 31 semi-structured interviews, a five-week period of participant observations and archive research in a Swedish…

  17. Once upon a Time... Tales of Organisational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to enrich the conceptual vocabulary of organisational learning by discussing the relevance of the interdisciplinary work of Gregory Bateson, an original and challenging twentieth century thinker. Design/methodology/approach: The paper debates a number of principles identified by Bateson, which reflect patterns…

  18. Human Resource Management in Australian Registered Training Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Hawke Geof

    2008-01-01

    This report forms part of a comprehensive research program that has examined issues related to building the organisational capability of vocational education and training providers. In particular, this report focuses on the current state of human resource management practice in both technical and further education and private registered training…

  19. Biological Nature of Knowledge in the Learning Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a biological approach to the analysis of learning organisations based on complexity theory, autopoiesis, and evolutionary epistemology. Design/methodology/approach: This paper synthesises ideas from disciplines ranging from physics, epistemology and philosophy of science to military affairs, to sketch a scientific framework in…

  20. HIV/AIDS and disability organisations in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Rohleder, Poul; Swartz, Leslie; Schneider, Marguerite; Groce, Nora; Eide, Arne Henning

    2010-02-01

    Despite the seriousness of the HIV epidemic globally, and in South Africa in particular, little is known about how HIV/AIDS affects disabled people. One important and little explored area is the role that organisations that represent disabled people or that work on behalf of disabled people, are playing in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic among the disabled people they represent or serve. This paper presents the findings of a nationwide survey of disability organisations in South Africa. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of disability organisations in addressing the HIV epidemic among disabled people in South Africa. The findings suggest that while organisations recognise the importance of providing HIV education, and many have taken steps to do so, disabled people are largely excluded from general HIV prevention messages. Disabled people also have significant difficulties in accessing general health care, relevant for HIV testing and treatment. In a country trying to manage serious social problems with limited resources, this paper highlights the need for increased cooperation and collaboration between relevant parties in order to facilitate the changes necessary for disabled people to access needed health information and care.

  1. Teachers' Organisational Behaviour in Public and Private Funded Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honingh, M. E.; Oort, F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare teachers' organisational behaviour in publicly- and privately-funded schools in the Dutch Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector. Design/methodology/approach: A percentage of all middle managers in publicly and privately funded schools (72 per cent and 43 per cent respectively) distributed…

  2. Learning Organisation Review--A "Good" Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa, Mijalce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to perform integrative literature review of the learning organisation (LO) concept, on the basis of the results of the literature review to assess the concept on the principles of "good" theory, and provide future avenues for LO concept clarification and development. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  3. Organisational Factors and Teachers' Professional Development in Dutch Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Arnoud T.; van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Kreijns, Karel; Gerrichhauzen, John T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study that investigates the relationship between organisational factors, Teachers' Professional Development (TPD) and occupational expertise. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was administered among 152 Dutch teachers in secondary education. Findings: Analysis of the data revealed that of…

  4. Postgraduate Education to Support Organisation Change: A Reflection on Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jim; Keegan, Anne; Stevens, Pam

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore how teaching and assessing reflective learning skills can support postgraduate practitioners studying organisational change and explores the challenges for tutors in assessing these journals. Design/methodology/approach: Assessment criteria were developed from the literature on reflective practice and…

  5. Principals' Opinions of Organisational Justice in Elementary Schools in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Inayet; Karaman-Kepenekci, Yasemin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--This study aims to present the opinions of public elementary school principals in Turkey about the current organisational justice practices among teachers from the distributive, procedural, interactional, and rectificatory dimensions. Design/methodology/approach--The opinions of 11 public elementary school principals in Ankara about…

  6. Developing a Supportive Learning Environment in a Newly Formed Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Sue; Di Milia, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the factors that employees perceived were important in creating a supportive learning environment in a recently merged organisation. The study provides rich qualitative data from the employees' perspective. Design/methodology/approach: This case study used a qualitative phenomenological constructivist…

  7. Improving Your Organisation's Workplace Learning. Consortium Research Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Many organisations, including VET providers, are looking to find ways to achieve competitive advantage through the people they employ. Creating this advantage has a number of facets and most of these depend on training and developing people, and their ability to learn. The VET sector also faces significant changes in the ways it does business.…

  8. Organisational Culture and Technology-Enhanced Innovation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions are evolving and technology often plays a central role in their transformations. Educational changes benefit from a supportive environment. The study examines the relationship between organisational culture and teachers' perceptions of and responses to technology-enhanced innovation among Chinese universities. A…

  9. The Human Rights Approach to Education in International Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hufner, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the work of three international governmental organisations (IGOs) dealing with human rights will be discussed, namely the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the Council of Europe (CoE). In the first section, the main characteristics of the…

  10. Strategic Capacity and Organisational Capabilities: A Challenge for Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoenig, Jean-Claude; Paradeise, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Are universities able to operate as strategic actors? An organisational sociology based approach supported by a comparative field research project identifies three types of social, cultural and cognitive processes that play a decisive role in building and implementing local capabilities required to mobilise a strategic capacity. The paper…

  11. Learning at Work: Organisational Affordances and Individual Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Jane; Pajo, Karl; Ward, Robyn; Mallon, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to explore the interaction between organisational affordances for the development of individuals' capability, and the engagement of workers at various levels with those opportunities. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of a large New Zealand wine company, using in-depth interviews. Interviews were…

  12. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  13. Using enterprise architecture to analyse how organisational structure impact motivation and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närman, Pia; Johnson, Pontus; Gingnell, Liv

    2016-06-01

    When technology, environment, or strategies change, organisations need to adjust their structures accordingly. These structural changes do not always enhance the organisational performance as intended partly because organisational developers do not understand the consequences of structural changes in performance. This article presents a model-based analysis framework for quantitative analysis of the effect of organisational structure on organisation performance in terms of employee motivation and learning. The model is based on Mintzberg's work on organisational structure. The quantitative analysis is formalised using the Object Constraint Language (OCL) and the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and implemented in an enterprise architecture tool.

  14. Organising habilitation services: team structures and family participation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, M

    2000-11-01

    This study is part of a project focusing on co-operation between receivers of habilitation services (families) and professionals. The study focuses on the organisation and co-ordination of the services, and compares two structures for their accomplishment. The first is the typical multiprofessional habilitation team (MHT), and the second is the individualised team (ISP). MHT teams are organised within the habilitation agency, while ISP teams span institutional boundaries. An ISP team is formed around the individual child who receives services from the habilitation centre, and includes parents (sometimes the child), professionals from the habilitation centre, and professionals from other service-providing institutions that are actively involved (for instance pre-school teacher, schoolteacher etc.). The team maps child and family needs, organises assessments and services and formulates goals that subsequently are monitored and followed up. A questionnaire (Measures of Processes of Care) was used to assess the experiences of 385 service receivers. The questionnaire focuses on service receivers' experiences of the family-centredness of the service, operationalised in 56 items, along with five items concerning perceptions of level of control over service provision. The experiences of families having individualised teams were compared to those not having these teams. Significant differences were obtained, suggesting the impact of the form of service organisation on the content. Families having ISP teams report both more family-centred service, and a greater level of control over service provision. Results are discussed in terms of organising structures and co-ordination of services, and in terms of family participation.

  15. Dysphagia, dystussia, and aspiration pneumonia in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hideki; Miyagi, Midori; Ebihara, Takae; Okazaki, Tatsuma

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development and wide distribution of guidelines for pneumonia, death from pneumonia is increasing due to population aging. Conventionally, aspiration pneumonia was mainly thought to be one of the infectious diseases. However, we have proven that chronic repeated aspiration of a small amount of sterile material can cause the usual type of aspiration pneumonia in mouse lung. Moreover, chronic repeated aspiration of small amounts induced chronic inflammation in both frail elderly people and mouse lung. These observations suggest the need for a paradigm shift of the treatment for pneumonia in the elderly. Since aspiration pneumonia is fundamentally based on dysphagia, we should shift the therapy for aspiration pneumonia from pathogen-oriented therapy to function-oriented therapy. Function-oriented therapy in aspiration pneumonia means therapy focusing on slowing or reversing the functional decline that occurs as part of the aging process, such as “dementia → dysphagia → dystussia → atussia → silent aspiration”. Atussia is ultimate dysfunction of cough physiology, and aspiration with atussia is called silent aspiration, which leads to the development of life-threatening aspiration pneumonia. Research pursuing effective strategies to restore function in the elderly is warranted in order to decrease pneumonia deaths in elderly people. PMID:27076964

  16. Dysphagia, dystussia, and aspiration pneumonia in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Satoru; Sekiya, Hideki; Miyagi, Midori; Ebihara, Takae; Okazaki, Tatsuma

    2016-03-01

    Despite the development and wide distribution of guidelines for pneumonia, death from pneumonia is increasing due to population aging. Conventionally, aspiration pneumonia was mainly thought to be one of the infectious diseases. However, we have proven that chronic repeated aspiration of a small amount of sterile material can cause the usual type of aspiration pneumonia in mouse lung. Moreover, chronic repeated aspiration of small amounts induced chronic inflammation in both frail elderly people and mouse lung. These observations suggest the need for a paradigm shift of the treatment for pneumonia in the elderly. Since aspiration pneumonia is fundamentally based on dysphagia, we should shift the therapy for aspiration pneumonia from pathogen-oriented therapy to function-oriented therapy. Function-oriented therapy in aspiration pneumonia means therapy focusing on slowing or reversing the functional decline that occurs as part of the aging process, such as "dementia → dysphagia → dystussia → atussia → silent aspiration". Atussia is ultimate dysfunction of cough physiology, and aspiration with atussia is called silent aspiration, which leads to the development of life-threatening aspiration pneumonia. Research pursuing effective strategies to restore function in the elderly is warranted in order to decrease pneumonia deaths in elderly people.

  17. Patient organisations and the reimbursement process for medicines: an exploratory study in eight European countries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the role European patient organisations play in the process of deciding on reimbursement for medicines. Therefore we explore the current role of patient organisations in the process of reimbursement for medicines in Western Europe. We focus in particular on collaboration between patient organisations and the pharmaceutical industry in this respect. Methods Sixty-eight patient organisations representing seven medical conditions, from ten Western European countries, were asked to participate in the study. The participating organisations reported their experiences in a web-based questionnaire. Results Twenty-one patient organisations completed the questionnaire (response rate: 31%), of which ten (47.6%) demanded reimbursement for medicines. Organisations demanding reimbursement were larger than those not demanding reimbursement. The main aim of these organisations was to create better accessibility of medicines for patients. Most organisations limited themselves to single actions. Only two engaged in multiple actions. Almost all organisations had general policies on cooperation with the pharmaceutical industry, with autonomy as the key feature. The patient organisations said they were reasonably successful and almost always satisfied with their own role in the reimbursement process. Conclusion Our study has found that the role of European patient organisations in the reimbursement process still seems limited, especially for small patient organisations. PMID:20170557

  18. Polyamine transporter in Streptococcus pneumoniae is essential for evading early innate immune responses in pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Aswathy N.; Thornton, Justin A.; Stokes, John; Sunesara, Imran; Swiatlo, Edwin; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common bacterial etiology of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults worldwide. Genomic plasticity, antibiotic resistance and extreme capsular antigenic variation complicates the design of effective therapeutic strategies. Polyamines are ubiquitous small cationic molecules necessary for full expression of pneumococcal virulence. Polyamine transport system is an attractive therapeutic target as it is highly conserved across pneumococcal serotypes. In this study, we compared an isogenic deletion strain of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 in polyamine transport operon (ΔpotABCD) with the wild type in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Our results show that the wild type persists in mouse lung 24 h post infection while the mutant strain is cleared by host defense mechanisms. We show that intact potABCD is required for survival in the host by providing resistance to neutrophil killing. Comparative proteomics analysis of murine lungs infected with wild type and ΔpotABCD pneumococci identified expression of proteins that could confer protection to wild type strain and help establish infection. We identified ERM complex, PGLYRP1, PTPRC/CD45 and POSTN as new players in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Additionally, we found that deficiency of polyamine transport leads to up regulation of the polyamine synthesis genes speE and cad in vitro. PMID:27247105

  19. Gatifloxacin used for therapy of outpatient community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Andes, David R; Mandell, Lionel A; Gothelf, Samantha; Ehrhardt, Anton F; Nicholson, Susan C

    2002-09-01

    Gatifloxacin is an advanced-generation fluoroquinolone with demonstrated efficacy and safety as therapy for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). As part of a phase IV postmarketing surveillance program (TeqCES), 136 outpatients with CAP whose sputum was culture-positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae were enrolled in an open-label trial of oral gatifloxacin 400 mg daily for 7 to 14 days. An antibiogram of isolates showed 100% susceptibility to gatifloxacin (MIC(90) 0.5 micro g/mL) and respective susceptibilities of 67%, 70%, and 80% to penicillin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Clinical cure was achieved in 95.3% of evaluable patients, including seven patients infected with penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (MIC > or =2 micro g/mL). The bacteriologic eradication rate for S. pneumoniae was 94.5%. Diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness, the most common adverse events in CAP patients (<3%), were generally mild to moderate; no serious adverse events were recorded. These results support recommendations to treat CAP, particularly due to S. pneumoniae including multidrug-resistant strains, with the newer 8-methoxy-fluoroquinolone, gatifloxacin.

  20. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. PMID:27379238

  1. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections from Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Marcelo-Rodríguez, Alvaro; Verne, Eduardo; Esquivel-Vizcarra, Mónica; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; Weilg, Pablo; Casabona-Oré, Verónica; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are atypical pathogens responsible for pneumonia and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low income countries. The study objective is to determine the prevalence of this pathogens in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections. Methods A consecutive cross-sectional study was conducted in Lima, Peru from May 2009 to September 2010. A total of 675 children admitted with clinical diagnoses of acute respiratory infections were tested for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and clinical symptoms were registered by the attending physician. Results Mycoplasma pneumonia was detected in 25.19% (170/675) of nasopharyngeal samples and Chlamydia pneumonia in 10.52% (71/675). The most common symptoms in patients with these atypical pathogens were rhinorrhea, cough and fever. A higher prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae cases were registered in summer, between December 2009 and March 2010. Conclusions Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumonia are a significant cause of morbidity in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Further studies should evaluate the use of reliable techniques such as PCR in Peru in order to avoid underdiagnoses of these atypical pathogens. PMID:28129377

  2. Single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related molecule impairs host defense during pneumonia and sepsis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Blok, Dana C; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Florquin, Sandrine; de Boer, Onno J; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia and sepsis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in the host defense against infection. In this study, we sought to determine the role of single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related molecule (SIGIRR a.k.a. TIR8), a negative regulator of TLR signaling, in pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Wild-type and SIGIRR-deficient (sigirr-/-) mice were infected intranasally (to induce pneumonia) or intravenously (to induce primary sepsis) with S. pneumoniae and euthanized after 6, 24, or 48 h for analyses. Additionally, survival studies were performed. sigirr-/- mice showed delayed mortality during lethal pneumococcal pneumonia. Accordingly, sigirr-/- mice displayed lower bacterial loads in lungs and less dissemination of the infection 24 h after the induction of pneumonia. SIGIRR deficiency was associated with increased interstitial and perivascular inflammation in lung tissue early after infection, with no impact on neutrophil recruitment or cytokine production. sigirr-/- mice also demonstrated reduced bacterial burdens at multiple body sites during S. pneumoniae sepsis. sigirr-/- alveolar macrophages and neutrophils exhibited an increased capacity to phagocytose viable pneumococci. These results suggest that SIGIRR impairs the antibacterial host defense during pneumonia and sepsis caused by S. pneumoniae.

  3. [New aspects of the pathophysiology of pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Hippenstiel, S; Witzenrath, M; Opitz, B; Schütte, H; Rosseau, S; Suttorp, N

    2007-05-01

    Pneumonia can lead to the critical impairment of gas exchange in the lung. Due to the great variability of pneumonia causing pathogens, a large variety of diverse virulence factors act on the lung. Besides stimulation of unspecific defense mechanisms, activation of receptor-dependent cell-mediated innate immune defense mechanisms are critical for the pulmonary immune defense. Pathogen-associated molecules are detected via transmembraneous and cytosolic receptors of the host. This interaction stimulates the expression of immunomodulatory molecules via signal cascades. Of particular importance, in addition to direct pathogen-caused lung damage, is the overwhelming activation of the inflammatory response which can result in lung barrier failure and impairment of pulmonary gas exchange. In addition to the design of new antibiotics, innovative therapeutic strategies should therefore concentrate on the enhancement of antimicrobial mechanisms by concurrent limitation of inflammation.

  4. Management of pneumonia in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    El-Solh, Ali A; Niederman, Mike S; Drinka, Paul

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among nursing home residents. The approach to managing these patients has lacked uniformity because of the paucity of clinical trials, complexity of underlying comorbid diseases, and heterogeneity of administrative structures. The decision to hospitalize nursing home patients with pneumonia varies among institutions depending on staffing level, availability of diagnostic testing, and laboratory support. In the absence of comparative studies, choice of empirical antibiotic therapy continues to be based on expert opinion. Validated prognostic scoring models are needed for risk stratification. Pneumococcal and influenza vaccination are the primary prevention measures. As of January 2010, Medicare no longer pays for consultation codes; thus, practitioners must instead use existing evaluation and management service codes when providing these services.

  5. Cytoskeletal elements in the bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegermann, Jan; Herrmann, Richard; Mayer, Frank

    2002-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a pathogenic eubacterium lacking a cell wall. Three decades ago, a "rod", an intracellular cytoskeletal structure, was discovered that was assumed to define and stabilize the elongated cell shape. Later, by treatment with detergent, a "Triton shell" (i.e. a fraction of detergent-insoluble cell material) could be obtained, believed to contain additional cytoskeletal elements. Now, by application of a modified Triton X-100 treatment, we are able to demonstrate that M. pneumoniae possesses a cytoskeleton consisting of a blade-like rod and a peripheral lining located close to the inner face of the cytoplasmic membrane, exhibiting features of a highly regular network. Attached "stalks" may support the cytoplasmic membrane. The rod was connected to the cell periphery by "spokes" and showed a defined ultrastructure. Its proximal end was found to be attached to a wheel-like complex. Fibrils extended from the proximal end of the rod into the cytoplasm.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE (EATON'S AGENT)

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Adnan S.; Clyde, Wallace A.; Denny, Floyd W.

    1965-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was studied in the Syrian hamster with qualitative and quantitative culture methods and special histopathologic techniques. The animals were readily infected with the mycoplasma, which multiplied throughout the respiratory tract. Sensitivity of this experimental host to infection was indicated by the 50 per cent infective dose, which was 10 colony-forming units of the organism. Inoculation consistently resulted in the production of peribronchial pneumonitis which was induced by the mycoplasma. The organisms were visualized in a superficial location in the mucosa of involved bronchi, by means of indirect fluorescent antibody staining and by a modification of the Brown and Brenn technique. The data indicate applicability of the hamster to the study of problems concerned with M. pneumoniae disease which are impractical or impossible to resolve in the human host. PMID:14319403

  7. Tracheal mucormycosis pneumonia: a rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Mohindra, Satyawati; Gupta, Bhumika; Gupta, Karan; Bal, Amanjit

    2014-11-01

    This article reports an unusual case of tracheal mucormycosis following H1N1 pneumonia and reviews previously reported cases. A 40-y-old female with a 5-y history of diabetes mellitus, adequately controlled by oral hypoglycemic agents, developed tracheal mucormycosis after successful treatment for H1N1 pneumonia. The condition was diagnosed during workup for decannulation due to subglottic and upper tracheal obstruction by necrotic chewing gum-like tissue and cartilage. The patient was managed successfully by treatment with amphotericin B and surgical intervention in the form of laryngofissure and Montgomery tube placement. A review of the literature revealed only 5 previously reported cases of tracheal mucormycosis. A high degree of suspicion, early endoscopy and biopsy, histopathological evidence of the infection, and early institution of therapy are the keys to successful outcome.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  10. Pneumonia in immunocompetent patients: combination antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Salva, S; Borgatta, B; Rello, J

    2014-04-01

    Pneumonia's burden is still important worldwide not only because of its high incidence and mortality, but also for the elevated costs related to it. Despite the concerted efforts to reduce the incidence of sepsis-related complications, they continue to represent a major human and economic burden. The cornerstone of sepsis management is early appropriate empiric broad spectrum antibiotics, resuscitation, and source control. The association between inappropriate use of antibiotics and increased mortality is the rationale for the use of empiric antibiotic combination therapy in critically ill patients. The aim of this manuscript was to discuss recent literature regarding the management of severe pneumonia, both community-acquired and hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated, in critically ill patients. Use of combination therapy is warranted in severe infections with shock; considerations should be made on the importance of optimal antibiotic administration and adverse reactions, thus providing guidance for a rational use of antibiotics.

  11. Rothia mucilaginosa pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Baeza Martínez, Carlos; Zamora Molina, Lucia; García Sevila, Raquel; Gil Carbonell, Joan; Ramos Rincon, José Manuel; Martín Serrano, Concepción

    2014-11-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is a gram-postive coccus that occurs as part of the normal flora of the oropharynx and upper respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infections caused by this organism are rare and usually occur in immunocompromised patients. This is the case of an immunocompetent 47-year-old woman with right upper lobe pneumonia in which R.mucilaginosa was isolated in sputum and bronchial aspirate. Infections caused by this agent in the last four years in our hospital were reviewed. The most common predisposing factor was COPD with bronchiectasis. R.mucilaginosa was identified as the causative agent for pneumonia in only two cases, of which one was our case and the other was a patient with lung cancer.

  12. Mycobacterium fortuitum lipoid pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, M K; Garber, J B; Fowlkes, N; Grooters, A M; Royal, A B; Gaunt, S D

    2015-03-01

    A 1-year old female spayed German Shepherd dog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea. Pyogranulomatous inflammation and green globoid structures were present on aspirates of the affected lung. Impression smears and histopathology confirmed pyogranulomatous pneumonia, with large amounts of lipid corresponding to the green structures noted cytologically, and identified poorly staining bacterial rods within lipid vacuoles. Special stains confirmed the presence of acid-fast bacterial rods, and polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing identified the organism as Mycobacterium fortuitum. M. fortuitum pneumonia is well described in humans and has previously been reported in 4 dogs and 1 cat. Lipid was a prominent cytologic and histologic feature, as is often described in humans and in the single feline case report. Additionally, this case highlights the variable cytologic appearance of lipid, as well as Mycobacterium spp, which are classically nonstaining with Wright-Giemsa.

  13. Pneumonia research to reduce childhood mortality in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J. Anthony G.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Peiris, J.S. Malik; Holtzman, Douglas; Mulhollan, E. Kim

    2008-01-01

    Pneumonia is an illness, usually caused by infection, in which the lungs become inflamed and congested, reducing oxygen exchange and leading to cough and breathlessness. It affects individuals of all ages but occurs most frequently in children and the elderly. Among children, pneumonia is the most common cause of death worldwide. Historically, in developed countries, deaths from pneumonia have been reduced by improvements in living conditions, air quality, and nutrition. In the developing world today, many deaths from pneumonia are also preventable by immunization or access to simple, effective treatments. However, as we highlight here, there are critical gaps in our understanding of the epidemiology, etiology, and pathophysiology of pneumonia that, if filled, could accelerate the control of pneumonia and reduce early childhood mortality. PMID:18382741

  14. Pneumonia in low and middle income countries: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zar, H J; Madhi, S A; Aston, S J; Gordon, S B

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of childhood mortality and the most common reason for adult hospitalisation in low and middle income countries, despite advances in preventative and management strategies. In the last decade, pneumonia mortality in children has fallen to approximately 1.3 million cases in 2011, with most deaths occurring in low income countries. Important recent advances include more widespread implementation of protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae, implementation of case-management algorithms and better prevention and treatment of HIV. Determining the aetiology of pneumonia is challenging in the absence of reliable diagnostic tests. High uptake of new bacterial conjugate vaccines may impact on pneumonia burden, aetiology and empiric therapy but implementation in immunisation programmes in many low and middle income countries remains an obstacle. Widespread implementation of currently effective preventative and management strategies for pneumonia remains challenging in many low and middle income countries. PMID:23956020

  15. Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Geisler, William M; Corey, Lawrence

    2002-03-27

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in immunocompetent patients; however, its role as a respiratory pathogen in immunocompromised hosts has been infrequently recognized. We describe C. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection in a 19-year-old male after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The patient developed fever on day +14, and a subsequent computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a right lateral pleural-based opacity, which was then resected during thoracoscopy. Diagnosis was made by culture and staining of the resected tissue with C. pneumoniae-specific monoclonal antibodies, and azithromycin was administered. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. pneumoniae respiratory infection after stem cell or marrow transplantation. C. pneumoniae often coexists with other etiologic agents of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Considering the infrequency of infections from this organism in this clinical setting, one must still rule out other more likely respiratory pathogens.

  16. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia. Treatment options.

    PubMed

    Marrie, T J; Slayter, K L

    1996-05-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, and antimicrobial therapy represents only 1 facet of the treatment of this disease. The nursing home population consists of a mixture of well, frail and dependent elderly. For some residents, supportive care may be the best therapeutic option. A variety of antimicrobial regimens have been proposed for the empirical therapy of NHAP; however, there are still very few data from controlled clinical trials that assess outcome. The clinical trials that have been completed support the concept that an early switch from intravenous to oral therapy can be successfully used to treat pneumonia affecting frail, often seriously ill, groups of patients. Annual influenza vaccine should be offered to all nursing home residents. This practice is about 50% effective in preventing hospitalisation and pneumonia, and about 80% effective in preventing death. The same level of evidence is not available to support the use of pneumococcal vaccine in this group; however, current practice suggests that all nursing home residents receive this vaccine on admission and once every 6 years thereafter. Frequently, knowledge about pneumonia is not applied as optimally as should be done. Care maps have been shown to reduce length of stay and shorten the time from emergency room entry until administration of antibiotic therapy by up to 3 hours. Areas for urgent research attention in patients with NHAP are: (a) proper studies to define the microbiological aetiology of NHAP (this requires bronchoscopy with sampling of the distal airways using a protected bronchial brush); (b) randomised controlled clinical trials of sufficient size to determine whether one antibiotic regimen is superior to another (currently most trials are designed to show that the agent under study is equivalent to a currently used agent); and (c) end-of-life decision making in the nursing home population.

  17. Sialorrhea and aspiration pneumonia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Trigoboff, Eileen; Grace, Jeffery; Szymanski, Herman; Bhullar, Jaspinder; Lee, Claudia; Watson, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    This case study compares two different clinical outcomes for a patient with a long-standing psychotic disorder prescribed clozapine on two occasions. During the first trial, clozapine was used at a higher dose for this patient (350-450mg/day) and included clinically significant sialorrhea, pneumonia, and pneumonia-like illnesses requiring immediate medical intervention including hospitalization. There were also patient complaints of fatigue, cough, choking, and constipation leading to poor adherence. Clozapine was discontinued when the patient withdrew his consent due to side effects, despite his awareness of its benefits, including reduction of command hallucinations and irritability. The second clozapine trial was associated with lower daily doses and therapeutic serum blood levels. The patient was actively participating in and adhering to the medication plan. A very narrow window of clozapine dose was exceeded for two days and the patient complained of hypersalivation, cough, and lethargy. He was subsequently hospitalized for a two week period to treat aspiration pneumonia. This hospitalization helped establish the ideal daily dose of clozapine for this patient and also brought the relationship between aspiration pneumonia and clozapine to the attention of the psychiatrist and medical specialist. Once the appropriate dosage for this patient was established, his psychotic and affective symptoms were controlled, he was not hampered by adverse side effects, and he started to actively participate in social and recreational activities and plans that culminated in discharge from a state psychiatric facility to a supportive community residence. It is our hope that the lessons we have learned from our shared experience with this patient will be of benefit to other clinicians and patients.

  18. Mapping the Evolution of Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Chandler C.; Stegger, Marc; Stahlhut, Steen G.; Hansen, Dennis S.; Engelthaler, David M.; Andersen, Paal S.; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Keim, Paul; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly invasive, community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infections have recently emerged, resulting in pyogenic liver abscesses. These infections are caused by hypervirulent K. pneumoniae (hvKP) isolates primarily of capsule serotype K1 or K2. Hypervirulent K1 isolates belong to clonal complex 23 (CC23), indicating that this clonal lineage has a specific genetic background conferring hypervirulence. Here, we apply whole-genome sequencing to a collection of K. pneumoniae isolates to characterize the phylogenetic background of hvKP isolates with an emphasis on CC23. Most of the hvKP isolates belonged to CC23 and grouped into a distinct monophyletic clade, revealing that CC23 is a unique clonal lineage, clearly distinct from nonhypervirulent strains. Separate phylogenetic analyses of the CC23 isolates indicated that the CC23 lineage evolved recently by clonal expansion from a single common ancestor. Limited grouping according to geographical origin was observed, suggesting that CC23 has spread globally through multiple international transmissions. Conversely, hypervirulent K2 strains clustered in genetically unrelated groups. Strikingly, homologues of a large virulence plasmid were detected in all hvKP clonal lineages, indicating a key role in K. pneumoniae hypervirulence. The plasmid encodes two siderophores, aerobactin and salmochelin, and RmpA (regulator of the mucoid phenotype); all these factors were found to be restricted to hvKP isolates. Genomic comparisons revealed additional factors specifically associated with CC23. These included a distinct variant of a genomic island encoding yersiniabactin, colibactin, and microcin E492. Furthermore, additional novel genomic regions unique to CC23 were revealed which may also be involved in the increased virulence of this important clonal lineage. PMID:26199326

  19. Sialorrhea and Aspiration Pneumonia: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Jeffery; Szymanski, Herman; Bhullar, Jaspinder; Lee, Claudia; Watson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This case study compares two different clinical outcomes for a patient with a long-standing psychotic disorder prescribed clozapine on two occasions. During the first trial, clozapine was used at a higher dose for this patient (350-450mg/day) and included clinically significant sialorrhea, pneumonia, and pneumonia-like illnesses requiring immediate medical intervention including hospitalization. There were also patient complaints of fatigue, cough, choking, and constipation leading to poor adherence. Clozapine was discontinued when the patient withdrew his consent due to side effects, despite his awareness of its benefits, including reduction of command hallucinations and irritability. The second clozapine trial was associated with lower daily doses and therapeutic serum blood levels. The patient was actively participating in and adhering to the medication plan. A very narrow window of clozapine dose was exceeded for two days and the patient complained of hypersalivation, cough, and lethargy. He was subsequently hospitalized for a two week period to treat aspiration pneumonia. This hospitalization helped establish the ideal daily dose of clozapine for this patient and also brought the relationship between aspiration pneumonia and clozapine to the attention of the psychiatrist and medical specialist. Once the appropriate dosage for this patient was established, his psychotic and affective symptoms were controlled, he was not hampered by adverse side effects, and he started to actively participate in social and recreational activities and plans that culminated in discharge from a state psychiatric facility to a supportive community residence. It is our hope that the lessons we have learned from our shared experience with this patient will be of benefit to other clinicians and patients. PMID:23882437

  20. Pneumonia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) ... हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Japanese (日本語) Pneumonia 肺炎 - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health ...

  1. [Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-negative adults].

    PubMed

    Rouyer, M; Stoclin, A; Blanc, F-X

    2015-12-01

    In HIV-negative adults, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia can be observed when immunodeficiency is present, especially in case of drug-induced immune suppression (steroids, chemotherapy, transplantation). Clinical, radiological, and biological presentations are different in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals with different immunodeficiency profiles. In HIV-negative patients, dyspnea occurs more quickly (median duration of 5 days to get a diagnosis), diagnosis is more difficult because of less Pneumocystis in bronchoalveolar lavage, and mortality is higher than in HIV-positive individuals. Lung CT-scan typically shows diffuse ground glass opacities, but peri-bronchovascular condensations or ground glass opacities clearly limited by interlobular septa can also be observed. Lymphopenia is common but CD4+ T-cells count is rarely performed. HIV-negative patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia are co-infected with bacteria, viruses or fungi in about 30% cases. Bronchoalveolar lavage is often more neutrophilic than in HIV-positive individuals. PCR and β-D-glucan have good sensitivity but poor specificity to diagnose Pneumocystis pneumonia. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains the first choice of treatment. Duration is 14 days in HIV-negative patients whereas it is typically of 21 days in HIV-positive individuals. Adjunctive corticosteroids are of beneficial effect in HIV-positive adult patients with substantial hypoxaemia but are not recommended in HIV-negative patients, as they could be deleterious in some individuals.

  2. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Churton, Nicholas W. V.; Misra, Raju V.; Howlin, Robert P.; Allan, Raymond N.; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N.; Gharbia, Saheer E.; Edwards, Richard J.; Clarke, Stuart C.; Webb, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. PMID:27190203

  3. Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae with a DNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Denys, G A; Carey, R B

    1992-01-01

    The Accuprobe Streptococcus pneumoniae Culture Identification Test (Gen-Probe, Inc.) was evaluated with 172 isolates of S. pneumoniae and 204 nonpneumococcal isolates. The sensitivity and specificity of the Accuprobe test were 100%. Optimum results were obtained when four or more discrete colonies were selected for testing. The Accuprobe test was determined to be an accurate and rapid method for identification of S. pneumoniae. PMID:1400974

  4. Community-acquired pneumonia due to Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Marinella, Mark A

    2004-12-01

    Most cases of community-acquired pneumonia result from infection with predictable common pathogens. However, rare patients develop pneumonia from unusual bacterial species such as Pasteurella multocida, a Gram-negative oral commensal of most dogs and cats. The majority of P. multocida infections involve skin and soft tissue and complicate a bite or scratch. I report the case of an elderly man who owned 16 cats and developed bacteremic pneumonia with P. multocida. .

  5. Description of Streptococcus pneumoniae Infections in Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Description of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in burn patients§ Jessie S. Glasser a, Michael L. Landruma,b,c, Kevin K. Chung a,d, Duane R...history: Accepted 10 July 2009 Keywords: Burn Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumococcus Pneumococcal a b s t r a c t Background: Longer survival in burn...Staphylococcus aureus. Although Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are common in the community and can cause nosocomial infections, the incidence and

  6. Aspiration pneumonia in dogs: pathophysiology, prevention, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Heidi M; Rahilly, Louisa J

    2012-12-01

    Aspiration pneumonia and aspiration pneumonitis are associated with significant morbidity in veterinary and human medicine. A variety of medical conditions and medications can predispose patients to aspiration, and every precaution should be taken to prevent aspiration from occurring. For dogs that aspirate oral or gastric contents and subsequently develop pneumonia, monitoring and supportive care are imperative. This article discusses the pathophysiology, prevention, and diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia.

  7. Pneumonia and purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae: an uncommon association in the antibiotic era.

    PubMed

    Flores-González, Jose Carlos; Rubio-Quiñones, Fernando; Hernández-González, Arturo; Rodríguez-González, Moisés; Blanca-García, Jose Antonio; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso María; Quintero-Otero, Sebastián

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial pericarditis in children has become a rare entity in the modern antibiotic era. The most common pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus, being Streptococcus pneumoniae an exceptional cause. We present 2 children, who were diagnosed of pneumonia complicated with a pleural effusion that developed a purulent pericarditis with signs of cardiac tamponade. One of them had received 4 doses of the 7-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine. Systemic antibiotics and pericardial and pleural drainages were used. Pneumococcal antigens were positive in pleural and pericardial fluids in both cases, and S. pneumoniae was isolated from pleural effusion in one of them. Both children fully recovered, and none of them developed constrictive pericarditis, although 1 case presented a transient secondary left ventricular dysfunction. Routine immunization with 10- and 13-valent vaccines including a wider range of serotypes should further decrease the already low incidence.

  8. Rapidly fatal bacteremic pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae with K1 hypermucoviscosity phenotype in a previously healthy young man receiving levofloxacin treatment.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Chou-Jui; Chi, Chun-Lin; Liu, An-Yu; Lee, Shih-Wei; Lin, T L; Wang, Jin-Town; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2009-10-01

    Fatal bacteremic Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia is commonly encountered in alcoholic and diabetic patients. This report describes a previously healthy young man with rapidly fatal bacteremic pneumonia caused by K. pneumoniae serotype K1, complicated by septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction.

  9. Conventional NK cells can produce IL-22 and promote host defense in Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Weiss, Ido D; Zhang, Hongwei H; Singh, Satya P; Wynn, Thomas A; Wilson, Mark S; Farber, Joshua M

    2014-02-15

    It was reported that host defense against pulmonary Klebsiella pneumoniae infection requires IL-22, which was proposed to be of T cell origin. Supporting a role for IL-22, we found that Il22(-/-) mice had decreased survival compared with wild-type mice after intratracheal infection with K. pneumoniae. Surprisingly, however, Rag2(-/-) mice did not differ from wild-type mice in survival or levels of IL-22 in the lungs postinfection with K. pneumoniae. In contrast, K. pneumoniae-infected Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice failed to produce IL-22. These data suggested a possible role for NK cells or other innate lymphoid cells in host defense and production of IL-22. Unlike NK cell-like innate lymphoid cells that produce IL-22 and display a surface phenotype of NK1.1(-)NKp46(+)CCR6(+), lung NK cells showed the conventional phenotype, NK1.1(+)NKp46(+)CCR6(-). Mice depleted of NK cells using anti-asialo GM1 showed decreased survival and higher lung bacterial counts, as well as increased dissemination of K. pneumoniae to blood and liver, compared with control-treated mice. NK cell depletion also led to decreased production of IL-22 in the lung. Within 1 d postinfection, although there was no increase in the number of lung NK cells, a subset of lung NK cells became competent to produce IL-22, and such cells were found in both wild-type and Rag2(-/-) mice. Our data suggest that, during pulmonary infection of mice with K. pneumoniae, conventional NK cells are required for optimal host defense, which includes the production of IL-22.

  10. Specimen collection for the diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hammitt, Laura L; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Driscoll, Amanda; Karron, Ruth A; Levine, Orin S; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2012-04-01

    Diagnosing the etiologic agent of pneumonia has an essential role in ensuring the most appropriate and effective therapy for individual patients and is critical to guiding the development of treatment and prevention strategies. However, establishing the etiology of pneumonia remains challenging because of the relative inaccessibility of the infected tissue and the difficulty in obtaining samples without contamination by upper respiratory tract secretions. Here, we review the published and unpublished literature on various specimens available for the diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each specimen, and discuss the rationale for the specimens to be collected for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health study.

  11. Mortality, morbidity, and disease severity of patients with aspiration pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lanspa, Michael J.; Jones, Barbara E.; Brown, Samuel M.; Dean, Nathan C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspiration pneumonia is a common syndrome, although less well characterized than other pneumonia syndromes. We describe a large population of patients with aspiration pneumonia. Methods In this retrospective population study, we queried the electronic medical record at a tertiary-care, university-affiliated hospital from 1996–2006. Patients were initially identified by ICD-9 code 507.x; subsequent physician chart review excluded patients with aspiration pneumonitis and those without a confirmatory radiograph. Patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia were compared to a contemporaneous population of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. We compared CURB-65 predicted mortality with actual 30-day mortality. Results We identified 628 patients with aspiration pneumonia, of which 510 were community-acquired. Median age was 77, with 30-day mortality of 21%. Compared to CAP patients, patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia had more frequent inpatient admission (99% vs. 58%) and ICU admission (38% vs. 14%), higher Charlson comorbidity index (3 vs. 1), and higher prevalence of “do not resuscitate/intubate” orders (24% vs. 11%). CURB-65 predicted mortality poorly in aspiration pneumonia patients (AUC 0.66). Conclusions Patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia are older, have more comorbidities, and demonstrate higher mortality than CAP patients, even after adjustment for age and comorbidities. CURB-65 poorly predicts mortality in this population. PMID:23184866

  12. First report of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bedenić, Branka; Mazzariol, Annarita; Plečko, Vanda; Bošnjak, Zrinka; Barl, Petra; Vraneš, Jasmina; Cornaglia, Giuseppe

    2012-08-01

    In February 2011, a 78-year-old male patient was admitted to Clinical Hospital Center Zagreb with subdural haematoma. Klebsiella pneumoniae with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems was isolated. PCR revealed the presence of bla(KPC), bla(TEM), and bla(SHV) genes. Sequencing of bla(KPC) gene identified K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2 beta-lactamase. The strain belonged to ST37 clone by multilocus sequence typing. Infection control efforts limited the spread of KPC-producing clone of K. pneumoniae in our hospital so far. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a KPC-producing K. pneumoniae in Croatia.

  13. Achieving enhanced organisational resilience by improved management of risk: Summary of research into the principles of resilience and the practices of resilient organisations.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, Paul

    There have been many high-profile incidents in recent times that have affected both individual organisations and large parts of society. In response to these disasters and their consequences, there has been increasing focus on the concept of 'resilience'. Airmic worked with Cranfield School of Management to investigate the features of resilient organisations and whether common characteristics could be identified. The research summarised in this paper discovered five principles that increase an organisation's level of resilence. The paper also reports on the actions taken by organisations to embed these resilience principles into four main business enablers. These business enablers in combination represent the business model of the organisation. The overall conclusion of the research was that, in order to achieve a state of enhanced resilience, organisations need to be aware of risks and threats they face and then combine the actions required to be 'risk compliant' with the ability to be 'risk responsive'.

  14. Percutaneous CT-Guided Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosing Pneumonia and Mimics of Pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas; Galani, Panagiota Mylona, Sophia; Pomoni, Maria; Mpatakis, Nikolaos

    2004-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of percutaneous core needle biopsy (CNB) relative to fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. In this prospective study we present our experience with 48 thoracic FNAs and CNBs carried out on 48 patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. Samples were obtained from all patients using both CNB (with an automated 18-G core biopsy needle and a gun) and FNA (with a 22-G needle). A specific diagnosis was made in 10/48 cases (20.83%) by FNA and in 42/48 (87.5%) by CNB. The main complications encountered were pneumothorax (n = 4) and hemoptysis (n = 2), yielding a total complication rate of 12.5%. We concluded that CNB using an automated biopsy gun results in a higher diagnostic accuracy for pneumonia and pneumonia mimic biopsies than FNA. Complications should be considered and proper patient observation should follow the procedure.

  15. Synthetic biology in the view of European public funding organisations

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Lei; Gaisser, Sibylle; Schmidt, Markus

    2012-01-01

    We analysed the decisions of major European public funding organisations to fund or not to fund synthetic biology (SB) and related ethical, legal and social implication (ELSI) studies. We investigated the reaction of public organisations in six countries (Austria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the UK) towards SB that may influence SB’s further development in Europe. We examined R&D and ELSI communities and their particular funding situation. Our results show that the funding situation for SB varies considerably among the analysed countries, with the UK as the only country with an established funding scheme for R&D and ELSI that successfully integrates these research communities. Elsewhere, we determined a general lack of funding (France), difficulties in funding ELSI work (Switzerland), lack of an R&D community (Austria), too small ELSI communities (France, Switzerland, Netherlands), or difficulties in linking existing communities with available funding sources (Germany), partly due to an unclear SB definition. PMID:22586841

  16. Workplace bullying in nursing: towards a more critical organisational perspective.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Marie; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Wilkes, Lesley

    2006-06-01

    Workplace bullying is a significant issue confronting the nursing profession. Bullying in nursing is frequently described in terms of 'oppressed group' behaviour or 'horizontal violence'. It is proposed that the use of 'oppressed group' behaviour theory has fostered only a partial understanding of the phenomenon in nursing. It is suggested that the continued use of 'oppressed group' behaviour as the major means for understanding bullying in nursing places a flawed emphasis on bullying as a phenomenon that exists only among nurses, rather than considering it within the broader organisational context. The work of Foucault and the 'circuits of power' model proposed by Clegg are used to provide an alternative understanding of the operation of power within organisations and therefore another way to conceive bullying in the nursing workforce.

  17. An early history of the Gestalt factors of organisation.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Stefano; Marino, Barbara F M; Giora, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Wertheimer's (1923, Psychologische Forschung 4 301 - 350) idea that the perceptual world is articulated according to factors of organisation is widely acknowledged as one of the most original contributions of Gestalt psychology and stands as a milestone in the history of vision research. An inquiry focused on the forerunners of some of Wertheimer's factors of perceptual organisation is documented here. In fact, in 1900 Schumann described grouping by proximity and by vertical symmetry, and in 1903 G E Müller identified the factors of sameness/similarity and contour. Other authors contributed to the early description of these factors, such as Rubin, who in 1922 originally illustrated grouping by similarity. Even though Wertheimer himself granted these authors due recognition, later psychologists have paid little attention to their contributions. Some possible reasons for this negligence are briefly discussed.

  18. Organisational factors affecting the quality of hospital clinical coding.

    PubMed

    Santos, Suong; Murphy, Gregory; Baxter, Kathryn; Robinson, Kerin M

    2008-01-01

    The influence of organisational factors on the quality of hospital coding using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Health Related Problems, 10th Revision, Australian Modification (ICD-10-AM) was investigated using a mixed quantitative-qualitative approach. The organisational variables studied were: hospital specialty; geographical locality; structural characteristics of the coding unit; education, training and resource supports for Clinical Coders; and quality control mechanisms. Baseline data on the hospitals' coding quality, measured by the Performance Indicators for Coding Quality tool, were used as an independent index measure. No differences were found in error rates between rural and metropolitan hospitals, or general and specialist hospitals. Clinical Coder allocation to "general" rather than "specialist" unit coding resulted in fewer errors. Coding Managers reported that coding quality can be improved by: Coders engaging in a variety of role behaviours; improved Coder career opportunities; higher staffing levels; reduced throughput; fewer time constraints on coding outputs and associated work; and increased Coder interactions with medical staff.

  19. A Meta-Analysis: Exploring the Effects of Gender on Organisational Commitment of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalgiç, Gülay

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of organisational commitment (OC) are of great importance to organisations. Considering the effect of teacher commitment on student success and the increasing teacher turnover rates in the world, studies focusing on the organisational commitment of teachers gained more importance. However there is still a significant gap about the…

  20. Linking Action Learning and Inter-Organisational Learning: The Learning Journey Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The article presents and illustrates the learning journey (LJ)--a new management development approach to inter-organisational learning based on observation, reflection and problem-solving. The LJ involves managers from different organisations and applies key concepts of action learning and systemic organisational development. Made up of…

  1. Organisational Learning and Leadership: On Metaphor, Meaning Making, Liminality and Intercultural Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jean A.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses sensemaking as a broad framework for understanding organisational learning and its implications for leadership in a global context. Organisational metaphors, the concept of liminality and understanding organisations as interpretation systems are presented as possibilities for enhancing intercultural communication within…

  2. Attracting Generation Y Graduates: Organisational Attributes, Likelihood to Apply and Sex Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terjesen, Siri; Vinnicombe, Susan; Freeman, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Building on person-organisation fit and gender self-schema, this research aims to examine UK university final year students' perception of the importance of organisational attributes and their presence in three major graduate employers. This study also seeks to explore which organisational attributes attract Generation Y men and women to…

  3. Organisational Restructuring and Downsizing: Issues Related to Learning, Training and Employability of Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbery, Ronan; Garavan, Thomas N.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article sets out to look at how employees who have survived an organisational downsizing and restructuring process adjust to meet the dynamics of the organisation, develop new skills and competencies, and the extent to which they take on new roles in the organisation. Design/methodology/approach: Collects accounts from managers,…

  4. Organisation of Workplace Learning: A Case Study of Paediatric Residents' and Consultants' Beliefs and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skipper, Mads; Nøhr, Susanne Backman; Jacobsen, Tine Klitgaard; Musaeus, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have examined how doctors learn in the workplace, but research is needed linking workplace learning with the organisation of doctors' daily work. This study examined residents' and consultants' attitudes and beliefs regarding workplace learning and contextual and organisational factors influencing the organisation and planning of…

  5. Secure and interoperable communication infrastructures for PPDR organisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wilmuth; Marques, Hugo; Pereira, Luis; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Brouwer, Frank; Bouwers, Bert; Politis, Ilias; Lykourgiotis, Asimakis; Ladas, Alexandros; Adigun, Olayinka; Jelenc, David

    2016-05-01

    The growing number of events affecting public safety and security (PS&S) on a regional scale with potential to grow up to large scale cross border disasters puts an increased pressure on agencies and organisation responsible for PS&S. In order to respond timely and in an adequate manner to such events, Public Protection and Disaster Relief (PPDR) organisations need to cooperate, align their procedures and activities, share the needed information and be interoperable. Existing PPDR/PMR technologies such as TETRA, TETRAPOL or P25, do not currently provide broadband capability nor is expected such technologies to be upgraded in the future. This presents a major limitation in supporting new services and information flows. Furthermore, there is no known standard that addresses interoperability of these technologies. In this contribution the design of a next generation communication infrastructure for PPDR organisations which fulfills the requirements of secure and seamless end-to-end communication and interoperable information exchange within the deployed communication networks is presented. Based on Enterprise Architecture of PPDR organisations, a next generation PPDR network that is backward compatible with legacy communication technologies is designed and implemented, capable of providing security, privacy, seamless mobility, QoS and reliability support for mission-critical Private Mobile Radio (PMR) voice and broadband data services. The designed solution provides a robust, reliable, and secure mobile broadband communications system for a wide variety of PMR applications and services on PPDR broadband networks, including the ability of inter-system, interagency and cross-border operations with emphasis on interoperability between users in PMR and LTE.

  6. The cell proliferation antigen Ki-67 organises heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Sobecki, Michal; Mrouj, Karim; Camasses, Alain; Parisis, Nikolaos; Nicolas, Emilien; Llères, David; Gerbe, François; Prieto, Susana; Krasinska, Liliana; David, Alexandre; Eguren, Manuel; Birling, Marie-Christine; Urbach, Serge; Hem, Sonia; Déjardin, Jérôme; Malumbres, Marcos; Jay, Philippe; Dulic, Vjekoslav; Lafontaine, Denis LJ; Feil, Robert; Fisher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Antigen Ki-67 is a nuclear protein expressed in proliferating mammalian cells. It is widely used in cancer histopathology but its functions remain unclear. Here, we show that Ki-67 controls heterochromatin organisation. Altering Ki-67 expression levels did not significantly affect cell proliferation in vivo. Ki-67 mutant mice developed normally and cells lacking Ki-67 proliferated efficiently. Conversely, upregulation of Ki-67 expression in differentiated tissues did not prevent cell cycle arrest. Ki-67 interactors included proteins involved in nucleolar processes and chromatin regulators. Ki-67 depletion disrupted nucleologenesis but did not inhibit pre-rRNA processing. In contrast, it altered gene expression. Ki-67 silencing also had wide-ranging effects on chromatin organisation, disrupting heterochromatin compaction and long-range genomic interactions. Trimethylation of histone H3K9 and H4K20 was relocalised within the nucleus. Finally, overexpression of human or Xenopus Ki-67 induced ectopic heterochromatin formation. Altogether, our results suggest that Ki-67 expression in proliferating cells spatially organises heterochromatin, thereby controlling gene expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13722.001 PMID:26949251

  7. Agri-environmental collaboratives as bridging organisations in landscape management.

    PubMed

    Prager, Katrin

    2015-09-15

    In recent years, landscape and its management has become a focus of policies and academic conceptualisation. Landscape is understood as a concept of interconnected natural and human systems. Its management must take into account the dynamic interdependencies and diverging interests of various stakeholders at different levels. Bridging organisations can provide an arena for trust-building, conflict resolution, learning and collaboration between relevant stakeholders. This paper draws on two strands of literature - landscape governance and co-management of social-ecological systems - to investigate the contributions of agri-environmental collaboratives (AEC) to sustainable landscape management. Based on data from 41 interviews with key informants and AEC members in Germany and the Netherlands, six fields of contributions were identified: policy implementation and service provision; coordination and mediation; awareness raising and behaviour change; care for 'everyday' landscapes; maintenance and protection of landscapes (including species and habitats); and income generation and economic benefits. Some of the contributions evolve around the specific role of AEC as bridging organisations, but other contributions such as economic benefits emerge beyond this analytical lens. The paper therefore emphasises holistic, bottom up assessment of AEC contributions and argues that governments should support such organisations through i) funding for facilitators and ii) funding for impact monitoring and data management.

  8. The organisation of spatial and temporal relations in memory.

    PubMed

    Rondina, Renante; Curtiss, Kaitlin; Meltzer, Jed A; Barense, Morgan D; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2017-04-01

    Episodic memories are comprised of details of "where" and "when"; spatial and temporal relations, respectively. However, evidence from behavioural, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging studies has provided mixed interpretations about how memories for spatial and temporal relations are organised-they may be hierarchical, fully interactive, or independent. In the current study, we examined the interaction of memory for spatial and temporal relations. Using explicit reports and eye-tracking, we assessed younger and older adults' memory for spatial and temporal relations of objects that were presented singly across time in unique spatial locations. Explicit change detection of spatial relations was affected by a change in temporal relations, but explicit change detection of temporal relations was not affected by a change in spatial relations. Younger and older adults showed eye movement evidence of incidental memory for temporal relations, but only younger adults showed eye movement evidence of incidental memory for spatial relations. Together, these findings point towards a hierarchical organisation of relational memory. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the neural mechanisms that may support such a hierarchical organisation of memory.

  9. Role of Serum Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgA, IgM, and IgG in the Diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-Related Pneumonia in School-Age Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ju; Huang, Eng-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Min; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Niu, Chen-Kuang; Yu, Hong-Ren

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important causative pathogen of community-acquired pneumonia in children. Rapid and reliable laboratory diagnosis of M. pneumoniae infection is important so that appropriate antibiotic treatment can be initiated to reduce the misuse of drugs and resistance rates. Anti-M. pneumoniae immunoglobulin M (IgM) is an indicator of recent primary infection but can persist for several months after initial infection. It has been suggested that anti-M. pneumoniae immunoglobulin A (IgA) can be a reliable indicator for recent M. pneumoniae infection in adults. We investigated the clinical diagnostic value of M. pneumoniae IgA in school-age children and adolescents with M. pneumoniae-related pneumonia. Eighty children with pneumonia and seropositive for M. pneumoniae IgM or with a 4-fold increase of anti-M. pneumoniae immunoglobulin G (IgG) were enrolled from May 2015 to March 2016. The titers of M. pneumoniae IgA, IgM, and IgG, the clinical features, and laboratory examinations of blood, C-reactive protein, and liver enzymes were analyzed. The initial positivity rates for M. pneumoniae IgM and IgA upon admission to the hospital were 63.6 and 33.8%, respectively. One week after admission, the cumulative positivity rates for M. pneumoniae IgM and IgA increased to 97.5 and 56.3%, respectively. Detection of M. pneumoniae IgM was more sensitive than detection of M. pneumoniae IgA for the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae-related pneumonia in school-age children and adolescents; however, paired sera are necessary for a more accurate diagnosis.

  10. Ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by colistin-resistant KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Viaggi, Bruno; Sbrana, Francesco; Malacarne, Paolo; Tascini, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type carbapenemase causes severe nosocomial infection at a high mortality rate. Nosocomial pneumonia in particular is associated with high mortality, likely due to the unfavorable pulmonary pharmacokinetics of the antibiotics used against this agent. Therefore, early and accurate microbiological identification and susceptibility evaluation are crucial in order to optimize antibiotic therapy. We report a case of ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae producing KPC-type carbapenemase treated using a carbapenem-sparing therapy and tailored according to the serum procalcitonin concentration in order to limit the duration of antibiotic therapy.

  11. Outbreak of Pneumonia in the Setting of Fatal Pneumococcal Meningitis among US Army Trainees: Potential Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Compared to the civilian population, military trainees are often at increased risk for respiratory infections. We investigated an outbreak of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia that was recognized after 2 fatal cases of serotype 7F pneumococcal meningitis were reported in a 303-person military trainee company (Alpha Company). Methods We reviewed surveillance data on pneumonia and febrile respiratory illness at the training facility; conducted chart reviews for cases of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia; and administered surveys and collected nasopharyngeal swabs from trainees in the outbreak battalion (Alpha and Hotel Companies), associated training staff, and trainees newly joining the battalion. Results Among Alpha and Hotel Company trainees, the average weekly attack rates of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia were 1.4% and 1.2% (most other companies at FLW: 0-0.4%). The pneumococcal carriage rate among all Alpha Company trainees was 15% with a predominance of serotypes 7F and 3. Chlamydia pneumoniae was identified from 31% of specimens collected from Alpha Company trainees with respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Although the etiology of the outbreak remains unclear, the identification of both S. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae among trainees suggests that both pathogens may have contributed either independently or as cofactors to the observed increased incidence of pneumonia in the outbreak battalion and should be considered as possible etiologies in outbreaks of pneumonia in the military population. PMID:21635754

  12. Risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-I; Song, J-H; Kim, S H; Chung, D R; Peck, K R; So, T M; Hsueh, P-R

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical features of community-onset levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia and to identify risk factors for levofloxacin resistance. Using the database of a surveillance study of community-acquired pneumococcal infections in Asian countries, we conducted a nested case-control study to identify risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Of 981 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, 46 (4.7 %) had levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, of whom 39 evaluable cases were included in the analysis. All cases were from Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Among patients with levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae, 490 controls were selected based on patient country. Of the 39 cases of levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia, 23 (59.0 %) were classified as healthcare-associated, while 164 (33.5 %) of the 490 controls of levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (P = 0.001) were classified as healthcare-associated. Multivariate analysis showed that previous treatment with fluoroquinolones, cerebrovascular disease, and healthcare-associated infection were significantly associated with levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia (all P < 0.05). Levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococci pose an important new public health threat in our region, and more information on the emergence and spread of these resistant strains will be necessary to prevent spread throughout the population.

  13. The obligations of Member Countries of the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) in the Organisation of Veterinary Services.

    PubMed

    Vallat, B; Wilson, D W

    2003-08-01

    The authors discuss the mission, organisation and resources of Veterinary Services in the new international trading environment and examine how the standards for Veterinary Services, contained in the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) International Animal Health Code (the Code), help provide the necessary support for Veterinary Services to meet their rights and obligations under the provisions of the Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Agreement of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The authors describe the challenges of gaining access to international trading markets through surveillance and control of OIE listed diseases. Finally, the approach in the Code to the principles underpinning the quality of Veterinary Services and to guidelines for evaluating Veterinary Services, is discussed.

  14. A Non-Human Primate Model of Severe Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Luis F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Soni, Nilam J.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Gilley, Ryan P.; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Noda, Julio R.; Winter, Vicki T.; de la Garza, Melissa A.; Shade, Robert E.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Anzueto, Antonio; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and infectious death in adults worldwide. A non-human primate model is needed to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of severe pneumonia, identify diagnostic tools, explore potential therapeutic targets, and test clinical interventions during pneumococcal pneumonia. Objective To develop a non-human primate model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Seven adult baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were surgically tethered to a continuous monitoring system that recorded heart rate, temperature, and electrocardiography. Animals were inoculated with 109 colony-forming units of S. pneumoniae using bronchoscopy. Three baboons were rescued with intravenous ampicillin therapy. Pneumonia was diagnosed using lung ultrasonography and ex vivo confirmation by histopathology and immunodetection of pneumococcal capsule. Organ failure, using serum biomarkers and quantification of bacteremia, was assessed daily. Results Challenged animals developed signs and symptoms of pneumonia 4 days after infection. Infection was characterized by the presence of cough, tachypnea, dyspnea, tachycardia and fever. All animals developed leukocytosis and bacteremia 24 hours after infection. A severe inflammatory reaction was detected by elevation of serum cytokines, including Interleukin (IL)1Ra, IL-6, and IL-8, after infection. Lung ultrasonography precisely detected the lobes with pneumonia that were later confirmed by pathological analysis. Lung pathology positively correlated with disease severity. Antimicrobial therapy rapidly reversed symptomology and reduced serum cytokines. Conclusions We have developed a novel animal model for severe pneumococcal pneumonia that mimics the clinical presentation, inflammatory response, and infection kinetics seen in humans. This is a novel model to test vaccines and treatments, measure biomarkers to diagnose pneumonia, and predict outcomes. PMID:27855182

  15. Lipoid pneumonia--a case of refractory pneumonia in a child treated with ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Wieteska-Klimczak, Anna; Własienko, Anna; Mazur, Agnieszka; Ziołkowski, Jerzy; Jaworska, Joanna; Kościesza, Andrzej; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Książyk, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia (LP) is a chronic inflammation of the lung parenchyma with interstitial involvement due to the accumulation of endogenous or exogenous lipids. Exogenous LP (ELP) is associated with the aspiration or inhalation of oil present in food, oil-based medications or radiographic contrast media. The clinical manifestations of LP range from asymptomatic cases to severe pulmonary involvement, with respiratory failure and death, according to the quantity and duration of the aspiration. The diagnosis of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is based on a history of exposure to oil and the presence of lipid-laden macrophages on sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) analysis. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the imaging technique of choice for evaluation of patients with suspected LP. The best therapeutic strategy is to remove the oil as early as possible through bronchoscopy with multiple BALs and interruption in the use of mineral oil. Steroid therapy remains controversial, and should be reserved for severe cases. We describe a case of LP due to oil aspiration in 3-year-old girl with intractable epilepsy on ketogenic diet. Diagnostic problems were due to non-specific symptoms that were mimicking serious infectious pneumonia. A high index of suspicion and precise medical history is required in cases of refractory pneumonia and fever unresponsive to conventional therapy. Gastroesophageal reflux and a risk of aspiration may be regarded as relative contraindications to the ketogenic diet. Conservative treatment, based on the use of oral steroids, proved to be an efficient therapeutic approach in this case.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series *

    PubMed Central

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. PMID:26398760

  17. Treatment of experimental pneumonia due to penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in immunocompetent rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldà, J; Capdevila, J A; Almirante, B; Otero, J; Ruiz, I; Laguarda, M; Allende, H; Crespo, E; Pigrau, C; Pahissa, A

    1997-01-01

    A model of pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to penicillin was developed in immunocompetent Wistar rats and was used to evaluate the efficacies of different doses of penicillin, cefotaxime, cefpirome, and vancomycin. Adult Wistar rats were challenged by intratracheal inoculation with 3 x 10(9) CFU of one strain of S. pneumoniae resistant to penicillin (MICs of penicillin, cefotaxime, cefpirome, and vancomycin, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively) suspended in brain heart broth supplemented with 0.7% agar. The rats experienced a fatal pneumonia, dying within 5 days and with peak mortality (70 to 80%) occurring 48 to 72 h after infection, and the bacterial counts in the lungs persisted from 8.87 +/- 0.3 log10 CFU/g of lung at 24 h of the infection to 9.1 +/- 0.3 log10 CFU/g at 72 h. Four hours after infection the animals were randomized into the following treatment groups: (i) control without treatment, (ii) penicillin G at 100,000 IU/kg of body weight every 2 h, (iii) penicillin G at 250,000 IU/kg every 2 h, (iv) cefotaxime at 100 mg/kg every 2 h, (v) cefpirome at 200 mg/kg every 2 h, and (vi) vancomycin at 50 mg/kg every 8 h. Two different protocols were used for the therapeutic efficacy studies: four doses of beta-lactams and one dose of vancomycin or eight doses of beta-lactams and two doses of vancomycin. Results of the therapy for experimental pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae showed that initially, all the antimicrobial agents tested had similar efficacies, but when we prolonged the treatment, higher doses of penicillin, cefotaxime, and cefpirome were more effective than penicillin at lower doses in decreasing the residual bacterial titers in the lungs. Also, when we extended the treatment, vancomycin was more efficacious than penicillin at lower doses but was less efficacious than higher doses of penicillin or cefpirome. The model that we have developed is simple and amenable for inducing pneumonia in

  18. Methyl-prednisolone in neurologic complications of Mycoplasma pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gücüyener, K; Simşek, F; Yilmaz, O; Serdaroğlu, A

    2000-06-01

    In patients with Mycoplasma pneumonia extrapulmonary manifestations such as encephalitis, meningitis, cerebellar and brain stem involvement, cranial nerve lesions, peripheral neuropathy, polymyositis have been observed. We report a 16-year-old girl with M. pneumonia infection, acute behavioral changes and coma. Treatment with high dose methyl-prednisolone and clarithromycin led to rapid clinical improvement.

  19. Serum zinc and pneumonia in nursing home elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc plays an important role in immune function. The association between serum zinc and pneumonia in the elderly has not been studied. The study aim is to determine if serum zinc concentrations in nursing home elderly are associated with incidence and duration of pneumonia, total and duration of ant...

  20. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia accompanied by mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Esme, Hidir; Sahin, Onder; Sezer, Murat; Fidan, Fatma; Unlu, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia, which was described in 1989, is thought to represent a hypersensitivity reaction to unidentified inhaled antigens. Here, we present a case of a marble mine worker with acute eosinophilic pneumonia complicated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17128696

  1. Acute pneumonia in Zimbabwe: bacterial isolates by lung aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeogu, M O

    1988-01-01

    Forty children, aged 2 months to 11 years, with severe acute pneumonia were investigated by needle aspiration of the lung. Fourteen organisms were isolated in only 13 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated in six patients, Staphylococcus aureus in three, and Haemophilus influenzae in two. Two patients had mixed organisms. PMID:3196056

  2. Pneumonia Frequencies with Different Enteral Tube Feeding Access Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Henry M.

    2002-01-01

    Over a 24-month period, 25 adults with mental retardation being fed via a gastrostomy tube experienced 40 cases of pneumonia during 508 person-months of observations, whereas 5 individuals being fed via a jejunostromy tube did not experience any pneumonia during 96 person-months of observation. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  3. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries.

  4. A Neonatal Murine Model of MRSA Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bishwas; Siefker, David; Patel, Vivek S.; Yadav, Nikki; Jaligama, Sridhar; Cormier, Stephania A.

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants particularly following lower respiratory tract viral infections such as Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). However, the mechanisms by which co-infection of infants by MRSA and RSV cause increased lung pathology are unknown. Because the infant immune system is qualitatively and quantitatively different from adults we developed a model of infant MRSA pneumonia which will allow us to investigate the effects of RSV co-infection on disease severity. We infected neonatal and adult mice with increasing doses of MRSA and demonstrate that neonatal mice have delayed kinetics in clearing the bacteria in comparison to adult mice. There were differences in recruitment of immune cells into the lung following infection. Adult mice exhibited an increase in neutrophil recruitment that coincided with reduced bacterial titers followed by an increase in macrophages. Neonatal mice, however, exhibited an early increase in neutrophils that did not persist despite continued presence of the bacteria. Unlike the adult mice, neonatal mice failed to exhibit an increase in macrophages. Neonates exhibited a decrease in phagocytosis of MRSA suggesting that the decrease in clearance was partially due to deficient phagocytosis of the bacteria. Both neonates and adults responded with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines following infection. However, in contrast to the adult mice, neonates did not express constitutive levels of the anti-microbial peptide Reg3γ in the lung. Infection of neonates did not stimulate expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 by dendritic cells and neonates exhibited a diminished T cell response compared to adult mice. Overall, we have developed a neonatal model of MRSA pneumonia that displays a similar delay in bacterial clearance as is observed in the neonatal intensive care unit and will be useful for performing co

  5. Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae induced ventilator-associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Q; Zhou, M; Zou, M; Liu, W-e

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae (hvKP) induced ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and the microbiological characteristics and epidemiology of the hvKP strains. A retrospective study of 49 mechanically ventilated patients with K. pneumoniae induced VAP was conducted at a university hospital in China from January 2014 to December 2014. Clinical characteristics and K. pneumoniae antimicrobial susceptibility and biofilm formation were analyzed. Genes of capsular serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57 and virulence factors plasmid rmpA(p-rmpA), iroB, iucA, mrkD, entB, iutA, ybtS, kfu and allS were also evaluated. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses were used to study the clonal relationship of the K. pneumoniae strains. Strains possessed p-rmpA and iroB and iucA were defined as hvKP. Of 49 patients, 14 patients (28.6 %) were infected by hvKP. Antimicrobial resistant rate was significantly higher in cKP than that in hvKP. One ST29 K54 extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing hvKP strain was detected. The prevalence of K1 and K2 in hvKP was 42.9 % and 21.4 %, respectively. The incidences of K1, K2, K20, p-rmpA, iroB, iucA, iutA, Kfu and alls were significantly higher in hvKP than those in cKP. ST23 was dominant among hvKP strains, and all the ST23 strains had identical RAPD pattern. hvKP has become a common pathogen of VAP in mechanically ventilated patients in China. Clinicians should increase awareness of hvKP induced VAP and enhance epidemiologic surveillance.

  6. Neurological complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Hely, M A; Williamson, P M; Terenty, T R

    1984-01-01

    This study documents five patients with neurological disease associated with evidence of recent Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Four patients had encephalitis associated with coma. Two of these had hemiparesis (one with dysphasia), one had seizures, and one had cerebellar and brainstem involvement. Two also had evidence of a radiculopathy and peripheral neuropathy. One patient had aseptic meningitis with later transverse myelitis. Three patients had multiple sites of neurological involvement. Respiratory infections preceded the neurological syndromes in four cases. Antibiotic therapy did not appear to alter the course of the disease. All patients had a favourable outcome.

  7. Critical pneumonia complicating early-stage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mercieri, Marco; Di Rosa, Roberta; Pantosti, Annalisa; De Blasi, Roberto Alberto; Pinto, Giovanni; Arcioni, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia, Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive, in a woman at 14 weeks of pregnancy. To our knowledge, this is the first case reporting this critical lung infection occurring during an early phase of pregnancy. This case study alerts physicians to the increasing worldwide spread of these uncommon yet virulent and potentially lethal infections. In our patient, antibiotic therapy with linezolid plus rifampin started at 14 weeks of pregnancy had a successful outcome without inducing toxicity or teratogenesis in the fetus.

  8. Pneumonia due to Enterobacter cancerogenus infection.

    PubMed

    Demir, Tülin; Baran, Gamze; Buyukguclu, Tuncay; Sezgin, Fikriye Milletli; Kaymaz, Haci

    2014-11-01

    Enterobacter cancerogenus (formerly known as CDC Enteric Group 19; synonym with Enterobacter taylorae) has rarely been associated with human infections, and little is known regarding the epidemiology and clinical significance of this organism. We describe a community-acquired pneumonia case in a 44-year-old female due to E. cancerogenus. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of the microorganism was performed by the automatized VITEK 2 Compact system (bioMerieux, France). The clinical case suggests that E. cancerogenus is a potentially pathogenic microorganism in determined circumstances; underlying diseases such as bronchial asthma, empiric antibiotic treatment, wounds, diagnostic, or therapeutic instruments.

  9. Pneumocystis pneumonia associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert F; Huang, Laurence; Walzer, Peter D

    2013-06-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is caused by the yeastlike fungus Pneumocystis. Despite the widespread availability of specific anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis and of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), PCP remains a common AIDS-defining presentation. PCP is increasingly recognized among persons living in Africa. Pneumocystis cannot be cultured and bronchoalveolar lavage is the gold standard diagnostic test to diagnose PCP. Use of adjunctive biomarkers for diagnosis requires further evaluation. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains the preferred first-line treatment regimen. In the era of ART, mortality from PCP is approximately 10% to 12%. The optimal time to start ART in a patient with PCP remains uncertain.

  10. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in developing countries*

    PubMed Central

    De Armas Rodríguez, Y.; Wissmann, G.; Müller, A.L.; Pederiva, M.A.; Brum, M.C.; Brackmann, R.L.; Capó De Paz, V.; Calderón, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is a serious fungal infection among immunocompromised patients. In developed countries, the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of PcP have been clearly defined and well documented. However, in most developing countries, relatively little is known about the prevalence of pneumocystosis. Several articles covering African, Asian and American countries were reviewed in the present study. PcP was identified as a frequent opportunistic infection in AIDS patients from different geographic regions. A trend to an increasing rate of PcP was apparent in developing countries from 2002 to 2010. PMID:21894262

  11. Pneumonia in nursing homes and long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Mark B

    2005-12-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology of pneumonia in residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most important cause of pneumonia in residents of nursing homes and LTCFs. Factors suggestive of aspiration are the most important risk factors for pneumonia in this population. The clinical presentation of pneumonia among long-term care facility residents is challenging; residents tend to be older and more debilitated than their elderly community-dwelling counterparts. Data on optimal antimicrobial therapy in this setting is sparse. Functional status is an important predictor of outcome in this population. There are key management issues, such as site of care, which remain unresolved. Immunization with influenza and pneumococcal vaccines remains the mainstay of prevention.

  12. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Bernet, C; Garret, M; de Barbeyrac, B; Bebear, C; Bonnet, J

    1989-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A specific DNA sequence for M. pneumoniae was selected from a genomic library, and two oligonucleotides were chosen in this sequence to give an amplified fragment of 144 base pairs. We show that DNA from different M. pneumoniae strains can be detected by PCR, with DNA from other Mycoplasma species giving negative results. Analysis of biological samples (throat swabs) obtained from hamsters that were experimentally infected with M. pneumoniae showed that PCR was more sensitive and reliable than conventional culture techniques for the detection of M. pneumoniae. Initial experiments on artificially seeded human bronchoalveolar lavages showed that PCR can be used to detect 10(2) to 10(3) organisms. Images PMID:2509513

  13. Molecular distinctions among clinical isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Su, C J; Dallo, S F; Baseman, J B

    1990-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fingerprinting of genomic DNA and Southern blots probed with subclones of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae cytadhesin P1 gene were used to characterize clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae. On the basis of the examination of 29 individual M. pneumoniae isolates, two distinct groups were established. Group 1, which displayed a 12-kilobase band following DNA digestion with HindIII, consisted of strain M129-B16 and three others obtained in the state of Washington during the 1960s. The remaining M. pneumoniae strains belonged to group 2, which lacked the 12-kilobase band and included samples from the 1940s, 1970s, and 1980s. This category also included the only M. pneumoniae strain isolated from the synovial fluid of an arthritic patient. Images PMID:2166088

  14. Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis: the role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, M; Schiavoni, G; Del Piano, M; Shaik, Y; Boscolo, P; Caraffa, A; Grano, M; Teté, S; Conti, F; Sessa, R

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae), a respiratory pathogen, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, an inflammatory progressive disease, characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Among several types of inflammatory cells involved in the atherogenesis process, recently particular attention has been directed toward the mast cells. Experimental studies have provided several mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae and mast cells could play a role in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initial inflammatory lesions to plaque rupture. C. pneumoniae, as well as mast cells, may actively participate both through the production of cytokines and matrix-degrading metalloproteinases and by provoking apoptosis of atheroma-associated vascular cells, key events in plaque rupture. This mini-review provides a brief overview on adventitial inflammatory effects of C. pneumoniae and mast cells and their potential role in plaque instability. In addition, in this paper we review the role of mast cells in innate immunity.

  15. [Infection and coronary atherosclerosis: the role Chlamydia pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Paz, M; de Otero, J; Codinach, P; Ferrer-Ruscalleda, F; Gayà, M; Ibernón, M

    1998-11-01

    The role of inflammatory reactions in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is widely accepted. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has linked infections to atherosclerosis. It is hypothesized that infections could interact with other risk factors of vascular disease, enhancing the endothelial damage and the production of atherosclerotic plaques. Several different infectious agents have been related to the atherosclerosis genesis: mainly herpesvirus, Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Several lines of evidence strongly link C. pneumoniae to atherosclerosis. Consequently, several studies evaluating the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment in the reduction of cardiac ischemic events in patients with C. pneumoniae seropositivity have been performed. These studies support a causative role for C. pneumoniae. This article reviews the recent evidence linking infections to atherosclerosis, with emphasis on the role of C. pneumoniae on the atherosclerotic plaque.

  16. Increasing Pneumocystis pneumonia, England, UK, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Maini, Rishma; Henderson, Katherine L; Sheridan, Elizabeth A; Lamagni, Theresa; Nichols, Gordon; Delpech, Valerie; Phin, Nick

    2013-03-01

    After an increase in the number of reported cases of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in England, we investigated data from 2000-2010 to verify the increase. We analyzed national databases for microbiological and clinical diagnoses of P. jirovecii pneumonia and associated deaths. We found that laboratory-confirmed cases in England had increased an average of 7% per year and that death certifications and hospital admissions also increased. Hospital admissions indicated increased P. jirovecii pneumonia diagnoses among patients not infected with HIV, particularly among those who had received a transplant or had a hematologic malignancy. A new risk was identified: preexisting lung disease. Infection rates among HIV-positive adults decreased. The results confirm that diagnoses of potentially preventable P. jirovecii pneumonia among persons outside the known risk group of persons with HIV infection have increased. This finding warrants further characterization of risk groups and a review of P. jirovecii pneumonia prevention strategies.

  17. Aspiration prevention protocol: decreasing postoperative pneumonia in heart surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Starks, Bobbie; Harbert, Christy

    2011-10-01

    BACKGROUND Postoperative pneumonia contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients who have open heart surgery. OBJECTIVES To determine if measures to reduce aspiration in patients after cardiothoracic surgery would decrease the occurrence of postoperative pneumonia. METHODS All patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery from April 2008 through October 2008 were prospectively enrolled in the study. An aspiration prevention protocol was developed and implemented in a 24-bed intensive care unit. The protocol incorporated a bedside swallowing evaluation by a speech therapist and progressive oral intake. RESULTS In the 6 months before development and implementation of the protocol, postoperative pneumonia developed in 11% of patients. After implementation of the protocol, no patients had postoperative pneumonia (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS Implementing an aspiration prevention protocol was effective in reducing the occurrence of postoperative pneumonia in patients who had cardiothoracic surgery.

  18. Chlamydia pneumoniae promotes dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Annette R; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Witt, Colleen M; Yu, Jieh-Juen; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Chambers, James P; Perry, George; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2015-06-01

    The human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae has been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate pancreatic beta cells and mast cells during chlamydial infection. Our study revealed that C. pneumoniae infected mast cells significantly (p<0.005) decreased beta cell ATP and insulin production, in contrast to uninfected mast cells co-cultured with beta cells. Infected mast cells exhibited pyknotic nuclei and active caspase-3 and caspase-1 expression. Additionally, ex vivo analyses of tissues collected from C. pneumoniae infected mice showed increased interleukin-1β production in splenocytes and pancreatic tissues as was observed with in vitro mast cell-beta cell co-cultures during C. pneumoniae infection. Notably, infected mast cells promoted beta cell destruction. Our findings reveal the negative effect of C. pneumoniae on mast cells, and the consequential impact on pancreatic beta cell function and viability.

  19. Cortical Blindness in a Child Secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia Tirado, A; Jimenez-Rolando, B; Noval, S; Martinez Bermejo, A

    2017-01-01

    Our objective is to present a case of an uncommon complication associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in a child where cortical blindness was the main clinical feature. Stroke due to an infection by M. pneumoniae is very uncommon. No consensus has been reached on the pathogenesis, although several pathogenic mechanisms have been proposed. Occlusion of posterior cerebral circulation is the most uncommon central nervous system complication of M. pneumoniae infection being reported. Symptoms are usually hemiplegia and dysarthria. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who suffered cortical blindness due to a stroke 2 days after M. pneumoniae infection. This is the first case of documented cortical blindness due to posterior cerebral arteries occlusion in children after M. pneumoniae infection.

  20. Distance in Schools: The Influence of Psychological and Structural Distance from Management on Teachers' Trust in Management, Organisational Commitment, and Organisational Citizenship Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Maren; Karsten, Sjoerd; Oort, Frans J.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between teachers' perceived psychological distance and structural distance from management and teachers' affective organisational commitment (AOC) and organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB). Teachers' trust in management was expected to mediate these relationships. Furthermore, the adequacy and…